WorldWideScience

Sample records for copper-clad niobium titanium superconductor

  1. Soldering of copper-clad niobium--titanium superconductor composite

    Moorhead, A.J.; Woodhouse, J.J.; Easton, D.S.

    1977-04-01

    When superconductivity is applied to various electrical devices, the joining of the superconducting material and the performance of the joints are generally crucial to the successful operation of the system. Although many techniques are being considered for joining composite superconductors, soldering is the most common. We determined the wetting and flow behavior of various solder and flux combinations on a copper-clad Nb-Ti composite, developed equipment and techniques for soldering and inspection of lap joints, and determined the shear strength of joints at temperatures down to -269 0 C (4 0 K). We studied 15 solders and 17 commercial and experimental fluxes in the wettability and flow tests. A resistance unit was built for soldering test specimens. A series of samples soldered with 80 Pb-20 Sn, 83 Pb-15 Sn-2 Sb, 97.5 Pb-1.5 Ag-1 Sn, 80 In-15 Pb-5 Ag, or 25 In-37.5 Pb-37.5 Sn (wt percent) was inspected by three nondestructive techniques. Through-transmission ultrasound gave the best correlation with nonbond areas revealed in peel tests. Single-lap shear specimens soldered with 97.5 Pb-1.5 Ag-1 Sn had the highest strength (10.44 ksi, 72 MPa) and total elongation (0.074 in., 1.88 mm) at -269 0 C (4 0 K) of four solders tested

  2. Niobium Titanium and Copper wire samples

    2009-01-01

    Two wire samples, both for carrying 13'000Amperes. I sample is copper. The other is the Niobium Titanium wiring used in the LHC magnets. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. Magnet coils are made of copper-clad niobium–titanium cables — each wire in the cable consists of 9’000 niobium–titanium filaments ten times finer than a hair. The cables carry up to 12’500 amps and must withstand enormous electromagnetic forces. At full field, the force on one metre of magnet is comparable ...

  3. Electron heating by photon-assisted tunneling in niobium terahertz mixers with integrated niobium titanium nitride striplines

    Leone, B; Gao, [No Value; Klapwijk, TM; Jackson, BD; Laauwen, WM; de Lange, G

    2001-01-01

    We describe the gap voltage depression and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics in pumped niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction with niobium titanium nitride tuning stripline by introducing an electron heating power contribution resulting from the photon-assisted tunneling

  4. Superconductors made of niobium germanide

    Newkirk, L.R.; Valencia, F.A.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns the superconductors and particularly the mass coatings of niobium germanide (Nb 3 Ge) exhibiting superconductor properties, as well as the compositions enabling them to be obtained, having transition temperatures of around 20 0 K or more. The invention proposes a composition of a material of the general formula Nb 3 Ge, containing from around 1 to around 10 at. % oxygen. Preferably, the material contains around 5 at. % of oxygen. The invention also proposes fabricated articles in which the compositions described above are associated with and joined to a metallic substrate. Hence, for instance, the present studies involving a superconducting power transmission line for direct current make it possible to envisage the use of conductors placed in a double envelope, enabling the superconducting element transmitting the current to be carried, whilst containing the cryogenic coolant. In this type of design, the coat of superconducting material surrounds a tube containing liquid helium or possibly liquid hydrogen if a sufficiently high superconduction transition temperature can be reached. The tube must be a good heat and electricity conductor in order to achieve good stability of the superconducting coating [fr

  5. Sample of superconducting wiring (Niobium Titanium)

    About NbTi cable: The cable consists of 36 strands of superconducting wire, each strand has a diameter of 0.825 mm and houses 6300 superconducting filaments of niobium-titanium (Nb-Ti, a superconducting alloy). Each filament has a diameter of about 0.006 mm, i.e. 10 times smaller than a typical human hair. The filaments are embedded in a high-purity copper matrix. Copper is a normal conducting material. The filaments are in the superconductive state when the temperature is below about -263ºC (10.15 K). When the filaments leave the superconductive state, the copper acts as conductor transports the electrical current. Each strand of The NbTi cable (at superconducting state) has a current density of up to above 2000 A/mm2 at 9 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). A cable transport a current of about 13000 A at 10 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). About LHC superconducting wiring: The high magnetic fields needed for the LHC can only be reached using superconductors. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistan...

  6. Sample of superconducting wiring (Niobium Titanium)

    About NbTi cable: The cable consists of 36 strands of superconducting wire, each strand has a diameter of 0.825 mm and houses 6300 superconducting filaments of niobium-titanium (Nb-Ti, a superconducting alloy). Each filament has a diameter of about 0.006 mm, i.e. 10 times smaller than a typical human hair. The filaments are embedded in a high-purity copper matrix. Copper is a normal conducting material. The filaments are in the superconductive state when the temperature is below about -263ºC (10.15 K). When the filaments leave the superconductive state, the copper acts as conductor transports the electrical current. Each strand of The NbTi cable (at superconducting state) has a current density of up to above 2000 A/mm2 at 9 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). A cable transport a current of about 13000 A at 10 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). About LHC superconducting wiring: The high magnetic fields needed for the LHC can only be reached using superconductors. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resista...

  7. The investigation of the effect of niobium artificial doping with titanium on Nb3Sn superconductors properties

    Nikulin, A.; Shikov, A.; Beliakov, N.; Semin, M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect on titanium doping of Nb filaments, and thus on the properties of bronze processed multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn wires and wires with internal tin sources with copper volume fraction up to 65 %, has been analysed. Either titanium rods or rods of the Nb-50Ti alloy, inserted in the axial area of each filament, were used as a source of titanium. The influence of doping on the quantity, composition, structure and superconducting properties of intermetallic compound Nb 3 Sn after heat treatments at 570-750 degrees C with duration up to 350 h was investigated by means of electrical measurements, optical metallography and methods of microanalysis and X-ray analysis. It was shown that the non-copper critical current density of the doped wires attained 600 and 270 A/mm 2 in 12.5 and 16 T respectively for bronze processed wires and 800 and 300 A/mm 2 for wires with internal tin source. Upper critical field calculated in accordance with Kramer's extrapolation was equal to 29-32 T

  8. Molding of L band niobium superconductor cavity

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Koizumi, Susumu [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    A cavity to produce high accelerating electron field was developed. The L-band (1.3 GHz) niobium superconductor unit cell cavity was ellipsoid with {phi}217.3 mm outer diameter and 2.5 mm thickness and consisted of two pieces of half cell, two beam pipes and flange. A deep drawing process was adapted. In spite of the first trial manufacture, each good cavity was obtained. Characteristic properties of niobium materials, molding method of cavity, extension of sheet after molding, production of beam pipe, accuracy and the cost were explained. Niobium materials. showed tensile strength 15.6 kg/mm{sup 2}, load-carrying capacity 4.1 kg/mm{sup 2}, density 8.57, extension 42.5% and RRR (resistance residual ratio){>=}200. (S.Y.)

  9. Hydrogen in niobium-titanium alloys

    Silva, J.R.G. da; Cabral, F.A.O.; Florencio, O.

    1985-01-01

    High purity Nb-Ti polycrystalline alloys were doped with hydrogen in equilibrium with the gaseous atmosphere at a pressure of 80 torr. at different temperatures. The partial molar enthalpy and entropy of the hydrogen solution at high dilution, ΔH sup(-) 0 and ΔS sup(-) 0 , were calculated from the equilibrium solubility data. The ΔH sup(-) 0 values are compared with the electron screened proton model of metal-hydrogen solutions. The addition of titanium to niobium has the effect to increase the hydrogen solubility at a given equilibrium temperature. (Author) [pt

  10. Electrodeposition of niobium and titanium in molten salts

    Sartori, A.F.; Chagas, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    The electrodeposition of niobium and titanium in molten fluorides from the additions of fluorine niobates and fluorine titanates of potassium is described in laboratory and pilot scale. The temperature influence, the current density and the time deposition over the current efficiency, the deposits structure and the deposits purity are studied. The conditions for niobium coating over copper and carbon steel and for titanium coating over carbon steel are also presented. (C.G.C.) [pt

  11. Compatibility of niobium, titanium, and vanadium metals with LMFBR cladding

    Wilson, C.N.

    1975-10-01

    A series of laboratory capsule annealing experiments were conducted to assess the compatibility of niobium, vanadium, and titanium with 316 stainless steel cladding in the temperature range of 700 to 800 0 C. Niobium, vanadium, and titanium are cantidate oxygen absorber materials for control of oxygen chemistry in LMFBR fuel pins. Capsule examination indicated good compatibility between niobium and 316 stainless steel at 800 0 C. Potential compatibility problems between cladding and vanadium or titanium were indicated at 800 0 C under reducing conditions. In the presence of Pu/sub 0.25/U/sub 0.75/O/sub 1.98/ fuel (Δanti G 02 congruent to -160 kcal/mole) no reaction was observed between vanadium or titanium and cladding at 800 0 C

  12. Different shape normal metal interlayers between niobium based SIS junctions and niobium titanium nitride leads and their influence on the electron temperature

    Selig, S; Westig, M P; Jacobs, K; Honingh, C E

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the reduction of heating in a niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) junction with aluminum-oxide tunnel barrier embedded in a niobium-titanium-nitride circuit. Nonequilibrium quasiparticles which are created due to the Andreev trap at the interface between the niobium and the niobium-titanium-nitride layers are relaxed by inserting a normal-metal conductor of gold between these two layers. In an earlier work we explained the observed relaxation of nonequilibrium quasiparticles due to the geometrically assisted cooling effect. In this paper we investigate this cooling effect in dependence of the normal-metal layer shape and size. We expect that an adapted normal-metal layer is necessary for implementation in practical terahertz SIS heterodyne mixer circuits. We observe in DC-measurements of a large number of devices a clear relation between the volume of the gold layer and the effective electron temperature in the device. Our central finding is that the shape of the gold layer does not influence the cooling provided that the volume is sufficient.

  13. Process of forming niobium and boron containing titanium aluminide

    Huang, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of forming a composition of titanium, aluminum, niobium, and boron of higher ductility comprising casting the following approximate composition: Ti 34-50.5 Al 43-48 Nb 6-16 B 0.5-2.0 and thermomechanically working the cast composition

  14. Effect of substitution of titanium by magnesium and niobium on ...

    Administrator

    Effect of substitution of titanium by magnesium and niobium on structure and piezoelectric properties in (Bi1/2. Na1/2. )TiO3 ceramics. ZHOU CHANG-RONG*, LIU XIN-YU, LI WEI-ZHOU. † and YUAN CHANG-LAI. Department of Information Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology,. Guilin ...

  15. Corrosion of alloys of the niobium--titanium--aluminium system

    Andreeva, V.V.; Alekseeva, E.L.; Dontsov, S.N.; Moiseeva, I.S.

    The mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of niobium--titanium--aluminum alloys in 20 percent HCl and 40--75 percent H 2 SO 4 at 40 and 100 0 C are considered. Current density vs potential and corrosion rate vs potential potentiostatic curves plotted in 75 percent H 2 SO 4 at 140 0 C for the alloys with different titanium contents at a constant content of aluminum and also for alloys with a constant titanium content at different contents of aluminum are given. It was shown that the corrosion resistance of the alloys in 75 percent H 2 SO 4 at 140 0 C is an exponential function of the atomic content of the alloying components (Ti, Al) in them; aluminum vitiates the corrosion resistance very strongly

  16. Producing titanium-niobium alloy by high energy beam

    Sharkeev, Yu. P., E-mail: sharkeev@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4 Akademicheski Prosp., Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Av., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Golkovski, M. G., E-mail: golkoski@mail.ru [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Akademika Lavrentiev Prosp., Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Glukhov, I. A., E-mail: gia@ispms.tsc.ru; Eroshenko, A. Yu., E-mail: eroshenko@ispms.tsc.ru; Fortuna, S. V., E-mail: s-fortuna@mail.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4 Akademicheski Prosp., Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Bataev, V. A., E-mail: bataev@vadm.ustu.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 K. Marx Prosp., Novosibirsk, 630073 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The research is involved in producing a Ti-Nb alloy surface layer on titanium substrate by high energy beam method, as well as in examining their structures and mechanical properties. Applying electron-beam cladding it was possible to produce a Ti-Nb alloy surface layer of several millimeters, where the niobium concentration was up to 40% at. and the structure itself could be related to martensite quenching structure. At the same time, a significant microhardness increase of 3200-3400 MPa was observed, which, in its turn, is connected with the formation of martensite structure. Cladding material of Ti-Nb composition could be the source in producing alloys of homogeneous microhardness and desired concentration of alloying niobium element.

  17. Deposition of niobium plate on niobium-titanium from molten salts

    Matychenko, Eh.S.; Shevyrev, A.A.; Stolyarova, L.A.; Sukhorzhevskaya, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    A possibility of using Nb-Ti alloys (50 and 34 mas.% of Ti) as substrates for deposition of niobium coating of chloride-fluoride and fluoride molten salts is studied. Corrosion behaviour of alloys indicates in the electrolytic bath within 970-1070 K interval, coating structure and state of coating-substrate boundary are investigated. Chloride-fluoride molten salt usefullness for making products with niobium coatings is shown

  18. Study of physicochemical processes and parameters of regime of diffusion brazing of niobium with titanium, zirconium and vanadium

    Grishin, V.L.; Lashko, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    Physicochemical processes at diffusion brazing of niobium with titanium, zirconium and vanadium, producing continious series of solid solutions with niobium are studied. Diffusion coefficients, time of isothermal crystallization of soldered welds, as well as the duration of homogenized thermal treatment of soldered welds necessary to provide the given temperature of weld unsoldering

  19. Crystallography and Morphology of MC Carbides in Niobium-Titanium Modified As-Cast HP Alloys

    Buchanan, Karl G.; Kral, Milo V.; Bishop, Catherine M.

    2014-07-01

    The microstructures of two as-cast heats of HP alloy stainless steels modified with niobium and titanium were examined with particular attention paid to the interdendritic niobium-titanium-rich carbides formed during solidification of these alloys. Generally, these precipitates obtain a blocky morphology in the as-cast condition. However, the (NbTi)C precipitates may obtain a nodular morphology. To provide further insight to the origin of the two different morphologies obtained by the (NbTi)C precipitates in the HP-NbTi alloy, the microstructure and crystallography of each have been studied in detail using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, various electron diffraction methods (EBSD, SAD, and CBED), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  20. Localized and collectivized behaviour of d-electrons in complicated titanium, vanadium and niobium oxides

    Bazuev, G.V.; Shvejkin, G.P.

    1980-01-01

    On the basis of investigation of electric and magnetic properties of oxide compounds of transition metals made are the conclusions on the degree of localization and delocalization of d-electrons in them. Generalized are the investigation results of complicated titanium, vanadium, niobium oxide compounds in low degrees of oxidation with rare earth and alkaline earth elements belonging to the two structural types: perovskite and pyrochlore. Presented are the results of investigations of perovskite-like solid solutions and of variable-content phases containing cations of transition metals in two different oxidation degrees: oxide niobium bronzes of two-valent europium and titanium bronzes of rare-earth elements, as well as Lnsub(1-x)Msub(x)Vsub(1-x)sup(3+)Vsub(x)sup(4+)Osub(3), where M is an alkaline earth element

  1. Polarographic determination of the titanium and niobium content of zirconium alloys

    Levin, R; Gabra, J.

    1978-03-01

    A method is described for the polarographic determination of titanium and niobium in zirconium alloys in the concentration range of 0.1% to 4% of each of the determined metals. To assure the complete dissolution of the sample a mixture of nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid is used. After evaporating these acids in the presence of sulphuric acid, the contents are determined polarographically with a supporting electrolyte solution of 0.1M EDTA, 0.33M potassium sulfate and 0.4M sodium acetate, buffered to pH 4 with acetic acid. The half-wave potential (Esub(1/2)) of titanium is -0.35V and that of niobium is -0.67 V. (author)

  2. Young's modulus of a copper-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductive wire

    Ledbetter, H.M.; Moulder, J.C.; Austin, M.W.

    1980-01-01

    Young's modulus was determined for a 0.6-mm-dia niobium-titanium superconductive wire. Two methods were used: continuous-wave-resonance and laser-pulse-excitation. Young's moduli were also determined for the components - copper and Nb-Ti - in both wire and bulk forms. Some mechanical-deformation effects on Young's modulus were also measured. From the component' elastic moduli, that of the composite was predicted accurately by a simple rule-of-mixtures relationship

  3. Low field critical currents and ac losses of thin film niobium--tin superconductors

    Howard, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a study of the low field critical current and ac loss properties of niobium-tin thin films and layered composites fabricated by electron-beam coevaporation are presented. Particular emphasis is placed upon determining the suitability of this material for use as a conductor in a superconducting power transmission line. Chapter I contains a summary of this work and its major results together with an introduction to the scientific and engineering concepts associated with a superconducting power transmission line. Chapter II is a discussion of the physics of current transport and the associated loss mechanisms in a type-II superconductor. Chapter III gives the details of the electron-beam coevaporation technique developed to fabricate the samples for this study. Also discussed in this chapter are the effects of the evaporation conditions on the growth morphology of the niobium-tin films. Chapter IV presents the details of the experimental techniques developed to measure the ac loss and critical current in these samples as a function of temperature. Chapter V shows the dependence of the critical current of these films and composites on temperature, magnetic field, and on the number of artificially introduced pinning centers in the layered composites. Experimental results are also presented concerning the stability of these conductors against flux jumps. Chapter VI is a discussion of the ac losses in these samples. Detailed comparisons are made between the measured loss and the predictions of the critical state model

  4. Formation and Thermal Stability of Large Precipitates and Oxides in Titanium and Niobium Microalloyed Steel

    ZHUO Xiao-jun; WOO Dae-hee; WANG Xin-hua; LEE Hae-geon

    2008-01-01

    As-cast CC slabs of microalloyed steels are prone to surface and sub-surface cracking. Precipitation phenomena in-itiated during solidification reduce ductility at high temperature. The unidirectional solidification unit is employed to sim-ulate the solidification process during continuous casting. Precipitation behavior and thermal stability are systemati-cally investigated. Samples of adding titanium and niobium to steels have been examined using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), electron probe X-ray microanalyzer (EPMA), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It has been found that the addition of titanium and niobium to high-strength low-alloyed (HSLA) steel resuited in undesirable large precipitation in the steels, i. e. , precipitation of large precipitates with various morphologies. The composition of the large precipitates has been determined. The effect of cooling rate on (Ti, Nb)(C, N) precipitate formation is investigated. With increasing the cooling rate, titanium-rich (Ti,Nb)(C, N) precipitates are transformed to niobium-rich (Ti,Nb)(C,N) precipitates. The thermal stability of these large precipitates and oxides have been assessed by carrying out various heat treatments such as holding and quenching from temperature at 800 and 1 200 ℃. It has been found that titanium-rich (Ti,Nb)(C,N) precipitate is stable at about 1 200 ℃ and niobi-um-rich (Ti,Nb)(C,N) precipitate is stable at about 800 ℃. After reheating at 1 200 ℃ for 1 h, (Ca, Mn)S and TiN are precipitated from Ca-Al oxide. However, during reheating at 800 ℃ for 1 h, Ca-Al-Ti oxide in specimens was stable. The thermodynamic calculation of simulating the thermal process is employed. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  5. A Study of the Batch Annealing of Cold-Rolled HSLA Steels Containing Niobium or Titanium

    Fang, Chao; Garcia, C. Isaac; Choi, Shi-Hoon; DeArdo, Anthony J.

    2015-08-01

    The batch annealing behavior of two cold-rolled, microalloyed HSLA steels has been studied in this program. One steel was microalloyed with niobium while the other with titanium. A successfully batch annealed steel will exhibit minimum variation in properties along the length of the coil, even though the inner and outer wraps experience faster heating and cooling rates and lower soaking temperatures, i.e., the so-called "cold spot" areas, than the mid-length portion of the coil, i.e., the so-called "hot spot" areas. The variation in strength and ductility is caused by differences in the extent of annealing in the different areas. It has been known for 30 years that titanium-bearing HSLA steels show more variability after batch annealing than do the niobium-bearing steels. One of the goals of this study was to try to explain this observation. In this study, the annealing kinetics of the surface and center layers of the cold-rolled sheet were compared. The surface and center layers of the niobium steel and the surface layer of the titanium steel all showed similar annealing kinetics, while the center layer of the titanium steel exhibited much slower kinetics. Metallographic results indicate that the stored energy of the cold-rolled condition, as revealed by grain center sub-grain boundary density, appeared to strongly influence the annealing kinetics. The kinetics were followed by the Kernel Average Misorientation reconstruction of the microstructure at different stages on annealing. Possible pinning effects caused by microalloy precipitates were also considered. Methods of improving uniformity and increasing kinetics, involving optimizing both hot-rolled and cold-rolled microstructure, are suggested.

  6. Effect of cooldown and residual magnetic field on the performance of niobium–copper clad superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2017-01-01

    Here, we present the results of rf measurements on a niobium–copper clad superconducting radio-frequency cavity with different cooldown conditions and residual magnetic field in a vertical test Dewar in order to explore the effect of thermal current induced magnetic field and its trapping on the performance of the cavity. The residual resistance, extracted from the Q 0 (T) curves in the temperature range 4.3–1.5 K, showed no dependence on a temperature gradient along the cavity during the cooldown across the critical temperature up to ~50 K m –1 . The rf losses due to the trapping of residual magnetic field during the cavity cooldown were found to be ~4.3 nΩ μT –1 , comparable to the values measured in bulk niobium cavities. An increase of residual resistance following multiple cavity quenches was observed along with evidence of trapping of magnetic flux generated by thermoelectric currents.

  7. Phase transformations in the titanium-niobium binary alloy system

    Moffat, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    A fundamental study of the phase transformations in the Ti-Nb binary alloy system was completed. Eight alloys in the range 20 to 70 at% Nb were investigated using transmission electron microscopy, light metallography, and x-ray diffraction. Measurements of electric resistivity and Vicker's microhardness also were performed. Emphasis was placed on the minimization of interstitial contamination in all steps of alloy fabrication and specimen preparation. In order to eliminate the effects of prior cold working, the alloys studied were recrystallized at 1000 0 C. Phase transformations were studied in alloys quenched to room temperature after recrystallization and then isothermally aged, and in those isothermally aged without a prior room temperature quench. It was found that the microstructures of the quenched 20 and 25% Nb alloys were extremely sensitive to quench rate - with a fast quench producing martensite, a slow quench, the omega phase. Microstructures of the higher niobium content alloys were much less sensitive to quench rate. The microstructures of the isothermally aged 20 and 25% Nb alloys were found to be sensitive to prior thermal history. Alloys quenched to room temperature and then aged at 400 0 C contained large omega precipitates, while those aged without an intermediate room temperature quench contained alpha precipitates

  8. Electrical characterization of zirconia-niobium and zirconia-titanium composites

    Reis, S.T. dos.

    1993-01-01

    Zirconia-niobium and zirconia-titanium composites were made by powder mixing, cold pressing, and vacuum sintering at 1600 0 C. The metallic particles were added in the proportion of 0-50% by volume. Electrical resistivity measurements were performed by the two probes and the four probes d.c. method as a function of metallic particle concentration. Electrical resistivity of these composites decreased sharply in the region of 30-40 vol% Nb or Ti, in agreement with the percolation theory. Tests in an induction furnace were performed to check the self-heating response of these composites. (author). 33 refs, 40 figs, 11 tabs

  9. Diffusion of titanium and niobium in b.c.c. Ti--Nb alloys

    Pontau, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion coefficients for titanium and niobium radioactive tracers were simultaneously measured in Ti, Ti 94 6 Nb 5 4 , Ti 80 4 Nb 19 6 , and Ti 64 3 Nb 35 . 7 over the temperature range from 950 0 C to 1511 0 C using standard lathe sectioning techniques. The samples were initially heat treated by annealing above the α-β phase transition temperature and then either cooling slowly to room temperature or quenching. The room temperature crystal morphology was then examined using x-ray diffraction. Alloy concentrations were chosen both to suppress the β-α transition and to obtain the metastable ω-phase

  10. Superconductor with improved persistence characteristics

    Stekly, Z. J. J.; Strauss, B. P.

    1984-01-01

    In a multifilamentary superconductor, plural filaments are separated from one another by a ductile nonsuperconducting copper matrix. The niobium titanium filaments are arrayed through the copper, with one filament being substantially larger than the others, and preferably, centrally located in the wire. Preferably also, the other filaments are arrayed in an annular configuration about the periphery of the wire

  11. Niobium technological alternatives

    Pinatti, D.G.; Dainesi, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    The process-product matrix of Niobium is presented, through which the technological alternatives for Niobium are identified. It is shown that the three axes of Niobium application, steels, superalloys and metallic Niobium have a tendency to be economical by equivalent. The critical points where technological development of Niobium is needed are analyzed and results are presented on the following products: Nb 2 O 5 by volatilization, metalic Niobium, Niobium powder, bars and sheets, NbTi alloy, corrosion resistent Niobium alloys and superconductor cable and wires. (Author) [pt

  12. Additive manufacturing of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy by selective electron beam melting

    Tang, H.P.; Yang, G.Y.; Jia, W.P.; He, W.W.; Lu, S.L.; Qian, M.

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers a radical net-shape manufacturing approach for titanium aluminide alloys but significant challenges still remain. A study has been made of the AM of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy (Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W, in at% throughout the paper) using selective electron beam melting (SEBM). The formation of various types of microstructural defects, including banded structures caused by the vaporization of aluminum, was investigated with respect to different processing parameters. To avoid both micro- and macro-cracks, the use of higher preheating temperatures and an intermediate reheating process (to reheat each solidified layer during SEBM) was assessed in detail. These measures enabled effective release of the thermal stress that developed during SEBM and therefore the avoidance of cracks. In addition, the processing conditions for the production of a fine full lamellar microstructure were identified. As a result, the Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W alloy fabricated showed outstanding properties (compression strength: 2750 MPa; strain-to-fracture: 37%). SEBM can be used to fabricate high performance titanium aluminide alloys with appropriate processing parameters and pathways

  13. Additive manufacturing of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy by selective electron beam melting

    Tang, H.P., E-mail: thpfys@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); Yang, G.Y.; Jia, W.P.; He, W.W.; Lu, S.L. [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); Qian, M., E-mail: ma.qian@rmit.edu.au [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); RMIT University, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Centre for Additive Manufacturing, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia)

    2015-06-11

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers a radical net-shape manufacturing approach for titanium aluminide alloys but significant challenges still remain. A study has been made of the AM of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy (Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W, in at% throughout the paper) using selective electron beam melting (SEBM). The formation of various types of microstructural defects, including banded structures caused by the vaporization of aluminum, was investigated with respect to different processing parameters. To avoid both micro- and macro-cracks, the use of higher preheating temperatures and an intermediate reheating process (to reheat each solidified layer during SEBM) was assessed in detail. These measures enabled effective release of the thermal stress that developed during SEBM and therefore the avoidance of cracks. In addition, the processing conditions for the production of a fine full lamellar microstructure were identified. As a result, the Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W alloy fabricated showed outstanding properties (compression strength: 2750 MPa; strain-to-fracture: 37%). SEBM can be used to fabricate high performance titanium aluminide alloys with appropriate processing parameters and pathways.

  14. Alumina and Hafnia ALD Layers for a Niobium-Doped Titanium Oxide Photoanode

    Naji Al Dahoudi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Niobium-doped titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles were used as a photoanode in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs. They showed a high photocurrent density due to their higher conductivity; however, a low open-circuit voltage was exhibited due to the back-reaction of photogenerated electrons. Atomic layer deposition is a useful technique to form a conformal ultrathin layer of Al2O3 and HfO, which act as an energy barrier to suppress the back electrons from reaching the redox medium. This resulted in an increase of the open-circuit voltage and therefore led to higher performance. HfO showed an improvement of the light-to-current conversion efficiency by 74%, higher than the 21% enhancement obtained by utilizing Al2O3 layers.

  15. Mechanical properties of Fe3Al-based alloys with addition of carbon, niobium and titanium

    Zhang Zhengrong; Liu Wenxi

    2006-01-01

    Several Fe 3 Al-based iron aluminides with the addition of alloying elements carbon, niobium and titanium were produced by vacuum induction melting (VIM) and hot spinning forging. Analytic techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used in studying the microstructure and fracture manner of these alloys. The results show that due to the addition of alloying elements, the superlattice dislocations tend towards multiple slipping, leaving behind on their slip plane ribbons of square-shaped slip-induced antiphase boundaries. The elongation of Fe 3 Al in tension at room temperature increased to about 10% by the addition of suitable alloying elements, the usage of thermo-mechanical processing that has the function of refining grains and substructures, and subsequent annealing

  16. Investigating the structure and biocompatibility of niobium and titanium oxides as coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    Pradhan, D.; Wren, A.W.; Misture, S.T.; Mellott, N.P., E-mail: mellott@alfred.edu

    2016-01-01

    Applying sol gel based coatings to orthopedic metallic implant materials can significantly improve their properties and lifespan in vivo. For this work, niobium (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) and titanium (TiO{sub 2}) oxides were prepared via solution processing in order to determine the effect of atomic arrangement (amorphous/crystalline) on bioactivity. Thermal evaluation on the synthesized materials identified an endotherm for Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} at 75 °C with 40% weight loss below 400 °C, and minimal weight loss between 400 and 850 °C. Regarding TiO{sub 2} an endotherm was present at 92 °C with 25% weight loss below 400 °C, and 4% between 400 and 850 °C. Phase evolution was determined using High Temperature X-ray Diffraction (HT-XRD) where amorphous-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} (450 °C), hexagonal-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} (525 °C), orthorhombic-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} (650 °C), amorphous-TiO{sub 2} (275 °C) and tetragonal TiO{sub 2} (500 °C) structures were produced. Simulated body fluid (SBF) testing was conducted over 1, 7 and 30 days and resulted in positive chemical and morphological changes for crystalline Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} (525 °C) and TiO{sub 2} (500 °C) after 30 days of incubation. Rod-like CaP deposits were observed on the surfaces using Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Grazing Incidence-X-ray Diffraction (GI-XRD) shows that the deposits were X-ray amorphous. Cell viability was higher with the TiO{sub 2} (122%) samples when compared to the growing cell population while Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} samples exhibited a range of viability (64–105%), partially dependent on materials atomic structure. - Highlights: • Niobium and titanium oxides were prepared to determine the effect of structure on bioactivity. • Simulated body fluid testing resulted in positive surface chemical and morphological changes. • Amorphous, rod-like CaP deposits were observed on the surfaces. • Niobium oxide exhibited a range of viability partially dependent on materials atomic structure.

  17. A comparative study of the cytotoxicity and corrosion resistance of nickel-titanium and titanium-niobium shape memory alloys.

    McMahon, Rebecca E; Ma, Ji; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V; Munoz-Pinto, Dany; Karaman, Ibrahim; Rubitschek, Felix; Maier, Hans J; Hahn, Mariah S

    2012-07-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloys (SMAs) are commonly used in a range of biomedical applications. However, concerns exist regarding their use in certain biomedical scenarios due to the known toxicity of Ni and conflicting reports of NiTi corrosion resistance, particularly under dynamic loading. Titanium-niobium (TiNb) SMAs have recently been proposed as an alternative to NiTi SMAs due to the biocompatibility of both constituents, the ability of both Ti and Nb to form protective surface oxides, and their superior workability. However, several properties critical to the use of TiNb SMAs in biomedical applications have not been systematically explored in comparison with NiTi SMAs. These properties include cytocompatibility, corrosion resistance, and alterations in alloy surface composition in response to prolonged exposure to physiological solutions. Therefore, the goal of the present work was to comparatively investigate these aspects of NiTi (49.2 at.% Ti) and TiNb (26 at.% Nb) SMAs. The results from the current studies indicate that TiNb SMAs are less cytotoxic than NiTi SMAs, at least under static culture conditions. This increased TiNb cytocompatibility was correlated with reduced ion release as well as with increased corrosion resistance according to potentio-dynamic tests. Measurements of the surface composition of samples exposed to cell culture medium further supported the reduced ion release observed from TiNb relative to NiTi SMAs. Alloy composition depth profiles also suggested the formation of calcium phosphate deposits within the surface oxide layers of medium-exposed NiTi but not of TiNb. Collectively, the present results indicate that TiNb SMAs may be promising alternatives to NiTi for certain biomedical applications. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nanoporous titanium niobium oxide and titanium tantalum oxide compositions and their use in anodes of lithium ion batteries

    Dai, Sheng; Guo, Bingkun; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Qiao, Zhenan

    2017-10-31

    Nanoporous metal oxide framework compositions useful as anodic materials in a lithium ion battery, the composition comprising metal oxide nanocrystals interconnected in a nanoporous framework and having interconnected channels, wherein the metal in said metal oxide comprises titanium and at least one metal selected from niobium and tantalum, e.g., TiNb.sub.2-x Ta.sub.xO.sub.y (wherein x is a value from 0 to 2, and y is a value from 7 to 10) and Ti.sub.2Nb.sub.10-vTa.sub.vO.sub.w (wherein v is a value from 0 to 2, and w is a value from 27 to 29). A novel sol gel method is also described in which sol gel reactive precursors are combined with a templating agent under sol gel reaction conditions to produce a hybrid precursor, and the precursor calcined to form the anodic composition. The invention is also directed to lithium ion batteries in which the nanoporous framework material is incorporated in an anode of the battery.

  19. Quench-age method for the fabrication of niobium--aluminum superconductors

    Pickus, M.R.; Ciardella, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    A flexible Nb 3 Al superconducting wire is fabricated from a niobium-aluminum composite wire by heating to form a solid solution which is retained at room temperature as a metastable solid solution by quenching. The metastable solid solution is then transformed to the stable superconducting A-15 phase by low temperature aging. The transformation induced by aging can be controlled to yield either a multifilamentary or a solid A-15 core surrounded by ductile niobium

  20. Quench-age method for the fabrication of niobium-aluminum superconductors

    Pickus, Milton R.; Ciardella, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    A flexible Nb.sub.3 Al superconducting wire is fabricated from a niobium-aluminum composite wire by heating to form a solid solution which is retained at room temperature as a metastable solid solution by quenching. The metastable solid solution is then transformed to the stable superconducting A-15 phase by low temperature aging. The transformation induced by aging can be controlled to yield either a multifilamentary or a solid A-15 core surrounded by ductile niobium.

  1. THE NIOBIUM-THORIUM EUTECTIC ALLOY AS A HIGH-FIELD, HIGH-CURRENT SUPERCONDUCTOR

    Cline, H. E.; Rose, R. M.; Wulff, J.

    1963-03-15

    Niobium-thorium eutectic alloys having fine acicuiar microstructures were produced by fast cooling frorn a vacuum melt. Although the solidified material was normal, continuity between the superconducting niobium-rich phase, which was essentially pure niobium, was attained by plastic deformation at room temperature. The resulting wire was tested for critical current at 4.2 deg K, in transverse magnetic fields up to 82.5 kilogauss; at the highest field, critical current densities of slightly more than 10/sup 4/ amps per square centimeter were observed. The critical current density was independent of applied field from 20 kilogauss to the highest field used; the level of critical current density depended on diameter in a manner that suggested dependence on cold work. It was concluded that the cold work reduced the thickness of the needles of niobium below the superconducting penetration depth, and brought them sufficiently close together to allow the superconducting correlation to interconnect the niobium, in the manner suggested by Cooper; furthermore, the constant critical current region may possibly extend to considerably higher fields. (auth)

  2. Titanium-Niobium Oxides as Non-Noble Metal Cathodes for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Akimitsu Ishihara

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop noble-metal- and carbon-free cathodes, titanium-niobium oxides were prepared as active materials for oxide-based cathodes and the factors affecting the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR activity were evaluated. The high concentration sol-gel method was employed to prepare the precursor. Heat treatment in Ar containing 4% H2 at 700–900 °C was effective for conferring ORR activity to the oxide. Notably, the onset potential for the ORR of the catalyst prepared at 700 °C was approximately 1.0 V vs. RHE, resulting in high quality active sites for the ORR. X-ray (diffraction and photoelectron spectroscopic analyses and ionization potential measurements suggested that localized electronic energy levels were produced via heat treatment under reductive atmosphere. Adsorption of oxygen molecules on the oxide may be governed by the localized electronic energy levels produced by the valence changes induced by substitutional metal ions and/or oxygen vacancies.

  3. State of the Art Power-in Tube Niobium-Tin Superconductors

    Godeke, A.; Ouden, A. Den; Nijhuis, A.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    2008-06-01

    Powder-in-Tube (PIT) processed Niobium-Tin wires are commercially manufactured for nearly three decades and have demonstrated a combination of very high current density (presently up to 2500 A mm{sup -2} non-Cu at 12 T and 4.2 K) with fine (35 {micro}m), well separated filaments. We review the developments that have led to the present state of the art PIT Niobium-Tin wires, discuss the wire manufacturing and A15 formation processes, and describe typical superconducting performance in relation to magnetic field and strain. We further highlight successful applications of PIT wires and conclude with an outlook on possibilities for further improvements in the performance of PIT Niobium-Tin wires.

  4. Progress on a high current density low cost Niobium3Tin conductor scaleable to modern niobium titanium production

    Zeitlin, Bruce A.; Pyon, Taeyoung; Gregory, Eric; Scanlan, R. M.

    2002-05-01

    A number of configurations of a mono element internal tin conductor (MEIT) were fabricated designed to explore the effect of local ratio, niobium content, and tin content on the overall current density. Critical current densities on four configurations were measured, two to 17T. Current density as a function of filament size was also measured with filaments sizes ranging from 1.8 to 7.1 microns. A Nb60wt%Ta barrier was also explored as a means to reduce the high cost of the Tantalum barrier. The effectiveness of radial copper channels in high Nb conductors is also evaluated. Results are used to suggest designs for more optimized conductors.

  5. Niobium, tantalum and titanium extraction from natural and technogenic raw materials of the Kola Peninsula by liquid-liquid extraction methods

    Kassikova, N.I.; Kassikov, A.G.; Balabanov, Yu.I.; Petrov, V.B.; Kalinnikov, V.T.

    2003-01-01

    Such rare metals as niobium and tantalum are important strategic materials underlying many of the modern advanced technologies. Since the extraction and processing of rare metal concentrates from own deposits has diminished abruptly in recent years, it is essential to look into the possibility of extracting these elements from various production wastes. This work discusses liquid-liquid extraction and purification of niobium, tantalum and titanium from process solutions of loparite, perovskite and sphene concentrate decomposition with sulphuric and hydrochloric acids; niobium from lithium niobate production wastes decomposed by hydrochloric acid; and tantalum from tantalum capacitor and heat-resistant alloy wastes. (Original)

  6. Investigating the structure and biocompatibility of niobium and titanium oxides as coatings for orthopedic metallic implants.

    Pradhan, D; Wren, A W; Misture, S T; Mellott, N P

    2016-01-01

    Applying sol gel based coatings to orthopedic metallic implant materials can significantly improve their properties and lifespan in vivo. For this work, niobium (Nb2O5) and titanium (TiO2) oxides were prepared via solution processing in order to determine the effect of atomic arrangement (amorphous/crystalline) on bioactivity. Thermal evaluation on the synthesized materials identified an endotherm for Nb2O5 at 75 °C with 40% weight loss below 400 °C, and minimal weight loss between 400 and 850 °C. Regarding TiO2 an endotherm was present at 92 °C with 25% weight loss below 400 °C, and 4% between 400 and 850 °C. Phase evolution was determined using High Temperature X-ray Diffraction (HT-XRD) where amorphous-Nb2O5 (450 °C), hexagonal-Nb2O5 (525 °C), orthorhombic-Nb2O5 (650 °C), amorphous-TiO2 (275 °C) and tetragonal TiO2 (500 °C) structures were produced. Simulated body fluid (SBF) testing was conducted over 1, 7 and 30 days and resulted in positive chemical and morphological changes for crystalline Nb2O5 (525 °C) and TiO2 (500 °C) after 30 days of incubation. Rod-like CaP deposits were observed on the surfaces using Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Grazing Incidence-X-ray Diffraction (GI-XRD) shows that the deposits were X-ray amorphous. Cell viability was higher with the TiO2 (122%) samples when compared to the growing cell population while Nb2O5 samples exhibited a range of viability (64-105%), partially dependent on materials atomic structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Tantalum, Niobium and Titanium Coatings for Biocompatibility Improvement of Dental Implants

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metals have a wide range of applications in implant and prosthetic materials in dentistry.Corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of metals should be improved in order to utilizethem as biomaterials. The aim of this work was to prepare metallic coatings on 316L stainless steel dental implants, to evaluate the corrosion characteristics of the uncoated and metallic coated dentalimplants as an indication of biocompatibility and, to compare the effect of the type of the coatings on biocompatibility.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro evaluation, three types of metallic coatings including tantalum, niobium and titanium coatings were compared using a physical vapor deposition process on 316L stainless steel dental implants. Structural characterization techniques including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were utilized to investigatethe microstructure and morphology of the coatings. Electrochemical potentiodynamic tests were performed in two types of physiological solutions at 37±1°C in order to determine and compare the corrosioncurrent density and corrosion potential characteristics. The mean values were statistically compared by ANOVA at a 95% level of confidence.Results: the findings showed that all of the three types of metallic coatings had a positive effect on improvement of the corrosion behavior. The coatings could increase the corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel and this trend was independent of the type of physiological environment.Conclusion: The biocompatible metallic coatings could decrease the corrosion current density and is a distinct advantage for prevention of ion release. Decreasing ion release can improve the biocompatibility of the dental implant, and consequently can prevent tissue damage, tissue inflammation and irritation, and can also lead to obtaining a desirable histopathological response.

  8. Study of Thermocurrents in ILC cavities via measurements of the Seebeck Effect in niobium, titanium, and stainless steel thermocouples

    Cooley, Victoria [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The goals of Fermilab’s Superconductivity and Radio Frequency Development Department are to engineer, fabricate, and improve superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities in the interest of advancing accelerator technology. Improvement includes exploring possible limitations on cavity performance and mitigating such impediments. This report focuses on investigating and measuring the Seebeck Effect observed in cavity constituents titanium, niobium, and stainless steel arranged in thermocouples. These junctions exist between cavities, helium jackets, and bellows, and their connection can produce a loop of electrical current and magnetic flux spontaneously during cooling. The experimental procedure and results are described and analyzed. Implications relating the results to cavity performance are discussed.

  9. Rheology of Prepreg and Properties of Silica/bismaleimide Matrix Copper Clad Laminate

    DAI Shankai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the silica surface treated by coupling agents KH550, KH560 and KH570 on the rheological properties of bismaleimide (BMI resin system were investigated. The rigidity, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE and thermal stability of the copper clad laminate (CCL were studied by DMA, TMA and TGA. The resin system containing silica surface treated by KH-560, comparing to KH550, KH570 and without surface treatment resin system has better rheological properties and low melt viscosity. The comprehensive properties of the copper clad laminate can be effectively improved by the introduction of silica in the resin system, exhibiting higher storage modulus and lower CTE compare to no silica in the CCL. When the silica mass fraction is 50%, the storage modulus is increased by 83% at 50℃, and the CTE below the glass transition temperature is decreased by 153%.

  10. Extensive Characterisation of Copper-clad Plates, Bonded by the Explosive Technique, for ITER Electrical Joints

    Langeslag, S A E; Libeyre, P; Gung, C Y

    2015-01-01

    Cable-in-conduit conductors will be extensively implemented in the large superconducting magnet coils foreseen to confine the plasma in the ITER experiment. The design of the various magnet systems imposes the use of electrical joints to connect unit lengths of superconducting coils by inter-pancake coupling. These twin-box lap type joints, produced by compacting each cable end in into a copper - stainless steel bimetallic box, are required to be highly performing in terms of electrical and mechanical prop- erties. To ascertain the suitability of the first copper-clad plates, recently produced, the performance of several plates is studied. Validation of the bonded interface is carried out by determining microstructural, tensile and shear characteristics. These measure- ments confirm the suitability of explosion bonded copper-clad plates for an overall joint application. Additionally, an extensive study is conducted on the suitability of certain copper purity grades for the various joint types.

  11. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y. [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Haghshenas, M., E-mail: mhaghshe@uwaterloo.ca [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Nguyen, T. [Mechanical Systems Engineering, Conestoga College, Kitchener (Canada); Galloway, J. [Welding Engineering Technology, Conestoga College, Kitchener (Canada); Gerlich, A.P. [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  12. [Effect of niobium nitride on the bonding strength of titanium porcelain by magnetron sputtering].

    Wang, Shu-shu; Zhang, La-bao; Guang, Han-bing; Zhou, Shu; Zhang, Fei-min

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the effect of magnetron sputtered niobium nitride (NbN) on the bonding strength of commercially pure cast titanium (Ti) and low-fusing porcelain (Ti/Vita titankeramik system). Sixty Ti specimens were randomly divided into four groups, group T1, T2, T3 and T4. All specimens of group T1 and T2 were first treated with 120 microm blasted Al2O3 particles, and then only specimens of group T2 were treated with magnetron sputtered NbN film. All specimens of group T3 and T4 were first treated with magnetron sputtered NbN film and then only specimens of group T4 were treated with 120 microm blasted Al2O3 particles. The composition of the deposits were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). A universal testing machine was used to perform the three-point bending test to evaluate the bonding strength of Ti and porcelain. The microstructure of NbN, the interface of Ti-porcelain and the fractured Ti surface were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy depressive spectrum (EDS), and the results were compared. The XRD results showed that the NbN deposits were cubic crystalline phases. The bonding strength of Ti and porcelain in T1 to T4 group were (27.2+/-0.8), (43.1+/-0.6), (31.4+/-1.0) and (44.9+/-0.6) MPa. These results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and differences between groups were compared using least significant difference test. Significant inter-group differences were found among all groups (Pporcelain, while samples treated with both Al2O3 and NbN had better bond. EDS of Ti-porcelain interface showed oxidation occurred in T1, T2 and T3, but was well controlled in T4. Magnetron sputtered NbN can prevent Ti from being oxidized, and can improve the bonding strength of Ti/Vita titankeramik system. Al2O3 blast can also improve the bonding strength of Ti/Vita titankeramik system.

  13. Extreme and Local 3rd Harmonic Response of Niobium (Nb) Superconductor

    Oripov, Bakhrom; Tai, Tamin; Anlage, Steven

    Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities are being widely used in new generation particle accelerators. These SRF cavities are based on bulk Nb. Based on the needs of the SRF community to identify defects on Nb surfaces, a novel near-field magnetic microwave microscope was successfully built using a magnetic writer from a conventional magnetic recording hard-disk drive1. This magnetic writer can create an RF magnetic field, localized and strong enough to drive Nb into the vortex state. This probe enables us to locate defects through scanning and mapping of the local electrodynamic response in the multi-GHz frequency range. Recent measurements have shown that 3rd harmonic nonlinear response is far more sensitive to variations in input power and temperature then linear response, thus we mainly study the 3rd harmonic response. Moreover, the superconductor is usually the only source for nonlinear response in our setup, thus there is less chance of having noise or background signal. Understanding the mechanism responsible for this non-linear response is important for improving the performance of SRF cavities. Besides Nb we also study various other superconductors such as MgB2 and the cuprate Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSCCO) for potential applications in SRF cavities. This work is funded by US Department of Energy through Grant # DE-SC0012036T and CNAM.

  14. Advances in high-field superconducting composites by addition of artificial pinning centres to niobium-titanium

    Cooley, L.D.; Motowidlo, L.R.

    1999-01-01

    Artificial pinning-centre (APC) niobium-titanium composites attain critical current density J c values higher than 4000 A mm -2 at 5 T, 4.2 K, surpassing the barrier reached by the conventional Nb-Ti composite process. At 2 T APC composites achieve more than double the J c of conventional composites, making them particularly well suited for low-field applications. On the other hand, APC composites are inferior to conventional composites at 8 T, due to weak high-field pinning and reduced upper critical field. This review discusses fabrication techniques, microstructural development and superconducting and flux-pinning properties of APC composites. Key elements and underlying issues for achieving higher J c are identified and discussed in terms of the current state of the art. (author)

  15. Interaction of Human Osteoblast-Like Saos-2 and MG-63 Cells with Thermally Oxidized Surfaces of a Titanium-Niobium Alloy

    Vandrovcová, Marta; Jirka, Ivan; Novotná, Katarína; Lisá, Věra; Frank, Otakar; Kolská, Z.; Starý, V.; Bačáková, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 6 (2014), e100475 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/1858; GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/12/1025; GA MPO FR-TI3/088 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : thermally oxidized surface * titanium-niobium * TiO2 * osteoblast * macrophage Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  16. Superconductors

    Newkirk, L.R.; Valencia, F.A.

    1977-01-01

    The structural quality of niobium germanide as a high-transition-temperature superconducting material is substantially improved by the presence of about 5 at. percent oxygen. Niobium germanide having this oxygen content may readily be prepared as a bulk coating bonded to a metallic substrate by chemical vapor deposition techniques. 2 figures, 1 table

  17. Superconductors

    Newkirk, Lawrence R.; Valencia, Flavio A.

    1977-02-01

    The structural quality of niobium germanide as a high-transition-temperature superconducting material is substantially improved by the presence of about 5 at. % oxygen. Niobium germanide having this oxygen content may readily be prepared as a bulk coating bonded to a metallic substrate by chemical vapor deposition techniques.

  18. High-T/sub c/ superconductor and its use in superconducting magnets

    Green, M.A.

    1988-02-01

    Many of the proposed uses for the high-T/sub c/ superconductor involve the creation of a magnetic field using superconducting coils. This report will assess what is known about the high-T/sub c/ superconductors and take a realistic look at their potential use in various kinds of superconducting magnets. Based on what is known about the high-T/sub c/ superconductors, one can make a ''wish list'' of things that will make such materials useful for magnets. Then, the following question is asked. If one had a high-T/sub c/ superconductor with the same properties as modern niobium-titanium superconductor, how would the superconductor work in a magnet environment? Finally, this report will show the potential impact of the ideal high-T/sub c/ superconductor on: 1) accelerator dipole and quadrupole magnets, 2) superconducting magnets for use in space, and 3) superconducting solenoids for magnetic resonance imaging. 78 refs., 11 tabs

  19. Fine-scale precipitation and mechanical properties of thin slab processed titanium-niobium bearing high strength steels

    Jia, Z. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); O' Malley, R. [Nucor Steel Decatur, LLC, 4301 Iverson Blvd., Trinity, AL 35673 (United States); Jansto, S.J. [CBMM-Reference Metals Company, 1000 Old Pond Road, Bridgeville, PA 15017 (United States)

    2011-08-25

    Highlights: {yields} Precipitation and mechanical behavior of Ti-Nb and Ti-Nb-Mo-V steels were elucidated. {yields} Distribution of precipitates was analyzed with microscopy and diffraction pattern. {yields} During austenite-ferrite transformation, interface precipitation of NbC was observed. {yields} Epitaxial precipitation of NbC on TiC surface results in mixed precipitates Ti(Nb)C. - Abstract: We describe here the precipitation behavior and mechanical properties of 560 MPa Ti-Nb and 770 MPa Ti-Nb-Mo-V steels. The precipitation characteristics were analyzed in terms of chemistry and size distribution of precipitates, with particular focus on the crystallography of precipitates through an analysis of electron diffraction patterns. In addition to pure carbides (NbC, TiC, Mo{sub 2}C, and VC), Nb containing titanium-rich carbides were also observed. These precipitates were of a size range of 4-20 nm. The mechanism of formation of these Ti-rich niobium containing carbides is postulated to involve epitaxial nucleation of NbC on previously precipitated TiC. Interface precipitation of NbC was an interesting observation in compact strip processing which is characterized by an orientation relationship of [0 0 1]{sub NbC}//[0 0 1]{sub {alpha}-Fe}, implying that the precipitation of NbC occurred during austenite-ferrite transformation.

  20. Fine-scale precipitation and mechanical properties of thin slab processed titanium-niobium bearing high strength steels

    Jia, Z.; Misra, R.D.K.; O'Malley, R.; Jansto, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Precipitation and mechanical behavior of Ti-Nb and Ti-Nb-Mo-V steels were elucidated. → Distribution of precipitates was analyzed with microscopy and diffraction pattern. → During austenite-ferrite transformation, interface precipitation of NbC was observed. → Epitaxial precipitation of NbC on TiC surface results in mixed precipitates Ti(Nb)C. - Abstract: We describe here the precipitation behavior and mechanical properties of 560 MPa Ti-Nb and 770 MPa Ti-Nb-Mo-V steels. The precipitation characteristics were analyzed in terms of chemistry and size distribution of precipitates, with particular focus on the crystallography of precipitates through an analysis of electron diffraction patterns. In addition to pure carbides (NbC, TiC, Mo 2 C, and VC), Nb containing titanium-rich carbides were also observed. These precipitates were of a size range of 4-20 nm. The mechanism of formation of these Ti-rich niobium containing carbides is postulated to involve epitaxial nucleation of NbC on previously precipitated TiC. Interface precipitation of NbC was an interesting observation in compact strip processing which is characterized by an orientation relationship of [0 0 1] NbC //[0 0 1] α-Fe , implying that the precipitation of NbC occurred during austenite-ferrite transformation.

  1. Application of Copper Cladding Aluminum Composites in UHV Portable Earthing and Short-circuiting Wires

    Zhu Jianjun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the heavy weight and inconvenience when carrying and installing copper earthing wires on the UHV transmission lines, in this paper, we present the use of copper clad aluminum(CCA composite materials as a lightweight method for UHV earthing wire conductor. Theoretical calculations and tests of the fusing current in a short time for copper and CCA material are conducted. The results show that the theoretical value of the earthing wire conductor's fusing current corresponds with the test value on condition of the conductor cross section greater than 4mm2 as well as fusing time less than 1.5s. The CCA-10 earthing wires get 36.2% weight reduction compared with copper wires.

  2. Superconductors

    1988-01-01

    The chapter 6.3 p. 143 to 153 of this book deals with superconductors 19 items are briefly presented with address of manufacturer or laboratory to contact, mainly in the USA or Japan. In particular magnets, films, high temperature superconductors and various applications are presented [fr

  3. A comparative evaluation of metallurgical properties of stainless steel and TMA archwires with timolium and titanium niobium archwires - An in vitro study

    Vijayalakshmi R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aims to evaluate and compare the mechanical and metallurgical properties of stainless steel and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA archwires, with recently introduced timolium and titanium niobium arch wires. Materials and Methods: Archwires were categorized into four groups (group I to IV with 10 samples in each group. They were evaluated for tensile strength, yield strength, modulus of elasticity, load deflection, frictional properties and weld characteristics. Results: The results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA test and it indicated that stainless steel has high strength, high stiffness and low friction compared to other arch wires, thereby proving that it is the best choice for both sliding as well as frictionless retraction mechanics. TMA with its high formability, low stiffness and low load deflection property is suited to apply consistent force in malaligned teeth but, high friction limits its use in retraction only with loop mechanics. Conclusion: Timolium possesses comparatively low stiffness, better strength and behaves as an intermediate between stainless steel and TMA and hence can be tried for almost all clinical situations. Low springback and high formability of titanium-niobium archwire allows creation of finishing bends and thus it can be used as finishing archwire.

  4. Niobium 1 percent zirconium/potassium and titanium/potassium life-test heat pipe design and testing

    Sena, J. Tom; Merrigan, Michael A.

    Experimental lifetime performance studies currently in progress use Niobium 1 percent Zirconium (Nb-1Zr) and Titanium (Ti) heat pipes with potassium (K) as the working fluid. A heat pipe life test matrix was developed for testing the heat pipes. Because the corrosion rates in alkali metal heat pipes are affected by temperature and working fluid evaporation flux, the variable parameters of the experimental matrix are established as steady operating temperature and input heat flux density. Total impurity inventory is a factor in corrosion rate so impurity levels are being evaluated in the heat pipe materials before and after testing. Eight Nb-1Zr/K heat pipes were designed, fabricated, and tested. Two of the heat pipes have completed testing whereas the other six are currently in test. These are gravity assist heat pipes operating in a reflux mode. The heat pipes are tested by sets, one set of two and two sets of three heat pipes. Three Ti/K heat pipes are also in life test. These heat pipes are tested as a set in a horizontal position in a capillary pumped annular flow mode. Each of the heat pipes is encapsulated in a quartz vacuum container with a water calorimeter over the vacuum container for power throughput measurements. Thermocouples are attached to the heat pipes for measuring temperature. Heat input to the heat pipes is via an RF coil. The heat pipes are operating at between 800 and 900 K, with heat input fluxes of 13.8 to 30 W/sq cm. Of the Nb-1Zr/K heat pipes, two of the heat pipes have been in operation for 14,000 hours, three over 10,000 hours, and three over 7,000 hours. The Ti/K heat pipes have been in operation for 1,266 hours.

  5. Review of corrosion phenomena on zirconium alloys, niobium, titanium, inconel, stainless steel, and nickel plate under irradiation

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The role of nuclear fluxes in corrosion processes was investigated in ATR, ETR, PRTR, and in Hanford production reactors. Major effort was directed to zirconium alloy corrosion parameter studies. Corrosion and hydriding results are reported as a function of oxygen concentration in the coolant, flux level, alloy composition, surface pretreatment, and metallurgical condition. Localized corrosion and hydriding at sites of bonding to dissimilar metals are described. Corrosion behavior on specimens transferred from oxygenated to low-oxygen coolants in ETR and ATR experiments is compared. Mechanism studies suggest that a depression in the corrosion of the Zr--2.5Nb alloy under irradiation is due to radiation-induced aging. The radiation-induced onset of transition on several alloys is in general a gradual process which nucleates locally, causing areas of oxide prosity which eventually encompass the surface. Examination of Zry-2 process tubes reveals that accelerated corrosion has occurred in low-oxygen coolants. Hydrogen contents are relatively low, but show some localized profiles. Gross hydriding has occurred on process tubes containing aluminum spacers, apparently by a galvanic charging mechanism. Titanium paralleled Zry-2 in corrosion behavior under irradiation. Niobium corrosion was variable, but did not appear to be strongly influenced by radiation. Corrosion rates on Inconel and stainless steel were only slightly higher in-flux than out-of-reactor. Corrosion rates on nickel-plated aluminum appeared to vary substantially with preexposure treatments, but the rates generally were accelerated compared to rates on unirradiated coupons. (59 references, 11 tables, 12 figs.)

  6. Electrical characterization of zirconia-niobium and zirconia-titanium composites; Caracterizacao eletrica dos compositos zirconia-niobio e zirconia-titanio

    Reis, S.T. dos

    1994-12-31

    Zirconia-niobium and zirconia-titanium composites were made by powder mixing, cold pressing, and vacuum sintering at 1600{sup 0} C. The metallic particles were added in the proportion of 0-50% by volume. Electrical resistivity measurements were performed by the two probes and the four probes d.c. method as a function of metallic particle concentration. Electrical resistivity of these composites decreased sharply in the region of 30-40 vol% Nb or Ti, in agreement with the percolation theory. Tests in an induction furnace were performed to check the self-heating response of these composites. (author). 33 refs, 40 figs, 11 tabs.

  7. Superconductors

    Narlikar, A V

    2014-01-01

    Superconductors is neither about basic aspects of superconductivity nor about its applications, but its mainstay is superconducting materials. Unusual and unconventional features of a large variety of novel superconductors are presented and their technological potential as practical superconductors assessed. The book begins with an introduction to basic aspects of superconductivity. The presentation is readily accessible to readers from a diverse range of scientific and technical disciplines, such as metallurgy, materials science, materials engineering, electronic and device engineering, and chemistry. The derivation of mathematical formulas and equations has been kept to a minimum and, wherever necessary, short appendices with essential mathematics have been added at the end of the text. The book is not meant to serve as an encyclopaedia, describing each and every superconductor that exists, but focuses on important milestones in their exciting development.

  8. Microstructure evaluation and mechanical behavior of high-niobium containing titanium aluminides

    Bean, Glenn Estep, Jr.

    Ti-Al-Nb-based alloys with gamma(TiAl)+sigma(Nb2Al) microstructure have shown promise for potential high temperature applications due to their high specific strength. Recent research has been aimed towards increasing strength and operating temperatures through microstructural refinement and control. Alloys with 10 - 30% sigma-phase have been investigated, exploring relationships between chemistry, microstructure development, and flow behavior. Alloys with composition Ti-45Al-xNb-5Cr-1Mo (where x = 15, 20, 25 at%) have been produced, characterized, and tested at high temperature under compression. Processing, microstructure and mechanical property relationships are thoroughly investigated to reveal a significant connection between phase stability, morphology and their resultant effects on mechanical properties. Phase transformation temperatures and stability ranges were predicted using the ThermoCalc software program and a titanium aluminide database, investigated through thermal analysis, and alloys were heat treated to develop an ultrafine gamma+sigma microstructure. It has been demonstrated that microstructural development in these alloys is sensitive to composition and processing parameters, and heating and cooling rates are vital to the modification of gamma+sigma microstructure in these alloys. Towards the goal of designing a high-Nb titanium aluminide with ultrafine, disconnected gamma+sigma morphology, it has been established that microstructural control can be accomplished in alloys containing 15-25at% Nb through targeted chemistry and processing controls. The strength and flow softening characteristics show strain rate sensitivity that is also affected by temperature. From the standpoint of microstructure development and mechanical behavior at elevated temperature, the most favorable results are obtained with the 20 at% Nb alloy, which produces a combination of high strength and fine disconnected gamma+sigma microstructure. Microstructural analysis reveals

  9. Interfacial Microstructure and Its Influence on Resistivity of Thin Layers Copper Cladding Steel Wires

    Li, Hongjuan; Ding, Zhimin; Zhao, Ruirong

    2018-04-01

    The interfacial microstructure and resistivity of cold-drawn and annealed thin layers copper cladding steel (CCS) wires have been systematically investigated by the methods of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and resistivity testing. The results showed that the Cu and Fe atoms near interface diffused into each other matrixes. The Fe atoms diffused into Cu matrixes and formed a solid solution. The mechanism of solid solution is of substitution type. When the quantity of Fe atoms exceeds the maximum solubility, the supersaturated solid solution would form Fe clusters and decompose into base Cu and α-Fe precipitated phases under certain conditions. A few of α-Fe precipitates was observed in the copper near Cu/Fe interfaces of cold-drawn CCS wires, with 1-5 nm in size. A number of α-Fe precipitates of 1-20 nm in size can be detected in copper near Cu/Fe interfaces of CCS wires annealed at 850°C. When annealing temperature was less than 750°C, the resistivity of CCS wires annealed was lower than that of cold-drawn CCS wires. However, when annealing temperature was above 750°C, the resistivity of CCS wires was greater than that of cold-drawn CCS wires and increased with rising the annealing temperature. The relationship between nanoscale α-Fe precipitation and resistivity of CCS wires has been well discussed.

  10. Characteristics of copper-clad aluminum rods prepared by horizontal continuous casting

    Zhang, Yubo; Fu, Ying; Jie, Jinchuan; Wu, Li; Svynarenko, Kateryna; Guo, Qingtao; Li, Tingju; Wang, Tongmin

    2017-11-01

    An innovative horizontal continuous casting method was developed and successfully used to prepare copper-clad aluminum (CCA) rods with a diameter of 85 mm and a sheath thickness of 16 mm. The solidification structure and element distribution near the interface of the CCA ingots were investigated by means of a scanning electron microscope, an energy dispersive spectrometer, and an electron probe X-ray microanalyzer. The results showed that the proposed process can lead to a good metallurgical bond between Cu and Al. The interface between Cu and Al was a multilayered structure with a thickness of 200 μm, consisting of Cu9Al4, CuAl2, α-Al/CuAl2 eutectic, and α-Al + α-Al/CuAl2 eutectic layers from the Cu side to the Al side. The mean tensile-shear strength of the CCA sample was 45 MPa, which fulfills the requirements for the further extrusion process. The bonding and diffusion mechanisms are also discussed in this paper.

  11. Effects of low-temperature fusion neutron irradiation on critical properties of a monofilament niobium-tin superconductor

    Guinan, M.W.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Mitchell, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this work was to irradiate a Nb 3 Sn superconductor with 14.8 MeV neutrons at 4 K and measure critical current in transverse fields of up to 12 T, irradiating up to a fluence sufficient to decrease the critical current to below its initial value. Critical temperatures were also to be measured. The samples were to be kept near 4 K between the irradiation and the measurement of critical properties. This work is directed toward establishing an engineering design fluence limit for Nb 3 Sn when used in fusion reactor superconducting magnets

  12. Effects of low-temperature fusion neutron irradiation on critical properties of a monofilament niobium-tin superconductor

    Guinan, M.W.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Mitchell, J.B.

    1984-03-22

    The objective of this work was to irradiate a Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor with 14.8 MeV neutrons at 4 K and measure critical current in transverse fields of up to 12 T, irradiating up to a fluence sufficient to decrease the critical current to below its initial value. Critical temperatures were also to be measured. The samples were to be kept near 4 K between the irradiation and the measurement of critical properties. This work is directed toward establishing an engineering design fluence limit for Nb/sub 3/Sn when used in fusion reactor superconducting magnets.

  13. Generation of the J/sub c/, H/sub c/, T/sub c/ surface for commercial superconductor using reduced-state parameters

    Green, M.A.

    1988-04-01

    This report presents a method for calculating the J/sub C/, H/sub C/, T/sub C/ surface for Type II Superconductors. The method requires that one knows T/sub C/ at zero current and field, H/sub c2/ at zero current and temperature, and J/sub c/ at at least one temperature and field. The theory presented in this report agrees with the measured data quite well over virtually the entire J/sub c/, H/sub c/, T/sub c/ surface given the value of J/sub c/ versus H at one or two temperatures. This report presents calculated and measured values of J/sub c/ versus T and B for niobium titanium, niobium zirconium, niobium tin, niobium titanium tin, niobium tantalum tin, vanadium zirconium hafnium, and vanadium gallium. Good agreement of theory with measured data was obtained for commercial niobium titanium and niobium tin. 76 refs., 26 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Study of the microstructural and mechanical properties of titanium-niobium-zirconium based alloys processed with hydrogen and powder metallurgy for use in dental implants

    Duvaizem, Jose Helio

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen has been used as pulverization agent in alloys based on rare earth and transition metals due to its extremely high diffusion rate even on low temperatures. Such materials are used on hydrogen storage dispositives, generation of electricity or magnetic fields, and are produced by a process which the first step is the transformation of the alloy in fine powder by miling. Besides those, hydrogenium is also being used to obtain alloys based on titanium - niobium - zirconium in the pulverization. Powder metallurgy is utilized on the production of these alloys, making it possible to obtain structures with porous surface as result, requirement for its application as biomaterials. Other advantages of powder metallurgy usage include better surface finish and better microstructural homogeneity. In this work samples were prepared in the Ti-13Nb-13Zr composition. The hydrogenation was performed at 700 degree C, 600 degree C, and 500 degree C for titanium, niobium and zirconium respectively. After hydrogenation, the milling stage was carried out on high energy planetary ball milling with 200rpm during 90 minutes, and also in conventional ball milling for 30 hours. Samples were pressed in uniaxial press, followed by isostatic cold press, and then sintered at 1150 degree C for 7-13 hours. Microstructural properties of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray diffraction. Mechanical and structural properties determined were density, microhardness and moduli of elasticity. The sample sintered at 1150 degree C for 7h, hydrogenated using 10.000 mbar and produced by milling on high energy planetary ball milling presented the best mechanical properties and microstructural homogeneity. (author)

  15. Superconductors

    Ekin, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter attempts to provide an introductory guide to interpreting handbook data on practical, high-current, superconducting materials, principally for magnet applications. An overview is given of the properties and operational limits of superconductive materials, as well as techniques used to fabricate practical superconducting wires. Topics considered include critical temperature, critical magnetic field, Type I and Type II superconductors, upper critical field values for practical materials, the temperature dependence of critical field and upper critical field, critical current, critical current density values for practical materials, the measurement of critical current, composite fabrication, stability, ac losses, eddy current loss, hysteretic loss, mechanical properties, critical current degradation, and superconducting materals selection and composite design

  16. Mechanical behavior and stress effects in hard superconductors: a review

    Koch, C.C.; Easton, D.S.

    1977-11-01

    The mechanical properties of type II superconducting materials are reviewed as well as the effect of stress on the superconducting properties of these materials. The bcc alloys niobium-titanium and niobium-zirconium exhibit good strength and extensive ductility at room temperature. Mechanical tests on these alloys at 4.2 0 K revealed serrated stress-strain curves, nonlinear elastic effects and reduced ductility. The nonlinear behavior is probably due to twinning and detwinning or a reversible stress-induced martensitic transformation. The brittle A-15 compound superconductors, such as Nb 3 Sn and V 3 Ga, exhibit unusual elastic properties and structural instabilities at cryogenic temperatures. Multifilamentary composites consisting of superconducting filaments in a normal metal matrix are generally used for superconducting devices. The mechanical properties of alloy and compound composites, tapes, as well as composites of niobium carbonitride chemically vapor deposited on high strength carbon fibers are presented. Hysteretic stress-strain behavior in the metal matrix composites produces significant heat generation, an effect which may lead to degradation in the performance of high field magnets. Measurements of the critical current density, J/sub c/, under stress in a magnetic field are reported. Modest stress-reversible degradation in J/sub c/ was observed in niobium-titanium composites, while more serious degradation was found in Nb 3 Sn samples. The importance of mechanical behavior to device performance is discussed

  17. Thermally Stable Siloxane Hybrid Matrix with Low Dielectric Loss for Copper-Clad Laminates for High-Frequency Applications.

    Kim, Yong Ho; Lim, Young-Woo; Kim, Yun Hyeok; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2016-04-06

    We report vinyl-phenyl siloxane hybrid material (VPH) that can be used as a matrix for copper-clad laminates (CCLs) for high-frequency applications. The CCLs, with a VPH matrix fabricated via radical polymerization of resin blend consisting of sol-gel-derived linear vinyl oligosiloxane and bulky siloxane monomer, phenyltris(trimethylsiloxy)silane, achieve low dielectric constant (Dk) and dissipation factor (Df). The CCLs with the VPH matrix exhibit excellent dielectric performance (Dk = 2.75, Df = 0.0015 at 1 GHz) with stability in wide frequency range (1 MHz to 10 GHz) and at high temperature (up to 275 °C). Also, the VPH shows good flame resistance without any additives. These results suggest the potential of the VPH for use in high-speed IC boards.

  18. Comparison of changes in irregularity and transverse width with nickel-titanium and niobium-titanium-tantalum-zirconium archwires during initial orthodontic alignment in adolescents: A double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Nordstrom, Barrett; Shoji, Toshihiro; Anderson, W Cameron; Fields, Henry W; Beck, F Michael; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Deguchi, Toru

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was to compare the clinical efficiency of nickel-titanium (NiTi) and niobium-titanium-tantalum-zirconium (TiNbTaZr) archwires during initial orthodontic alignment. All subjects (ages between 12 and 20 years) underwent nonextraction treatment using 0.022-inch brackets. All patients were randomized into two groups for initial alignment with 0.016-inch NiTi archwires (n = 14), or with 0.016-inch TiNbTaZr archwires (n = 14). Digital scans were taken during the course of treatment and were used to compare the improvement in Little's Irregularity Index and the changes in intercanine and intermolar widths. There was approximately a 27% reduction in crowding during the first month with the use of 0.016-inch TiNbTaZr (Gummetal) wire, and an additional 25% decrease in crowding was observed during the next month. There was no significant difference between the two treatment groups in the decrease in irregularity over time ( P = .29). There was no significant difference between the two groups in the changes in intercanine and intermolar width ( P = .80). It can be concluded that Gummetal wires and conventional NiTi wires possess a similar ability to align teeth, and Gummetal wires have additional advantages over conventional NiTi, such as formability and use in patients with nickel allergy.

  19. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced phase transformation in undoped and niobium doped titanium dioxide composite thin films

    Gautam, Subodh K., E-mail: subodhkgtm@gmail.com [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Chettah, Abdelhak [LGMM Laboratory, Université 20 Août 1955-Skikda, BP 26, 21000 Skikda (Algeria); Singh, R.G. [Department of Physics, Bhagini Nivedita College, Delhi University, Delhi 110043 (India); Ojha, Sunil; Singh, Fouran [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2016-07-15

    Study reports the effect of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation induced phase transformation in undoped and Niobium doped anatase TiO{sub 2} composite thin films. Investigations were carried out at different densities of electronic excitations (EEs) using 120 MeV Ag and 130 MeV Ni ions irradiations. Films were initially annealed at 900 °C and results revealed that undoped films were highly stable in anatase phase, while the Nb doped films showed the composite nature with the weak presence of Niobium penta-oxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) phase. The effect at low density of EEs in undoped film show partial anatase to rutile phase transformation; however doped film shows only further growth of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} phase beside the anatase to rutile phase transformation. At higher density of EEs induced by Ag ions, registered continuous ion track of ∼3 nm in lattice which leads to nano-crystallization followed by decomposition/amorphization of rutile TiO{sub 2} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} phases in undoped and doped films, respectively. However, Ni ions are only induced discontinuous sequence of ion tracks with creation of damage and disorder and do not show amorphization in the lattice. The in-elastic thermal spike calculations were carried out for anatase TiO{sub 2} phase to understand the effect of EEs on anatase to rutile phase transformation followed by amorphization in NTO films in terms of continuous and discontinuous track formation by SHI irradiation.

  20. Investigation of hydrostatic extrusion and other deformation modes for the fabrication of multifilamentary niobium--tin superconductors by a powder metallurgy approach

    MacLeod, G.E.

    1977-06-01

    Various aspects of a powder metallurgy approach to fabricate filamentary niobium-tin superconducting wire were investigated. Difficulties occurred due to lack of complete tin infiltration of the sintered niobium rod, formation of intermetallics during infiltration, and both cladding and core fracture during mechanical reduction. The influence of sintering time, infiltration temperature, and deformation mode was investigated. Progress is reported on the clarification of the role of several of the important process parameters

  1. The determining impact of coiling temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a titanium-niobium ultrahigh strength microalloyed steel: Competing effects of precipitation and bainite

    Natarajan, V.V.; Challa, V.S.A. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Department of Metallurgical, Materials and Biomedical Engineering, 500 W. University Avenue, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra2@utep.edu [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Department of Metallurgical, Materials and Biomedical Engineering, 500 W. University Avenue, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Sidorenko, D.M.; Mulholland, M.D.; Manohar, M.; Hartmann, J.E. [ArcelorMittal Global R& D Center, 3001 East Columbus Drive, East Chicago, IN 46312 (United States)

    2016-05-17

    We elucidate here the influence of coiling temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties, in an ultrahigh strength titanium-niobium microalloyed steel. The objective was to underscore the impact of coiling temperature on the nature and distribution of microstructural constituents (including different phases, precipitates, and dislocation structure) that significantly contributed to differences in the yield and tensile strength of these steels. Depending on the coiling temperature, the microstructure consisted of either a combination of fine lath-type bainite and polygonal ferrite or polygonal ferrite together with the precipitation of microalloyed carbides of size ~2–10 nm in the matrix and at dislocations. The microstructure of steel coiled at lower temperature predominantly consisted of bainitic ferrite with lower yield strength compared to the steel coiled at higher temperature, and the yield to tensile strength ratio was 0.76. The steel coiled at higher temperature consisted of polygonal ferrite and extensive precipitation of carbides and was characterized by higher yield strength and with yield strength/tensile strength ratio of 0.936. The difference in the tensile strength was insignificant for the two coiling temperatures. The observed microstructure was consistent with the continuous cooling transformation diagram.

  2. Titanium

    Woodruff, Laurel G.; Bedinger, George M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Titanium is a mineral commodity that is essential to the smooth functioning of modern industrial economies. Most of the titanium produced is refined into titanium dioxide, which has a high refractive index and is thus able to impart a durable white color to paint, paper, plastic, rubber, and wallboard. Because of their high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance, titanium metal and titanium metal alloys are used in the aerospace industry as well as for welding rod coatings, biological implants, and consumer goods.Ilmenite and rutile are currently the principal titanium-bearing ore minerals, although other minerals, including anatase, perovskite, and titanomagnetite, could have economic importance in the future. Ilmenite is currently being mined from two large magmatic deposits hosted in rocks of Proterozoic-age anorthosite plutonic suites. Most rutile and nearly one-half of the ilmenite produced are from heavy-mineral alluvial, fluvial, and eolian deposits. Titanium-bearing minerals occur in diverse geologic settings, but many of the known deposits are currently subeconomic for titanium because of complications related to the mineralogy or because of the presence of trace contaminants that can compromise the pigment production process.Global production of titanium minerals is currently dominated by Australia, Canada, Norway, and South Africa; additional amounts are produced in Brazil, India, Madagascar, Mozambique, Sierra Leone, and Sri Lanka. The United States accounts for about 4 percent of the total world production of titanium minerals and is heavily dependent on imports of titanium mineral concentrates to meet its domestic needs.Titanium occurs only in silicate or oxide minerals and never in sulfide minerals. Environmental considerations for titanium mining are related to waste rock disposal and the impact of trace constituents on water quality. Because titanium is generally inert in the environment, human health risks from titanium and titanium

  3. High field superconductor development and understanding: A. Establishing the limits of performance of niobium titanium; B. Establishing whether Chevrel Phase materials can become useful high field superconductors

    Lee, P.J.; Jablonski, P.D.; Cooley, L.D.; Stejic, G.; Bonney, L.A.; Willis, T.C.; Larbalestier, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    The acquisition of a hydrostatic extrusion press now allows us to extrude composites under controlled conditions and enables us to fabricate new composite designs. We have successfully extruded a variety of composites including powder metallurgy APCs. Our conventional APC composite has been successfully brought to the completion of its fabrication. The results of the characterization of that composite have proven to be quite exciting. There is proof that the ''ideal'' microstructures that are hoped for in APC composites can be made. The flux pinning force of our APC composite is stronger than that for a conventional composite, despite having about half of the volume fraction of pins and a lower B c2 than occurs in a conventional composite. Additionally, the uniform nature of the microstructure makes our APC composite well-suited for more fundamental studies of flux pinning. We have fabricated thin film ''model'' conductors in order to understand basic flux-pinning mechanisms and these films have yielded interesting data on the importance of film geometry. Further advances have been made in increasing the J c of Chevrel Phase conductors and a clear path is now outlined for further improvement

  4. High-temperature superconductors make major progress

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    This month's Nature Materials featured an important breakthrough for high-temperature superconductors. A new method has been found for processing Bi-2212 high-temperature superconducting round wire in order to drastically increase its critical current density. The result confirms that this conductor is a serious candidate for future very-high-field magnets.   This image shows the cross-section of two Bi-2212 wires. The bottom wire has less leakage and void porosity due to a heat treatment done at an overpressure of 100 bar - about 100 times the pressure used to produce the top wire (image from [Nature Materials, Vol. 13 (2014), 10.1038/nmat3887]). The workhorse for building superconducting accelerator magnets has been, so far, the Niobium-Titanium (Nb-Ti) alloy superconductor. But with Nb-Ti having reached its full potential, other conductors must be used to operate in higher magnetic fields beyond those reached with the LHC magnets. Today, the intermetallic Niobium-Tin (Nb3Sn) is th...

  5. Influence of heat treatment and oxygen doping on the mechanical properties and biocompatibility of titanium-niobium binary alloys.

    da Silva, Luciano Monteiro; Claro, Ana Paula Rosifini Alves; Donato, Tatiani Ayako Goto; Arana-Chavez, Victor E; Moraes, João Carlos Silos; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Grandini, Carlos Roberto

    2011-05-01

    The most commonly used titanium (Ti)-based alloy for biological applications is Ti-6Al-4V, but some studies associate the vanadium (V) with the cytotoxic effects and adverse reactions in tissues, while aluminum (Al) has been associated with neurological disorders. Ti-Nb alloys belong to a new class of Ti-based alloys with no presence of Al and V and with elasticity modulus values that are very attractive for use as a biomaterial. It is well known that the presence of interstitial elements (such as oxygen, for example) changes the mechanical properties of alloys significantly, particularly the elastic properties, the same way that heat treatments can change the microstructure of these alloys. This article presents the effect of heat treatment and oxygen doping in some mechanical properties and the biocompatibility of three alloys of the Ti-Nb system, characterized by density measurements, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, Vickers microhardness, in vitro cytotoxicity, and mechanical spectroscopy. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. RF Characterization of Niobium Films for Superconducting Cavities

    Aull† , S; Doebert, S; Junginger, T; Ehiasarian, AP; Knobloch, J; Terenziani, G

    2013-01-01

    The surface resistance RS of superconductors shows a complex dependence on the external parameters such as temperature, frequency or radio-frequency (RF) field. The Quadrupole Resonator modes of 400, 800 and 1200 MHz allow measurements at actual operating frequencies of superconducting cavities. Niobium films on copper substrates have several advantages over bulk niobium cavities. HIPIMS (High-power impulse magnetron sputtering) is a promising technique to increase the quality and therefore the performance of niobium films. This contribution will introduce CERNs recently developed HIPIMS coating apparatus. Moreover, first results of niobium coated copper samples will be presented, revealing the dominant loss mechanisms.

  7. ''Football'' test coil: a simulated service test of internally-cooled, cabled superconductor

    Marston, P.G.; Iwasa, Y.; Thome, R.J.; Hoenig, M.O.

    1981-01-01

    Internally-cooled, cabled superconductor, (ICCS), appears from small-scale tests to be a viable alternative to pool-boiling cooled superconductors for large superconducting magnets. Potential advantages may include savings in helium inventory, smaller structure and ease of fabrication. Questions remain, however, about the structural performance of these systems. The ''football'' test coil has been designed to simulate the actual ''field-current-stress-thermal'' operating conditions of a 25 ka ICCS in a commercial scale MHD magnet. The test procedure will permit demonstration of the 20 year cyclic life of such a magnet in less than 20 days. This paper describes the design, construction and test of that coil which is wound of copper-stabilized niobium-titanium cable in steel conduit. 2 refs

  8. The new superconductors: Prospects for applications

    Wolsky, A.M.; Giese, R.F.; Daniels, E.J.

    1989-01-01

    Two years ago several groups around the world, excited by the discovery by K. Alex Mueller and J. Georg Bednorz of the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory of a superconducting ceramic oxide, developed an yttrium-barium-copper oxide that superconducted at 90 K. Since then other investigators have found two separate families of copper oxides, one incorporating bismuth and the other thallium, that superconduct at between 110 and 120 K. These high-temperature superconductors could be cooled to 77 degrees K with liquid nitrogen, which is cheap and abundant. This immediately suggested that certain applications of superconductivity long considered not to be economic or practical might be feasible. Yet many of the envisioned applications-generators and motors, energy storage, magnetically levitating trains-raise the same issues to which Onnes referred. It is not yet known whether the new materials can be made easily workable-strong and flexible enough to fashion into wire and other useful forms. Nor is it known whether they can be made to carry large currents and operate in intense magnetic fields. Whether the new discoveries will prove fruitful will depend on the progress made toward achieving design requirements for known applications and on identifying new applications as yet unforeseen. Indeed, such new applications may well have the greater impact. No one foresaw today's most important commercial use of superconductivity, magnetic-resonance imaging for medical diagnosis, in the 1960's, when niobium-3-tin and niobium-titanium were found to remain superconducting while carrying high currents in the presence of sizable magnetic fields. Leaving aside the unforeseen, an informed view of the economic and technical advantages of the new superconductors can help guide attempts to achieve the applications now being envisioned

  9. Titanium

    Fage, Simon W; Muris, Joris; Jakobsen, Stig S

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to titanium (Ti) from implants and from personal care products as nanoparticles (NPs) is common. This article reviews exposure sources, ion release, skin penetration, allergenic effects, and diagnostic possibilities. We conclude that human exposure to Ti mainly derives from dental...... and medical implants, personal care products, and foods. Despite being considered to be highly biocompatible relative to other metals, Ti is released in the presence of biological fluids and tissue, especially under certain circumstances, which seem to be more likely with regard to dental implants. Although...... most of the studies reviewed have important limitations, Ti seems not to penetrate a competent skin barrier, either as pure Ti, alloy, or as Ti oxide NPs. However, there are some indications of Ti penetration through the oral mucosa. We conclude that patch testing with the available Ti preparations...

  10. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs

  11. HIP bonding for the different material between Niobium and Stainless steel

    Inoue, H.; Saito, K.; Abe, K.; Fujino, T.; Hitomi, N.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2000-01-01

    In the future advanced cryomodule for superconducting RF cavities, a helium vessel made from titanium or stainless steel has to be welded directly to the niobium cavity wall in order to be simple structure. For that, we need a transformer from niobium to titanium or stainless steel. Stainless steel will have many benefits if the reliable bonding to the niobium is developed. We have tested the niobium/stainless steel bonding by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) with the heat shock between 1023K and 2K. The bonding interface was also observed by SEM. These test results will be presented. (author)

  12. Niobium-base grain refiner for aluminium

    Silva Pontes, P. da; Robert, M.H.; Cupini, N.L.

    1980-01-01

    A new chemical grain refiner for aluminium has been developed, using inoculation of a niobium-base compound. When a bath of molten aluminium is inoculated whith this refiner, an intermetallic aluminium-niobium compound is formed which acts as a powerful nucleant, producing extremely fine structure comparable to those obtained by means of the traditional grain refiner based on titanium and boron. It was found that the refinement of the structure depends upon the weight percentage of the new refiner inoculated as well as the time of holding the bath after inoculation and before pouring, but mainly on the inoculating temperature. (Author) [pt

  13. Evidence of preferential diffusion and segregation of impurities at grain boundaries in very pure niobium used for radiofrequency cavities

    Antoine, C.; Bonin, B.; Safa, H.; Berthier, B.; Tessier, E.; Trocelier, P.; Chevarier, A.; Chevarier, N.; Roux, B.

    1996-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Grain boundaries (GB) of titanified, heat treated and then etched niobium have been observed by the mean of the nuclear microprobe from the Laboratoire Pierre Sue at Saclay. The very small area of the probe allows to measure by PIXE 1 quantities of titanium as low as one monolayer at the GB. Indeed concentrations of titanium as high as some atomic percent were found on 6 μm etched samples, giving indication of a preferential diffusion and/or segregation at GB. Titanium was detectable also on 15 μm etched samples but was bellow the sensitivity of the microprobe for 35 μm etched samples. Moreover it was shown that not all boundaries were polluted with titanium, and that their behaviour was correlated with orientation. A discussion of the literature shows that all these facts are consistent with the behaviour of very pure metals. Segregation at GB is also known to influence dramatically the GB resistivity in metals and superconductors. For the latter, it has been shown that the GB resistivity can be responsible of occurrence of granular superconductivity phenomena. The presence of Ti deep into the Nb GB explains why a strong etching is needed after a purification heat treatment. Moreover, it has been shown that a heat treatment at lower temperature, although much longer in time, allows less deep diffusion of Ti and then needs a lighter etch. (author)

  14. Experiment to measure the effects of biaxial strain on the critical current of NbTi superconductor

    Froelich, K.J.

    1975-01-01

    Twisted multifilament, copper-clad NbTi superconductors have been axially and biaxially strained at 4.2K with a 7.5T background field. A simply-constructed cryogenic loading frame was built and used to strain the conductor. Results on 1.27 mm x 3.13 mm conductor have shown that degradation of less than .3 percent of critical current occurred when the wire was biaxially strained to +3260 μepsilon in the axial direction and -1875 μepsilon in the transverse direction. Degradation approaches 3 percent of critical current at approximately 6000 μepsilon in the axial direction only

  15. Mechanical properties of soldered joints of niobium base alloys

    Grishin, V.L.

    1980-01-01

    Mechanical properties of soldered joints of niobium alloys widely distributed in industry: VN3, VN4, VN5A, VN5AE, VN5AEP etc., 0.6-1.2 mm thick are investigated. It is found out that the usage of zirconium-vanadium, titanium-tantalum solders for welding niobium base alloys permits to obtain soldered joints with satisfactory mechanical properties at elevated temperatures

  16. Technology of niobium and molybdenum refining by electron beam

    Conti, R.A.; Pinatti, D.G.; Sandim, H.R.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The uses of metals and alloys in superconductors (Nb46%Ti), aerospatial industry (Ti6Al4V), electroeletronic industry (Nb, Mo, W) and in surgical implants (Ti, Nb) are increasing nowadays. A refining process of niobium and molybdenum by electron beam technique, since the oxides reduction till the obtention of a high purity ingot is presented. (C.G.C.) [pt

  17. Corrosion of niobium and niobium alloys

    Yau, T.L.; Webster, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Niobium and niobium alloys are used in several corrosion-resistant applications, principally rocket and jet engines, nuclear reactors, sodium vapor highway lighting, and chemical-processing equipment. Niobium has many of the same properties of tantalum, its sister metal, but has one half the density of tantalum (see the article ''Corrosion of Tantalum'' in this Volume). A common property of niobium and tantalum is the interaction with the reactive elements hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon at temperatures above 300 0 C (570 0 F). These reactions will cause severe embrittlement. Consequently, at elevated temperatures, the metal must be protectively coated or used in vacuum or inert atmospheres. Niobium resists a wide variety of corrosive environments, including concentrated mineral acids, organic acids, liquid metals (particularly sodium and lithium), metal vapors, and molten salts

  18. Niobium stainless steel for implants

    Rollo, J.M.D.A.

    1983-01-01

    The materials that have often been used, during the last two or three decades, to carry out materials for implants are made according to the specifications: a)A.S.T.M. (F.55-76, F.56-76, F.138-76, F.139-76) stainless steel b)A.S.T.M. (F.75-76), cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys. c)A.S.T.M. (F.90-76), cobalt-chromium-tungsten-nickel alloys. d)A.S.T.M. (F.67-77), unalloyed titanium. e)A.S.T.M. (F.136-70), titanium alloys. It was the purpose of retaking them, toverify the niobium influence as alloy element in ANSI/ASTM F.55-76 classification stainless steels, usually for these materials elaboration. The problem by substituting molybdenum total or partially for niobium, by comparing the mechanical and corrosion properties, and biocompatibility is presented, by pointing out the variables of these substitutions, when we employ this new material to perform materials for implants. (Author) [pt

  19. Mesostructured niobium-doped titanium oxide-carbon (Nb-TiO2-C) composite as an anode for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    Hwang, Keebum; Sohn, Hiesang; Yoon, Songhun

    2018-02-01

    Mesostructured niobium (Nb)-doped TiO2-carbon (Nb-TiO2-C) composites are synthesized by a hydrothermal process for application as anode materials in Li-ion batteries. The composites have a hierarchical porous structure with the Nb-TiO2 nanoparticles homogenously distributed throughout the porous carbon matrix. The Nb content is controlled (0-10 wt%) to investigate its effect on the physico-chemical properties and electrochemical performance of the composite. While the crystalline/surface structure varied with the addition of Nb (d-spacing of TiO2: 0.34-0.36 nm), the morphology of the composite remained unaffected. The electrochemical performance (cycle stability and rate capability) of the Nb-TiO2-C composite anode with 1 wt% Nb doping improved significantly. First, a full cut-off potential (0-2.5 V vs. Li/Li+) of Nb-doped composite anode (1 wt%) provides a higher energy utilization than that of the un-doped TiO2-C anode. Second, Nb-TiO2-C composite anode (1 wt%) exhibits an excellent long-term cycle stability (100% capacity retention, 297 mAh/g at 0.5 C after 100 cycles and 221 mAh/g at 2 C after 500 cycles) and improved rate-capability (192 mAh/g at 5 C), respectively (1 C: 150 mA/g). The superior electrochemical performance of Nb-TiO2-C (1 wt%) could be attributed to the synergistic effect of improved electronic conductivity induced by optimal Nb doping (1 wt%) and lithium-ion penetration (high diffusion kinetics) through unique pore structures.

  20. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    Bueno, J.; Baselmans, J. J. A; Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G.; Visser, P. J. de; Klapwijk, T. M.; Driessen, E. F. C.; Doyle, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations

  1. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    Bueno, J., E-mail: j.bueno@sron.nl; Baselmans, J. J. A [SRON, Netherlands Institute of Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Visser, P. J. de [SRON, Netherlands Institute of Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Klapwijk, T. M. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Driessen, E. F. C. [Université Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Doyle, S. [Cardiff University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queens Buildings, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-10

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations.

  2. Fluxons in thin-film superconductor-insulator superlattices

    Sakai, S.; Bodin, P.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1993-01-01

    In a system of thin alternating layers of superconductors and insulators the equations describing static and dynamic fluxon solutions are derived. The approach, represented by a useful compact matrix form, is intended to describe systems fabricated for example of niobium or niobium-nitride thin...... films; in the limit of ultrathin superconductor films it may give a model for describing fluxon motion in layered high-Tc superconductors. Numerical examples of current versus voltage curves to be expected in such an experiment are presented. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American...

  3. Method of fabricating composite superconductors

    Koike, Y.; Shiraki, H.; Suzuki, E.; Yoshida, M.

    1977-01-01

    A method of making stabilized superconductors of a composition such as Nb 3 Sn is disclosed. The method includes forming a stock product comprising a tin base alloy as a core with a copper jacket and having a niobium tube clad thereon. The stock product is then embedded in a good thermally and electrically conducting matrix which is then coreduced until the desired size is obtained. This cold worked product is then submitted to a heat treatment to form superconductors of Nb 3 Sn

  4. Niobium, catalyst repair kit

    Tanabe, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that niobium oxides, when small amounts are added to known catalysts, enhance catalytic activity and selectivity and prolong catalyst life. Moreover, niobium oxides exhibit a pronounced effect as supports of metal or metal oxide catalysts. Recently we found that the surface acidity of hydrated niobium pentoxide, niobic acid (Nb 2 O 5 · nH 2 O), corresponds to the acidity of 70% sulfuric acid and exhibits high catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability for acid-catalyzed reactions in which water molecules participate. Although there are few differences in electronegativity and ionic radius between niobium and its neighbors in the periodic table, it is interesting that the promoter effect, support effect, and acidic nature of niobium compounds are quite different from those of compounds of the surrounding elements. Here we review what's known of niobium compounds from the viewpoint of their pronounced catalytic behavior

  5. Interaction of Cr-Ti-Si coating on VN-3 niobium alloy with air environment

    Lazarev, Eh.M.; Kozlov, A.T.; Monakhova, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Investigation of heat-resistance, microstructure and phase composition of Cr-Ti-Si coating on VN-3 niobium alloy with air oxidation in the temperature interval of 1200-1600 deg C is conducted. Thermogravimetry, metallography, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis methods are used. It is ascertained that the coating is a dense niobium disilicide layer, luriched on the surface with chromium and titanium disilicides and separated and from the protected alloy by a narrow zone of the lowest niobium silicide Nb 5 Si 3 . The coating protective junctions are provided by a selective chromium and titanium disilicides oxidation as well as niobium disilicide oxidation at the temperature of 1600 deg C, and by the rates of niobium and silicon diffusion through Nb 5 SI 3 and NbSi 2 and oxygen diffusion through the amorphous SiO 2

  6. Deformation and fracture behavior of titanium-aluminum-niobium-(chromium,molybdenum) alloys with a gamma+sigma microstructure at ambient temperature

    Kesler, Michael Steiner

    Titanium aluminides are of interest as a candidate material for aerospace turbine applications due to their high strength to weight ratio. gamma-TiAl + alpha2-Ti3Al alloys have recently been incorporated in the low pressure turbine region but their loss of strength near 750C limits their high temperature use. Additions of Nb have been shown to have several beneficial effects in gamma+alpha2 alloys, including enhancements in strength and ductility of the gamma-phase, along with the stabilization of the cubic BCC beta-phase at forging temperatures allowing for thermomechanical processing. In the ternary Ti-Al-Nb system at high Nb-contents above approximately 10at%, there exists a two-phase gamma-TiAl + sigma-Nb2Al region at and above current service temperature for the target application. Limited research has been conducted on the mechanical properties of alloys with this microstructure, though they have demonstrated excellent high temperature strength, superior to that of gamma+alpha2 alloys. Because the sigma-phase does not deform at room temperature, high volume fractions of this phase result in poor toughness and no tensile elongation. Controlling the microstructural morphology by disconnecting the brittle matrix through heat treatments has improved the toughness at room temperature. In this study, attempts to further improve the mechanical properties of these alloys were undertaken by reducing the volume fraction of the sigma-phase and controlling the scale of the gamma+sigma microstructure through the aging of a meta-stable parent phase, the beta- phase, that was quenched-in to room temperature. Additions of beta-stabilizing elements, Cr and Mo, were needed in order to quench-in the beta-phase. The room temperature mechanical properties were evaluated by compression, Vickers' indentation and single edge notch bend tests at room temperature. The formation of the large gamma-laths at prior beta- phase grain boundaries was found to be detrimental to ductility due

  7. High temperature niobium alloys

    Wojcik, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    Niobium alloys are currently being used in various high temperature applications such as rocket propulsion, turbine engines and lighting systems. This paper presents an overview of the various commercial niobium alloys, including basic manufacturing processes, properties and applications. Current activities for new applications include powder metallurgy, coating development and fabrication of advanced porous structures for lithium cooled heat pipes

  8. Niobium ore OKA-1

    Steger, H.F.; Bowman, W.S.

    1981-01-01

    A 287-kg sample of a niobium ore, OKA-1, from Oka, Quebec, was prepared as a compositional reference material. OKA-1 was ground to minus 74 μm, blended in one lot, tested for homogeneity by X-ray fluorescence and chemical methods and bottled in 200-g units. In a 'free-choice' round-robin analytical program, 22 laboratories contributed results for niobium in each of two bottles of OKA-1. A statistical analysis of the data gave a recommended value of 0.37 +- 0.01% for niobium

  9. Electrical and thermal properties of niobium-base cermets

    Skidan, B.S.; Vlasov, A.S.; Alekseev, V.A.; Myl'nikova, T.S.; Ryzhkov, Yu.F.

    1979-01-01

    Behaviour of corundum-niobium cermets containing 16-70 vol.% metal was studied at low temperatures. It is found that the given materials are superconductors with Tsub(k) 6-7 K but their resistivity before their transfer into superconducting state is determined by the metal concentration and is found within 10 -2 -10 -4 Ohm. cm. The cermet heat conductivity is found to increase with the metal content

  10. Interlaboratory niobium dosimetry comparison

    Wille, P.

    1980-01-01

    For an interlaboratory comparison of neutron dosimetry using niobium the 93 sup(m)Nb activities of irradiated niobium monitors were measured. This work was performed to compare the applied techniques of dosimetry with Nb in different laboratories. The niobium monitors were irradiated in the fast breeder EBRII, USA and the BR2, Belgium. The monitors were dissolved and several samples were prepared. Their niobium contents were determined by the 94 Nb-count rates. since the original specific count rate was known. The KX radiations of the 93 sup(m)Nb of the samples and of a calibrated Nb-foil were compared. This foil was measured by PTB, Braunschweig and CBNM, Geel, which we additionally compared with the KX radiation of 88 Sr produced by a thin 88 Y source from a 88 Y-standard solution (PTB). (orig.) [de

  11. On niobium nitrilohalogenides

    Sinitsyna, S.M.

    1977-01-01

    Niobium nitrilhalogenides of the general formula [MNH]sub(n) and [MNH 2 ]sub(n) have been synthesized and their properties investigated. The effect of the ligand nature on the properties, structure, and nature of the chemical bond in niobium nitrilhalogenides has been shown. With an increase of electron-donor properties of the ligands F 2 -800 cm -1 , NbNCl 2 -740 cm -1 , NbNBr 2 -720 cm -1 , NbNI-725 cm -1 )

  12. Field determination of microgram quantities of niobium in rocks

    Ward, F.N.; Marranzino, A.P.

    1955-01-01

    A rapid, simple, and moderately accurate method was needed for the determination of traces of niobium in rocks. The method developed is based on the reaction of niobium(V) with thiocyanate ion in a 4M hydrochloric acid and 0.5M tartaric acid medium, after which the complex is extracted with ethyl ether. The proposed procedure is applicable to rocks containing from 50 to 2000 p.p.m. of niobium, and, with modifications, can be used on rocks containing larger amounts. Five determinations on two rocks containing 100 p.p.m. or less of niobium agree within 5 p.p.m. of the mean, and the confidence limits at the 95% level are, respectively, ??6 and ??4 p.p.m. The addition of acetone to the ether extract of the niobium thiocyanate inhibits the polymerization of the thiocyanate ion and stabilizes the solution for at least 20 hours. The proposed procedure permits the determination of 20 ?? of niobium in the presence of 1000 ?? of iron, titanium, or uranium; 500 ?? of vanadium; or 100 ?? of tungsten or molybdenum or both.

  13. Catalytic applications of niobium compounds

    Wright, C.J.; England, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This article examines the potential uses of niobium, and its compounds, as catalysts in chemical processing. The word potential is deliberately chosen because in 1978 none of the world's twenty-five major catalysts (1) contained niobium. On the other hand, catalysts containing molybdenum and vanadium, neighbors of niobium in the periodic table, realized over 80 x 10 6 of sales in that same year. At the same time many of the patents for niobium catalysts cover applications in which niobium improves the activity of, or substitutes for, molybdenum based compounds. With favorable cost differentials and improvements in understanding, niobium may be able to replace molybdenum in some its traditional uses

  14. Hardening of niobium alloys at precrystallization annealing

    Vasil'eva, E.V.; Pustovalov, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Niobium base alloys were investigated. It is shown that precrystallization annealing of niobium-molybdenum, niobium-vanadium and niobium-zirconium alloys elevates much more sufficiently their resistance to microplastic strains, than to macroplastic strains. Hardening effect differs sufficiently for different alloys. The maximal hardening is observed for niobium-vanadium alloys, the minimal one - for niobium-zirconium alloys

  15. Study of the microstructural and mechanical properties of titanium-niobium-zirconium based alloys processed with hydrogen and powder metallurgy for use in dental implants; Estudo das propriedades mecanicas e microestruturais de ligas a base de titanio-niobiozirconio processados com hidrogenio e metalurgia do po para utilizacao em implantes dentarios

    Duvaizem, Jose Helio

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen has been used as pulverization agent in alloys based on rare earth and transition metals due to its extremely high diffusion rate even on low temperatures. Such materials are used on hydrogen storage dispositives, generation of electricity or magnetic fields, and are produced by a process which the first step is the transformation of the alloy in fine powder by miling. Besides those, hydrogenium is also being used to obtain alloys based on titanium - niobium - zirconium in the pulverization. Powder metallurgy is utilized on the production of these alloys, making it possible to obtain structures with porous surface as result, requirement for its application as biomaterials. Other advantages of powder metallurgy usage include better surface finish and better microstructural homogeneity. In this work samples were prepared in the Ti-13Nb-13Zr composition. The hydrogenation was performed at 700 degree C, 600 degree C, and 500 degree C for titanium, niobium and zirconium respectively. After hydrogenation, the milling stage was carried out on high energy planetary ball milling with 200rpm during 90 minutes, and also in conventional ball milling for 30 hours. Samples were pressed in uniaxial press, followed by isostatic cold press, and then sintered at 1150 degree C for 7-13 hours. Microstructural properties of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray diffraction. Mechanical and structural properties determined were density, microhardness and moduli of elasticity. The sample sintered at 1150 degree C for 7h, hydrogenated using 10.000 mbar and produced by milling on high energy planetary ball milling presented the best mechanical properties and microstructural homogeneity. (author)

  16. Niobium in gray cast iron

    Castello Branco, C.H.; Beckert, E.A.

    1984-03-01

    The potential for utilization of niobium in gray cast iron is appraised and reviewed. Experiments described in literature indicate that niobium provides structural refinement of the eutectic cells and also promotes pearlite formation. (Author) [pt

  17. Superconductors for pulsed rf accelerators

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1985-04-01

    The choice of superconducting materials for accelerator rf cavities has been determined in the past only in part by basic properties of the superconductors, such as the critical field, and to a larger extent by criteria which include fabrication processes, surface conditions, heat transfer capabilities and so on. For cw operated cavities the trend has been toward choosing materials with higher critical temperatures and lower surface resistance, from Lead to Niobium, from Niobium to Nb 3 Sn. This trend has been dictated by the specific needs of storage ring cw system and by the relatively low fields which could be reached without breakdown. The work performed at SLAC on superconducting cavities using microsecond long high power rf pulses has shown that in Pb, Nb, and Nb 3 Sn fields close to the critical magnetic fields can be reached without magnetic breakdown

  18. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy on Electron-Boson Interactions in Superconductors

    Schackert, Michael Peter

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the experimental study of electron-boson interactions in superconductors by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at temperatures below 1 K. This new approach allows the direct measurement of the Eliashberg function of conventional superconductors as demonstrated on lead (Pb) and niobium (Nb). Preparative experiments on unconventional iron-pnictides are presented in the end.

  19. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on electron-boson interactions in superconductors

    Schackert, Michael Peter

    2014-07-01

    This work describes the experimental study of electron-boson interactions in superconductors by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at temperatures below 1 K. This new approach allows the direct measurement of the Eliashberg function of conventional superconductors as demonstrated on lead (Pb) and niobium (Nb). Preparative experiments on unconventional iron-pnictides are presented in the end.

  20. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on electron-boson interactions in superconductors

    Schackert, Michael Peter

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the experimental study of electron-boson interactions in superconductors by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at temperatures below 1 K. This new approach allows the direct measurement of the Eliashberg function of conventional superconductors as demonstrated on lead (Pb) and niobium (Nb). Preparative experiments on unconventional iron-pnictides are presented in the end.

  1. Spectrographic determination of impurities in high-purity tantalum oxide and niobium oxide

    Anderson, S.T.G.; Russell, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of spectrographic methods by direct current arc excitation and carrier distillation for the determination of impurities in tantalum and niobium oxides are described. Iron, silicon, aluminium, titanium, calcium, silver, tin, magnesium, and manganese can be determined in tantalum oxide and niobium oxide in concentrations ranging from 3 to 300 p.p.m. Niobium can be determined in tantalum oxide in concentrations ranging from 10 to 300 p.p.m. Tantalum cannot be determined in niobium oxide, and tungsten cannot be determined in either matrix as a result of the absence of sensitive lines in the spectra of these elements. Relative standard deviations of analyte element concentrations are in the region of 0,18 for tantalum oxide samples, and 0,13 for niobium oxide samples. A detailed laboratory method is included. 4 figs., 4 tabs., 3 refs

  2. Vitreous-enamel protective coatings for niobium and niobium alloys

    Kobyakov, V.P.; Sedmale, G.P.; Tsimdin', R.A.; Sedmalis, U.Ya.; Tsetskhladze, D.L.; Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol'zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Sukhumi. Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst.)

    1988-01-01

    Vitreous-enanel coatings to protect niobium and niobium alloys, used in oxidizing media at temperatures up to 1000degC, from embrittlement are developed on the basis of Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -P 2 O 5 -Ba vetrificating system. By means of microhardness measurement and IR-spectroscopy it is found, that at coating formation the intermediate ∼20 mkm width zone which prevents oxygen penetration in niobium is formed. Test of niobium pieces with ERS-1000 vitreous-enamel coating have shown, that coating provides niobium reliable protection in the air at 800degC and atmospheric pressure

  3. Method of removing niobium from uranium-niobium alloy

    Pollock, E.N.; Schlier, D.S.; Shinopulos, G.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of removing niobium from a uranium-niobium alloy. It comprises dissolving the uranium-niobium alloy metal pieces in a first aqueous solution containing an acid selected from the group consisting of hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid and fluoboric acid as a catalyst to provide a second aqueous solution, which includes uranium (U +4 ), acid radical ions, the acids insolubles including uranium oxides and niobium oxides; adding nitric acid to the insolubles to oxidize the niobium oxides to yield niobic acid and to complete the solubilization of any residual uranium; and separating the niobic acid from the nitric acid and solubilized uranium

  4. The superconductor

    Lad, J.K.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques for fabrication of a few important superconductors like Nb, Ti and Nb 3 Sn are described. Copper or bronze or both can be used as a matrix in the superconductor. Current densities obtained for different ratios of copper to superconductor are studied. The specifications of multi-filament Nb 3 Sn superconductors are given. The relative merits of the two superconductors are discussed. The temperature range obtained is approximately 3 0 K and a magnetic field of 9T(tesla) can be achieved. (A.K.)

  5. Niobium and tantalum

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Papp, John F.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Niobium and tantalum are transition metals that are almost always found together in nature because they have very similar physical and chemical properties. Their properties of hardness, conductivity, and resistance to corrosion largely determine their primary uses today. The leading use of niobium (about 75 percent) is in the production of high-strength steel alloys used in pipelines, transportation infrastructure, and structural applications. Electronic capacitors are the leading use of tantalum for high-end applications, including cell phones, computer hard drives, and such implantable medical devices as pacemakers. Niobium and tantalum are considered critical and strategic metals based on the potential risks to their supply (because current production is restricted to only a few countries) and the significant effects that a restriction in supply would have on the defense, energy, high-tech industrial, and medical sectors.The average abundance of niobium and tantalum in bulk continental crust is relatively low—8.0 parts per million (ppm) niobium and 0.7 ppm tantalum. Their chemical characteristics, such as small ionic size and high electronic field strength, significantly reduce the potential for these elements to substitute for more common elements in rock-forming minerals and make niobium and tantalum essentially immobile in most aqueous solutions. Niobium and tantalum do not occur naturally as pure metals but are concentrated in a variety of relatively rare oxide and hydroxide minerals, as well as in a few rare silicate minerals. Niobium is primarily derived from the complex oxide minerals of the pyrochlore group ((Na,Ca,Ce)2(Nb,Ti,Ta)2(O,OH,F)7), which are found in some alkaline granite-syenite complexes (that is, igneous rocks containing sodium- or potassium-rich minerals and little or no quartz) and carbonatites (that is, igneous rocks that are more than 50 percent composed of primary carbonate minerals, by volume). Tantalum is derived mostly from the

  6. Niobium in steels and alloys

    Lyakishev, N.P.; Tulin, N.A.; Pliner, Y.L.

    1984-01-01

    Data are presented on the reserves and processing of niobium raw materials followed by brief review of the current status and long-range trends in the commercial usage of niobium and its compounds. A survey is made of the physical properties of niobium and its chemical reactions with elements of direct concern in the manufacture of ferroalloys, quality steels and other products. Niobium minerals and ores, along with common ore processing practices are described briefly. Attention is paid to Brazilian niobium ores, and to the Araxa deposit specifically. Some emphasis has been given to methods of processing lean niobium ores not easily amenable to simple concentration. A systematic review is presented of the techniques used in the production of niobium ferroalloys. (E.G.) [pt

  7. Evidence of preferential diffusion and segregation of impurities at grain boundaries in very pure niobium used for radiofrequency cavities

    Antoine, C.; Bonin, B.; Safa, H.; Berthier, B.; Tessier, E.; Trocelier, P.; Chevarier, A.; Chevarier, N.; Roux, B.

    1996-04-01

    In order to overcome dissipation due to impurity segregation at grain boundary, niobium cavities are submitted to a purification annealing (1300 deg C ± 200 deg C under vacuum) during which titanium is evaporated onto the Nb surface. The resulting titanium layer acts as a solid state getter reacting with light impurities (H, C, N, O), thereby removing these impurities from the bulk of the niobium. Evidence of preferential titanium diffusion and segregation at grain boundaries has been studied using PIXE analysis induced by proton microbeam. (author)

  8. Organic superconductors

    Bulaevskij, L.N.; Shchegolev, I.F.

    1986-01-01

    Main achievements in creating new organic conducting materials - synthetic metals and superconductors, are considered. The processes of superconductivity occurrence in organic materials are discussed. It is shown that conjugated bonds between C and H atoms in organic molecules play an important role in this case. At present ''crystal direction'' in organic superconductor synthesis is mainly developed. Later on, organic superconductor crystals are supposed to be introduced into usual polymers, e.g. polyethylene

  9. Surface preparation of niobium

    Kneisel, P.

    1980-01-01

    Any discussion of surface preparation for superconducting rf-surfaces is certainly connected with the question what is the best recipe for achieving high Q-values and high break-down fields. Since the break-down in a cavity is not understood so far and because several mechanisms play a role, it also is not possible to give one recipe which always works. Nevertheless in the past certain preparation techniques for niobium surfaces have been developed and certain rules for preparation can be applied. In the following the to-days state of the art will be described and it is attempted to give a short description of the surface in conjunction with the methods of surface treatments, which generally can be applied to niobium cavities. (orig./WTR)

  10. Terahertz time-domain transmission and reflection spectroscopy of niobium

    Hong, Tae Yoon; Choi, Kyu Jin; Park, Byoung Cheol; Ha, Tae Woo; Sim, Kyung Ik; Kim, Jea Hoon; Ha, Dong Gwang; Chang, Yonuk

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system for transmission and reflection measurements of metallic thin films. Using our THz-TDS system, we studied the conventional superconductor niobium (Nb) in the normal state in the spectral range from 5 to 50 cm -1 . Both the real and imaginary parts of the conductivity are acquired without Kramers-Kronig analysis. Nb exhibits a nearly frequency independent real conductivity spectrum in the terahertz range, with a very small imaginary part.

  11. Isoelectronic substitutions and aluminium alloying in the Ta-Nb-Hf-Zr-Ti high-entropy alloy superconductor

    von Rohr, Fabian O.; Cava, Robert J.

    2018-03-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) are a new class of materials constructed from multiple principal elements statistically arranged on simple crystallographic lattices. Due to the large amount of disorder present, they are excellent model systems for investigating the properties of materials intermediate between crystalline and amorphous states. Here we report the effects of systematic isoelectronic replacements, using Mo-Y, Mo-Sc, and Cr-Sc mixtures, for the valence electron count 4 and 5 elements in the body-centered cubic (BCC) Ta-Nb-Zr-Hf-Ti high-entropy alloy (HEA) superconductor. We find that the superconducting transition temperature Tc strongly depends on the elemental makeup of the alloy, and not exclusively its electron count. The replacement of niobium or tantalum by an isoelectronic mixture lowers the transition temperature by more than 60%, while the isoelectronic replacement of hafnium, zirconium, or titanium has a limited impact on Tc. We further explore the alloying of aluminium into the nearly optimal electron count [TaNb] 0.67(ZrHfTi) 0.33 HEA superconductor. The electron count dependence of the superconducting Tc for (HEA)Al x is found to be more crystallinelike than for the [TaNb] 1 -x(ZrHfTi) x HEA solid solution. For an aluminum content of x =0.4 the high-entropy stabilization of the simple BCC lattice breaks down. This material crystallizes in the tetragonal β -uranium structure type and superconductivity is not observed above 1.8 K.

  12. Search for Majorana fermions in topological superconductors.

    Pan, Wei [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shi, Xiaoyan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hawkins, Samuel D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Klem, John Frederick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this project is to search for Majorana fermions (a new quantum particle) in a topological superconductor (a new quantum matter achieved in a topological insulator proximitized by an s-wave superconductor). Majorana fermions (MFs) are electron-like particles that are their own anti-particles. MFs are shown to obey non-Abelian statistics and, thus, can be harnessed to make a fault-resistant topological quantum computer. With the arrival of topological insulators, novel schemes to create MFs have been proposed in hybrid systems by combining a topological insulator with a conventional superconductor. In this LDRD project, we will follow the theoretical proposals to search for MFs in one-dimensional (1D) topological superconductors. 1D topological superconductor will be created inside of a quantum point contact (with the metal pinch-off gates made of conventional s-wave superconductors such as niobium) in a two-dimensional topological insulator (such as inverted type-II InAs/GaSb heterostructure).

  13. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    Tanabe, K.; Iizuka, T.

    1983-04-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author) [pt

  14. Large grain cavities from pure niobium ingot

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Yorktown, VA; Kneisel, Peter [Williamsburg, VA; Cameiro, Tadeu [McMurray, PA

    2012-03-06

    Niobium cavities are fabricated by the drawing and ironing of as cast niobium ingot slices rather than from cold rolled niobium sheet. This method results in the production of niobium cavities having a minimum of grain boundaries at a significantly reduced cost as compared to the production of such structures from cold rolled sheet.

  15. Briefing on superconductor developments

    Larbalestier, D.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, the author covers the technology of the new oxide superconductors and how they might relate to the existing superconductors. He discusses old-fashioned superconductors; the material science of superconductors; the new oxide superconductors; and the future of oxide superconductors. 13 figures, 1 table

  16. Oxide superconductors

    Cava, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    This article briefly reviews ceramic superconductors from historical and materials perspectives. It describes the factors that distinguish high-temperature cuprate superconductors from most electronic ceramics and places them in the context of other families of superconducting materials. Finally, it describes some of the scientific issues presently being actively pursued in the search for the mechanism for high-temperature superconductivity and the directions of research into new superconducting ceramics in recent years

  17. Niobium and tantalum

    Polupanova, L.I.; Volkova, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    General mineralogical-geochemical and analytical characteristics of niobium and tantalum are presented. Potentialities of any analytical methods for determining these elements in various geologic samples are estimated. The following specific techniques are described: neutron + activation determination of Ta, fluorescence X-radiometric determination of Nb and Ta, fluorescence X-ray spectral determination of Nb and Ta, spectrographic determination of Nb and Ta, gravimetric determination of Nb and Ta, their extraction-photometric determination with various reagents (crystal violet, rhodamine 6 Y, butylrhodamine B)

  18. Ceramic superconductors II

    Yan, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    This volume compiles papers on ceramic superconductors. Topics include: structural patterns in High-Tc superconductors, phase equilibria of barium oxide superconductors, localized electrons in tetragonal YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-δ/, lattice and defect structure and properties of rare earth/alkaline earth-copper-oxide superconductors, alternate candidates for High-Tc superconductors, perovskite-structure superconductors; superconductive thin film fabrication, and superconductor/polymer composites

  19. Behaviour of hydrogen in niobium

    Chuang, Y.C.; Tang, C.H.; Chuang, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Polycrystalline niobium was charged electrolytically with hydrogen at room temperature. The behaviour of hydrogen in niobium has been investigated by optical microscopy, SEM, and ion microprobe analysis. It is shown that, when the hydrogen content in niobium is low, hydride tends to form at the grain boundary. As the hydrogen content is increased, precipitation of hydrides with domain structure takes place in the grain. The habit plane of the hydride formed in the vicinity of the grain boundary has been determined by Laue X-ray back reflection technique to be (130)c and (111)c. The structure of the hydride formed on the surface of niobium after 6 h hydrogen charging at room temperature (c.d. 0.2 A/cm 2 ) has been established to be identical to that of NbHsub(0.89). (orig.) [de

  20. Morphology study of niobium pentoxide

    Romero, R.P.P.; Panta, P.C.; Araujo, A.O. de; Bergmann, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Niobium pentoxide (Nb 2 O 5 ) has been studied due to physical properties and their use in obtaining electronic ceramics, optical lenses, pH sensors, special filters for TV receivers, among other applications. This study investigated the morphology of the niobium pentoxide obtained by hydrothermal synthesis from the precursor pentachloride niobium (NbCl 5 ), where the synthesis was carried out at a temperature of 150 and 200 °C for 130 min and the product obtained was calcined at temperatures 600, 800 and 1000 °C for 60 min. The following characterizations were performed for analysis of the material, among them, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for analysis of the crystal structure, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) for detecting the existing functional groups and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology of material. As a result, different morphologies were obtained and consequently different niobium pentoxide properties studied. (author)

  1. Quenching experiments on niobium

    Schwirtlich, I.A.; Schultz, H.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart

    1980-01-01

    High-purity niobium wire specimens have been quenched in superfluid helium from near the melting point in order to obtain information on vacancies in this material. The quenched-in resistivity Δsub(pQ) for a quench from 2600 K was very small (approximately 0.3 x 10 -12 Ω m) and near the limit of detection. It is assumed that large quenching losses are responsible for the small quenched-in resistance. From the experimental cooling curve estimates have been made for the formation and migration enthalpies (Hsub(1V)sup(F), Hsub(1V)sup(M)), where Hsub(1V)sup(M)+Hsub(1V)sup(F)=Qsub(1V)sup(SD)=3.62 ev. For Ssub(1V)sup(F), the formation entropy, two different values were assumed. (author)

  2. Making superconductors

    McDonald, W.K.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described of producing composite rod or wire of increased strength and fineness wherein the composite is formed by reducing a lamina of two metals which have been rolled to form a cylindrical billet in which one of the metals is in expanded form. The composite produced can be encased in copper and fabricated to produce a superconductor. Alloys contemplated for producing superconductors are Nb 3 Sn, Nb 3 Ga, Nb 3 Ge, Nb 3 Si, Nb-Ti, V 3 Ga, V 3 Si, V 3 Sn, V 3 Al, and V 3 Ge laminated on bronze, Al, Cu, Ta, or combinations thereof. (author)

  3. Inhomogeneous superconductors

    Tinkham, M.

    1978-01-01

    The coherence length xi and penetration depth lambda set the characteristic length scales in superconductors, typically 100 to 5,000 A. A lattice of flux lines, each carrying a single quantum, can penetrate type II superconductors, i.e., those for which kappa identical with lambda/xi > 1/√2. Inhomogeneities on the scale of the flux lattice spacing are required to pin the lattice to prevent dissipative flux motion. Recent work using voids as pinning centers has demonstrated this principle, but practical materials rely on cold-work, inclusions of second phases, etc., to provide the inhomogeneity. For stability against thermal fluctuations, the superconductor should have the form of many filaments of diameter 10 to 100 μm imbedded in a highly conductive normal metal matrix. Such wire is made by drawing down billets of copper containing rods of the superconductor. An alternative approach is the metallurgical one of Tsuei, which leads to thousands of superconducting filamentary segments in a copper matrix. The superconducting proximity effect causes the whole material to superconduct at low current densities. At high current densities, the range of the proximity effect is reduced so that the effective superconducting volume fraction falls below the percolation threshold, and a finite resistance arises from the copper matrix. But, because of the extremely elongated filaments, this resistance is orders of magnitude lower than that of the normal wire, and low enough to permit the possibility of technical applications

  4. Direct Flotation of Niobium Oxide Minerals from Carbonatite Niobium Ores

    Ni, Xiao

    Currently the recovery of niobium oxide minerals from carbonatite niobium ores relies on the use of non-selective cationic collectors. This leads to complicated process flowsheets involving multiple desliming and multiple reverse flotation stages, and low niobium recovery. In this research, anionic collectors that are capable of strong chemisorption on the niobium minerals were studied with the objective of directly floating the niobium oxide minerals from the carbonatite ores. In the flotation of both high purity minerals and Niobec ores, it was shown that the combination of hydroxamic acid and sodium metaphosphate was an effective reagent scheme for the direct flotation of niobium oxide from its ores. Batch flotation on the Niobec Mill Feed showed that over 95% of niobium oxide was recovered into a rougher concentrate that was less than 47% of the original feed mass. Preliminary cleaning tests showed that the reagent scheme could also be used to upgrade the rougher concentrate, although the depression of iron oxide minerals required further study. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) measurement results confirm that OHA (octyl hydroxamic acid) could chemisorb on pyrochlore surface while only physically adsorb on calcite, judging by the chemical shifts of electron binding energies in the elements in both OHA and the mineral surfaces. When hydroxamic acid was adsorbed on calcite surface, the binding energies of the N 1s electrons, at 400.3 eV, did not shift. However, after adsorption on pyrochlore, the N 1s binding energy peak split into two peaks, one at a binding energy of around 399 eV, representing chemically adsorbed OHA, the other at between 400 and 401 eV. The experimental data suggested a strong chemisorption of the OHA on pyrochlore surface in the form of a vertical head-on orientation of the OHA molecules so that the pyrochlore was strongly hydrophobized even at low OHA concentrations, followed by possibly randomly oriented physisorbed OHA molecules

  5. Synthesis of niobium nitride by pyrolysis of niobium pentachloride ammines

    Grebtsova, O.M.; Shulga, Y.M.; Troitskii, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper investigates the conditions for the preparation of niobium nitride in the thermal decomposition of niobium nitride in the thermal decomposition of niobium pentachloride ammines. The synthesis of the ammines was accomplished by the reaction of powdered NbC1 5 with dry ammonia at 210 K. Thermography and x-ray diffraction, spectral, and chemical analyses were used to identify the ammonolysis products. It was established that the products of ammonolysis of NbC1 5 are a mixture of the x-ray-amorphous complex Nb (NH 2 ) /SUB 5-x/ - (NG 3 ) 3 CL 3 (x≅) and 2 moles of NH 4 C1. The steps in the thermal decomposition of this mixture were studied. The phase transition that is observed in the case of further vacuum heat treatment at 1100-1300 K is presented

  6. Chapter 27. Superconductors

    Vavra, O.

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter author deals with superconductors and superconductivity. Different chemical materials used as high-temperature superconductors are presented. Some applications of superconductivity are presented.

  7. GaN/NbN epitaxial semiconductor/superconductor heterostructures

    Yan, Rusen; Khalsa, Guru; Vishwanath, Suresh; Han, Yimo; Wright, John; Rouvimov, Sergei; Katzer, D. Scott; Nepal, Neeraj; Downey, Brian P.; Muller, David A.; Xing, Huili G.; Meyer, David J.; Jena, Debdeep

    2018-03-01

    Epitaxy is a process by which a thin layer of one crystal is deposited in an ordered fashion onto a substrate crystal. The direct epitaxial growth of semiconductor heterostructures on top of crystalline superconductors has proved challenging. Here, however, we report the successful use of molecular beam epitaxy to grow and integrate niobium nitride (NbN)-based superconductors with the wide-bandgap family of semiconductors—silicon carbide, gallium nitride (GaN) and aluminium gallium nitride (AlGaN). We apply molecular beam epitaxy to grow an AlGaN/GaN quantum-well heterostructure directly on top of an ultrathin crystalline NbN superconductor. The resulting high-mobility, two-dimensional electron gas in the semiconductor exhibits quantum oscillations, and thus enables a semiconductor transistor—an electronic gain element—to be grown and fabricated directly on a crystalline superconductor. Using the epitaxial superconductor as the source load of the transistor, we observe in the transistor output characteristics a negative differential resistance—a feature often used in amplifiers and oscillators. Our demonstration of the direct epitaxial growth of high-quality semiconductor heterostructures and devices on crystalline nitride superconductors opens up the possibility of combining the macroscopic quantum effects of superconductors with the electronic, photonic and piezoelectric properties of the group III/nitride semiconductor family.

  8. Niobium interaction with chloride-carbonate melts

    Kuznetsov, S.A.; Kuznetsova, S.V.

    1996-01-01

    Niobium interaction with chloride-carbonate melt NaCl-KCl-K 2 CO 3 (5 mass %) in the temperature range of 973-1123 K has been studied. The products and niobium corrosion rate have been ascertained, depending on the temperature of melt and time of allowance. Potentials of niobium corrosion have been measured. Refs. 11, figs. 3, tabs. 2

  9. Biocompatibility of Niobium Coatings

    René Olivares-Navarrete

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Niobium coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering were evaluated as a possible surface modification for stainless steel (SS substrates in biomedical implants. The Nb coatings were deposited on 15 mm diameter stainless steel substrates having an average surface roughness of 2 mm. To evaluate the biocompatibility of the coatings three different in vitro tests, using human alveolar bone derived cells, were performed: cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability. Stainless steel substrates and tissue culture plastic were also studied, in order to give comparative information. No toxic response was observed for any of the surfaces, indicating that the Nb coatings act as a biocompatible, bioinert material. Cell morphology was also studied by immune-fluorescence and the results confirmed the healthy state of the cells on the Nb surface. X-ray diffraction analysis of the coating shows that the film is polycrystalline with a body centered cubic structure. The surface composition and corrosion resistance of both the substrate and the Nb coating were also studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and potentiodynamic tests. Water contact angle measurements showed that the Nb surface is more hydrophobic than the SS substrate.

  10. Spectrographic determination of niobium in uranium - niobium alloys

    Charbel, M.Y.; Lordello, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method for the spectrographic determination of niobium in uranium-niobium alloys in the concentration range 1-10% has been developed. The metallic sample is converted to oxide by calcination in a muffle furnace at 800 0 C for two hours. The standards are prepared synthetically by dry-mixing. One part of the sample or standard is added to nineteen parts of graphite powder and the mixture is excited in a DC arc. Hafnium has been used as internal standard. The precision of the method is + - 4.8%. (Author) [pt

  11. Mechanical strenght and niobium and niobium-base alloys substructures

    Monteiro, W.A.; Andrade, A.H.P. de

    1986-01-01

    Niobium and some of its alloys have been used in several fields of technological applications such as the aerospace, chemical and nuclear industries. This is due to its excelent mechanical stringth at high temperatures and reasonable ductility at low temperatures. In this work, we review the main features of the relationship mechanical strength - substructure in niobium and its alloys, taking into account the presence of impurities, the influence of initial thermal and thermo - mechanical treatments as well as the irradiation by energetic particles. (Author) [pt

  12. Ternary superconductors

    Giorgi, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    Ternary superconductors constitute a class of superconducting compounds with exceptional properties such as high transition temperatures (≅ 15.2 K), extremely high critical fields (H c2 >60 Tesla), and the coexistence of superconductivity and long-range magnetic order. This has generated great interest in the scientific community and resulted in a large number of experimental and theoretical investigations in which many new ternary compounds have been discovered. A review of some of the properties of these ternary compounds is presented with particular emphasis on the ternary molybdenum chalcogenides and the ternary rare earth transition metal tetraborides. The effect of partial substitution of a second metal atom to form pseudoternary compounds is examined as well as some of the proposed correlations between the superconducting transition temperature and the structural and electronic properties of the ternary superconductors

  13. Superconductor Dynamics

    Gömöry, F [Bratislava, Inst. Elect. Eng. (Slovakia)

    2014-07-01

    Superconductors used in magnet technology could carry extreme currents because of their ability to keep the magnetic flux motionless. The dynamics of the magnetic flux interaction with superconductors is controlled by this property. The cases of electrical transport in a round wire and the magnetization of wires of various shapes (circular, elliptical, plate) in an external magnetic field are analysed. Resistance to the magnetic field penetration means that the field produced by the superconducting magnet is no longer proportional to the supplied current. It also leads to a dissipation of electromagnetic energy. In conductors with unequal transverse dimensions, such as flat cables, the orientation with respect to the magnetic field plays an essential role. A reduction of magnetization currents can be achieved by splitting the core of a superconducting wire into fine filaments; however, new kinds of electrical currents that couple the filaments consequently appear. Basic formulas allowing qualitative analyses of various flux dynamic cases are presented.

  14. Chiral superconductors.

    Kallin, Catherine; Berlinsky, John

    2016-05-01

    Chiral superconductivity is a striking quantum phenomenon in which an unconventional superconductor spontaneously develops an angular momentum and lowers its free energy by eliminating nodes in the gap. It is a topologically non-trivial state and, as such, exhibits distinctive topological modes at surfaces and defects. In this paper we discuss the current theory and experimental results on chiral superconductors, focusing on two of the best-studied systems, Sr2RuO4, which is thought to be a chiral triplet p-wave superconductor, and UPt3, which has two low-temperature superconducting phases (in zero magnetic field), the lower of which is believed to be chiral triplet f-wave. Other systems that may exhibit chiral superconductivity are also discussed. Key signatures of chiral superconductivity are surface currents and chiral Majorana modes, Majorana states in vortex cores, and the possibility of half-flux quantum vortices in the case of triplet pairing. Experimental evidence for chiral superconductivity from μSR, NMR, strain, polar Kerr effect and Josephson tunneling experiments are discussed.

  15. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  16. On niobium sputter coated cavities

    Arnolds-Mayer, G.; Kaufmann, U.; Downar, H.

    1988-01-01

    To coat copper cavities with a thin film of niobium, facilities for electropolishing and sputter deposition have been installed at Dornier. Experiments have been performed on samples to optimize electropolishing and deposition parameters. In this paper, characteristics concerning surface properties, adhesion of the niobium film to the copper substrate, and film properties were studied on planar samples. A 1.5 GHz single cell cavity made from oxygen free high conductivity (OFHC) copper was sputter coated twice. First rf measurements were performed in the temperature range from 300 K to 2 K

  17. Niobium electrodeposition from molten fluorides

    Sartori, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    Niobium electrodeposition from molten alkali fluorides has been studied aiming the application of this technic to the processes of electrorefining and galvanotechnic of this metal. The effects of current density, temperature, niobium concentration in the bath, electrolysis time, substrate nature, ratio between anodic and cathodic areas, electrodes separation and the purity of anodes were investigated in relation to the cathodic current efficiency, electrorefining, electroplating and properties of the deposit and the electrolytic solution. The work also gives the results of the conctruction and operation of a pilot plant for refractory metals electrodeposition and shows the electrorefining and electroplating compared to those obtained at the laboratory scale. (author) [pt

  18. TiO2 effect on break-down of low-grade tantalum-niobium concentrates in the process of sulphatization

    Petrova, N.V.; Popov, A.D.; Mulenko, V.N.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of TiO 2 additive or materials containing it on tantalum-niobate decomposition in the process of sulphatization is investigated. It is shown that favourable effect of titanium dioxide in the process of sulphatization is especially noticeable in reprocessing of hard-brokening down tantalum-niobium concentrates with low Nb:Ta ratio etc. Chemical composition and type of tantalum-niobium mineralization of enrichment products used in the given investigation is presented. It is stated that the degree of concentrate break-down under similar sulphatization conditions (t=230 deg C; tau=2 h) essentially depends on the quantity of the introduced titanium dioxide. It is shown that sulphatization in the presence of titanium dioxide additive or materials containing it permits to exercise practically complete break-down of lean tantalum-niobium raw material, to avoid application of complexers in leaching of sulphatization products

  19. Block copolymer self-assembly–directed synthesis of mesoporous gyroidal superconductors

    Robbins, Spencer W.; Beaucage, Peter A.; Sai, Hiroaki; Tan, Kwan Wee; Werner, Jörg G.; Sethna, James P.; DiSalvo, Francis J.; Gruner, Sol M.; Van Dover, Robert B.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Superconductors with periodically ordered mesoporous structures are expected to have properties very different from those of their bulk counterparts. Systematic studies of such phenomena to date are sparse, however, because of a lack of versatile synthetic approaches to such materials. We demonstrate the formation of three-dimensionally continuous gyroidal mesoporous niobium nitride (NbN) superconductors from chiral ABC triblock terpolymer self-assembly–directed sol-gel–derived niobium oxide with subsequent thermal processing in air and ammonia gas. Superconducting materials exhibit a critical temperature (Tc) of about 7 to 8 K, a flux exclusion of about 5% compared to a dense NbN solid, and an estimated critical current density (Jc) of 440 A cm−2 at 100 Oe and 2.5 K. We expect block copolymer self-assembly–directed mesoporous superconductors to provide interesting subjects for mesostructure-superconductivity correlation studies. PMID:27152327

  20. Block copolymer self-assembly-directed synthesis of mesoporous gyroidal superconductors.

    Robbins, Spencer W; Beaucage, Peter A; Sai, Hiroaki; Tan, Kwan Wee; Werner, Jörg G; Sethna, James P; DiSalvo, Francis J; Gruner, Sol M; Van Dover, Robert B; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Superconductors with periodically ordered mesoporous structures are expected to have properties very different from those of their bulk counterparts. Systematic studies of such phenomena to date are sparse, however, because of a lack of versatile synthetic approaches to such materials. We demonstrate the formation of three-dimensionally continuous gyroidal mesoporous niobium nitride (NbN) superconductors from chiral ABC triblock terpolymer self-assembly-directed sol-gel-derived niobium oxide with subsequent thermal processing in air and ammonia gas. Superconducting materials exhibit a critical temperature (T c) of about 7 to 8 K, a flux exclusion of about 5% compared to a dense NbN solid, and an estimated critical current density (J c) of 440 A cm(-2) at 100 Oe and 2.5 K. We expect block copolymer self-assembly-directed mesoporous superconductors to provide interesting subjects for mesostructure-superconductivity correlation studies.

  1. Spectro-photometric determination of niobium in Nb-Ti alloy using in-situ separation of Ti by masking with H3PO4

    Ghosh, Prasun; Dutta, M.; Jat, J.R.; Reddy, G.B.; Balaji Rao, Y.; Subba Rao, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The present paper details a simple procedure for the determination of Nb content in Nb-Ti alloy. The method involves dissolution of alloy in mixture of HNO 3 and HF followed by fuming with H 2 SO 4 . Subsequently, solution is taken for UV-Vis Spectro-photometric measurement after addition of Conc. H 3 PO 4 and H 2 O 2 . Hydrogen peroxide is added as coloring agent. Hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) is known to form yellow color peroxo complex with both Niobium and Titanium in sulfuric acid medium and thus Ti will interfere with Nb in absorbance measurement. In view of this practical difficulty, in-situ separation of Ti during measurement has been resorted by masking Ti using Conc. H 3 PO 4 . Standard synthetic sample solution of Nb-Ti was prepared having Niobium and titanium in the ratio of 60:40, 50:50 and 40:60. Quantitative measurement of Niobium was carried out by UV-Visible spectrophotometer at 365 nm. The interference of titanium is prominent from the obtained Niobium concentration. Different ratios of H 3 PO 4 and H 2 SO 4 tried to arrive at optimum ratio to eliminate titanium interference and results are as shown. Quantitative measurement of Niobium was carried out at 355 nm as absorption maxima shifted from 365 nm to 355 nm in presence of phosphoric acid. Results show a good agreement with synthetic standard at 80:20 sulfuric to phosphoric acid ratio

  2. Possible Measurable Effects of Dark Energy in Rotating Superconductors

    Clovis Jacinto de Matos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss recent laboratory experiments with rotating superconductors and show that three so far unexplained experimentally observed effects (anomalous acceleration signals, anomalous gyroscope signals, Cooper pair mass excess can be physically explained in terms of a possible interaction of dark energy with Cooper pairs. Our approach is based on a Ginzburg-Landau-like model of electromagnetic dark energy, where gravitationally active photons obtain mass in the superconductor. We show that this model can account simultaneously for the anomalous acceleration and anomalous gravitomagnetic fields around rotating superconductors measured by Tajmar et al. and for the anomalous Cooper pair mass in superconductive Niobium, measured by Cabrera and Tate. It is argued that these three different physical effects are ultimately different experimental manifestations of the simultaneous spontaneous breaking of gauge invariance and of the principle of general covariance in superconductive materials.

  3. Evidence of preferential diffusion and segregation of impurities at grain boundaries in very pure niobium used for radiofrequency cavities

    Antoine, C.; Bonin, B.; Safa, H.; Chevarier, A.; Chevarier, N.; Roux, B.

    1996-01-01

    Grain boundaries (GB) of titaniferous, heat treated and then etched niobium have been observed by nuclear microprobe analysis. The very small area of the probe allows to measure by PIXE quantities of titanium as low as one monolayer at the GB. Concentrations of titanium as high as some atomic percent were found on 6 μm etched samples, giving indication of a preferential diffusion and/or segregation at GB. Titanium was detectable also on 15 μm etched samples but was bellow the sensitivity of the microprobe for 35 μm etched samples. (author)

  4. Production of titanium alloys with uniform distribution of heat resisting metals

    Reznichenko, V.A.; Goncharenko, T.V.; Khalimov, F.B.; Vojtechova, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    Consideration is given to the process of the formation of a titanium sponge alloyed with niobium or tantalum, in the joint metallic reduction of titanium, niobium and tantanum chlorides. A percentage composition of the phases observed and the structure of the alloyed sponge have been studied. It is shown that after one remelting operation of the alloyed sponge the alloys of titanium with niobium and tantalum have a uniform component distribution. At the stage of chloride reduction there appear solid solutions based on titanium and an alloying component. The stage of vacuum separation of the reaction mass is associated with a mutual dissolution of the primary phases and the formation of the solid solutions of the alloyed titanium sponge, which, by their composition, are close to the desired alloy composition. The principal features of the formation of a titanium sponge alloyed with niobium and tantalum are in a perfect agreemet with those typical of Ti-Mo and Ti-W sponges, therefore it can be assumed that these features will be also common to the other cases of the metallic reduction of titanium and refractory metals chlorides

  5. Production of titanium alloys with uniform distribution of heat resisting metals

    Reznichenko, V A; Goncharenko, T V; Khalimov, F B; Voitechova, E A

    1976-01-01

    Consideration is given to the process of the formation of a titanium sponge alloyed with niobium or tantalum, in the joint metallic reduction of titanium, niobium and tantanum chlorides. A percentage composition of the phases observed and the structure of the alloyed sponge have been studied. It is shown that after one remelting operation of the alloyed sponge the alloys of titanium with niobium and tantalum have a uniform component distribution. At the stage of chloride reduction there appear solid solutions based on titanium and an alloying component. The stage of vacuum separation of the reaction mass is associated with a mutual dissolution of the primary phases and the formation of the solid solutions of the alloyed titanium sponge, which, by their composition, are close to the desired alloy composition. The principal features of the formation of a titanium sponge alloyed with niobium and tantalum are in a perfect agreemet with those typical of Ti-Mo and Ti-W sponges, therefore it can be assumed that these features will be also common to the other cases of the metallic reduction of titanium and refractory metals chlorides.

  6. Localized superconductors

    Ma, M.; Lee, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    We study the effects of Anderson localization on superconductivity by using a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type trial wave function which pairs electrons in exact time-reversed eigenstates of the single-particle Hamiltonian. Within this approximation, and neglecting localization effects on the effective Coulomb repulsion and the electron-phonon coupling, we find that superconductivity persists below the mobility edge. In fact, Anderson's theorem is valid in the localized phase as long as rhoΔ 0 L/sup d/ > 1 (rho is the density of states averaged over +- Δ 0 of the Fermi energy, Δ 0 the BCS gap parameter, and L the localization length). Hence the gap order parameter Δ(r) remains uniform in space at the BCS value Δ 0 . The superfluid density and response to electromagnetic perturbations, however, show marked differences from the ''dirty superconductor'' regime. For rhoΔ 0 L/sup d/ < 1, Δ(r) fluctuates spatially and eventually drops to zero. In the limit when states are site localized, the system crosses over into the ''Anderson negative-U glass.'' Considerations beyond the trial wave-function approximation will speed up the destruction of superconductivity. The superconductor formed from localized states has the property that its quasiparticle excitations are also localized. Such excitations can be probed by observing the normal current in a tunneling junction

  7. Niobium Nitride Thin Films and Multilayers for Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    Roach, William; Beringer, Douglas; Li, Zhaozhu; Clavero, Cesar; Lukaszew, Rosa

    2013-03-01

    Niobium nitride in thin film form has been considered for a number of applications including multi-layered coatings onto superconducting radio frequency cavities which have been proposed to overcome the fundamental accelerating gradient limit of ~50 MV/m in niobium based accelerators. In order to fulfill the latter application, the selected superconductor's thermodynamic critical field, HC, must be larger than that of niobium and separated from the Nb surface by an insulating layer in order to shield the Nb cavity from field penetration and thus allow higher field gradients. Thus, for the successful implementation of such multilayered stack it is important to consider not just the materials inherent properties but also how these properties may be affected in thin film geometry and also by the specific deposition techniques used. Here, we show the results of our correlated study of structure and superconducting properties in niobium nitride thin films and discuss the shielding exhibited in NbN/MgO/Nb multilayer samples beyond the lower critical field of Nb for the first time. This work was funded by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (HDTRA-10-1-0072).

  8. Titanium ; dream new material

    Lee, Yong Tae; Kim Seung Eon; Heoon, Yong Taek; Jung, Hui Won

    2001-11-01

    The contents of this book are history of Titanium, present situation of Titanium industry, property of Titanium alloy, types of it, development of new alloy of Titanium smelting of Titanium, cast of Titanium and heat treatment of Titanium, Titanium alloy for plane, car parts, biological health care, and sport leisure and daily life, prospect, and Titanium industrial development of Titanium in China.

  9. Niobium sputter deposition on quarter wave resonators

    Viswanadham, C; Jayaprakash, D; Mishra, R L

    2003-01-01

    Niobium sputter deposition on quarter wave copper R.F resonators, have been taken up in our laboratory, An ultra high vacuum system was made for this purpose. Niobium exhibits superconducting properties at liquid Helium temperature. A uniform coating of about 1.5 mu m of niobium on the internal surfaces of the copper resonant cavities is desired. Power dissipation in the resonators can be greatly reduced by making the internal surfaces of the R.F cavity super conducting. (author)

  10. Microwave study of magnetic field penetration parallel to thin niobium films

    Grbic, M.S.; Janjusevic, D.; Pozek, M.; Dulcic, A.; Wagner, T.

    2007-01-01

    Complex conductivity of high quality niobium thin films has been investigated by microwave technique in parallel static magnetic field. For the 40 nm thick film no vortices can be formed and the microwave penetration is defined by the strength of the superconducting order parameter which varies with the applied magnetic field. 160 nm thick measured film allows formation of two rows of vortices. Microwave dissipiation is dominated by dynamics of vortices which is strongly affected by size effects. Results have been compared with the generalised models of complex conductivity for low-dimensional superconductor in mixed state following earlier considerations by other authors

  11. Flux pinning by voids in surface-oxidized superconducting niobium and vanadium

    Meij, G.P. van der.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of flux pinning by small voids (roughly 10 nm) in the type II superconductors niobium and vanadium. These voids were created in rectangular foils (with typical dimensions of 30x3x0.2 mm) during an irradiation with fast neutrons in the High Flux Reactor at Petten at temperatures between 400 and 1000 0 C. The pinning force per unit volume is determined from the magnetic properties of the superconducting samples. The experiments were carried out in a slowly ramped magnetic field, as well as in a combination of a static and a much smaller alternating field. (Auth.)

  12. Determination of hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium in niobium and niobium-based alloys by atomic absorption spectrometry

    Ide, Kunikazu; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Sudo, Emiko.

    1985-01-01

    The analytical procedure is as follows: Weigh 1 g of a sample and put it into a 100 cm 3 PTFE beaker. Add 5 ml of distilled water and 5 ml of hydrofluoric acid, and then heat the solution on a hot plate, adding 3 ml of nitric acid dropwise. Dilute the solution to 100 cm 3 with distilled water. When hafnium is determined, add 2 g of diammonium titanium hexafluoride ((NH 4 ) 2 TiF 6 )) before dilution. Working standard solutions are prepared by adding the stock standard solutions of hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium into niobium solutions. When hafnium is determined, add 2 g of (NH 4 ) 2 TiF 6 and the alloying elements in amounts corresponding to those in sample solutions into the working standard solutions. The tolerable amounts of hydrofluoric acid were 2.9 M, 2.1 M, and 3.1 M and those of nitric acid were 1.0 M, 1.6 M, and 1.6 M for hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium, respectively. It was found that (NH 4 ) 2 TiF 6 greatly increased the sensitivity for hafnium determination. Niobium showed minus effect for hafnium and plus effect for molybdenum and vanadium. The atomic absorption of molybdenum and vanadium were not influenced by the presence of 20 % of each alloying element, while the atomic absorption of hafnium was given plus effect by 20 % of zirconium, iron, cobalt, nickel, manganese, chromium or vanadium and minus effect by 20 % tungsten. The analytical values of hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium in niobium-based alloys by this method showed a good agreement with those by X-ray fluorescence analysis. The lower limits of determination (S/N=2) were 0.05, 0.001, and 0.002 % and the relative standard deviation were 3, 1, and 1.5 % for hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium, respectively. (author)

  13. Free energy of hydration of niobium oxide

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Some of the glasses being formulated by SRTC researchers contain niobium oxide. In this report, the free energy of hydration of the oxide is calculated from the free energies of formation of the oxide, the hydroxide, and water. This value can be used in calculations of the free energy of hydration of glasses containing niobium

  14. Distribution of magnetic field in type II superconductors

    Castro, J.L. de.

    1986-09-01

    The magnetie field penetration profile, in type II superconductor, has studied in specially designed cylindrical samples. The samples consist of alternated thick layers ( > 30 μm ) of niobium and copper deposited, by electron-beam evaporation or electro-chemical deposition, on cylindric core of either niobium or copper. The magnetization curves, the magnetic susceptibility and the differential susceptibility for small hysteresis loop ( H c1 c2 ) were measured for all the samples between 4. 2 and 9.5 K. These measurements, done with flux pinned and without, show some peculiar descontinuities and inflections which seems to resemble the samples shape. A simple phenonenological extension of Bean's critical state model was applied to these results, giving a resonable qualitative agreement. Also, a more elaborated theoretical model was improve which could give more quantitative fitting. (author) [pt

  15. High Filed Magnets: Niobium-titanium and beyond

    Waloschek, Pedro

    1990-09-15

    To guide proton beams at tomorrow's higher energies - for the LHC project in CERN's existing LEP tunnel, and for the US Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) construction project - accelerator physicists are pushing for more powerful magnets.

  16. Behaviour of solvent extraction of niobium in nitric acid

    Lin Cansheng; Huang Meixin; Zhang Xianzi; Zhang Chonghai

    1988-01-01

    The behaviour of solvent extraction of niobium is discussed. The expractants, includding TBP, HDBP, H 2 MBP, TBP irradiated, HDEHP, TTA and Aliquat-7402, are used. The special influence of molybdenum and zirconium on solvent extraction of niobium and the extraction behaviur of niobium with TBP irradiated are described. The effect of fluorine and uranium in aqueous phase on extraction of niobium is mentioned. It is observed that the interfacial crud has not relevance to D Nb , but niobium-95 can be absorbed on it. The species of extractable niobium, extraction mechanism, and the reason brought niobum into organic phase are discussed. Finally, the idea of increasing decontamination factor for niobium is suggested

  17. The Resonance Integral of Niobium

    Hellstrand, E; Lundgren, G

    1962-08-15

    The resonance integral of niobium has been studied by both pile oscillator and activation techniques. A value of 8.15b {+-} 0.65 b was obtained for the infinitely dilute integral. In addition, the variation of the resonance integral with foil thickness has been measured for thicknesses in the range 0.06 mm to 1.36 mm. A separate study of the half-life of the isomeric state in {sup 94}Nb yielded a value T{sub 1/2} = 6.30 - 0.03 m which is about 5 % lower than the value given in literature.

  18. Quantitative magneto-optical investigation of superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid structures.

    Shaw, G; Brisbois, J; Pinheiro, L B G L; Müller, J; Blanco Alvarez, S; Devillers, T; Dempsey, N M; Scheerder, J E; Van de Vondel, J; Melinte, S; Vanderbemden, P; Motta, M; Ortiz, W A; Hasselbach, K; Kramer, R B G; Silhanek, A V

    2018-02-01

    We present a detailed quantitative magneto-optical imaging study of several superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid structures, including Nb deposited on top of thermomagnetically patterned NdFeB and permalloy/niobium with erasable and tailored magnetic landscapes imprinted in the permalloy layer. The magneto-optical imaging data are complemented with and compared to scanning Hall probe microscopy measurements. Comprehensive protocols have been developed for calibrating, testing, and converting Faraday rotation data to magnetic field maps. Applied to the acquired data, they reveal the comparatively weaker magnetic response of the superconductor from the background of larger fields and field gradients generated by the magnetic layer.

  19. Cold atoms near superconductors: atomic spin coherence beyond the Johnson noise limit

    Kasch, B; Hattermann, H; Cano, D; Judd, T E; Zimmermann, C; Kleiner, R; Koelle, D; Fortagh, J; Scheel, S

    2010-01-01

    We report on the measurement of atomic spin coherence near the surface of a superconducting niobium wire. As compared to normal conducting metal surfaces, the atomic spin coherence is maintained for time periods beyond the Johnson noise limit. The result provides experimental evidence that magnetic near-field noise near the superconductor is strongly suppressed. Such long atomic spin coherence times near superconductors open the way towards the development of coherently coupled cold atom/solid state hybrid quantum systems with potential applications in quantum information processing and precision force sensing.

  20. Quantitative magneto-optical investigation of superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid structures

    Shaw, G.; Brisbois, J.; Pinheiro, L. B. G. L.; Müller, J.; Blanco Alvarez, S.; Devillers, T.; Dempsey, N. M.; Scheerder, J. E.; Van de Vondel, J.; Melinte, S.; Vanderbemden, P.; Motta, M.; Ortiz, W. A.; Hasselbach, K.; Kramer, R. B. G.; Silhanek, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    We present a detailed quantitative magneto-optical imaging study of several superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid structures, including Nb deposited on top of thermomagnetically patterned NdFeB and permalloy/niobium with erasable and tailored magnetic landscapes imprinted in the permalloy layer. The magneto-optical imaging data are complemented with and compared to scanning Hall probe microscopy measurements. Comprehensive protocols have been developed for calibrating, testing, and converting Faraday rotation data to magnetic field maps. Applied to the acquired data, they reveal the comparatively weaker magnetic response of the superconductor from the background of larger fields and field gradients generated by the magnetic layer.

  1. Surface Characterization of Impurities in Superconducting Niobium for Radio Frequency (RF) Cavities used in Particle Accelerators

    Maheshwari, Prateek

    absorption/desorption of hydrogen and that hydrogen does not diffuse in the oxide. Subsequent ion implantation of hydrogen in an anodized niobium sample thus provided a quantification factor of hydrogen in niobium oxide, which was used to obtain an estimate of the hydrogen concentration in niobium. This estimate was found to be 40% atomic H in a non heat treated niobium sample. Such high levels of hydrogen observed in Nb before heat treatment ensures that is the main contributor to cavity degradation. TEM analysis was performed to study the effect of heat treatment on the surface oxide thickness of niobium. Results showed a continuous oxide layer with a sharp metal-oxide interface. No significant changes in the oxide thickness were seen after heat treatment. Time of Flight (TOF)-SIMS imaging was used to characterize the grain boundaries of large grain niobium bicrystals, since it was believed that impurity segregation at the grain boundaries of Nb might deteriorate cavity performance. Images showed segregation of carbon at the grain boundaries after 800°C heat treatment of the samples, while no segregation of hydrogen and oxygen were seen for both non heat treated and heat treated samples. An important aspect of this study was the record-performance improvement of the 1400°C heat treated cavity, which showed a 200% increase in the cavity efficiency. SIMS analysis of the surface of this sample showed high levels of titanium, down to 1im depth, and it is speculated that this Ti might be responsible for high performance of the cavity by affecting the distribution of impurities within the penetration depth.

  2. Niobium Nb and tantalum Ta

    Busev, A.I.; Tiptsova, V.G.; Ivanov, V.M.

    1978-01-01

    The basic methods for determining niobium and tantalum in various objects are described. Nb and Ta are separated with the aid of N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine by precipitating Nb(5) from a tartaric acid solution with subsequent precipitation of Ta from the filtrate. The gravimetric determination of Nb and Ta in steels is based on their quantitative separation from a diluted solution by way of hydrolysis with subsequent after-precipitation with phenylarsonic acid (in the absence of W). The gravimetric determination of Nb in the presence of W is carried out with the aid of Cupferron. To determine Nb in its carbide, Nb(5) reduced to Nb(3) is titrated with a solution of K 2 Cr 2 O 7 in the presence of phenyl-anthranilic acid. The photometric determination of Nb in tungsten-containing steels and in ores containing Ti, W, Mo and Cr is based on the rhodanide method. Nb is determined in alloys with Zr and Ti photometrically with the aid of 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcin and in alloyed steels with the aid of benzhydroxamic acid. The latter complex is extracted with chloroform. This method is used to determine Nb in rocks. The photometric determination of Ta in TiCl 4 is carried out with the aid of pyrogallol, in commercial niobium with the aid of methyl violet, and in steel with the aid of 4-(-pyridylazo)-resorcin. Also described is the polarographic determination of Nb in tantalum pentoxide

  3. Buffered Electrochemical Polishing of Niobium

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Tian, Hui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Corcoran, Sean [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The standard preparation of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of pure niobium include the removal of a 'damaged' surface layer, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP), after the cavities are formed. The performance of the cavities is characterized by a sharp degradation of the quality factor when the surface magnetic field exceeds about 90 mT, a phenomenon referred to as 'Q-drop.' In cavities made of polycrystalline fine grain (ASTM 5) niobium, the Q-drop can be significantly reduced by a low-temperature (? 120 °C) 'in-situ' baking of the cavity if the chemical treatment was EP rather than BCP. As part of the effort to understand this phenomenon, we investigated the effect of introducing a polarization potential during buffered chemical polishing, creating a process which is between the standard BCP and EP. While preliminary results on the application of this process to Nb cavities have been previously reported, in this contribution we focus on the characterization of this novel electrochemical process by measuring polarization curves, etching rates, surface finish, electrochemical impedance and the effects of temperature and electrolyte composition. In particular, it is shown that the anodic potential of Nb during BCP reduces the etching rate and improves the surface finish.

  4. Anomalous diffusion in niobium. Study of solute diffusion mechanism of iron in niobium

    Ablitzer, D.

    1977-01-01

    In order to explain anomalously high diffusion velocities observed for iron diffusion in niobium, the following parameters were measured: isotope effect, b factor (which expresses the effect of iron on niobium self-diffusion), self-diffusion coefficient of niobium, solute diffusion coefficient of iron in niobium. The results obtained show that neither pure vacancy models, nor diffusion in the lattice defects (dislocations, sub-boundaries, grain boundaries), nor pure interstitialy mechanisms, nor simple or cyclic exchange mechanisms agree with experiments. A mechanism is proposed which considers an equilibrium between substitution iron atoms and interstitial iron atoms. The diffusion of iron then occurs through interstitial vancancy pairs [fr

  5. Fine uniform filament superconductors

    Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Li, Qi; Roberts, Peter R.; Antaya, Peter D.; Seuntjens, Jeffrey M.; Hancock, Steven; DeMoranville, Kenneth L.; Christopherson, Craig J.; Garrant, Jennifer H.; Craven, Christopher A.

    2002-01-01

    A multifilamentary superconductor composite having a high fill factor is formed from a plurality of stacked monofilament precursor elements, each of which includes a low density superconductor precursor monofilament. The precursor elements all have substantially the same dimensions and characteristics, and are stacked in a rectilinear configuration and consolidated to provide a multifilamentary precursor composite. The composite is thereafter thermomechanically processed to provide a superconductor composite in which each monofilament is less than about 50 microns thick.

  6. The electrodeposition of niobium on tungsten

    Taylor, R.G.

    1977-03-01

    The electrodeposition of niobium on a tungsten substrate has been demonstrated by electrolysis of an alkali metal fluoride melt. The deposit produced was non-porous, coherent and formed a good bond to the substrate. (author)

  7. Polarography of niobium in hydrochloric acid

    Henrion, G.; Adler, F.; Andreas, B.

    1978-01-01

    Dependence between the limiting current and the concentration of niobium and hydrochloric acid has been investigated. With the decrease of niobium concentration the hydrolysis and condensation reactions proceed slower. The time dependence of condensation is shown using ethylene glycol which delays the condensation because of complexation of Nb(5). Hydroxylamine hydrochloride increases the limiting current by a kinetic effect by one order of magnitude which was observed clearly by cyclic voltammetry. Even small amounts of ethylene glycol suppress the kinetic effect. Polarographic determination of niobium in HCl as a supporting electrolyte is possible in concentration above 10 M only. Addition of ethylene glycol and hydroxylamine hydrochloride enables determination of small amounts of niobium in 4 M HCl. (author)

  8. Hydride Olefin complexes of tantalum and niobium

    Klazinga, Aan Hendrik

    1979-01-01

    This thesis describes investigations on low-valent tantalum and niobium hydride and alkyl complexes, particularly the dicyclopentadienyl tantalum hydride olefin complexes Cp2Ta(H)L (L=olefin). ... Zie: Summary

  9. Mineral Resource of the Month: Niobium

    Papp, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Niobium, also called columbium, is a transition metal with a very high melting point. It is in greatest demand in industrialized countries, like the United States, because of its defense-related uses in the aerospace, energy and transportation industries. Niobium is used mostly to make high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steel and stainless steel. HSLA steels are used in large-diameter pipes for oil and natural gas pipelines and automobile wheels.

  10. Theoretical modeling of critical temperature increase in metamaterial superconductors

    Smolyaninov, Igor; Smolyaninova, Vera

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that the metamaterial approach is capable of drastic increase of the critical temperature Tc of epsilon near zero (ENZ) metamaterial superconductors. For example, tripling of the critical temperature has been observed in Al-Al2O3 ENZ core-shell metamaterials. Here, we perform theoretical modelling of Tc increase in metamaterial superconductors based on the Maxwell-Garnett approximation of their dielectric response function. Good agreement is demonstrated between theoretical modelling and experimental results in both aluminum and tin-based metamaterials. Taking advantage of the demonstrated success of this model, the critical temperature of hypothetic niobium, MgB2 and H2S-based metamaterial superconductors is evaluated. The MgB2-based metamaterial superconductors are projected to reach the liquid nitrogen temperature range. In the case of an H2S-based metamaterial Tc appears to reach 250 K. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant DMR-1104676 and the School of Emerging Technologies at Towson University.

  11. Low temperature oxidation of niobium alloy with silicon-aluminium coating

    Lazarev, Eh.M.; Sapozhnikova, L.V.; Shabanova, M.E.; Pod'yachev, V.N.; Kornilova, Z.I.

    1987-01-01

    Using the gravimetry methods heat resistance of niobium-titanium-aluminium alloy in the air and at 700 deg C in the initial state and when it is protected by silicide-aluminium coatings (with variable content of aluminium) is investigated. Using X-ray diffraction and micro X-ray diffraction analyses, mechanisms of the alloy oxidation and the coating protective effect are studied. The role of aluminium in the formation of coatings is analyzed and according to bend tests the plasticity of the coatings is evaluated

  12. Superconductors with excess quasiparticles

    Elesin, V.F.; Kopaev, Y.V.

    1981-01-01

    This review presents a systematic kinetic theory of nonequilibrium phenomena in superconductors with excess quasiparticles created by electromagnetic or tunnel injection. The energy distributions of excess quasiparticles and of nonequilibrium phonons, dependence of the order parameter on the power and frequency (or intensity) of the electromagnetic field, magnetic properties of nonequilibrium superconductors, I-V curves of superconductor-insulator-superconductor junctions, and other properties are described in detail. The stability of superconducting states far from thermodynamic equilibrium is investigated and it is shown that characteristic instabilities leading to the formation of nonuniform states of a new type or phase transitions of the first kind are inherent to superconductors with excess quasiparticles. The results are compared with experimental data

  13. Fabrication of high temperature superconductors

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Dorris, Stephen E.; Ma, Beihai; Li, Meiya

    2003-06-17

    A method of forming a biaxially aligned superconductor on a non-biaxially aligned substrate substantially chemically inert to the biaxially aligned superconductor comprising is disclosed. A non-biaxially aligned substrate chemically inert to the superconductor is provided and a biaxially aligned superconductor material is deposited directly on the non-biaxially aligned substrate. A method forming a plume of superconductor material and contacting the plume and the non-biaxially aligned substrate at an angle greater than 0.degree. and less than 90.degree. to deposit a biaxially aligned superconductor on the non-biaxially aligned substrate is also disclosed. Various superconductors and substrates are illustrated.

  14. Kinetics and oxidation mechanisms of polycrystaline niobium

    Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1979-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of annealed niobium was determined by thermogravimetric analysis between 450 and 800 0 C and for oxygen pressures varying from 20 to 700 mmHg. The oxidation kinetics of cold worked and/or irradiated niobium for temperatures between 500 and 700 0 C, with oxygen pressures varying from 100 to 300 mmHg. Was also determined. Using X-ray diffraction it was found that the oxide formed in the range of temperature and oxygen pressure considered in this research is γ-Nb 2 O 5 . Optical and scanning eletronic microscopy showed that for annealed niobium oxidized under 600 0 C there was formation of non-uniform oxide layers, containing cracks and pores, presenting very irregular metal/pentoxide interface. The presence of sub-oxide NbOsub(z) platelets was observed in this interface. This sub-oxide platelets where not observed in annealed oxidized niobium samples over 600 0 C; the oxide layers formed were compact. At 800 0 C and the beginning at 700 0 C the interfaces were quite regular. Through microhardness measurements for the metal near the metal/pentoxide interface, the formation of oxygen solid solution was found and the oxygen diffusion coefficient was calculated. The results showed that at 600 0 C the oxygen diffusion coefficient in cold worked niobium is three times larger than the value obtained for annealed niobium. The results suggest that the reaction between annealed niobium and oxygen undaer 600 0 C is controlled by reaction in interface where the oxide layers are not compacted, parcially due to Nb sub(z) platelets formation.(Author) [pt

  15. Hydrogen Contamination of Niobium Surfaces

    Viet Nguyen-Tuong; Lawrence Doolittle

    1993-01-01

    The presence of hydrogen is blamed for dramatic reductions in cavity Q's. Hydrogen concentration is difficult to measure, so there is a great deal of Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt (FUD) associated with the problem. This paper presents measurements of hydrogen concentration depth profiles, commenting on the pitfalls of the methods used and exploring how material handling can change the amount of hydrogen in pieces of niobium. Hydrogen analysis was performed by a forward scattering experiment with Helium used as the primary beam. This technique is variously known as FRES (Forward Recoil Elastic Scattering), FRS, HFS (Hydrogen Forward Scattering), and HRA (Hydrogen Recoil Analysis). Some measurements were also made using SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry). Both HFS and SIMS are capable of measuring a depth profile of Hydrogen. The primary difficulty in interpreting the results from these techniques is the presence of a surface peak which is due (at least in part) to contamination with either water or hydrocarbons. With HFS, the depth resolution is about 30 nm, and the maximum depth profiled is about 300 nm. (This 10-1 ratio is unusually low for ion beam techniques, and is a consequence of the compromises that must be made in the geometry of the experiment, surface roughness, and energy straggling in the absorber foil that must be used to filter out the forward scattered helium.) All the observed HFS spectra include a surface peak which includes both surface contamination and any real hydrogen uptake by the niobium surface. Some contamination occurs during the analysis. The vacuum in the analysis chamber is typically a few times 10(sup -6) torr, and some of the contamination is in the form of hydrocarbons from the pumping system. Hydrocarbons normally form a very thin (less than a monolayer) film which is in equilibrium between arrival rate and the evaporation rate. In the presence of the incoming ion beam, however, these hydrocarbons crack on the surface into non

  16. Development of high field superconductors for fusion energy applications. Final report

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a conductor design and a manufacturing procedure for a composite multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn conductor suitable for winding a magnet for use in a fusion energy power plant. Effort was concentrated on the design of a conductor with tubular niobium filaments in a copper matrix. Bronze in the bores of the filaments would react with the niobium to form Nb 3 Sn on the inside diameter of the niobium tubular filaments during a heat treatment at final size. Four filament geometries were evaluated. The addition of titanium to the bronze was found to increase the current density. The use of a hydrogen atmosphre did not appear to cause any increase in current density. Primary billets were assembled and extruded with five tubular filament designs and for comparison, five rod type filament designs. Billet designs are described

  17. Magnetization hysteresis and history effects in conventional and high temperature superconductors

    Chaddah, P.

    1990-01-01

    The magnetization in hard superconductors is irreversible and history-dependent, and cannot be a priori compared with the equilibrium magnetization. These features have gained prominence in the high T c superconductors (HTSC) where the short coherence length presumably leads to intrinsic pinning. Various experimental features, first noticed in the HTSC, are explained by an extension of Bean's macroscopic model to include temperature variations and the field dependence of J c . This paper discusses recent measurements of history effects in niobium and show their similarities with other published data on HTSC. The authors also present our calculations of magnetization behaviour in hard superconductors of sample-shapes having a non-zero demagnetization factor

  18. Once upon a time, there was a brittle but superconducting niobium-tin…

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    The production of the new niobium-tin cables for the high-performance superconducting magnets of the HL-LHC is now in full swing at CERN.   The Rutherford cabling machine is operating in the superconducting laboratory, in Building 163. (Photo: Max Brice/CERN) Extraordinary research needs extraordinary machines: the upgrade project of the LHC, the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), has the goal of achieving instantaneous luminosities a factor of five larger than the LHC nominal value, and it relies on magnetic fields reaching the level of 12 Tesla. The superconducting niobium-titanium (Nb-Ti) used in the LHC magnets can only bear magnetic fields of up to 9-10 Tesla. Therefore, an alternative solution for the superconducting magnets materials was needed. The key innovative technology to develop superconducting magnets beyond 10 Tesla has been found in the niobium-tin (Nb3Sn)  compound. This compound was actually discovered in 1954, eight years before Nb-Ti, but when the LHC was built, ...

  19. Niobium based coatings for dental implants

    Ramirez, G.; Rodil, S.E.; Arzate, H.; Muhl, S.; Olaya, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Niobium based thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) substrates to evaluate them as possible biocompatible surfaces that might improve the biocompatibility and extend the life time of stainless steel dental implants. Niobium nitride and niobium oxide thin films were deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering under standard deposition conditions without substrate bias or heating. The biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated by testing the cellular adhesion and viability/proliferation of human cementoblasts during different culture times, up to 7 days. The response of the films was compared to the bare substrate and pieces of Ti6Al4V; the most commonly used implant material for orthopedics and osteo-synthesis applications. The physicochemical properties of the films were evaluated by different means; X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results suggested that the niobium oxide films were amorphous and of stoichiometric Nb 2 O 5 (a-Nb 2 O 5 ), while the niobium nitride films were crystalline in the FCC phase (c-NbN) and were also stoichiometric with an Nb to N ratio of one. The biological evaluation showed that the biocompatibility of the SS could be improved by any of the two films, but neither was better than the Ti6Al4V alloy. On the other hand, comparing the two films, the c-NbN seemed to be a better surface than the oxide in terms of the adhesion and proliferation of human cemetoblasts.

  20. Large area bulk superconductors

    Miller, Dean J.; Field, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  1. Friction in levitated superconductors

    Brandt, E.H.

    1988-01-01

    A type I superconductor levitated above a magnet of low symmetry has a unique equilibrium position about which it may oscillate freely. In contrast, a type II superconductor has a continuous range of stable equilibrium positions and orientations where it floats rigidly without swinging or orbiting as if it were stuck in sand. A strong internal friction conspicuously indicates the existence and unpinning of flux lines in oxide superconductors levitated above liquid nitrogen. It is shown how these effects follow from the hysteretic magnetization curves and how the energy is dissipated

  2. Development of superconductor bulk for superconductor bearing

    Kim, Chan Joong; Jun, Byung Hyuk; Park, Soon Dong (and others)

    2008-08-15

    Current carrying capacity is one of the most important issues in the consideration of superconductor bulk materials for engineering applications. There are numerous applications of Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) bulk superconductors e.g. magnetic levitation train, flywheel energy storage system, levitation transportation, lunar telescope, centrifugal device, magnetic shielding materials, bulk magnets etc. Accordingly, to obtain YBCO materials in the form of large, single crystals without weak-link problem is necessary. A top seeded melt growth (TSMG) process was used to fabricate single crystal YBCO bulk superconductors. The seeded and infiltration growth (IG) technique was also very promising method for the synthesis of large, single-grain YBCO bulk superconductors with good superconducting properties. 5 wt.% Ag doped Y211 green compacts were sintered at 900 .deg. C {approx} 1200 .deg.C and then a single crystal YBCO was fabricated by an infiltration method. A refinement and uniform distribution of the Y211 particles in the Y123 matrix were achieved by sintering the Ag-doped samples. This enhancement of the critical current density was ascribable to a fine dispersion of the Y211 particles, a low porosity and the presence of Ag particles. In addition, we have designed and manufactured large YBCO single domain with levitation force of 10-13 kg/cm{sup 2} using TSMG processing technique.

  3. Study of niobium corrosion in alkaline medium

    Almeida, S.H. de.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative study of niobium electrochemical behaviour in NaOH and KOH solution, with concentrations between 0,5 and 6,1M is presented. The studies were done through electrochemicals assays, consisting in the corrosion potential and anodic and cathodic polarization curves, complemented by loss of mass experiments. The niobium anodic behaviour in alkaline medium is characterized by passivation occurrence, with a stable film formation. The Na oH solution in alkaline medium are more corrosible to niobium than the KOH solution. The loss of mass assays showed that the corrosion velocit is more dependente of hydroxide concentration in KOH medium than the NaOH medium. (C.G.C.) [pt

  4. Josephson tunnel junctions in niobium films

    Wiik, Tapio.

    1976-12-01

    A method of fabricating stable Josephson tunnel junctions with reproducible characteristics is described. The junctions have a sandwich structure consisting of a vacuum evaporated niobium film, a niobium oxide layer produced by the glow discharge method and a lead film deposited by vacuum evaporation. Difficulties in producing thin-film Josephson junctions are discussed. Experimental results suggest that the lower critical field of the niobium film is the most essential parameter when evaluating the quality of these junctions. The dependence of the lower critical field on the film thickness and on the Ginzburg-Landau parameter of the film is studied analytically. Comparison with the properties of the evaporated films and with the previous calculations for bulk specimens shows that the presented model is applicable for most of the prepared samples. (author)

  5. Radioactivity analysis in niobium activation foils

    Mueller, G.E.

    1995-06-01

    The motivation for this study was to measure and analyze the activity of six (6) niobium (Nb) foils (the x-rays from an internal transition in Nb-93m) and apply this information with previously obtained activation foil data. The niobium data was used to determine the epithermal to MeV range for the neutron spectrum and fluence. The foil activation data was re-evaluated in a spectrum analysis code (STAY`SL) to provide new estimates of the exposure at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effect Facility (LASREF). The activity of the niobium foils was measured and analyzed at the University of Missouri-Columbia (UMC) under the direction of Professor William Miller. The spectrum analysis was performed at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) by Professor Gary Mueller.

  6. Liquid-film assisted formation of alumina/niobium interfaces

    Sugar, Joshua D.; McKeown, Joseph T.; Marks, Robert A.; Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2002-01-01

    Alumina has been joined at 1400 degrees C using niobium-based interlayers. Two different joining approaches were compared: solid-state diffusion bonding using a niobium foil as an interlayer, and liquid-film assisted bonding using a multilayer copper/niobium/copper interlayer. In both cases, a 127-(mu)m thick niobium foil was used; =1.4-(mu)m or =3-(mu)m thick copper films flanked the niobium. Room-temperature four-point bend tests showed that the introduction of a copper film had a significa...

  7. Corrosion surface protection by using titanium carbon nitride/titanium-niobium carbon nitride multilayered system

    Caicedo, J.C., E-mail: jcesarca@calima.univalle.edu.co [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Amaya, C. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros, CDT-ASTIN SENA, Cali (Colombia); Cabrera, G. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Esteve, J. [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Aperador, W. [Universidad Militar Nueva Granada Bogota D.C (Colombia); Gomez, M.E. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Prieto, P. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Centro de Excelencia en Nuevos Materiales, CENM, Calle 13 100-00 Edificio 320, espacio 1026, Cali (Colombia)

    2011-07-29

    The aim of this work is the improvement of the electrochemical behavior of 4140 steel substrate using TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system as a protective coating. We have grown [TiCN/TiNbCN]{sub n} multilayered via reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering technique in which was varied systematically the bilayer period ({Lambda}), and the bilayer number (n), maintaining constant the total thickness of the coatings ({approx} 3 {mu}m). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy, electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy assisted with selected area electron diffraction. The electrochemical properties were studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Tafel curves. XRD results showed a preferential growth in the face-centered cubic (111) crystal structure for [TiCN/TiNbCN]{sub n} multilayered coatings [1]. In this work was obtained the maximum corrosion resistance for the coating with ({Lambda}) equal to 15 nm, corresponding to n = 200 bilayered. The polarization resistance and corrosion rate were around 8.6 kOhm cm{sup 2} and 7.59 . 10{sup -4} mm/year, these values were 8.6 and 0.001 times better than those showed by the uncoated 4140 steel substrate (1.0 kOhm and 0.57 mm/year), respectively. The improvement of the electrochemical behavior of the 4140 coated with this TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system can be attributed to the presence of several interfaces that act as obstacles for the inward and outward diffusions of Cl{sup -} ion species, generating an increment in the energy or potential required for translating the corrosive ions across the coating/substrate interface. Moreover, the interface systems affect the means free path on the ions toward the metallic substrate, due to the decreasing of the defects presented in the multilayered coatings.

  8. Corrosion surface protection by using titanium carbon nitride/titanium-niobium carbon nitride multilayered system

    Caicedo, J.C.; Amaya, C.; Cabrera, G.; Esteve, J.; Aperador, W.; Gomez, M.E.; Prieto, P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is the improvement of the electrochemical behavior of 4140 steel substrate using TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system as a protective coating. We have grown [TiCN/TiNbCN] n multilayered via reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering technique in which was varied systematically the bilayer period (Λ), and the bilayer number (n), maintaining constant the total thickness of the coatings (∼ 3 μm). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy, electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy assisted with selected area electron diffraction. The electrochemical properties were studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Tafel curves. XRD results showed a preferential growth in the face-centered cubic (111) crystal structure for [TiCN/TiNbCN] n multilayered coatings [1]. In this work was obtained the maximum corrosion resistance for the coating with (Λ) equal to 15 nm, corresponding to n = 200 bilayered. The polarization resistance and corrosion rate were around 8.6 kOhm cm 2 and 7.59 . 10 -4 mm/year, these values were 8.6 and 0.001 times better than those showed by the uncoated 4140 steel substrate (1.0 kOhm and 0.57 mm/year), respectively. The improvement of the electrochemical behavior of the 4140 coated with this TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system can be attributed to the presence of several interfaces that act as obstacles for the inward and outward diffusions of Cl - ion species, generating an increment in the energy or potential required for translating the corrosive ions across the coating/substrate interface. Moreover, the interface systems affect the means free path on the ions toward the metallic substrate, due to the decreasing of the defects presented in the multilayered coatings.

  9. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    Shepard, K W; Kennedy, W L; Sagalovsky, L [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-11-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling costs for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed. (Author) fig., 7 refs.

  10. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling cost for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed

  11. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling costs for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed. (Author) fig., 7 refs

  12. Investigation of superconducting niobium 1170 MHz cavities

    Anashin, V.V.; Bibko, S.I.; Fadeyev, E.I.

    1988-01-01

    The design, fabrication and experiments with superconducting L-band single cell cavities are described. These cavities model a cell of an accelerating RF structure. The cavities have been fabricated from technical grade and higher purity grade sheet niobium using deep-drawing, electron beam welding and chemical polishing. They have spherical geometry and are excited in the TM 010 mode. A computerized set-up was used for cavity tests. Qo=1.5 x 10 9 and E acc = 4.3 MV/m were obtained in the cavity made of higher purity grade niobium. 6 references, 8 figures, 3 tables

  13. Tool steel for cold worck niobium carbides

    Goldenstein, H.

    1984-01-01

    A tool steel was designed so as to have a microstructure with the matrix similar a cold work tool steel of D series, containing a dispersion of Niobium carbides, with no intention of putting Niobium in solution on the matrix. The alloy was cast, forged and heat treated. The alloy was easily forged; the primary carbide morfology, after forging, was faceted, tending to equiaxed. The hardness obtained was equivalent to the maximum hardness of a D-3 sttel when quenched from any temperature between 950 0 C, and 1200 0 , showing a very small sensitivy to the quenching temperature. (Author) [pt

  14. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling cost for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed.

  15. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling cost for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed.

  16. Kohn anomalies in superconductors

    Flatte, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The detailed behavior of phonon dispersion curves near momenta which span the electronic Fermi sea in a superconductor is presented. An anomaly, similar to the metallic Kohn anomaly, exists in a superconductor's dispersion curves when the frequency of the photon spanning the Fermi sea exceeds twice the superconducting energy gap. This anomaly occurs at approximately the same momentum but is stronger than the normal-state Kohn anomaly. It also survives at finite temperature, unlike the metallic anomaly. Determination of Fermi-surface diameters from the location of these anomalies, therefore, may be more successful in the superconducting phase than in the normal state. However, the superconductor's anomaly fades rapidly with increased phonon frequency and becomes unobservable when the phonon frequency greatly exceeds the gap. This constraint makes these anomalies useful only in high-temperature superconductors such as La 1.85 Sr 0.15 CuO 4

  17. Topological superconductors: a review.

    Sato, Masatoshi; Ando, Yoichi

    2017-07-01

    This review elaborates pedagogically on the fundamental concept, basic theory, expected properties, and materials realizations of topological superconductors. The relation between topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions are explained, and the difference between dispersive Majorana fermions and a localized Majorana zero mode is emphasized. A variety of routes to topological superconductivity are explained with an emphasis on the roles of spin-orbit coupling. Present experimental situations and possible signatures of topological superconductivity are summarized with an emphasis on intrinsic topological superconductors.

  18. Room temperature superconductors

    Sleight, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    If the Holy Grail of room temperature superconductivity could be achieved, the impact on could be enormous. However, a useful room temperature superconductor for most applications must possess a T c somewhat above room temperature and must be capable of sustaining superconductivity in the presence of magnetic fields while carrying a significant current load. The authors will return to the subject of just what characteristics one might seek for a compound to be a room temperature superconductor. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. Continuous lengths of oxide superconductors

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    2000-01-01

    A layered oxide superconductor prepared by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon. A continuous length of a second substrate ribbon is overlaid on the first substrate ribbon. Sufficient pressure is applied to form a bound layered superconductor precursor powder between the first substrate ribbon and the second substrate ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to establish the oxide superconducting phase. The layered oxide superconductor has a smooth interface between the substrate and the oxide superconductor.

  20. SSC type NbTi superconductor research program at Teledyne SC

    Kallsen, J.F.; McDonald, W.K.; Geno, J.D.; O'Larey, P.M.; Siddall, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    In an on-going research effort at Teledyne SC, several multifilament niobium titanium composite billets have been fabricated and processed to make SSC type wire. Critical current densities of 3000 A/mm 2 ± 5% and 2950 A/mm 2 ± 5% (5 T, 4.2 K, 10 -14 ohm-m) have been achieved in wires containing 6.5 and 4.8 micron diameter filaments respectively. This paper addresses piece length and cable-able characteristics

  1. Thermal transport properties of niobium and some niobium-based alloys from 80 to 1600 K

    Moore, J P; Graves, R S; Williams, R K [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1980-01-01

    The electric resistivity, rho, and Seebeck coefficient, S, of 99.8 at% niobium, and Nb-4.8 at% W, Nb-5 at% Mo, Nb-10 at% Mo, and Nb-2.4 at% Mo-2.4 at% Zr alloys were measured from 80 to 1600 K, and the thermal conductivity, lambda, of the niobium and the Nb-5 at% W alloy was measured from 80 to 1300 K. A technique is described for measuring rho and S of a specimen during radial-heat-flow measurements of lambda. The transport property results, which had uncertainties of +-0.4% for rho and +-1.4% for lambda, showed the influence of tungsten and molybdenum solutes on the transport properties of niobium and were used to obtain the electronic Lorenz function of pure niobium, which was found to approach the Sommerfeld value at high temperatures.

  2. Thermal transport properties of niobium and some niobium base alloys from 80 to 16000K

    Moore, J.P.; Graves, R.S.; Williams, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    The electrical resistivities and absolute Seebeck coefficients of 99.8 at. % niobium with a RRR of 36, Nb-4.8 at. % W, Nb-5 at. % Mo, Nb-10 at. % Mo, and Nb-2.4 at. % Mo-2.4 at. % Zr were measured from 80 to 1600 0 K, and the thermal conductivities of the niobium and Nb-5 at. % W were measured from 80 to 1300 0 K. A technique is described for measuring the electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient of a specimen during radial heat flow measurements of the thermal conductivity. The transport property results, which had uncertainties of +-0.4%for electrical resistivity and +-1.4% for thermal conductivity, showed the influence of tungsten and molybdenum solutes on the transport properties of niobium and were used to obtain the electronic Lorenz function of pure niobium, which was found to approach the Sommerfeld value at high temperatures

  3. HIP bonding between niobium/copper/stainless steel materials

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Fujino, Takeo; Hitomi, Nobuteru; Saito, Kenji; Yamada, Masahiro; Shibuya, Junichi; Ota, Tomoko

    2000-01-01

    We have used niobium flanges for the niobium bulk superconducting RF cavities, however, they are expensive. Stainless steel flanges instead of the niobium flanges will be used in the future large scale production of sc cavities like the KEK/JAERI joint project. For a future R and D of the vacuum sealing related to the clean horizontal assembly method or development of cavities welded a helium vessel in the KEK/JAERI joint project, a converter section of niobium material to stainless steel is required. From these requirements we need to develop the converter. We have tried a HIP bonding method between niobium materials and stainless steel or copper material. It was made clear that the technology could offer an enough bonding strength even higher than niobium tensile strength in the joined surface between niobium and stainless steel or copper. (author)

  4. Dislocation morphology in deformed and irradiated niobium

    Chang, C.P.

    1977-06-01

    Niobium foils of moderate purity were examined for the morphology of dislocations or defect clusters in the deformed or neutron-irradiated state by transmission electron microscopy. New evidence has been found for the dissociation of screw dislocations into partials on the (211) slip plane according to the Crussard mechanism: (a/2) [111] → (a/3) [111] + (a/6) [111

  5. Growth of anodic films on niobium

    Gomes, M.A.B.; Bulhoes, L.O.S.

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of the response of the galvanostatic growth of anodic films on niobium metal in aqueous solutions is shown. The first spark voltage showed a dependence upon value of current density that could be explained as the incorporation of anions into the film. (M.J.C.) [pt

  6. Review of tantalum and niobium alloy production

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the current state of niobium- and tantalum-base alloy production. The materials requirements, alloy compositions of interest, and production status are discussed. Finally, a list of developments needed to support the SP-100 program will be identified. A bibliography is included

  7. Intercalated compounds of niobium and tantalum dicalcogenides

    Wypych, F.

    1988-01-01

    The synthesis of niobium and tantalum lamellar compounds and its intercalated derivatives is described. The intercalated compounds with lithium, with alkaline metal and with metals of the first-row transition are studied, characterized by X-ray diffraction. (C.G.C.) [pt

  8. Voltage breakdown on niobium and copper surfaces

    Werner, G.R.; Padamsee, H.; Betzwieser, J.C.; Liu, Y.G.; Rubin, K.H.R.; Shipman, J.E.; Ying, L.T.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have shown that voltage breakdown in superconducting niobium RF cavities is in many ways similar to voltage breakdown on niobium cathodes in DC voltage gaps; most striking are the distinctive starburst patterns and craters that mark the site of voltage breakdown in both superconducting cavities and DC vacuum gaps. Therefore, we can learn much about RF breakdown from simpler, faster DC experiments. We have direct evidence, in the form of before'' and ''after'' pictures, that breakdown events caused by high surface electric fields occur with high probability at contaminant particles on surfaces. Although the pre-breakdown behavior (field emission) seems to depend mostly on the contaminant particles present and little on the substrate, the breakdown event itself is greatly affected by the substrate-niobium, heavily oxidized niobium, electropolished copper, and diamond-machined copper cathodes lead to different kinds of breakdown events. By studying DC voltage breakdown we hope to learn more details about the processes involved in the transition from field emission to catastrophic arcing and the cratering of the surface; as well as learning how to prevent breakdown, we would like to learn how to cause breakdown, which could be important when ''processing'' cavities to reduce field emission. (author)

  9. Magnesium diboride coated bulk niobium: a new approach to higher acceleration gradient

    Civale, Leonardo; Tan, Teng; Wolak, M.; Xi, Xiaoxing; Tajima, Tsuyoshi

    Bulk niobium Superconducting Radio-Frequency cavities are a leading accelerator technology. Their performance is limited by the cavity loss and maximum acceleration gradient, which are negatively affected by vortex penetration into the superconductor when the peak magnetic field at the cavity wall surface exceeds the vortex penetration field (Hvp). It has been proposed that coating the inner wall of an SRF cavity with superconducting thin films increases Hvp. In this work, we utilized Nb ellipsoids to simulate an inverse SRF cavity and investigate the effect of coating it with magnesium diboride layer on the vortex penetration field. A significant enhancement of Hvp was observed. At 2.8 K, Hvp increased from 2100 Oe for an uncoated Nb ellipsoid to 2700 Oe for a Nb ellipsoid coated with 200 nm thick MgB2 thin film. This finding creates a new route towards achieving higher acceleration gradient in SRF cavity accelerator beyond the theoretical limit of bulk Nb.

  10. High temperature superconductor accelerator magnets

    van Nugteren, J.

    2016-01-01

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding 20T. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and

  11. Niobium based coatings for dental implants

    Ramirez, G., E-mail: enggiova@hotmail.com [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Facultad de Quimica, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Arzate, H. [Laboratorio de Biologia Celular y Molecular, Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Olaya, J.J. [Unidad de Materiales, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Cra. 30 45-03 Bogota (Colombia)

    2011-01-15

    Niobium based thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) substrates to evaluate them as possible biocompatible surfaces that might improve the biocompatibility and extend the life time of stainless steel dental implants. Niobium nitride and niobium oxide thin films were deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering under standard deposition conditions without substrate bias or heating. The biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated by testing the cellular adhesion and viability/proliferation of human cementoblasts during different culture times, up to 7 days. The response of the films was compared to the bare substrate and pieces of Ti6Al4V; the most commonly used implant material for orthopedics and osteo-synthesis applications. The physicochemical properties of the films were evaluated by different means; X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results suggested that the niobium oxide films were amorphous and of stoichiometric Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} (a-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}), while the niobium nitride films were crystalline in the FCC phase (c-NbN) and were also stoichiometric with an Nb to N ratio of one. The biological evaluation showed that the biocompatibility of the SS could be improved by any of the two films, but neither was better than the Ti6Al4V alloy. On the other hand, comparing the two films, the c-NbN seemed to be a better surface than the oxide in terms of the adhesion and proliferation of human cemetoblasts.

  12. Calculating the Jc, B, T surface for commercial niobium tin conductors using a reduced state model

    Green, M.A.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents a method for calculating the J c , B, T critical surface for commercial grade niobium tin given an effective T c and B c2 and J c over a range of magnetic inductions B. Given the effective T c and B c2 and J c , one can estimate the J c over a range of magnetic inductions from 0.1 T to 0.8 times effective B c2 and a range of temperatures from 1.5 K to about 14 K. The effects of conductor strain can also be estimated using the method. A comparison between calculated values of J c and measurements is illustrated for a number of cases. The method presented in this report can be used to estimate the performance of niobium tin in magnets at temperatures different from those where measured data is available. The method of calculating the J c can also be used to estimate the effects of superconductor magnetization on the field quality at low fields

  13. Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors Resources with in Superconductors Measured by Electron Tunneling; Physical Review Letters, Vol. 5 Issue 4: 147 - 148 ; August 15, 1960 Electron Tunneling Between Two Superconductors; Physical Review Letters, Vol. 5 Issue 10

  14. Granular Superconductors and Gravity

    Noever, David; Koczor, Ron

    1999-01-01

    As a Bose condensate, superconductors provide novel conditions for revisiting previously proposed couplings between electromagnetism and gravity. Strong variations in Cooper pair density, large conductivity and low magnetic permeability define superconductive and degenerate condensates without the traditional density limits imposed by the Fermi energy (approx. 10(exp -6) g cu cm). Recent experiments have reported anomalous weight loss for a test mass suspended above a rotating Type II, YBCO superconductor, with a relatively high percentage change (0.05-2.1%) independent of the test mass' chemical composition and diamagnetic properties. A variation of 5 parts per 104 was reported above a stationary (non-rotating) superconductor. In experiments using a sensitive gravimeter, bulk YBCO superconductors were stably levitated in a DC magnetic field and exposed without levitation to low-field strength AC magnetic fields. Changes in observed gravity signals were measured to be less than 2 parts in 108 of the normal gravitational acceleration. Given the high sensitivity of the test, future work will examine variants on the basic magnetic behavior of granular superconductors, with particular focus on quantifying their proposed importance to gravity.

  15. Multiwall carbon nanotube Josephson junctions with niobium contacts

    Pallecchi, Emiliano

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is the investigation of dissipationless supercurrent in multiwall carbon nanotubes embedded in a controlled environment. The experimental observation of a dissipationless supercurrent in gated carbon nanotubes remains challenging because of its extreme sensitivity to the environment and to noise fluctuations. We address these issues by choosing niobium as a superconductor and by designing an optimized on chip electromagnetic environment. The environment is meant to reduce the suppression of the supercurrent and allows to disentangle the effects of thermal fluctuations from the intrinsic behavior of the junction. This is crucial for the extraction of the value critical current from the measured data. When the transparency of the contacts is high enough we observed a fully developed supercurrent and we found that it depends on the gate voltage in a resonant manner. In average the critical current increases when the gate is tuned more negative, reflecting the increase of the transparency of the contacts, while the resonant behavior is due to quantum interference effects. We measured the temperature dependence of the switching current and we analyzed the data with an extended RCSJ model that allow to extract the critical current from the experimental data. The measured critical currents are very high with respect to previous reports on gated devices. At positive gate voltage the contacts transparency is lowered and Coulomb blockade is observed. This allows to use Coulomb blockade measurements to further characterize the nanotube and to study the physics of a quantum dot coupled to superconducting leads. The last part of this thesis is dedicated to the measurements of a carbon nanotube Josephson junction in the Coulomb blockade regime. (orig.)

  16. Multiwall carbon nanotube Josephson junctions with niobium contacts

    Pallecchi, Emiliano

    2009-02-17

    The main goal of this thesis is the investigation of dissipationless supercurrent in multiwall carbon nanotubes embedded in a controlled environment. The experimental observation of a dissipationless supercurrent in gated carbon nanotubes remains challenging because of its extreme sensitivity to the environment and to noise fluctuations. We address these issues by choosing niobium as a superconductor and by designing an optimized on chip electromagnetic environment. The environment is meant to reduce the suppression of the supercurrent and allows to disentangle the effects of thermal fluctuations from the intrinsic behavior of the junction. This is crucial for the extraction of the value critical current from the measured data. When the transparency of the contacts is high enough we observed a fully developed supercurrent and we found that it depends on the gate voltage in a resonant manner. In average the critical current increases when the gate is tuned more negative, reflecting the increase of the transparency of the contacts, while the resonant behavior is due to quantum interference effects. We measured the temperature dependence of the switching current and we analyzed the data with an extended RCSJ model that allow to extract the critical current from the experimental data. The measured critical currents are very high with respect to previous reports on gated devices. At positive gate voltage the contacts transparency is lowered and Coulomb blockade is observed. This allows to use Coulomb blockade measurements to further characterize the nanotube and to study the physics of a quantum dot coupled to superconducting leads. The last part of this thesis is dedicated to the measurements of a carbon nanotube Josephson junction in the Coulomb blockade regime. (orig.)

  17. Influence of different grained powders and pellets made of Niobium and Ti-42Nb on human cell viability

    Markhoff, Jana, E-mail: markhoffj@gmail.com [University Medicine Rostock, Department of Orthopedics, Biomechanics and Implant Technology Laboratory, Doberaner Strasse 142, 18057 Rostock (Germany); Weinmann, Markus [H.C. Starck Tantalum and Niobium GmbH, Im Schleeke 78-91, 38642 Goslar (Germany); Schulze, Christian; Bader, Rainer [University Medicine Rostock, Department of Orthopedics, Biomechanics and Implant Technology Laboratory, Doberaner Strasse 142, 18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays, biomaterials can be used to maintain or replace several functions of the human body if necessary. Titanium and its alloys, i.e. Ti6Al4V are the most common materials (70 to 80%) used for structural orthopedic implants due to their unique combination of good mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Addition of β-stabilizers, e.g. niobium, can improve the mechanical properties of such titanium alloys further, simultaneously offering excellent biocompatibility. In this in vitro study, human osteoblasts and fibroblasts were cultured on different niobium specimens (Nb Amperit, Nb Ampertec), Nb sheets and Ti-42Nb (sintered and 3D-printed by selective laser melting, SLM) and compared with forged Ti6Al4V specimens. Furthermore, human osteoblasts were incubated with particulates of the Nb and Ti-42Nb specimens in three concentrations over four and seven days to imitate influence of wear debris. Thereby, the specimens with the roughest surfaces, i.e. Ti-42Nb and Nb Ampertec, revealed excellent and similar results for both cell types concerning cell viability and collagen synthesis superior to forged Ti6Al4V. Examinations with particulate debris disclosed a dose-dependent influence of all powders with Nb Ampertec showing the highest decrease of cell viability and collagen synthesis. Furthermore, interleukin synthesis was only slightly increased for all powders. In summary, Nb Ampertec (sintered Nb) and Ti-42Nb materials seem to be promising alternatives for medical applications compared to common materials like forged or melted Ti6Al4V. - Highlights: • Titanium and its alloys most common materials used for structural orthopedic implants • Addition of β-stabilizers to improve mechanical properties • Roughest surfaces, Nb ampertec and Ti-42Nb, with excellent results concerning cell viability and collagen synthesis • No cell-specific differences between human osteoblasts and fibroblasts • Niobium based powders with dose- and partly

  18. Photothermal measurements of superconductors

    Kino, G.S.; Wu, X.D.; Kapitulnik, A.; Fishman, I.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed a new photothermal technique to investigate electronic phase transitions of high temperature superconductors. The phase shift of the thermal wave yields the anisotropic thermal diffusivity coefficient of the sample. The amplitude of the photothermal signal is sensitive to electronic phase transitions of the second kind. The technique is completely noncontacting and nondestructive, and is well suited to measure small and fragile single-crystal high-T c superconductors. The measurements give good agreement with fluctuation theory near the transition temperature. They have studied diffusion in, and superconducting fluctuations of, single crystals of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ and Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 . Both systems show fluctuation effects beyond Gaussian fluctuations. While YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ behaves as a three-dimensional anisotropic superconductor, results on Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 indicate strong two-dimensional effects

  19. An unconventional colour superconductor

    Huang Mei

    2007-01-01

    Superfluidity, or superconductivity with mismatched Fermi momenta, appears in many systems such as charge-neutral dense quark matter, asymmetric nuclear matter, and in imbalanced cold atomic gases. The mismatch plays the role of breaking the Cooper pairing, and the pair-breaking state cannot be properly described in the framework of standard BCS theory. I give a brief review on recent theoretical developments in understanding unconventional colour superconductivity, including a gapless colour superconductor, chromomagnetic instabilities and the Higgs instability in the gapless phase. I also introduce a possible new framework for describing an unconventional colour superconductor

  20. Macroscopic theory of superconductors

    Carr, W.J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A macroscopic theory for bulk superconductors is developed in the framework of the theory for other magnetic materials, where ''magnetization'' current is separated from ''free'' current on the basis of scale. This contrasts with the usual separation into equilibrium and nonequilibrium currents. In the present approach magnetization, on a large macroscopic scale, results from the vortex current, while the Meissner current and other surface currents are surface contributions to the Maxwell j. The results are important for the development of thermodynamics in type-II superconductors. The advantage of the description developed here is that magnetization becomes a local concept and its associated magnetic field can be given physical meaning

  1. Study of niobium V compounds in nitric medium

    Gue, J.-P.; Kikindai, Tivadar; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92

    1976-01-01

    Nitric solutions of niobium V were studied in the range of concentrations of 5.10 -6 M to 0,5.10 -3 M in niobium and 0,4 to 10N in nitric acid. Methods used were light scattering, electron microscopy, electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. It is shown that niobium was in a colloidal hydroxide form. Solvent extraction studies were performed with dibutyl phosphoric acid diluted in dodecane. It appears that floculation of the sol occurs for weak organic acid concentrations. But if the concentration increases, the precipitated niobium compound is redissolved in the organic phase [fr

  2. Degradation of ethyl alcohol on niobium hydraxide compounds

    Artem'eva, M.A.; Maslova, E.S.; Artem'ev, Yu.M.

    1992-01-01

    Samples of niobium hydroxide were prepared from niobium(5) chloride solutions in anhydrous ethanol. Niobium hydroxide groups were applied on the surface of dispersed silica-airsilogel. Pulse microcatalytic method was used to reveal, that synthesized hydroxide catalysed ethanol decomposition at 573 K only along the direction of dehydration with formation of ethylene. Ethylene was also the main product of alcohol degradation on applied samples, and procedure of dehydration reactions was noticeable. Spectra of temperature programmed surface reactions demonstrate the similarity of acidic surface properties of these two types of samples. Hydroxide compounds of niobium and bismuth were tested for correlation. They were active during ethyl alcohol dehydrogenation

  3. Proposal of a new biokinetic model for niobium

    Oliveira, Roges

    2006-01-01

    There are two niobium isotopes generated in nuclear power plants: 95 Nb and 94 Nb. Workers and members of the public are subjects to intake these radionuclides in accident situation. For dose calculation purpose, it is very important to develop a model that describes in a more realistic way the kinetics of niobium inside of the human body. Presently the model adopted by ICRP (ICRP, 1989) is based on animal studies and describes the behavior of niobium in human being in a simple manner. The new model proposal describes the kinetics of the niobium from the intake into the blood until the excretion, doing this in a more realistic form and considering not only data from animals but data from human beings as well. For this objective, a workers group of a niobium extraction and processing industry exposed to stable niobium (93 Nb) in oxide insoluble form with associated uranium, was monitored for uranium and niobium determination in urinary and fecal excretion, by mass spectrometry. Based in the ratios of the niobium concentration in urinary and faecal excretion of this workers and animal data study, a new biokinetic model for niobium was proposed, with the followings modifications relative to ICRP model: a new compartment that represents muscular tissue; the fractions which are deposited into the compartment are modified; a third component in the retention equation of the bone tissue; introduction of recirculation between organs and blood. The new model was applied for a case of accidental intake and described adequately the experimental data

  4. Development of high purity niobium material for superconducting cavities

    Umezawa, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Koichi; Sakita, Kohei; Suzuki, Takafusa; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi.

    1993-01-01

    For the superconducting niobium cavities, issues of thermal quench and field emission have to be solved to achieve a high field gradient (>25MV/m) for TESLA (TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator). In order to overcome the quench, upgrading of thermal conductivity of niobium material at the low temperature is very important. On the reduction of the field emission not only dust particles but also defect, impurity and inhomogeneity should be considered. Therefore development of high purity niobium material is very important to solve these issues. This paper describes the our latest R and D for high purity niobium material. (author)

  5. Impurity dependence of superconductivity in niobium

    Laa, C.

    1984-04-01

    Jump temperatures, the critical fields Hsubc and Hsubc 2 and specific heats were measured on niobium samples where the impurity content was systematically varied by loading with nitrogen. Quantities could thus be extrapolated to lattice perfection and absolute purity. Comparisons with theories were made and some parameters extracted. Agreement was found with Gorkov theory for small impurities. A new value of the Ginsburg-Landau parameter Ko was determined to be just above 1/sqrt2 which proves that niobium is an elementary Type II semiconductor. By comparisons with the BCS and the CLAC theory the values of the mean Fermi velocity, the London penetration depth, the BCS coherence length and the impurity parameter were extracted. (G.Q.)

  6. Niobium and hafnium grown on porous membranes

    Morant, C.; Marquez, F.; Campo, T.; Sanz, J.M.; Elizalde, E.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we report on a method for fabricating highly ordered nanostructures of niobium and hafnium metals by physical vapour deposition using two different templates: anodized aluminum oxide membranes (AAO) and zirconium onto AAO membranes (Zr/AAO). The growth mechanism of these metal nanostructures is clearly different depending on the material used as a template. A different morphology was obtained by using AAO or Zr/AAO templates: when the metal is deposited onto AAO membranes, nanospheres with ordered hexagonal regularity are obtained; however, when the metal is deposited onto a Zr/AAO template, highly ordered nanocones are formed. The experimental approach described in this work is simple and suitable for synthesizing nanospheres or nanoholes of niobium and hafnium metals in a highly ordered structure.

  7. Tunneling measurements in amorphous layers of superconducting transition metals: molybdenum, vanadium, and niobium

    Roll, U.

    1981-01-01

    Tunneling experiments with amorphous Molybdenum and Vanadium layers are presented, showing no significant increase of the reduced energy gap 2δ(O)/kTsub(c)(δ) compared with the BCS-value, in contrast to all previous measurement on amorphous superconducting materials of simple s-p-metals, showing on enhanced electron-phonon-interaction. This fact may lead to the conclusion that the strong electron-phonon coupling is caused by the amorphous structure of the superconductor. The present results, however, indicate that the strong electron-phonon interaction cannot be explained only ba the amorphous structure of the superconductor. In the measurements of the second derivative d 2 U/dI 2 no phonon-induced structures have been observed for amorphous molybdenum, vanadium and niobium films. Apparently the phonon density of states F(#betta#) of amorphous transition metals has no structure, thus the longitudinal and transverse phonons cannot be identified in the measured (d 2 U/dI 2 )-curves. This particular behaviour of the amorphous transition metals in contrast to the simple s-p-metals may be interpreted by the strongly localized d-electrons. (orig./GG) [de

  8. Defect studies of H+ implanted niobium

    Prochazka, I.; Čížek, J.; Havránek, Vladimír; Anwand, W.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 645, SI1 (2015), s. 69-71 ISSN 0925-8388. [14th International Symposium on Metal-Hydrogen Systems (MH). Salford, 20.07.2014-25.07.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Niobium * Hydrogen * defects * Positron annihilation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.014, year: 2015

  9. Hydrogen solubility in polycrystalline - and nonocrystalline niobium

    Ishikawa, T.T.; Silva, J.R.G. da

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen solubility in polycrystalline and monocrystalline niobium was measured in the range 400 0 C to 1000 0 C at one atmosphere hydrogen partial pressure. The experimental technique consists of saturation of the solvent metal with hydrogen, followed by quenching and analysis of the solid solution. It is presented solubility curves versus reciprocal of the absolute doping temperature, associated with their thermodynamical equation. (Author) [pt

  10. Superconducting parameters of polycrystalline niobium films

    Kandyba, P.E.; Kolesnikov, D.P.; Tkachev, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    The niobium semi-crystalline films, having a thickness of 200-5,050 A have been studied. The films have been produced by the electron-beam evaporation in the oilless vacuum and by the ionic plasma spraying with diode and triode methods. Determined have been the coherence length, the magnetic field penetration depth and the Ginsburg-andau parameter. An attempt is made to determine the electron states density of the Fermi surface

  11. ROUGHNESS ANALYSIS OF VARIOUSLY POLISHED NIOBIUM SURFACES

    Ribeill, G.; Reece, C.

    2008-01-01

    Niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities have gained widespread use in accelerator systems. It has been shown that surface roughness is a determining factor in the cavities’ effi ciency and maximum accelerating potential achievable through this technology. Irregularities in the surface can lead to spot heating, undesirable local electrical fi eld enhancement and electron multipacting. Surface quality is typically ensured through the use of acid etching in a Buffered Chemical Polish (BCP) bath and electropolishing (EP). In this study, the effects of these techniques on surface morphology have been investigated in depth. The surface of niobium samples polished using different combinations of these techniques has been characterized through atomic force microscopy (AFM) and stylus profi lometry across a range of length scales. The surface morphology was analyzed using spectral techniques to determine roughness and characteristic dimensions. Experimentation has shown that this method is a valuable tool that provides quantitative information about surface roughness at different length scales. It has demonstrated that light BCP pretreatment and lower electrolyte temperature favors a smoother electropolish. These results will allow for the design of a superior polishing process for niobium SRF cavities and therefore increased accelerator operating effi ciency and power.

  12. Structural phase transitions in niobium oxide nanocrystals

    Yuvakkumar, R.; Hong, Sun Ig

    2015-09-01

    Niobium oxide nanocrystals were successfully synthesized employing the green synthesis method. Phase formation, microstructure and compositional properties of 1, 4 and 7 days incubation treated samples after calcinations at 450 °C were examined using X-ray diffraction, Raman, photoluminescence (PL), infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectra and transmission electron microscopic characterizations. It was observed that phase formation of Nb2O5 nanocrystals was dependent upon the incubation period required to form stable metal oxides. The characteristic results clearly revealed that with increasing incubation and aging, the transformation of cubic, orthorhombic and monoclinic phases were observed. The uniform heating at room temperature (32 °C) and the ligation of niobium atoms due to higher phenolic constituents of utilized rambutan during aging processing plays a vital role in structural phase transitions in niobium oxide nanocrystals. The defects over a period of incubation and the intensities of the PL spectra changing over a period of aging were related to the amount of the defects induced by the phase transition.

  13. Fatigue behavior of niobium--hydrogen alloys

    Chung, D.W.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on room temperature fatigue behavior of niobium were investigated under both high frequency stress control and low frequency strain control conditions, in air. Hydrogen markedly improved the fatigue life in high frequency tests, while low frequency tests resulted in decreased fatigue life with increasing hydrogen content. Notches in hydrogen-charged alloys reduced high cycle life significantly but had little effect on low cycle tests. Fracture surfaces of annealed niobium mainly exhibited striations, with numerous cracks originating at troughs of striated bands in both stress and strain control tests. The fracture mode for alloys with hydrogen in solution was mixed, with striations interspersed with cleavage facets at high frequencies but generally cleavage steps at low frequencies. For the hydrided alloys, distinctive steps of mixed ductile-brittle appearance were revealed under high frequency conditions, but large cleavage facets only were observed for low frequency tests. The results are discussed in terms of the effects of hydrogen on the cyclic strain hardening rate, as well as on fatigue strength and ductility of niobium

  14. Electrical and electrochemical properties of niobium disulphide

    Molenda, J.; Bak, T.; Marzec, J. [Academy of Min. and Metall., Cracow (Poland). Dept. of Chem. of Solids

    1996-07-16

    The electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power measurements of NbS{sub 2} pure and electrochemically doped with lithium, Li{sub x}NbS{sub 2}, were done as a function of temperature (77 to 300 K). The high absolute values of conductivity and their dependence on temperature together with low absolute values of thermoelectric power and their linear increase with temperature indicate metallic properties of niobium disulphide. In case of Li{sub x}NbS{sub 2} the obtained values of electrical conductivity are significantly lower as compared with the starting NbS{sub 2}. The temperature dependence of the thermo-electric power of intercalated niobium disulphide also indicates that metallic properties get worse as the concentration of lithium increases. The modification of the electronic structure of NbS{sub 2} due to lithium intercalation was proposed. The character of the discharge curves in the electrochemical Li/Li{sup +}/Li{sub x}NbS{sub 2} systems was correlated with the electronic properties of niobium disulphide. (orig.) 11 refs.

  15. Classical spins in superconductors

    Shiba, H [Tokyo Univ.; Maki, K

    1968-08-01

    It is shown that there exists a localized excited state in the energy gap in a superconductor with a classical spin. At finite concentration localized excited states around classical spins form an impurity band. The process of growth of the impurity band and its effects on observable quantities are investigated.

  16. Superconductors and medical imaging

    Aubert, Guy

    2011-01-01

    After difficult beginnings in the 1970's, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved to become nowadays the jewel in the crown of medical technology. Superconductors have been a key factor for the extraordinary expansion of MRI which in turn represents about 75 % of their total market. After recalling some basic principles, this article traces their common history and refers to future developments. (author)

  17. Irradiation damage in superconductors

    Quere, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Most superconductors are quite sensitive to irradiation defects. Critical temperatures may be depressed, critical currents may be increased, by irradiation, but other behaviours may be encountered. In compounds, the sublattice in which defects are created is of significant importance. 24 refs

  18. Imaging of topological magnetic pinning in superconductor-ferrimagnet bilayer with scanning Hall microscopy

    Marchevsky, M; Higgins, M J; Bhattacharya, S; Fratello, V J

    2011-01-01

    In a superconducting film deposited on ferromagnetic substrate with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, vortex matter is confined by the magnetic potential landscape. Using scanning Hall microscopy we visualize flux accumulation and removal in a superconductor-ferrimagnet (S/F) bilayer prepared by rf sputtering of thin niobium film on bismuth-doped rare-earth iron garnet. Penetration of the perpendicular magnetic field in the S/F bilayer follows magnetic domain boundaries and is laterally guided by the garnet magnetization component along the field direction. Upon field removal, localization of the remnant flux at the disclination points of the labyrinthine domain pattern is observed. Our experiments show evidence for strong vortex pinning due the special topology of the domain pattern. Ac magnetic imaging of the transport current distribution in the bilayer reveals complex flow paths commensurate with the magnetic domain boundaries. Topological magnetic pinning can be a useful tool for enhancement and control of critical current in thin film superconductors.

  19. Imaging of topological magnetic pinning in superconductor-ferrimagnet bilayer with scanning Hall microscopy

    Marchevsky, M [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 12344 (United States); Higgins, M J [Princeton High School, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Bhattacharya, S [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Fratello, V J, E-mail: mmartchevskii@lbl.gov [Integrated Photonics, Inc., Hillsborough, NJ 08844 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    In a superconducting film deposited on ferromagnetic substrate with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, vortex matter is confined by the magnetic potential landscape. Using scanning Hall microscopy we visualize flux accumulation and removal in a superconductor-ferrimagnet (S/F) bilayer prepared by rf sputtering of thin niobium film on bismuth-doped rare-earth iron garnet. Penetration of the perpendicular magnetic field in the S/F bilayer follows magnetic domain boundaries and is laterally guided by the garnet magnetization component along the field direction. Upon field removal, localization of the remnant flux at the disclination points of the labyrinthine domain pattern is observed. Our experiments show evidence for strong vortex pinning due the special topology of the domain pattern. Ac magnetic imaging of the transport current distribution in the bilayer reveals complex flow paths commensurate with the magnetic domain boundaries. Topological magnetic pinning can be a useful tool for enhancement and control of critical current in thin film superconductors.

  20. A sourcebook of titanium alloy superconductivity

    Collings, E W

    1983-01-01

    In less than two decades the concept of supercon­ In every field of science there are one or two ductivity has been transformed from a laboratory individuals whose dedication, combined with an innate curiosity to usable large-scale applications. In the understanding, permits them to be able to grasp, late 1960's the concept of filamentary stabilization condense, and explain to the rest of us what that released the usefulness of zero resistance into the field is all about. For the field of titanium alloy marketplace, and the economic forces that drive tech­ superconductivity, such an individual is Ted Collings. nology soon focused on niobium-titanium alloys. They His background as a metallurgist has perhaps given him are ductile and thus fabricable into practical super­ a distinct advantage in understanding superconduc­ conducting wires that have the critical currents and tivity in titanium alloys because the optimization of fields necessary for large-scale devices. More than superconducting parameters in ...

  1. A New Vacuum Brazing Route for Niobium-316L Stainless Steel Transition Joints for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Kumar, Abhay; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Bhatnagar, V. K.; Yedle, K.; Ram Sankar, P.; Sindal, B. K.; Kumar, K. V. A. N. P. S.; Singh, M. K.; Rai, S. K.; Bose, A.; Veerbhadraiah, T.; Ramteke, S.; Sridhar, R.; Mundra, G.; Joshi, S. C.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2015-02-01

    The paper describes a new approach for vacuum brazing of niobium-316L stainless steel transition joints for application in superconducting radiofrequency cavities. The study exploited good wettability of titanium-activated silver-base brazing alloy (CuSil-ABA®), along with nickel as a diffusion barrier, to suppress brittle Fe-Nb intermetallic formation, which is well reported during the established vacuum brazing practice using pure copper filler. The brazed specimens displayed no brittle intermetallic layers on any of its interfaces, but instead carried well-distributed intermetallic particles in the ductile matrix. The transition joints displayed room temperature tensile and shear strengths of 122-143 MPa and 80-113 MPa, respectively. The joints not only exhibited required hermeticity (helium leak rate high vacuum but also withstood twelve hour degassing heat treatment at 873 K (suppresses Q-disease in niobium cavities), without any noticeable degradation in the microstructure and the hermeticity. The joints retained their leak tightness even after undergoing ten thermal cycles between the room temperature and the liquid nitrogen temperature, thereby establishing their ability to withstand service-induced low cycle fatigue conditions. The study proposes a new lower temperature brazing route to form niobium-316L stainless steel transition joints, with improved microstructural characteristics and acceptable hermeticity and mechanical properties.

  2. Accurate X-ray diffraction studies of KTiOPO{sub 4} single crystals doped with niobium

    Novikova, N. E., E-mail: natnov@ns.crys.ras.ru; Sorokina, N. I.; Alekseeva, O. A.; Verin, I. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Crystallography and Photonics Federal Scientific Research Center (Russian Federation); Kharitonova, E. P.; Orlova, E. I.; Voronkova, V. I. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    Single crystals of potassium titanyl phosphate doped with 4% of niobium (КТР:4%Nb) and 6% of niobium (KTP:6%Nb) are studied by accurate X-ray diffraction at room temperature. The niobium atoms are localized near the Ti1 and Ti2 atomic positions, and their positions are for the first time refined independent of the titanium atomic positions. Maps of difference electron density in the vicinity of K1 and K2 atomic positions are analyzed. It is found that in the structure of crystal КТР:4%Nb, additional positions of K atoms are located farther from the main positions and from each other than in КТР and KTP:6%Nb crystals. The nonuniform distribution of electron density found in the channels of the КТР:4%Nb structure is responsible for ~20% increase in the signal of second harmonic generation.

  3. Characterization and Catalytic Performance of Niobic Acid Dispersed over Titanium Silicalite

    Didik Prasetyoko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Niobic acid, Nb2O5⋅nH2O, has been supported on the titanium silicalite by impregnation method. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared, and ultra-violet—visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, temperature programmed reduction, pyridine adsorption, and field emission scanning electron microscopy techniques. It was demonstrated that the tetrahedral titanium species still retained after impregnation of niobic acid. The results revealed that niobium species interacted with hydroxyl groups on the surface of TS-1. The niobium species in the catalysts are predominantly polymerized niobium oxides species or bulk niobium oxide with the octahedral structure. All catalysts showed both Brønsted and Lewis acid sites. The catalysts have been tested for epoxidation of 1-octene with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. It was found that the presence of niobic acid in the catalysts enhanced the rate of the formation of epoxide at the initial reaction time. Diol as a side product was also observed due to the acidic properties of the catalysts.

  4. Opportunities in the electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available used, the following forms of titanium are produced: titanium sponge, sintered electrode sponge, powder, molten titanium, electroplated titanium, hydride powder, and vapor-phase depos- ited titanium. Comparing the economics of alter- native...-up for producing titanium via the Kroll process is approximately as follows: ilmenite ($0.27/kg titanium sponge); titanium slag ($0.75/kg titanium sponge); TiCl4 ($3.09/kg titanium sponge); titanium sponge raw materials costs ($5.50/kg titanium sponge); total...

  5. Mining, ore preparation and niobium alloys production at Araxa, Brazil

    Paraiso, O.S.; Fuccio Junior, R. de; Betz, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed description of the worlds major niobium producer is presented covering mining, concentration by froth flotation, leaching, and production of ferro-alloys. The present exploration of the Araxa deposit, its ore preparation and production of ferro-niobium is described. (E.G.) [pt

  6. Diffusion of oxygen in niobium during bake-out

    Calatroni, Sergio; Ruzinov, V

    2001-01-01

    Bake-outs at temperatures between 100 C and 150 C for a duration up to two days have become customary for optimising the performance of bulk niobium cavities. This treatment results in the diffusion of oxygen, originating from the surface oxide, into the niobium. The theoretical oxygen profile has been simulated using the diffusion equations, and compared with some experimental results.

  7. Processing of Niobium-Lined M240 Machine Gun Barrels

    2014-11-01

    Fig. 5 Finished niobium-lined M240 machine gun barrel with flash suppressor attached ..........11 Fig. 6 End of barrel 1 showing small amount of...the finished barrel is shown in Fig. 5. 11 Fig. 5 Finished niobium-lined M240 machine gun barrel with flash suppressor attached Firing tests

  8. Iron pnictide superconductors

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co x Fe 1-x )PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr 2 Si 2 -type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba 0.6 K 0.4 Fe 2 As 2 , is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba 1-x K x )Fe 2 As 2 is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe 2 As 2 and EuFe 2 As 2 are characterised and the superconductors Sr 1-x K x Fe 2 As 2 and Ca 1-x Na x Fe 2 As 2 are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se 1-x Te x ) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr 3 Sc 2 O 5 Fe 2 As 2 are presented and Ba 2 ScO 3 FeAs and Sr 2 CrO 3 FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr 2 CrO 3 FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound is given. Finally, the superconductor Sr 2 VO 3 FeAs is scrutinised and necessary prerequisites for superconductivity in this compound are suggested. (orig.)

  9. "Fluctuoscopy" of Superconductors

    Varlamov, A. A.

    Study of fluctuation phenomena in superconductors (SCs) is the subject of great fundamental and practical importance. Understanding of their physics allowed to clear up the fundamental properties of SC state. Being predicted in 1968, one of the fluctuation effects, namely paraconductivity, was experimentally observed almost simultaneously. Since this time, fluctuations became a noticeable part of research in the field of superconductivity, and a variety of fluctuation effects have been discovered. The new wave of interest to fluctuations (FL) in superconductors was generated by the discovery of cuprate oxide superconductors (high-temperature superconductors, HTS), where, due to extremely short coherence length and low effective dimensionality of the electron system, superconductive fluctuations manifest themselves in a wide range of temperatures. Moreover, anomalous properties of the normal state of HTS were attributed by many theorists to strong FL in these systems. Being studied in the framework of the phenomenological Ginzburg-Landau theory and, more extensively, in diagrammatic microscopic approach, SC FLs side by side with other quantum corrections (weak localization, etc.) became a new tool for investigation and characterization of such new systems as HTS, disordered electron systems, granular metals, Josephson structures, artificial super-lattices, etc. The characteristic feature of SC FL is their strong dependence on temperature and magnetic fields in the vicinity of phase transition. This allows one to definitely separate the fluctuation effects from other contributions and to use them as the source of information about the microscopic parameters of a material. By their origin, SC FLs are very sensitive to relaxation processes, which break phase coherence. This allows using them for versatile characterization of SC. Today, one can speak about the " fluctuoscopy" of superconductive systems. In review, we present the qualitative picture both of thermodynamic

  10. Measuring condensate fraction in superconductors

    Chakravarty, Sudip; Kee, Hae-Young

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of off-diagonal long-range order in superconductors shows that the spin-spin correlation function is significantly influenced by the order if the order parameter is anisotropic on a microscopic scale. Thus, magnetic neutron scattering can provide a direct measurement of the condensate fraction of a superconductor. It is also argued that recent measurements in high-temperature superconductors come very close to achieving this goal. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  11. Processing of Mixed Oxide Superconductors

    1990-07-01

    rapid changes world wide a major research centre on high Tc superconductors was awarded to Cambridge which involved moving the work and people to a...reports and paper is in the appendices. Separation Ceramic superconductors tend to be mixtures of phases, especially when first discovered. It would...properties of the superconducting state will in principle allow superconducting material to be levitated from the non superconductor and several designs

  12. Superconductor stability 90: A review

    Dresner, L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews some recent developments in the field of stability of superconductors. The main topics dealt with are hydrodynamic phenomena in cable-in-conduit superconductors, namely, multiple stability, quench pressure, thermal expulsion, and thermal hydraulic quenchback, traveling normal zones in large, composite conductors, such as those intended for SMES, and the stability of vapor-cooled leads made of high-temperature superconductors. 31 refs., 5 figs

  13. Studies of niobium and development of niobium resonant RF cavities for accelerator driven system

    Mondal, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    The present approach for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is to roll and deep draw sheets of polycrystalline high-purity niobium. Jefferson Laboratory pioneered the use of large-grain/single-crystal Nb directly sliced from an ingot for the fabrication of single-crystal high-purity Nb SRF cavities. The large grain/single crystal niobium has several potential advantages over the polycrystalline niobium and has become a viable alternative to the standard fine grain (ASTM grain size>6 μm), high purity (RRR ≥ 250 ) niobium for the fabrication of high-performance SRF cavities for particle accelerators. The present study includes the prototype single cell low beta cavity design, fabrication, EB welding and low temperature RF test at 2K. In this study also the medium field Q-Slope has been analyzed with the help of an added non linear term in Heabel's analytical model and a linear increase of surface resistance Rs with the magnetic field

  14. Direct atomic absorption determination of silicon in metallic niobium

    Blinova, Eh.S.; Guzeev, I.D.; Nedler, V.V.; Khokhrin, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration is being given to realization of the basic advantage of non-flame atomizer-analysis of directly solid samples-for silicon determination in niobium for the content of the first one of less than 1x10 -3 mass %. Analysis technique is described. Diagrams of the dependences of atomic silicon absorption in graphite cells of usual type as well as lined by tungsten carbide and atomic silicon absorption on the value of niobium weighed amount are presented. It is shown that Si determination in metallic niobium according to aqueous reference solutions results in understatement of results 2.4 times. The optimal conditions for Si determination in niobium are the following: 2400 deg C temperature, absence of carbon and oxygen. Different niobium specimens with the known silicon content were used as reference samples

  15. Titanium–35niobium alloy as a potential material for biomedical implants: In vitro study

    Perez de Andrade, Dennia; Marotta Reis de Vasconcellos, Luana; Chaves Silva Carvalho, Isabel; Ferraz de Brito Penna Forte, Lilibeth; Souza Santos, Evelyn Luzia de; Falchete do Prado, Renata; Santos, Dalcy Roberto dos; Alves Cairo, Carlos Alberto; Rodarte Carvalho, Yasmin

    2015-01-01

    Research on new titanium alloys and different surface topographies aims to improve osseointegration. The objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of osteogenic cells cultivated on porous and dense samples of titanium–niobium alloys, and to compare them with the behavior of such type of cells on commercial pure titanium. Samples prepared using powder metallurgy were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and metallographic and profilometer analyses. Osteogenic cells from newborn rat calvaria were plated over different groups: dense or porous samples composed of Ti or Ti–35niobium (Nb). Cell adhesion, cell proliferation, MTT assay, cell morphology, protein total content, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization nodules were assessed. Results from XRD and EDS analysis confirmed the presence of Ti and Nb in the test alloy. Metallographic analysis revealed interconnected pores, with pore size ranging from 138 to 150 μm. The profilometer analysis detected the greatest rugosity within the dense alloy samples. In vitro tests revealed similar biocompatibility between Ti–35Nb and Ti; furthermore, it was possible to verify that the association of porous surface topography and the Ti–35Nb alloy positively influenced mineralized matrix formation. We propose that the Ti–35Nb alloy with porous topography constitutes a biocompatible material with great potential for use in biomedical implants. - Highlights: • Powder metallurgy is effective in producing porous biomaterials. • Ti–35Nb alloy improved mineralized matrix formation. • Porous surface favored a multidirectional pattern of cell spreading. • Porous surface Ti–35Nb alloy appears to be more favorable to bone formation than existing alloys

  16. Titanium–35niobium alloy as a potential material for biomedical implants: In vitro study

    Perez de Andrade, Dennia; Marotta Reis de Vasconcellos, Luana; Chaves Silva Carvalho, Isabel; Ferraz de Brito Penna Forte, Lilibeth; Souza Santos, Evelyn Luzia de [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil); Falchete do Prado, Renata, E-mail: renatafalchete@hotmail.com [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil); Santos, Dalcy Roberto dos; Alves Cairo, Carlos Alberto [Division of Materials, Air and Space Institute, CTA, Praça Mal. do Ar Eduardo Gomes, 14, São José dos Campos 12904-000, SP (Brazil); Rodarte Carvalho, Yasmin [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-01

    Research on new titanium alloys and different surface topographies aims to improve osseointegration. The objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of osteogenic cells cultivated on porous and dense samples of titanium–niobium alloys, and to compare them with the behavior of such type of cells on commercial pure titanium. Samples prepared using powder metallurgy were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and metallographic and profilometer analyses. Osteogenic cells from newborn rat calvaria were plated over different groups: dense or porous samples composed of Ti or Ti–35niobium (Nb). Cell adhesion, cell proliferation, MTT assay, cell morphology, protein total content, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization nodules were assessed. Results from XRD and EDS analysis confirmed the presence of Ti and Nb in the test alloy. Metallographic analysis revealed interconnected pores, with pore size ranging from 138 to 150 μm. The profilometer analysis detected the greatest rugosity within the dense alloy samples. In vitro tests revealed similar biocompatibility between Ti–35Nb and Ti; furthermore, it was possible to verify that the association of porous surface topography and the Ti–35Nb alloy positively influenced mineralized matrix formation. We propose that the Ti–35Nb alloy with porous topography constitutes a biocompatible material with great potential for use in biomedical implants. - Highlights: • Powder metallurgy is effective in producing porous biomaterials. • Ti–35Nb alloy improved mineralized matrix formation. • Porous surface favored a multidirectional pattern of cell spreading. • Porous surface Ti–35Nb alloy appears to be more favorable to bone formation than existing alloys.

  17. High Temperature Superconductor Resonator Detectors

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) infrared detectors were studied for years but never matured sufficiently for infusion into instruments. Several recent...

  18. Generation of amorphous ceramic capacitor coatings on titanium using a continuous sol-gel process

    Dixon, B.G.; Walsh, M.A. III; Phillips, P.G.; Morris, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Thin amorphous films of ceramic capacitor materials were successfully deposited using sol-gel chemistry onto titanium wire using a continuous, computer controlled process. By repeatedly depositing and calcining very thin layers of material, smooth and even coats can be produced. Surface analyses revealed the layered nature of these thin coats, as well as the amorphous nature of the ceramic. The electrical properties of the better coatings, all composed of niobium, bismuth, zinc oxides, were then evaluated. copyright 1995 Materials Research Society

  19. Precipitation behavior during thin slab thermomechanical processing and isothermal aging of copper-bearing niobium-microalloyed high strength structural steels: The effect on mechanical properties

    Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); Jia, Z. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); O' Malley, R. [Nucor Steel Decatur, LLC Sheet Mill, 4301, Iverson Blvd., Trinity, AL 35673 (United States); Jansto, S.J. [CBMM-Reference Metals Company, 1000 Old Pond Road, Bridgeville, PA 15017 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Copper does not significantly influence toughness. {yields} Copper precipitation during aging occurs at dislocations. {yields} Precipitation of copper and carbides is mutually exclusive. - Abstract: We describe here the precipitation behavior of copper and fine-scale carbides during thermo-mechanical processing and isothermal aging of copper-bearing niobium-microalloyed high strength steels. During thermo-mechanical processing, precipitation of {epsilon}-copper occurs in polygonal ferrite and at the austenite-ferrite interface. In contrast, during isothermal aging, nucleation of {epsilon}-copper precipitation occurs at dislocations. In the three different chemistries investigated, the increase in strength associated with copper during aging results only in a small decrease in impact toughness, implying that copper precipitates do not seriously impair toughness, and can be considered as a viable strengthening element in microalloyed steels. Precipitation of fine-scale niobium carbides occurs extensively at dislocations and within ferrite matrix together with vanadium carbides. In the presence of titanium, titanium carbides act as a nucleus for niobium carbide formation. Irrespective of the nature of carbides, copper precipitates and carbides are mutually exclusive.

  20. Precipitation behavior during thin slab thermomechanical processing and isothermal aging of copper-bearing niobium-microalloyed high strength structural steels: The effect on mechanical properties

    Misra, R.D.K.; Jia, Z.; O'Malley, R.; Jansto, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Copper does not significantly influence toughness. → Copper precipitation during aging occurs at dislocations. → Precipitation of copper and carbides is mutually exclusive. - Abstract: We describe here the precipitation behavior of copper and fine-scale carbides during thermo-mechanical processing and isothermal aging of copper-bearing niobium-microalloyed high strength steels. During thermo-mechanical processing, precipitation of ε-copper occurs in polygonal ferrite and at the austenite-ferrite interface. In contrast, during isothermal aging, nucleation of ε-copper precipitation occurs at dislocations. In the three different chemistries investigated, the increase in strength associated with copper during aging results only in a small decrease in impact toughness, implying that copper precipitates do not seriously impair toughness, and can be considered as a viable strengthening element in microalloyed steels. Precipitation of fine-scale niobium carbides occurs extensively at dislocations and within ferrite matrix together with vanadium carbides. In the presence of titanium, titanium carbides act as a nucleus for niobium carbide formation. Irrespective of the nature of carbides, copper precipitates and carbides are mutually exclusive.

  1. Neutron Depolarization in Superconductors

    Zhuchenko, N. K.

    1995-04-01

    The dependences of neutron depolarization on applied magnetic field are deduced along the magnetization hysteresis loop in terms of the Bean model of the critical state. The depolarization in uniaxial superconductors with the reversible magnetization, including uniaxial magnetic superconductors, is also considered. A strong depolarization is expected if the neutrons travel along the vortex lines. On calcule la dépendance en champ magnétique de la dépolarisation des neutrons le long du cycle d'hystérésis en termes du modèle critique de Bean. On considère aussi la dépolarisation dans les supraconducteurs uniaxiaux en fonction de l'aimantation réversible, y compris pour les supraconducteurs magnétiques. On attend une forte dépolarisation si les neutrons se propagent le long des vortex.

  2. Vortices and nanostructured superconductors

    2017-01-01

    This book provides expert coverage of modern and novel aspects of the study of vortex matter, dynamics, and pinning in nanostructured and multi-component superconductors. Vortex matter in superconducting materials is a field of enormous beauty and intellectual challenge, which began with the theoretical prediction of vortices by A. Abrikosov (Nobel Laureate). Vortices, vortex dynamics, and pinning are key features in many of today’s human endeavors: from the huge superconducting accelerating magnets and detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which opened new windows of knowledge on the universe, to the tiny superconducting transceivers using Rapid Single Flux Quanta, which have opened a revolutionary means of communication. In recent years, two new features have added to the intrinsic beauty and complexity of the subject: nanostructured/nanoengineered superconductors, and the discovery of a range of new materials showing multi-component (multi-gap) superconductivity. In this book, leading researche...

  3. Fast fluence measurement for JOYO irradiation field using niobium dosimeter

    Ito, Chikara

    2004-03-01

    Neutron fluence and spectrum are key parameters in various irradiation tests and material surveillance tests so they need to be evaluated accurately. The reactor dosimetry test has been conducted by the multiple foil activation method, and a niobium dosimeter has been developed for measurement of fast neutron fluence in the experimental fast reactor JOYO. The inelastic scattering reaction of 93 Nb has a low threshold energy, about 30 keV, and the energy distribution of reaction cross section is similar to the displacement cross section for iron. Therefore, a niobium dosimeter is suitable for evaluation of the fast neutron fluence and the displacement per atom for iron. Moreover, a niobium dosimeter is suited to measure neutron fluence in long-term irradiation test because 93 Nb, which is produced by the reaction, has a long half-life (16.4 years). This study established a high precision measurement technique using the niobium reaction rate. The effect of self-absorption was decreased by the solution and evaporation to dryness of niobium dosimeter. The dosimeter weight was precisely measured using the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. This technique was applied to JOYO dosimetry. The fast neutron fluences (E > 0.1 MeV) found by measuring the reaction rate in the niobium dosimeter were compared with the values evaluated using the multiple foil activation method. The ratio of measured fast neutron fluences by means of niobium dosimeter and multiple foil activation method range from 0.97 to 1.03 and agree within the experimental uncertainty. The measurement errors of fast neutron fluence by niobium dosimeter range from 4.5% (fuel region) to 10.1% (in-vessel storage rack). As a result of this study, the high precision measurement of fast neutron fluence by niobium dosimeters was confirmed. The accuracy of fast reactor dosimetry will be improved by application of niobium dosimeters to the irradiation tests in the JOYO MK-III core. (author)

  4. Composite conductor containing superconductive wires

    Larson, W.L.; Wong, J.

    1974-03-26

    A superconductor cable substitute made by coworking multiple rods of superconductive niobium--titanium or niobium--zirconium alloy with a common copper matrix to extend the copper and rods to form a final elongated product which has superconductive wires distributed in a reduced cross-section copper conductor with a complete metallurgical bond between the normal-conductive copper and the superconductor wires contained therein is described. The superconductor cable can be in the form of a tube.

  5. Radiation behavior of superconductors

    Scanlan, R.M.; Raymond, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    High energy neutron irradiations have been performed on Nb 3 Sn superconductors to assess their behavior in a fusion reactor environment. Irradiations were performed at 4.2 K and property measurements were made without warming the samples. The critical current I/sub c/ increased with irradiation to a level about 50% above the unirradiated value at the highest fluences reached in our experiments. These results are compared with the results of other low temperature irradiations of Nb 3 Sn

  6. Strongly disordered superconductors

    Muttalib, K.A.

    1982-01-01

    We examine some universal effects of strong non-magnetic disorder on the electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions in a superconductor. In particular we explicitly take into account the effect of slow diffusion of electrons in a disordered medium by working in an exact impurity eigenstate representation. We find that the normal diffusion of electrons characterized by a constant diffusion coefficient does not lead to any significant correction to the electron-phonon or the effective electron-electron interactions in a superconductor. We then consider sufficiently strong disorder where Anderson localization of electrons becomes important and determine the effect of localization on the electron-electron interactions. We find that due to localization, the diffusion of electrons becomes anomalous in the sense that the diffusion coefficient becomes scale dependent. This results in an increase in the effective electron-electron interaction with increasing disorder. We propose that this provides a natural explanation for the unusual sensitivity of the transition temperature T/sub c/ of the high T/sub c/ superconductors (T/sub c/ > 10 0 K) to damage effects

  7. Evaluated nuclear-data file for niobium

    Smith, A.B.; Smith, D.L.; Howerton, R.J.

    1985-03-01

    A comprehensive evaluated nuclear-data file for elemental niobium is provided in the ENDF/B format. This file, extending over the energy range 10 -11 -20 MeV, is suitable for comprehensive neutronic calculations, particulary those dealing with fusion-energy systems. It also provides dosimetry information. Attention is given to the internal consistancy of the file, energy balance, and the quantitative specification of uncertainties. Comparisons are made with experimental data and previous evaluated files. The results of integral tests are described and remaining outstanding problem areas are cited. 107 refs

  8. Critical unpairing currents in narrow niobium films

    Gershenzon, M.E.; Gubankov, V.N.

    1979-01-01

    Investigated are the dependences of critical currents of narrow ( with the width of W=0.5-15 μm) superconducting niobium films on temperature and a magnetic field. The proposed method of film production with the width of the 1μm order and with small edge inhomogeneities ((<=500 A) permitted to realize the Ginsburg-Landau unpairing currents in the wide range of temperatures. The correct comparison with the theory showed that the unpairing currents are observed if W(< or approximately) 2delta, where delta is the effective depth of the penetration of the perpendicular magnetic field

  9. Germanium-overcoated niobium Dayem bridges

    Holdeman, L.B.; Peters, P.N.

    1976-01-01

    Overcoating constriction microbridges with semiconducting germanium provides additional thermal conductivity at liquid-helium temperatures to reduce the effects of self-heating in these Josephson junctions. Microwave-induced steps were observed in the I-V characteristics of an overcoated Dayem bridge fabricated in a 15-nm-thick niobium film; at 4.2 K (T/sub c/-T=2.6 K), at least 20 steps could be counted. No steps were observed in the I-V characteristics of the bridge prior to overcoating. In addition, the germanium overcoat can protect against electrical disturbances at room temperature

  10. Methods for determination of zirconium in titanium alloys

    1985-01-01

    Two methods for determining zirconium content in titanium alloys are specified in this standard. One is the ion-exchange/mandelic acid gravimetry for Zr content below 20 % down to 1 % while the other is the mandelic acid gravimetry for Zr content below 20 % down to 0.5 %. In the former, a specimen is decomposed by hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid. After substances such as titanium are oxidized by adding nitric acid, the liquid is adjusted into a 4N hydrochloric acid - gN hydrofluoric acid solution, which is them passed through an ion-exchange column. The niobium and tantalum contents are absorbed while the titanium and zirconium contents flow out. Perchloric acid and sulfuric acid are poured in the solution to remove hydrofluoric acid. Aqueous ammonia is added to produce hydroxide of titanium and zirconium, which is then filtered out. The hydroxyde is dissolved in hydrochloric acid, and mandelic acid is poured to precipitate the zirconium content. The precipitate is ignited and the weight of the oxide formed is measured. The coprecipitated titanium content is determined by the absorptiometric method using hydrogen peroxide. Finally, the weight of the oxide is corrected. In the latter determination method, on the other hand, only several steps of the above procedure are used, namely, decomposition by hydrochloric acid, precipitation of zirconium, ignition of precipitate, measurement of oxide weight and weight correction. (Nogami, K.)

  11. Testability issues in Superconductor Electronics

    Kerkhoff, Hans G.; Arun, Arun J.

    2004-01-01

    An emerging technology for solutions in high-end applications in computing and telecommunication is superconductor electronics. A system-level study has been carried out to verify the feasibility of DfT in superconductor electronics. In this paper, we present how this can be realized to monitor

  12. Method for preparation of superconductors

    Barber, A.C.; McDougall, I.L.

    1975-07-10

    The invention deals with a method to prepare a superconductor consisting of a superconducting compound of at least two elements. It especially deals with superconductors which surround a superconducting intermetallic compounds of at least two elements, examples of which are Nb/sub 2/Sn and Nb/sub 3/Al.

  13. Nonmagnetic impurities in magnetic superconductors

    Mineev, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetization and magnetic field arising around the nonmagnetic impurity in magnetic superconductor with triplet pairing are found. The relationship of these results with the data of recent (gm)sR experiments in heavy fermionic superconductor U 1 - x Th x Be 13 is presented

  14. Low carbon manganese-nickel-niobium steel

    Heisterkamp, F.; Hulka, K.

    1983-11-01

    Experimental heats of a low carbon-manganese-0.5% nickel-0.15% niobium steel have been rolled to plates between 13.5 and 50 mm thickness and to a 16 mm hot strip. Various combinations of soaking temperatures form 1100 0 C to 1300 0 C and of finish rolling temperatures between 710 0 C and 930 0 C have been investigated. From mechanical properties obtained, one can conclude that the investigated steel composition provides very good properties e.g. for pipe steels X65 to X75. In particular, the toughness at low temperature is outstanding despite relaxed rolling conditions. Metalographic and special investigations such as electron microscopy, texture evaluation and chemical extraction, correlated with applied rolling schedules and the mechanical properties obtained resulted in a comprehensive understanding about the benefits of high niobium metallurgy combined with nickel addition. All practically applied welding processes generated mechanical properties, in particular toughness of the weldment, that meet arctic specifications.(Author) [pt

  15. Coupling spin qubits via superconductors

    Leijnse, Martin; Flensberg, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We show how superconductors can be used to couple, initialize, and read out spatially separated spin qubits. When two single-electron quantum dots are tunnel coupled to the same superconductor, the singlet component of the two-electron state partially leaks into the superconductor via crossed...... Andreev reflection. This induces a gate-controlled singlet-triplet splitting which, with an appropriate superconductor geometry, remains large for dot separations within the superconducting coherence length. Furthermore, we show that when two double-dot singlet-triplet qubits are tunnel coupled...... to a superconductor with finite charging energy, crossed Andreev reflection enables a strong two-qubit coupling over distances much larger than the coherence length....

  16. Evaluating superconductors for microwave applications

    Hammond, B.; Bybokas, J.

    1989-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly obvious that some of the earliest applications for high Tc superconductors will be in the microwave market. While this is a major opportunity for the superconductor community, it also represents a significant challenge. At DC or low frequencies a superconductor can be easily characterized by simple measurements of resistivity and magnetic susceptibility versus temperature. These parameters are fundamental to superconductor characterization and various methods exist for measuring them. The only valid way to determine the microwave characteristics of a superconductor is to measure it at microwave frequencies. It is for this reason that measuring microwave surface resistance has emerged as one of the most demanding and telling tests for materials intended for high frequency applications. In this article, the theory of microwave surface resistance is discussed. Methods for characterizing surface resistance theoretically and by practical implementation are described

  17. Aspects of chlorination and its potential to produce niobium pentoxide

    Brocchi, E.A.; Jeffes, J.H.E.

    1984-01-01

    Reduction chlorination of niobium pentoxide were carried out under different experimental conditions in order to study the effects of some variables of the process. In order to evaluate the efficiency of the recovery of niobium pentoxide which could be obtained as condensed material a group of experiments were also carried out with pyrochlore concentrate. The results showed that a balance of factors such as temperature, percentage of carbon in the initial charge and porosity cause the progress of the reaction to be controlled by different mechanisms and indicate that chlorination can be used to produce niobium pentoxide-especially if applied on rich starting material. (Author) [pt

  18. Effect of plastic deformation on the niobium thermal expansion

    Savitskij, E.M.; Bychkova, M.I.; Kanikovskij, V.B.

    1978-01-01

    Using dilatometric method the effect of plastic deformation on change of thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of niobium of different purity was studied. It was shown that deformation affected the TEC in different ways. At first the deformation degree rising causes linear decrease of the TEC and then linear increase. Carbon intensifies the TEC decrease of deformed niobium. The linear correlation was established between the TEC and the value of macroscopic stresses in plastic deformed niobium. The expression indicating the metal TEC change under loading was defined for case of strain hardening

  19. Thermodynamic Calculation of Carbide Precipitate in Niobium Microalloyed Steels

    XU Yun-bo; YU Yong-mei; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of regular solution sublattice model, thermodynamic equilibrium of austenite/carbide in Fe-Nb-C ternary system was investigated. The equilibrium volume fraction, chemical driving force of carbide precipitates and molar fraction of niobium and carbon in solution at different temperatures were evaluated respectively. The volume fraction of precipitates increases, molar fraction of niobium dissolved in austenite decreases and molar fraction of carbon increases with decreasing the niobium content. The driving force increases with the decrease of temperature, and then comes to be stable at relatively low temperatures. The predicted ratio of carbon in precipitates is in good agreement with the measured one.

  20. Critical fields of niobium nitride films of various granularity

    Antonova, E.A.; Sukhov, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The behaviour of lattice parameter, specific electrical resistivity, critical temperature, and temperature dependence of upper critical field near Tsub(cr) of sputtered niobium nitride films is investigated versus the substrate temperature and gas mixture composition in the process of reactive cathode sputtering. The relation between extrapolated value of the upper critical field and granularity of niobium nitride films, close as to composition to the stoichiometric one, has been found. Values of the kappa parameter of the Ginsburg-Landau theory and of the coherence length for niobium nitride films of various granularity are estimated in an approximation of uniform distribution of impurities in a sample

  1. Iron pnictide superconductors

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-03-22

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x})PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are characterised and the superconductors Sr{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}O{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are presented and Ba{sub 2}ScO{sub 3}FeAs and Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound is

  2. Iron pnictide superconductors

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-03-22

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x})PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are characterised and the superconductors Sr{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}O{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are presented and Ba{sub 2}ScO{sub 3}FeAs and Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound

  3. Crystallography and Morphology of Niobium Carbide in As-Cast HP-Niobium Reformer Tubes

    Buchanan, Karl G.; Kral, Milo V.

    2012-06-01

    The microstructures of two as-cast heats of niobium-modified HP stainless steels were characterized. Particular attention was paid to the interdendritic niobium-rich carbides formed during solidification of these alloys. At low magnifications, these precipitates are grouped in colonies of similar lamellae. Higher magnifications revealed that the lamellae actually obtain two distinct morphologies. The type I morphology exhibits broad planar interfaces with a smooth platelike shape. Type II lamellae have undulating interfaces and an overall reticulated shape. To provide further insight into the origin of these two different morphologies, the microstructure and crystallography of each have been studied in detail using high resolution scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, various electron diffraction methods (electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), selected area diffraction (SAD), and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED)), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  4. Microstructural evaluation of alumina-niobium and alumina- niobium-zircon ceramics for ballistic application

    Mota, Juliana Machado da; Lopes, Cristina Moniz Araujo; Melo, Francisco Lourenco Cristovao de

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the microstructural of Alumina- Niobium and Alumina- Niobium-Zircon ceramics. Samples with 3.5 x 4.5 x 34 mm dimensions were prepared by uniaxial pressure (50 MPa) followed by isostatic pressure (300 MPa). The samples were sintered at 1500 ° C for 1 hour. The ceramics obtained were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction, to evaluate the phases and microstructures. In order to analyze the microstructure, by SEM the samples were prepared using two techniques: heat treatment (1350 ° C for 5 minutes) and thermochemical treatment (500 ° C for 8 minutes in a solution of NaOH and KOH) on polished and fractured surfaces. The results showed that despite differences between the two etchings, both were effective to analyze the microstructure. (author)

  5. Superconductors go organic

    Singleton, John; Mielke, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Superconductors made from organic molecules are revealing fascinating new physics and could offer huge technological potential as well. Solid-state physicists are simple people. They believe that basic research is best carried out on chemically simple materials. Traditionally they have focused on inorganic elements, alloys, and other straightforward compounds. This approach has provided some notable successes. For example, any physicist over 35 will remember the huge fuss surrounding the discovery of high-temperature cuprate superconductors in 1986, which led to the infamous 'Woodstock of physics' meeting the following year. Just before the cuprates were discovered, however, an alternative view had begun to emerge. Physical chemists such as Klaus Bechgaard, Peter Day, Gunzi Saito, Viktor Schegolev and Jack Williams were suggesting that the 'simple-materials-are-best' assumption was misplaced. They argued that some of the most exciting studies in solid-state physics can - and should - be attempted on crystalline organic materials. Although chemically complex, such materials are beautifully simple in other ways, and they can, for example, provide much more information about basic phenomena like superconductivity and magnetism than supposedly simple materials. Physicists eventually embraced these materials with enthusiasm, and the number of papers on crystalline organic metals overtook those on the high-temperature cuprate superconductors three years ago. The gap has widened ever since, and the fact that God and a billion years of evolution have produced a processor based on three-dimensional arrays of molecules, rather than silicon or gallium-arsenide chips, is taken as a good omen by those working in the field. (U.K.)

  6. Magnetic Scaling in Superconductors

    Lawrie, I.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Ginzburg-Landau-Wilson superconductor in a magnetic field B is considered in the approximation that magnetic-field fluctuations are neglected. A formulation of perturbation theory is presented in which multiloop calculations fully retaining all Landau levels are tractable. A 2-loop calculation shows that, near the zero-field critical point, the singular part of the free energy scales as F sing ∼ |t| 2-α F(B|t| -2ν ), where ν is the coherence-length exponent emdash a result which has hitherto been assumed on purely dimensional grounds. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  7. High temperature superconductors

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2010-01-01

    This essential reference provides the most comprehensive presentation of the state of the art in the field of high temperature superconductors. This growing field of research and applications is currently being supported by numerous governmental and industrial initiatives in the United States, Asia and Europe to overcome grid energy distribution issues. The technology is particularly intended for densely populated areas. It is now being commercialized for power-delivery devices, such as power transmission lines and cables, motors and generators. Applications in electric utilities include current limiters, long transmission lines and energy-storage devices that will help industries avoid dips in electric power.

  8. New Al5 multifilamentary superconductor based on the niobium--aluminum--silicon system

    Quinn, G.C.

    1977-12-01

    Based on Powder Metallurgy techniques, a process to fabricate Nb-Nb 3 (Al,Si) multifilamentary superconducting wire has been developed. Optimum sintering and infiltration parameters are listed and the methods of mechanical reduction to wire form are described. Preliminary data indicate that diffusion reaction temperatures as low as 850 0 C form the A15 superconducting compound Nb 3

  9. A SRF niobium cylindrical cavity with a large silicon nitride niobium-coated membrane as one end-wall

    Martinez, Luis; Castelli, Alessandro; Pate, Jacob; Thompson, Johnathon; Delmas, William; Sharping, Jay; Chiao, Raymond; Chiao Team; Sharping Team

    The development of large silicon nitride membranes and niobium film deposition techniques motivate new architectures in opto-mechanics and microwave devices that can exploit the extremely high Q's obtainable with superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities. We present a X-band SRF cylindrical cavity-membrane system in which one end-wall of the cavity is replaced by a niobium coated centimeter-sized silicon nitride membrane. We report moderately high Q factors above 10 million. Experimental results characterizing the system and potential future applications for such schemes in microwave devices and optomechanics are discussed.

  10. Impurity composition effect on work function in cylindrical specimens of niobium and low zirconium niobium base alloys

    Kobyakov, V.P.

    2000-01-01

    A study is made into poly- and single crystal cylindrical niobium specimens, prepared by various methods as well as into polycrystalline specimens of niobium base alloys doped with 1.2 and 1.6 % Zr. Thermionic work function is measured using a full current method. Several techniques are applied to determine the content of substitutional and interstitial impurities in specimens. The phase composition of polished section surface is also investigated. A work function increase is observed when a considerable amount of carbide phases occurs at the surface. This increase is comparable with the effect of going from a polycrystalline niobium specimen to a single crystal with (110) surface orientation [ru

  11. Pinning and creep in superconductors

    Ovchinnikov, Yu.N.

    1994-01-01

    All superconductors can be separated into two large groups: type I and type II. The behaviour of these two groups in a magnetic field is quite different. The superconductors of type I, in a strong magnetic field, enter the intermediate state. Phenomenological picture of this state was given by Landau. The type II superconductors, in strong magnetic fields, form the mixed state (or Shubnikov phase). The microscopic picture of the mixed state was given by Abrikosov on the basis of Ginzburg-Landau equations. In ideal homogeneous superconductors the free energy is not changed if all the vortex structure is shifted on some distance u. The transport current will be proportional, therefore, to the electric field E. All the real superconductors, however, are inhomogeneous. Inhomogeneities interact with vortex lattice and pin it. In this new state the transport current below some critical value does not lead to the motion of the flux lattice and to the energy dissipation. The value of critical current strongly depends on the type of inhomogeneities, on the value of magnetic field and on temperature. In new layered superconductors, the critical current depends also on the orientation of the magnetic field B with respect to the layer planes. Temperature and quantum fluctuations lead to the transition between different metastable states in superconductors with current. As a result, the vortex lattice slowly moves (creep phenomenon). Below we will briefly discuss all these phenomena. (orig.)

  12. Plane strain forging of a niobium micro-alloyed steel

    Balancin, O.; Ferran L, G.; Rio de Janeiro Univ.

    1984-01-01

    Various termomechanical treatments were carried out on a niobium micro-alloyed steel and a low carbon steel as reference material, using an apparatus for hot phane strain forging. Control of processing variables and the presence of niobium strongly modify the austenite microstructure, which upon decomposition produces various phases such as polygonal and acicular ferrite and martensite, alone or together in variable proportions. Corresponding to this diversity of structures there is a wide variation in mechanical properties at room temperature: the initial yield point varies from 310 to 650 MPa and the reduction of area in uniaxial tension from 82 to 57% for the niobium steel. These results show that hot forging a niobium micro-alloyed steel may be a suitable manufacturing process for satisfying a wide range of specifications in a final product with low equivalent carbon. (Author) [pt

  13. An investigation of tantalum and niobium contents by nuclear technique

    Patmasiriwat, N.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this experimental study was to find suitable nuclear techniques to determine the quantities of niobium and tantalum in columbite. The study has been performed by using radioisotope X-ray fluorescent technique (X RF) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). The results showed a good agreement between these two techniques. Nevertheless, with NAA, if there is uranium in the sample, the spectrum of niobium will be interfered. So practically, on the basis of accuracy and speed of determination, X-ray fluorescence is more suitable than NAA to determine the quantity of niobium while tantalum is preferable to use NAA. The detection limit of niobium and tantalum using the above techniques are 0.661% and 0.1 mg respectively

  14. Functionalization of niobium electrodes for the construction of impedimetric biosensors

    Helali, S.; Abdelghani, A.; Hafaiedh, I.; Martelet, C.; Prodromidis, M.I.; Albanis, T.; Jaffrezic-Renault, N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an impedimetric immunosensor, based on niobium/niobium oxide (Nb/NbOxHy) electrodes, for the detection of atrazine. Niobium oxide was anodically formed onto niobium electrodes at 25 V in 1 M H 2 SO 4 . Hydrous oxide layers were then silanized with APTES, and using glutaraldehyde as a cross linker, Fab fragment k47 antibody was covalently immobilized onto the surface of the electrodes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to characterize the building-up of the immunosensors as well as the binding of atrazine to its specific antibody. In presence of ferricyanide redox species and under a cathodic polarization voltage (- 1.2 V versus SCE), the relationship between the concentration of atrazine and the change of the electron transfer resistance value was studied

  15. Reactivity of niobium cluster anions with nitrogen and carbon monoxide

    Mwakapumba, Joseph; Ervin, Kent M.

    1997-02-01

    Reactions of small niobium cluster anions, Nbn-(n = 2-7), with CO and N2 are investigated using a flow tube reactor (flowing afterglow) apparatus. Carbon monoxide chemisorption on niobium cluster anions occurs with faster reaction rates than nitrogen chemisorption on corresponding cluster sizes. N2 addition to niobium cluster anions is much more size-selective than is CO addition. These general trends follow those reported in the literature for reactions of neutral and cationic niobium clusters with CO and N2. Extensive fragmentation of the clusters is observed upon chemisorption. A small fraction of the larger clusters survive and sequentially add multiple CO or N2 units without fragmentation. However, chemisorption saturation is not reached at the experimentally accessible pressure and reagent concentration ranges. The thermochemistry of the adsorption processes and the nature of the adsorbed species, molecular or dissociated, are discussed.

  16. Diffusion of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium in niobium

    Matusiewicz, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    The diffusion of hydrogen in niobium was investigated over the temperature range 148 to 500 degrees Kelvin, using measurements of the elastic after effect caused by long range diffusion (the Gorsky Effect). Relaxation curves for pure annealed niobium were generally not of the single exponential form expected from the Gorsky Effect theory, but were described well by a sum of two exponential curves with different amplitudes and relaxation times. The effects of oxygen and nitrogen interstitials on the diffusion were studied and were not in agreement with conventional trapping models. Deuterium and tritium diffusion in niobium were also studied, and a non-classical isotope effect was observed. Hydrogen diffusion coefficients in several Nb-Ta alloys were measured, and the diffusivity in all these alloys exhibited a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence. Experimental results were compared to several models for diffusion and trapping. A model is presented which can account for the form of the relaxation curves observed in pure, annealed niobium

  17. Alternative dissolution methods for analysis of niobium containing ...

    NICO

    2The South African Nuclear Energy Corporation Ltd. (Necsa), P.O. Box 582, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. ... Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry was applied for ..... Validation of the methods for niobium determination was.

  18. Electroplating and stripping copper on molybdenum and niobium

    Power, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Molybdenum and niobium are often electroplated and subsequently stripped of copper. Since general standard plating techniques produce poor quality coatings, general procedures have been optimized and specified to give good results.

  19. Fabrication of ultrashort niobium variable-thickness bridges

    Goto, T.

    1982-01-01

    A simple technique for the fabrication of niobium variable-thickness bridges of length approx.0.1 μm is described. The bridges are found to operate as ideal Josephson junctions over a wide temperature range

  20. Progress in the development of niobium alloyed high speed steel

    Guimaraes, J.R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of economy-grades of niobium alloyed high speed steel is described. Both the metallurgical concepts behind the steel design and the results of performance tests are presented. (Author) [pt

  1. Titanium and titanium alloys: fundamentals and applications

    Leyens, C; Peters, M

    2003-01-01

    ... number of titanium alloys have paved the way for light metals to vastly expand into many industrial applications. Titanium and its alloys stand out primarily due to their high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance, at just half the weight of steels and Ni-based superalloys. This explains their early success in the aerospace and the...

  2. Plasmons in strong superconductors

    Baldo, M.; Ducoin, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the possible plasmon excitations that can occur in systems where strong superconductivity is present. In these systems the plasmon energy is comparable to or smaller than the pairing gap. As a prototype of these systems we consider the proton component of Neutron Star matter just below the crust when electron screening is not taken into account. For the realistic case we consider in detail the different aspects of the elementary excitations when the proton, electron components are considered within the Random-Phase Approximation generalized to the superfluid case, while the influence of the neutron component is considered only at qualitative level. Electron screening plays a major role in modifying the proton spectrum and spectral function. At the same time the electron plasmon is strongly modified and damped by the indirect coupling with the superfluid proton component, even at moderately low values of the gap. The excitation spectrum shows the interplay of the different components and their relevance for each excitation modes. The results are relevant for neutrino physics and thermodynamical processes in neutron stars. If electron screening is neglected, the spectral properties of the proton component show some resemblance with the physical situation in high-T c superconductors, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences in this connection. In a general prospect, the results of the study emphasize the role of Coulomb interaction in strong superconductors.

  3. Superconductor fluxoid logic

    Andronov, A.A.; Kurin, V.V.; Levichev, M.Yu.; Ryndyk, D.A.; Vostokov, V.I.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years there has been much interest in superconductor logical devices. Our paper is devoted to the analysis of some new possibilities in this field. The main problems here are: minimization of time of logical operations and reducing of device scale. Josephson systems are quite appropriate for this purpose because of small size, short characteristic time and also small energy losses. Two different types of Josephson logic have been investigated during last years. The first type is based on hysteretic V-A characteristic of a single Josephson junction. Superconducting and resistive (with nonzero voltage) states are considered as logical zero and logical unit. The second one - rapid single flux quantum logic, has been developed recently and is based on SQUID-like bistability. Different logical states are the states with different number of magnetic flux quanta inside closed superconducting contour. Information is represented by voltage pulses with fixed ''area'' (∫ V(t)/dt). This pulses are generated when logical state of SQUID-like elementary cell changes. The fundamental role of magnetic flux quantization in this type of logic leads to the necessity of large enough self-inductance of superconductor contour and thus to limitations on minimal device dimensions. (orig.)

  4. Theory of disordered superconductors

    Wysokinski, K.I.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of disorder on the superconducting transition temperature is discussed. The main steps on the way to complete theory of disordered superconductors follows the steps in the authors' understanding of disorder and its effect on the quasiparticles in metals. Loosely speaking one can distinguish three such steps. First is the study of weakly disordered systems and this resulted in famous, celebrated Anderson theorem. The second step is ultimately connected with the coherent potential approximation as a method to study the spectrum and transport in concentrated alloys. The discovery of the role of usually neglected interferences between scattered waves in disordered conductors leading to decrease in mobility and increase of the mutual interactions between quantum particles, known as localization and interaction effects has given the new impetus to the theory of superconductivity. This is third step to be discussed in this lecture. The authors limit themselves to homogeneous bulk superconductors. In this paper some experiments on thin films as well as on copper oxides related to the presented theory are briefly mentioned

  5. Flux cutting in superconductors

    Campbell, A M

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes experiments and theories of flux cutting in superconductors. The use of the flux line picture in free space is discussed. In superconductors cutting can either be by means of flux at an angle to other layers of flux, as in longitudinal current experiments, or due to shearing of the vortex lattice as in grain boundaries in YBCO. Experiments on longitudinal currents can be interpreted in terms of flux rings penetrating axial lines. More physical models of flux cutting are discussed but all predict much larger flux cutting forces than are observed. Also, cutting is occurring at angles between vortices of about one millidegree which is hard to explain. The double critical state model and its developments are discussed in relation to experiments on crossed and rotating fields. A new experiment suggested by Clem gives more direct information. It shows that an elliptical yield surface of the critical state works well, but none of the theoretical proposals for determining the direction of E are universally applicable. It appears that, as soon as any flux flow takes place, cutting also occurs. The conclusion is that new theories are required. (perspective)

  6. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii K.; Koshelev, Alexei E.; Glatz, Andreas; Welp, Ulrich; Kwok, Wai-K.

    2015-03-01

    Unlike illusive magnetic field lines in vacuum, magnetic vortices in superconductors are real physical strings, which interact with the sample surface, crystal structure defects, and with each other. We address the complex and poorly understood process of vortex cutting via a comprehensive set of magneto-optic experiments which allow us to visualize vortex patterns at magnetization of a nearly twin-free YBCO crystal by crossing magnetic fields of different orientations. We observe a pronounced anisotropy in the flux dynamics under crossing fields and the filamentation of induced supercurrents associated with the staircase vortex structure expected in layered cuprates, flux cutting effects, and angular vortex instabilities predicted for anisotropic superconductors. At some field angles, we find formation of the vortex domains following a type-I phase transition in the vortex state accompanied by an abrupt change in the vortex orientation. To clarify the vortex cutting scenario we performed time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations, which confirmed formation of sharp vortex fronts observed in the experiment and revealed a left-handed helical instability responsible for the rotation of vortices. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  7. Flux Pinning in Superconductors

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of supercondu...

  8. Neutron data evaluation for natural niobium

    Ma Gonggui; Zou Yiming; Wang Shiming

    1992-01-01

    The complete neutron nuclear data for natural niobium were evaluated based on both experimental data measured up to 1989 and calculated data with program MUP2 and AUJP. The present work was done for CENDL-2 and supersedes the CENDL-1 (MAT = 1411) evaluation. The following neutron data are given for Nb in the energy range 10 -5 eV to 20 MeV (MAT = 2411): total, elastic, nonelastic, total inelastic, inelastic cross sections to 13 discrete levels, inelastic continuum, (n,2n), (n,3n), (n,n'α) + (n,αn'), (n,n'p) + (n,pn'),(n,n'd) + (n,dn'), (n,p), (n,d), (n,t), (n,α) and capture cross sections. Derived data for MT = 251, 252 and 253 are also included. Angular distributions and energy spectra of secondary neutron are also given inelastic continuum,

  9. Bragg projection ptychography on niobium phase domains

    Burdet, Nicolas; Shi, Xiaowen; Clark, Jesse N.; Huang, Xiaojing; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian

    2017-07-01

    Bragg projection ptychography (BPP) is a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging technique which combines the strengths of scanning microscopy with the phase contrast of x-ray ptychography. Here we apply it for high resolution imaging of the phase-shifted crystalline domains associated with epitaxial growth. The advantages of BPP are that the spatial extent of the sample is arbitrary, it is nondestructive, and it gives potentially diffraction limited spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate the application of BPP for revealing the domain structure caused by epitaxial misfit in a nanostructured metallic thin film. Experimental coherent diffraction data were collected from a niobium thin film, epitaxially grown on a sapphire substrate as the beam was scanned across the sample. The data were analyzed by BPP using a carefully selected combination of refinement procedures. The resulting image shows a close packed array of epitaxial domains, shifted with respect to each other due to misfit between the film and its substrate.

  10. Developments in niobium steels for linepipe applications

    Heisterkamp, F.; Bergmann, B.; Chaussy, L.

    1982-11-01

    Current niobium containing steels being produced for line pipe applications, developed over the last ten years, demonstrate an excellent respoNse to heavy deformation at low temperatures, which results in an optimum balance of yield strength and toughness. However, it has long been recognized that excessive use of controlled rolling involves production penalties and contributes to the characteristic anisotropy present in rolled products. Thus, changes in rolling procedures would be desirable if they minimized delays or reduced directionality thereby resulting in further improvement of secondary properties, such as through thickness ductility and hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) tendency in sour gas environments. Present steel development is focused on transformation strengthening or increased precipitation hardening. Coupled with the trend to even lower carbon ( [pt

  11. Study on niobium carbide dispersed superconducting tapes

    Wada, H; Tachikawa, K [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tokyo (Japan); Oh' asa, M [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1977-11-01

    Niobium carbide (NbC) dispersed superconducting tapes have been fabricated by two metallurgical processes. In the first process, Ni-Nb-C alloys are directly arc melted and hot worked in air and the NbC phase is distributed in the form of fine discrete particles. In the second process, Ni-Nb and Ni-Nb-Cu alloys are arc melted, hot worked and subjected to solid-state carburization. NbC then precipitates along the grain boundaries, forming a network. The highest superconducting transition temperature attained is about 11 K. Taken together with the lattice parameter measurement, this indicates that NbC with a nearly perfect NaCl structure is formed in both processes. Measured values of the upper critical field, the critical current density and the volume fraction of the NbC phase are also discussed.

  12. Superconducting niobium cavities with high gradients

    Kneisel, P.; Saito, K.

    1992-01-01

    Present accelerator projects making use of superconducting cavity technology are constructed with design accelerating gradients E acc ranging between 5 MV/m and 8 MV/m and Q-values of several 10 9 . Future plans for upgrades of existing accelerators or for linear colliders call for gradients greater than 15 MV/m corresponding to peak surface electric fields above 30 MV/m. These demands challenge state-of-the-art production technology and require improvements in processing and handling of these cavities to overcome the major performance limitation of field emission loading. This paper reports on efforts to improve the performance of cavities made from niobium from different suppliers by using improved cleaning techniques after processing and ultrahigh vacuum annealing at temperatures of 1400 C. In single cell L-band cavities peak surface electric fields as high as 50 MV/m have been measured without significant field emission loading. (Author) 8 refs., fig

  13. Thorium exposure in a niobium mine

    Fonseca, Adelaide M. Gondin da

    1995-01-01

    The workers involved in the mineral process to obtain Nb-Fe alloy are exposure to thorium. Internal contamination with radioactive materials is a common problem. This is caused by presence of U and Th and their natural decay series associated with the mine ore. The examples are the workers at the niobium mine located in the state of Goias. Twenty mine workers were evaluated using in vitro bioassay techniques. Samples of urine and feces from occupationally exposed mine workers were analyzed for thorium isotopes. The fecal samples corresponding to one complete excretion and urine sample corresponding to a 24 hours collection were analyzed using alpha spectrometry. The results of thorium excretion (feces) have shown that in all the samples the 228 Th excretions in high than 232 Th. Thorium concentration in all the urine samples were below limit of detection that is approximately 1 mBq/l. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  14. Study of niobium oxidation by photoelectron spectroscopy

    Durand, C.

    1985-01-01

    The chemical composition of thin oxide layers, grown on clean niobium, in low oxygen pressure, was studied by a surface analysis method: X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The purpose of this study was to find the best conditions for the building of Nb/Nb oxide/Pb Josephson junctions, and particularly to minimise the interface thickness during the formation of the insulator film (Nb 2 O 5 ) on the metal (Nb). This interface is essentially formed by the monoxide (NbO) and dioxide (NbO 2 ). Nb 3d XPS core level peak positions and area ratios (obtained by the signal decomposition) of the components of the total peak, were used to determine the presence of the different oxidation states II, IV and V, their relative abundance, oxide thicknesses and their depth distribution. All this information was extracted by a special numerical procedure [fr

  15. Ac losses of transposed superconductors

    Eckert, D.; Enderlein, G.; Lange, F.

    1975-01-01

    Eastham and Rhodes published results of loss measurements on transposed superconducting NbTi cables and concluded basing on an extrapolation to very large numbers of wires that transposed superconductors could be used favorably in cables for power transmission. There are some reasons to question the correctness of their extrapolation. Losses were calculated for transposed superconductors in self field and got results different from those of Eastham and Rhodes. Loss measurements were performed the results of which give evidence for the correctness of our calculations. The results lead to the conclusion that the use of transposed cables of irreversible type 2 superconductors for power transmission is not advantageous

  16. Diffusion of oxygen in niobium during bake-out

    Benvenuti, C.; Calatroni, S.; Ruzinov, V.

    2003-01-01

    Bake-outs at temperatures between 100 degC and 150 degC for duration up to two days have become customary for optimising the performance of bulk niobium cavities. This treatment results in the diffusion of oxygen, originating from the surface oxide, into the niobium. The theoretical oxygen profile has been simulated using the diffusion equations, and compared with some experimental results. (author)

  17. Surface processing for bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Kelly, M. P.; Reid, T.

    2017-04-01

    The majority of niobium cavities for superconducting particle accelerators continue to be fabricated from thin-walled (2-4 mm) polycrystalline niobium sheet and, as a final step, require material removal from the radio frequency (RF) surface in order to achieve performance needed for use as practical accelerator devices. More recently bulk niobium in the form of, single- or large-grain slices cut from an ingot has become a viable alternative for some cavity types. In both cases the so-called damaged layer must be chemically etched or electrochemically polished away. The methods for doing this date back at least four decades, however, vigorous empirical studies on real cavities and more fundamental studies on niobium samples at laboratories worldwide have led to seemingly modest improvements that, when taken together, constitute a substantial advance in the reproducibility for surface processing techniques and overall cavity performance. This article reviews the development of niobium cavity surface processing, and summarizes results of recent studies. We place some emphasis on practical details for real cavity processing systems which are difficult to find in the literature but are, nonetheless, crucial for achieving the good and reproducible cavity performance. New approaches for bulk niobium surface treatment which aim to reduce cost or increase performance, including alternate chemical recipes, barrel polishing and ‘nitrogen doping’ of the RF surface, continue to be pursued and are closely linked to the requirements for surface processing.

  18. Recent developments in high purity niobium metal production at CBMM

    Abdo, Gustavo Giovanni Ribeiro; Sousa, Clovis Antonio de Faria; Guimarães, Rogério Contato; Ribas, Rogério Marques; Vieira, Alaércio Salvador Martins; Menezes, Andréia Duarte; Fridman, Daniel Pallos; Cruz, Edmundo Burgos

    2015-01-01

    CBMM is a global supplier of high quality niobium products including pure niobium, the focus of this paper. CBMM’s position has been consolidated over three decades of producing high purity niobium metal ingots. The company supplies, among other products, commercial and reactor grade niobium ingots. One of the main uses of CBMM’s ingots is for the manufacture of particle accelerators (superconducting radio frequency – SRF – cavities), where the purity and homogeneity of niobium metal is essentially important for good performance. CBMM constantly strives to improve process controls and product quality, and is currently implementing innovations in production, research and development to further improve ingot quality. The main aim is to reduce the content of interstitial elements, such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), carbon (C), and hydrogen (H), starting with the raw materials through the final step of ingot production. CBMM held the first trial to produce the world’s largest-diameter niobium ingot (as cast 535 mm). The results of this initial trial presented very low levels of interstitial impurities (N, O, C, H), allowing the achievement of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values very close to 300 in a six-melt process in an electron beam furnace. These values were reached with 850 ppm of tantalum. SRF cavities will be produced with this material in order to study the effect of low impurities and high RRR on the Q factor and accelerating gradient

  19. Quasiparticle current in superconductor-semiconductor-superconductor junctions

    Tartakovskij, A.V.; Fistul', M.V.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the quasiparticle current in a superconductor-semiconductor-superconductor junction may significantly increase as a result of resonant passage of the quasiparticle along particular trajectories from periodically situated localized centers. A prediction of the theory is that with increasing junction resistance there should be a change from an excessive current to a insufficient current on the current-voltage characteristics (at high voltages). The effect of transparency of the boundaries on resonance tunneling in such junctions is also investigated

  20. Process for the production of a tantalum and niobium bearing concentrate from a tantalum and niobium bearing ferro-alloy

    Deweck, J.; Van, H.

    1980-01-01

    In a process for the production of a tantalum and niobium bearing concentrate from a tantalum and niobium bearing ferro-alloy containing tantalum and niobium as carbide, by treating the ferro-alloy in molten state with a controlled amount of an oxidizing agent in order to slag at least most of the tantalum and at least part of the niobium and by separting the so obtained slag phase from the metal phase, the improvement which comprises using air, oxygen enriched air or oxygen as oxidizing agent and adjusting the iron content to the ferro-alloy by adding at least 70% by weight of iron prior to the step of forming the slag so that at least most of the tantalum carbide is dissolved in the molten ferro-alloy

  1. Superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor nanojunctions from perovskite materials

    Štrbík, V.; Beňačka, Š.; Gaži, Š.; Španková, M.; Šmatko, V.; Knoška, J.; Gál, N.; Chromik, Š.; Sojková, M.; Pisarčík, M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor nanojunction. • Nanojunctions prepared by Ga"3"+ focused ion beam patterning. • Indication of triplet Cooper pair component in junction superconducting current. • Qualitative agreement with theoretical model. - Abstract: The lateral superconductor-ferromagnet–superconductor (SFS) nanojunctions based on high critical temperature superconductor YBa_2Cu_3O_x (YBCO) and half-metallic ferromagnet La_0_._6_7Sr_0_._3_3MnO_3 (LSMO) thin films were prepared to investigate a possible presence of long range triplet component (LRTC) of Cooper pairs in the LSMO. We applied Ga"3"+ focused ion beam patterning to create YBCO/LSMO/YBCO lateral type nanojunctions with LSMO length as small as 40 nm. The resistivity vs. temperature, critical current density vs. temperature and resistance vs. magnetic field dependence were studied to recognize the LRTC of Cooper pairs in the LSMO. A non-monotonic temperature dependence of junction critical current density and a decrease of the SFS nanojunction resistance in increased magnetic field were observed. Only weak manifestations of LRTC and some qualitative agreement with theory were found out in SFS nanojunctions realized from the perovskite materials. The presence of equal-spin triplet component of Cooper pairs in half-metallic LSMO ferromagnet is not such apparent as in SFS junctions prepared from low temperature superconductors NbTiN and half-metallic ferromagnet CrO_2.

  2. Superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor nanojunctions from perovskite materials

    Štrbík, V., E-mail: vladimir.strbik@savba.sk [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská Cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Beňačka, Š.; Gaži, Š.; Španková, M.; Šmatko, V. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská Cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Knoška, J. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607, Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22607, Hamburg (Germany); Gál, N.; Chromik, Š.; Sojková, M.; Pisarčík, M. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská Cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor nanojunction. • Nanojunctions prepared by Ga{sup 3+} focused ion beam patterning. • Indication of triplet Cooper pair component in junction superconducting current. • Qualitative agreement with theoretical model. - Abstract: The lateral superconductor-ferromagnet–superconductor (SFS) nanojunctions based on high critical temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (YBCO) and half-metallic ferromagnet La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) thin films were prepared to investigate a possible presence of long range triplet component (LRTC) of Cooper pairs in the LSMO. We applied Ga{sup 3+} focused ion beam patterning to create YBCO/LSMO/YBCO lateral type nanojunctions with LSMO length as small as 40 nm. The resistivity vs. temperature, critical current density vs. temperature and resistance vs. magnetic field dependence were studied to recognize the LRTC of Cooper pairs in the LSMO. A non-monotonic temperature dependence of junction critical current density and a decrease of the SFS nanojunction resistance in increased magnetic field were observed. Only weak manifestations of LRTC and some qualitative agreement with theory were found out in SFS nanojunctions realized from the perovskite materials. The presence of equal-spin triplet component of Cooper pairs in half-metallic LSMO ferromagnet is not such apparent as in SFS junctions prepared from low temperature superconductors NbTiN and half-metallic ferromagnet CrO{sub 2}.

  3. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath

    1998-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  4. Kinetic equations in dirty superconductors

    Kraehenbuehl, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetic equations for superconductors in the dirty limit are derived using a method developed for superfluid systems, which allows a systematic expansion in small parameters; exact charge conservation is obeyed. (orig.)

  5. Polymeric conductors and superconductors

    Goodings, E.P.

    1975-01-01

    The production of electrically conductive polymers which are flexible ans capable of being shaped by normal processes, is discussed. The relation between the structure of the polymer and its ability to transport electric charge is considered. The main problem is to combine high conductivity with good processability and it is shown that stacked-planar systems are superior to conjugated polymers. Good mechanical properties have yet to be achieved. In some way the rigid pi-bonded systems must be combined with a conventional sigma-bonded polymer without destroying its flexibility and tensile properties. The structure will contain a radical ion system to provide charge carriers but it is not yet known how to design the polymer structure to give high carrier mobility. Further work is required on organic superconductors in unravelling the relationship between charge carrier mobility and the supermolecular structure of polymers. (UK)

  6. Superconductor digital electronics

    Likharev, Konstantin K.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of these notes is to offer a brief review of the history of superconductor digital electronics, and discuss prospects of its future development. Due to length restrictions, many important technical contributions could not be mentioned at all - with sincere apologies to their authors. Though an attempt has been made to give an unbiased review of the most important work all over the world, a special emphasis on the efforts in the former Soviet Union, which had not been discussed much in literature, and in which the author of this text took an active part, seemed excusable. Another important qualification is that the author phased out his own research in the field about 10 years ago, so that the last parts of the notes, devoted to present-time and future work, should be viewed as not much more than remarks by an (interested) outsider.

  7. Manufacturing of Superconductors

    Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Bay, Niels

    Superconducting tapes based on the ceramic high temperature superconductor (HTS) is a new promising product for high current applications such as electro-magnets and current transmission cables. The tapes are made by the oxide powder in tube (OPIT) method implying drawing and rolling of silver...... tubes containing ceramic powder. The final product is a composite tape, where ceramic superconducting fibres are embedded in a silver matrix. The critical current density Je [kA/cm 2 ] is the primary quality parameter of the product. The quality of the superconducting tape depends very much...... in the individual fibres. · The stresses and strains in the deformation zone are analysed. It is concluded that more detailed mechanical tests and a more detailed constitutive plasticity model is desirable in order to improve the precision of the numerical modelling. New test equipment is designed implying the new...

  8. High temperature superconductor current leads

    Zeimetz, B.; Liu, H.K.; Dou, S.X.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The use of superconductors in high electrical current applications (magnets, transformers, generators etc.) usually requires cooling with liquid Helium, which is very expensive. The superconductor itself produces no heat, and the design of Helium dewars is very advanced. Therefore most of the heat loss, i.e. Helium consumption, comes from the current lead which connects the superconductor with its power source at room temperature. The current lead usually consists of a pair of thick copper wires. The discovery of the High Temperature Superconductors makes it possible to replace a part of the copper with superconducting material. This drastically reduces the heat losses because a) the superconductor generates no resistive heat and b) it is a very poor thermal conductor compared with the copper. In this work silver-sheathed superconducting tapes are used as current lead components. The work comprises both the production of the tapes and the overall design of the leads, in order to a) maximize the current capacity ('critical current') of the superconductor, b) minimize the thermal conductivity of the silver clad, and c) optimize the cooling conditions

  9. Hybrid molecule/superconductor assemblies

    McDevitt, J.T.; Haupt, S.G.; Riley, D.R.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, J.P., Jones, C.

    1993-01-01

    The fabrication of electronic devices from molecular materials has attracted much attention recently. Schottky diodes, molecular transistors, metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes, MIS field effect transistors and light emitting diodes have all been prepared utilizing such substances. The active elements in these devices have been constructed by depositing the molecular phase onto the surface of a metal, semiconductor or insulating substrate. With the recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity, new opportunities now exist for the study of molecule/superconductor interactions as well as for the construction of novel hybrid molecule/superconductor devices. In this paper, methods for preparing the initial two composite molecule/semiconductor devices will be reported. Consequently, light sensors based on dye-coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor microbridges will be discussed. Moreover, molecule/superconductor energy and electron transfer phenomena will be illustrated also for the first time

  10. Superconducting niobium in high rf magnetic fields

    Mueller, G.

    1988-01-01

    The benefit of superconducting cavities for accelerator applications depends on the field and Q/sub 0/ levels which can be achieved reliably in mass producible multicell accelerating structures. The presently observed field and Q/sub 0/ limitations are caused by anomalous loss mechanisms which are not correlated with the intrinsic properties of the pure superconductor but rather due to defects or contaminants on the superconducting surface. The ultimate performance levels of clean superconducting cavities built from pure Nb will be given by the rf critical field and the surface resistance of the superconductor. In the first part of this paper a short survey is given of the maximum surface magnetic fields achieved in single-cell cavities. The results of model calculations for the thermal breakdown induced by very small defects and for the transition to the defect free case is discussed in part 2. In the last chapter, a discussion is given for the rf critical field of Nb on the basis of the Ginzburg-Landau Theory. It is shown that not only purity but also the homogeneity of the material should become important for the performance of superconducting Nb cavities at field levels beyond 100mT. Measurement results of the upper critical field for different grades of commercially available Nb sheet materials are given. 58 references, 20 figures, 1 table

  11. Ultrasonic attenuation in niobium II: measurements near Bsub(c2)

    Forgan, E.M.; Gough, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    The attenuation of 10 to 90 MHz longitudinal sound waves has been measured from 1.2 K upwards in the superconducting mixed state of niobium near Bsub(c2). The attenuation was determined as a function of the directly measured average induction, B, within single crystal specimens which had resistance ratios ranging from 83 to 3380. The specimens tended to the 'clean' limit (electron mean free path, 1 much greater than xi 0 , the superconducting coherence length) in which there is a strong purity dependence of the relative attenuation. For the purest crystals close to Bsub(C2), the results are in reasonable agreement with the purity and field dependence predicted by microscopic theories, and agree over a much wider field range with a phenomenological modification of these theories. Measurements of attenuation and other transport properties in clean type II superconductors by other authors are discussed and it is shown that many of the evident discrepancies can be attributed to neglect of the effects of magnetic irreversibility and crystalline anisotropy. (author)

  12. Evidence for preferential flux flow at the grain boundaries of superconducting RF-quality niobium

    Sung, Z.-H.; Lee, P. J.; Gurevich, A.; Larbalestier, D. C.

    2018-04-01

    The question of whether grain boundaries (GBs) in niobium can be responsible for lowered operating field (B RF) or quality factor (Q 0) in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is still controversial. Here, we show by direct DC transport across planar GBs isolated from a slice of very large-grain SRF-quality Nb that vortices can preferentially flow along the grain boundary when the external magnetic field lies in the GB plane. However, increasing the misalignment between the GB plane and the external magnetic field vector markedly reduces preferential flux flow along the GB. Importantly, we find that preferential GB flux flow is more prominent for a buffered chemical polished than for an electropolished bi-crystal. The voltage-current characteristics of GBs are similar to those seen in low angle grain boundaries of high temperature superconductors where there is clear evidence of suppression of the superconducting order parameter at the GB. While local weakening of superconductivity at GBs in cuprates and pnictides is intrinsic, deterioration of current transparency of GBs in Nb appears to be extrinsic, since the polishing method clearly affect the local GB degradation. The dependence of preferential GB flux flow on important cavity preparation and experimental variables, particularly the final chemical treatment and the angle between the magnetic field and the GB plane, suggests two more reasons why real cavity performance can be so variable.

  13. Experiments on the rf surface resistance of the perovskite superconductors at 3 GHz

    Hein, M.; Klein, N.; Mueller, G.; Piel, H.; Roeth, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Since the discovery of the perovskite superconductors many experiments to explore their physical properties have been performed and various potential applications have been considered. The high critical temperature of more than 90 K obtained with Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-δ/ (Y may be substituted by other rare earth elements) makes these superconductors interesting for applications in microwave technology. This has focused the authors interest on the investigation of their rf properties. Due to the sensitivity of the rf surface resistance to surface impurities and remaining non superconducting phases rf measurements are a good means to provide useful information about the quality of sample preparation and about physical properties of the superconductor itself. This contribution reports on the experimental determination of the rf surface resistance of Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-δ/ and Eu 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-δ/ in the normal and superconducting state at 3 GHz. In the first chapter the preparation of the ceramic samples and initial dc experiments are described. The main part of the paper describes the rf measurements which are performed in a superconducting niobium host cavity. The obtained results for both the surface resistance and the high field performance are discussed with respect to the preparation of the samples and regarding possible applications. 7 references, 7 figures, 2 tables

  14. Investigation of the possible technological use of magnetron-synthetic coverings on the basis of niobium nitridium to manufacture high conductivity windings during the generation of power magnetic fields

    Kadyrzhanov, K.; Zhetbaev, A.; Tuleushev, A.; Penkov, F.; Lisitsin, V.; Kim, S.; Tuleushev, Yu.; Turkebaev, T.; Borisenko, A.; Gorlachev, I.; Platov, A.; Lisuchin, S.; Skoz, E.; Zhukov, V.; Guliykin, Yu.; Chavalinsky, Yu.

    1996-01-01

    The main objective. The objective of this project is to investigate the possibilities for technological use of niobium nitride-based magnetron synthesized coatings for the purpose of manufacture of superconducting tape windings when generating strong magnetic fields for NMR-tomographs and commercial magnets. Background. Niobium nitride can be produced by sputtering as a continuous coating directly on the surface of a substrate made of a normal conductor, e.g. a copper or aluminium thin tape, by well-known techniques of plasma-chemical synthesis, using magnetron procedure (d.c. magnetron), allowing al synthesis, using magnetron procedure (d.c. magnetron), allowing to solve some difficult problems of superconductor manufacture by means of plastic deformation. For example, risk of break of a superconducting thread will no longer arises and the procedure of control for heat removal and relation between the thickness of superconducting and normal components will be made much easier, and, in turn, this enables to enhance stability of superconductivity and to prevent flux quench. Methodology. The group of eleven specialists from NNC RK will be occupied in the magnetron synthesis of niobium nitride coatings of copper and aluminum foils (five persons) and in its X-ray, nuclear-physical and electron microscopic analysis (six persons). The group of six specialists from the ULBA plant will be occupied in determination of the critical parameters of belt samples with niobium nitride coatings produced by Inst. of Nuclear Physics' specialists. Multi-purpose research test benches for determination of superconductor critical parameters that are available at the ULBA enables to test different types superconductor characteristics, including film ones, in magnetic fields up to 11 T at helium temperatures. Expected Results. As the result of the project execution complete evaluation concerning technical reasoning for magnetron ways of coating synthesis of niobium nitride when

  15. Evaluation of niobium dimethylamino-ethoxide for chemical vapour deposition of niobium oxide thin films

    Dabirian, Ali; Kuzminykh, Yury; Wagner, Estelle; Benvenuti, Giacomo; Rushworth, Simon; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) processes depend on the availability of suitable precursors. Precursors that deliver a stable vapour pressure are favourable in classical CVD processes, as they ensure process reproducibility. In high vacuum CVD (HV-CVD) process vapour pressure stability of the precursor is of particular importance, since no carrier gas assisted transport can be used. The dimeric Nb 2 (OEt) 10 does not fulfil this requirement since it partially dissociates upon heating. Dimethylamino functionalization of an ethoxy ligand of Nb(OEt) 5 acts as an octahedral field completing entity and leads to Nb(OEt) 4 (dmae). We show that Nb(OEt) 4 (dmae) evaporates as monomeric molecule and ensures a stable vapour pressure and, consequently, stable flow. A set of HV-CVD experiments were conducted using this precursor by projecting a graded molecular beam of the precursor onto the substrate at deposition temperatures from 320 °C to 650 °C. Film growth rates ranging from 8 nm·h −1 to values larger than 400 nm·h −1 can be obtained in this system illustrating the high level of control available over the film growth process. Classical CVD limiting conditions along with the recently reported adsorption–reaction limited conditions are observed and the chemical composition, and microstructural and optical properties of the films are related to the corresponding growth regime. Nb(OEt) 4 (dmae) provides a large process window of deposition temperatures and precursor fluxes over which carbon-free and polycrystalline niobium oxide films with growth rates proportional to precursor flux are obtained. This feature makes Nb(OEt) 4 (dmae) an attractive precursor for combinatorial CVD of niobium containing complex oxide films that are finding an increasing interest in photonics and photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. The adsorption–reaction limited conditions provide extremely small growth rates comparable to an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process

  16. Corrosion resistance of the substrates for the cryogenic gyroscope and electrodeposition of the superconductive niobium coatings

    Dubrovskiy, A. R.; Okunev, M. A.; Makarova, O. V.; Kuznetsov, S. A.

    2017-05-01

    The interaction of different materials with the niobium containing melt was investigated. As substrate materials the ceramics, beryllium and carbopyroceram were chosen. Several spherical ceramic and beryllium samples were coated with protective molybdenum and niobium films by magnetron sputtering and PVD, respectively. After the experiment (exposition time 10 min) the exfoliation of molybdenum film from ceramic samples was observed due to interaction of the substrate with the melt. The niobium protective coatings reacted with the melt with niobium oxide formation. The beryllium samples regardless of the shape and the presence of the protective films were dissolved in the niobium containing melt due to more negative electrode potential comparing with niobium one. The carbopyroceram samples were exposed in the melt during 3 and 12 h. It was found that the carbopyroceram not corrodes in the niobium containing melt. The optimal regimes for electrodeposition of smooth uniform niobium coatings with the thickness up to 50 μm on carbopyroceram spheres were found.

  17. Effect of high concentration of molybdenum on the structure and properties of niobium

    Trekina, M.I.; Vasil'eva, E.V.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of alloying of 20,25 and 30 % Mo on the structure and mechanical properties of niobium is studied. It is shown that niobium alloying with molybdenum in the studied concentration leads to grain grinding, which increases with the molybdenum content growth in the alloy. The effective energy values of recrystallization activation of the studied niobium and molybdenum alloys are determined. The high hardness level at some plasticity and deformability of niobium alloy with 20 % Mo is established

  18. Modelling of bulk superconductor magnetization

    Ainslie, M D; Fujishiro, H

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a topical review of the current state of the art in modelling the magnetization of bulk superconductors, including both (RE)BCO (where RE = rare earth or Y) and MgB 2 materials. Such modelling is a powerful tool to understand the physical mechanisms of their magnetization, to assist in interpretation of experimental results, and to predict the performance of practical bulk superconductor-based devices, which is particularly important as many superconducting applications head towards the commercialization stage of their development in the coming years. In addition to the analytical and numerical techniques currently used by researchers for modelling such materials, the commonly used practical techniques to magnetize bulk superconductors are summarized with a particular focus on pulsed field magnetization (PFM), which is promising as a compact, mobile and relatively inexpensive magnetizing technique. A number of numerical models developed to analyse the issues related to PFM and optimise the technique are described in detail, including understanding the dynamics of the magnetic flux penetration and the influence of material inhomogeneities, thermal properties, pulse duration, magnitude and shape, and the shape of the magnetization coil(s). The effect of externally applied magnetic fields in different configurations on the attenuation of the trapped field is also discussed. A number of novel and hybrid bulk superconductor structures are described, including improved thermal conductivity structures and ferromagnet–superconductor structures, which have been designed to overcome some of the issues related to bulk superconductors and their magnetization and enhance the intrinsic properties of bulk superconductors acting as trapped field magnets. Finally, the use of hollow bulk cylinders/tubes for shielding is analysed. (topical review)

  19. Metabolic and environmental aspects of fusion reactor activation products: niobium

    Easterly, C.E.; Shank, K.E.

    1977-11-01

    A summary of the metabolic and environmental aspects of niobium is presented. The toxicological symptoms from exposure to niobium are given, along with lethal concentration values for acute and chronic exposures. Existing human data are presented; animal uptake and retention data are analyzed for various routes of administration. Recommended metabolic values are also presented along with comments concerning their use and appropriateness. The natural distribution of niobium is given for freshwater, seawater, and the biosphere. Concentration factors and retention of 95 Nb in the environment are discussed with reference to: plant retention via leaf absorption; plant retention via root uptake; uptake in terrestrial animals from plants; uptake in freshwater organisms; uptake in marine organisms; and movement in soil. Conclusions are drawn regarding needs for future work in these areas. This review was undertaken because niobium is expected to be a key metal in the development of commercial fusion reactors. It is recognized that niobium will likely not be used in the first generation reactors as a structural material but will appear as an alloy in such materials as superconducting wire

  20. Metabolic and environmental aspects of fusion reactor activation products: niobium

    Easterly, C.E.; Shank, K.E.

    1977-11-01

    A summary of the metabolic and environmental aspects of niobium is presented. The toxicological symptoms from exposure to niobium are given, along with lethal concentration values for acute and chronic exposures. Existing human data are presented; animal uptake and retention data are analyzed for various routes of administration. Recommended metabolic values are also presented along with comments concerning their use and appropriateness. The natural distribution of niobium is given for freshwater, seawater, and the biosphere. Concentration factors and retention of /sup 95/Nb in the environment are discussed with reference to: plant retention via leaf absorption; plant retention via root uptake; uptake in terrestrial animals from plants; uptake in freshwater organisms; uptake in marine organisms; and movement in soil. Conclusions are drawn regarding needs for future work in these areas. This review was undertaken because niobium is expected to be a key metal in the development of commercial fusion reactors. It is recognized that niobium will likely not be used in the first generation reactors as a structural material but will appear as an alloy in such materials as superconducting wire.

  1. Development of technology of high-purity compounds of tantalum and niobium with octanol use

    Majorov, V.G.; Nikolaev, A.I.; Kopkov, V.K.; Baklanova, I.V.; Safonova, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    Effect of composition of solutions and extractant expenditure on tantalum and niobium distribution during extraction by octanol and purification of tantalum and niobium extracts from impurities was studied. Scheme was developed according to which samples of high-pure tantalum and niobium pentaoxides were prepared [ru

  2. Passive behaviour of zirconium, hafnium and niobium

    Hornkjoel, S.

    1990-01-01

    The paper deals mainly with the results of stationary and transient polarization measurements together with capacitance measurements on passive electrodes of Zr, Hf and Nb over the entire pH-scale. The passive current densities are exstremely low, and essentially both pH and potential independent, exept for Nb at high pH. The extrapolated potential of zero inverse capacitance seems to be different from the extrapolated potential of zero film thickness for Zr and Hf, but not for Nb. The potential versus time curves at constant current show a downwards bending for Zr and Hf. It is shown that the pitting potentials of Zr and Hf are dependent of the concentration of halide ions and the type of halide ion, but not on pH. It is also shown that the pitting induction is second-order stimulated by chloride ions and first-order hindered by sulphate ions. Results from electron transfer reactions on passive niobium are reported. 9 refs

  3. Mechanical niobium doping in barium titanate electroceramics

    Velasco-Davalos, I.A., E-mail: ivan.velascodavalos@gmail.com [Departmento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Zacatenco, 07338 México D.F. (Mexico); INRS-EMT, 1650 Boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes J3X 1S2 (Canada); Ruediger, A. [INRS-EMT, 1650 Boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes J3X 1S2 (Canada); Cruz-Rivera, J.J. [Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Sierra Leona 550, Lomas, 78210 S.L.P. (Mexico); Gomez-Yanez, C. [Departmento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Zacatenco, 07338 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-12-25

    Highlights: •We demonstrate a new doping procedure by Mechanical Alloying (MA). •For small dopant concentrations, charge compensation of Nb is primarily attributed to free electrons. •At higher Nb concentrations cation vacancies prevail as compensation mechanism. -- Abstract: Niobium is a well-established donor dopant for semi-conducting BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics. The conventional procedure to dissolve Nb into BaTiO{sub 3} relies on thermal activation at high temperatures (up to 1500 °C) and even then, large dwell times are necessary due to the small diffusion coefficients of Nb{sup 5+}. In this work, we demonstrate a new doping procedure by Mechanical Alloying (MA), which has already proven its potential for the fabrication of conductive electroceramics. In a planetary mill, powders of BaTiO{sub 3} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} were mixed for up to 540 min. The BaTiO{sub 3} unit cell volume increases with increasing Nb concentration. The electrical properties of conventional and mechanical alloyed samples as a function of Nb concentration are similar, however the mechanically alloyed samples shows a large conductivity that we attribute to a better homogeneity in the structure of MA-processed samples. For small dopant concentrations, charge compensation of the pentavalent Nb is primarily attributed to free electrons. At higher Nb concentrations cation vacancies prevail as compensation mechanism.

  4. Carbochlorination kinetics of tantalum and niobium pentoxides

    Allain, E.; Gaballah, I.; Garcia, F.; Ferreira, S.; Ayala, J. N.; Hernandez, A.

    1999-01-01

    The carbochlorination kinetics of pure Nb 2 O 5 and Ta 2 O 5 by gas mixture (CL 2 +CO+N 2 ) between 380 and 1,000 degree centigree is studied. A calculation of the standard free energy of the carbochlorination reactions is made. A diagram of the phases stability is drawn. The influence of the gas flow, temperature and the partial pressure of Cl 2 and Co at temperatures below 650 degree centigree on the reaction rate is studied. The apparent activation energy is approximately 75 and 110 kJ/mol for Nb 2 O 5 and Ta 2 O 5 , respectively. At temperatures above 650 degree centigree the Arrhenius diagram presents and anomaly which may be attributed to the decomposition of the COCL 2 formed in situ. The apparent reaction order of the carbochlorination of these oxides against Cl 2 +CO is approximately 2. The carbochlorination rates of these oxides are much greater than those of chlorination by Cl 2 +N 2 . The carbochlorination kinetics of tin furnace slag leaching concentrates containing tantalum and niobium compounds are also studied and compared with the carbochlorination kinetics of the pure oxides. (Author) 14 refs

  5. Radiation effects in uranium-niobium titanates

    Lian, J.; Wang, S.X.; Wang, L.M.; Ewing, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Pyrochlore is an important actinide host phase proposed for the immobilization of high level nuclear wastes and excess weapon plutonium.[1] Synthetic pyrochlore has a great variety of chemical compositions due to the possibility of extensive substitutions in the pyrochlore structure.[2] During the synthesis of pyrochlore, additional complex titanate phases may form in small quantities. The response of these phases to radiation damage must be evaluated because volume expansion of minor phases may cause micro-fracturing. In this work, two complex uranium-niobium titanates, U 3 NbO 9.8 (U-rich titanate) and Nb 3 UO 10 (Nb-rich titanate) were synthesized by the alkoxide/nitrate route at 1300 deg. C under an argon atmosphere. The phase composition and structure were analyzed by EDS, BSE, XRD, EMPA and TEM techniques. An 800 KeVKr 2+ irradiation was performed using the IVEM-Tandem Facility at Argonne National Laboratory in a temperature range from 30 K to 973 K. The radiation effects were observed by in situ TEM

  6. Detection of MM.-radiation with high current density submicron niobium-niobium Josephson junctions

    Daalmans, G.M.; Graauw, T. de; Lidholm, S.; Vliet, F. v.

    1980-01-01

    The rf-induced step heights in submicron niobium-niobium Josephson junctions are in good agreement with Russer theory at 230 and 240 GHz. At 115 and 460 GHz the agreement is less but still reasonably good. The junction noise without rf-bias is within a factor of two equal to the theoretical limit. With rf-bias applied it can be equal to the theoretical limit within a factor of two. The maximum conversion efficiency measured at 230 GHz was 0.18 and the lowest single side band mixer noise temperature at the same frequency was 380 K. Saturation effects are limiting the performance of the mixer. Improvements in eta and Tsub(M) of a factor of two can be expected by eliminating these saturation effects. The mixer which has been studied most extensively starting at 12-3-80 is still alive at 5-6-80 after many cooling cycles, storage at room temperature and soldering in and out of the dewar. The reliability of this type of junction cannot be questionable anymore. (orig.)

  7. Ferromagnet / superconductor oxide superlattices

    Santamaria, Jacobo

    2006-03-01

    The growth of heterostructures combining oxide materials is a new strategy to design novel artificial multifunctional materials with interesting behaviors ruled by the interface. With the (re)discovery of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) materials, there has been renewed interest in heterostructures involving oxide superconductors and CMR ferromagnets where ferromagnetism (F) and superconductivity (S) compete within nanometric distances from the interface. In F/S/F structures involving oxides, interfaces are especially complex and various factors like interface disorder and roughness, epitaxial strain, polarity mismatch etc., are responsible for depressed magnetic and superconducting properties at the interface over nanometer length scales. In this talk I will focus in F/S/F structures made of YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) and La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 (LCMO). The high degree of spin polarization of the LCMO conduction band, together with the d-wave superconductivity of the YBCO make this F/S system an adequate candidate for the search of novel spin dependent effects in transport. We show that superconductivity at the interface is depressed by various factors like charge transfer, spin injection or ferromagnetic superconducting proximity effect. I will present experiments to examine the characteristic distances of the various mechanisms of superconductivity depression. In particular, I will discuss that the critical temperature of the superconductor depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the F layers, giving rise to a new giant magnetoresistance effect which might be of interest for spintronic applications. Work done in collaboration with V. Peña^1, Z. Sefrioui^1, J. Garcia-Barriocanal^1, C. Visani^1, D. Arias^1, C. Leon^1 , N. Nemes^2, M. Garcia Hernandez^2, S. G. E. te Velthuis^3, A. Hoffmann^3, M. Varela^4, S. J. Pennycook^4. Work supported by MCYT MAT 2005-06024, CAM GR- MAT-0771/2004, UCM PR3/04-12399 Work at Argonne supported by the Department of Energy, Basic

  8. Topological Insulators and Superconductors for Innovative Devices

    2015-03-20

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 20120321 - 20150320 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Topological insulators and superconductors for innovative...locking, which hold promise for various innovative devices. Similarly, topological superconductors are associated with exotic surface states, which...298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Final Report Title: Topological Insulators and Superconductors for Innovative Devices

  9. Superconductors: The long road ahead

    Foner, S.; Orlando, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    Before the discovery of high-temperature superconductors, progress in superconductivity was measured by quite small increases in critical temperature, often of less than one degree. Today, there is no reason to believe that the dramatic leaps in critical temperature inaugurated by superconducting ceramics are over. Researchers may find new high-temperature superconducting materials with less severe technical limitations than the ceramics we know today. And if the day ever comes when a superconductor can be reliably manufactured to operate effectively at room temperature, then superconductors will be incorporated in a broad range of everyday household devices - motors, appliances, even children's toys - with a large consumer market. High-temperature superconductors may also cause us to extensively revise our traditional theories about how superconductivity works. Should it run out that superconductivity in ceramics involves new physical mechanisms, then these mechanisms could lead to applications never considered before. The recent discoveries have already reinvigorated superconductivity research. What was once largely the domain of a relatively small group of scientists has become a genuinely multidisciplinary realm. Now physicists, materials scientists, chemists, metallurgists, ceramists, and solid-state electronics engineers are all focusing on superconductivity. The cross-fertilization of these disciplines should contribute to further discoveries of importance to the practical application of superconductors

  10. High field superconductor development and understanding

    Larbalestier, David C. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Lee, Peter J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Tarantini, Chiara [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2014-09-28

    All present circular accelerators use superconducting magnets to bend and to focus the particle beams. The most powerful of these machines is the large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN. The main ring dipole magnets of the LHC are made from Nb-Ti but, as the machine is upgraded to higher luminosity, more powerful magnets made of Nb3Sn will be required. Our work addresses how to make the Nb3Sn conductors more effective and more suitable for use in the LHC. The most important property of the superconducting conductor used for an accelerator magnet is that it must have very high critical current density, the property that allows the generation of high magnetic fields in small spaces. Nb3Sn is the original high field superconductor, the material which was discovered in 1960 to allow a high current density in the field of about 9 T. For the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC, much higher current densities in fields of about 12 Tesla will be required. The critical value of the current density is of order 2600 A/mm2 in a field of 12 Tesla. But there are very important secondary factors that complicate the attainment of this critical current density. The first is that the effective filament diameter must be no larger than about 40 µm. The second factor is that 50% of the cross-section of the Nb3Sn conductor that is pure copper must be protected from any poisoning by any Sn leakage through the diffusion barrier that protects the package of niobium and tin from which the Nb3Sn is formed by a high temperature reaction. These three, somewhat conflicting requirements, mean that optimization of the conductor is complex. The work described in this contract report addresses these conflicting requirements. They show that very sophisticated characterizations can uncover the way to satisfy all 3 requirements and they also suggest that the ultimate optimization of Nb3Sn is still not yet in sight

  11. Studies on ceramic superconductors

    Chaklader, A.C.D.; Roemer, G.; Hardy, W.N.; Brewer, J.H.; Carolan, J.F.; Parsons, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    The superconducting properties of both bulk specimens and sputtered thin films of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O x compound have been studied. The bulk specimens were fabricated by cold pressing and sintering, and also by hot-pressing (subsequent reheating). The dc resistivity measurements showed a sharp drop in the temperature range 92-87K in this material. Muon spin relaxation (μSR) measurements of sintered discs in 3.4 kOe revealed the formation of a mixed state with an effective magnetic penetration depth λ ∼ 1365 angstrom at 6K, implying an effective charge carrier density of 6 x 10 21 cm -3 . The temperature dependence λ(T) is that of an ordinary s-wave superconductor. The resistivity of the thin film prepared from the compound by dc planar magnetron sputtering, showed a sharp drop to a very low value near 80K. The compound YBa 2 Cu 3 O x loses its superconducting properties, when either hot-pressed (in air) or oxidized at 500 degree C in high O 2 pressure, but this property can be restored when reheated in one atmosphere of O 2 above 900 degree C

  12. Parametrisation of the niobium thermal conductivity in the superconducting state

    Koechlin, F.; Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal conductivity measurements of niobium sheets manufactured for deep-drawing of superconducting cavities have been gathered. Due to various histories of the niobium samples and a wide range of metal purities (35< RRR<1750) the data offer a large scatter of thermal conductivities. An attempt is made to obtain an analytical expression with realistic parameters for the thermal conductivity between 1.8 K and 9.25 K. The set of parameters deduced from a least square fit of experimental data is not very different from those yielded by the theory of superconducting metals, taken as a starting point. This should make possible to obtain a reasonable guess of the thermal conductivity of niobium in this temperature range, once the RRR and the past history of the metal samples have been determined. (author)

  13. Characterization and sintering of niobium-ATR alumina

    Sibuya, N.H.; Iwasaki, H.; Suzuki, C.K.; Pinatti, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    In the niobium aluminothermy a slag is produced, composed mostly of alumina and other compounds such as niobium oxide and silica. The phase composition of this ATR alumina was characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry, and afterwards this alumina was subjected to leaching processes. It was noticed that the original content of 70% α-alumina in slag rose to 95% after the calcination. ATR alumina (leached and calcined, and without any treatment) was used to make pressed bodies which were fired in air at 1200 to 1400 0 C for 1 to 10,5 hours; and in vacuum at 1550 to 1800$0C for 2 hours. Characterization was done by density measurements, X-ray diffractometry and ultrasonic analysis. Ultrasonic analysis of some vacuum fired bodies showed londitudinal velocities close to the value found in literature. Correlation of several techniques measurements disclosed the niobium oxide interference in sintering. (Author) [pt

  14. Solid solutions of hydrogen in niobium, molybdenum and their alloys

    Ishikawa, T.T.

    1981-01-01

    The solubility of hydrogen in niobium, molybdenum and niobium-molybdenum alloys with varying atomic fraction of molybdenum from 0.15 to 0.75 was measured on the temperature range of 673 0 K to 1273 0 k for one atmosphere hydrogen pressure. The experimental technique involved the saturation of the solvent metal or alloy with hydrogen, followed by quenching and analysis of the solid solution. The results obtained of hydrogen solubility are consistent with the quasi-regular model for the dilute interstitial solid solutions. The partial molar enthalpy and partial molar entropy in excess of the dissolved hydrogen atoms were calculated from data of solubility versus reciprocal doping temperature. The variation of the relative partial molar enthalpy of hydrogen dissolved in niobium-molybdenum alloys, with the increase of molybdenum content of the alloy was analized. (Author) [pt

  15. Growth of anodic oxide films on oxygen-containing niobium

    Habazaki, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)]. E-mail: habazaki@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Ogasawara, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Konno, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Shimizu, K. [University Chemical Laboratory, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Asami, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Saito, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Nagata, S. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Skeldon, P. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Thompson, G.E. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-20

    The present study is directed at understanding of the influence of oxygen in the metal on anodic film growth on niobium, using sputter-deposited niobium containing from about 0-52 at.% oxygen, with anodizing carried out at high efficiency in phosphoric acid electrolyte. The findings reveal amorphous anodic niobia films, with no significant effect of oxygen on the field strength, transport numbers, mobility of impurity species and capacitance. However, since niobium is partially oxidized due to presence of oxygen in the substrate, less charge is required to form the films, hence reducing the time to reach a particular film thickness and anodizing voltage. Further, the relative thickness of film material formed at the metal/film interface is increased by the incorporation of oxygen species into the films from the substrate, with an associated altered depth of incorporation of phosphorus species into the films.

  16. Precipitation of hydrides in high purity niobium after different treatments

    Barkov, F.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation of lossy non-superconducting niobium hydrides represents a known problem for high purity niobium in superconducting applications. Using cryogenic optical and laser confocal scanning microscopy we have directly observed surface precipitation and evolution of niobium hydrides in samples after different treatments used for superconducting RF cavities for particle acceleration. Precipitation is shown to occur throughout the sample volume, and the growth of hydrides is well described by the fast diffusion-controlled process in which almost all hydrogen is precipitated at $T=140$~K within $\\sim30$~min. 120$^{\\circ}$C baking and mechanical deformation are found to affect hydride precipitation through their influence on the number of nucleation and trapping centers.

  17. Edge instabilities of topological superconductors

    Hofmann, Johannes S. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Assaad, Fakher F. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany); Schnyder, Andreas P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Nodal topological superconductors display zero-energy Majorana flat bands at generic edges. The flatness of these edge bands, which is protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry, gives rise to an extensive ground state degeneracy and a diverging density of states. Therefore, even arbitrarily weak interactions lead to an instability of the flat-band edge states towards time-reversal and translation-symmetry broken phases, which lift the ground-state degeneracy. Here, we employ Monte Carlo simulations combined with mean-field considerations to examine the instabilities of the flat-band edge states of d{sub xy}-wave superconductors. We find that attractive interactions induce a complex s-wave pairing instability together with a density wave instability. Repulsive interactions, on the other hand, lead to ferromagnetism mixed with spin-triplet pairing at the edge. We discuss the implications of our findings for experiments on cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  18. Superconductor stability, 1983: a review

    Dresner, L.

    1983-01-01

    Three main topics have been discussed in this paper, namely, internally cooled superconductors, cooling by superfluid helium, and metastable magnets. The discussion of each has centered around a dominant idea, and it is fitting to highlight these ideas by way of conclusion. With regard to internally cooled superconductors, most of what we have learned in the last few years centers on the strong motion caused by the thermal expansion of helium. How naive were our early calculations that treated the helium as though it were incompressible. Our discussion of He-II was organized around the Gorter-Mellink relation and the solutions of the nonlinear diffusion equation it gives rise to. And our discussion of metastable magnets revolved around the fruitful concept of the MPZ. These three ideas are sturdy trunks that support much of the thought about superconductor stability that has flowered in the past several years

  19. Topological insulators and topological superconductors

    Bernevig, Andrei B

    2013-01-01

    This graduate-level textbook is the first pedagogical synthesis of the field of topological insulators and superconductors, one of the most exciting areas of research in condensed matter physics. Presenting the latest developments, while providing all the calculations necessary for a self-contained and complete description of the discipline, it is ideal for graduate students and researchers preparing to work in this area, and it will be an essential reference both within and outside the classroom. The book begins with simple concepts such as Berry phases, Dirac fermions, Hall conductance and its link to topology, and the Hofstadter problem of lattice electrons in a magnetic field. It moves on to explain topological phases of matter such as Chern insulators, two- and three-dimensional topological insulators, and Majorana p-wave wires. Additionally, the book covers zero modes on vortices in topological superconductors, time-reversal topological superconductors, and topological responses/field theory and topolo...

  20. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  1. Study of dissipation in superconductors at high frequency regime

    Vallet, Christophe

    1994-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of the Joule effect dissipation occurring in superconducting accelerating cavities. Two mechanisms of dissipation are presented: the first concerns the magnetic flux present around the cryostat and trapped by the (Niobium) superconducting cavity during a temperature descent; a theoretical and experimental study allow the evaluation of the percentage of flux which rests trapped and its contribution to the dissipation. Improving the magnetic shielding leads to a remnant field of the order of several milli-Gauss and the surface resistance drops from 25 nΩ to 4.2 nΩ (with a few other modifications). The second mechanism is related to the polycrystalline structure of the superconductor. A theoretical study evaluates this contribution to about 3 nΩ. A complex process of recrystallization is needed in order to overcome this effect. Using an electron beam at low energy might help in reaching this goal and thus observing surface resistance values smaller than ever obtained. (author) [fr

  2. Multifilamentary Cu-Nb3Sn superconductor wires

    Rodrigues, D.; Pinatti, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on one of the main technological problems concerning Nb 3 Sn superconducting wires production which is the optimization of heat treatments for the formation of the A-15 intermetallic compound. At the present work, Nb 3 Sn superconducting wire is produced by solid-liquid diffusion method which increases considerably the critical current values of the superconductor. Through this method, niobium, copper and Sn 7% wt Cu alloy are kept in the pure state. Thus, the method dispenses intermediate heat treatments of recrystallization during the manufacturing process of the wire. After the wire was ready, optimization work of heat treatments was accomplished aiming to obtain its best superconducting characteristics, Measurement of critical temperature, critical current versus magnetic field, normal and at room temperature resistivity were performed, as well as scanning electron microscopy for determination of Nb 3 Sn layers and transmission electron microscopy measurements of redetermining the grain sizes in Nb 3 Sn formed in each treatment. It was obtained critical current densities of 1.8 x 10 6 A/cm 2 in the Nb 3 Sn layer, at 10 Teslas and 4.2 K. The samples were analyzed by employing the superconducting collective flux pinning theories and a satisfactory agreement between the experimental and theoretical data was attained. The production process and the small size of the filaments used made a successful optimization of the wire possible

  3. Topological surface states in nodal superconductors.

    Schnyder, Andreas P; Brydon, Philip M R

    2015-06-24

    Topological superconductors have become a subject of intense research due to their potential use for technical applications in device fabrication and quantum information. Besides fully gapped superconductors, unconventional superconductors with point or line nodes in their order parameter can also exhibit nontrivial topological characteristics. This article reviews recent progress in the theoretical understanding of nodal topological superconductors, with a focus on Weyl and noncentrosymmetric superconductors and their protected surface states. Using selected examples, we review the bulk topological properties of these systems, study different types of topological surface states, and examine their unusual properties. Furthermore, we survey some candidate materials for topological superconductivity and discuss different experimental signatures of topological surface states.

  4. Low noise niobium dc SQUID with a planar input coil

    de Waal, V. J.; van den Hamer, P.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    1983-02-01

    A practical all-niobium dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a niobium spiral input coil has been developed. The SQUID utilizes submicron Josephson junctions. The best intrinsic energy resolution obtained with a 1-nH SQUID is 4×10-32 J/Hz. A 20-turn 1.2-μH input coil is coupled to a 2.3-nH SQUID with an efficiency of 0.5. The energy resolution with respect to the coil is 1×10-30 J/Hz.

  5. Low noise niobium dc SQUID with a planar input coil

    de Waal, V.J.; van den Hamer, P.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    1983-02-15

    A practical all-niobium dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a niobium spiral input coil has been developed. The SQUID utilizes submicron Josephson junctions. The best intrinsic energy resolution obtained with a 1-nH SQUID is 4 x 10/sup -32/ J/Hz. A 20-turn 1.2-..mu..H input coil is coupled to a 2.3-nH SQUID with an efficiency of 0.5. The energy resolution with respect to the coil is 1 x 10/sup -30/ J/Hz.

  6. Niobium-Matrix-Composite High-Temperature Turbine Blades

    Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.; La Ferla, Raffaele; Heng, Sangvavann; Harding, John T.

    1995-01-01

    High-temperture composite-material turbine blades comprising mainly niobium matrices reinforced with refractory-material fibers being developed. Of refractory fibrous materials investigated, FP-AL(2)0(3), tungsten, and polymer-based SiC fibers most promising. Blade of this type hollow and formed in nearly net shape by wrapping mesh of reinforcing refractory fibers around molybdenum mandrel, then using thermal-gradient chemical-vapor infiltration (CVI) to fill interstices with niobium. CVI process controllable and repeatable, and kinetics of both deposition and infiltration well understood.

  7. Electromigration of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium, niobium, and tantalum

    Jensen, C.L.

    1977-10-01

    The electric mobility and effective valence of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium, niobium, tantalum and three niobium-tantalum alloys were measured. A resistance technique was used to directly determine the electric mobility of hydrogen and deuterium at 30 0 C while a steady-state method was used to measure the effective valence. The use of mass spectrographic techniques on a single specimen which contained both hydrogen and deuterium greatly increased the precision with which the isotope effect in the effective valence could be measured

  8. Thermal diffusivity of alumina-zirconia sintered with niobium additions

    Santos, W.N. dos; Paulin Filho, P.I.; Taylor, R.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of niobium oxide addition on the alumina-zirconia thermal diffusivity was investigated from 100 0 C to 1000 0 C by the laser flash method. It was observed that 4 to 6% addition of niobium oxide increases the thermal diffusivity when samples were sintered at 1450 0 C. This effect was due to elimination of porosity by formation of liquid please above 1420 0 C in the Al 2 O 3 - Nb 2 O 5 system. (author). 7 refs., 3 figs

  9. Oxygen diffusion in cuprate superconductors

    Routbort, J.L.; Rothman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Superconducting properties of the cuprate superconductors depend on the oxygen content of the material; the diffusion of oxygen is thus an important process in the fabrication and application of these materials. This article reviews studies of the diffusion of oxygen in La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 , YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7- δ, YBa 2 Cu 4 O 8 , and the Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca n-1 Cu n O 2+4 (n = 1, and 2) superconductors, and attempt to elucidate the atomic mechanisms responsible

  10. Classification of titanium dioxide

    Macias B, L.R.; Garcia C, R.M.; Maya M, M.E.; Ita T, A. De; Palacios G, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (Sem) and the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy techniques are used with the purpose to achieve a complete identification of phases and mixture of phases of a crystalline material as titanium dioxide. The problem for solving consists of being able to distinguish a sample of titanium dioxide being different than a titanium dioxide pigment. A standard sample of titanium dioxide with NIST certificate is used, which indicates a purity of 99.74% for the TiO 2 . The following way is recommended to proceed: a)To make an analysis by means of X-ray diffraction technique to the sample of titanium dioxide pigment and on the standard of titanium dioxide waiting not find differences. b) To make a chemical analysis by the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy via in a microscope, taking advantage of the high vacuum since it is oxygen which is analysed and if it is concluded that the aluminium oxide appears in a greater proportion to 1% it is established that is a titanium dioxide pigment, but if it is lesser then it will be only titanium dioxide. This type of analysis is an application of the nuclear techniques useful for the tariff classification of merchandise which is considered as of difficult recognition. (Author)

  11. Sorption of niobium on boreal forest soil

    Soederlund, Mervi; Hakanen, Martti; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry

    2015-07-01

    The sorption of niobium (Nb) was investigated on humus and mineral soil samples taken from various depths of a four-metre deep forest soil pit on Olkiluoto Island, southwestern Finland. Mass distribution coefficients, K{sub d}, were determined in batch sorption tests. The steady state of Nb sorption was observed in the mineral soil samples already after one week of equilibration, and sorption decreased with depth from a very high value of 185000 mL/g at 0.7 m to 54000 mL/g at 3.4 m. The reason behind this decrease is probably the tenfold reduction in the specific surface area of the soil at the same depth range. Distribution coefficients were clearly lower in the humus layer (1000 mL/g). The K{sub d} values determined in pure water at a pH range of 4.7-6.5 were at a high level (above 55000 mL/g), but decreased dramatically above pH 6.5, corresponding to the change in the major Nb species from the neutral Nb(OH){sub 5} to the low-sorbing anionic Nb(OH){sub 6}{sup -} and Nb(OH){sub 7}{sup 2-}. However, the K{sub d} values in the model soil solution were in the slightly alkaline range an order of magnitude higher than in pure water, which is probably caused by the formation of calcium niobate surface precipitate or electrostatic interaction between surface-sorbed calcium and solute Nb. Among nine soil constituent minerals kaolinite performed best in retaining Nb in both pure water and model soil solution at pH 8, whereas potassium feldspar showed the poorest sorption. The K{sub d} value for kaolinite was above 500000 mL/g in both solutions, while the respective potassium feldspar values were in the range of 120-220 mL/g.

  12. Variation of Mechanical Properties of High RRR And Reactor Grade Niobium With Heat Treatments

    Ganapati Myneni; H. Umezawa

    2003-06-01

    Superconducting rf cavities used as accelerating structures in particle accelerators are made from high purity niobium with residual resistance ratios greater than 250. Reactor grade niobium is also used to make wave-guide and/or end group components for these accelerating structures. The major impurities in this type of niobium are interstitially dissolved gases such as hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen in addition to carbon. After fabricating the niobium accelerating structures, they are subjected to heat treatments for several hours in vacuum at temperatures of up to 900 C for degassing hydrogen or up to 1400 C for improving the thermal conductivity of niobium considerably. These heat treatments are affecting the mechanical properties of niobium drastically. In this paper the variation of the mechanical properties of high purity and reactor grade niobium with heat treatments in a vacuum of {approx} 10{sup -6} Torr and temperatures from 600 C to 1250 C for periods of 10 to 6 hours are presented.

  13. Rotational Symmetry Breaking in a Trigonal Superconductor Nb-doped Bi_{2}Se_{3}

    Tomoya Asaba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for unconventional superconductivity has been focused on materials with strong spin-orbit coupling and unique crystal lattices. Doped bismuth selenide (Bi_{2}Se_{3} is a strong candidate, given the topological insulator nature of the parent compound and its triangular lattice. The coupling between the physical properties in the superconducting state and its underlying crystal symmetry is a crucial test for unconventional superconductivity. In this paper, we report direct evidence that the superconducting magnetic response couples strongly to the underlying trigonal crystal symmetry in the recently discovered superconductor with trigonal crystal structure, niobium (Nb-doped Bi_{2}Se_{3}. As a result, the in-plane magnetic torque signal vanishes every 60°. More importantly, the superconducting hysteresis loop amplitude is enhanced along one preferred direction, spontaneously breaking the rotational symmetry. This observation indicates the presence of nematic order in the superconducting ground state of Nb-doped Bi_{2}Se_{3}.

  14. Further developments in NbTi superconductors with artificial pinning centers

    Kanithi, H.C.; Valaris, P.; Motowidlo, L.R.; Zeitlin, B.A.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Artificial pinning centers (APC) have been successfully incorporated in multifilamentary NbTi based superconductors. using pure niobium as the pinning material and applying state-of-the-art processing technology, we have developed conductors which exhibit record low-field current densities. Two volume fractions of Nb have been investigated. One of the objectives of the present development effort is the feasibility study of billet scale-up from earlier work. A J 3 (3T) of ∼7500 A/mm 2 , which is twice that of the present MRI conductors, and a J c (5T) of ∼3400 A/mm 2 , have been achieved in samples. The results of this ongoing effort, in terms of conductor configuration, microstructure, critical current density, and pinning force, are presented in this paper. Appropriate comparisons with past performances are made

  15. Microwave superconductivity for particle accelerators - How the high TC superconductors measure up

    Padamsee, H.; Green, K.; Gruschus, J.

    1988-01-01

    Application of superconducting niobium cavities to accelerators for high energy physics, nuclear physics and free electron laser is growing rapidly. Cornell has a long standing effort in the development of superconducting RF accelerator technology. Nb cavities developed here from the basis for constructing the world's highest energy electron accelerator for nuclear physics. These cavities have set a standard against which the behavior of the new superconductors must be compared. From available results on dc critical fields, and the energy gap, it appears that the new materials could make a significant impact on the capabilities of future accelerators. Crucial to this assessment, however, are direct microwave loss measurements, together with measurements of the energy gap and RF frequency dependence as well as the behavior at high RF fields. Latest results on these properties for bulk sintered ceramics, thin films and single crystals at RF frequencies of 1.5 and 6 Ghz are presented

  16. Stability of superconductor

    Wada, Hitoshi; Takeuchi, Takao; Kuroda, Tsuneo

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the stability of superconductors, we constructed a measurement system of the critical current density Jr property as function of temperature, magnetic strength, azimuth of magnetic field and distortion. LabView program automatically controlled the magnetic field, temperature, rotational displacement, load, multimeter and sample source in the system. The superconducting critical surface of Nb 3 Al wire was prepared by two methods: a low temperature diffusion method and a phase transformation method. Nb 3 Al prepared by two methods proved the temperature scaling law of magnetic pinning force density and parameters for fitting the pinning model were introduced. The tailing of Jc-T curve at the high temperature side was generated by pinning property of magnetic flux line. On measurement of AC magnetic susceptibility, a primary stack (JR filament) of RIT Nb 3 Al wire prepared by phase transformation connected electrically and the size corresponded to the effective core size, so that, large n value was shown in spite of high temperature treatment and it showed good distortion resistance. Nb 3 Al wire prepared by low temperature diffusion method indicated large anisotropy of Bc 2 and Jc in the rectangular wire. On V 3 Ga, the temperature scaling law of magnetic field was not established and it was observed the effective grain boundary pinning at the low magnetic field and the other pinning mechanism of which magnetic flux line synchronized in the high temperature field. The specific magnetic azimuth dependency showed in the neighborhood of the parallel magnetic field. Jc indicated the positive dependence of temperature in the peak magnetic field. Jc of Bi oxides tape conductor was measured and the results showed the magnetic field was governed by magnetic field dependence on the c axis direction. (S.Y.)

  17. Electrowinning molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in it quest for global competitiveness CSIR Manufacturing and Materials Technology 3 Rationale – Titanium Cost Build-up Material Cost Ilmenite $0.27/kg Ti sponge Titanium slag $0.75/kg Ti Sponge TiCl4 and TiO2 $3....10/kg Ti Sponge Ti Sponge raw materials costs $5.50/kg Ti Sponge Total Ti Sponge cost $9-$11/kg Ti Sponge Ti ingot $15-17/kg Ti Aluminium $1.7/kg Al Supporting the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in its quest for global competitivenessorting...

  18. Loading rate and test temperature effects on fracture of in situ niobium silicide-niobium composites

    Rigney, J.D.; Lewandowski, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Arc cast, extruded, and heat-treated in situ composites of niobium silicide (Nb 5 Si 3 ) intermetallic with niobium phases (primary--Nb p and secondary--Nb s ) exhibited high fracture resistance in comparison to monolithic Nb 5 Si 3 . In toughness tests conducted at 298 K and slow applied loading rates, the fracture process proceeded by the microcracking of the Nb 5 Si 3 and plastic deformation of the Nb p and Nb s phases, producing resistance-curve behavior and toughnesses of 28 MPa√m with damage zone lengths less than 500 microm. The effects of changes in the Nb p yield strength and fracture behavior on the measured toughnesses were investigated by varying the loading rates during fracture tests at both 77 and 298 K. Quantitative fractography was utilized to completely characterize each fracture surface created at 298 K in order to determine the type of fracture mode (i.e., dimpled, cleavage) exhibited by the Nb p . Specimens tested at either higher loading rates or lower test temperatures consistently exhibited a greater amount of cleavage fracture in the Nb p , while the Nb s always remained ductile. However, the fracture toughness values determined from experiments spanning six orders of magnitude in loading rate at 298 and 77 K exhibited little variation, even under conditions when the majority of Nb p phases failed by cleavage at 77 K. The changes in fracture mode with increasing loading rate and/or decreasing test temperature and their effects on fracture toughness are rationalized by comparison to existing theoretical models

  19. Method of processing titanium aluminium alloys modified by chromium and niobium

    Huang, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes the method of processing a TiAl base alloy to impart desirable strength and ductility properties which providing a melt of the TiAl base alloy having the formula Ti 51-42 Al 46-50 Cr 1-3 Nb 1-5

  20. Critical current degradation in superconducting niobium-titanium alloys in external magnetic fields under loading

    Bojko, V.S.; Lazareva, M.B.; Starodubov, Ya.D.; Chernyj, O.V.; Gorbatenko, V.M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of external magnetic fields on the stress at which the critical current starts to degrade (the degradation threshold σ 0 e ) under mechanical loads in superconducting Nb-Ti alloys is studied and a possible mechanism of realization of the effect observed is proposed.It is assumed that additional stresses on the transformation dislocation from the external magnetic fields are beneficial for the growth of martensite inclusions whose superconducting parameters (critical current density j k and critical temperature T k ) are lower then those in the initial material.The degradation threshold is studied experimentally in external magnetic fields H up to 7 T.The linear dependence σ 0 e (H) is observed.It is shown that external magnetic fields play an important role in the critical current degradation at the starting stages of deformation.This fact supports the assumption that the degradation of superconducting parameters under loading are due to the phenomenon of superelasticity,i.e. a reversible load-induced change in the martensite inclusions sizes rather than the reversible mechanical twinning.The results obtained are thought to be important to estimating superconducting solenoid stability in a wide range of magnetic fields

  1. Effect of aluminium on formation of metastable phases in titanium-niobium alloys

    Trenogina, T.L.; Derevyanko, V.N.; Vozilkin, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    Specific features of phase transformations in the alloy of Ti-20Nb-29Al (at.%) are investigated in comparison with those in the aluminium-free Ti-21Nb alloy. It is states that in the alloy Ti-20Nb-29Al on quenching the ordering of β-solid solution takes place with B2-structure formation. The B2-matrix experiences decomposition with the formation of ordered Ω 0 -phase which field ranges up to 700 deg C. The investigation results show that the sequence of phase formation in Ti-Nb-Al and aluminium-free alloys is much the same. The only difference between them is the formation of ordered phases in the alloy Ti-20Nb-29Al [ru

  2. Effect of niobium and titanium addition on the hot ductility of boron containing steel

    Cho, Kyung Chul; Mun, Dong Jun; Koo, Yang Mo; Lee, Jae Sang

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Addition of only Nb without Ti has little influence in the hot ductility of B steel. → Hot ductility loss of B-Nb steel is due to grain boundary precipitation of BN. → Adding a small amount of Ti improve the hot ductility of B-Nb steel. → In B-Nb-Ti steel, hot ductility improvement is related to presence of TiN particle. → Presence of TiN particles makes the BN precipitates' distribution more homogeneous. - Abstract: Hot ductility of boron containing steel (B steel) with adding Nb (0.03 wt.%) (B-Nb steel) and B-Nb steel with adding Ti (0.0079 wt.%) (B-Nb-Ti steel) was quantified using hot tensile tests. The specimens were solution-treated at 1350 deg. C and cooled at 20 deg. C s -1 to tensile test temperature (T) in the range of 750 ≤ T ≤ 1050 deg. C. After that, they were strained to failure at a strain rate of 2.5 x 10 -3 s -1 . For the B-Nb steel, severe hot ductility loss was observed at 850 ≤ T ≤ 950 deg. C, which covered the low temperature in which austenite (γ) single-phase exists, and the high temperature at which γ and ferrite (α) coexist. Ductility loss in the B-Nb steel was caused by the presence of a network of BN precipitates, rather than by Nb(C, N) precipitates at the γ grain boundaries. In contrast, hot ductility of the B-Nb-Ti steel was remarkably improved at 850 ≤ T ≤ 950 deg. C. In the B-Nb-Ti steel, BN precipitates preferentially on TiN particles, resulting in increased BN precipitation in the γ grain interior and a decrease in the network of BN precipitates at the γ grain boundaries. These changes reduce strain localization at the γ grain boundaries and therefore increase the hot ductility of the steel.

  3. Porous niobium coatings fabricated with selective laser melting on titanium substrates: Preparation, characterization, and cell behavior

    Zhang, Sheng [Science and Technology on Power Beam Processes Laboratory, Beijing Aeronautical Manufacturing Technology Research Institute (BAMTRI), Beijing 100024 (China); State Key Lab of Materials Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Cheng, Xian; Yao, Yao; Wei, Yehui [Department of Stomatology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Han, Changjun; Shi, Yusheng [State Key Lab of Materials Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wei, Qingsong, E-mail: wqs_xn@163.com [State Key Lab of Materials Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Zhen, E-mail: zhangzhentitanium@163.com [State Key Lab of Materials Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Stomatology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China)

    2015-08-01

    Nb, an expensive and refractory element with good wear resistance and biocompatibility, is gaining more attention as a new metallic biomaterial. However, the high price of the raw material, as well as the high manufacturing costs because of Nb's strong oxygen affinity and high melting point have limited the widespread use of Nb and its compounds. To overcome these disadvantages, porous Nb coatings of various thicknesses were fabricated on Ti substrate via selective laser melting (SLM), which is a 3D printing technique that uses computer-controlled high-power laser to melt the metal. The morphology and microstructure of the porous Nb coatings, which had pores ranging from 15 to 50 μm in size, were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The average hardness of the coating, which was measured with the linear intercept method, was 392 ± 37 HV. In vitro tests of the porous Nb coating which was monitored with SEM, immunofluorescence, and CCK-8 counts of cells, exhibited excellent cell morphology, attachment, and growth. The simulated body fluid test also proved the bioactivity of the Nb coating. Therefore, these new porous Nb coatings could potentially be used for enhanced early biological fixation to bone tissue. In addition, this study has shown that SLM technique could be used to fabricate coatings with individually tailored shapes and/or porosities from group IVB and VB biomedical metals and their alloys on stainless steel, Co–Cr, and other traditional biomedical materials without wasting raw materials. - Highlights: • Porous Nb coating was firstly fabricated on Ti substrate by SLM technique. • Morphology, microstructure and hardness of the coating were characterized. • In vitro test of the coating showed good cell attachment, morphology and growth.

  4. INTERMEDIATE STAGES OF REACTIONS FORMING CARBIDES OF TITANIUM, ZIRCONIUM, VANADIUM, NIOBIUM, AND TANTALIUM

    intermediate and final products, and also during the calculation of approximate heat values of their formation, the passage of the reaction is confirmed...for obtaining TiC, and ZrC through the stage of intermediate oxides Ti2O3, Ti3O5, TiO and Zr2O3, ZrO, respectively and also for the reaction of...forming carbides of V (from V2O3 + 5C), of Nb and Ta (from Nb2O5 + 7C and Ta205 + 7C) through the stage of intermediate oxides VO, V4O and TaO2, Ta4O. The

  5. Porous niobium coatings fabricated with selective laser melting on titanium substrates: Preparation, characterization, and cell behavior.

    Zhang, Sheng; Cheng, Xian; Yao, Yao; Wei, Yehui; Han, Changjun; Shi, Yusheng; Wei, Qingsong; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Nb, an expensive and refractory element with good wear resistance and biocompatibility, is gaining more attention as a new metallic biomaterial. However, the high price of the raw material, as well as the high manufacturing costs because of Nb's strong oxygen affinity and high melting point have limited the widespread use of Nb and its compounds. To overcome these disadvantages, porous Nb coatings of various thicknesses were fabricated on Ti substrate via selective laser melting (SLM), which is a 3D printing technique that uses computer-controlled high-power laser to melt the metal. The morphology and microstructure of the porous Nb coatings, which had pores ranging from 15 to 50 μm in size, were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The average hardness of the coating, which was measured with the linear intercept method, was 392±37 HV. In vitro tests of the porous Nb coating which was monitored with SEM, immunofluorescence, and CCK-8 counts of cells, exhibited excellent cell morphology, attachment, and growth. The simulated body fluid test also proved the bioactivity of the Nb coating. Therefore, these new porous Nb coatings could potentially be used for enhanced early biological fixation to bone tissue. In addition, this study has shown that SLM technique could be used to fabricate coatings with individually tailored shapes and/or porosities from group IVB and VB biomedical metals and their alloys on stainless steel, Co-Cr, and other traditional biomedical materials without wasting raw materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Porous niobium coatings fabricated with selective laser melting on titanium substrates: Preparation, characterization, and cell behavior

    Zhang, Sheng; Cheng, Xian; Yao, Yao; Wei, Yehui; Han, Changjun; Shi, Yusheng; Wei, Qingsong; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Nb, an expensive and refractory element with good wear resistance and biocompatibility, is gaining more attention as a new metallic biomaterial. However, the high price of the raw material, as well as the high manufacturing costs because of Nb's strong oxygen affinity and high melting point have limited the widespread use of Nb and its compounds. To overcome these disadvantages, porous Nb coatings of various thicknesses were fabricated on Ti substrate via selective laser melting (SLM), which is a 3D printing technique that uses computer-controlled high-power laser to melt the metal. The morphology and microstructure of the porous Nb coatings, which had pores ranging from 15 to 50 μm in size, were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The average hardness of the coating, which was measured with the linear intercept method, was 392 ± 37 HV. In vitro tests of the porous Nb coating which was monitored with SEM, immunofluorescence, and CCK-8 counts of cells, exhibited excellent cell morphology, attachment, and growth. The simulated body fluid test also proved the bioactivity of the Nb coating. Therefore, these new porous Nb coatings could potentially be used for enhanced early biological fixation to bone tissue. In addition, this study has shown that SLM technique could be used to fabricate coatings with individually tailored shapes and/or porosities from group IVB and VB biomedical metals and their alloys on stainless steel, Co–Cr, and other traditional biomedical materials without wasting raw materials. - Highlights: • Porous Nb coating was firstly fabricated on Ti substrate by SLM technique. • Morphology, microstructure and hardness of the coating were characterized. • In vitro test of the coating showed good cell attachment, morphology and growth

  7. Development of superconductor application technology

    Hong, G W; Kim, C J; Lee, H G; Lee, H J; Kim, K B; Won, D Y; Jang, K I; Kwon, S C; Kim, W J; Ji, Y A; Yang, S W; Kim, W K; Park, S D; Lee, M H; Lee, D M; Park, H W; Yu, J K; Lee, I S; Kim, J J; Choi, H S; Chu, Y; Kim, Y S; Kim, D H

    1997-09-01

    Fabrication of high Tc bulk superconductor and its application, fabrication of superconducting wire for electric power device and analysis for cryogenic system were carried out for developing superconductor application technologies for electric power system. High quality YBaCuO bulk superconductor was fabricated by controlling initial powder preparation process and prototype flywheel energy storage device was designed basically. The superconducting levitation force measuring device was made to examine the property of prepared superconductor specimen. Systematic studies onthe method of starting powder preparation, mechanical fabrication process, heat treatment condition and analysis of plastic deformation were carried out to increase the stability and reproducibility of superconducting wire. A starting power with good reactivity and fine particle size was obtained by mechanical grinding, control of phase assemblage, and emulsion drying method. Ag/BSCCO tape with good cross sectional shape and Jc of 20,000 A/cm{sup 2} was fabricated by applying CIP packing procedure. Multifilamentary wire with Jc of 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} was fabricated by rolling method using square billet as starting shape. The joining of the multifilamentary wire was done by etching and pressing process and showed 50% of joining efficiency. Analysis on the heat loss in cryostat for high Tc superconducting device was carried out for optimum design of the future cryogenic system. (author). 66 refs., 104 figs.

  8. Ceramic high-temperature superconductors

    Marquart, R.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution presents an overview treatment of the structure of the new superconductors (YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x ). Methods of powder production and processing technology are described, with current development projects by Dornier being taken into consideration. (orig.) [de

  9. Testing Superconductor Logic Integrated Circuits

    Arun, A.J.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2005-01-01

    Superconductor logic has the potential of extremely low-power consumption and ultra-fast digital signal processing. Unfortunately, the obtained yield of the present processes is low and specific faults occur. This paper deals with fault-modelling, Design-for-Test structures, and ATPG for these

  10. High Temperature Superconductor Machine Prototype

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Træholt, Chresten

    2011-01-01

    A versatile testing platform for a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) machine has been constructed. The stationary HTS field winding can carry up to 10 coils and it is operated at a temperature of 77K. The rotating armature is at room temperature. Test results and performance for the HTS field...

  11. Vortex lattices in layered superconductors

    Prokic, V.; Davidovic, D.; Dobrosavljevic-Grujic, L.

    1995-01-01

    We study vortex lattices in a superconductor--normal-metal superlattice in a parallel magnetic field. Distorted lattices, resulting from the shear deformations along the layers, are found to be unstable. Under field variation, nonequilibrium configurations undergo an infinite sequence of continuous transitions, typical for soft lattices. The equilibrium vortex arrangement is always a lattice of isocell triangles, without shear

  12. Superconductors by powder metallurgy techniques

    Pickus, M.R.; Wang, J.L.F.

    1976-05-01

    Fabrication methods for Nb 3 Sn type compounds are described. Information is included on the Bell Telephone process, the General Electric tape process, superconductor stability, the bronze process, powder metallurgy multifilamentary tapes and wires, and current assessment of powder metallurgy superconducting wire

  13. Dynamics of vortices in superconductors

    Weinan, E.

    1992-01-01

    We study the dynamics of vortices in type-II superconductors from the point of view of time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations. We outline a proof of existence, uniqueness and regularity of strong solutions for these equations. We then derive reduced systems of ODEs governing the motion of the vortices in the asymptotic limit of large Ginzburg-Landau parameter

  14. Development of superconductor application technology

    Hong, G. W.; Kim, C. J.; Lee, H. G.; Lee, H. J.; Kim, K. B.; Won, D. Y.; Jang, K. I.; Kwon, S. C.; Kim, W. J.; Ji, Y. A.; Yang, S. W.; Kim, W. K.; Park, S. D.; Lee, M. H.; Lee, D. M.; Park, H. W.; Yu, J. K.; Lee, I. S.; Kim, J. J.; Choi, H. S.; Chu, Y.; Kim, Y. S.; Kim, D. H.

    1997-09-01

    Fabrication of high Tc bulk superconductor and its application, fabrication of superconducting wire for electric power device and analysis for cryogenic system were carried out for developing superconductor application technologies for electric power system. High quality YBaCuO bulk superconductor was fabricated by controlling initial powder preparation process and prototype flywheel energy storage device was designed basically. The superconducting levitation force measuring device was made to examine the property of prepared superconductor specimen. Systematic studies onthe method of starting powder preparation, mechanical fabrication process, heat treatment condition and analysis of plastic deformation were carried out to increase the stability and reproducibility of superconducting wire. A starting power with good reactivity and fine particle size was obtained by mechanical grinding, control of phase assemblage, and emulsion drying method. Ag/BSCCO tape with good cross sectional shape and Jc of 20,000 A/cm 2 was fabricated by applying CIP packing procedure. Multifilamentary wire with Jc of 10,000 A/cm 2 was fabricated by rolling method using square billet as starting shape. The joining of the multifilamentary wire was done by etching and pressing process and showed 50% of joining efficiency. Analysis on the heat loss in cryostat for high Tc superconducting device was carried out for optimum design of the future cryogenic system. (author). 66 refs., 104 figs

  15. Chemistry of high temperature superconductors

    1991-01-01

    This review volume contains the most up-to-date articles on the chemical aspects of high temperature oxide superconductors. These articles are written by some of the leading scientists in the field and includes a comprehensive list of references. This is an essential volume for researchers working in the fields of ceramics, materials science and chemistry.

  16. Strain effects in oxide superconductors

    Wada, H.; Kuroda, T.; Sekine, H.; Yuyama, M.; Itoh, K.

    1991-01-01

    Strain sensitivities of superconducting properties are critical to high magnetic field applications of superconductors, since critical temperature, T c , upper critical field, H c2 , and critical current (density), I c (J c ), are all degraded under strains. Oxide superconductors so far known are all very fragile, thus requiring to be fabricated in the form of composite. In the case of practical metallic superconductors, such as Nb 3 Sn and V 3 Ga, the so-called bronze method has been developed where these superconducting intermetallics are enveloped in a ductile metallic sheath. Recently, a fabrication method similar to the bronze method has been developed for the Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O x superconductors using Ag tubes as sheath. In the present study mono- and multicore BiPbSrCaCuO tape conductors were prepared by means of this Ag-sheath composite method, and examined in terms of strain sensitivity by measuring their T c and I c (J c ) under bending or tensile strains. (orig.)

  17. Type II Quantum Computing With Superconductors

    Orlando, Terry

    2004-01-01

    ... for adiabatic quantum computing using these qubits. The major experimental results on single superconducting persistent current qubits have been the observation of the quantum energy level crossings in niobium qubits, and the microwave measurements...

  18. Solubility of nitrogen in iron alloys with vanadium and niobium

    Pomarin, Yu.M.; Grigorenko, G.M.; Lakomskij, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in the concentration range under study in Fe-N-V and Fe-N-Nb systems is in compliance with Syverts' law. An equation has been set up so as to estimate the nitrogen solubility in the iron alloys containing up to 10 per cent of vanadium and niobium in the wide temperature range

  19. Preferred orientations in niobium determined by neutrons diffraction

    Ueno, S.I.N.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been utilized to study textures developed in polycrystalline niobium, cold rolled to 60%, 80% and 95% in tickness and cold rolled to 95% in thickness and annealed at 800 0 C for 15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes in a vacuum of 10 -4 TORR [pt

  20. Mechanical behaviour of copper 15% volume niobium microcomposite wires

    Marcello Filgueira

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu-Nb microcomposites are attractive in magnet pulsed field technology applications due to their anomalous mechanism of mechanical strength and high electrical conductivity. In this sense, recently it was conceived the use of Cu 15% vol. Nb wires to operate as a high tensile strength cable for a diamond cutting tool (diamond wires for marble and granite slabbing. The multifilamentary Cu 15% vol. Nb composite was obtained using a new processing route, starting with niobium bars bundled into copper tubes, without arc melting. Cold working techniques, such as swaging and wire drawing, combined with heat treatments such as sintering and annealing, and tube restacking were employed. The tensile property of the composite was measured as a function of the niobium filaments dimensions and morphology into the copper matrix, in the several processing steps. An ultimate tensile strength (UTS of 960 MPa was obtained for an areal reduction (R = Ao/A, with Ao-initial cross section area, and A-final cross section area of 4x10(8 X, in which the niobium filaments reached thickness less than 20 nm. The anomalous mechanical strength increase is attributed to the fact that the niobium filaments acts as a barrier to copper dislocations.

  1. High-Q superconducting niobium cavities for gravitational wave detectors

    De Paula, L A N; Furtado, S R; Aguiar, O D; N F Oliveira Jr, N F Oliveira Jr; Castro, P J; Barroso, J J

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to optimize the electric Q-factor of superconducting niobium klystron cavities to be used in parametric transducers of the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector. Many cavities were manufactured from niobium with relatively high tantalum impurities (1420 ppm) and they were cryogenically tested to determine their resonance frequencies, unloaded electrical quality factors (Q 0 ) and electromagnetic couplings. These cavities were closed with a flat niobium plate with tantalum impurities below 1000 ppm and an unloaded electrical quality factors of the order of 10 5 have been obtained. AC conductivity of the order of 10 12 S/m has been found for niobium cavities when matching experimental results with computational simulations. These values for the Q-factor would allow the detector to reach the quantum limit of sensitivity of ∼ 10 −22 Hz −1/2 in the near future, making it possible to search for gravitational waves around 3.2 kHz. The experimental tests were performed at the laboratories of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and at the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv - CTA)

  2. Quantitative analysis method for niobium in lead zirconate titanate

    Hara, Hideo; Hashimoto, Toshio

    1986-01-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is a strong dielectric ceramic having piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties, and is used most as a piezoelectric material. Also it is a main component of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT), which is a typical electrical-optical conversion element. Since these have been developed, the various electronic parts utilizing the piezoelectric characteristics have been put in practical use. The characteristics can be set up by changing the composition of PZT and the kinds and amount of additives. Among the additives, niobium has the action to make metallic ion vacancy in crystals, and by the formation of this vacancy, to ease the movement of domain walls in crystal grains, and to increase resistivity. Accordingly, it is necessary to accurately determine the niobium content for the research and development, quality control and process control. The quantitative analysis methods for niobium used so far have respective demerits, therefore, the authors examined the quantitative analysis of niobium in PZT by using an inductively coupled plasma emission spectro-analysis apparatus which has remarkably developed recently. As the result, the method of dissolving a specimen with hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid, and masking unstable lead with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid 2 sodium and fluoride ions with boric acid was established. The apparatus, reagents, the experiment and the results are reported. (Kako, I.)

  3. Fatigue crack growth behavior in niobium-hydrogen alloys

    Lin, M.C.C.; Salama, K.

    1997-01-01

    Near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior has been investigated in niobium-hydrogen alloys. Compact tension specimens (CTS) with three hydrogen conditions are used: hydrogen-free, hydrogen in solid solution, and hydride alloy. The specimens are fatigued at a temperature of 296 K and load ratios of 0.05, 0.4, and 0.75. The results at load ratios of 0.05 and 0.4 show that the threshold stress intensity range (ΔK th ) decreases as hydrogen is added to niobium. It reaches a minimum at the critical hydrogen concentration (C cr ), where maximum embrittlement occurs. The critical hydrogen concentration is approximately equal to the solubility limit of hydrogen in niobium. As the hydrogen concentration exceeds C cr , ΔK th increases slowly as more hydrogen is added to the specimen. At load ratio 0.75, ΔK th decreases continuously as the hydrogen concentration is increased. The results provide evidence that two mechanisms are responsible for fatigue crack growth behavior in niobium-hydrogen alloys. First, embrittlement is retarded by hydride transformation--induced and plasticity-induced crack closures. Second, embrittlement is enhanced by the presence of hydrogen and hydride

  4. Thermodynamic analysis of reduction reactions of niobium oxides

    Takano, C.

    1981-01-01

    Reduction processes of niobium oxides by hydrogen, carbon and aluminium are analysed thermodinamically. It is shown that reduction by hydrogen is not technically feasible. High purity of raw materials is required. In the carbothermic process impurities which react to form high stability carbides should be avoided. (Author) [pt

  5. Manufacturing of the L band 9-cell niobium cavity

    Matsuoka, Masanori; Ohkubo, Kohichi; Yamanaka, Toshiyuki; Kako, Eiji; Saito, Kenji; Shishido, Toshio; Ono, Masaaki; Noguchi, Shuichi.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, L-band niobium superconducting cavities have been developed with collaboration between our company and National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK). The manufacturing procedure and the performance of 9-cell superconducting cavity are presented. The maximum accelerating gradient of 12 MV/m was attained in a cold test. (author)

  6. Method for the fabrication of filamentary superconductors

    McDougall, I.L.; Barber, A.C.

    1979-06-21

    There is produced a superconducting intermetallic compound, e.g. Nb/sub 3/Sn. For this purpose a precursor is formed in the shape of a copper-plated niobium thread by repeated drawing technique through reduction nozzles. Several niobium threads are to be embedded within a copper matrix on which Sn is coated in a number of layers. The copper matrix is then homogenized by an inward diffusion of Sn at temperatures between 230 and 760/sup 0/C.

  7. Method for the fabrication of filamentary superconductors

    McDougall, I.L.; Barber, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    There is produced a superconducting intermetallic compound, e.g. Nb 3 Sn. For this purpose a precursor is formed in the shape of a copper-plated niobium thread by repeated drawing technique through reduction nozzles. Several niobium threads are to be embedded within a copper matrix on which Sn is coated in a number of layers. The copper matrix is then homogenized by an inward diffusion of Sn at temperatures between 230 and 760 0 C. (RW) [de

  8. Noburnium: Systems design of niobium superalloys

    Misra, Abhijeet

    2005-11-01

    A systems-based approach, integrating quantum mechanical calculations with efficient experimentation, was employed to design niobium-based superalloys. The microstructural concept of gamma-gamma' nickel-based superalloys was adopted, where, the coherent gamma ' aluminides act both as the strengthening phase and a source of aluminum for Al2O3 passivation. Building on previous research, the selected bcc-type ordered aluminide was L2 1 structured Pd2HfAl phase. Comprehensive phase relations were measured on Nb-Pd-Hf-Al prototype alloys, and key tie-tetrahedra were identified. Aluminide precipitation in a bcc matrix was demonstrated in designed Nb+Pd2HfAl alloys. Thermodynamic databases were developed by integrating first-principles calculations with measured phase relations. Atomic volume models were developed for the bcc matrix and the Pd2HfAl phase and matrix elements which would reduce lattice misfit were identified. An experimental 2-phase alloy demonstrated a misfit of 3%. A modified Wagner's model was used to predict the required transient properties to form external Al2O3. The principal oxidation design goal was to decrease the oxygen permeability ( NSOx DO ) divided by the aluminum diffusivity (DAl) by 5 orders of magnitude. A multicomponent mobility database was developed to predict the diffusivities. Guided by first-principles calculations the effect of alloying elements on the oxygen diffusivity in Nb was measured, and the mobility database was experimentally validated. Based on the mobility database, it was found that increasing Al solubility in the bcc matrix greatly increased Al diffusivity. Alloying elements were identified that would increase Al solubility in the bcc matrix. Prototype alloys were prepared and the best oxidation performance was exhibited by a bcc+Nb2Al Nb-Hf-Al alloy, which exhibited parabolic oxidation behavior at 1300°C. The alloy was shown to have achieved the required 5 orders of magnitude reduction in the design parameter. The

  9. Fluctuoscopy of Superconductors

    Varlamov, Andrey

    2012-02-01

    The study of superconducting fluctuations (SF) is a subject of fundamental and practical importance. Since the moment of discovery SF became a noticeable part of research in the field of superconductivity (SC) and a variety of fluctuation effects have been detected. The interest to SF in SC was regenerated by the discovery of HTS, where, due to extremely short coherence length and low effective dimensionality of the electron system, SF manifest themselves in a wide range of temperatures. The characteristic feature of SF is their strong dependence on temperature and magnetic field. This allows to separate SFs from other contributions and to use them as a tool for characterization of SC systems (``fluctuoscopy'') for example to extract the values of Tc, Hc2(T) and phase-breaking time from experimental data. We present the complete results for fluctuation magneto-conductivity (FMC) and Nernst signal (FNS) of impure 2D superconductor in the whole phase diagram above the transition line Hc2(T), including the domain of quantum fluctuations. Along some line H0(T), in agreement with experimental findings, FMC becomes zero and beyond it remains small and negative. The corresponding surface in coordinates (T,H) becomes in particular non-trivial at low temperatures and close to Hc2(0), where it is trough-shaped. The observation of large FNS in HTS and conventional SC above Tc(H), has attracted much attention recently. The idea to attribute it to the entropy transport by analogy to vortices was proposed. On the other hand this giant effect, close to Tc(0), was explained in terms of SF. Our general results allow to successfully fit the available experimental data in a wide range of magnetic fields and temperatures, to extract the value of the ``ghost'' field and other parameters of SC. We offer also a qualitative consideration, which gives a natural explanation for the giant value of FNS attributing it to a strong dependence of the fluctuation Cooper pair (FCP) chemical

  10. Chitosan patterning on titanium alloys

    Gilabert Chirivella, Eduardo; Pérez Feito, Ricardo; Ribeiro, Clarisse; Ribeiro, Sylvie; Correia, Daniela; González Martin, María Luisa; Manero Planella, José María; Lanceros Méndez, Senentxu; Gallego Ferrer, Gloria; Gómez Ribelles, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are widely used in medical implants because of their excellent properties. However, bacterial infection is a frequent cause of titanium-based implant failure and also compromises its osseointegration. In this study, we report a new simple method of providing titanium surfaces with antibacterial properties by alternating antibacterial chitosan domains with titanium domains in the micrometric scale. Surface microgrooves were etched on pure titanium disks at i...

  11. Production of titanium tetrachloride

    Perillo, P.M.; Botbol, O.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a summary of results from theoperation of a laboratory scale for the production in batches of approximately 100 gs of titanium tetrachloride by chlorination with chloroform and carbon tetrachloride between 340 deg C and 540 deg C. Chlorination agent vapors were passed through a quartz column reacting with titanium oxide powder agglomerated in little spheres. Obtained titanium tetrachloride was condensed in a condenser, taken in a ballon and then purified by fractional distillation. Optimun temperature for chloroform was 400 deg C with 74 % yield and for carbon tetrachloride was 500 deg C with 69 % yield. (Author) [es

  12. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  13. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  14. Iron-Based Superconductors as Odd-Parity Superconductors

    Jiangping Hu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Parity is a fundamental quantum number used to classify a state of matter. Materials rarely possess ground states with odd parity. We show that the superconducting state in iron-based superconductors is classified as an odd-parity s-wave spin-singlet pairing state in a single trilayer FeAs/Se, the building block of the materials. In a low-energy effective model constructed on the Fe square bipartite lattice, the superconducting order parameter in this state is a combination of an s-wave normal pairing between two sublattices and an s-wave η pairing within the sublattices. The state has a fingerprint with a real-space sign inversion between the top and bottom As/Se layers. The results suggest that iron-based superconductors are a new quantum state of matter, and the measurement of the odd parity can help to establish high-temperature superconducting mechanisms.

  15. Determination of low-field critical parameters of superconducting niobium by small-angle neutron diffraction

    Christen, D.K.; Spooner, S.; Thorel, P.; Kerchner, H.R.

    1977-01-01

    The perfect double-crystal small-angle diffraction technique enables measurement of scattering angles to within 0.3 arc sec. accuracy. At a wavelength of 2.55 A, this provides a resolution of 3 x 10 -6 A -1 in the scattering vector. This technique has been used to study the anisotropic behavior of the critical parameters B 0 and H/sub c1/, characteristic of the first-order magnetic phase transition which occurs in low-kappa type-II superconductors. Magnetic fields were applied parallel to several crystal axes of a large single-crystal sphere of pure niobium, resulting in well-defined flux-line lattices (FLL). Measurement of the FLL cell area in the intermediate mixed state field region gives the equilibrium flux density B 0 , which results from an attractive interaction between fluxoids. In addition, field variation of the scattered neutron intensity allows measurement of the transition field between the mixed state and intermediate mixed state. This transition field is related to the lower critical field H/sub c1/ and enables its determination to a precision 0.2%. Data at T = 4.3 K display a small anisotropic effect of about 2% in B 0 and 1% in H/sub c1/. Although orientation effects of this magnitude are difficult to resolve by bulk measurements, the neutron data are in accord with magnetization data. Observations regarding the temperature dependence of these parameters also will be presented, and comparisons made with current theoretical models

  16. Titanium oxide fever

    De Jonge, D.; Visser, J.

    2012-01-01

    One measure to improve air quality is to apply photo-catalytic substances that capture NOx onto the road surface or onto baffle boards alongside the roads. The effect of titanium oxide containing clinkers with coating was discussed in the report 'Demonstration project of air-purifying pavement in Hengelo, The Netherlands' that was published in May 2011. This article examines the way in which the effectiveness of this study was determined. Can titanium oxide containing clinkers and coatings indeed capture NOx?. [nl

  17. Machining of titanium alloys

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of examples illustrating the resent research advances in the machining of titanium alloys. These materials have excellent strength and fracture toughness as well as low density and good corrosion resistance; however, machinability is still poor due to their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity with cutting tool materials. This book presents solutions to enhance machinability in titanium-based alloys and serves as a useful reference to professionals and researchers in aerospace, automotive and biomedical fields.

  18. NSSEFF Designing New Higher Temperature Superconductors

    2017-04-13

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0083 NSSEFF - DESIGINING NEW HIGHER TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS Meigan Aronson THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF...2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NSSEFF - DESIGINING NEW HIGHER TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0191 5c...materials, identifying the most promising candidates. 15. SUBJECT TERMS TEMPERATURE, SUPERCONDUCTOR 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  19. Passivation Of High-Temperature Superconductors

    Vasquez, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces of high-temperature superconductors passivated with native iodides, sulfides, or sulfates formed by chemical treatments after superconductors grown. Passivating compounds nearly insoluble in and unreactive with water and protect underlying superconductors from effects of moisture. Layers of cuprous iodide and of barium sulfate grown. Other candidate passivating surface films: iodides and sulfides of bismuth, strontium, and thallium. Other proposed techniques for formation of passivating layers include deposition and gas-phase reaction.

  20. Applications of superconductors to electric motors

    McConnell, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews previous experience in applying superconductors to electric motors and examines the difficulties encountered. While motors and generators have a common basis, several significant differences exist. The application of high temperature superconductors to the major electric motor types is discussed and expected difficulties are presented. The limitations imposed by various motor designs are reflected in a statement of the desired material properties for high temperature superconductor electric motor applications

  1. Holographic complexity in gauge/string superconductors

    Davood Momeni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Following a methodology similar to [1], we derive a holographic complexity for two dimensional holographic superconductors (gauge/string superconductors with backreactions. Applying a perturbation method proposed by Kanno in Ref. [2], we study behaviors of the complexity for a dual quantum system near critical points. We show that when a system moves from the normal phase (T>Tc to the superconductor phase (T

  2. Carbochlorination kinetics of tantalum and niobium pentoxides

    Allain, E.

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available The carbochlorination kinetics of pure Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 by gas mixture (C12 + CO + N2 between 380 and 1,000 °C is studied. A calculation of the standard free energy of the carbochlorination reactions is made. A diagram of the phases stability is drawn. The influence of the gas flow, temperature and the pardal pressure of Cl2 and CO at temperatures below 650 °C on the reaction rate is studied. The apparent activation energy is approximately 75 and 110 kJ/mol for Nb2Os and Ta2O5, respectively. At temperatures above 650°C the Arrhenius diagram presents an anomaly which may be attributed to the decomposition of the COCl2 formed in situ. The apparent reaction order of the carbochlorination of these oxides against Cl2+CO is approximately 2. The carbochlorination rates of these oxides are much greater than those of chlorination by Cl2 + N2. The carbochlorination kinetics of tin furnace slag leaching concentrates containing tantalum and niobium compounds are also studied and compared with the carbochlorination kinetics of the pure oxides.

    En este trabajo se estudia la cinética de carbocloruración del Nb2O5 y del Ta2O5 por la mezcla de gases (Cl2 + CO + N2 entre 380 y 1000°C. Se hace un cálculo de la energía libre estándar de carbocloruración y se dibujan los diagramas de equilibrio de fases. Se estudia la influencia del flujo de gas, la temperatura y la presión parcial de Cl2 y CO a temperaturas por debajo de 650°C sobre la velocidad de reacción. La energía de activación es aproximadamente 75 y 110 kJ/mol para el Nb2O5 y el Ta2O5, respectivamente. A temperaturas por encima de 650°C, el diagrama de Arrhenius presenta una anomalía que puede ser atribuida a la

  3. Melt processed high-temperature superconductors

    1993-01-01

    The achievement of large critical currents is critical to the applications of high-temperature superconductors. Recent developments have shown that melt processing is suitable for producing high J c oxide superconductors. Using magnetic forces between such high J c oxide superconductors and magnets, a person could be levitated.This book has grown largely out of research works on melt processing of high-temperature superconductors conducted at ISTEC Superconductivity Research Laboratory. The chapters build on melt processing, microstructural characterization, fundamentals of flux pinning, criti

  4. Recent status of superconductors for accelerator magnets

    Greene, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is given of superconductor wire and cable which has been or will be used for construction of dipole magnets for all of the large European and US superconducting accelerator rings. Included is a simplified view of the construction methods and operating requirements of an accelerator dipole magnet, with emphasis on required superconductor performance. The methods of fabricating Nb-Ti superconductors are described, including the critical parameters and materials requirements. The superconductor performance requirements are summarized in an effort to relate why these are important to accelerator designers. Some of the recently observed time dependent effects are covered briefly

  5. Titanium by design: TRIP titanium alloy

    Tran, Jamie

    Motivated by the prospect of lower cost Ti production processes, new directions in Ti alloy design were explored for naval and automotive applications. Building on the experience of the Steel Research Group at Northwestern University, an analogous design process was taken with titanium. As a new project, essential kinetic databases and models were developed for the design process and used to create a prototype design. Diffusion kinetic models were developed to predict the change in phase compositions and microstructure during heat treatment. Combining a mobility database created in this research with a licensed thermodynamic database, ThermoCalc and DICTRA software was used to model kinetic compositional changes in titanium alloys. Experimental diffusion couples were created and compared to DICTRA simulations to refine mobility parameters in the titanium mobility database. The software and database were able to predict homogenization times and the beta→alpha plate thickening kinetics during cooling in the near-alpha Ti5111 alloy. The results of these models were compared to LEAP microanalysis and found to be in reasonable agreement. Powder metallurgy was explored using SPS at GM R&D to reduce the cost of titanium alloys. Fully dense Ti5111 alloys were produced and achieved similar microstructures to wrought Ti5111. High levels of oxygen in these alloys increased the strength while reducing the ductility. Preliminary Ti5111+Y alloys were created, where yttrium additions successfully gettered excess oxygen to create oxides. However, undesirable large oxides formed, indicating more research is needed into the homogeneous distribution of the yttrium powder to create finer oxides. Principles established in steels were used to optimize the beta phase transformation stability for martensite transformation toughening in titanium alloys. The Olson-Cohen kinetic model is calibrated to shear strains in titanium. A frictional work database is established for common alloying

  6. Separation of niobium and tantalum by paper chromatography and their following spectrographic determination

    Moroshkina, T.M.; Peres Sanfiel', F.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an investigation into the use of water-saturated furfural to separate niobium and tantalum in a 1:1 ratio by means of ascending paper chromatography. The influence of sulphuric acid, ammonium fluoride and hydrofluoric acid concentrations on the completeness of the niobium and tantalum separation was investigated, the extent of the separation being checked by a spectral method. The results indicate that the use of furfural creates favourable conditions for niobium and tantalum separation. The purest tantalum is obtained at concentrations of sulphuric acid 600 k/l, hydrofluoric acid 4.6% and ammonium fluoride 30 g/l. To obtain pure niobium the acid concentrations remain the same but the quantity of ammonium fluoride is doubled. The fluoride ion concentration has a significant effect on the completeness of niobium and tantalum separation. The variation coefficient for the niobium determination is 14%, for the tantalum determination 1O% (author)

  7. Development of Nb3Sn based multi-filamentary superconductor wires for fusion reactor magnets

    Kundu, Sayandeep; Singh, A.K.; Hussain, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Nb 3 Sn is a proposed type II superconductor material to be used as superconducting magnet in fusion reactor for its superior superconducting properties. Fabrication of long single length wire containing Nb 3 Sn filaments is a challenge. The usual manufacturing philosophy involves deforming an assembly of tin and niobium in copper matrix to the final size, followed by the heat treatment to produce superconducting phase at Nb-Cu interface. Multi-filamentary wires were fabricated by hot extrusion of superconductor billet followed by several stages of cold drawing. Heat treatments at various temperature and time were carried out on as formed wire containing multiple filaments in order to see the growth of superconducting intermetallic phase during subsequent characterization. Post heat treatment characterization through SEM, EBSD and EDS revealed the presence of intermetallic phase of Nb and Sn, hypo stoichiometric in Sn, at the Cu-Nb interface growing towards the center of Nb filament. The manufacturing process till the desired final size of the wire happened to be a challenge, mainly because it required extraordinary co-deformability between various materials in such an assembly. Post-trial failure analysis through destructive testing using optical and scanning electron micrographs revealed the propensity of internal radial cracks at Cu-Sn interfaces, while the Nb-Cu interfaces were found to be relatively unaffected. This paper will discuss the details of the fabrication process. (author)

  8. Photographing magnetic fields in superconductors

    Harrison, R.B.; Wright, L.S.

    Magneto-optic techniques coupled with high-speed photography are being used to study the destruction of superconductivity by a magnetic field. The phenomenon of superconductivity will be introduced with emphasis placed on the properties of type I and type II superconductors in a magnetic field. The Faraday effect and its application to the study of the penetration of magnetic fields into these superconductors will be described; the relative effectiveness of some types of paramagnetic glass will be demonstrated. A number of cinefilms will be shown to illustrate the versatility of the magneto-optic method for observing flux motion and patterns. The analysis of data obtained from a high speed film (10,200 fps) of a flux jump in Nb-Zr will be presented and discussed

  9. Oxygen diffusion in cuprate superconductors

    Routbort, J.L.; Rothman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Superconducting properties of the cuprate superconductors depend on the oxygen content of the material; the diffusion of oxygen is thus an important process in the fabrication and application of these materials. This article reviews studies of the diffusion of oxygen in La{sub 2}{sub {minus}}{sub {times}}Sr{sub {times}}CuO{sub 4}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}{sub {minus}}{delta}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}, and the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub n}{sub {minus}}{sub 1}Cu{sub n}O{sub 2}{sub +}{sub 4} (n = 1, and 2) superconductors, and attempt to elucidate the atomic mechanisms responsible.

  10. QCD as a dual superconductor

    Zachariasen, F.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes the construction of an effective action describing long-range Yang-Mills theory. This action is motivated by a study of the system of Dyson equations and Ward identities, but cannot (yet) be derived from the underlying quantum theory. The effective action turns out to describe a medium very much like a dual relativistic superconductor; that is, with electric and magnetic fields interchanged. There is a dual Meissner effect, which serves to compress color electric fields into flux tubes, containing quantized units of color electric flux. This produces electric confinement. There is a magnetic condensate, resulting from a spontaneous symmetry breaking analogous to that in the relativistic superconductor, as in the Abelian Higgs model. He gives the motivation leading to the effective action, and describes the quantized electric flux tube solutions. Finally, he mentions briefly some other applications

  11. Theoretical studies of unconventional superconductors

    Groensleth, Martin Sigurd

    2008-07-01

    This thesis presents four research papers. In the first three papers we have derived analytical results for the transport properties in unconventional superconductors and ferromagnetic systems with multiple broken symmetries. In Paper I and parts of Paper II we have studied tunneling transport between two non-unitary ferromagnetic spin-triplet superconductors, and found a novel interplay between ferromagnetism and superconductivity manifested in the Josephson effect as a spin- and charge-current in the absence of an applied voltage across the junction. The critical amplitudes of these currents can be adjusted by the relative magnetization direction on each side of the junction. Furthermore, in Paper II, we have found a way of controlling a spin-current between two ferromagnets with spin-orbit coupling. Paper III considers a junction consisting of a ferromagnet and a non-unitary ferromagnetic superconductor, and we show that the conductance spectra contains detailed information about the superconducting gaps and pairing symmetry of the Cooper-pairs. In the last paper we present a Monte Carlo study of an effective Hamiltonian describing orbital currents in the CuO2 layers of high-temperature superconductive cuprates. The model features two intrinsically anisotropic Ising models, coupled through an anisotropic next-nearest neighbor interaction, and an Ashkin-Teller nearest neighbor fourth order coupling. We have studied the specific heat anomaly, as well as the anomaly in the staggered magnetization associated with the orbital currents and its susceptibility. We have found that in a limited parameter regime, the specific heat anomaly is substantially suppressed, while the susceptibility has a non-analytical peak across the order-disorder transition. The model is therefore a candidate for describing the breakup of hidden order when crossing the pseudo-gap line on the under-doped side in the phase diagram of high-temperature superconductors. (Author) 64 refs., figs

  12. Interaction between light and superconductors

    Gilabert, Alain

    In the first part of this review article we resume briefly the fundamental aspect of the photon-superconductor interaction. The emphase is focused on the characteristic times and on the phenomenological models (the T*, the μ* models and the model of the kinetics equations) describing the out of equilibrium superconductivity. The experiments made on classical illuminated superconductors especially on tunnel junctions are then reported. In the second part we present the applied aspect of the photon-superconductor interaction. The interaction of the light with the high Tc superconductors is reviewed in the last part. Dans la première partie de cet article de revue, on résume brièvement 1'aspect fondamental de l'action des photons sur les supraconducteurs en s'attachant surtout à rappeler les différents temps caractéristiques de cette interaction et les modèles phénoménologiques (le modèle T*, le modèle μ*, le modèle des équations cinétiques) décrivant la supraconductivité hors équilibre. La seconde partie rappelle les expériences réalisées sur les supraconducteurs classiques illuminés et spécialement les jonctions tunnel ainsi que certaines applications de la supraconductivité hors équilibre comme les liens faibles controllables par des moyens optiques. La dernière partie est consacrée aux nouvelles expériences qui démarrent concernant l'action de la lumière sur les supraconducteurs à hautes températures critiques.

  13. Negative magnetic relaxation in superconductors

    Krasnoperov E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was observed that the trapped magnetic moment of HTS tablets or annuli increases in time (negative relaxation if they are not completely magnetized by a pulsed magnetic field. It is shown, in the framework of the Bean critical-state model, that the radial temperature gradient appearing in tablets or annuli during a pulsed field magnetization can explain the negative magnetic relaxation in the superconductor.

  14. Investigation of a thermoplastic-powder metallurgy process for the fabrication of porous niobium rods

    Nordin, D.R.

    1978-06-01

    The feasibility of using a thermoplastic-powder metallurgy technique for the fabrication of porous niobium rods was investigated. Some early problems were overcome to successfully extrude the polymer coated niobium powder into long lengths. The effects of certain process variables were investigated. Residual porosity and extrusion pressure were found to be regulated by the polymer fraction. The procedures for taking the extruded polystyrene--niobium rods through the heat treatments to the final, tin infiltrated stage are explained

  15. LHC bending magnet coil

    A short test version of coil of wire used for the LHC dipole magnets. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. Magnet coils are made of copper-clad niobium–titanium cables — each wire in the cable consists of 9’000 niobium–titanium filaments ten times finer than a hair.

  16. MgB{sub 2} superconductors for applications

    Glowacki, B A; Majoros, M; Eisterer, M; Toenies, S; Weber, H W; Fukutomi, M; Komori, K; Togano, K

    2003-05-01

    The paper presents up to date results on MgB{sub 2} filamentary conductors and coated conductors from the point of view of their possible applications. Basic physical parameters of MgB{sub 2} compound relevant to conductor design are introduced. The correlation between the slope of the irreversibility line, critical temperature and critical current density is discussed with respect to the conductor performance and applicability. The possible origin of the observed anomalous decrease of ac susceptibility at 50 K in copper clad in situ powder-in-tube MgB{sub 2} wires is presented. Some numerical results on critical currents, thermal stability and ac losses of the MgB{sub 2} multifilamentary and coated conductors with magnetic cladding of their filaments are given.

  17. Chemical methods for the use of niobium from pressure vessel cladding as a fast neutron dosimeter

    Karnani, Hari

    1986-08-01

    the steel samples from the cladding of a pressure vessel of an operating nuclear power reactor were obtained by scraping. The cladding material of the pressure vessel contained about 0.5 % niobium. It was desired to use the niobium as a dosimeter for estimating fast fluences at the pressure vessel. The weak radiation from the reaction product 93m Nb cannot be measured in the presence of other elements and interfering activities. A method was developed to separate niobium from other metals present; the concentration and yield of niobium were determined spectrophotometrically. The irradiated niobium was electrodeposited from aqueous solutions on copper discs. The amount of the deposited niobium was determined by a radiochemical method which makes use of its own radioactivity - measured with a liquid scintillation counter - and the known starting mass of niobium. It was possible to determine the deposited niobium masses (5 to 200 microgram) with a desired degree of accuracy. The absolute emission rate of X-rays could then be measured without any self-absorption or interference from other activities. The mass of niobium on each preparate and its X-ray emission rate, later on, were used as basic experimental data for the estimation of last neutron doses at the pressure vessel

  18. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Ford, Denise C; Cooley, Lance D; Seidman, David N

    2013-01-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium–hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities. (paper)

  19. Extractive-photometric determination of niobium with N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine and lumogallion in alloyed steels

    Patratij, Yu.V.; Pilipenko, A.T.

    1978-01-01

    An extractive-photometric method has been developed to determine niobium (5) present as a heteroligand complex with N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine (BPH) and lumogallion in alloyed steels. The method is based on preliminary extraction of niobium in a complex with BPH from concentrated HCl and subsequent determination of niobium in a 5-n (with respect to HCl) solution with lumogallion added. Sensitivity of the method is 2.0 μg of niobium in 10 ml of extract. The method has been tested on standard steels specimens

  20. Determination of niobium in rocks by an isotope dilution spectrophotometric method

    Greenland, L.P.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1970-01-01

    Rocks and minerals are fused with sodium peroxide in the presence of carrierfree 95Nb. The fusion cake is leached with water and the precipitate dissolved in hydrofluoric-sulfuric acid mixture. Niobium is extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone and further purified by ion exchange. The amount of niobium is determined spectrophotometrically with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol, and the chemical yield of the separations determined by counting 95Nb. This procedure is faster and less sensitive to interferences than previously proposed methods for determining niobium in rocks.The high purity of the separated niobium makes the method applicable to nearly all matrices. ?? 1970.

  1. A new process of electron beam refining of niobium

    Pinatti, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    A review of thermodynamic equilibrium, the kinetic theory and experimental results of the metal-gas interaction in refractory metals is presented. N 2 , H 2 and CO absorption and desorption take place by a reversible process while O 2 takes place by a irreversible process with atom absorption and metal oxide desorption. A new technology of electron beam refining of Niobium is proposed based on four points: 1) preparation of the aluminothermic reduced electrode, 2) zone refining in the first melt, 3) kinetic theory of refining in the following melts and 4) design of a compact furnace. Experimental results in a pilot plant of 300 KW have shown complete agreement with the proposed technology yielding a productivity 2.4 times larger than the value predicted by the conventional technology of electron beam refining of Niobium. (Author) [pt

  2. Distribution of Stress in Deformation Zone of Niobium Microalloyed Steel

    Jandrlić, Ivan; Rešković, Stoja; Brlić, Tin

    2018-07-01

    Microalloyed steels today represent a significant part of total world production and processing of steel. Although widely used, there are scarce data on the stress distribution in the deformation zone of these steels. Research was carried out on two steel grades, both low-carbon structural steels with the same basic chemical composition, with one of them additionally microalloyed with niobium. Differences in the stress distribution in the deformation zone between two tested steels were continuously observed and measured using the methods of digital image correlation and thermography. It has been found out that niobium microalloyed steel has significantly more complex material flow and stress distribution in the deformation zone when compared to the plain low carbon steel.

  3. Crystallization of amorphous phase in niobium alloys with oxygen

    Dekanenko, V.M.; Samojlenko, Z.A.; Revyakin, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Crystallization and subsequent phase transformations of amorphous phase during annealings in the system Nb-O are studied. It is shown that quenching from liquid state of niobium alloys with oxygen with a rate of 10 5 -10 6 K/s results in partial crystallization of the melt. Phase transition from amorphous to crystal state at 670 K in all probability takes place without the change of chemical composition. After crystallization the decomposition of oversaturated solid solution on the basis of NbO takes place with the separation of low- temperature modification, γ-Nb 2 O 5 . Niobium pentoxide of both modifications during prolong annealings at 770 K and short- time annealings higher 1070 K disappears completely [ru

  4. Hydroforming SRF Three-cell Cavity from Seamless Niobium Tube

    Yamanaka, Masashi [KEK, Tsukuba; Dohmae, Takeshi [KEK, Tsukuba; Hocker, Andy [Fermilab; Inoue, Hitoshi [KEK, Tsukuba; Park, Gunn-Tae [KEK, Tsukuba; Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos; Umemori, Kensei [KEK, Tsukuba

    2016-06-01

    We are developing the manufacturing method for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities by using a hydroforming instead of using conventional electron beam welding. We expect higher reliability and reduced cost with hydroforming. For successful hydroforming, high-purity seamless niobium tubes with good formability as well as advancing the hydroforming technique are necessary. Using a seamless niobium tube from ATI Wah Chang, we were able to successfully hydroform a 1.3 GHz three-cell TESLA-like cavity and obtained an Eacc of 32 MV/m. A barrel polishing process was omitted after the hydroforming. The vertical test was carried out with very rough inside surface. We got amazing and interesting result.

  5. Magnetic Property in Large Array Niobium Antidot Thin Films

    Tinghui, Chen; Hsiang-Hsi, Kung; Wei-Li, Lee; Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan Team

    2014-03-01

    In a superconducting ring, the total flux inside the ring is required to be an integer number of the flux quanta. Therefore, a supercurrent current can appear within the ring in order to satisfy this quantization rule, which gives rise to certain magnetic response. By using a special monolayer polymer/nanosphere hybrid we developed previously, we fabricated a series of superconducting niobium antidot thin films with different antidot diameters. The antidots form well-ordered triangular lattice with a lattice spacing about 200 nm and extend over an area larger than 1 cm2, which enables magnetic detections simply by a SQUID magnetometer. We observed magnetization oscillation with external magnetic field due to the supercurrent screening effect, where different features for large and small antidot thin films were found. Detailed size and temperature dependencies of the magnetization in niobium antidot nanostructures will be presented.

  6. Measurement of Microwave Parameters of a Superconducting Niobium Cavity

    Azaryan, N. S.; Baturitskii, M. A.; Budagov, Yu. A.; Demin, D. L.; Dem‧yanov, S. E.; Karpovich, V. A.; Kniga, V. V.; Krivosheev, R. M.; Lyubetskii, N. V.; Maksimov, S. I.; Pobol‧, I. L.; Rodionova, V. N.; Shirkov, G. D.; Shumeiko, N. M.; Yurevich, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a method for direct measurement of the amplitude-frequency characteristics and the Q factor of empty superconducting niobium radio frequency Tesla-type cavities. An automated measuring complex that permits recording the superconductivity effect and measuring high Q values has been developed. Measurements have been made of the Q factors of the investigated objects (the first domestic 1.3-GHz niobium cavities) at a level no lower than 0.1·109 (with a maximum value of 1.2·1010) and a level of relative losses lower than 130 dB (with a minimum factor of 139.7 dB) at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  7. Implantation of D+ ions in niobium and deuterium gas reemission

    Pisarev, A.A.; Tel'kovskij, V.G.

    1975-01-01

    This is a study of the implanting and reflex gasoisolation of D ions in niobium. It has been discovered that deutrium scope and gasoisolation are defined by several processes. An assumption is made that in ion bombarding conditions the implanting solutions are possible to exist and that deutrium can be replaced on the basis of niobium and hydrid compounds NbxDy. The portion of the particles entrained in the metal in one or another way depends on the ion energy. The dependence of the scope coefficient of n D + ions from the target temperature in the range of 290-1500 K was registered. An increase of the scope coefficient of the ions at high temperature with an increase of the ion energy was discovered

  8. Vanadium and heat treatments effect on elastic characteristics of niobium

    Vasil'eva, E.V.; Tret'yakov, V.I.; Prokoshkin, D.A.; Pustovalov, V.A.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of vanadium content and of heat treatment conditions on the elastic properties of niobium at temperatures of 20 to 800 deg C was studied. Nb-V alloys were produced by binary vacuum remelting. The Nb-V alloys have been then subjected to thermal treatment. The total degree of deformation amounts to about 95%. The specimens were tested with a view to determine their microhardness, specific electric resistance, elasticity limit and modulus of elasticity. The elastic limit of niobium rises when alloyed with vanadium. With the increase of vanadium content the elastic limit of the alloy becomes greater. Pre-crystallization annealing at 600 - 700 deg C considerably increases the elastic limit, which is explained by development of the thermally activated processes leading to a decrease of dislocation mobility and thereby to a strengthening of the alloy

  9. Distribution of Stress in Deformation Zone of Niobium Microalloyed Steel

    Jandrlić, Ivan; Rešković, Stoja; Brlić, Tin

    2018-03-01

    Microalloyed steels today represent a significant part of total world production and processing of steel. Although widely used, there are scarce data on the stress distribution in the deformation zone of these steels. Research was carried out on two steel grades, both low-carbon structural steels with the same basic chemical composition, with one of them additionally microalloyed with niobium. Differences in the stress distribution in the deformation zone between two tested steels were continuously observed and measured using the methods of digital image correlation and thermography. It has been found out that niobium microalloyed steel has significantly more complex material flow and stress distribution in the deformation zone when compared to the plain low carbon steel.

  10. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Cantergiani, E.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A.T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulicforming (EHF). InEHF, half-cells areobtainedthrough ultrahigh-speed deformation ofblank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHFon high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half- cells produced by EHFand by spinning have been compared in terms of damage...

  11. Niobium nitride Josephson tunnel junctions with magnesium oxide barriers

    Shoji, A.; Aoyagi, M.; Kosaka, S.; Shinoki, F.; Hayakawa, H.

    1985-01-01

    Niobium nitride-niobium nitride Josephson tunnel junctions have been fabricated using amorphous magnesium oxide (a-MgO) films as barriers. These junctions have excellent tunneling characteristics. For example, a large gap voltage (V/sub g/ = 5.1 mV), a large product of the maximum critical current and the normal tunneling resistance (I/sub c/R/sub n/ = 3.25 mV), and a small subgap leakage current (V/sub m/ = 45 mV, measured at 3 mV) have been obtained for a NbN/a-MgO/NbN junction. The critical current of this junction remains finite up to 14.5 K

  12. Rapid radiochemical separation of zirconium-95 and niobium-95

    Downey, D.M.; McLaughlin, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    A rapid method for the quantitative separation of 95 Zr and 95 Nb has been developed. The method is based on the ion flotation of cationic zirconium complex ions with sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLS) from niobium which is masked with hydrogen peroxide. The separation was applied to mixtures of 95 Zr and 95 Nb initially in oxalic acid solution and quantitative recoveries of the radiochemically pure radioisotopes were obtained. (orig.)

  13. Rapid radiochemical separation of zirconium-95 and niobium-95

    Downey, D.M.; McLaughlin, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    A rapid method for the quantitative separation of /sup 95/Zr and /sup 95/Nb has been developed. The method is based on the ion flotation of cationic zirconium complex ions with sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLS) from niobium which is masked with hydrogen peroxide. The separation was applied to mixtures of /sup 95/Zr and /sup 95/Nb initially in oxalic acid solution and quantitative recoveries of the radiochemically pure radioisotopes were obtained.

  14. Magnetization measurement of niobium for superconducting cavity material evaluation

    Wake, Masayoshi; Saito, Kenji.

    1995-05-01

    A series of magnetization measurements on niobium materials for superconducting cavities was performed, and the method was found to be very useful for material evaluation. The effects of annealing, chemical polishing and machining were clearly observed by this method. The material quality and the processing of the material can be properly evaluated by measuring the magnetization. An observation of the Q-disease effect indicates the possibility of using this method for the studies beyond material evaluation. (J.P.N)

  15. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests

  16. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities.

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-05-10

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests.

  17. Dislocations and related defects in niobium oxide structures

    Anderson, J S; Hutchinson, J L; Lincoln, F J [Oxford Univ. (UK). Inorganic Chemistry Lab.

    1977-01-07

    Lattice images of the niobium oxides, structures based on the linkage of octahedral groups in continuous networks, occasionally contain features recognizable as dislocations. Since lattice imaging enables the microstructure to be resolved in greater detail, at the level of local structural organization, it is possible to determine the configuration, and also to infer the chemical composition, of dislocated areas. By treating the niobium oxide 'block' structures as superstructures of the ReO/sub 3/ (DO/sub 9/) type, the topology of dislocations can be expressed by relations between the insertion (or deletion) of one or more half-planes of cations, or of oxygen atoms only, changes in the number of crystallographic shear plane interfaces between blocks or columns, changes in (idealized) dimensions and any requisite distortion in the third dimension. Mapping the structure around a dislocation, from the lattice image, is directly equivalent to plotting the Burgers' circuit. In this way, the precise nature of a dislocating perturbation and its implications for the local chemical composition of the crystal can be directly identified. The method is exemplified by analysis of dislocations and of related extended defects of several types, associated with twinning phenomena, semicoherent intergrowth between different ReO/sub 3/-type superstructures and arrays building up a low angle boundary. The essential features of the analysis are not restricted to structures of the niobium oxide type, but can be extended to other types of polyhedron networks.

  18. Steady-state oxygen-solubility in niobium

    Schulze, K.; Jehn, H.

    1977-01-01

    During annealing of niobium in oxygen in certain temperature and pressure ranges steady states are established between the absorption of molecular oxygen and the evaporation of volatile oxides. The oxygen concentration in the niobium-oxygen α-solid solution is a function of oxygen pressure and temperature and has been redetermined in the ranges 10 -5 - 10 -2 Pa O 2 and 2,070 - 2,470 K. It follows differing from former results the equation csub(o) = 9.1 x 10 -6 x sub(po2) x exp (502000/RT) with csub(o) in at.-ppm, sub(po2) in Pa, T in K, R = 8.31 J x mol -1 x K -1 . The existence of steady states is limited to a temperature range from 1870 to 2470 K and to oxygen concentrations below the solubility limit given by solidus and solvus lines in the T-c diagram. In the experiments high-purity niobium wires with a specific electrical ratio rho (273 K)/rho(4.2 K) > 5,000 have been gassed under isothermal-isobaric conditions until the steady state has been reached. The oxygen concentration has been determined analytically by vacuum fusion extraction with platinum-flux technique as well as by electrical residual resistivity measurements at 4.2 K. (orig.) [de

  19. Irradiation swelling in self-ion irradiated niobium

    Bajaj, R.; Shiels, S.A.; Hall, B.O.; Fenske, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents initial results of an investigation of swelling mechanisms in a model body centered cubic (bcc) metal, niobium, irradiated at elevated temperatures (0.3 T/sub m/ to 0.6 T/sub m/) where T/sub m/ = melting point in K. The objective of this work is to achieve an understanding of the elevated temperature swelling in bcc metals, which are the prime candidate alloys and composite matrix materials for space reactor applications. Niobium was irradiated with 5.3 MeV Nb ++ ions, at temperatures ranging from 700 0 C to 1300 0 C, to a nominal dose of 50 dpa at a dose rate of 6 x 10 -3 dpas. Swelling was observed over a temperature range of 700 0 C to 1200 0 C, with a peak swelling of 7% at 900 0 C. The microstructural data, obtained from transmission electron microscopy, were compared to the predictions of the theoretical model developed during this program. A reasonable agreement was obtained between the experimental measurements of swelling and theoretical predictions by adjusting both the niobium-oxygen binding energy and the incubation dose for swelling to realistic values

  20. Field dependent surface resistance of niobium on copper cavities

    T. Junginger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The surface resistance R_{S} of superconducting cavities prepared by sputter coating a niobium film on a copper substrate increases significantly stronger with the applied rf field compared to cavities of bulk material. A possible cause is that the thermal boundary resistance between the copper substrate and the niobium film induces heating of the inner cavity wall, resulting in a higher R_{S}. Introducing helium gas in the cavity, and measuring its pressure as a function of applied field allowed to conclude that the inner surface of the cavity is heated up by less than 120 mK when R_{S} increases with E_{acc} by 100  nΩ. This is more than one order of magnitude less than what one would expect from global heating. Additionally, the effects of cooldown speed and low temperature baking have been investigated in the framework of these experiments. It is shown that for the current state of the art niobium on copper cavities there is only a detrimental effect of low temperature baking. A fast cooldown results in a lowered R_{S}.

  1. Enhancement of mechanical properties of 123 superconductors

    Balachandran, U.

    1995-04-25

    A composition and method are disclosed of preparing YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} superconductor. Addition of tin oxide containing compounds to YBCO superconductors results in substantial improvement of fracture toughness and other mechanical properties without affect on T{sub c}. About 5-20% additions give rise to substantially improved mechanical properties.

  2. Electrodynamics of spin currents in superconductors

    Hirsch, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    In recent work we formulated a new set of electrodynamic equations for superconductors as an alternative to the conventional London equations, compatible with the prediction of the theory of hole superconductivity that superconductors expel negative charge from the interior towards the surface. Charge expulsion results in a macroscopically inhomogeneous charge distribution and an electric field in the interior, and because of this a spin current is expected to exist. Furthermore, we have recently shown that a dynamical explanation of the Meissner effect in superconductors leads to the prediction that a spontaneous spin current exists near the surface of superconductors (spin Meissner effect). In this paper we extend the electrodynamic equations proposed earlier for the charge density and charge current to describe also the space and time dependence of the spin density and spin current. This allows us to determine the magnitude of the expelled negative charge and interior electric field as well as of the spin current in terms of other measurable properties of superconductors. We also provide a 'geometric' interpretation of the difference between type I and type II superconductors, discuss how superconductors manage to conserve angular momentum, discuss the relationship between our model and Slater's seminal work on superconductivity, and discuss the magnitude of the expected novel effects for elemental and other superconductors. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Enhancement of mechanical properties of 123 superconductors

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    1995-01-01

    A composition and method of preparing YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x superconductor. Addition of tin oxide containing compounds to YBCO superconductors results in substantial improvement of fracture toughness and other mechanical properties without affect on T.sub.c. About 5-20% additions give rise to substantially improved mechanical properties.

  4. Superconductors in the High School Classroom

    Lincoln, James

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the behavior of high-temperature superconductors and how to demonstrate them safely and effectively in the high school or introductory physics classroom. Included here is a discussion of the most relevant physics topics that can be demonstrated, some safety tips, and a bit of the history of superconductors. In an effort…

  5. Hexatic vortex glass in disordered superconductors

    Chudnovsky, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that interaction of the flux-line lattice with randomly arranged pinning centers should destroy the long-range positional order in the lattice, but not the long-range orientational order. A new phase: hexatic vortex glass, is suggested for the mixed state of disordered, type-II superconductors. Relevance to amorphous and high-T c superconductors is discussed

  6. Method of production multifilamentary intermetallic superconductors

    Marancik, W.G.; Young, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    A method of making A-15 type intermetallic superconductors is disclosed which features elimination of numerous annealing steps. Nb or V filaments are embedded in Cu matrices; annular layers of Sn or Ga, respectively, separated from each other by Cu layers, provide the other component of the intermetallic superconductors Nb3Sn and V3Ga

  7. Neutron-scattering studies of magnetic superconductors

    Sinha, S.K.; Crabtree, G.W.; Hinks, D.G.; Mook, H.A.; Pringle, O.A.

    1982-01-01

    Results obtained in the last few years obtained by neutron diffraction on the nature of the magnetic ordering in magnetic superconductors are reviewed. Emphasis is given to studies of the complex intermediate phase in ferromagnetic superconductors where both superconductivity and ferromagnetism appear to coexist

  8. The critical current of granular superconductor

    Ignat'ev, V.K.

    1998-01-01

    A mechanism of hyper vortex pinning in granular superconductors is proposed to describe the field dependence of the critical current density and pinning potential. The results are in a good agreement with the experiment. The model represents the peak effect and the percolation mechanism of conductivity in ceramic superconductors

  9. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  10. Industrial experience with titanium

    Ikeda, B.M.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Titanium is a reference material for the construction of waste containers in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. It has been in industrial service for over 30 a, often in severe corrosion environments, but it is still considered a relatively exotic material with limited operating history. This has arisen because of the aerospace applications of this material and the misconception that the high strength-to-weight ratio dominates the choice of this material. In fact, the advantage of titanium lies in its high reliability and excellent corrosion resistance. It has a proven record in seawater heat exchanger service and a demonstrated excellent reliability even in polluted water. For many reasons it is the technically correct choice of material for marine applications. In this report we review the industrial service history of titanium, particularly in hot saline environments, and demonstrate that it is a viable waste container material, based upon this industrial service history and operating experience. (author)

  11. Topological surface states in nodal superconductors

    Schnyder, Andreas P; Brydon, Philip M R

    2015-01-01

    Topological superconductors have become a subject of intense research due to their potential use for technical applications in device fabrication and quantum information. Besides fully gapped superconductors, unconventional superconductors with point or line nodes in their order parameter can also exhibit nontrivial topological characteristics. This article reviews recent progress in the theoretical understanding of nodal topological superconductors, with a focus on Weyl and noncentrosymmetric superconductors and their protected surface states. Using selected examples, we review the bulk topological properties of these systems, study different types of topological surface states, and examine their unusual properties. Furthermore, we survey some candidate materials for topological superconductivity and discuss different experimental signatures of topological surface states. (topical review)

  12. Future applications of superconductors for industrial use

    Reddy, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    Superconductors have been in existence for many years. Recent developments in superconductivity at higher temperatures are directed towards the potential use of superconductors at ambient temperatures. The diligent efforts of the scientific, engineering, and political agencies in researching and developing superconducting materials have resulted in encouraging accomplishments. Although superconductors could be used in every branch of electrical engineering, the authors focuses on a few areas in this paper. The power distribution and utilization in a typical industry is compared to that of a system using superconductors. Brief discussions of various machines with superconductors at ambient temperatures, based on developments made so far on large superconducting machines, for potential industrial applications are included in this paper

  13. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Micro-length anodic porous niobium oxide for lithium-ion thin film battery applications

    Yoo, Jeong Eun; Park, Jiyoung; Cha, Gihoon; Choi, Jinsub

    2013-01-01

    The anodization of niobium in an aqueous mixture of H 3 PO 4 and HF in the potential range from 2.5 to 30 V for 2 h at 5 °C was performed, demonstrating that anodic porous niobium oxide film with a thickness of up to 2000 nm, including a surface dissolution layer, can be obtained by controlling the applied potential and composition of the electrolytes. Specifically, surface dissolution-free porous niobium oxide film with a thickness of 800 nm can be prepared in a low electrolyte concentration. The surface dissolution is observed when the concentration ratio of HF (wt.%):H 3 PO 4 (M) was more than 2:1. The discontinuous layers in the niobium oxide film were observed when the thickness was higher than 500 nm, which was ascribed to the large volume expansion of the niobium oxide grown from the niobium metal. The anodic porous niobium oxide film was used as the cathode for lithium-ion batteries in the potential range from 1.2 to 3.0 V at a current density of 7.28 × 10 − 6 A cm −2 . The first discharge capacity of ca. 53 μA h cm − 2 was obtained in 800 nm thick niobium oxide without a surface dissolution layer. - Highlights: ► Anodic porous niobium oxide film with a thickness of 2000 nm was obtained. ► Surface dissolution-free porous niobium oxide film was prepared. ► The niobium oxide film was used as the cathode for lithium-ion batteries

  15. Thermogravimetric experiments with titanium

    Porter, L.J.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1991-02-01

    In the process of preparing for pyrophoricity experiments involving uranium, we conducted hydriding and air-exposure experiments on titanium. In these experiments the hydriding reactions and response to air-exposure was generally within the range expected based on work reported by others. One aberrant behavior was a sudden weight gain followed by a significant weight loss. We speculate that loss may be due to hydrogen evolution from the TiH 2 resulting from local heating by oxidation reactions. We verified that titanium is not pyrophoric at temperatures less than 750 degree C. 18 refs. 1 fig

  16. Effect of pH value and delayed-action time on catalytic activity of tartrate niobium(5) complexes

    Alekseeva, I.I.; Chernysheva, L.M.; Bobkova, M.V.; Solomonov, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Results of thermokinetic study of catalytic activity of niobium (5) tartrate solutions in the oxidation of ascorbic acid with hydrogen peroxide are presented. Addition of tartrate-ions to a concentration of 1x10 -2 M and higher in niobium (5) diluted solution enhances the catalytic activity of Nb(5). Alkaline tartrate solutions of niobium (5) may be used as standard solutions in determination of niobium microquantities by kinetic method

  17. Common phase diagram for low-dimensional superconductors

    Michalak, Rudi

    2003-01-01

    A phenomenological phase diagram which has been derived for high-temperature superconductors from NMR Knight-shift measurements of the pseudogap is compared to the phase diagram that is obtained for organic superconductors and spin-ladder superconductors, both low-dimensional systems. This is contrasted to the phase diagram of some Heavy Fermion superconductors, i.e. superconductors not constrained to a low dimensionality

  18. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  19. Microgravity Processing of Oxide Superconductors

    Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.; Vlasse, Marcus; McCallum, William; Peters, Palmer (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal is to understand the microstructures which develop under the nonequilibrium solidification conditions achieved by melt processing in copper oxide superconductor systems. More specifically, to define the liquidus at the Y- 1:2:3 composition, the Nd-1:2:3 composition, and several intermediate partial substitution points between pure Y-1:2:3 and Nd-1:2:3. A secondary goal has been to understand resultant solidification morphologies and pathways under a variety of experimental conditions and to use this knowledge to better characterize solidification phenomena in these systems.

  20. Intrinsic stability of technical superconductors

    Veringa, H.J.

    1981-10-01

    For the operation of technical superconductors under high current density conditions, the superconducting wires composing high current cables should be intrinsically stabilized. In this report the various important stability criteria are derived and investigated on their validity. An experimental set up is made to check the occurrence of magnetic instabilities if the different applicable criteria are violated. It is found that the observed instabilities can be predicted on the basis of the model given in this report. Production of high current cables based upon composites made by the ECN technique seems to be possible. (Auth.)