WorldWideScience

Sample records for copper nitrates

  1. Production of ultrahigh purity copper using waste copper nitrate solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J Y; Kim, D S

    2003-04-25

    The production of ultrahigh purity copper (99.9999%) by electrolysis in the presence of a cementation barrier has been attempted employing a waste nitric copper etching solution as the electrolyte. The amount of copper deposited on the cathode increased almost linearly with electrolysis time and the purity of copper was observed to increase as the electrolyte concentration was increased. At some point, however, as the electrolyte concentration increased, the purity of copper decreased slightly. As the total surface area of cementation barrier increased, the purity of product increased. The electrolyte temperature should be maintained below 35 degrees C in the range of investigated electrolysis conditions to obtain the ultrahigh purity copper. Considering that several industrial waste solutions contain valuable metallic components the result of present study may support a claim that electrowinning is a very desirable process for their treatment and recovery.

  2. Different pathways for copper sulphate and copper nitrate antioxidation and organic acid excretion in Typha latifolia?

    OpenAIRE

    Lyubenova L.; Kuhn A.; Höltkemeier A.; Bipuah H.; Belford E.; Schröder P.

    2013-01-01

    The major topic of the present experiment was the investigation of the antioxidative enzymes and the root exudate excretion after plant exposure to copper. The copper was added for each treatment as copper sulphate and copper nitrate in the concentrations of 10 μM, 50 μM and 100 μM, respectively. The plant species chosen for the study was Typha latifolia. The experiment gives insight into the plant responses to different copper supplies during the same conditions of exposure. Remarkable resul...

  3. Strain-induced orientation of copper oxide nanoislands through decomposition of pre-organized copper nitrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷俐; 陈树大; 赵惠明

    2004-01-01

    By the decomposition of copper nitrate at 400 ℃, oriented islands of copperoxide crystals were successfully fabricated on the amorphous glass surface. X-ray diffraction (XRD), atom force microscope (AFM), and Xray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirm the presence of copper oxide islands. The formation of oriented island structures is attributed to the following reasons: 1) the mismatch between the glass substrate and the copper oxide crystals during the relaxation of thermal expansion leads to the formation of islands; 2) the preorganized copper nitrate particles in the voids of colloidal crystals determine their ordered spatial distribution; 3) the strain of the glass substrate developing during calcination provides the driven energy for the orientation of copper oxide crystals along the same direction.

  4. The Synthesis and Characterization of Rouaite, a Copper Hydroxy Nitrate: An Integrated First-Year Laboratory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushong, Elizabeth J.; Yoder, Claude H.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis and analysis of a copper hydroxy nitrate provides an exposure to a simple ionic synthesis, qualitative analysis of copper and nitrate, two gravimetric analyses (copper and nitrate), one volumetric analysis (hydroxide), and a colorimetric analysis (copper). The results allow the student to determine the identity of the double salt and…

  5. Antioxidant promotion of tyrosine nitration in the presence of copper(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Liu, Baohong; Girault, Hubert H

    2013-06-01

    Copper(II) is known to catalyze the generation of reactive nitrogen species in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, nitrite or nitric oxide, leading to tyrosine nitration, a biomarker for free radical species associated diseases. Here, we find that biological antioxidants such as ascorbic acid can promote tyrosine nitration in the presence of copper(II) and nitrite under aerobic and weak acidic conditions. Tyrosine nitration is demonstrated on both the β-amyloid peptide and angiotensin I. These studies show that (i) ascorbic acid works as a pro-oxidant in the presence of copper(II) to induce oxidation and nitration on peptides, (ii) both free and coordinated copper(II) can catalyze peptide oxidation and nitration, (iii) nitration occurs under mild acidic conditions (pH = 6.0-6.5).

  6. Antioxidant Promotion of Tyrosine Nitration in the Presence of Copper(II)

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Liang; Liu, Baohong; Girault, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Copper(II) is known to catalyze the generation of reactive nitrogen species in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, nitrite or nitric oxide, leading to tyrosine nitration, a biomarker for free radical species associated diseases. Here, we find that biological antioxidants such as ascorbic acid can promote tyrosine nitration in the presence of copper(II) and nitrite under aerobic and weak acidic conditions. Tyrosine nitration is demonstrated on both β-amyloid peptide and angiotensin I. These stu...

  7. Rapid Microwave-Assisted Copper-Catalyzed Nitration of Aromatic Halides with Nitrite Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, Seung Uk; Jung, Myoung Geun [Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    A rapid and efficient copper-catalyzed nitration of aryl halides has been established under microwave irradiation. The catalytic systems were found to be the most effective with 4-substituted aryl iodides leading to nearly complete conversions. Nitration of aromatic compounds is one of the important industrial processes as underlying intermediates in the manufacture of a wide range of chemicals such as dyes, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and explosives. General methods for the nitration of aromatic compounds utilize strongly acidic conditions employing nitric acid or a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids, sometimes leading to problems with poor regioselectivity, overnitration, oxidized byproducts and excess acid waste in many cases of functionalized aromatic compounds. Several other nitrating agents or methods avoiding harsh reaction conditions have been explored using metal nitrates, nitrite salts, and ionic liquid-mediated or microwave-assisted nitrations. Recently, copper or palladium compounds have been successfully used as efficient catalysts for the arylation of amines with aryl halides under mild conditions.

  8. Comparative study on the impact of copper sulphate and copper nitrate on the detoxification mechanisms in Typha latifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubenova, Lyudmila; Bipuah, Hanif; Belford, Ebenezer; Michalke, Bernhard; Winkler, Barbro; Schröder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The present study focused on cupric sulphate and cupric nitrate uptake in Typha latifolia and the impact of these copper species on the plant's detoxification capacity. When the plants were exposed to 10, 50 and 100 μM cupric sulphate or cupric nitrate, copper accumulation in T. latifolia roots and shoots increased with rising concentration of the salts. Shoot to root ratios differed significantly depending on the form of copper supplementation, e.g. if it was added as cupric (II) sulphate or cupric (II) nitrate. After incubation with 100 μM of cupric sulphate, up to 450 mg Cu/kg fresh weight (FW) was accumulated, whereas the same concentration of cupric nitrate resulted in accumulation of 580 mg/kg FW. Furthermore, significant differences in the activity of some antioxidative enzymes in Typha roots compared to the shoots, which are essential in the plant's reaction to cope with metal stress, were observed. The activity of peroxidase (POX) in roots was increased at intermediate concentrations (10 and 50 μM) of CuSO4, whereas it was inhibited at the same Cu(NO3)2 concentrations. Ascorbate peroxidase (APOX) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) increased their enzyme activity intensely, which may be an indication for copper toxicity in T. latifolia plants. Besides, fluorodifen conjugation by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) was increased up to sixfold, especially in roots.

  9. Copper nano-clusters prepared by one-step electrodeposition and its application on nitrate sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the fabrication and characterization of copper nano-clusters prepared by a simple one-step electrodeposition process on platinum microelectrode, and the application for nitrate determination. The one-step electrodepostion process was performed by chronoamperometry scan in acidic copper sulphate electrolyte directly. The SEM and electrochemical examination showed that the morphologies and microstructures of deposited copper layers can be precisely controlled by using different deposition voltages. It was found that the copper layer is porous when the deposition voltage is higher than -500 mV, and this porous layer has a larger effective surface area compared with the corresponding smooth flat copper layer deposited under voltage less than -300 mV. Under the optimized deposition voltage, copper clusters constructed by uniform nanoparticles with an average diameter of about 100 nm can be obtained. The mechanism of electrodeposition process for this method was also speculated. The copper layers deposited under different voltages are used in a series of tests in order to evaluate their performance for nitrate sensing. The experimental results reveal that the microelectrode modified by fixed potential deposition under -700 mV had a higher sensitivity of 39.31 μA/mmolL−1 for nitrate detection within the concentration ranging from 0.1 mmolL−1 to 4.0 mmolL−1.

  10. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of azo dye (Direct Blue 15) using solvothermally synthesized copper hydroxide nitrate as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yuzhong; Zhou, Xiang; Fu, Bei; Chen, Yiliang

    2011-03-15

    Copper hydroxide nitrate (Cu(2)(OH)(3)NO(3)) was synthesized solvothermally in anhydrous ethanol and characterized by XRD, FTIR, TG-DTA and SEM. The peroxide degradation of an azo dye (Direct Blue 15) on this material was evaluated by examining catalyst loading, initial pH, hydrogen peroxide dosage, initial dye concentration and temperature. The leaching of Cu from the copper hydroxide nitrate during the reaction was also measured. The copper hydroxide nitrate synthesized solvothermally, which was of a novel spherical morphology with complex secondary structures and contained high-dispersed Cu(2)O impurity, showed good performance for oxidation degradation of the azo dye, especially high catalytic activity, high utilization of hydrogen peroxide and a wide pH range, whereas the copper hydroxide nitrate synthesized by the direct reaction of copper nitrate and sodium hydroxide showed low catalytic activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Copper reduces striatal protein nitration and tyrosine hydroxylase inactivation induced by MPP+ in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Osornio, M; Montes, S; Pérez-Severiano, F; Aguilera, P; Floriano-Sánchez, E; Monroy-Noyola, A; Rubio, C; Ríos, C

    2009-06-01

    Striatal administration of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), the active metabolite of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), causes nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway damage similar to that observed in Parkinson's disease. Copper acts as a prosthetic group of several antioxidant enzymes and recent data show that copper attenuated MPP(+)-evoked neurotoxicity. We evaluated the effect of copper (as a supplement) upon proteins nitration (60 kDa) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) inactivation induced by MPP(+) (10 microg/8 microL) injection into the rat striatum. Copper pretreatment (10 micromol/kg i.p.) prevented both MPP(+)-induced proteins nitration and TH inactivation. Copper treatment also prevented the dopamine-depleting effect of MPP(+) injection. Those results were accompanied by a significant reduction of enzymatic activity of the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS), whereas, the protein levels of the three isoforms of NOS remained unchanged. Results indicate that the effect of copper against MPP(+)-induced proteins nitration and TH inactivation in the striatum of rat may be mediated by a reduction of cNOS activity.

  12. Neutron scattering study of two-magnon states in the quantum magnet copper nitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tennant, D.A.; Broholm, C.; Reich, D.H.;

    2003-01-01

    We report measurements of the two-magnon states in a dimerized antiferromagnetic chain material, copper nitrate [Cu(NO3)(2).2.5D(2)O]. Using inelastic neutron scattering we have measured the one- and two-magnon excitation spectra in a large single crystal. The data are in excellent agreement with...

  13. One-dimensional Copper(Ⅱ) Complex Constructed with Nitrate Counter-anion as Bitopic Connector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Coordination polymer {[Cu(NPPCA)3(NO3)(H2O)]·NO3·H2O}n 1 ( NPPCA = N-(4′-nitrophenyl)-4-pyridinecarboxamide) has been synthesized by the reaction of NPPCA with copper(Ⅱ) nitrate in ethanol-water solution and characterized by X-ray diffraction. 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic space, group P21/n, a = 17.341(6)A, b = 6.744(2) (A), c = 34.555(12)(A), β =100.493(6)°, V = 3974(2) (A)3, Z = 4. Each copper(Ⅱ) ion has a distorted octahedral coordination geometry. Nitrate anion adopts the unusual coordination mode linking two adjacent copper(Ⅱ)ions to form a one-dimensional coordination polymer and these chains are further linked by noncovalent interactions.

  14. Electrical conductivity of solutions of copper(II) nitrate crystalohydrate in dimethyl sulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamyrbekova, Aigul K.; Mamitova, A. D.; Mamyrbekova, Aizhan K.

    2016-06-01

    Conductometry is used to investigate the electric conductivity of Cu(NO3)2 ṡ 3H2O solutions in dimethyl sulfoxide in the 0.01-2.82 M range of concentrations and at temperatures of 288-318 K. The limiting molar conductivity of the electrolyte and the mobility of Cu2+ and NO 3 - ions, the effective coefficients of diffusion of copper(II) ions and nitrate ions, and the degree and constant of electrolytic dissociation are calculated for different temperatures from the experimental results. It is established that solutions containing 0.1-0.6 M copper nitrate trihydrate in DMSO having low viscosity and high electrical conductivity can be used in electrochemical deposition.

  15. Synthesis of nano-structured polypyrrole/copper electrodes for nitrate and nitrite electroreduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong Thoa Nguyen, Thi; Thinh Nguyen, Viet; Nguyen Bui, Nhat; Do, Duong Kim Bao; Pham, Anh Minh

    2010-09-01

    Nanostructured polypyrrole film was synthesized onto a copper electrode in solutions of oxalic and salicylic acids and their buffers. The electrooxidation of pyrrole to form polypyrrole film and the electroreduction of nitrate and nitrite ions at synthesized Ppy modified copper electrodes (Ppy/Cu) in potassium chloride aqueous solutions were studied using chronoamperometry. The nanoporous structure of the synthesized Ppy films was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nitrate and nitrite reduction were performed by an electrochemical method under potentiostatic conditions. The Ppy/Cu electrodes prepared in the oxalate buffer and salicylic acid solutions perform more stable catalytic activity for nitrate reduction; their service life is about ten times longer than that for the electrodes prepared in oxalic acid solution. After 20 h of electrolysis, the nitrite was reduced completely with 100% efficiency and the nitrate was reduced with 35% efficiency. Report submitted to the 5th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN, Hanoi, 9-12 November 2010.

  16. Reaction of a copper(II)-nitrosyl complex with hydrogen peroxide: phenol ring nitration through a putative peroxynitrite intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Apurba; Deka, Ramesh C; Mondal, Biplab

    2013-10-07

    Copper(II) complex, 1, with the histidine-derived ligand L (L = methyl 2-(2-hydroxybenzylamino)-3-(1H-imidazol-5-yl)propanoate) has been synthesized and characterized. Single-crystal structure determination reveals a diphenolato-bridged dicopper(II) core in 1. Addition of (•)NO to an acetonitrile solution of 1 affords the corresponding mononuclear copper(II)-nitrosyl complex, 2. In the presence of H2O2, 2 results in formation of the corresponding copper(I)-peroxynitrite. Formation of peroxynitrite ((-)OONO) intermediate is evident from its characteristic phenol ring nitration reaction which resembles the tyrosine nitration in biological systems. Further, isolation of nitrate (NO3(-)) as the decomposition product from 2 at room temperature also supports the involvement of (-)OONO intermediate.

  17. Nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blockers Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors Antiarrhythmics Anticoagulants Antiplatelet Therapy Aspirin Beta-Blockers Blood Thinners Calcium Channel Blockers Digitalis Medicines Diuretics Inotropic Agents Statins, Cholesterol-Lowering Medicines Nitrates Disclaimer The information ...

  18. Analytical application of solid contact ion-selective electrodes for determination of copper and nitrate in various food products and drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardak, Cecylia; Grabarczyk, Malgorzata

    2016-08-02

    A simple, fast and cheap method for monitoring copper and nitrate in drinking water and food products using newly developed solid contact ion-selective electrodes is proposed. Determination of copper and nitrate was performed by application of multiple standard additions technique. The reliability of the obtained results was assessed by comparing them using the anodic stripping voltammetry or spectrophotometry for the same samples. In each case, satisfactory agreement of the results was obtained, which confirms the analytical usefulness of the constructed electrodes.

  19. Catalytic activity for nitrate electroreduction of nano-structured polypyrrole films electrochemically synthesized onto a copper electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong Thoa Nguyen, Thi; Thinh Nguyen, Viet; Hai Le, Viet

    2010-03-01

    Polypyrrole film was synthesized electrochemically onto a copper electrode in oxalate, oxalic acid and salicylic acid solutions. The electrochemical oxidation of pyrrole to form polypyrrole film and the electroreduction of nitrate and nitrite ions at synthesized Ppy modified copper electrodes (Ppy/Cu) in potassium chloride aqueous solutions were studied by cyclic voltammetry. Polypyrrole nano-porous film formation and the activity of the modified Ppy/Cu electrode for nitrate reduction were found to be dependent on the synthesis medium and conditions: pH; content and concentrations of the electrolytes; pyrrole concentration; electrode potential; electrolysis duration; drying time and temperature for finishing the Ppy/Cu electrode and immersion time in water for storing the Ppy/Cu electrode before use. High catalytic activity for nitrate reduction was found for composite electrodes with nano-porous structured Ppy films. The Ppy/Cu electrodes prepared in oxalate buffer and salicylic acid solutions perform more stable catalytic activity for nitrate reduction; their service life is about ten times longer than for an electrode prepared in oxalic acid solution.

  20. Criticality-Enhanced Magnetocaloric Effect in Quantum Spin Chain Material Copper Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jun-Sen; Chen, Cong; Li, Wei; Sheng, Xian-Lei; Su, Na; Cheng, Zhao-Hua; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Zi-Yu

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a systematic study of Cu(NO3)2·2.5 H2O (copper nitrate hemipentahydrate, CN), an alternating Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chain model material, is performed with multi-technique approach including thermal tensor network (TTN) simulations, first-principles calculations, as well as magnetization measurements. Employing a cutting-edge TTN method developed in the present work, we verify the couplings J = 5.13 K, α = 0.23(1) and Landé factors g∥= 2.31, g⊥ = 2.14 in CN, with which the magnetothermal properties have been fitted strikingly well. Based on first-principles calculations, we reveal explicitly the spin chain scenario in CN by displaying the calculated electron density distributions, from which the distinct superexchange paths are visualized. On top of that, we investigated the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in CN by calculating its isentropes and magnetic Grüneisen parameter. Prominent quantum criticality-enhanced MCE was uncovered near both critical fields of intermediate strengths as 2.87 and 4.08 T, respectively. We propose that CN is potentially a very promising quantum critical coolant. PMID:28294147

  1. Nanostructure copper oxocobaltate fabricated by co-precipitation route using copper and cobalt nitrate as precursors: characterization by combined diffuse reflectance and FT infrared spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Rezvani, Zoya

    2014-09-15

    Nanostructure copper oxocobaltate has been fabricated by a co-precipitation route using copper and cobalt nitrate as precursors. The physicochemical properties of copper cobaltate have been characterized via X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The X-ray diffraction patterns indicates the presence of a spinel crystalline phase, (Cu0.30Co0.70)Co2O4, copper oxocobaltate with face-centered cubic lattice and Fd3m space group. FESEM images also illustrated a typical hexagonal morphology with particle size 25 nm, showing a good nanoscale crystalline morphology, which corresponds well with their XRD results. The FTIR spectra confirmed the presence of hydroxyl groups bonded to the metals, stretching vibration of the cobalt-oxygen bond in an octahedral coordination and the characteristic band assigned to the vibration of Cu-O bond. UV-VIS diffuse reflectance spectrum shows a broad band over the whole visible range and broad band between 200 nm and 390 nm ascribed to the ligand to metal charge transfer.

  2. Structured ZnO films: Effect of copper nitrate addition to precursor solution on topography, band gap energy and photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, S.; Nikkanen, J.-P.; Kaleva, A.; Hyvärinen, L.; Levänen, E.

    2017-02-01

    ZnO is a widely studied semiconductor material with interesting properties such as photocatalytic activity leading to wide range of applications, for example in the field of opto-electronics and self-cleaning and antimicrobial applications. Doping of photocatalytic semiconductor materials has been shown to introduce variation in the band gap energy of the material. In this work, ZnO rods were grown on a stainless steel substrates using hydrothermal method introducing copper nitrate into the precursor solution. Zinc nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine were used as precursor materials and the growth was conducted at 90 °C for 2 h in order to achieve a well-aligned evenly distributed rod structure. Copper was introduced as copper nitrate that was added in the precursor solution in the beginning of the growth. The as-prepared films were then heat-treated at 350 °C and band gap measurements were performed for prepared films. It was found that increase in the copper concentration in the precursor solution decreased the band gap of the ZnO film. Methylene blue discolouration tests were then performed in order to study the effect of the copper nitrate addition to precursor solution on photocatalytic activity of the structured ZnO films.

  3. Laser-Assisted Reduction of Highly Conductive Circuits Based on Copper Nitrate for Flexible Printed Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shi; Zhang, Shigang; Zhou, Weiping; Ma, Delong; Ma, Ying; Joshi, Pooran; Hu, Anming

    2017-10-01

    Stretchable electronic sensing devices are defining the path toward wearable electronics. High-performance flexible strain sensors attached on clothing or human skin are required for potential applications in the entertainment, health monitoring, and medical care sectors. In this work, conducting copper electrodes were fabricated on polydimethylsiloxane as sensitive stretchable microsensors by integrating laser direct writing and transfer printing approaches. The copper electrode was reduced from copper salt using laser writing rather than the general approach of printing with pre-synthesized copper or copper oxide nanoparticles. An electrical resistivity of 96 μΩ cm was achieved on 40-μm-thick Cu electrodes on flexible substrates. The motion sensing functionality successfully demonstrated a high sensitivity and mechanical robustness. This in situ fabrication method leads to a path toward electronic devices on flexible substrates.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Insight into the electroreduction of nitrate ions at a copper electrode, in neutral solution, after determination of their diffusion coefficient by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aouina, Nizar; Cachet, Hubert [Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques - UPR15 du CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Debiemme-chouvy, Catherine, E-mail: catherine.debiemme-chouvy@upmc.f [Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques - UPR15 du CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Tran, Thi Tuyet Mai [Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques - UPR15 du CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2010-10-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrate ions at a copper electrode in an unbuffered neutral aqueous solution is studied. Using a two compartment electrochemical cell, three stationary cathodic waves, noted P1, P2 and P3, were evidenced by cyclic voltammetry at -0.9, -1.2 and -1.3 V/SCE, respectively. By comparing the electrochemical response of nitrate and nitrite containing solutions, P1 was attributed to the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. In order to assign P2 and P3 features by determining the number of electrons involved at the corresponding potential, rotating disk electrode experiments at various rotation speeds, combined with linear sweep voltammetry, were performed. Current data analysis at a given potential was carried out using Koutecky-Levich treatment taking into account water reduction. Confident values of the diffusion coefficient D of nitrate ions were assessed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for nitrate concentrations of 10{sup -3}, 10{sup -2} and 10{sup -1} M. For a nitrate concentration of 10{sup -2} M, D was found to be 1.31 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} allowing the number of electrons to be determined as 6 for P2 and 8 for P3, in accordance with nitrate reduction into hydroxylamine and ammonia, respectively. The formation of hydroxylamine was confirmed by the observation of its reoxidation at a Pt microelectrode present at the Cu electrode/nitrate solution interface.

  5. Nitrate removal by a paired electrolysis on copper and Ti/IrO(2) coupled electrodes - influence of the anode/cathode surface area ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyter, David; Bélanger, Daniel; Roué, Lionel

    2010-03-01

    In this study, nitrate removal in alkaline media by a paired electrolysis with copper cathode and Ti/IrO(2) anode enabled the conversion of nitrate to nitrogen. Optimum conditions for carrying out reduction of nitrate to ammonia and subsequent oxidation of the produced ammonia to nitrogen were found. At the copper cathode, electroreduction of nitrate to ammonia was optimal near -1.4 V vs Hg/HgO. At the Ti/IrO(2) anode, a pH value of 12, the presence of chloride and a potential fixed around 2.3 V vs Hg/HgO permitted the production of hypochlorite, leading to the oxidation of ammonia to nitrogen with a N(2) selectivity of 100%. Controlling the cathode/anode surface area ratio, and thus the current density, appeared to be a very efficient way of shifting electrode potentials to optimal values, consequently favoring the conversion of nitrate to nitrogen during a paired galvanostatic electrolysis. A cathode/anode surface area ratio of 2.25 was shown to be the most efficient to convert nitrate to nitrogen.

  6. Gulf of Alaska Shelf and Slope Iron and Nitrate Data, Copper River Region, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These are data from cruises carried out in April, May and July 2010 from the Copper River (AK) mouth to beyond the shelf break, ~150 km from shore. The focus of the...

  7. Methods for accelerating nitrate reduction using zerovalent iron at near-neutral pH: effects of H2-reducing pretreatment and copper deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Y H; Lo, S L; Lin, C I; Hu, C Y; Kuan, W H; Weng, S C

    2005-12-15

    Both surface treatments, H2-reducing pretreatment at 400 degrees C and the deposition of copper as a catalyst, were attempted to enhance the removal of nitrate (40 (mg N) L(-1)) using zerovalent iron in a HEPES buffered solution at a pH of between 6.5 and 7.5. After the iron surface was pretreated with hydrogen gas, the removal of the passive oxide layers that covered the iron was indicated by the decline in the oxygen fraction (energy dispersive X-ray analysis) and the overlap of the cyclic polarization curves. The reaction rate was doubled, and the lag of the early period disappeared. Then, the deposition of copper onto freshly pretreated iron promoted nitrate degradation more effectively than that onto a nonpretreated iron surface, because of the high dispersion and small size of the copper particles. An optimum of 0.25-0.5% (w/w) Cu/Fe accelerated the rate by more than six times that of the nonpretreated iron. The aged 0.5% (w/w) Cu/Fe with continual dipping in nitrate solution for 20 days completely restored its reactivity by a regeneration process with H2 reduction. Hence, these two iron surface treatments considerably promoted the removal of nitrate from near-neutral water; the reactivity of Cu/Fe was effectively recovered.

  8. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy Mapping of Porous Coatings Obtained on Titanium by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation in a Solution Containing Concentrated Phosphoric Acid with Copper Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokosz K.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The SEM and EDS study results of coatings obtained on titanium by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO in the electrolytes containing of 600 g copper nitrate in 1 liter of concentrated phosphoric acid at 450 V for 1 and 3 minutes, are presented. The obtained coatings are porous and consist mainly of phosphorus within titanium and copper. It was found that the time of PEO oxidation has impact on the chemical composition of the coatings. The longer time of PEO treatment, the higher amount of copper inside coating. The PEO oxidation of titanium for 1 minute has resulted in the creation of coating, on which 3 phases where found, which contained up to 13.4 wt% (9 at% of copper inside the phosphate structure. In case of 1 minute PEO treatment of titanium, the 2 phases were found, which contained up to 13 wt% (8 at% of copper inside the phosphate structure. The copper-to-phosphorus ratios after 1 minute processing belong to the range from 0.28 by wt% (0.14 by at% to 0.47 by wt% (0.23 by at%, while after 3 minutes the same ratios belong to the range from 0.27 by wt% (0.13 by at% to 0.35 by wt% (0.17 by at%. In summary, it should be stated that the higher amounts of phosphorus and copper were recorded on titanium after PEO oxidation for 3 minutes than these after 1 minute.

  9. Copper(II) bromide, nitrate and perchlorate complexes with sterically demanding N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)acetamide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolentsev, Anton I

    2017-08-01

    Functionalized acid amides are widely used in biology, medicine, environmental chemistry and many other areas. Among them, pyridine-substituted amides, in particular N-(pyridin-2-yl)acetamide and its derivatives, play an important role due to their excellent chelating properties. The donor properties of these ligands can be effectively modified by introducing electron-donating substituents (e.g. alkyl groups) into the heterocycle. On the other hand, substituents in the α-position of the pyridine ring can create steric hindrance, which significantly influences the coordination number and geometry. To achieve a better understanding of these effects, copper(II) complexes with sterically demanding N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)acetamide ligands (L) and monoanions of different size, shape and coordination ability have been chosen as model compounds. The crystal structures of three new compounds, bromidobis[N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl-κN)acetamide-κO]copper(II) bromide, [CuBr(C8H10N2O)]Br, (I), aquabis[N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl-κN)acetamide-κO]copper(II) dinitrate, [Cu(C8H10N2O)(H2O)](NO3)2, (II), and aquabis[N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl-κN)acetamide-κO]copper(II) bis(perchlorate), [Cu(C8H10N2O)(H2O)](ClO4)2, (III), have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. It has been shown that the presence of the 6-methyl group results in either a distorted square-pyramidal or a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal coordination geometry around the Cu(II) centres instead of the typical octahedral geometry observed when the methyl substituent is absent or occupies any other position on the pyridine ring. Moreover, due to the steric hindrance provided by the L ligands, only the bromide ligand, the smallest of the series, enters into the first coordination sphere of the Cu(II) ion in (I). In (II) and (III), the vacant coordination site of the Cu(II) ion is occupied by a water molecule, while the nitrate and perchlorate anions are not involved in coordination to the metal centre

  10. Crystal structures of bis- and hexakis[(6,6'-di-hydroxy-bipyridine)copper(II)] nitrate coordination complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Deidra L; Nieto, Ismael; Herbst-Gervasoni, Corey J; Ferrence, Gregory M; Zeller, Matthias; Papish, Elizabeth T

    2015-12-01

    Two multinuclear complexes synthesized from Cu(NO3)2 and 6,6'-di-hydroxy-bipyridine (dhbp) exhibit bridging nitrate and hydroxide ligands. The dinuclear complex (6,6'-di-hydroxy-bipyridine-2κ(2) N,N')[μ-6-(6-hy-droxy-pyridin-2-yl)pyridin-2-olato-1:2κ(3) N,N':O (2)](μ-hydroxido-1:2κ(2) O:O')(μ-nitrato-1:2κ(2) O:O')(nitrato-1κO)dicopper(II), [Cu2(C10H7N2O2)(OH)(NO3)2(C10H8N2O2)] or [Cu(6-OH-6'-O-bpy)(NO3)(μ-OH)(μ-NO3)Cu(6,6'-dhbp)], (I), with a 2:1 ratio of nitrate to hydroxide anions and one partially deprotonated dhbp ligand, forms from a water-ethanol mixture at neutral pH. The hexa-nuclear complex bis-(μ3-bi-pyridine-2,2'-diolato-κ(3) O:N,N':O')tetra-kis-(6,6'-di-hydroxy-bipyridine-κ(2) N,N')tetra-kis-(μ-hydroxido-κ(2) O:O')bis-(methanol-κO)tetra-kis-(μ-nitrato-κ(2) O:O')hexa-copper(II), [Cu6(C10H6N2O2)2(CH4O)2(OH)4(NO3)4(C10H8N2O2)4] or [Cu(6,6'-dhbp)(μ-NO3)2(μ-OH)Cu(6,6'-O-bpy)(μ-OH)Cu(6,6'dhbp)(CH3OH)]2, (II), with a 1:1 NO3-OH ratio and two fully protonated and fully deprotonated dhbp ligands, was obtained by methanol recrystallization of material obtained at pH 3. Complex (II) lies across an inversion center. Complexes (I) and (II) both display intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding. Inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding links symmetry-related mol-ecules forming chains along [100] for complex (I) with π-stacking along [010] and [001]. Complex (II) forms inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen-bonded chains along [010] with π-stacking along [100] and [001].

  11. Synthesis, thermogravimetric study and crystal structure of an N-rich copper(II) compound with tren ligands and nitrate counter-anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Toro, Inmaculada; Domínguez-Martín, Alicia [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Choquesillo-Lazarte, Duane [Laboratorio de Estudios Cristalográficos, IACT, CSIC-Universidad de Granada, Av. de las Palmeras 4, E-18100 Armilla, Granada (Spain); Vílchez-Rodríguez, Esther [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Castiñeiras, Alfonso [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Niclós-Gutiérrez, Juan, E-mail: jniclos@ugr.es [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2014-10-10

    The N-rich salt [{Cu(tren)}{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-tren)]{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 12}·3H{sub 2}O has been studied by XRD and by coupled TG and FT-IR spectroscopy of the evolved gases. After water loss, thermal decomposition of the nitrate ions and some tren ligands in the salt are overlapped. - Highlights: • A novel N-rich copper(II)-tren complex has been crystallized as a 3-hydrated nitrate salt. • Tren acts both as tripodal tetradentate and as μ{sub 3}-tren bridging ligand. • Copper(II) centers exhibit distorted trigonal bipyramidal coordination. • Coupled thermogravimetry and FT-IR spectra of evolved gases have been used. • Decomposition of nitrate anions and tren ligands occurs in an overlapped step. - Abstract: The compound [{Cu(tren)}{sub 3}(μ3-tren)]{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 12}·3H{sub 2}O has been synthesized, crystallized and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry (TG) coupled to FT-IR spectroscopy of the evolved gases, TG–differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and electronic (diffuse reflectance) and FT-IR spectroscopies. The sample loses the crystallization water between room temperature and 200 °C. The decomposition of the salt begins with an overlapped decomposition of nitrate anions and some tren ligands where CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}O, NO and NO{sub 2} are evolved (205–235 °C). Then decomposition of additional tren ligands takes place (235–725 °C). Finally a non-pure CuO residue is obtained at 725 °C.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and biological activities of copper(II) complex of 2-Benzimidazolyl-urea and the nitrate salt of 2-Benzimidazolyl-urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyraz, Mehmet; Sari, Musa; Banti, Christina N.; Hadjikakou, Sotiris K.

    2017-10-01

    The synthesis of the complex {[Cu(BZIMU)2](NO3)2} (1) (BZIMU = 2-Benzimidazolyl-urea) is reported here. The complex 1 was characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductance measurements. The crystal structures of 1 and of the nitrate salt of [(BZIMUH+)(NO3)-] (2) were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The copper complex 1 and [(BZIMUH+)(NO3)-] (2) were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxic activity (cell viability) against human cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell line and normal human fetal lung fibroblast cells (MRC-5) with SRB assay.

  13. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of a Dinuclear Complex: Bis[aqua(phen)(4-aba)copper(Ⅱ)nitrate(4-abaH)dihydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan-Guo; CHEN Hong-Ji

    2007-01-01

    The title complex has been obtained by the reaction of copper nitrate trihydrate with 4-abaH (4-abaH = 4-aminobenzonic acid) and phenanthroline in ethanol solution,and its structure was determined by X-ray crystallography with the following data: monoclinic,space group C2/c, Mr = 1266.13, Cu2C52H54N10O20, a = 25.884(5), b = 10.205(2), c = 20.849(4)(A), β= 106.34(3)°, Z = 4, V= 5284.7(18) (A)3, F(000) = 2616, Dc = 1.591 g/cm3, μ = 0.896 mm-1,the final R = 0.0441 and wR = 0.1148 for 4200 observed reflections (I > 2σ(I)). In the molecule of the title complex, the asymmetric unit contains one half molecule. The Cu(Ⅱ) atom is five-coordinated by a terminal water molecule, a bidentate phenanthroline and two monodentate 4-aminobenzoate ligands forming a square pyramidal coordination environment. The two bridging 4-aminobenzoate ligands result in a dinuclear copper(Ⅱ) cluster with a short Cu-Cu distance (3.048 (A)) and a π-πstacking between the adjacent phenanthroline rings (2.96 (A)).

  14. Spectroscopic Properties of Metaldehyde and Copper Nitrate-ammonia Mixture%四聚乙醛和硝酸铜氨体系谱学特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霸书红; 周龙; 孙振兴; 王桂萍; 程秀莲; 杜雪峰

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the burning spectrum of metaldehyde and copper nitrate-ammoniamixture,spectroscopic properties of the mixture were tested by thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry( TG-DDSC)TG/DSC method)and photoelectric detection technology. Based on thermal analysis of the mixture,its thermal decomposition process and possible combustion lumi-nous mechanism were studied,and compared with those tested by the burning spectrum. Results show that the burning flame of metaldehyde is yellow and there is a peak at 591. 35 nm which is formed by burning of carbon. When mixed the metaldehyde, thermal decomposition process of copper nitrate-ammonia is changed,with the exothermic peak decreasing from 272. 88 ℃ to 254. 78 ℃. The green and yellow flame gives off when metaldehyde and copper nitrate-ammonia mixture burns and the spectrum peaks appear separatly at 545. 8 nm and 589. 33 nm,which is related to carbon burning and forming of copper free radical. The results of theoretical prediction are in agreement with the experimental.%为研究四聚乙醛和硝酸铜氨烟火药的燃烧光谱,利用热重-差示扫描量热法和光电探测技术表征了该体系的谱学特性。基于热重-差示扫描量热分析,得到了四聚乙醛与硝酸铜氨体系的热分解历程,提出了可能的燃烧发光机理,并与燃烧光谱的测试结果进行了对比分析。结果表明:四聚乙醛燃烧时发出黄色火焰,在591.35 nm 处出现峰值,这是由于碳燃烧产生。当硝酸铜氨与四聚乙醛均匀混合后,硝酸铜氨的热分解历程改变,其放热峰从272.88℃提前到254.78℃。四聚乙醛与硝酸铜氨体系燃烧时呈黄绿色火焰,分别在545.8,589.33 nm处产生谱峰,这与碳的燃烧和铜自由基的形成有关,燃烧火焰的理论预测与光谱测试结果一致。

  15. Determination of LC50 of Copper Sulfate and Lead(II Nitrate and Behavioral Responses of Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed NEKOUBIN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella were exposed to copper and lead for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. Experimental fishes which measured an average length of 8.2 ± 0.44 cm and weighed 4.3 ± 0.5 g. Seven groups (with three replicates of experimental fish were exposed to seven concentrations of each metal. The grass carps were kept in 21 tanks each stocked with 30 fishes were used in our experiments for each metal. The median lethal concentration (LC50 of copper to grass carp for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h were 2.422 mg/L, 2.222 mg/L, 2.006 mg/L, and 1.717 mg/L respectively. The median lethal concentration (LC50 of lead to grass carp for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h were 293.747 mg/L, 278.019 mg/L, 260.324 mg/L, and 246.455 mg/L, respectively. In addition, the behavioral changes of grass carp at different metal concentrations were determined. LC50 increased as mean exposure times decreased for both metals. Physiological responses like rapid opercular movement and frequent gulping of air was observed during the initial stages of exposure after which it became occasional. All these observations can be considered to monitor the quality of aquatic ecosystem and severity of pollution. In conclusion, copper is more toxic than lead for grass carp.

  16. Remediation of actual groundwater polluted with nitrate by the catalytic reduction over copper-palladium supported on active carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi; Sakamoto, Yoshinori; Kamiya, Yuichi

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic reduction of nitrate (NO3-) in groundwater over a Cu-Pd catalyst supported on active carbon was investigated in a gas-liquid co-current flow system at 298 K. Although Cu-Pd/active carbon, in which the Cu/Pd molar ratio was more than 0.66, showed high activity, high selectivity for the formation of N2 and N2O (98%), and high durability for the reduction of 100 ppm NO3- in distilled water, the catalytic performance decreased during the reduction of NO3- in groundwater. The catalyst al...

  17. Reactivity of thiazolidine-2-thione towards CuI/CuII: Synthesis and structures of [3-(2-thiazolin-2-yl)thiazolidine-2-thione]copper(I) bromide and [bis(2,2′-bipyridine)nitratocopper(II)] nitrate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tarlok S Lobana; Anu Rani; Amanpreet K Jassal; Jerry P Jasinski

    2015-01-01

    Thiazolidine-2-thione (L1,NC3H5S2) reacted with copper(I) bromide in CH3CN under aerobic conditions and transformed through C-S bond cleavage into 3-(2-thiazolin-2-yl)thiazolidine-2-thione (L2, C3H4S2N-C3H4SN). This thio-ligand L2 with CuI ion yielded a three coordinate complex, [3-(2-Thiazolin-2-yl)thiazolidine-2-thione]copper(I)bromide 1a which crystallized in the triclinic system with the space group P1 as reported earlier. Treatment of 1a with bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (dppm) in dichloromethane also formed [3-(2-thiazolin-2-yl)thiazolidine-2-thione]copper(I) bromide 1b but it crystallized into the triclinic system with a new space group, P-1: 296(2) K, a, 7.3890(19); b, 8.473(2); c, 9.491(2) Å; , 70.273(5); , 67.170(5); , 84.949(5)°; R, 6.79%. Reactions of copper(II) nitrate with thiazolidine-2-thione followed by the addition of 2,2′-bipyridine or with 2,2′-bipyridine first followed by the addition of thiazolidine-2-thione, gave blue crystals in both the cases. The x-ray crystallography revealed stoichiometry of the complex formed as: [Cu(2-N,N′-bipy)2(1-ONO2)](NO3) 2, which crystallized in monoclinic crystal system with space group, P21/n(14). Crystal data: 173(2) K, a, 11.318(1), b, 12.160(1), c, 14.967(1) Å; = 98.01(1)°, R, 3.99%; 296(2) K, a, 11.340(5), b, 12.249(5), c, 15.065(6) Å; = 98.04(2)◦, R, 4.09%.

  18. Simultaneous removal of nitrate and heavy metals by iron metal*

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Zhi-wei; Xu, Xin-hua; Jin, Jian; He, Ping; Liu, Yong; Wang, Da-hui

    2005-01-01

    Great attention should be paid now to simultaneously removing common pollutants, especially inorganic pollutants such as nitrate and heavy metals, as individual removal has been investigated extensively. Removing common pollutants simultaneously by iron metal is a very effective alternative method. Near neutral pH, heavy metals, such as copper and nickel, can be removed rapidly by iron metal, while nitrate removal very much slower than that of copper and nickel, and copper can accelerate nitr...

  19. Differential nitrate accumulation, nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... storage in the leaf vacuole cells to be released later and reduced in the cytosol ... pathway dependent on nitrate ion concentration, and (2) potassium and ..... converted to starch in storage organs (Li et al., 2009;. Amtmann and ...

  20. Science Letters: Simultaneous removal of nitrate and heavy metals by iron metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Zhi-wei; XU Xin-hua; JIN Jian; HE Ping; LIU Yong; WANG Da-hui

    2005-01-01

    Great attention should be paid now to simultaneously removing common pollutants, especially inorganic pollutants such as nitrate and heavy metals, as individual removal has been investigated extensively. Removing common pollutants simultaneously by iron metal is a very effective alternative method. Near neutral pH, heavy metals, such as copper and nickel, can be removed rapidly by iron metal, while nitrate removal very much slower than that of copper and nickel, and copper can accelerate nitrate removal when both are removed simultaneously. Even a little amount of copper can enhance nitrate removal efficiently.Different mechanisms of these contaminants removal by iron metal were also discussed.

  1. Insensitive Ammonium Nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    is reduced by replacing the ammonium nitrate with a solid solution of potassium nitrate in form III ammonium nitrate wherein the potassium nitrate...constitutes from more than zero to less than 50 weight percent of the solid solution . (Author)

  2. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  3. Micromachined Amperometric Nitrate Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Dohyun Kim; Ira Goldberg; Jack Judy

    2003-01-01

    A nitrate-sensing system that consists of a micromachined sensor substrate, nitrate-permeable membrane, integrated microfluidic channels, and standard fluidic connectors has been designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested. Our microsensor was designed for in-situ monitoring of nitrate concentrations in ground water. A silver electrode was patterned for amperometric nitrate detection. An electrochemically oxidized silver electrode was used as a reference electrode. Microfluidic channels were ...

  4. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  5. Research on metal-plated cellulose nitrate flakes and their infrared / millimeter wave characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shu-qin; Zhu, Chen-guang; Wang, Li-hong; Ou'yang, De-hua; Pan, Gong-pei

    2016-10-01

    Copper-plated and silver-plated cellulose nitrate flakes, which were prepared by using chemical plating technology, were used to jam infrared detector and millimeter-wave radar. It was tested for the conductivity and infrared jamming performance of plating and also the RCS (Radar Cross Section) performance of millimeter-wave radar. Test results showed that the prepared metal-plated cellulose nitrate flakes have obvious conductivity, and infrared total radiation energy of silver plating and copper plating had approximately increased 32% and 21% respectively. Through determination, the millimeter-wave reflecting property and RCS of silver-plated cellulose nitrate flakes were higher than that of copper-plated cellulose nitrate flakes. Therefore, silver-plated cellulose nitrate flakes can be used as an effective infrared / millimeter wave composite jamming material.

  6. Ammonium nitrate explosion hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negovanović Milanka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate (AN primarily is used as a fertilizer but it is also very important compound in the production of industrial explosives. The application of ammonium nitrate in the production of industrial explosives was related with the early era of Nobel dynamite and widely increased with the appearance of blasting agents such as ANFO and Slurry, in the middle of the last Century. Throughout the world millions of tons of ammonium nitrate are produced annually and handled without incident. Although ammonium nitrate generally is used safely, accidental explosions involving AN have high impact resulting in loss of lives and destruction of property. The paper presents the basic properties of ammonium nitrate as well as hazards in handling of ammonium nitrate in order to prevent accidents. Several accidents with explosions of ammonium nitrate resulted in catastrophic consequences are listed in the paper as examples of non-compliance with prescribed procedures.

  7. Study of Silicon Nitrate and Tin Dioxide carbon nanotube composite as lithium-ion battery anode, gas sensor and the self-assembly of carbon nanotubes on copper substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Lugo, Dionne M.

    Carbon nanotubes since their discovery have been used for many applications. They are predicted to reinforce novel composite materials because of their structural perfection, excellent mechanical properties and low density. CNT can be made into nanowires of different materials or as part of a composite making them beneficial for the incorporation into electrochemical devices. Carbon nanotubes in this study were gown directly on a copper substrate employing hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). Bamboo-like carbon nanotubes were made into electrodes reducing the use of inactive materials on the development of working electrodes for electrochemical application. This BCNT were tested as lithium-ion battery anodes assembled together with high capacity materials such as Silicon and Tin Oxide (4200mAh/g and 782 mAh/g). On this study BCNT served as a conductive matrix as well as buffer matrix for the volume expansion brought by cycling silicon and tin oxide. The composite structural properties enhance the surface-to-volume ratio of the electrode demonstrating a desirable electrochemical performance for a lithium-ion battery anode. As a gas sensor electrode CNT was assembled with tin-oxide directly on a copper substrate for the detection of ethanol, methanol, ammonia and H2S. CNT gave a higher surface area and a conductive matrix aiding to the sensing capabilities of the SnO2 increasing the effectiveness of the matrix material for gas detection. Copper is known to produce CNT with a disturb structure. To develop an electrode on copper with well-ordered CNT other techniques need to be used. One way to do this is by chemical modification of the copper substrate with a molecule able to react with the carbon nanotube. For the attachment of well-ordered carbon nanotubes such as SWCNT a self-assembly monolayer technique is chosen. On this study 4-aminothiophenol served as the linker between the copper substrate and the carbon nanotubes. This study let to chemically

  8. Copper hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-10-01

    The world production of copper is steadily increasing. Although humans are widely exposed to copper-containing items on the skin and mucosa, allergic reactions to copper are only infrequently reported. To review the chemistry, biology and accessible data to clarify the implications of copper hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common. As a metal, it possesses many of the same qualities as nickel, which is a known strong sensitizer. Cumulative data on subjects with presumed related symptoms and/or suspected exposure showed that a weighted average of 3.8% had a positive patch test reaction to copper. We conclude that copper is a very weak sensitizer as compared with other metal compounds. However, in a few and selected cases, copper can result in clinically relevant allergic reactions.

  9. Copper transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  10. Copper hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-01-01

    hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common...

  11. Agricultural nitrate pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Helle Tegner

    2015-01-01

    Despite the passing of almost 25 years since the adoption of the EU Nitrates Directive, agricultural nitrate pollution remains a major concern in most EU Member States. This is also the case in Denmark, although a fairly strict regulatory regime has resulted in almost a 50 per cent reduction...

  12. Nitrate Leaching Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nitrate Leaching Index is a rapid assessment tool that evaluates nitrate (NO3) leaching potential based on basic soil and climate information. It is the basis for many nutrient management planning efforts, but it has considerable limitations because of : 1) an oversimplification of the processes...

  13. Preparation of copper nanofluids using an appropriate technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Ghorbani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the synthesis of copper nanoparticles. The synthesis involves the use of copper nitrate, polyvinylpyrrolidone (pvp, dextrose and water as the copper precursor, stabilizing agent, reducing agent and solvent respectively.The nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS. An absorption peak at 580 nm in Uv–Vis spectrophotometer was detected indicating the presence of copper nanoparticles. The DLS analysis showed Copper nanoparticles with size of 5-25 nm.

  14. Nutrient leaching and copper speciation in compost-amended bioretention systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Maninder K; Shi, Zhenqing; Flury, Markus

    2016-06-15

    Bioretention systems are designed to remove contaminants from stormwater; however, studies have shown that bioretention systems can export excess nitrogen, phosphorus, and copper when amended with compost. The objectives of this study were (1) to quantify removal of nitrates, phosphorus, copper, and dissolved organic matter (DOM) from compost-amended bioretention systems, and (2) to investigate the role of DOM on the leaching of copper. Simulated bioretention systems were irrigated with stormwater for seven storms in two-weeks intervals. Leachates were analyzed for nutrients, copper, and DOM. Visual MINTEQ was used to determine the speciation of copper and to quantify interactions of copper with DOM. Results showed that compost-amended bioretention systems were a source of nitrates, phosphorus, and DOM. Nitrate and phosphorus amounts were elevated up to three orders of magnitude in the leachate compared to the stormwater itself. Bioretention systems were a source for copper during the first 3-5 storms, but during later storms, they were a sink for copper. Copper speciation modeling indicated that the majority of dissolved copper was complexed with DOM. Dissolved organic matter thus helps to mobilize copper from the compost, particularly in the first few storms after compost application. However, since copper-DOM complexes are usually much less toxic than free copper ions, we expect that compost amendments may reduce harmful effects of copper on aquatic organisms.

  15. Hydrogen and oxygen plasma enhancement in the Cu electrodeposition and consolidation processes on BDD electrode applied to nitrate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, A. B.; Santos, L. C. D.; Matsushima, J. T.; Baldan, M. R.; Ferreira, N. G.

    2011-09-01

    Copper nanoparticle electrodeposition and consolidation processes were studied on boron doped diamond (BDD) electrode submitted to hydrogen and oxygen plasma treatments. The modified BDD films were applied as electrodes for nitrate electroreduction. The results showed that both treatments have a strong influence on the copper deposition and dissolution processes. For BDD treated with hydrogen plasma the copper electrodeposit was homogeneous with high particle density. This behavior was attributed to the BDD surface hydrogenation that improved its conductivity. On the other hand, the treatment with oxygen plasma was important for the copper nanoparticle consolidation on BDD surface, confirmed by the result's reproducibility for nitrate reduction. This performance may be associated with the formation of oxygen groups that can act as anchor points for Cu-clusters, enhancing the interfacial adhesion between diamond and the metal coating. The best electrochemical nitrate reduction response was obtained in acid media, where occurred the separation of the nitrate reduction process and the water reduction reaction.

  16. Bioactivation of organic nitrates and the mechanism of nitrate tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemenska, Emila; Beresewicz, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin, are commonly used in the therapy of cardiovascular disease. Long-term therapy with these drugs, however, results in the rapid development of nitrate tolerance, limiting their hemodynamic and anti-ischemic efficacy. In addition, nitrate tolerance is associated with the expression of potentially deleterious modifications such as increased oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and sympathetic activation. In this review we discuss current concepts regarding the mechanisms of organic nitrate bioactivation, nitrate tolerance, and nitrate-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. We also examine how hydralazine may prevent nitrate tolerance and related endothelial dysfunction.

  17. VT Nitrate Leaching Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) Nitrate Leaching Index data for the state of Vermont. This is a derivative product based on the SSURGO soils data for all counties except Essex...

  18. Agricultural nitrate pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Helle Tegner

    2015-01-01

    Despite the passing of almost 25 years since the adoption of the EU Nitrates Directive, agricultural nitrate pollution remains a major concern in most EU Member States. This is also the case in Denmark, although a fairly strict regulatory regime has resulted in almost a 50 per cent reduction...... in nitrogen leaching since the mid-80s. Nevertheless, further effort is needed, particularly in ecologically sensitive areas. This article discusses different regulatory approaches – and in particular the need for a differentiated nitrate regulation tailored to meet site-specific ecological demands – from...... of the mandatory specification standards of the Nitrates Directive combined with additional instruments to address the need for severe restrictions on fertiliser use or cultivation practices in the most ecologically vulnerable areas....

  19. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate....... A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings...

  20. Protein tyrosine nitration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Mounira; Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide metabolism in plant cells has a relative short history. Nitration is a chemical process which consists of introducing a nitro group (-NO2) into a chemical compound. in biological systems, this process has been found in different molecules such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that can affect its function. This mini-review offers an overview of this process with special emphasis on protein tyrosine nitration in plants and its involvement in the process of nitrosative stress. PMID:19826215

  1. Metal-catalyzed protein tyrosine nitration in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campolo, Nicolás; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Radi, Rafael

    2014-11-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is an oxidative postranslational modification that can affect protein structure and function. It is mediated in vivo by the production of nitric oxide-derived reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and nitrogen dioxide ((•)NO₂). Redox-active transition metals such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and manganese (Mn) can actively participate in the processes of tyrosine nitration in biological systems, as they catalyze the production of both reactive oxygen species and RNS, enhance nitration yields and provide site-specificity to this process. Early after the discovery that protein tyrosine nitration can occur under biologically relevant conditions, it was shown that some low molecular weight transition-metal centers and metalloproteins could promote peroxynitrite-dependent nitration. Later studies showed that nitration could be achieved by peroxynitrite-independent routes as well, depending on the transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of nitrite (NO₂(-)) to (•)NO₂ in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Processes like these can be achieved either by hemeperoxidase-dependent reactions or by ferrous and cuprous ions through Fenton-type chemistry. Besides the in vitro evidence, there are now several in vivo studies that support the close relationship between transition metal levels and protein tyrosine nitration. So, the contribution of transition metals to the levels of tyrosine nitrated proteins observed under basal conditions and, specially, in disease states related with high levels of these metal ions, seems to be quite clear. Altogether, current evidence unambiguously supports a central role of transition metals in determining the extent and selectivity of protein tyrosine nitration mediated both by peroxynitrite-dependent and independent mechanisms.

  2. Direct writing patterns for electroless plated copper thin film on plastic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ying-Chih; Kao, Zhen-Kai

    2012-10-24

    A simple and efficient method is developed to create conductive copper thin films on polymer surfaces. Instead of regular palladium colloid inks, micropatterns of silver nitrate inks, which serve as an activating agent for copper plating, were printed and dried on flexible plastic substrates. The printed plastic sheets were then immersed in an electroless copper plating bath at 55 °C for 2 min to create copper thin films on the printed patterns. The prepared copper films have an electrical conductivity as high as 83% of bulk copper and show good adhesion on PET or PI substrates.

  3. Electrochemical performance of coal-based activated carbon electrodes modified by copper nitrate for supercapacitor%硝酸铜改性超级电容器用煤基活性炭电极材料的电化学性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马亚芬; 谌伦建; 邢宝林; 徐冰; 黄光许; 张传祥

    2012-01-01

    Coal-based activated carbon(AC) was prepared from Indonesia lignite by KOH as activator. In order to improve electrochemical properties of AC, the AC was modified by means of soaking in copper nitrate solution and subsequent pyrolysis. The specific surface area and pore distribution of activated carbons before and after modification were studied by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, the crystallite structure and surface morphology of activated carbons were characterized by SEM and XRD. Moreover, the wettability and electrochemical performance of activated carbon electrodes were researched by contact angle and constant current charge-discharge, cyclic voltammograms, alternating current impedance, respectively. The results indicate that the portion pores of modified AC , especially the micropores, are blocked by the oxides produced from the Cu ( NO3 ) 2 decomposition, the specific surface and total pore volume decrease, the rate of mesopores increases. Meanwhile, the oxides loaded on AC by copper nitrate modification not only improves the wettability of AC to electrolyte, but also produces an obvious pseudo-capacitance effect, the specific capacitance of modified AC can be enhanced. Based on this study, the optimum concentration of Cu( NO3 )2 solution was 2% ,the specific capacitance of modified AC electrode can be reached up to 322 F/g, and the electrochemical performance can be improved.%以印尼褐煤为原料、KOH活化法制备的煤基活性炭,采用硝酸铜溶液浸渍-高温热解法对其进行改性处理,低温N2吸附法对改性前后活性炭的孔结构进行表征,SEM和XRD对改性前后活性炭的表面形态和微晶结构进行表征,并测定KOH对活性炭的润湿性及活性炭电极的恒流充放电、循环伏安、交流阻抗等电化学性能.结果表明:硝酸铜改性可能使部分孔隙(尤其是微孔堵塞)的比表面积和孔容积降低,但中孔率有所提高;硝酸铜改性可以提高KOH溶液对活性炭的润湿性,在

  4. Nitrate absorption through hydrotalcite reformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L; Musumeci, Anthony W

    2006-10-01

    Thermally activated hydrotalcite based upon a Zn/Al hydrotalcite with carbonate in the interlayer has been used to remove nitrate anions from an aqueous solution resulting in the reformation of a hydrotalcite with a mixture of nitrate and carbonate in the interlayer. X-ray diffraction of the reformed hydrotalcites with a d(003) spacing of 7.60 A shows that the nitrate anion is removed within a 30 min period. Raman spectroscopy shows that two types of nitrate anions exist in the reformed hydrotalcite (a) nitrate bonded to the 'brucite-like' hydrotalcite surface and (b) aquated nitrate anion in the interlayer. Kinetically the nitrate is replaced by the carbonate anion over a 21 h period. Two types of carbonate anions are observed. This research shows that the reformation of a thermally activated hydrotalcite can be used to remove anions such as nitrate from aqueous systems.

  5. Nitrate Leaching Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching is a significant nitrogen (N) loss process for agriculture that must be managed to minimize NO3 enrichment of groundwater and surface waters. Managing NO3 leaching should involve the application of basic principles of understanding the site’s hydrologic cycle, avoiding excess ...

  6. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  7. Nitrate in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schullehner, Jörg; Hansen, Birgitte; Sigsgaard, Torben

    Annual nationwide exposure maps for nitrate in drinking water in Denmark from the 1970s until today will be presented based on the findings in Schullehner & Hansen (2014) and additional work on addressing the issue of private well users and estimating missing data. Drinking water supply in Denmark...... is highly decentralized and fully relying on simple treated groundwater. At the same time, Denmark has an intensive agriculture, making groundwater resources prone to nitrate pollution. Drinking water quality data covering the entire country for over 35 years are registered in the public database Jupiter....... In order to create annual maps of drinking water quality, these data had to be linked to 2,852 water supply areas, which were for the first time digitized, collected in one dataset and connected to the Jupiter database. Analyses of the drinking water quality maps showed that public water supplies...

  8. Flash light sintered copper precursor/nanoparticle pattern with high electrical conductivity and low porosity for printed electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Wan-Ho; Hwang, Hyun-Jun [Department of Mechanical Convergence Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haendang-Dong, Seongdong-Gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak-Sung, E-mail: kima@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Convergence Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haendang-Dong, Seongdong-Gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the hybrid copper inks with precursor and nanoparticles were fabricated and sintered via flash light irradiation to achieve highly conductive electrode pattern with low porosity. The hybrid copper ink was made of copper nanoparticles and various copper precursors (e.g., copper(II) chloride, copper(II) nitrate trihydrate, copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate and copper(II) trifluoroacetylacetonate). The printed hybrid copper inks were sintered at room temperature and under ambient conditions using an in-house flash light sintering system. The effects of copper precursor weight fraction and the flash light irradiation conditions (light energy and pulse duration) were investigated. Surfaces of the sintered hybrid copper patterns were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope. Also, spectroscopic characterization techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the crystal phases of the flash light sintered copper precursors. High conductivity hybrid copper patterns (27.3 μΩ cm), which is comparable to the resistivity of bulk copper (1.68 μΩ cm) were obtained through flash light sintering at room temperature and under ambient conditions. - Highlights: • The hybrid copper inks with precursor and nanoparticles were fabricated. • The hybrid copper ink was sintered via flash light irradiation. • The resistivity of sintered hybrid copper ink was 27.3 μΩ cm. • Highly conductive copper film with low porosity could be achieved.

  9. Composition and particle size of electrolytic copper powders prepared in water-containing dimethyl sulfoxide electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamyrbekova, Aigul'; Abzhalov, B. S.; Mamyrbekova, Aizhan

    2017-07-01

    The possibility of the electroprecipitation of copper powder via the cathodic reduction of an electrolyte solution containing copper(II) nitrate trihydrate and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is shown. The effect electrolysis conditions (current density, concentration and temperature of electrolyte) have on the dimensional characteristics of copper powder is studied. The size and shape of the particles of the powders were determined by means of electron microscopy; the qualitative composition of the powders, with X-ray diffraction.

  10. Assimilation of nitrate by yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siverio, José M

    2002-08-01

    Nitrate assimilation has received much attention in filamentous fungi and plants but not so much in yeasts. Recently the availability of classical genetic and molecular biology tools for the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has allowed the advance of the study of this metabolic pathway in yeasts. The genes YNT1, YNR1 and YNI1, encoding respectively nitrate transport, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, have been cloned, as well as two other genes encoding transcriptional regulatory factors. All these genes lie closely together in a cluster. Transcriptional regulation is the main regulatory mechanism that controls the levels of the enzymes involved in nitrate metabolism although other mechanisms may also be operative. The process involved in the sensing and signalling of the presence of nitrate in the medium is not well understood. In this article the current state of the studies of nitrate assimilation in yeasts as well as possible venues for future research are reviewed.

  11. Catalytic membrane in reduction of aqueous nitrates: operational principles and catalytic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilinitch, O.M.; Cuperus, F.P.; Nosova, L.V.; Gribov, E.N.

    2000-01-01

    The catalytic membrane with palladium-copper active component supported over the macroporous ceramic membrane, and a series of γ-Al 2O 3 supported Pd-Cu catalysts were prepared and investigated. In reduction of nitrate ions by hydrogen in water at ambient temperature, pronounced internal diffusion

  12. Hybrid Copper-Silver Conductive Tracks for Enhanced Oxidation Resistance under Flash Light Sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Changyong; Sandwell, Allen; Park, Simon S

    2016-08-31

    We developed a simple method to prepare hybrid copper-silver conductive tracks under flash light sintering. The developed metal nanoparticle-based ink is convenient because its preparation process is free of any tedious washing steps. The inks were composed of commercially available copper nanoparticles which were mixed with formic acid, silver nitrate, and diethylene glycol. The role of formic acid is to remove the native copper oxide layer on the surface of the copper nanoparticles. In this way, it facilitates the formation of a silver outer shell on the surface of the copper nanoparticles through a galvanic replacement. In the presence of formic acid, the copper nanoparticles formed copper formate, which was present in the unsintered tracks. However, under illumination by a xenon flash light, the copper formate was then converted to copper. Moreover, the resistance of the copper-only films increased by 6 orders of magnitude when oxidized at high temperatures (∼220 °C). However, addition of silver nitrate to the inks suppressed the oxidation of the hybrid copper-silver films, and the resistance changes in these inks at high temperatures were greatly reduced. In addition, the hybrid inks proved to be advantageous for use in electrical circuits as they demonstrated a stable electrical conductivity after exposure to ambient air at 180 °C.

  13. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils;

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly...... and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate...... storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described...

  14. Waterproofing Materials for Ammonium Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Damse

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the possibility of overcoming the problem of hygroscopicity of ammonium nitrate by coating the particles with selected waterproofing materials. Gravimetric analysis ofthe samples of ammonium nitrate coated with eight different waterproofing materials, vis-a-vis, uncoated ammonium nitrate, were conducted at different relative humidity and exposuretime. The results indicate that mineral jelly is the promising waterproofing material for ammonium nitrate among the materials tested, viz, calcium stearate, dioctyl phthalate, kaoline, diethylphthalate, dinitrotoluene, shelac varnish, and beeswax. Attempts were made to confirm the waterproofing ability of mineral jelly to ammonium nitrate using differential thermal analysisand x-ray diffraction patterns as an experimental tool. Suitability of mineral jelly as an additive for the gun propellant was also assessed on the basis of theoretical calculations using THERMprogram.

  15. Nitration of Polystyrene-Part II Effect of Nitrating Medium on Nitration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bajaj

    1968-04-01

    Full Text Available Polystyrene has been nitrated in mixtures of anhydrous nitric and sulphuric acid (70 : 30 and 80 : 20 by volume. Degree of substitution of nitro group per benzene ring varies from 1 to 2 depending on the time, temperature and composition of the nitrating media. Effect of polar and non polar solvents on nitration has been studied by nitrating the polymer in (i fuming nitric acid and (iimixture of nitric and sulphuric acid in presence of dimethyl formamide (DMF and carbon tetrachloride (CCI/Sub4. MF increase the rate of nitration in fuming nitric acid whereas the rate of nitration is lowered in the presence of DMF in the nitrating mixtures. In the case of CCI/Sub4, however, the effect is just the opposite to that observed in DMF. The results have been explained from the mechanism of the formation of 'nitroniumion,NO/Sub2+ in various nitrating media. Degradation of the polymer has been found to be comparatively less in the presence of the organic solvents used in the study.

  16. Denitrifying kinetics and nitrous oxide emission under different copper concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guangxue; Zhai, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Chengai; Guan, Yuntao

    2014-01-01

    Denitrifying activities and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission during denitrification can be affected by copper concentrations. Different denitrifiers were acclimated in sequencing batch reactors with acetate or methanol as the electron donor and nitrate as the electron acceptor. The effect of copper concentrations on the denitrifying activity and N2O emission for the acclimated denitrifiers was examined in batch experiments. Denitrifying activities of the acclimated denitrifiers declined with increasing copper concentrations, and the copper concentration exhibited a higher effect on denitrifiers acclimated with acetate than those acclimated with methanol. Compared with the control without the addition of copper, at the copper concentration of 1 mg/L, the acetate utilization rate reduced by 89% for acetate-acclimated denitrifiers, while the methanol utilization rate only reduced by 15% for methanol-acclimated denitrifiers. Copper also had different effects on N2O emission during denitrification carried out by various types of denitrifiers. For the acetate-acclimated denitrifiers, N2O emission initially increased and then decreased with increasing copper concentrations, while for the methanol-acclimated denitrifiers, N2O emission decreased with increasing copper concentrations.

  17. Hydrogen-based tubular catalytic membrane for removing nitrate from groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y X; Zhang, Y; Liu, H Y; Sharma, K R; Chen, G H

    2004-02-01

    A porous tubular ceramic membrane coated with palladium-cupper (Pd-Cu) catalyst on its surface was prepared and evaluated for catalytic reduction of nitrate from groundwater. Nitrate reduction activity and selectivity with the catalytic membrane were compared with Pd-Cu/Al2O3 catalyst particles. The catalytic membrane reactor exhibited a better selectivity by enabling an effective control of hydrogen gas, thus minimizing ammonium production. No leaching of palladium and copper into aqueous phase was observed, thereby indicating a high chemical stability of the metallic ions on the carrier support. This was also evidenced by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) profiles of fresh and used catalysts, which showed no significant difference in surface compositions. Due to its higher selectivity in nitrate reduction and better flexibility in terms of operating conditions, the tubular catalytic ceramic membrane could be useful in removing nitrate from groundwater.

  18. Copper allergy from dental copper amalgam?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardsson, Lars; Björkner, Bert; Karlsteen, Magnus; Schütz, Andrejs

    2002-05-06

    A 65-year-old female was investigated due to a gradually increasing greenish colour change of her plastic dental splint, which she used to prevent teeth grinding when sleeping. Furthermore, she had noted a greenish/bluish colour change on the back of her black gloves, which she used to wipe her tears away while walking outdoors. The investigation revealed that the patient had a contact allergy to copper, which is very rare. She had, however, had no occupational exposure to copper. The contact allergy may be caused by long-term exposure of the oral mucosa to copper from copper-rich amalgam fillings, which were frequently used in childhood dentistry up to the 1960s in Sweden. The deposition of a copper-containing coating on the dental splint may be caused by a raised copper intake from drinking water, increasing the copper excretion in saliva, in combination with release of copper due to electrochemical corrosion of dental amalgam. The greenish colour change of the surface of the splint is probably caused by deposition of a mixture of copper compounds, e.g. copper carbonates. Analysis by the X-ray diffraction technique indicates that the dominant component is copper oxide (Cu2O and CuO). The corresponding greenish/bluish discoloration observed on the back of the patient's gloves may be caused by increased copper excretion in tears.

  19. Copper Products Capacity Expansion Stimulate the Copper Consumption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>The dramatic growth of copper consumption in China can directly be seen from the expansion of copper products capacity.According to sta- tistics,in the past 4 years,the improvement on the balance of trade on copper bar,copper,and copper alloy and copper wire & cable has driven the growth of copper consumption a lot.

  20. Variability of nitrate and phosphate

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.; Sundar, D.

    Nitrate and phosphate are important elements of the biogeochemical system of an estuary. Observations carried out during the dry season April-May 2002, and March 2003 and wet season September 2002, show temporal and spatial variability of these two...

  1. Antwerp Copper Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadum, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    In addition to presenting a short history of copper paintings, topics detail artists’ materials and techniques, as well as aspects of the copper industry, including mining, preparation and trade routes.......In addition to presenting a short history of copper paintings, topics detail artists’ materials and techniques, as well as aspects of the copper industry, including mining, preparation and trade routes....

  2. Nitrate Reductase: Properties and Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nitrate Reductase (NR) is a rating-limit and key enzyme of nitrate assimilation in plants ,so ,NR activity is important for growth,development and the dry matter accumulation of plants. The regulation of NR activity appears to be rather complex and many studies have been devoted to the description of regulation and properties,but in this paper we focus on the properties and regulation of NR in higher plants.

  3. Headspace Analysis of Ammonium Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-25

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6110--17-9709 Headspace Analysis of Ammonium Nitrate January 25, 2017 Approved for public...TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Headspace Analysis of Ammonium Nitrate G...isobutane reagent ion from analysis of ammonia desorbed from packed tungsten oxide sampling tube .................. 18 E-1 Executive Summary The

  4. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad, so that the level of sodium nitrate does not...

  5. Copper and copper proteins in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Sergio; Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology.

  6. XPS and GDOES Characterization of Porous Coating Enriched with Copper and Calcium Obtained on Tantalum via Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Rokosz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available XPS and GDOES characterizations of porous coatings on tantalum after Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO at 450 V for 3 minutes in electrolyte containing concentrated (85% phosphoric acid with calcium nitrate and copper (II nitrate are described. Based on the obtained data, it may be concluded that the PEO coating consists of tantalum (Ta5+, calcium (Ca2+, copper (Cu2+  and Cu+, and phosphates (PO43-. It has to be pointed out that copper and calcium are distributed throughout the volume. The authors also propose a new model of PEO, based on the derivative of GDOES signals with sputtering time.

  7. Nitrate transport and signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Anthony J; Fan, Xiaorong; Orsel, Mathilde; Smith, Susan J; Wells, Darren M

    2007-01-01

    Physiological measurements of nitrate (NO(3)(-)) uptake by roots have defined two systems of high and low affinity uptake. In Arabidopsis, genes encoding both of these two uptake systems have been identified. Most is known about the high affinity transport system (HATS) and its regulation and yet measurements of soil NO(3)(-) show that it is more often available in the low affinity range above 1 mM concentration. Several different regulatory mechanisms have been identified for AtNRT2.1, one of the membrane transporters encoding HATS; these include feedback regulation of expression, a second component protein requirement for membrane targeting and phosphorylation, possibly leading to degradation of the protein. These various changes in the protein may be important for a second function in sensing NO(3)(-) availability at the surface of the root. Another transporter protein, AtNRT1.1 also has a role in NO(3)(-) sensing that, like AtNRT2.1, is independent of their transport function. From the range of concentrations present in the soil it is proposed that the NO(3)(-)-inducible part of HATS functions chiefly as a sensor for root NO(3)(-) availability. Two other key NO(3)(-) transport steps for efficient nitrogen use by crops, efflux across membranes and vacuolar storage and remobilization, are discussed. Genes encoding vacuolar transporters have been isolated and these are important for manipulating storage pools in crops, but the efflux system is yet to be identified. Consideration is given to how well our molecular and physiological knowledge can be integrated as well to some key questions and opportunities for the future.

  8. Tetranuclear zinc(II-oxy (benzothiazole-2-thiolate aggregate and copper(I phenylthiolate aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Goswami

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A tetranuclear zinc-oxy (benzothiazole-2-thiolate aggregate whose structure has a C3-axis passing through ZnO unit relating three other zinc ions and a tetranuclear copper(I phenylthiolate aggregate having each thiphenolate ligand bridging three copper ions are reported. These aggregates were prepared by hydrothermal reactions of 2,2′-dithiobis-(benzothiazole with zinc nitrate or copper(I iodide, respectively. The reaction of zinc nitrate passed through in situ abstraction of a oxy ligand from moisture to form a Zn4O core holding six 2-benzothiazolethiolate ligands, and during the formation of the aggregate, cleavage of S–S bond of 2,2′-dithiobis-(benzothiazole took place. Whereas, an aggregate formed by self-assembling of copper(I phenylthiolate was formed after extensive degradation of 2,2′-dithiobis-(benzothiazole during solvothermal reaction.

  9. Formation of Submicron Copper Sulfide Particles Using Spray Pyrolysis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenggoro, I.; Kang, Yun; Komiya, Takafumi; Okuyama, Kikuo; Tohge, Noboru

    1998-03-01

    The morphology and crystalline phase of submicron copper sulfide particles prepared by spray pyrolysis method have been studied. In a nitrogen gas atmosphere, the covellite phase (CuS) spherical particles could be prepared using the solution with molar ratio of copper nitrate to thiourea and furnace temperatures of 1:2 at 200 300°C, as well as of 1:5 at 200 600°C. The crystalline phase of particles was highly depended on the composition of the precursors and the pyrolysis temperature. The sphericity of particles could be enhanced by increasing the temperature and prolonging the residence time of the droplets or particles in the furnace.

  10. Colorimetric determination of nitrate plus nitrite in water by enzymatic reduction, automated discrete analyzer methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Charles J.; Kryskalla, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents work at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to validate enzymatic reduction, colorimetric determinative methods for nitrate + nitrite in filtered water by automated discrete analysis. In these standard- and low-level methods (USGS I-2547-11 and I-2548-11), nitrate is reduced to nitrite with nontoxic, soluble nitrate reductase rather than toxic, granular, copperized cadmium used in the longstanding USGS automated continuous-flow analyzer methods I-2545-90 (NWQL laboratory code 1975) and I-2546-91 (NWQL laboratory code 1979). Colorimetric reagents used to determine resulting nitrite in aforementioned enzymatic- and cadmium-reduction methods are identical. The enzyme used in these discrete analyzer methods, designated AtNaR2 by its manufacturer, is produced by recombinant expression of the nitrate reductase gene from wall cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Unlike other commercially available nitrate reductases we evaluated, AtNaR2 maintains high activity at 37°C and is not inhibited by high-phenolic-content humic acids at reaction temperatures in the range of 20°C to 37°C. These previously unrecognized AtNaR2 characteristics are essential for successful performance of discrete analyzer nitrate + nitrite assays (henceforth, DA-AtNaR2) described here.

  11. Synthesis of carbon-supported copper catalyst and its catalytic performance in methanol dehydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelepova, Ekaterina V.; Vedyagin, Aleksey A.; Ilina, Ludmila Yu.; Nizovskii, Alexander I.; Tsyrulnikov, Pavel G.

    2017-07-01

    Carbon-supported copper catalyst was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of Sibunit with an aqueous solution of copper nitrate. Copper loading was 5 wt.%. Temperature of reductive pretreatment was varied within a range of 200-400 °C. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. Catalytic activity of the samples was studied in a reaction of methanol dehydrogenation. Silica-based catalyst with similar copper loading was used as a reference. It was found that copper is distributed over the surface of support in the form of metallic and partially oxidized particles of about 12-17 nm in size. Diminished interaction of copper with support was supposed to be responsible for high catalytic activity.

  12. Short-term effects of a high nitrate diet on nitrate metabolism in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Liu, Alex H; Croft, Kevin D; Ward, Natalie C; Puddey, Ian B; Woodman, Richard J; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2015-03-12

    Dietary nitrate, through the enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, can improve blood pressure and arterial stiffness. How long systemic nitrate and nitrite remain elevated following cessation of high nitrate intake is unknown. In 19 healthy men and women, the time for salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite to return to baseline after 7 days increased nitrate intake from green leafy vegetables was determined. Salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite was measured at baseline [D0], end of high nitrate diet [D7], day 9 [+2D], day 14 [+7D] and day 21 [+14D]. Urinary nitrite and nitrate was assessed at D7 and +14D. Increased dietary nitrate for 7 days resulted in a more than fourfold increase in saliva and plasma nitrate and nitrite (p nitrate had returned to baseline while saliva nitrate and nitrite were more than 1.5 times higher than at baseline levels. By [+7D] all metabolites had returned to baseline levels. The pattern of response was similar between men and women. Urinary nitrate and nitrate was sevenfold higher at D7 compared to +14D. These results suggest that daily ingestion of nitrate may be required to maintain the physiological changes associated with high nitrate intake.

  13. Efficiency of nitrate uptake in spinach : impact of external nitrate concentration and relative growth rate on nitrate influx and efflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Steege, MW; Stulen, [No Value; Wiersema, PK; Posthumus, F; Vaalburg, W

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of nitrate influx and efflux in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., cv. Subito), was studied in short-term label experiments with N-13- and N-15-nitrate. Nitrate fluxes were examined in relation to the N demand for growth, defined as relative growth rate (RGR) times plant N concentration. Plan

  14. Crystal structures of triazine-3-thione derivatives by reaction with copper and cobalt salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Torres, Elena; Mendiola, Maria Antonia; Pastor, César J

    2006-04-03

    The reaction of 5-methoxy-5,6-diphenyl-4,5-dihydro-2H-[1,2,4]triazine-3-thione L1H2OCH3 with copper(II) chloride leads to the formation of an organic molecule L2 containing two triazine rings linked by a new S-S bond. A binuclear copper(II) complex, 1, containing L1 is also isolated. The reaction of L1H2OCH3 with copper(I) chloride yields a hexanuclear cluster of copper(I), 2, in which the copper atoms form a distorted octahedron with the ligand L1 acting as an NS chelate and sulfur bridge, giving to the copper ion a trigonal geometry by one N and two S atoms. In any reaction of the disulfide L2 with metal salts, complexes containing this molecule are isolated. Reactions with copper(I) and copper(II) chloride and nickel(II) and cadmium(II) nitrate produce the S-S bond cleavage, giving complexes containing the triazine L1 behaving as the NS anion, which show spectroscopic characteristics identical with those formed by reaction with L1H2OCH3. However, the reaction with cobalt(II) nitrate gives a low-spin octahedral cobalt(III) complex, in which an asymmetric rupture of the disulfide L2 has been produced, giving an unexpected complex with a new ligand and keeping the S-S bond.

  15. [Copper pathology (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, B; Romette, J; Di Costanzo, J D

    1982-01-30

    Copper is an essential dietary component, being the coenzyme of many enzymes with oxidase activity, e.g. ceruloplasmin, superoxide dismutase, monoamine oxidase, etc. The metabolism of copper is complex and imperfectly known. Active transport of copper through the intestinal epithelial cells involves metallothionein, a protein rich in sulfhydryl groups which also binds the copper in excess and probably prevents absorption in toxic amounts. In hepatocytes a metallothionein facilitates absorption by a similar mechanism and regulates copper distribution in the liver: incorporation in an apoceruloplasmin, storage and synthesis of copper-dependent enzymes. Metallothioneins and ceruloplasmin are essential to adequate copper homeostasis. Apart from genetic disorders, diseases involving copper usually result from hypercupraemia of varied origin. Wilson's disease and Menkes' disease, although clinically and pathogenetically different, are both marked by low ceruloplasmin and copper serum levels. The excessive liver retention of copper in Wilson's disease might be due to increased avidity of hepatic metallothioneins for copper and decreased biliary excretion through lysosomal dysfunction. Menkes' disease might be due to low avidity of intestinal and hepatic metallothioneins for copper. The basic biochemical defect responsible for these two hereditary conditions has not yet been fully elucidated.

  16. Metal nitrate conversion method, patent application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    A method for converting a supported metal nitrate into the corresponding supported metal comprises heating the metal nitrate to effect its decomposition under a gas mixture that contains nitric oxide and has an oxygen content of

  17. 76 FR 62311 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... to best notify agents (AN Agents) when ammonium nitrate purchasers (AN Purchasers) submit those AN... directly to ammonium nitrate sellers (AN Sellers) when it is not possible for an AN Seller to verify the...

  18. Development of a nitrate ion-selective electrode based on an Urushi matrix membrane and its application to the direct measurement of nitrate-nitrogen in upland soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, S; Baba, K; Asano, Y; Takesako, H; Wada, H

    1996-11-01

    A solid-state nitrate ion-selective electrode based on an Urushi matrix membrane was developed. Urushi, a natural oriental lacquer, has excellent mechanical strength and binding affinity for metal electrodes. Using the same technique for a dip-coating ion-selective electrode, an electrode was prepared by coating and hardening a sensing membrane on the metal base. The effects of the metal electrode on the electrode potential stability, the liquid-membrane components and the oven temperature for hardening of membrane were studied. The sensing membrane, consisting of 27.5 wt.% of o-nitrophenyl octyl ether. 27.5 wt.% of tri-n-octylmethylammonium nitrate and 45 wt.% of raw Urushi latex, was coated with a thickness of 0.5 mm on a silver disc which was plated with Ag/AgCl, then plated with copper and hardened in the oven at 80 degrees C for 50 h. A semi-logarithmic calibration curve of potential versus nitrate ion concentration was obtained over the range 6-60 000 mg l(-1) NO(3)(poststaggered-). The slope of the linear part of the curve was -56 mV per decade change in NO(3)(poststaggered-) concentration. Compared with a PVC matrix nitrate ion-selective electrode, the Urushi matrix nitrate ion-selective electrode was superior in terms of hardness and mechanical strength of the membrane, short response time and long life. The combination of an Urushi matrix nitrate ion-selective electrode with a porous PTFE junction reference electrode, air-tight structured KCl solution chamber and a temperature sensor was applied to field measurements of nitrate-nitrogen concentrations in upland soils. The values obtained for upland soils containing 30-50% of water were good agreement with those for soil solution.

  19. [Copper IUDs (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, M

    1983-10-01

    Following initial development of the Grafenberg ring in the 1920's, IUDs fell into disuse until the late 1950s, when plastic devices inserted using new technology began to gain worldwide acceptance. Further research indicated that copper had a significant antifertility effect which increased with increasing surface area, and several copper IUDs were developed and adapted, including the Copper T 200, the Copper T 220C, and the Copper T 380 A, probably the most effective yet. The Gravigard and Multiload are 2 other copper devices developed according to somewhat different principles. Copper devices are widely used not so much because of their great effectiveness as because of their suitability for nulliparous patients and their ease of insertion, which minimizes risk of uterine perforation. Records of 2584 women using Copper IUDs for 7190 women-years and 956 women using devices without copper for 6059 women-years suggest that the copper devices were associated with greater effectiveness and fewer removals for complications. Research suggests that the advantages of copper IUDs become more significant with increased duration of use. Contraindications to copper devices include allergy to copper and hepatolenticular degeneration. No carcinogenic or teratogenic effect of copper devices has been found, but further studies are needed to rule out other undesirable effects. Significant modifications of copper devices in recent years have been developed to increase their effectiveness, prolong their duration of usefulness, facilitate insertion and permit insertion during abortion or delivery. The upper limit of the surface area of copper associated with increased effectiveness appears to be between 200-300 sq mm, and at some point increases in copper exposure may provoke expulsion of the IUD. The duration of fertility inhibition of copper IUDs is usually estimated at 2-3 years, but recent research indicates that it may be 6-8 years, and some devices may retain copper surface

  20. Nitrate Removal from Ground Water: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Archna *; Surinder K. Sharma; Ranbir Chander Sobti

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate contamination of ground water resources has increased in Asia, Europe, United States, and various other parts of the world. This trend has raised concern as nitrates cause methemoglobinemia and cancer. Several treatment processes can remove nitrates from water with varying degrees of efficiency, cost, and ease of operation. Available technical data, experience, and economics indicate that biological denitrification is more acceptable for nitrate removal than reverse osmosis and ion ex...

  1. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  2. Nitrate tolerance impairs nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jørn Bech; Boesgaard, Søren; Poulsen, Henrik E.;

    1996-01-01

    Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized......Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized...

  3. Nitration of Naphthol: A Laboratory Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowery, Dwight F.

    1982-01-01

    Products of nitrations, upon distillation or steam distillation, may produce dermatitis in some students. A procedure for nitration of beta-naphthol producing a relatively non-volatile product not purified by steam distillation is described. Nitration of alpha-naphthol by the same procedure yields Martius Yellow dye which dyes wool yellow or…

  4. 76 FR 11273 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the suspended investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia... investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  5. 76 FR 47238 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4249 (August 2011), entitled Ammonium Nitrate from...

  6. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a...

  7. Mg-Cu-Al layered double hydroxides based catalysts for the reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulić Tatjana J.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The secondary waste and bacterial contamination in physico-chemical and biological separation processes used today for nitrate removal from ground water make novel catalytic technologies that convert nitrates to unharmful gaseous nitrogen, very attractive for scientific research. The Mg-Cu-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH based catalysts with different Mg/Al ratio were investigated in water denitrification reaction in the presence of hydrogen and with solely copper as an active phase. Since LDHs have ion exchange properties and their derived mixed oxides possess memory effect (restoration of layered structure after thermal decomposition, their adsorption capacity for nitrates was also measured in the same model system. All studied samples showed nitrate removal from 23% to 62% following the decrease in Al content, as well as the substantial adsorption capacity ranging from 18% to 38%. These results underlie the necessity to take into account the effects of the adsorption in all future investigations.

  8. Negative feedback loops leading to nitrate homeostasis and oscillatory nitrate assimilation in plants and fungi.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yongshun

    2011-01-01

    Nitrate is an important nutrient for plants and fungi. For plants it has been shown that cytosolic nitrate levels are under homeostatic control. Here we describe two networks that can obtain robust, i.e. perturbation independent, homeostatic behavior in cytosolic nitrate concentration. One of the networks, a member in the family of outflow controllers, is based on a negative feedback loop containing a nitrate-induced activation of a controller molecule which removes nitrate. In plants this co...

  9. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Amol A

    2014-01-01

    This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed.

  10. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol A. Kulkarni

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed.

  11. Recovery of copper through decontamination of synthetic solutions using modified barks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballah, I.; Goy, D.; Allain, E.; Kilbertus, G.; Thauront, J.

    1997-02-01

    Decontamination of synthetic acetate, chloride, nitrate, and sulfate solutions containing 10, 100, 1,000, 10,000, and 50,000 ppm of copper using chemically treated barks has been studied. Metal percentage removal from solutions depends on the pH, the initial concentration, and, to some extent, the anion. It varies from 40 through 99 pct of the initial metallic ion’s content in the solution. The average retention capacity of the treated bark is about 43 mg of Cu/g of dry modified bark (0.68 mmole/g of dry bark). Extraction of copper cations from the saturated modified bark was made possible with dilute acid. Regeneration of bark for reuse as an ion exchanger was possible. Bark loaded with copper was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Copper was uniformly distributed in the bulk of the bark. No copper segregation was observed. It seems that copper was bound to the acidic (phenolic) sites of the bark. Anions were not detected on the copper-loaded bark with either SEM electron probe microanalysis or IR spectroscopy. Incineration of the bark loaded with copper resulted in ashes containing about 77 pct of copper oxides, while pyrolysis of the same sample led to ashes containing 10 pct of metallic copper and about 85 pct carbon.

  12. Nitrate metabolism in the gromiid microbial universe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Cedhagen, Tomas

    Eukaryotic nitrate respiration supported by intracellular nitrate storages contributes substantially to the nitrogen cycle. Research focus is currently directed towards two phyla: Foraminifera and diatoms, but the widespread Gromia in the Rhizaria may be another key organism. These giant protists...... enclose and regulate a small biogeochemical universe within their cell. Their transparent proteinaceous cell wall surrounds a complex matrix consisting of sediment, bacteria and nitrate which is concentrated to hundreds of mM in the gromiid cell. The nitrate is respired to dinitrogen, but in contrast...... to the findings of eukaryotic mediated nitrate reduction in some foraminifera and diatoms, nitrate respiration in gromiids seems to be mediated by bacterial endosymbionts. The role of endobionts in nitrate accumulating eukaryotes is of fundamental importance for understanding the evolutionary path...

  13. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunuwille, M.; Yoo, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  14. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  15. 2-Amino-5-chloropyridinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Zaouali Zgolli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The title structure, C5H6ClN2+·NO3−, is held together by extensive hydrogen bonding between the NO3− ions and 2-amino-5-chloropyridinium H atoms. The cation–anion N—H...O hydrogen bonds link the ions into a zigzag- chain which develops parallel to the b axis. The structure may be compared with that of the related 2-amino-5-cyanopyridinium nitrate.

  16. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Paulot

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL atmospheric model (AM3. Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 % or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %. Our best estimate for present-day fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm is 0.006 (0.005–0.008. We only find a modest increase of nitrate optical depth (2 (−40 % and ammonia (+38 % from 2010 to 2050. Nitrate burden is projected to increase in the tropics and in the free troposphere, but to decrease at the surface in the midlatitudes because of lower nitric acid concentrations. Our results suggest that better constraints on the heterogeneous chemistry of nitric acid on dust, on tropical ammonia emissions, and on the transport of ammonia to the free troposphere are needed to improve projections of aerosol optical depth.

  17. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.-Y.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm in 2010 is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). In wintertime, nitrate aerosols are simulated to account for over 30 % of the aerosol optical depth over western Europe and North America. Simulated nitrate optical depth increases by less than 30 % (0.0061-0.010) in response to projected changes in anthropogenic emissions from 2010 to 2050 (e.g., -40 % for SO2 and +38 % for ammonia). This increase is primarily driven by greater concentrations of nitrate in the free troposphere, while surface nitrate concentrations decrease in the midlatitudes following lower concentrations of nitric acid. With the projected increase of ammonia emissions, we show that better constraints on the vertical distribution of ammonia (e.g., convective transport and biomass burning injection) and on the sources and sinks of nitric acid (e.g., heterogeneous reaction on dust) are needed to improve estimates of future nitrate optical depth.

  18. Handling of Copper and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles by Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcke, Felix; Dringen, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    Copper is an essential trace element for many important cellular functions. However, excess of copper can impair cellular functions by copper-induced oxidative stress. In brain, astrocytes are considered to play a prominent role in the copper homeostasis. In this short review we summarise the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms which are involved in the handling of copper by astrocytes. Cultured astrocytes efficiently take up copper ions predominantly by the copper transporter Ctr1 and the divalent metal transporter DMT1. In addition, copper oxide nanoparticles are rapidly accumulated by astrocytes via endocytosis. Cultured astrocytes tolerate moderate increases in intracellular copper contents very well. However, if a given threshold of cellular copper content is exceeded after exposure to copper, accelerated production of reactive oxygen species and compromised cell viability are observed. Upon exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of copper ions or copper oxide nanoparticles, astrocytes increase their copper storage capacity by upregulating the cellular contents of glutathione and metallothioneins. In addition, cultured astrocytes have the capacity to export copper ions which is likely to involve the copper ATPase 7A. The ability of astrocytes to efficiently accumulate, store and export copper ions suggests that astrocytes have a key role in the distribution of copper in brain. Impairment of this astrocytic function may be involved in diseases which are connected with disturbances in brain copper metabolism.

  19. Transparent Conductive Films of Copper Nanofiber Network Fabricated by Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungyeoul Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu nanofiber networks can be a good alternative of the Ag nanowire of high electrical conductivity while having the advantage of low price. An electrospinning method was developed to fabricate copper nanofiber network for use as a transparent conductive film on glass substrate. The effects of liquid diluents for electrospinning processability were examined in relation to the subsequent Cu nanofiber formation processes. Electrospinning solutions of copper acetate/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA and copper nitrate trihydrate/polyvinyl butyral (PVB were investigated. The polymer mixing solutions influenced the subsequent annealing temperatures for removal of the polymers and reduction of the formed CuO nanofibers to Cu metal nanofibers. The morphology and structures of the formed nanofiber networks were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and so forth. The mixture with PVB provided lower annealing temperatures suitable for application to flexible substrates.

  20. Influence of ultrasonic waves in the reduction of nitrate to nitrite by hydrazine-Cu(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luciana A; Korn, Mauro; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2007-02-01

    Colorimetric methods are still important for determining nitrate and nitrite. A critical step in the use of these methods to determine nitrate in low concentrations is the reaction time required to totally reduce nitrate to nitrite, i.e., 24h in the dark. This work involved a study of the influence of ultrasonic irradiation on the nitrate reduction reaction by hydrazine. Our findings indicated that ultrasonic irradiation, associated with copper(II) ion as a catalyst, increased the redox reaction rate, decreasing the reaction time to about 10min when the power of the ultrasonic irradiation was set in 14.0357W. The strong influence of the ultrasonic irradiation in the reduction reaction rates can be sustained by an excellent linear correlation (R(2)=0.9993) between the kinetic constants and ultrasonic powers. Nitrate conversion also increased from 68% to 98% at the latter conditions. It thus become clear that high intensity ultrasound is very beneficial for this reduction reaction to proceed in good yield and in short reaction time in comparison to its silent reaction.

  1. Canine models of copper toxicosis for understanding mammalian copper metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Fieten, Hille; Leegwater, Peter A. J.; Watson, Adrian L.; Rothuizen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary forms of copper toxicosis exist in man and dogs. In man, Wilson’s disease is the best studied disorder of copper overload, resulting from mutations in the gene coding for the copper transporter ATP7B. Forms of copper toxicosis for which no causal gene is known yet are recognized as well, often in young children. Although advances have been made in unraveling the genetic background of disorders of copper metabolism in man, many questions regarding disease mechanisms and copper homeo...

  2. Hydrothermal Formation of Calcium Copper Tetrasilicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-McDaniel, Darrah; Comer, Sara; Kolis, Joseph W; Salguero, Tina T

    2015-12-01

    We describe the first hydrothermal synthesis of CaCuSi4 O10 as micron-scale clusters of thin platelets, distinct from morphologies generated under salt-flux or solid-state conditions. The hydrothermal reaction conditions are surprisingly specific: too cold, and instead of CaCuSi4 O10 , a porous calcium copper silicate forms; too hot, and calcium silicate (CaSiO3 ) forms. The precursors also strongly impact the course of the reaction, with the most common side product being sodium copper silicate (Na2 CuSi4 O10 ). Optimized conditions for hydrothermal CaCuSi4 O10 formation from calcium chloride, copper(II) nitrate, sodium silicate, and ammonium hydroxide are 350 °C at 3000 psi for 72 h; at longer reaction times, competitive delamination and exfoliation causes crystal fragmentation. These results illustrate that CaCuSi4 O10 is an even more unique material than previously appreciated.

  3. Hair copper in intrauterine copper device users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, M; Heyndrickx, A; Uyttersprot, C

    1984-03-01

    The antifertility effect of copper-bearing IUDs is based on continuous release of copper, which is a result of the reaction between the metal and the uterine secretions. Released cupric ions collect in the endometrium and in the uterine fluid but significant accumulation has not been found in the bloodstream or elsewhere. Following Laker's suggestion that hair be used for monitoring essential trace elements, e.g., copper, we checked the copper content of the hair of women wearing copper-bearing IUDs. Samples of untreated pubic hair removed by clipping before diagnostic curettage were obtained from 10 young (24-34 years old), white caucasian females who until then had been wearing an MLCu250 IUD for more than 1 year. Pubes from 10 comparable (sex, age, race) subjects who had never used a Cu-containing device served as controls. The unwashed material was submitted to the toxicology laboratory, where the copper content was assessed by flameless atomic absorption, a technique whose lower limit of measurement lies at a concentration of 0.05 mcg Cu/ml fluid (50 ppb). Hair samples were washed to remove extraneous traces of metal according to the prescriptions of the International Atomic Energy Agency, weighed, and mineralized, after which a small volume (10 mcl) of the diluted fluid was fed into the graphite furnace. Each sample (75-150 mg) was analyzed 4 times, both before and after washing. Since the cleaning procedure reduces the weight of the sample (mainly by the removal of fat, dust, etc.) this explains why the percentage copper content of washed hair is higher than that of unwashed hair belonging to the same subject. The results indicate that there was no significant difference (Mann-Whitney U test) between the mean copper levels of both unwashed and washed pubes from women who were using or had never used an MLCu250 IUD. We therefore conclude that the use of this copper-containing device is not associated with significant accumulation of copper in (pubic) hair.

  4. China Copper Processing Industry Focus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>1. Market Consumption The ’China Factor’ and Copper Price Fluctuation We all know China is an enormous consumer of copper,but the exact levels of consumption and where the copper has gone remains a mystery.

  5. Biogenic nanoparticles: copper, copper oxides, copper sulphides, complex copper nanostructures and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubilar, Olga; Rai, Mahendra; Tortella, Gonzalo; Diez, Maria Cristina; Seabra, Amedea B; Durán, Nelson

    2013-09-01

    Copper nanoparticles have been the focus of intensive study due to their potential applications in diverse fields including biomedicine, electronics, and optics. Copper-based nanostructured materials have been used in conductive films, lubrification, nanofluids, catalysis, and also as potent antimicrobial agent. The biogenic synthesis of metallic nanostructured nanoparticles is considered to be a green and eco-friendly technology since neither harmful chemicals nor high temperatures are involved in the process. The present review discusses the synthesis of copper nanostructured nanoparticles by bacteria, fungi, and plant extracts, showing that biogenic synthesis is an economically feasible, simple and non-polluting process. Applications for biogenic copper nanoparticles are also discussed.

  6. Nitrate contamination of groundwater and its countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitamura, Hisayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The inevitable increases of food production and energy consumption with an increase in world population become main causes of an increase of nitrate load to the environment. Although nitrogen is essential for the growth of animal and plant as a constituent element of protein, excessive nitrate load to the environment contaminates groundwater resources used as drinking water and leads to seriously adverse effects on the health of man and livestock. In order to clarify the problem of nitrate contamination of groundwater and search a new trend of technology development from the viewpoint of environment remediation and protection, the present paper has reviewed adverse effects of nitrate on human health, the actual state of nitrogen cycle, several kinds of nitrate sources, measures for reducing nitrate level, etc. (author)

  7. Interaction of neodymium nitrate with rubidium and cesium nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molodkin, A.K.; Odinets, Z.K.; S' ' edina, T.V.; Ivanova, T.N. (Universitet Druzhby Narodov, Moscow (USSR))

    1982-12-01

    The Rb/sub 2/Nd(NO/sub 3/)/sub 5/xH/sub 2/O (1) and Cs/sub 2/Nd(NO/sub 3/)/sub 5/xH/sub 2/O (2) new complexes are prepared. The crystals 1 are isotropic, of cubic crystal system, Ng=1.570+-0.002; 2 - Ng=1.582+-0.002; Csub(Np)=0-9 degrees, of low crystal system (syngony). The bands of coordinated nitrate group, the ..delta nu..=..nu../sub 4/(B/sub 2/)-..nu../sub 1/(A/sub 1/) splitting value is respectively equal to 225 and 230 cm/sup -1/ are present in the infrared absorption spectra of the compounds. The interplane distances and corresponding intensities for the 1, 2 and hexahydrate of neodymium nitrate are determined. Derivatograms of the compounds are recorded, the final products of the thermolysis are correspondingly RbNdO/sub 2/ and Nd/sub 2/O/sub 3/.

  8. High catalytic activity of oriented 2.0.0 copper(I) oxide grown on graphene film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primo, Ana; Esteve-Adell, Ivan; Blandez, Juan F.; Dhakshinamoorthy, Amarajothi; Álvaro, Mercedes; Candu, Natalia; Coman, Simona M.; Parvulescu, Vasile I.; García, Hermenegildo

    2015-10-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles supported on graphene exhibit high catalytic activity for oxidation, reduction and coupling reactions. Here we show that pyrolysis at 900 °C under inert atmosphere of copper(II) nitrate embedded in chitosan films affords 1.1.1 facet-oriented copper nanoplatelets supported on few-layered graphene. Oriented (1.1.1) copper nanoplatelets on graphene undergo spontaneous oxidation to render oriented (2.0.0) copper(I) oxide nanoplatelets on few-layered graphene. These films containing oriented copper(I) oxide exhibit as catalyst turnover numbers that can be three orders of magnitude higher for the Ullmann-type coupling, dehydrogenative coupling of dimethylphenylsilane with n-butanol and C-N cross-coupling than those of analogous unoriented graphene-supported copper(I) oxide nanoplatelets.

  9. KINETICS STUDY ON NITRATION OF METHYL RICINOLEATE

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Abdullah; Triyono, Triyono; Trisunaryanti, Wega; Haryadi, Winarto

    2012-01-01

    Kinetics parameter values of methyl ricinoleate nitration (rate constant, reaction order and the rate of reaction) have been determined. Nitration was carried out with both concentrations of HNO3 and acetic anhydride in excess to the concentration of methyl ricinoleate. Thus, the kinetics parameter value was only affected by the concentration of methyl ricinoleate. Based on kinetic study conducted, it could be concluded that the nitration follows pseudo first-order, and the reaction rate for ...

  10. Nitrate leaching from Silage Maize

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Elly Møller; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    During the last 20 years the area with maize in Denmark has increased dramatically and reached 163,000 ha in 2008. Silage maize is easy to grow, is a suitable fodder for cows and goes well with grass-clover in the diet. This means that silage maize is often found in crop rotations with grass-clover on sandy soils in western Denmark. The ploughing in of grass-clover fields poses a serious risk of increased nitrate leaching on a coarse sandy soil, even when carried out in spring. With increased...

  11. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, T.; Erlandsen, M.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded in decreasing the N surplus by 40% since the mid 1980s while at the same time maintaining crop yields and increasing the animal production of especially pigs. Trend analyses prove that the youngest (0-15 years old) oxic groundwater shows more pronounced significant downward nitrate trends (44%) than the oldest (25-50 years old) oxic groundwater (9%). This amounts to clear evidence of the effect of reduced nitrate leaching on groundwater nitrate concentrations in Denmark. Are the Danish groundwater monitoring strategy obtimal for detection of nitrate trends? Will the nitrate concentrations in Danish groundwater continue to decrease or are the Danish nitrate concentration levels now appropriate according to the Water Framework Directive?

  12. Measurement of isoprene nitrates by GCMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Graham P.; Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D.; Bew, Sean P.; Reeves, Claire E.

    2016-09-01

    According to atmospheric chemistry models, isoprene nitrates play an important role in determining the ozone production efficiency of isoprene; however this is very poorly constrained through observations as isoprene nitrates have not been widely measured. Measurements have been severely restricted largely due to a limited ability to measure individual isoprene nitrate isomers. An instrument based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) and the associated calibration methods are described for the speciated measurements of individual isoprene nitrate isomers. Five of the primary isoprene nitrates which formed in the presence of NOx by reaction of isoprene with the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the Master Chemical Mechanism are identified using known isomers on two column phases and are fully separated on the Rtx-200 column. Three primary isoprene nitrates from the reaction of isoprene with the nitrate radical (NO3) are identified after synthesis from the already identified analogous hydroxy nitrate. A Tenax adsorbent-based trapping system allows the analysis of the majority of the known hydroxy and carbonyl primary isoprene nitrates, although not the (1,2)-IN isomer, under field-like levels of humidity and showed no impact from typical ambient concentrations of NOx and ozone.

  13. Nitration of Phenol Catalyzed by Horseradish Peroxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Rong-ji; HUANG Hui; TONG Bin; XIAO Sheng-yuan

    2007-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase, an acidic peroxidase from the horseradish, is one of the most important enzymes as analytical reagent.The enzymatic nitration of phenol by oxidation of nitrite was studied using horseradish peroxidase in the presence of H2O2.The results showed that nitration occur at 2- and 4- positions of phenol.There were also minor products of hydroquinone and catechol.The influence of various reaction parameters, including pH, organic solvent, and concentration of H2O2, on nitration products were discussed.The best nitration pH was 7.0, and H2O2 should be added to the reaction mixture slowly.

  14. Copper and silver halates

    CERN Document Server

    Woolley, EM; Salomon, M

    2013-01-01

    Copper and Silver Halates is the third in a series of four volumes on inorganic metal halates. This volume presents critical evaluations and compilations for halate solubilities of the Group II metals. The solubility data included in this volume are those for the five compounds, copper chlorate and iodate, and silver chlorate, bromate and iodate.

  15. Coping with copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Ines; Jacquiod, Samuel; Brejnrod, Asker

    2016-01-01

    Copper has been intensively used in industry and agriculture since mid-18(th) century and is currently accumulating in soils. We investigated the diversity of potential active bacteria by 16S rRNA gene transcript amplicon sequencing in a temperate grassland soil subjected to century-long exposure......, suggesting a potential promising role as bioindicators of copper contamination in soils....

  16. Yttrium Nitrate mediated Nitration of Phenols at room temperature in Glacial Acetic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MOHABUL A MONDAL; DBASHIS MANDAL; KANCHAN MITRA

    2017-01-01

    Rapid nitration of electron rich phenols using Y(NO₃)₃.6H₂O in glacial acetic acid at room temperature was observed with good yield. The method allows nitration of phenols without oxidation, and isolation of nitration product in a rapid and simple way. The described method is selective for phenols.

  17. Arabidopsis Nitrate Transporter NRT1.9 Is Important in Phloem Nitrate Transport[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Yun; Tsay, Yi-Fang

    2011-01-01

    This study of the Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate transporter NRT1.9 reveals an important function for a NRT1 family member in phloem nitrate transport. Functional analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that NRT1.9 is a low-affinity nitrate transporter. Green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter analyses indicated that NRT1.9 is a plasma membrane transporter expressed in the companion cells of root phloem. In nrt1.9 mutants, nitrate content in root phloem exudates was decreased, and downward nitrate transport was reduced, suggesting that NRT1.9 may facilitate loading of nitrate into the root phloem and enhance downward nitrate transport in roots. Under high nitrate conditions, the nrt1.9 mutant showed enhanced root-to-shoot nitrate transport and plant growth. We conclude that phloem nitrate transport is facilitated by expression of NRT1.9 in root companion cells. In addition, enhanced root-to-shoot xylem transport of nitrate in nrt1.9 mutants points to a negative correlation between xylem and phloem nitrate transport. PMID:21571952

  18. Arabidopsis nitrate transporter NRT1.9 is important in phloem nitrate transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Yun; Tsay, Yi-Fang

    2011-05-01

    This study of the Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate transporter NRT1.9 reveals an important function for a NRT1 family member in phloem nitrate transport. Functional analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that NRT1.9 is a low-affinity nitrate transporter. Green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter analyses indicated that NRT1.9 is a plasma membrane transporter expressed in the companion cells of root phloem. In nrt1.9 mutants, nitrate content in root phloem exudates was decreased, and downward nitrate transport was reduced, suggesting that NRT1.9 may facilitate loading of nitrate into the root phloem and enhance downward nitrate transport in roots. Under high nitrate conditions, the nrt1.9 mutant showed enhanced root-to-shoot nitrate transport and plant growth. We conclude that phloem nitrate transport is facilitated by expression of NRT1.9 in root companion cells. In addition, enhanced root-to-shoot xylem transport of nitrate in nrt1.9 mutants points to a negative correlation between xylem and phloem nitrate transport.

  19. Challenges with nitrate therapy and nitrate tolerance: prevalence, prevention, and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadani, Udho

    2014-08-01

    Nitrate therapy has been an effective treatment for ischemic heart disease for over 100 years. The anti-ischemic and exercise-promoting benefits of sublingually administered nitrates are well established. Nitroglycerin is indicated for the relief of an established attack of angina and for prophylactic use, but its effects are short lived. In an effort to increase the duration of beneficial effects, long-acting orally administered and topical applications of nitrates have been developed; however, following their continued or frequent daily use, patients soon develop tolerance to these long-acting nitrate preparations. Once tolerance develops, patients begin losing the protective effects of the long-acting nitrate therapy. By providing a nitrate-free interval, or declining nitrate levels at night, one can overcome or reduce the development of tolerance, but cannot provide 24-h anti-anginal and anti-ischemic protection. In addition, patients may be vulnerable to occurrence of rebound angina and myocardial ischemia during periods of absent nitrate levels at night and early hours of the morning, and worsening of exercise capacity prior to the morning dose of the medication. This has been a concern with nitroglycerin patches but not with oral formulations of isosorbide-5 mononitrates, and has not been adequately studied with isosorbide dinitrate. This paper describes problems associated with nitrate tolerance, reviews mechanisms by which nitrate tolerance and loss of efficacy develop, and presents strategies to avoid nitrate tolerance and maintain efficacy when using long-acting nitrate formulations.

  20. Large pore volume mesoporous copper particles and scaffold microporous carbon material obtained from an inorganic-organic nanohybrid material, copper-succinate-layered hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotbi, Mohammad Yeganeh; Bagheri, Narjes; Sadrnezhaad, S K

    2011-10-01

    Copper-succinate-layered hydroxide (CSLH), a new nanohybrid material, was synthesized as an inorganic-organic nanohybrid, in which organic moiety was intercalated between the layers of a single cation layered material, copper hydroxide nitrate. Microporous scaffold carbon material was obtained by thermal decomposition of the nanohybrid at 500 °C under argon atmosphere followed by acid washing process. Furthermore, the heat-treated product of the nanohybrid at 600 °C was ultrafine mesoporous metallic copper particles. The results of this study confirmed the great potential of CSLH to produce the carbon material with large surface area (580 m(2)/g) and high pore volume copper powder (2.04 cm(3)/g).

  1. Kunpeng Copper:The largest Copper Smelting Company of Sichuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>On September 9,Liangshan Mining Company’s 100,000 tons/year cathode copper project kicked off.It is another key project of the company following the successful launch of the 100,000 tons/year anode copper project.Based on ISA copper smelting technology of the largest open-cast copper mine in southwest China,

  2. Evaluation of nitrates in albanian wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariola Morina

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitrates are important compounds in nature but not desirable if they are present in wine at increased amount. The high level of nitrate is attributed to the use of nitrogen fertilizers in the vineyards. Method of the reactive Gries I and Gries II was used for the determination of nitrates in wine. There were analyzed 45 white wines and 55 red wines produced in 2008 – 2010, as well as wines produced from Albanian grape varieties Shesh i Bardhë and Shesh i Zi in 2009 and 2010, as an authentic wines evidence with denominated origin. From the results of analyses was observed that, in 51 % of white wines was found that the content of nitrates were less than 5 mg/l, in 46% of them the nitrates level goes up to 10 mg/l and only in 3 % of them the amount of nitrates is up to 12 mg/l. None of white wine samples have the content of nitrates over 20 mg/l. In this case there is no doubt for water addition during wine preparation. In regards of red wines, in 34% of them the amount of nitrates is up to 5 mg/l, in 30% of them up to 10 mg/l, while in 26% of them the amount of nitrates is 20 mg/l. Only 10 % of red wines have nitrates content over 20 mg/l which raise dubiety for falsified wines where water and sugar is added in the red marc. The level of nitrates in wines with denominated origin was under 20 mg/L.

  3. Regulation of nitrate assimilation in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Yoshitake; Shi, Wei; Takatani, Nobuyuki; Aichi, Makiko; Maeda, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Satoru; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Omata, Tatsuo

    2011-02-01

    Nitrate assimilation by cyanobacteria is inhibited by the presence of ammonium in the growth medium. Both nitrate uptake and transcription of the nitrate assimilatory genes are regulated. The major intracellular signal for the regulation is, however, not ammonium or glutamine, but 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG), whose concentration changes according to the change in cellular C/N balance. When nitrogen is limiting growth, accumulation of 2-OG activates the transcription factor NtcA to induce transcription of the nitrate assimilation genes. Ammonium inhibits transcription by quickly depleting the 2-OG pool through its metabolism via the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase cycle. The P(II) protein inhibits the ABC-type nitrate transporter, and also nitrate reductase in some strains, by an unknown mechanism(s) when the cellular 2-OG level is low. Upon nitrogen limitation, 2-OG binds to P(II) to prevent the protein from inhibiting nitrate assimilation. A pathway-specific transcriptional regulator NtcB activates the nitrate assimilation genes in response to nitrite, either added to the medium or generated intracellularly by nitrate reduction. It plays an important role in selective activation of the nitrate assimilation pathway during growth under a limited supply of nitrate. P(II) was recently shown to regulate the activity of NtcA negatively by binding to PipX, a small coactivator protein of NtcA. On the basis of accumulating genome information from a variety of cyanobacteria and the molecular genetic data obtained from the representative strains, common features and group- or species-specific characteristics of the response of cyanobacteria to nitrogen is summarized and discussed in terms of ecophysiological significance.

  4. Formation of copper nanoparticles in mordenite s with variable SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratios under redox treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petranovskii, V.; Avalos, M. [UNAM, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, 22800 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Stoyanov, E. [University of California, Department of Chemistry, Riverside, 92521 California (United States); Gurin, V. [Belarusian State University, Research Institute for Physical Chemical Problems, Minsk 220080 (Belarus); Katada, N. [Tottori University, Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Tottori 680-8552 (Japan); Hernandez, M. A. [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Departamento de Investigacion en Zeolitas, Ciudad Universitaria, Puebla (Mexico); Pestryakov, A. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Chavez R, F.; Zamorano U, R. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Fisica, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Portillo, R., E-mail: vitalii@cnyn.unam.mx [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Ciudad Universitaria, Puebla (Mexico)

    2013-05-01

    A series of protonated copper-containing mordenite s with different SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratios (MR) in the range of 10{<=}MR{<=}206 was prepared by ion exchange in copper nitrate aqueous solution. The electron paramagnetic resonance of hydrated copper Mordenite s series testifies of several Cu{sup 2+} ion sites. Hydrogen reduction of copper ions incorporated into the mordenite s was shown to lead to different reduced copper species including small metallic particles inter alia. The structural properties and acidity of mordenite s were characterized. The optical appearance of the copper particles showed strong but nonmonotonic dependence on the MR value, in line with the variation in acidity of this series of mordenite s. Correlations between mordenite properties and the formation of different reduced copper species are discussed. (Author)

  5. Nitrate reduction functional genes and nitrate reduction potentials persist in deeper estuarine sediments. Why?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokratis Papaspyrou

    Full Text Available Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the

  6. Nitrate Reduction Functional Genes and Nitrate Reduction Potentials Persist in Deeper Estuarine Sediments. Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Smith, Cindy J.; Dong, Liang F.; Whitby, Corinne; Dumbrell, Alex J.; Nedwell, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the sediment column. This

  7. Computational insight into nitration of human myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Wu; Shu, Xiao-Gang; Du, Ke-Jie; Nie, Chang-Ming; Wen, Ge-Bo

    2014-10-01

    Protein nitration is an important post-translational modification regulating protein structure and function, especially for heme proteins. Myoglobin (Mb) is an ideal protein model for investigating the structure and function relationship of heme proteins. With limited structural information available for nitrated heme proteins from experiments, we herein performed a molecular dynamics study of human Mb with successive nitration of Tyr103, Tyr146, Trp7 and Trp14. We made a detailed comparison of protein motions, intramolecular contacts and internal cavities of nitrated Mbs with that of native Mb. It showed that although nitration of both Tyr103 and Tyr146 slightly alters the local conformation of heme active site, further nitration of both Trp7 and Trp14 shifts helix A apart from the rest of protein, which results in altered internal cavities and forms a water channel, representing an initial stage of Mb unfolding. The computational study provides an insight into the nitration of heme proteins at an atomic level, which is valuable for understanding the structure and function relationship of heme proteins in non-native states by nitration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bacterial nitrate assimilation: gene distribution and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Gates, Andrew J; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Ferguson, Stuart J; Richardson, David J; Roldán, M Dolores

    2011-12-01

    In the context of the global nitrogen cycle, the importance of inorganic nitrate for the nutrition and growth of marine and freshwater autotrophic phytoplankton has long been recognized. In contrast, the utilization of nitrate by heterotrophic bacteria has historically received less attention because the primary role of these organisms has classically been considered to be the decomposition and mineralization of dissolved and particulate organic nitrogen. In the pre-genome sequence era, it was known that some, but not all, heterotrophic bacteria were capable of growth on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source. However, examination of currently available prokaryotic genome sequences suggests that assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas) systems are widespread phylogenetically in bacterial and archaeal heterotrophs. Until now, regulation of nitrate assimilation has been mainly studied in cyanobacteria. In contrast, in heterotrophic bacterial strains, the study of nitrate assimilation regulation has been limited to Rhodobacter capsulatus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Azotobacter vinelandii and Bacillus subtilis. In Gram-negative bacteria, the nas genes are subjected to dual control: ammonia repression by the general nitrogen regulatory (Ntr) system and specific nitrate or nitrite induction. The Ntr system is widely distributed in bacteria, whereas the nitrate/nitrite-specific control is variable depending on the organism.

  9. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-09

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate.

  10. 4-Methoxy-N,N′-diphenylbenzamidinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata S. Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title salt N,N′-diphenyl-4-methoxybenzamidinium nitrate, C20H19N2O+·NO3−, comprises two independent N,N′-diphenyl-4-methoxybenzamidinium cations and two nitrate anions. The crystal structure features N—H...O hydrogen bonds and C—H...O contacts responsible for the packing.

  11. Posttranslational regulation of copper transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berghe, P.V.E.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal copper is an essential cofactor for many redox-active enzymes, but excessive copper can generate toxic reactive oxygen species. Copper homeostasis is maintained by highly conserved proteins, to balance copper uptake, distribution and export on the systemic and cellular level. Th

  12. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  13. Nitrate reduction in an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Boesen, Carsten; Kristiansen, Henning;

    1991-01-01

    Nitrate distribution and reduction processes were investigated in an unconfined sandy aquifer of Quaternary age. Groundwater chemistry was studied in a series of eight multilevel samplers along a flow line, deriving water from both arable and forested land. Results show that plumes of nitrate...... processes of O2 and NO3- occur at rates that are fast compared to the rate of downward water transport. Nitrate-contaminated groundwater contains total contents of dissolved ions that are two to four times higher than in groundwater derived from the forested area. The persistence of the high content...... of total dissolved ions in the NO3- free anoxic zone indicates the downward migration of contaminants and that active nitrate reduction is taking place. Nitrate is apparently reduced to N2 because both nitrite and ammonia are absent or found at very low concentrations. Possible electron donors...

  14. [Copper and the human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krízek, M; Senft, V; Motán, J

    1997-11-19

    Copper is one of the essential trace elements. It is part of a number of enzymes. Deficiency of the element is manifested by impaired haematopoesis, bone metabolism, disorders of the digestive, cardiovascular and nervous system. Deficiency occurs in particular in patients suffering from malnutrition, malabsorption, great copper losses during administration of penicillamine. Sporadically copper intoxications are described (suicidal intentions or accidental ingestion of beverages with a high copper content). Acute exposure to copper containing dust is manifested by metal fume fever. Copper salts can produce local inflammations. Wilson's disease is associated with inborn impaired copper metabolism. In dialyzed patients possible contaminations of the dialyzate with copper must be foreseen as well as the possible release of copper from some dialyzation membranes. With the increasing amount of copper in the environment it is essential to monitor the contamination of the environment.

  15. Sedimentary nitrate reduction and its effect on the N-isotopic composition of oceanic nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, M. F.; Sigman, D. M.; McCorkle, D. C.

    2005-12-01

    A prerequisite for assessing denitrification fluxes in a specific environment using water column nitrate N isotope ratios is the knowledge of the expressed N isotope effects of water column and/or benthic denitrification in this environment. Here, we aim at assessing the effects of benthic nitrogen cycling on the N isotopic composition of the oceanic nitrate pool in deep-sea sediments, which are believed to harbour a large portion of the global benthic denitrification. We report 15N/14N ratios of pore water nitrate in pelagic sediments from the deep Bering Sea, where benthic nitrate reduction has previously been identified as a significant sink of fixed nitrogen. Porewater profiles from multicores indicate strong 15N enrichment in porewater nitrate at all stations, as one goes deeper in the sediments and nitrate concentrations decrease (δ15N generally reached 25-35‰). Our data are consistent with variable biological isotope effect (ɛ) for dissimilatory nitrate reduction ranging between 13 to 30 ‰. A one-dimensional diffusion-reaction model including organic matter degradation, nitrification, and denitrification indicates that, although denitrification leads to a pore water nitrate pool that is enriched in 15N, N isotope fractionation is poorly expressed at the scale of sediment-water nitrate exchange, independent of whether sediments are a net sink or a net source of nitrate. The apparent nitrate isotope effect of sedimentary denitrification on nitrate in overlying waters is generally below 2‰, as a result of diffusive transport limitation into, and within, the sediments and/or the production of light nitrate during nitrification. Thus, our data suggest that the low expressed isotope effect of benthic denitrification observed previously in reactive shelf sediments also applies to deep-sea sediments. However, where ammonium fluxes out of the sediments, it is enriched in 15-N, and may ultimately lead to an N-isotopic enrichment of the water-column nitrate

  16. Differential inhibition of Arabidopsis superoxide dismutases by peroxynitrite-mediated tyrosine nitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzmeister, Christian; Gaupels, Frank; Geerlof, Arie; Sarioglu, Hakan; Sattler, Michael; Durner, Jörg; Lindermayr, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Despite the importance of superoxide dismutases (SODs) in the plant antioxidant defence system little is known about their regulation by post-translational modifications. Here, we investigated the in vitro effects of nitric oxide derivatives on the seven SOD isoforms of Arabidopsis thaliana. S-nitrosoglutathione, which causes S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues, did not influence SOD activities. By contrast, peroxynitrite inhibited the mitochondrial manganese SOD1 (MSD1), peroxisomal copper/zinc SOD3 (CSD3), and chloroplastic iron SOD3 (FSD3), but no other SODs. MSD1 was inhibited by up to 90% but CSD3 and FSD3 only by a maximum of 30%. Down-regulation of these SOD isoforms correlated with tyrosine (Tyr) nitration and both could be prevented by the peroxynitrite scavenger urate. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that-amongst the 10 Tyr residues present in MSD1-Tyr63 was the main target responsible for nitration and inactivation of the enzyme. Tyr63 is located nearby the active centre at a distance of only 5.26 Å indicating that nitration could affect accessibility of the substrate binding pocket. The corresponding Tyr34 of human manganese SOD is also nitrated, suggesting that this might be an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for regulation of manganese SODs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  17. Targeting copper in cancer therapy: 'Copper That Cancer'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoyer, Delphine; Masaldan, Shashank; La Fontaine, Sharon; Cater, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient involved in fundamental life processes that are conserved throughout all forms of life. The ability of copper to catalyze oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, which can inadvertently lead to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), necessitates the tight homeostatic regulation of copper within the body. Many cancer types exhibit increased intratumoral copper and/or altered systemic copper distribution. The realization that copper serves as a limiting factor for multiple aspects of tumor progression, including growth, angiogenesis and metastasis, has prompted the development of copper-specific chelators as therapies to inhibit these processes. Another therapeutic approach utilizes specific ionophores that deliver copper to cells to increase intracellular copper levels. The therapeutic window between normal and cancerous cells when intracellular copper is forcibly increased, is the premise for the development of copper-ionophores endowed with anticancer properties. Also under investigation is the use of copper to replace platinum in coordination complexes currently used as mainstream chemotherapies. In comparison to platinum-based drugs, these promising copper coordination complexes may be more potent anticancer agents, with reduced toxicity toward normal cells and they may potentially circumvent the chemoresistance associated with recurrent platinum treatment. In addition, cancerous cells can adapt their copper homeostatic mechanisms to acquire resistance to conventional platinum-based drugs and certain copper coordination complexes can re-sensitize cancer cells to these drugs. This review will outline the biological importance of copper and copper homeostasis in mammalian cells, followed by a discussion of our current understanding of copper dysregulation in cancer, and the recent therapeutic advances using copper coordination complexes as anticancer agents.

  18. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  19. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghane, Ehsan; Fausey, Norman R; Brown, Larry C

    2015-03-15

    Denitrification beds are promoted to reduce nitrate load in agricultural subsurface drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution of surface water. In this system, drainage water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transformed into nitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to model a denitrification bed treating drainage water and evaluate its adverse greenhouse gas emissions. Field experiments were conducted at an existing denitrification bed. Evaluations showed very low greenhouse gas emissions (mean N2O emission of 0.12 μg N m(-2) min(-1)) from the denitrification bed surface. Field experiments indicated that nitrate removal rate was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with the Michaelis-Menten constant of 7.2 mg N L(-1). We developed a novel denitrification bed model based on the governing equations for water flow and nitrate removal kinetics. The model evaluation statistics showed satisfactory prediction of bed outflow nitrate concentration during subsurface drainage flow. The model can be used to design denitrification beds with efficient nitrate removal which in turn leads to enhanced drainage water quality.

  20. Demonstration of an Integrated Compliance Model for Predicting Copper Fate and Effects in DoD Harbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    phaeopigments, bacterial abundance, cyanobacteria abundance, nitrates, phosphates, silicates, nitrites, ammonia, copper complexation capacity (Cu-CC...Mussels,” Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 24: 2365–2372. Nriagu, J. O. 1996. “A History of Global Metal Pollution,” Science 272: 223–224. Paquin

  1. Supplemental foliar nickel and copper applications do not reduce kernel necrosis in pecan trees receiving excess nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wang.) K. Koch] fruit developed necrotic tissue at the basal end of the kernels (cotyledons) in an orchard receiving unusually high amounts of nitrogen (N) from nitrate contaminated irrigation water. It was hypothesized that increasing canopy nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu) ...

  2. Copper wire bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  3. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Cui; Qu, Ruijuan; Liang, Jinyan; Yang, Xi

    2010-11-01

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  4. Standard Specification for Copper-Aluminum-Silicon-Cobalt Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon-Magnesium Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy, and Copper-Nickel-Tin Alloy Sheet and Strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Copper-Aluminum-Silicon-Cobalt Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon-Magnesium Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy, and Copper-Nickel-Tin Alloy Sheet and Strip

  5. Chemical modification of zinc hydroxide nitrate and Zn-Al-layered double hydroxide with dicarboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe Carbajal; Mangrich, Antonio Salvio; da Costa Gardolinski, José Eduardo Ferreira; Wypych, Fernando

    2008-04-01

    A zinc hydroxide nitrate (ZHN), Zn5(OH)8(NO3)2.2H2O, and a layered double hydroxide (LDH), Zn/Al-NO3 were doped with 0.2 mol% of Cu2+ during alkaline chemical precipitation. Both compounds were intercalated with adipate ((-)OOC(CH2)4COO(-)), azelate ((-)OOC(CH2)7COO(-)), and benzoate (C6H5COO(-)) ions through ion exchange reactions. Solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed only one signal of carboxylic carbon for adipate and azelate intercalated into LDH, indicating that the carboxylic ends of both acids were equivalent, whereas the signal split when the intercalation was into the ZHN matrix. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of copper in octahedral cation sites of LDH layers showed a Hamiltonian parameter ratio g ||/A ||=170 cm and, after intercalation of adipate, the change was not significant: g ||/A ||=174 cm. This result indicates that the carboxylate ions did not coordinate with copper centers. Nonetheless, the intercalation of azelate increased the ratio to g ||/A ||=194 cm, similar to the spectra of ZHN modified with adipate, g ||/A ||=199 cm, and azelate, g ||/A ||=183 and 190 cm, which are associated with the coordination of copper by weak carboxylate anion ligands. Copper occupies octahedral or tetrahedral sites in ZHN layers, and the EPR spectra indicate that the dicarboxylate anions reacted preferentially with octahedral sites, whereas benzoate reacted with both sites.

  6. 77 FR 65532 - Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation: Notice of Rescission of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... International Trade Administration Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation: Notice... the antidumping duty order on solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (ammonium nitrate) from the... Administrative Review: Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate (Ammonium Nitrate) from the Russian...

  7. Denitrification of nitrate waste solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolami, R.J.; Chao, E.I.; Choi, W.M.; Johnson, B.R.; Varlet, J.L.P.

    1976-04-26

    Growth rates for the denitrifying bacteria Pseudomonas Stutzeri were studied to minimize the time necessary to start up a bacterial denitrification reactor. Batch experiments were performed in nine 250-ml Erlenmeyer flasks, a 7-liter fermentor, and a 67-liter fermentor. All reactors maintained an anaerobic environment. Initial microorganism inoculum concentration was varied over four orders of magnitude. Initial nitrate and substrate carbon concentrations were varied from 200 to 6000 ppm and from 56 to 1596 ppm, respectively, with a carbon-to-nitrogen weight ratio of 1.18. In all experiments, except those with the highest initial substrate-to-bacteria ratio, no growth was observed due to substrate depletion during the lag period. In those experiments which did exhibit an increase in bacterial population, growth also stopped due to substrate depletion. A model simulating microbe growth during the induction period was developed, but insufficient data were available to properly adjust the model constants. Because of this, the model does not accurately predict microbe growth. The metabolism of Pseudomonas Stutzeri was studied in detail. This resulted in a prediction of the denitrification stoichiometry during steady state reactor operation. Iron was found to be an important component for bacterial anabolism.

  8. Removal of Nitrate from Groundwater by Cyanobacteria: Quantitative Assessment of Factors Influencing Nitrate Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Qiang; Westerhoff, Paul; Vermaas, Wim

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of biologically removing nitrate from groundwater was tested by using cyanobacterial cultures in batch mode under laboratory conditions. Results demonstrated that nitrate-contaminated groundwater, when supplemented with phosphate and some trace elements, can be used as growth medium supporting vigorous growth of several strains of cyanobacteria. As cyanobacteria grew, nitrate was removed from the water. Of three species tested, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 displayed the h...

  9. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  10. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  11. Spectrophotometric Determination of Nitrate and Phosphate Levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2013-04-09

    Apr 9, 2013 ... Drinking Water Samples in The Vicinity of Irrigated Farmlands of Kura ... of Kura irrigated farmlands using polythene plastic containers and were analysed for the nitrate and ... polythene bottles, the bottles were covered with.

  12. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Auken, Esben; Bamberg, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface...... conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root...... the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface...

  13. Nitrate Waste Treatment Sampling and Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Patrick Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Garcia, Terrence Kerwin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-05

    This plan is designed to outline the collection and analysis of nitrate salt-bearing waste samples required by the New Mexico Environment Department- Hazardous Waste Bureau in the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (Permit).

  14. Qualitative Determination of Nitrate with Triphenylbenzylphosphonium Chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donna A.; Cole, Jerry J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two procedures for the identification of nitrate, the standard test ("Brown Ring" test) and a new procedure using triphenylbenzylphosphonium chloride (TPBPC). Effectiveness of both procedures is compared, with the TPBPC test proving to be more sensitive and accurate. (JM)

  15. 76 FR 70366 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ...- accessible Internet access could obtain the access necessary to register online. 3. How to best notify... ammonium nitrate sellers (AN Sellers) when it is not possible for an AN Seller to verify the identity of...

  16. The Arabidopsis ATNRT2.7 nitrate transporter controls nitrate content in seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Franck; Orsel, Mathilde; Dorbe, Marie-France; Chardon, Fabien; Truong, Hoai-Nam; Miller, Anthony J; Krapp, Anne; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise

    2007-05-01

    In higher plants, nitrate is taken up by root cells where Arabidopsis thaliana NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 (ATNRT2.1) chiefly acts as the high-affinity nitrate uptake system. Nitrate taken up by the roots can then be translocated from the root to the leaves and the seeds. In this work, the function of the ATNRT2.7 gene, one of the seven members of the NRT2 family in Arabidopsis, was investigated. High expression of the gene was detected in reproductive organs and peaked in dry seeds. beta-Glucuronidase or green fluorescent protein reporter gene expression driven by the ATNRT2.7 promoter confirmed this organ specificity. We assessed the capacity of ATNRT2.7 to transport nitrate in Xenopus laevis oocytes or when it is expressed ectopically in mutant plants deficient in nitrate transport. We measured the impact of an ATNRT2.7 mutation and found no difference from the wild type during vegetative development. By contrast, seed nitrate content was affected by overexpression of ATNRT2.7 or a mutation in the gene. Finally, we showed that this nitrate transporter protein was localized to the vacuolar membrane. Our results demonstrate that ATNRT2.7 plays a specific role in nitrate accumulation in the seed.

  17. Organic nitrates and nitrate tolerance--state of the art and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas; Gori, Tommaso

    2010-01-01

    The hemodynamic and antiischemic effects of nitroglycerin (GTN) are lost upon chronic administration due to the rapid development of nitrate tolerance. The mechanism of this phenomenon has puzzled several generations of scientists, but recent findings have led to novel hypotheses. The formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the mitochondria and the subsequent inhibition of the nitrate-bioactivating enzyme mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2) appear to play a central role, at least for GTN, that is, bioactivated by ALDH-2. Importantly, these findings provide the opportunity to reconcile the two "traditional" hypotheses of nitrate tolerance, that is, the one postulating a decreased bioactivation and the concurrent one suggesting a role of oxidative stress. Furthermore, recent animal and human experimental studies suggest that the organic nitrates are not a homogeneous group but demonstrate a broad diversity with regard to induction of vascular dysfunction, oxidative stress, and other side effects. In the past, attempts to avoid nitrate-induced side effects have focused on administration schedules that would allow a "nitrate-free interval"; in the future, the role of co-therapies with antioxidant compounds and of activation of endogeneous protective pathways such as the heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) will need to be explored. However, the development of new nitrates, for example, tolerance-free aminoalkyl nitrates or combination of nitrate groups with established cardiovascular drugs like ACE inhibitors or AT(1)-receptor blockers (hybrid molecules) may be of great clinical interest.

  18. Biodegradation of Glycidol and Glycidyl Nitrate

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    When calcium hydroxide is used to desensitize glycerol trinitrate (nitroglycerine)-containing waste streams, the epoxides glycidol and glycidyl nitrate are formed. The epoxide rings of both compounds are unstable to heat in aqueous solutions, and they open to form glycerol 1-mononitrate and presumably glycerol. These transformations were accelerated by microbial activity. Glycerol 1-mononitrate was slowly denitrated to form glycerol. Glycidol and glycidyl nitrate caused base-pair substitution...

  19. Preformed Nitrate in the Glacial North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S.; Estes, E. R.; Insua, T. L.; McKinley, C. C.; Murray, R. W.; Pockalny, R. A.; Robinson, R. S.; Sauvage, J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 abundances are highly correlated with global temperature variations over the past 800,000 years. Consequently, understanding the feedbacks between climate and CO2 is important for predictions of future climate. Leading hypotheses to explain this feedback invoke changes in ocean biology, circulation, chemistry, and/or gas exchange rates to trap CO2 in the deep ocean, thereby reducing the greenhouse effect of CO2 in the atmosphere. To test these hypotheses, we use sediment pore water profiles of dissolved nitrate and oxygen to reconstruct paleo-preformed nitrate concentrations at two deep-water sites in the western North Atlantic (23°N 57°W, 5557 m water depth; 30°N 58°W, 5367 m water depth). Preformed nitrate increases down-core to 22.7 μM (25.6 m core depth) at the northern site, and to 28.5 μM (27.8 m core depth) at the southern site. The large preformed nitrate gradient between these sites reveals a paleo-boundary between a southern water source high in preformed nitrate and a northern water source with lower concentrations, similar to today's ocean. However, the boundary between these water masses occurs north of where their modern counterparts meet, indicating that Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) extended farther north during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In addition, the southern source had a higher preformed nitrate concentration than today's AABW (25 μM), contradicting hypotheses that nutrient utilization was more efficient in the Southern Ocean deep-water formation regions during the LGM. Comparison to our previous Pacific data reveals that the average preformed nitrate concentration of the deep ocean was slightly higher during the LGM than today. This result implies that the CO2-climate feedback was not principally due to more efficient nitrate utilization.

  20. Is beetroot juice more effective than sodium nitrate? The effects of equimolar nitrate dosages of nitrate-rich beetroot juice and sodium nitrate on oxygen consumption during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flueck, Joelle Leonie; Bogdanova, Anna; Mettler, Samuel; Perret, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Dietary nitrate has been reported to lower oxygen consumption in moderate- and severe-intensity exercise. To date, it is unproven that sodium nitrate (NaNO3(-); NIT) and nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BR) have the same effects on oxygen consumption, blood pressure, and plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations or not. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different dosages of NIT and BR on oxygen consumption in male athletes. Twelve healthy, well-trained men (median [minimum; maximum]; peak oxygen consumption: 59.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) [40.5; 67.0]) performed 7 trials on different days, ingesting different nitrate dosages and placebo (PLC). Dosages were 3, 6, and 12 mmol nitrate as concentrated BR or NIT dissolved in plain water. Plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations were measured before, 3 h after ingestion, and postexercise. Participants cycled for 5 min at moderate intensity and further 8 min at severe intensity. End-exercise oxygen consumption at moderate intensity was not significantly different between the 7 trials (p = 0.08). At severe-intensity exercise, end-exercise oxygen consumption was ~4% lower in the 6-mmol BR trial compared with the 6-mmol NIT (p = 0.003) trial as well as compared with PLC (p = 0.010). Plasma nitrite and nitrate concentrations were significantly increased after the ingestion of BR and NIT with the highest concentrations in the 12-mmol trials. Plasma nitrite concentration between NIT and BR did not significantly differ in the 6-mmol (p = 0.27) and in the 12-mmol (p = 0.75) trials. In conclusion, BR might reduce oxygen consumption to a greater extent compared with NIT.

  1. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  2. The mitochondrial permeability transition, and oxidative and nitrosative stress in the mechanism of copper toxicity in cultured neurons and astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Pichili V B; Rao, Kakulavarapu V Rama; Norenberg, Michael D

    2008-08-01

    Copper is an essential element and an integral component of various enzymes. However, excess copper is neurotoxic and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Wilson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, prion conditions, and other disorders. Although mechanisms of copper neurotoxicity are not fully understood, copper is known to cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. As oxidative stress is an important factor in the induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT), we determined whether mPT plays a role in copper-induced neural cell injury. Cultured astrocytes and neurons were treated with 20 microM copper and mPT was measured by changes in the cyclosporin A (CsA)-sensitive inner mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta Psi m), employing the potentiometric dye TMRE. In astrocytes, copper caused a 36% decrease in the Delta Psi m at 12 h, which decreased further to 48% by 24 h and remained at that level for at least 72 h. Cobalt quenching of calcein fluorescence as a measure of mPT similarly displayed a 45% decrease at 24 h. Pretreatment with antioxidants significantly blocked the copper-induced mPT by 48-75%. Copper (24 h) also caused a 30% reduction in ATP in astrocytes, which was completely blocked by CsA. Copper caused death (42%) in astrocytes by 48 h, which was reduced by antioxidants (35-60%) and CsA (41%). In contrast to astrocytes, copper did not induce mPT in neurons. Instead, it caused early and extensive death with a concomitant reduction (63%) in ATP by 14 h. Neuronal death was prevented by antioxidants and nitric oxide synthase inhibitors but not by CsA. Copper increased protein tyrosine nitration in both astrocytes and neurons. These studies indicate that mPT, and oxidative and nitrosative stress represent major factors in copper-induced toxicity in astrocytes, whereas oxidative and nitrosative stress appears to play a major role in neuronal injury.

  3. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Montes; Susana Rivera-Mancia; Araceli Diaz-Ruiz; Luis Tristan-Lopez; Camilo Rios

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased pr...

  4. Stimulating nitrate removal processes of restored wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantine, Kate A; Groffman, Peter M; Lehmann, Johannes; Schneider, Rebecca L

    2014-07-01

    The environmental and health effects caused by nitrate contamination of aquatic systems are a serious problem throughout the world. A strategy proposed to address nitrate pollution is the restoration of wetlands. However, although natural wetlands often remove nitrate via high rates of denitrification, wetlands restored for water quality functions often fall below expectations. This may be in part because key drivers for denitrification, in particular soil carbon, are slow to develop in restored wetlands. We added organic soil amendments that range along a gradient of carbon lability to four newly restored wetlands in western New York to investigate the effect of carbon additions on denitrification and other processes of the nitrogen cycle. Soil carbon increased by 12.67-63.30% with the use of soil amendments (p ≤ 0.0001). Soil nitrate, the carbon to nitrogen ratio, and microbial biomass nitrogen were the most significant predictors of denitrification potential. Denitrification potential, potential net nitrogen nitrification and mineralization, and soil nitrate and ammonium, were highest in topsoil-amended plots, with increases in denitrification potential of 161.27% over control plots. While amendment with topsoil more than doubled several key nitrogen cycling processes, more research is required to determine what type and level of amendment application are most effective for stimulating removal of exogenous nitrate and meeting functional goals within an acceptable time frame.

  5. Nitrate Adsorption on Clay Kaolin: Batch Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mohsenipour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils possessing kaolin, gibbsite, goethite, and hematite particles have been found to have a natural capacity to attenuate pollution in aqueous phase. On the other hand, the hydroxyl group in soil increases anion exchange capacity under a low pH condition. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate effects of kaolin on nitrate reduction under acidic condition. In order to analyze the kaolin adsorption behaviour under various conditions, four different concentrations of nitrate, 45, 112.5, 225, and 450 mgNO3-/L, with a constant pH equal to 2, constant temperature equal to 25°C, and exposure period varying from 0 to 150 minutes were considered. The capacity of nitrate adsorption on kaolin has also been studied involving two well-known adsorption isotherm models, namely, Freundlich and Longmuir. The results revealed that approximately 25% of the nitrate present in the solution was adsorbed on clay kaolin. The laboratory experimental data revealed that Freundlich adsorption isotherm model was more accurate than Longmuir adsorption model in predicting of nitrate adsorption. Furthermore, the retardation factor of nitrate pollution in saturated zone has been found to be approximately 4 in presence of kaolin, which indicated that kaolin can be used for natural scavenger of pollution in the environment.

  6. Antimicrobial electrospun silver-, copper- and zinc-doped polyvinylpyrrolidone nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirós, Jennifer [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Borges, João P. [CENIMAT/I3N, Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Boltes, Karina [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies of Water (IMDEA Agua), Parque Científico Tecnológico, E-28805, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Rodea-Palomares, Ismael [Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Rosal, Roberto [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies of Water (IMDEA Agua), Parque Científico Tecnológico, E-28805, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Electrospun polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanofibers containing silver, copper, and zinc. • Antimicrobial effect for the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. • Silver strongly reduced colony forming units and bacterial viability. • Silver, copper, and zinc led to a significant increase of non-viable cells on mats. - Abstract: The use of electrospun polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanofibers containing silver, copper, and zinc nanoparticles was studied to prepare antimicrobial mats using silver and copper nitrates and zinc acetate as precursors. Silver became reduced during electrospinning and formed nanoparticles of several tens of nanometers. Silver nanoparticles and the insoluble forms of copper and zinc were dispersed using low molecular weight PVP as capping agent. High molecular weight PVP formed uniform fibers with a narrow distribution of diameters around 500 nm. The fibers were converted into an insoluble network using ultraviolet irradiation crosslinking. The efficiency of metal-loaded mats against the bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was tested for different metal loadings by measuring the inhibition of colony forming units and the staining with fluorescent probes for metabolic viability and compromised membranes. The assays included the culture in contact with mats and the direct staining of surface attached microorganisms. The results indicated a strong inhibition for silver-loaded fibers and the absence of significant amounts of viable but non-culturable microorganisms. Copper and zinc-loaded mats also decreased the metabolic activity and cell viability, although in a lesser extent. Metal-loaded fibers allowed the slow release of the soluble forms of the three metals.

  7. Evaluation of copper ion of antibacterial effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium and Helicobacter pylori and optical, mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Hwan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yu-ri; Kim, Kwang-Mahn [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, University of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Se-Young, E-mail: sychoi@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    Antibacterial effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium and Helicobacter pylori of copper ion was researched. Also, additional effects of copper ion coating on optical and mechanical properties were researched as well. Copper ion was coated on glass substrate as a thin film to prevent bacteria from growing. Cupric nitrate was used as precursors for copper ion. The copper ion contained sol was deposited by spin coating process on glass substrate. Then, the deposited substrates were heat treated at the temperature range between 200 Degree-Sign C and 250 Degree-Sign C. The thickness of deposited copper layer on the surface was 63 nm. The antibacterial effect of copper ion coated glass on P. aeruginosa, S. typhimurium and H. pylori demonstrated excellent effect compared with parent glass. Copper ion contained layer on glass showed a similar value of transmittance compared with value of parent glass. The 3-point bending strength and Vickers hardness were 209.2 MPa, 540.9 kg/mm{sup 2} which were about 1.5% and 1.3% higher than the value of parent glass. From these findings, it is clear that copper ion coating on glass substrate showed outstanding effect not only in antibacterial activity but also in optical and mechanical properties as well.

  8. Evaluation of copper ion of antibacterial effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium and Helicobacter pylori and optical, mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hwan; Choi, Yu-ri; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Se-Young

    2012-02-01

    Antibacterial effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium and Helicobacter pylori of copper ion was researched. Also, additional effects of copper ion coating on optical and mechanical properties were researched as well. Copper ion was coated on glass substrate as a thin film to prevent bacteria from growing. Cupric nitrate was used as precursors for copper ion. The copper ion contained sol was deposited by spin coating process on glass substrate. Then, the deposited substrates were heat treated at the temperature range between 200 °C and 250 °C. The thickness of deposited copper layer on the surface was 63 nm. The antibacterial effect of copper ion coated glass on P. aeruginosa, S. typhimurium and H. pylori demonstrated excellent effect compared with parent glass. Copper ion contained layer on glass showed a similar value of transmittance compared with value of parent glass. The 3-point bending strength and Vickers hardness were 209.2 MPa, 540.9 kg/mm2 which were about 1.5% and 1.3% higher than the value of parent glass. From these findings, it is clear that copper ion coating on glass substrate showed outstanding effect not only in antibacterial activity but also in optical and mechanical properties as well.

  9. Jiangxi Copper Plans to Increase its Refined Copper Output

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>According to news published on March 30th, China’s largest copper producer--Jiangxi Copper alleged in its 2010 Financial Report Statement that it plans to improve its output of refined copper by 4.4% in 2011, to increase from 900,000 tonnes last year to 940,000 tons.

  10. [Copper metabolism and genetic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Norikazu

    2016-07-01

    Copper is one of essential trace elements. Copper deficiency lead to growth and developmental failure and/or neurological dysfunction. However, excess copper is also problems for human life. There are two disorders of inborn error of copper metabolism, Menkes disease and Wilson disease. Menkes disease is an X linked recessive disorder with copper deficiency and Wilson disease is an autosomal recessive disorder with copper accumulation. These both disorders result from the defective functioning of copper transport P-type ATPase, ATP7A of Menkes disease and ATP7B of Wilson disease. In this paper, the author describes about copper metabolism of human, and clinical feature, diagnosis and treatment of Menkes disease and Wilson disease.

  11. Determination of kjeldahl nitrogen in fertilizers by AOAC official methods 978.02: effect of copper sulfate as a catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Dean; Metcalf, David; Hojjatie, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In AOAC Official Method 955.04, Nitrogen (Total) in Fertilizers, Kjeldahl Method, fertilizer materials are analyzed using mercuric oxide or metallic mercury HgO or Hg) as a catalyst. AOAC Official Methods 970.02, Nitrogen (Total) in Fertilizers is a comprehensive total nitrogen (including nitrate nitrogen) method adding chromium metal. AOAC Official Method 978.02, Nitrogen (Total) in Fertilizers is a modified comprehensive nitrogen method used to measure total nitrogen in fertilizers with two types of catalysts. In this method, either copper sulfate or chromium metal is added to analyze for total Kjeldahl nitrogen. In this study, the part of AOAC Official Method 978.02 that is for nitrate-free fertilizer products was modified. The objective was to examine the necessity of copper sulfate as a catalyst for the nitrate-free fertilizer products. Copper salts are not environmentally friendly and are considered pollutants. Products such as ammonium sulfate, diammonium phosphate, monoammonium phosphate, urea-containing fertilizers such as isobutylene diurea (IBDU), and urea-triazone fertilizer solutions were examined. The first part of the study was to measure Kjeldahl nitrogen as recommended by AOAC Official Method 978.02. The second part of the study was to exclude the addition of copper sulfate from AOAC Official Method 978.02 to examine the necessity of copper sulfate as a catalyst in nitrate-free fertilizers, which was the primary objective. Our findings indicate that copper sulfate can be eliminated from the method with no significant difference in the results for the nitrogen content of the fertilizer products.

  12. Radiation-induced nitration of organic compounds in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershov, B.G.; Gordeev, A.V.; Bykov, G.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Inst. of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Moisy, P. [CEA, Bagnols sur Ceze (France). Nuclear Energy Div.

    2012-07-01

    Radiolysis in aqueous nitrate and acetic acid solutions and nitrate/nitric acid and phenol was studied. The radiolysis of these solutes occurs with {sup circle} NO{sup 2} radical, which is the active nitrating agent. Accumulation of nitromethane and nitrite was determined during {gamma}-irradiation of aqueous solutions containing acetic and nitrate solutions. Irradiation of aqueous phenol-nitrate/nitric acid solutions results in the formation of 2- and 4-nitrophenols.

  13. Historical Tracking of Nitrate in Contrasting Vineyard Using Water Isotopes and Nitrate Depth Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, M.; Erhardt, M.; Riedel, M.; Weiler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (EWFD) aims to achieve a good chemical status for the groundwater bodies in Europe by the year 2015. Despite the effort to reduce the nitrate pollution from agriculture within the last two decades, there are still many groundwater aquifers that exceed nitrate concentrations above the EWFD threshold of 50 mg/l. Viticulture is seen as a major contributor of nitrate leaching and sowing of a green cover was shown to have a positive effect on lowering the nitrate loads in the upper 90 cm of the soil. However, the consequences for nitrate leaching into the subsoil were not yet tested. We analyzed the nitrate concentrations and pore water stable isotope composition to a depth of 380 cm in soil profiles under an old vineyard and a young vineyard with either soil tillage or permanent green cover in between the grapevines. The pore water stable isotopes were used to calibrate a soil physical model, which was then used to infer the age of the soil water at different depths. This way, we could relate elevated nitrate concentrations below an old vineyard to tillage processes that took place during the winter two years before the sampling. We further showed that the elevated nitrate concentration in the subsoil of a young vineyard can be related to the soil tillage prior to the planting of the new vineyard. If the soil is kept bare due to tillage, a nitrate concentration of 200 kg NO3--N/ha is found in 290 to 380 cm depth 2.5 years after the installation of the vineyard. The amount of nitrate leaching is considerably reduced due to a seeded green cover between the grapevines that takes up a high share of the mobilized nitrate reducing a potential contamination of the groundwater.

  14. Chinese Copper Manufacturers Expand Overseas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>In 2012,China’s apparent copper consumption reached 8.84 million tons,accounting for 43%of the global total demand.Spurred by strong demand,China’s copper smelting capacity roars with annual average growth in domestic copper smelting capacity reaching approx-

  15. Fabrication and Characterization of Metallic Copper and Copper Oxide Nanoflowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *H. S. Virk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Copper nanoflowers have been fabricated using two different techniques; electro-deposition of copper in polymer and anodic alumina templates, and cytyltrimethal ammonium bromide (CTAB-assisted hydrothermal method. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM images record some interesting morphologies of metallic copper nanoflowers. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM has been used to determine morphology and composition of copper oxide nanoflowers. X-ray diffraction (XRD pattern reveals the monoclinic phase of CuO in the crystallographic structure of copper oxide nanoflowers. There is an element of random artistic design of nature, rather than science, in exotic patterns of nanoflowers fabricated in our laboratory.

  16. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, M R; Stoner, J D

    2007-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWQA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and also shallow carbonate aquifers that provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional nutrient applications. The system of corn, soybean, and hogs produced significantly larger concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems because this system imports the largest amount of N-fertilizer per unit production area. Mean nitrate under dairy, poultry, horticulture, and cattle and grains systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as

  17. Observations of Alkyl Nitrates during ARCTAS: Investigation of the low NOx Chemistry of Isoprene Nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, E. C.; Cohen, R. C.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Min, K.; Apel, E. C.; Blake, D. R.; Brune, W. H.; Fried, A.; Ren, X.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Wisthaler, A.; Team, A. S.

    2009-12-01

    During numerous ground and airborne experiments alkyl and multifunctional nitrates, measured by Thermal Dissociation-Laser Induced Fluorescence, have been shown to represent a significant fraction of oxidized nitrogen. It is postulated that a large fraction of these nitrates, particularly in forested environments, are isoprene-derived nitrates. The formation of these nitrates is important in terminating photochemical ozone production. However, it is still highly uncertain if these nitrates serve as a permanent termination step or only as a temporary sink that upon further oxidation, releases NO2 back into the atmosphere. The summer portion of the NASA ARCTAS experiment allows us to investigate the role of alkyl nitrates in photochemical ozone production in a new regime: the low NOx of the summer boreal forest. This data set also represents the first time that vertical profiles of the isoprene oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein were obtained along with total alkyl nitrates. We use these measurements to investigate and constrain the low NOx chemistry of isoprene nitrates. We compare these measurements to past airborne and laboratory studies.

  18. Nitrate removal from high strength nitrate-bearing wastes in granular sludge sequencing batch reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Mohan, Tulasi Venkata; Renu, Kadali; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda Venkata; Satya Sai, Pedapati Murali; Venugopalan, Vayalam Purath

    2016-02-01

    A 6-L sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated for development of granular sludge capable of denitrification of high strength nitrates. Complete and stable denitrification of up to 5420 mg L(-1) nitrate-N (2710 mg L(-1) nitrate-N in reactor) was achieved by feeding simulated nitrate waste at a C/N ratio of 3. Compact and dense denitrifying granular sludge with relatively stable microbial community was developed during reactor operation. Accumulation of large amounts of nitrite due to incomplete denitrification occurred when the SBR was fed with 5420 mg L(-1) NO3-N at a C/N ratio of 2. Complete denitrification could not be achieved at this C/N ratio, even after one week of reactor operation as the nitrite levels continued to accumulate. In order to improve denitrification performance, the reactor was fed with nitrate concentrations of 1354 mg L(-1), while keeping C/N ratio at 2. Subsequently, nitrate concentration in the feed was increased in a step-wise manner to establish complete denitrification of 5420 mg L(-1) NO3-N at a C/N ratio of 2. The results show that substrate concentration plays an important role in denitrification of high strength nitrate by influencing nitrite accumulation. Complete denitrification of high strength nitrates can be achieved at lower substrate concentrations, by an appropriate acclimatization strategy.

  19. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Montes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson’s disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson’s disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson’s disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson’s disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology.

  20. Industrial experiment of copper electrolyte purification by copper arsenite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Ya-jie; XIAO Fa-xin; WANG Yong; LI Chun-hua; XU Wei; JIAN Hong-sheng; MA Yut-ian

    2008-01-01

    Copper electrolyte was purified by copper arsenite that was prepared with As2O3. And electrolysis experiments of purified electrolyte were carried out at 235 and 305 A/m2, respectively. The results show that the yield of copper arsenite is up to 98.64% when the molar ratio of Cu to As is 1.5 in the preparation of copper arsenite. The removal rates of Sb and Bi reach 74.11% and 65.60% respectively after copper arsenite is added in electrolyte. The concentrations of As, Sb and Bi in electrolyte nearly remain constant during electrolysis of 13 d. The appearances of cathode copper obtained at 235 and 305 A/m2 are slippery and even, and the qualification rate is 100% according to the Chinese standard of high-pure cathode copper(GB/T467-97).

  1. Bioactive and Antibacterial Glass Powders Doped with Copper by Ion-Exchange in Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Miola

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, two bioactive glass powders (SBA2 and SBA3 were doped with Cu by means of the ion-exchange technique in aqueous solution. SBA2 glass was subjected to the ion-exchange process by using different Cu salts (copper(II nitrate, chloride, acetate, and sulphate and concentrations. Structural (X-ray diffraction-XRD, morphological (Scanning Electron Microscopy-SEM, and compositional (Energy Dispersion Spectrometry-EDS analyses evidenced the formation of crystalline phases for glasses ion-exchanged in copper(II nitrate and chloride solutions; while the ion-exchange in copper(II acetate solutions lead to the incorporation of higher Cu amount than the ion-exchange in copper(II sulphate solutions. For this reason, the antibacterial test (inhibition halo towards S. aureus was performed on SBA2 powders ion-exchanged in copper(II acetate solutions and evidenced a limited antibacterial effect. A second glass composition (SBA3 was developed to allow a greater incorporation of Cu in the glass surface; SBA3 powders were ion-exchanged in copper(II acetate solutions (0.01 M and 0.05 M. Cu-doped SBA3 powders showed an amorphous structure; morphological analysis evidenced a rougher surface for Cu-doped powders in comparison to the undoped glass. EDS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS confirmed the Cu introduction as Cu(II ions. Bioactivity test in simulated body fluid (SBF showed that Cu introduction did not alter the bioactive behaviour of the glass. Finally, inhibition halo test towards S. aureus evidenced a good antimicrobial effect for glass powders ion-exchanged in copper(II acetate solutions 0.05 M.

  2. Activation of peroxyl and molecular oxygen using bis-benzimidazole diamide copper (II) compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pavan Mathur

    2006-11-01

    New tetradentate bis-benzimidazole ligands have been synthesized and utilized to prepare copper (II) complexes. Some of these copper (II) complexes have been characterized structurally. The copper (II) in these complexes is found to possess varying geometries. A distorted octahedral geometry is found with a highly unsymmetrical bidentate nitrate group. An unusual polymeric one-dimensional structure is observed where copper (II) is in a distorted square pyramidal geometry with a monodentate nitrate ion, having long Cu-O bond, while a distorted triagonal bipyramidal geometry is found with two carbonyl O atoms and a Cl atom in the equatorial plane, and two benzimidazole imine N atoms occupy the axial position. These compounds are found to activate the cumylperoxyl group, and this has been utilized in the facile oxidation of aromatic alcohols to aldehydes, where they act as catalysts with large turnovers. The yields of the respective products vary from 32 to 65%. The role of molecular oxygen has been studied and an attempt has been made to identify the "active copper species”. Activation of molecular oxygen has also been observed and has been used for oxidative dealkylation of a hindered phenol, producing di-butyl quinones with yields of 20-25% and 10-12 fold catalytic turnover. Dihydroxybenzenes and substituted catechols are also readily oxidized to the corresponding quinones, in oxygen-saturated solvents. Yields of 84% have been observed with 34-fold catalyst turnover, with di--butylcatechol. The activity of these copper (II) - bis-benzmidazolediamide compounds is reminiscent of the functioning of copper centres in galactose oxidase, tyrosinase and catechol oxidase.

  3. Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

    2014-11-04

    Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

  4. The δ15N of nitrate in the Southern Ocean: Consumption of nitrate in surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, D. M.; Altabet, M. A.; McCorkle, D. C.; Francois, R.; Fischer, G.

    1999-12-01

    We report nitrogen isotope data for nitrate from transects of hydrocast and surface samples collected in the eastern Indian and Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean, focusing here on the data from the upper water column to study the effect of nitrate consumption by phytoplankton. The δ15N of nitrate increases by 1-2‰ from deep water into the Antarctic summertime surface layer, due to kinetic isotopic fractionation during nitrate uptake. Estimation of the nitrate uptake isotope effect from Antarctic depth profiles yields values in the range of 5-6‰ in east Indian sector and 4-5‰ in the east Pacific sector. Surface transect data from the Pacific sector also yield values of 4-5‰. The major uncertainty in the profile-based estimation of the isotope effect involves the δ15N of nitrate from the temperature minimum layer below the summertime Antarctic surface layer, which deviates significantly from the predictions of simple models of isotope fractionation. For the Subantarctic surface, it is possible to distinguish between nitrate supplied laterally from the surface Antarctic and nitrate supplied vertically from the Subantarctic thermocline because of the distinctive relationships between the δ15N and concentration of nitrate in these two potential sources. Our Subantarctic samples, collected during the summer and fall, indicate that nitrate is supplied to the Subantarctic surface largely by northward transport of Antarctic surface water. Isotopic data from the Pacific sector of the Subantarctic suggest an isotope effect of 4.5‰, indistinguishable from the Antarctic estimates in this sector.

  5. Microbial Reduction of Chromate in the presence of Nitrate by Three Nitrate Respiring Organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eChovanec

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge for the bioremediation of toxic metals is the co-occurrence of nitrate, as it can inhibit metal transformation. Geobacter metallireducens, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, and Sulfurospirillum barnesii are three soil bacteria that can reduce chromate (Cr(VI and nitrate, and may be beneficial for developing bioremediation strategies. All three organisms respire through dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA, employing different nitrate reductases but similar nitrite reductase (Nrf. G. metallireducens reduces nitrate to nitrite via the membrane bound nitrate reductase (Nar, while S. barnesii and D. desulfuricans strain 27774 have slightly different forms of periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap. We investigated the effect of DNRA growth in the presence of Cr(VI in these three organisms and the ability of each to reduce Cr(VI to Cr(III, and each organisms responded differently. Growth of G. metallireducens on nitrate was completely inhibited by Cr(VI. Cultures of D. desulfuricans on nitrate media was initially delayed (48 h in the presence of Cr(VI, but ultimately reached comparable cell yields to the non-treated control. This prolonged lag phase accompanied the transformation of Cr(VI to Cr(III. Viable G. metallireducens cells could reduce Cr(VI, whereas Cr(VI reduction by D. desulfuricans during growth, was mediated by a filterable and heat stable extracellular metabolite. S. barnesii growth on nitrate was not affected by Cr(VI, and Cr(VI was reduced to Cr(III. However, Cr(VI reduction activity in S. barnesii, was detected in both the cell free spent medium and cells, indicating both extracellular and cell associated mechanisms. Taken together, these results have demonstrated that Cr(VI affects DNRA in the three organisms differently, and that each have a unique mechanism for Cr(VI reduction.

  6. The influence of Glyceria maxima and nitrate input on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijburg, J.W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of nitrate addition and the presence of Glyceria maxima (reed sweetgrass) on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community was investigated. Anoxic freshwater sediment was incubated in pots with or without G. maxima and with or without

  7. The influence of Glyceria maxima and nitrate input on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijburg, J.W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of nitrate addition and the presence of Glyceria maxima (reed sweetgrass) on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community was investigated. Anoxic freshwater sediment was incubated in pots with or without G. maxima and with or without

  8. Exclusion of Nitrate from Frozen Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocco, H. A.; Michelsen, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Reactions occurring at the surface of ice, sea ice, and snow in Earth's cryosphere have an impact on the composition of the overlying atmosphere. In order to elucidate reaction mechanisms and model their contributions to atmospheric processes, the morphology of frozen aqueous surfaces and amounts of reactants contained therein must be determined. To this end, the exclusion of nitrate ions to the surface of frozen aqueous solutions has been studied by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). In this technique the near-surface region of the frozen films are interrogated to a depth of a few hundred nanometers from the film-crystal interface. Aqueous solutions (0.001 to 0.01 M) of sodium nitrate (NaNO3), magnesium nitrate (Mg(NO3)2), and nitric acid (HNO3) were quickly frozen on the germanium ATR crystal and observed at a constant temperature of about -18°C. In addition to ice and the solutes, liquid water in varying amounts was observed in the spectra. The amount of nitrate in the surface liquid is three to four orders of magnitude higher than in the unfrozen solution. While all the nitrate salts exhibit exclusion to the unfrozen surface, the dynamics are different for different counter-ions. Results are compared to freezing point depression data and the predictions of equilibrium thermodynamics.

  9. Nitrate transceptor(s) in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojon, Alain; Krouk, Gabriel; Perrine-Walker, Francine; Laugier, Edith

    2011-04-01

    The availability of mineral nutrients in the soil dramatically fluctuates in both time and space. In order to optimize their nutrition, plants need efficient sensing systems that rapidly signal the local external concentrations of the individual nutrients. Until recently, the most upstream actors of the nutrient signalling pathways, i.e. the sensors/receptors that perceive the extracellular nutrients, were unknown. In Arabidopsis, increasing evidence suggests that, for nitrate, the main nitrogen source for most plant species, a major sensor is the NRT1.1 nitrate transporter, also contributing to nitrate uptake by the roots. Membrane proteins that fulfil a dual nutrient transport/signalling function have been described in yeast and animals, and are called 'transceptors'. This review aims to illustrate the nutrient transceptor concept in plants by presenting the current evidence indicating that NRT1.1 is a representative of this class of protein. The various facets, as well as the mechanisms of nitrate sensing by NRT1.1 are considered, and the possible occurrence of other nitrate transceptors is discussed.

  10. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities.

  11. The Effect of Copper

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    higher (p<0.05) in the broodfish fed CSD0 and CSD1 diets than the other diets. Exposure of Clarias gariepinus fish to copper in water, at concentrations above 1.0mg CuSO4/g elicits adverse ... introduction of a toxicant to an aquatic system ..... Toxicity of four commonly used agrochemicals on. Oreochromis niloticus (L) fry.

  12. Presenilin promotes dietary copper uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Southon

    Full Text Available Dietary copper is essential for multicellular organisms. Copper is redox active and required as a cofactor for enzymes such as the antioxidant Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1. Copper dyshomeostasis has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in the presenilin genes encoding PS1 and PS2 are major causes of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease. PS1 and PS2 are required for efficient copper uptake in mammalian systems. Here we demonstrate a conserved role for presenilin in dietary copper uptake in the fly Drosophila melanogaster. Ubiquitous RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the single Drosophila presenilin (PSN gene is lethal. However, PSN knockdown in the midgut produces viable flies. These flies have reduced copper levels and are more tolerant to excess dietary copper. Expression of a copper-responsive EYFP construct was also lower in the midgut of these larvae, indicative of reduced dietary copper uptake. SOD activity was reduced by midgut PSN knockdown, and these flies were sensitive to the superoxide-inducing chemical paraquat. These data support presenilin being needed for dietary copper uptake in the gut and so impacting on SOD activity and tolerance to oxidative stress. These results are consistent with previous studies of mammalian presenilins, supporting a conserved role for these proteins in mediating copper uptake.

  13. Ammonium and nitrate tolerance in lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Since lichens lack roots and take up water, solutes and gases over the entire thallus surface, these organisms respond more sensitively to changes in atmospheric purity than vascular plants. After centuries where effects of sulphur dioxide and acidity were in the focus of research on atmospheric chemistry and lichens, recently the globally increased levels of ammonia and nitrate increasingly affect lichen vegetation and gave rise to intense research on the tolerance of lichens to nitrogen pollution. The present paper discusses the main findings on the uptake of ammonia and nitrate in the lichen symbiosis and to the tolerance of lichens to eutrophication. Ammonia and nitrate are both efficiently taken up under ambient conditions. The tolerance to high nitrogen levels depends, among others, on the capability of the photobiont to provide sufficient amounts of carbon skeletons for ammonia assimilation. Lowly productive lichens are apparently predisposed to be sensitive to excess nitrogen.

  14. Insights on nitrate respiration by Shewanella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengping eWang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanellae are well known for their ability to utilize a number of electron acceptors and are therefore considered to have important roles in element cycling in the environment, such as nitrogen cycling through dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA and denitrification. Possessing two periplasmic nitrate reductase systems (NAP-α and NAP-β is a special trait of the Shewanella genus, and both enzymes are likely to provide selective advantage to the host. This review relates the current knowledge and aspects of the nitrate respiration system of Shewanella. Specifically, the potential physiological functions and regulation mechanisms of the duo-NAP system are discussed in addition to the evolution of anaerobic respiration systems of Shewanella.

  15. Plasma nitrate and nitrite are increased by a high-nitrate supplement but not by high-nitrate foods in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gary D; Marsh, Anthony P; Dove, Robin W; Beavers, Daniel; Presley, Tennille; Helms, Christine; Bechtold, Erika; King, S Bruce; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about the effect of dietary nitrate on the nitrate/nitrite/nitric oxide cycle in older adults. We examined the effect of a 3-day control diet vs high-nitrate diet, with and without a high-nitrate supplement (beetroot juice), on plasma nitrate and nitrite kinetics and blood pressure using a randomized 4-period crossover controlled design. We hypothesized that the high-nitrate diet would show higher levels of plasma nitrate/nitrite and lower blood pressure compared with the control diet, which would be potentiated by the supplement. Participants were 8 normotensive older men and women (5 female, 3 male, 72.5 ± 4.7 years old) with no overt disease or medications that affect nitric oxide metabolism. Plasma nitrate and nitrite levels and blood pressure were measured before and hourly for 3 hours after each meal. The mean daily changes in plasma nitrate and nitrite were significantly different from baseline for both control diet + supplement (P < .001 and P = .017 for nitrate and nitrite, respectively) and high-nitrate diet + supplement (P = .001 and P = .002), but not for control diet (P = .713 and P = .741) or high-nitrate diet (P = .852 and P = .500). Blood pressure decreased from the morning baseline measure to the three 2-hour postmeal follow-up time points for all treatments, but there was no main effect for treatment. In healthy older adults, a high-nitrate supplement consumed at breakfast elevated plasma nitrate and nitrite levels throughout the day. This observation may have practical utility for the timing of intake of a nitrate supplement with physical activity for older adults with vascular dysfunction.

  16. Comparative characteristics of copper, copper chloride, and copper bromide vapor lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazarian, M.A.; Petrash, G.G.; Trofimov, A.N.

    1980-03-01

    The paper reports the results of a comparative study of copper and copper halide vapor lasers emitting in a repetitively-pulsed regime. Copper chloride and copper bromide vapor lasers are found to have identical lasing characteristics under any excitation conditions. These characteristics are different from those of a copper vapor laser. An average lasing power of 13 W has been obtained for all lasers studied for an efficiency of 1%. It is shown that the choice of a laser will largely depend on the laser design suitability for a specific application.

  17. Techniques for Measurement of Nitrate Movement in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    Contamination of surface and ground waters with nitrate usually involves leaching through soil of nitrate produced by mineralization of soil organic matter, decomposition of animal wastes or plant residues, or derived from fertilizers. Nitrate concentrations in the soil solution may be measured by several chemical procedures or by the nitrate electrode. since nitrate is produced throughout the soil mass it is difficult to identify a source of nitrate contamination by conventional means. This problem can be solved by use of N-15-enriched or N-15-depleted materials as tracers. The latter is particularly attractive because of the negligible possibility of the tracer hazardous to health.

  18. Stochastic Controls on Nitrate Transport and Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botter, G.; Settin, T.; Alessi Celegon, E.; Marani, M.; Rinaldo, A.

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, the impact of nutrient inputs on basin-scale nitrates losses is investigated in a probabilistic framework by means of a continuous, geomorphologically based, Montecarlo approach, which explicitly tackles the random character of the processes controlling nitrates generation, transformation and transport in river basins. This is obtained by coupling the stochastic generation of climatic and rainfall series with simplified hydrologic and biogeochemical models operating at the hillslope scale. Special attention is devoted to the spatial and temporal variability of nitrogen sources of agricultural origin and to the effect of temporally distributed rainfall fields on the ensuing nitrates leaching. The influence of random climatic variables on bio-geochemical processes affecting the nitrogen cycle in the soil-water system (e.g. plant uptake, nitrification and denitrification, mineralization), is also considered. The approach developed has been applied to a catchment located in North-Eastern Italy and is used to provide probabilistic estimates of the NO_3 load transferred downstream, which is received and accumulated in the Venice lagoon. We found that the nitrogen load introduced by fertilizations significantly affects the pdf of the nitrates content in the soil moisture, leading to prolonged risks of increased nitrates leaching from soil. The model allowed the estimation of the impact of different practices on the probabilistic structure of the basin-scale hydrologic and chemical response. As a result, the return period of the water volumes and of the nitrates loads released into the Venice lagoon has been linked directly to the ongoing climatic, pluviometric and agricultural regimes, with relevant implications for environmental planning activities aimed at achieving sustainable management practices.

  19. Effect of reduction treatment on copper modified activated carbons on NO(x) adsorption at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, Benoit; Gonzalez-Lopez, Eugene; Rossin, Joseph A; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2011-05-01

    Activated carbon was impregnated with copper salt and then exposed to reductive environment using hydrazine hydrate or heat treatment under nitrogen at 925 °C. On the obtained samples, adsorption of NO(2) was carried out at dynamic conditions at ambient temperature. The adsorbents before and after exposure to nitrogen dioxide were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N(2)-sorption at -196 °C, and potentiometric titration. Copper loading improved the adsorption capacity of NO(2) as well as the retention of NO formed in the process of NO(2) reduction on the carbon surface. That improvement is linked to the presence of copper metal and its high dispersion on the surface. Even though both reduction methods lead to the reduction of copper, different reactions with the carbon surface take place. Heat treatment results in a significant percentage of metallic copper and a reduction of oxygen functional groups of the carbon matrix, whereas hydrazine, besides reduction of copper, leads to an incorporation of nitrogen. The results suggest that NO(2) mainly is converted to copper nitrates although the possibility to its reduction to N(2) is not ruled out. A high capacity on hydrazine treated samples is linked to the high dispersion of metallic copper on the surface of this carbon.

  20. Efficient syntheses of climate relevant isoprene nitrates and (1R,5S)-(−)-myrtenol nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D; Mills, Graham P; Reeves, Claire E

    2016-01-01

    Summary Here we report the chemoselective synthesis of several important, climate relevant isoprene nitrates using silver nitrate to mediate a ’halide for nitrate’ substitution. Employing readily available starting materials, reagents and Horner–Wadsworth–Emmons chemistry the synthesis of easily separable, synthetically versatile ‘key building blocks’ (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-chlorobut-2-en-1-ol as well as (E)- and (Z)-1-((2-methyl-4-bromobut-2-enyloxy)methyl)-4-methoxybenzene has been achieved using cheap, ’off the shelf’ materials. Exploiting their reactivity we have studied their ability to undergo an ‘allylic halide for allylic nitrate’ substitution reaction which we demonstrate generates (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrate, and (E)- and (Z)-2-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrates (‘isoprene nitrates’) in 66–80% overall yields. Using NOESY experiments the elucidation of the carbon–carbon double bond configuration within the purified isoprene nitrates has been established. Further exemplifying our ‘halide for nitrate’ substitution chemistry we outline the straightforward transformation of (1R,2S)-(−)-myrtenol bromide into the previously unknown monoterpene nitrate (1R,2S)-(−)-myrtenol nitrate. PMID:27340495

  1. Nitrate removal and denitrification affected by soil characteristics in nitrate treatment wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Feng; Jing, Shuh-Ren; Lee, Der-Yuan; Chang, Yih-Feng; Shih, Kai-Chung

    2007-03-01

    Several small-scale surface flow constructed wetlands unplanted and planted (monoculture) with various macrophytes (Phragmites australis, Typha orientalis, Pennisetum purpureum, Ipomoea aquatica, and Pistia stratiotes) were established to continuously receive nitrate-contaminated groundwater. Soil characteristics and their effects on nitrate removal and soil denitrification were investigated. The results showed that planted wetland cells exhibited significantly higher (P wetland cell (1%, 0.11 microg N2O-N/g/h). However, the unplanted uncovered wetland cell showed a nitrate removal efficiency (55%) lower than but a soil denitrification rate (9.12 microg N2O-N/g/h) comparable to the planted cells. The nitrate removal rate correlated closely and positively with the soil denitrification rate for the planted cells, indicating that soil denitrification is an important process for removing nitrate in constructed wetlands. The results of nitrogen budget revealed that around 68.9-90.7% of the overall nitrogen removal could be attributed to the total denitrification. The soil denitrification rate was found to correlate significantly (P wetland soil, which accordingly were concluded as suitable indicators of soil denitrification rate and nitrate removal rate in nitrate treatment wetlands.

  2. Excess nitrate loads to coastal waters reduces nitrate removal efficiency: mechanism and implications for coastal eutrophication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunau, Mirko; Voss, Maren; Erickson, Matthew; Dziallas, Claudia; Casciotti, Karen; Ducklow, Hugh

    2013-05-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems are becoming increasingly nitrogen-saturated due to anthropogenic activities, such as agricultural loading with artificial fertilizer. Thus, more and more reactive nitrogen is entering streams and rivers, primarily as nitrate, where it is eventually transported towards the coastal zone. The assimilation of nitrate by coastal phytoplankton and its conversion into organic matter is an important feature of the aquatic nitrogen cycle. Dissolved reactive nitrogen is converted into a particulate form, which eventually undergoes nitrogen removal via microbial denitrification. High and unbalanced nitrate loads to the coastal zone may alter planktonic nitrate assimilation efficiency, due to the narrow stochiometric requirements for nutrients typically shown by these organisms. This implies a cascade of changes for the cycling of other elements, such as carbon, with unknown consequences at the ecosystem level. Here, we report that the nitrate removal efficiency (NRE) of a natural phytoplankton community decreased under high, unbalanced nitrate loads, due to the enhanced recycling of organic nitrogen and subsequent production and microbial transformation of excess ammonium. NRE was inversely correlated with the amount of nitrate present, and mechanistically controlled by dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and organic carbon (Corg) availability. These findings have important implications for the management of nutrient runoff to coastal zones.

  3. Nitrate stimulation of indigenous nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidising bacterial community in wastewater anaerobic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-de-Lomas, Juan; Corzo, Alfonso; Carmen Portillo, M; Gonzalez, Juan M; Andrades, Jose A; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesáreo; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio

    2007-07-01

    The role of the nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidising bacteria (NR-SOB) in the nitrate-mediated inhibition of sulfide net production by anaerobic wastewater biofilms was analyzed in two experimental bioreactors, continuously fed with the primary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant, one used as control (BRC) and the other one supplemented with nitrate (BRN). This study integrated information from H(2)S and pH microelectrodes, RNA-based molecular techniques, and the time course of biofilm growth and bioreactors water phase. Biofilms were a net source of sulfide for the water phase (2.01 micromol S(2-)(tot)m(-2)s(-1)) in the absence of nitrate dosing. Nitrate addition effectively led to the cessation of sulfide release from biofilms despite which a low rate of net sulfate reduction activity (0.26 micromol S(2-)(tot)m(-2)s(-1)) persisted at a deep layer within the biofilm. Indigenous NR-SOB including Thiomicrospira denitrificans, Arcobacter sp., and Thiobacillus denitrificans were stimulated by nitrate addition resulting in the elimination of most sulfide from the biofilms. Active sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) represented comparable fractions of total metabolically active bacteria in the libraries obtained from BRN and BRC. However, we detected changes in the taxonomic composition of the SRB community suggesting its adaptation to a higher level of NR-SOB activity in the presence of nitrate.

  4. Biodegradation of Glycidol and Glycidyl Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, David L.; Cornell, John H.; Kaplan, Arthur M.

    1982-01-01

    When calcium hydroxide is used to desensitize glycerol trinitrate (nitroglycerine)-containing waste streams, the epoxides glycidol and glycidyl nitrate are formed. The epoxide rings of both compounds are unstable to heat in aqueous solutions, and they open to form glycerol 1-mononitrate and presumably glycerol. These transformations were accelerated by microbial activity. Glycerol 1-mononitrate was slowly denitrated to form glycerol. Glycidol and glycidyl nitrate caused base-pair substitutions in the Ames test for mutagenicity, whereas glycerol 1-mononitrate tests were negative. PMID:16345917

  5. Biodegradation of glycidol and glycidyl nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D L; Cornell, J H; Kaplan, A M

    1982-01-01

    When calcium hydroxide is used to desensitize glycerol trinitrate (nitroglycerine)-containing waste streams, the epoxides glycidol and glycidyl nitrate are formed. The epoxide rings of both compounds are unstable to heat in aqueous solutions, and they open to form glycerol 1-mononitrate and presumably glycerol. These transformations were accelerated by microbial activity. Glycerol 1-mononitrate was slowly denitrated to form glycerol. Glycidol and glycidyl nitrate caused base-pair substitutions in the Ames test for mutagenicity, whereas glycerol 1-mononitrate tests were negative.

  6. 9-Amino­acridinium nitrate monohydrate

    OpenAIRE

    Pourayoubi, Mehrdad; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Sanaei Ataabadi, Somayyeh; Mancilla Percino, Teresa; A. Leyva Ramírez, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The pyridine N atom of the cation in the title hydrated salt, C13H11N2 +·NO3 −·H2O, is protonated; the N atom of the NH2 group shows a planar conformation. The former N atom is hydrogen bonded to a water mol­ecule. The amino group is involved in three N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds with two neighboring nitrate anions. The water mol­ecule is hydrogen bonded to two adjacent nitrate anions. In the crystal, this results in a layered network.

  7. 9-Amino­acridinium nitrate monohydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourayoubi, Mehrdad; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Sanaei Ataabadi, Somayyeh; Mancilla Percino, Teresa; A. Leyva Ramírez, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The pyridine N atom of the cation in the title hydrated salt, C13H11N2 +·NO3 −·H2O, is protonated; the N atom of the NH2 group shows a planar conformation. The former N atom is hydrogen bonded to a water mol­ecule. The amino group is involved in three N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds with two neighboring nitrate anions. The water mol­ecule is hydrogen bonded to two adjacent nitrate anions. In the crystal, this results in a layered network. PMID:21522328

  8. Catalytic reduction of nitrate in secondary effluent of wastewater treatment plants by Fe(0) and Pd-Cu/γ-Al2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yupan; Li, Zifu; Chen, Yi-Hung; Saino, Mayiani; Cheng, Shikun; Zheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Total nitrogen, in which NO3(-) is dominant in the effluent of most wastewater treatment plants, cannot meet the requirements of the Chinese wastewater discharge standard (nitrate (NO3(-)) elimination attract considerable attention. In this study, reductant iron (Fe(0)) and γ-Al2O3 supported palladium-copper bimetallic catalysts (Pd-Cu/γ-Al2O3) were innovatively used for the chemical catalytic reduction of nitrate in wastewater. A series of specific operational conditions (such as mass ratio of Pd:Cu, catalyst amounts, reaction time and pH of solution) were optimized for nitrate reduction in the artificial solution, and then the selected optimal conditions were further applied for investigating the nitrate elimination of secondary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant in Beijing, China. Results indicated that a better catalytic performance (74% of nitrate removal and 62% of N2 selectivity) could be obtained under the optimal condition: 5 g/L Fe(0), 3:1 mass ratio (Pd:Cu), 4 g/L catalyst, 2 h reaction time and pH 5.1. It is noteworthy to point out that nitrogen gas (N2) predominated in the byproducts without another system to treat ammonium and nitrite. Therefore, the chemical catalytic reduction combining Fe(0) with Pd-Cu/γ-Al2O3 could be regarded as a better alternative for nitrate removal in wastewater treatment.

  9. Studying the Adsorption Behavior of Copper Ions in Industrial Wastewater, Using Modified Electrospun Polymeric Nano Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Kaviani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study:  Soil and water pollution to heavy metals is a serious threat for environment and human health. Finding an effective way for refining water from these metals is very important. The aim of this study was modifying electrospun polymeric nano fibers and studying its efficiency for copper ion omission in water solutions. Materials & Methods: In this study, nano fiber was produced by solution electrospun polystyrene in DMF/THF solvent and produced nano fiber was used for copper pre-concentration in waste water sample. In this study, an investigation of primary PH of solution, adsorption particle size, cleaning solvent volume, salt supply, contact time duration of adsorption material on copper ion adsorption supply was done, using modified nano fiber. Results: According to this study, copper adsorption process with correlation coefficient of (R2 in scope of 0.986 by Langmuir and Freundlich are describable. Findings show that, pH optimized amount for isolating copper ion on absorbent level is 7, absorbent particle size is 0.006 g/l, salt 1.3, potassium nitrate and the contact time of absorbent material on copper ion adsorption is 10 minutes. Copper ion adsorbate was cleaned, using 0.7 ml methanol. Most of obtrusive ions didn't have any inconvenience for copper ion isolation and measuring. The mean of the method was 2.7 µg/l and standard deviation was lower than %4. Conclusions: this method was done on actual samples which findings show that, this method has the ability of cooper adsorption and can use this method for measuring heavy metals like copper in different tissues. This method because of having the privilege for isolating and pre concentrating different kind of mineral and organic is used successfully in different samples.

  10. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  11. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  12. Catalytic activation of copper (II) salts on the reaction of peroxynitrite with propofol in alkaline medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnen, Stephan; Halusiak, Emilie; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Deby, Carol; Hans, Pol; Lamy, Maurice; Noels, Alfred F

    2005-06-01

    We report here on the role of copper (II) salts on the acceleration of peroxynitrite (ONOO-) decomposition and ONOO- reaction with the anaesthetic agent propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) in alkaline medium. We observed a strong acceleration of the ONOO- decomposition in alkaline medium in the presence of copper (I and II) salts. After 18 h of ONOO- reaction with propofol, we observed nitrosated, nitrated, and oxidized (quinone and diphenylquinone) derivatives of propofol, but in the presence of Cu(II) (20% molar vs ONOO-), the yields of quinone and nitrosopropofol strongly increased. We also observed that the temperature and the atmosphere influenced the effects of Cu(II) on ONOO- reactions with propofol: low temperatures promoted nitrosation and high temperatures promoted oxidation; O2 atmosphere increased the general reactivity and the yield of nitrated and oxidized products. We highlighted the influence of Cu(II) salts on the radical character of the reaction by direct EPR technique. The exact mechanism of the Cu(II) catalysis remains unexplained, but we suggest the formation of a copper complex with propofol or, more probably, the oxidation of ONOO- into ONOO. by copper ions promoting the formation of quinone and nitrosopropofol according to a previously reported mechanism [M. Cudic, C. Ducrocq, Transformations of 2,6-diisopropylphenol by NO-derived nitrogen oxides, particularly peroxynitrite, Nitric Oxide 4 (2000) 147-156].

  13. Tongling:Copper Industry Giant Takes Shape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>Centering on the strategic goal of building "World Copper Capital", Tongling constantly extends its product lines and improves the copper industry chain. Now, the copper industry with a production value of RMB 100 billion has taken shape.As the largest copper wire rod manufacturer in Asia, Tongling Quanwei Copper Technologies Co., Ltd., upon its moving into the local market,

  14. Characterization of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Fabricated by the Sol-Gel Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayani, Zohra Nazir; Umer, Maryam; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad

    2015-10-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles were successfully prepared by a sol-gel technique. An aqueous solution of copper nitrate Cu(NO3)2 and acetic acid was used as precursor. On addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) a precipitate of copper oxide was immediately formed. The copper oxide nanoparticles were characterized by use of x-ray diffractometry (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), vibrating sample magnetometry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD pattern contained sharp peaks of copper oxide nanoparticles with mixed cuprite and tenorite phases. Use of the Debye-Scherer equation showed that the crystallite size of the copper oxide nanoparticles increased with increasing annealing temperature. FTIR spectra revealed vibration of the CuO band at 473 cm-1; a band at 624 cm-1 was attributed to Cu2O. Maximum coercivity and saturation magnetization of the nanoparticles were 276 Oe and 0.034 emu/g, respectively. SEM micrographs of the nanoparticles revealed the presence of spherical nanoparticles of the tenorite phase whereas the cuprite phase was in the form of a compact deposit.

  15. A toxicological study of gadolinium nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show gadolinium nitrate to have potential sensitizing properties. Skin application studies in the rabbit demonstrated that it was cutaneously a severe irritant. This material was considered an irritant in the rabbit eye application studies. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Nitrate Salt Surrogate Blending Scoping Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-13

    Test blending equipment identified in the “Engineering Options Assessment Report: Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing”. Determine if the equipment will provide adequate mixing of zeolite and surrogate salt/Swheat stream; optimize equipment type and operational sequencing; impact of baffles and inserts on mixing performance; and means of validating mixing performance

  17. Protein Tyrosine Nitration: Role in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Bulbul; Chakravarti, Deb Narayan

    2017-03-15

    Aging is the inevitable fate of all living organisms, but the molecular basis of physiological aging is still poorly understood. Oxidative stress is believed to play a key role in the aging process. In addition to reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are generated during aerobic metabolism in living organisms. Protein damage and functional modification by ROS have been demonstrated in details by different investigators. However, compared to protein carbonylation by ROS, fewer studies have been reported on the protein damage by RNS and its implication with the aging process. Due to the high chemical reactivity of RNS, they can covalently modify various endogenous macromolecules including proteins and alter their essential biological functions. Tyrosine residues in protein molecules are nitrated following their interaction with RNS under nitrosative stress. Proteins undergoing tyrosine nitration are associated with pathophysiology of several diseases, as well as physiological aging. The purpose of the current review is to provide a brief summary of the biochemical mechanisms of tyrosine nitration, methodologies used for the detection of these modified proteins, effect of this post translational modification on biological functions and the putative role of tyrosine nitrated proteins in the aging process. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, Tommy;

    2012-01-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribut......This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis...... of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first...... two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded...

  19. Denitration of High Nitrate Salts Using Reductants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HD Smith; EO Jones; AJ Schmidt; AH Zacher; MD Brown; MR Elmore; SR Gano

    1999-05-03

    This report describes work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in conjunction with Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), to remove nitrates in simulated low-activity waste (LAW). The major objective of this work was to provide data for identifying and demonstrating a technically viable and cost-effective approach to condition LAW for immobilization (grout).

  20. Assimilatory Nitrate Reduction in Hansenula polymorpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Beatrice; Berardi, Enrico

    In the last decade, the yeast Hansenula polymorpha (syn.: Pichia angusta) has become an excellent experimental model for genetic and molecular investigations of nitrate assimilation, a subject traditionally investigated in plants, filamentous fungi and bacteria. Among other advantages, H. polymorpha offers classical and molecular genetic tools, as well as the availability of genomic sequence data.

  1. Detonation characteristics of ammonium nitrate products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, R.J.A.; Hengel, E.I.V. van den; Steen, A.C. van der

    2006-01-01

    The detonation properties of ammonium nitrate (AN) products depend on many factors and are therefore, despite the large amount of information on this topic, difficult to assess. In order to further improve the understanding of the safety properties of AN, the European Fertilizer Manufacturers Associ

  2. The Path to Nitrate Salt Disposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-16

    The topic is presented in a series of slides arranged according to the following outline: LANL nitrate salt incident as thermal runaway (thermally sensitive surrogates, full-scale tests), temperature control for processing, treatment options and down selection, assessment of engineering options, anticipated control set for treatment, and summary of the overall steps for RNS.

  3. Reinforced Sisal Fiber with Ferric Nitrate Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Jehan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ferric oxide synthesized through annealing route. The present research work deals with ferrite composite prepared using chemical reactions. Ferric nitrates and ammonium chloride doped with sisal fiber has been prepared. The structural behavior of aluminum oxide was studied in XRD, SEM, TEM, FTIR & dielectric measurement. This behavior showed ferrite nature of the sample.

  4. Direct Production of Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorovich, G. S.; Bell, M. C.; Diaz, C. M.; Bell, J. A. E.

    1987-09-01

    The use of commercially pure oxygen in flash smelting a typical chalcopyrite concentrate or a low grade comminuted matte directly to copper produces a large excess of heat. The heat balance is controlled by adjusting the calorific value of the solid feed. A portion of the sulfide material is roasted to produce a calcine which is blended with unroasted material, and the blend is then autogeneously smelted with oxygen and flux directly to copper. Either iron silicate or iron calcareous slags are produced, both being subject to a slag cleaning treatment. Practically all of the sulfur is contained in a continuous stream of SO2 gas, most of which is strong enough for liquefaction. A particularly attractive feature of these technologies is that no radically new metallurgical equipment needs to be developed. The oxygen smelting can be carried out not only in the Inco type flash furnace but in other suitable smelters such as cyclone furnaces. Another major advantage stems from abolishion of the ever-troublesome converter aisle, which is replaced with continuous roasting of a fraction of the copper sulfide feed.

  5. NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J.

    2011-02-01

    This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves

  6. Impact of Sulfide on Nitrate Conversion in Eutrophic Nitrate-Rich Marine Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwermer, Carsten U.; Krieger, Bärbel; Lavik, Gaute

    2006-01-01

    IMPACT OF SULFIDE ON NITRATE CONVERSION IN EUTROPHIC NITRATE-RICH MARINE SLUDGE C.U. Schwermer 1, B.U. Krieger 2, G. Lavik 1, A. Schramm 3, J. van Rijn 4, D. de Beer 1, D. Minz 5, E. Cytryn 4, M. Kuypers 1, A. Gieseke 1 1 Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany; 2 Dept...... and Environmental Sciences, Volcani Research Center, Bet-Dagan, Israel Multiple anaerobic processes are responsible for carbon mineralization in eutrophic nitrate-rich marine environments (e.g., upwelling areas, estuaries, and aquacultures), involving electron acceptors from both the nitrogen and sulfur cycle....... The interaction of these processes is less understood. Our aim was to investigate the functional interaction of nitrate reduction, denitrification and sulfate reduction in an anaerobic marine sludge. We hypothesize that sulfide (from sulfate reduction) (i) causes incomplete denitrification, and (ii) directs...

  7. Benefits of Safer Drinking Water: The Value of Nitrate Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Crutchfield, Stephen R.; Cooper, Joseph C.; Hellerstein, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    Nitrates in drinking water, which may come from nitrogen fertilizers applied to crops, are a potential health risk. This report evaluates the potential benefits of reducing human exposure to nitrates in the drinking water supply. In a survey, respondents were asked a series of questions about their willingness to pay for a hypothetical water filter, which would reduce their risk of nitrate exposure. If nitrates in the respondent's drinking water were to exceed the EPA minimum safety standard,...

  8. Identification of nitrate sources and discharge-depending nitrate dynamics in a mesoscale catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christin; Strachauer, Ulrike; Brauns, Mario; Musolff, Andreas; Kunz, Julia Vanessa; Brase, Lisa; Tarasova, Larisa; Merz, Ralf; Knöller, Kay

    2017-04-01

    During the last decades, nitrate concentrations in surface and groundwater have increased due to land use change and accompanying application of fertilizer in agriculture as well as increased atmospheric deposition. To mitigate nutrient impacts on downstream aquatic ecosystems, it is important to quantify potential nitrate sources, instream nitrate processing and its controls in a river system. The objective of this project is to characterize and quantify (regional) scale dynamics and trends in water and nitrogen fluxes of the entire Holtemme river catchment in central Germany making use of isotopic fingerprinting methods. Here we compare two key date sampling campaigns in 2014 and 2015, with spatially highly resolved measurements of discharge at 23 sampling locations including 11 major tributaries and 12 locations at the main river. Additionally, we have data from continuous runoff measurements at 10 locations operated by the local water authorities. Two waste water treatment plants contribute nitrogen to the Holtemme stream. This contribution impacts nitrate loads and nitrate isotopic signatures depending on the prevailing hydrological conditions. Nitrogen isotopic signatures in the catchment are mainly controlled by different sources (nitrified soil nitrogen in the headwater and manure/ effluents from WWTPs in the lowlands) and increase with raising nitrate concentrations along the main river. Nitrate loads at the outlet of the catchment are extremely different between both sampling campaigns (2014: NO3- = 97 t a-1, 2015: NO3- = 5 t a-1) which is associated with various runoff (2014: 0.8 m3 s-1, 2015: 0.2 m3 s-1). In 2015, the inflow from WWTP's raises the NO3- loads and enriches δ18O-NO3 values. Generally, oxygen isotope signatures from nitrate are more variable and are controlled by biogeochemical processes in concert with the oxygen isotopic composition of the ambient water. Elevated δ18O-NO3 in 2015 are most likely due to higher temperatures and lower

  9. 76 FR 49449 - Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... Nitrate From the Russian Federation AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade Administration... duty investigation on solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (``ammonium nitrate'') from the Russian... and the ITC instituted a second sunset review of the ammonium nitrate suspended investigation....

  10. 76 FR 23569 - Termination of the Suspension Agreement on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... Nitrate From the Russian Federation and Notice of Antidumping Duty Order AGENCY: Import Administration... (``AD'') Investigation on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate from the Russian Federation (``the... determine whether imports of solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (``ammonium nitrate'') from Russia...

  11. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: A hidden source of nitrite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, A.M.; Keuskamp, Joost A.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought

  12. Synthesis, Characterization, and Sensitivity Analysis of Urea Nitrate (UN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    ARL-TR-7250 ● APR 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Synthesis, Characterization, and Sensitivity Analysis of Urea Nitrate (UN...Characterization, and Sensitivity Analysis of Urea Nitrate (UN) by William M Sherrill Weapons and Materials Research Directorate...Characterization, and Sensitivity Analysis of Urea Nitrate (UN) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  13. 40 CFR 721.5769 - Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols... Substances § 721.5769 Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a mixture of nitrated alkylated...

  14. Nitrate to ammonia ceramic (NAC) bench scale stabilization study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caime, W.J.; Hoeffner, S.L. [RUST - Clemson Technical Center, Anderson, SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) sites such as the Hanford site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have large quantities of sodium-nitrate based liquid wastes. A process to reduce the nitrates to ammonia has been developed at ORNL. This technology creates a sludge lower in nitrates. This report describes stabilization possibilities of the sludge.

  15. A nitrate sensitive planar optode; performance and interferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse; Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a newly developed nitrate sensitive planar optode. It exhibits a linear response to nitrate from 1 to 50 mM at pH 8.0, a fast response time below 10 s and a good lifetime, allowing for fast two dimensional nitrate measurements over long periods of time. Interference from nitrite...

  16. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  17. 78 FR 32690 - Certain Ammonium Nitrate From Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... COMMISSION Certain Ammonium Nitrate From Ukraine Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... antidumping duty order on certain ammonium nitrate from Ukraine would be likely to lead to continuation or... Publication 4396 (May 2013), entitled Certain Ammonium Nitrate from Ukraine: Investigation No....

  18. 40 CFR 721.7500 - Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name... Substances § 721.7500 Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nitrate polyether polyol (PMN P88-2540)...

  19. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  20. Mechanochemical reactions on copper-based compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castricum, H.L.; Bakker, H.; Poels, E.K.

    1999-01-01

    Mechanochemical reactions of copper and copper oxides with oxygen and carbon dioxide are discussed, as well as decomposition and reduction of copper compounds by mechanical milling under high-vacuum conditions.

  1. Oxidation Mechanism of Copper Selenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskinen, Pekka; Patana, Sonja; Kobylin, Petri; Latostenmaa, Petri

    2014-09-01

    The oxidation mechanism of copper selenide was investigated at deselenization temperatures of copper refining anode slimes. The isothermal roasting of synthetic, massive copper selenide in flowing oxygen and oxygen - 20% sulfur dioxide mixtures at 450-550 °C indicate that in both atmospheres the mass of Cu2Se increases as a function of time, due to formation of copper selenite as an intermediate product. Copper selenide oxidises to copper oxides without formation of thick copper selenite scales, and a significant fraction of selenium is vaporized as SeO2(g). The oxidation product scales on Cu2Se are porous which allows transport of atmospheric oxygen to the reaction zone and selenium dioxide vapor to the surrounding gas. Predominance area diagrams of the copper-selenium system, constructed for selenium roasting conditions, indicate that the stable phase of copper in a selenium roaster gas with SO2 is the sulfate CuSO4. The cuprous oxide formed in decomposition of Cu2Se is further sulfated to CuSO4.

  2. Copper and copper-nickel-alloys - An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klassert, Anton; Tikana, Ladji [Deutsches Kupferinstitut e.V. Am Bonneshof 5, 40474 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    With the increasing level of industrialization the demand for and the number of copper alloys rose in an uninterrupted way. Today, the copper alloys take an important position amongst metallic materials due to the large variety of their technological properties and applications. Nowadays there exist over 3.000 standardized alloys. Copper takes the third place of all metals with a worldwide consumption of over 15 millions tons per year, following only to steel and aluminum. In a modern industrial society we meet copper in all ranges of the life (electro-technology, building and construction industry, mechanical engineering, automotive, chemistry, offshore, marine engineering, medical applications and others.). Copper is the first metal customized by humanity. Its name is attributed to the island Cyprus, which supplied in the antiquity copper to Greece, Rome and the other Mediterranean countries. The Romans called it 'ore from Cyprus' (aes cyprium), later cuprum. Copper deposited occasionally also dapper and could be processed in the recent stone age simply by hammering. Already in early historical time copper alloys with 20 to 50 percent tin was used for the production of mirrors because of their high reflecting power. Although the elementary nickel is an element discovered only recently from a historical perspective, its application in alloys - without any knowledge of the alloy composition - occurred at least throughout the last 2.000 years. The oldest copper-nickel coin originates from the time around 235 B.C.. Only around 1800 AD nickel was isolated as a metallic element. In particular in the sea and offshore technology copper nickel alloys found a broad field of applications in piping systems and for valves and armatures. The excellent combination of characteristics like corrosion resistance, erosion stability and bio-fouling resistance with excellent mechanical strength are at the basis of this success. An experience of many decades supports the use

  3. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blander, Milton; Sinha, Shome N.

    1990-01-01

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  4. Variations of serum copper values in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Vukelić Jelka; Kapamadžija Aleksandra; Petrović Đorđe; Grujić Zorica; Novakov-Mikić Aleksandra; Kopitović Vesna; Bjelica Artur

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Copper is essential micronutrient and has an important role in the human body. The serum copper increases during pregnancy and is doubled at full term. Lower levels of serum copper in pregnancy are connected with some pathological conditions. Objective. The aim of this study was to estimate the levels of serum copper in normal and pathological pregnancies, comparing them with values of serum copper in non-pregnant women, to determine if serum copper is lower in some pathol...

  5. Solid state interaction studies on binary nitrate mixtures of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate and lanthanum nitrate hexahydrate at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalekar, Bhupesh; Raje, Naina; Reddy, A. V. R.

    2017-02-01

    Interaction behavior of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) and lanthanum nitrate hexahydrate (LaNH) have been investigated on the mixtures in different molar ratios of the two precursors and monitoring the reactions at elevated temperatures with thermoanalytical and X-ray diffraction measurement techniques. During the decomposition of equimolar mixture of LaNH and UNH, formation of lanthanum uranate (U0.5La0.5)O2, was seen by the temperature of 500 °C along with lanthanum oxide (La2O3) and uranium trioxide (UO3). By the temperature of 700 °C, the formation of uranium sesquioxide (U3O8) was observed along with (U0.5La0.5)O2 as end products in uranium rich mixtures. Lanthanum rich compositions decomposed by the temperature of 700 °C to give (U0.5La0.5)O2 and La2O3 as end products.

  6. Protein Tyrosine Nitration : Selectivity, Physicochemical and Biological Consequences, Denitration, and Proteomics Methods for the Identification of Tyrosine-Nitrated Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abello, Nicolas; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Bischoff, Rainer

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a post-translational modification occurring under the action of a nitrating agent. Tyrosine is modified in the 3-position of the phenolic ring through the addition of a nitro group (NO(2)). In the present article, we review the main nitration reactions and

  7. Protein Tyrosine Nitration: Selectivity, physicochemical and biological consequences, denitration and proteomics methods for the identification of tyrosine-nitrated proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abello, N.; Kerstjens, H.A.M.; Postma, D.S; Bischoff, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a post-translational modification occurring under the action of a nitrating agent. Tyrosine is modified in the 3-position of the phenolic ring through the addition of a nitro group (NO2). In the present article, we review the main nitration reactions and elucidate

  8. Effect of Sodium Nitrate and Nitrate Reducing Bacteria on In vitro Methane Production and Fermentation with Buffalo Rumen Liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, Pillanatham Civalingam; Kamra, Devki Nandan; Agarwal, Neeta; Chaudhary, Lal Chandra

    2012-06-01

    Nitrate can serve as a terminal electron acceptor in place of carbon dioxide and inhibit methane emission in the rumen and nitrate reducing bacteria might help enhance the reduction of nitrate/nitrite, which depends on the type of feed offered to animals. In this study the effects of three levels of sodium nitrate (0, 5, 10 mM) on fermentation of three diets varying in their wheat straw to concentrate ratio (700:300, low concentrate, LC; 500:500, medium concentrate, MC and 300:700, high concentrate, HC diet) were investigated in vitro using buffalo rumen liquor as inoculum. Nitrate reducing bacteria, isolated from the rumen of buffalo were tested as a probiotic to study if it could help in enhancing methane inhibition in vitro. Inclusion of sodium nitrate at 5 or 10 mM reduced (pfeed reduced (pfeeding and introduced individually (3 ml containing 1.2 to 2.3×10(6) cfu/ml) into in vitro incubations containing the MC diet with 10 mM sodium nitrate. Addition of live culture of NRBB 57 resulted in complete removal of nitrate and nitrite from the medium with a further reduction in methane and no effect on IVTD compared to the control treatments containing nitrate with autoclaved cultures or nitrate without any culture. The data revealed that nitrate reducing bacteria can be used as probiotic to prevent the accumulation of nitrite when sodium nitrate is used to reduce in vitro methane emissions.

  9. Nickel, copper and cobalt coalescence in copper cliff converter slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to assess the effect of various additives on coalescence of nickel, copper and cobalt from slags generated during nickel extraction. The analyzed fluxes were silica and lime while examined reductants were pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon compound. Slag was settled at the different holding temperatures for various times in conditions that simulated the industrial environment. The newly formed matte and slag were characterized by their chemical composition and morphology. Silica flux generated higher partition coefficients for nickel and copper than the addition of lime. Additives used as reducing agents had higher valuable metal recovery rates and corresponding partition coefficients than fluxes. Microstructural studies showed that slag formed after adding reductants consisted of primarily fayalite, with some minute traces of magnetite as the secondary phase. Addition of 5 wt% of pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon alloys favored the formation of a metallized matte which increased Cu, Ni and Co recoveries. Addition of copper-silicon alloys with low silicon content was efficient in copper recovery but coalescence of the other metals was low. Slag treated with the ferrosilicon facilitated the highest cobalt recovery while copper-silicon alloys with silicon content above 10 wt% resulted in high coalescence of nickel and copper, 87 % and 72 % respectively.

  10. Study of Copper Substitute in High Copper Price Market Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>The high price of copper drives up industry cost,also it is difficult for terminal products to raise price to transfer the cost pressure brought by increase in copper price,as a result downstream consumption markets instead try to seek

  11. Synthesis, Spectroscopy, Thermal Analysis, Electrochemistry and Superoxide Scavenging Activity of a New Bimetallic Copper(II Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Sarma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new bimetallic copper(II complex has been synthesized with ligand obtained by the condensation of salicylaldehyde and the amine derived from reduction of nitration product of benzil. The ligand was characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra, and the binuclear Copper(II complex was characterized by vibrational and electronic spectra, EPR spectra, and magnetic moment measurement. Thermogravimetric analysis study and electrochemical study of the complex were also done. The complex was found to show superoxide dismutase activity.

  12. Fixation Property of Copper Triazole Wood Preservatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    According to AWPA E11-2006 standard,copper fixation rates of several copper-based formulations,such as ammoniacal copper,amine copper,and ammoniacal-ethanolamine copper,as well as alkaline copper quaternary(ACQ),were tested and compared in this paper.And the fixation rates of tebuconazole(TEB) and propiconazole(PPZ) in several formulations,such as copper azole,emulsified type and solvent type,were also compared.The determination of copper content in the leachate was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrom...

  13. INTERACTION OF COPPER BASED PRESERVATIVES WITH WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Temiz

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Copper is highly toxic to fungi and the element is widely used in many preservative formulations over 50 years. The interactions of wood and copper-based preservatives impact both the performance and the environment aspects of treated wood. Copper might be present in treated wood as coppercellulose complex, copper-lignin complex, and crystalline or amorphous inorganic/organic copper compounds. In this review; it was aimed to investigate the interactions of wood and copper-based preservatives, Copper Adsorpsion factors and copper forms in treated wood

  14. Electroleaching of Copper Waste with Recovery of Copper by Electrodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuñez P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A new process to leach and recover copper from solid waste using electric fields was designed. The leaching with electro migration is presented as an alternative to traditional leaching. Preliminary data indicate that the copper ion migration is facilitated by using the electrical potential difference; therefore applying a potential difference in the processes of leaching facilitates the removal of copper. This is especially useful when mineral concentrations are very low. Different phenomena associated with transport of copper in solution are studied to generate a model able predict the state of the copper ion concentration in time. A kinetic model for the process was developed and fitted very well the experimental data.

  15. Synthesis of copper/copper oxide nanoparticles by solution plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Genki; Hosokai, Sou; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of copper/copper oxide nanoparticles via a solution plasma, in which the effect of the electrolyte and electrolysis time on the morphology of the products was mainly examined. In the experiments, a copper wire as a cathode was immersed in an electrolysis solution of a K2CO3 with the concentration from 0.001 to 0.50 M or a citrate buffer (pH = 4.8), and was melted by the local-concentration of current. The results demonstrated that by using the K2CO3 solution, we obtained CuO nanoflowers with many sharp nanorods, the size of which decreased with decreasing the concentration of the solution. Spherical particles of copper with/without pores formed when the citrate buffer was used. The pores in the copper nanoparticles appeared when the applied voltage changed from 105 V to 130 V, due to the dissolution of Cu2O.

  16. Studies of copper transport in mammalian cells using copper radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camakaris, J.; Voskoboinik, I.; Brooks, H.; Greenough, M. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia). Department of Genetics; Smith, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Radiopharmaceuticals Division; Mercer, J. [Deakin University, Clayton, VIC (Australia). Centre of Cellular and Molecular Biology

    1998-12-31

    The trace element copper poses a major problem for all organisms. It is essential as a number of vital enzymes require it. Copper deficiency can lead to neurological disorders, osteoporosis and weakening of arteries. However Cu is also highly toxic and homeostatic mechanisms have evolved to maintain Cu at levels which satisfy requirements but do not cause toxicity. Toxicity is mediated by the oxidative capacity of Cu and its ability to generate toxic free radicals. There are several acquired and inherited diseases due to either Cu toxicity or Cu deficiency. The study of these diseases facilitates identification of genes and proteins involved in copper homeostasis, and this in turn will provide rational therapeutic approaches. Using the copper radioisotopes {sup 64}Cu (t1/2 = 12.8 hr) and {sup 67}Cu (t1/2 = 61 hr) we have developed a number of systems for studying copper transport in mammalian cells. These include investigation of copper uptake, copper efflux and ligand blot assays for Cu-binding proteins. Our studies have focused on Menkes disease which is an inherited and usually lethal copper deficiency disorder in humans. We have demonstrated that the Menkes protein is directly involved as a copper efflux pump in mammalian cells. Using cells overexpressing the Menkes protein we have provided the first biochemical evidence that this functions as a Cu translocating (across the membrane) P-type ATPase (Voskoboinik et al., FEBS Letters, in press). These studies were carried out using purified plasma membrane vesicles. We are now carrying out structure- function studies on this protein using targeted mutations and assaying using the radiocopper vesicle assay. Recently we have commenced studies on the role of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in copper transport and relationship of this to Alzheimers disease

  17. Factors influencing protein tyrosine nitration--structure-based predictive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayden, Alexander S; Yakovlev, Vasily A; Graves, Paul R; Mikkelsen, Ross B; Kellogg, Glen E

    2011-03-15

    Models for exploring tyrosine nitration in proteins have been created based on 3D structural features of 20 proteins for which high-resolution X-ray crystallographic or NMR data are available and for which nitration of 35 total tyrosines has been experimentally proven under oxidative stress. Factors suggested in previous work to enhance nitration were examined with quantitative structural descriptors. The role of neighboring acidic and basic residues is complex: for the majority of tyrosines that are nitrated the distance to the heteroatom of the closest charged side chain corresponds to the distance needed for suspected nitrating species to form hydrogen bond bridges between the tyrosine and that charged amino acid. This suggests that such bridges play a very important role in tyrosine nitration. Nitration is generally hindered for tyrosines that are buried and for those tyrosines for which there is insufficient space for the nitro group. For in vitro nitration, closed environments with nearby heteroatoms or unsaturated centers that can stabilize radicals are somewhat favored. Four quantitative structure-based models, depending on the conditions of nitration, have been developed for predicting site-specific tyrosine nitration. The best model, relevant for both in vitro and in vivo cases, predicts 30 of 35 tyrosine nitrations (positive predictive value) and has a sensitivity of 60/71 (11 false positives). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Open-Source Photometric System for Enzymatic Nitrate Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittbrodt, B T; Squires, D A; Walbeck, J; Campbell, E; Campbell, W H; Pearce, J M

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate, the most oxidized form of nitrogen, is regulated to protect people and animals from harmful levels as there is a large over abundance due to anthropogenic factors. Widespread field testing for nitrate could begin to address the nitrate pollution problem, however, the Cadmium Reduction Method, the leading certified method to detect and quantify nitrate, demands the use of a toxic heavy metal. An alternative, the recently proposed Environmental Protection Agency Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method, eliminates this problem but requires an expensive proprietary spectrophotometer. The development of an inexpensive portable, handheld photometer will greatly expedite field nitrate analysis to combat pollution. To accomplish this goal, a methodology for the design, development, and technical validation of an improved open-source water testing platform capable of performing Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method. This approach is evaluated for its potential to i) eliminate the need for toxic chemicals in water testing for nitrate and nitrite, ii) reduce the cost of equipment to perform this method for measurement for water quality, and iii) make the method easier to carryout in the field. The device is able to perform as well as commercial proprietary systems for less than 15% of the cost for materials. This allows for greater access to the technology and the new, safer nitrate testing technique.

  19. A Plasmodium falciparum copper-binding membrane protein with copper transport motifs

    OpenAIRE

    Choveaux David L; Przyborski Jude M; Goldring JP

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Copper is an essential catalytic co-factor for metabolically important cellular enzymes, such as cytochrome-c oxidase. Eukaryotic cells acquire copper through a copper transport protein and distribute intracellular copper using molecular chaperones. The copper chelator, neocuproine, inhibits Plasmodium falciparum ring-to-trophozoite transition in vitro, indicating a copper requirement for malaria parasite development. How the malaria parasite acquires or secretes copper st...

  20. Nitrate removal by microbial enhancement in a riparian wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yuansheng; Yang, Zhifeng; Tian, Binghui

    2010-07-01

    A riparian wetland (RW) was constructed in a river bend to study the effect of the addition of Bacillus subtilis FY99-01 on nitrate removal. Nitrate was removed more efficiently in the summer than in the winter owing to integrated hydraulic, microbial and environmental effects. The maximal nitrate removal and the mean nitrate loss rate in the RW were 36.1% and 50.5 g/m(2)/yr, respectively. Statistic analyses indicated that the redox potential was very significant to denitrification while organic matter in the outflow, temperature and nitrate in the inflow significantly affected nitrate removal. These results suggest that an RW can be a cost-effective approach to enhance microbial nitrate removal and can potentially be extended to similar river bends.

  1. Understanding nitrate assimilation and its regulation in microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel eSanz-Luque

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate assimilation is a key process for nitrogen (N acquisition in green microalgae. Among Chlorophyte algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has resulted to be a good model system to unravel important facts of this process, and has provided important insights for agriculturally relevant plants. In this work, the recent findings on nitrate transport, nitrate reduction and the regulation of nitrate assimilation are presented in this and several other algae. Latest data have shown nitric oxide (NO as an important signal molecule in the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of nitrate reductase and inorganic N transport. Participation of regulatory genes and proteins in positive and negative signaling of the pathway and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of nitrate assimilation, as well as those involved in Molybdenum cofactor synthesis required to nitrate assimilation, are critically reviewed.

  2. Observations on particulate organic nitrates and unidentified components of NOy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T.; Egeløv, A.H.; Granby, K.

    1995-01-01

    A method to determine the total content of particulate organic nitrates (PON) has been developed and ambient air measurements of PON, NO, NO2, HNO3, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), peroxypropionyl nitrate (PPN), gas NOy and particulate inorganic nitrate have been performed in the spring and early...... = gas NOy + particulate inorganic nitrate). Residual gas NOy was much higher than the particulate fraction of organic nitrates (PON). PON was only 0.25 +/- 0.11% of concentrations of photochemical oxidants in connection with high-pressure systems suggesting atmospheric processes being the major source...... summer al an agricultural site in Denmark and compared with measurements of ozone, H2O2, SO2, formic acid, acetic acid and methane sulphonic acid. The gas NOy detector determines the sum NO + NO2 + HNO2 + HNO3 + PAN + PPN + gas phase organic nitrates + 2 x N2O5 + NO3. The content of residual gas NOy...

  3. Nitrate intake from drinking water on Tenerife island (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero Mesa, J M; Rubio Armendáriz, C; Hardisson de la Torre, A

    2003-01-20

    Although meat and vegetable products contain higher concentrations of nitrate, drinking water is the fastest and most direct form of nitrate consumption by the population. It becomes contaminated with nitrates when sea water infiltrates fresh water aquifers and when rain and irrigation water wash through soils that have been excessively treated with nitrated fertilizers. Nitrates are of great toxicological interest as they are involved in the origin of nitrites and nitrosamines and the development of metahaemoglobinaemia in infants. The objective of this study was to determine the quantities of NO(3)(-) in the water supply of each of the Island's municipalities and in the leading brands of bottled waters consumed by the population of Tenerife. This parameter is necessary for the determination of Acceptable Daily Intake (A.D.I.) of nitrates from drinking water. With one unremarkable exception, the nitrate levels found in the water analyzed were optimum for human consumption and amply complied with current European Legislation.

  4. Understanding nitrate assimilation and its regulation in microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Chamizo-Ampudia, Alejandro; Llamas, Angel; Galvan, Aurora; Fernandez, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation is a key process for nitrogen (N) acquisition in green microalgae. Among Chlorophyte algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has resulted to be a good model system to unravel important facts of this process, and has provided important insights for agriculturally relevant plants. In this work, the recent findings on nitrate transport, nitrate reduction and the regulation of nitrate assimilation are presented in this and several other algae. Latest data have shown nitric oxide (NO) as an important signal molecule in the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of nitrate reductase and inorganic N transport. Participation of regulatory genes and proteins in positive and negative signaling of the pathway and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of nitrate assimilation, as well as those involved in Molybdenum cofactor synthesis required to nitrate assimilation, are critically reviewed.

  5. Nanocrystalline copper based microcomposites

    OpenAIRE

    J.P. Stobrawa; Z.M. Rdzawski; W. Głuchowski; J. Domagała-Dubiel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to investigate microstructure, mechanical properties and deformation behavior of copper microcomposites: Cu- Y2O3, Cu- ZrO2 and Cu-WC produced by powder metallurgy techniques.Design/methodology/approach: Tests were made with Cu-Y2O3, Cu-ZrO2 and Cu-WC microcomposites containing up to 2% of a strengthening phase. The materials were fabricated by powder metallurgy techniques, including milling of powders, followed by their compacting and sintering. The main mec...

  6. The Bauschinger Effect in Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Bøcker; Brown, L .M.; Stobbs, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the Bauschinger effect in pure copper shows that by comparison with dispersion hardened copper the effect is very small and independent of temperature. This suggests that the obstacles to flow are deformable. A simple composite model based on this principle accounts for the data semi...

  7. Silver nanoparticles can attenuate nitrative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Zuberek

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We have reported previously that glucose availability can modify toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs via elevation of antioxidant defence triggered by increased mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we examined the effect of glucose availability on the production of reactive nitrogen species in HepG2 cells and modification of nitrative stress by AgNPs. We found that lowering the glucose concentration increased expression of genes coding for inducible nitric oxide syntheas, NOS2 and NOS2A resulting in enhanced production of nitric oxide. Surprisingly, AgNPs decreased the level of nitric oxide accelerated denitration of proteins nitrated by exogenous peroxynitrite in cells grown in the presence of lowered glucose concentration, apparently due to further induction of protective proteins.

  8. Enzyme catalytic nitration of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Mingming; Wang, Kun; Dong, Runan; Gao, Haijun

    2015-06-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds are important intermediates in organic synthesis. The classic method used to synthesize them is chemical nitration, which involves the use of nitric acid diluted in water or acetic acid, both harmful to the environment. With the development of green chemistry, environmental friendly enzyme catalysis is increasingly employed in chemical processes. In this work, we adopted a non-aqueous horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/NaNO2/H2O2 reaction system to study the structural characteristics of aromatic compounds potentially nitrated by enzyme catalysis, as well as the relationship between the charges on carbon atoms in benzene ring and the nitro product distribution. Investigation of various reaction parameters showed that mild reaction conditions (ambient temperature and neutral pH), plus appropriate use of H2O2 and NaNO2 could prevent inactivation of HRP and polymerization of the substrates. Compared to aqueous-organic co-solvent reaction media, the aqueous-organic two-liquid phase system had great advantages in increasing the dissolved concentration of substrate and alleviating substrate inhibition. Analysis of the aromatic compounds' structural characteristics indicated that substrates containing substituents of NH2 or OH were readily catalyzed. Furthermore, analysis of the relationship between natural bond orbital (NBO) charges on carbon atoms in benzene ring, as calculated by the density functional method, and the nitro product distribution characteristics, demonstrated that the favored nitration sites were the ortho and para positions of substituents in benzene ring, similar to the selectivity of chemical nitration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential of dietary nitrate in angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christos; Rammos; Peter; Luedike; Ulrike; Hendgen-Cotta; Tienush; Rassaf

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction with impaired bioavailability of nitric oxide(NO) is the hallmark in the development of cardiovascular disease. Endothelial dysfunction leads to atherosclerosis, characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall and stepwise narrowing of the vessel lumen. Atherosclerosis causes deprivation of adequate tissue blood flow with compromised oxygen supply. To overcome this undersupply, remodeling of the vascular network is necessary to reconstitute and sustain tissue viability. This physiological response is often not sufficient and therapeutic angiogenesis remains an unmet medical need in critical limb ischemia or coronary artery disease. Feasible approaches to promote blood vessel formation are sparse. Administration of pro-angiogenic factors, gene therapy, or targeting of micro RNAs has not yet entered the daily practice. Nitric oxide is an important mediator of angiogenesis that becomes limited under ischemic conditions and the maintenance of NO availability might constitute an attractive therapeutic target. Until recently it was unknown how the organism provides NO under ischemia. In recent years it could be demonstrated that NO can be formed independently of its enzymatic synthesis in the endothelium by reduction of inorganic nitrite under hypoxic conditions. Circulating nitrite derives from oxidation of NO or reduction of inorganic nitrate by commensal bacteria in the oral cavity. Intriguingly, nitrate is a common constituent of our everyday diet and particularly high concentrations are found in leafy green vegetables such as spinach, lettuce, or beetroot. Evidence suggests that dietary nitrate supplementation increases the regenerative capacity of ischemic tissue and that this effect may offer an attractive nutrition-based strategy to improve ischemia-induced revascularization. We here summarize and discuss the regenerative capacity of dietary nitrate on the vascular system.

  10. Methemoglobinaemia in Cardiac Patients on Nitrate Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Aziz A. Ghanem

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methaemoglobinaemia refers to the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron within the haemoglobin molecule, which occurs following oxidative stresses. The subsequent impairment in oxygen transport may lead to progressive hypoxia that is highly dangerous condition especially in borderline patients like the cardiac patient.Objectives: In the present work, authors explore the extent of methaemoglobinaemia in cardiac patients receiving nitrate therapy.Methodology: The study included 970 cardiac patients presented in cardiology department, Mansoura Specialised Medical Hospital, Egypt, in the period from February to July 2009. Patients were taking oral, sublingual, dermal preparation or a combination of two preparations.Results: cases of the study had methemoglobin level 1.1782 ± 0.3476 g/dL with insignificant difference between males and females. Methemoglobin showed positive correlation with carboxyhemogloin and negative correlation with O2 content and O2 saturation. It was significantly higher in cardiac patient with chest infection, anaemia and diabetic patients but didn't differ in hepatic or non hepatic cardiac patients. 3.2% of cardiac patients who receive more than one nitrate preparation (either oral and dermal or oral and sublingual therapy have methemoglobin level significantly higher than those who receive single preparation. There is significant difference in methemoglobin level in cardiac patients complaining of myocardial infarction “MI”, unstable Angina, atrial fibrillation “AF” and hypertensive heart disease “HTN”.Conclusions: It is concluded that commonly used dosages of nitrates are capable of causing elevations of methemoglobin ranged from 0.9 – 5.3 g/dl. Although the elevation in methaemoglobin (MetHb levels was not of routine clinical significance, there was statistically significant increase in MetHb levels in cardiac patients with another pathologic condition as anaemia, diabetes mellitus or chest

  11. Potential of dietary nitrate in angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammos, Christos; Luedike, Peter; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike; Rassaf, Tienush

    2015-10-26

    Endothelial dysfunction with impaired bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) is the hallmark in the development of cardiovascular disease. Endothelial dysfunction leads to atherosclerosis, characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall and stepwise narrowing of the vessel lumen. Atherosclerosis causes deprivation of adequate tissue blood flow with compromised oxygen supply. To overcome this undersupply, remodeling of the vascular network is necessary to reconstitute and sustain tissue viability. This physiological response is often not sufficient and therapeutic angiogenesis remains an unmet medical need in critical limb ischemia or coronary artery disease. Feasible approaches to promote blood vessel formation are sparse. Administration of pro-angiogenic factors, gene therapy, or targeting of microRNAs has not yet entered the daily practice. Nitric oxide is an important mediator of angiogenesis that becomes limited under ischemic conditions and the maintenance of NO availability might constitute an attractive therapeutic target. Until recently it was unknown how the organism provides NO under ischemia. In recent years it could be demonstrated that NO can be formed independently of its enzymatic synthesis in the endothelium by reduction of inorganic nitrite under hypoxic conditions. Circulating nitrite derives from oxidation of NO or reduction of inorganic nitrate by commensal bacteria in the oral cavity. Intriguingly, nitrate is a common constituent of our everyday diet and particularly high concentrations are found in leafy green vegetables such as spinach, lettuce, or beetroot. Evidence suggests that dietary nitrate supplementation increases the regenerative capacity of ischemic tissue and that this effect may offer an attractive nutrition-based strategy to improve ischemia-induced revascularization. We here summarize and discuss the regenerative capacity of dietary nitrate on the vascular system.

  12. Effects of copper(II) and copper oxides on THMs formation in copper pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Qu, Jiuhui; Liu, Huijuan; Hu, Chengzhi

    2007-08-01

    Little is known about how the growth of trihalomethanes (THMs) in drinking water is affected in copper pipe. The formation of THMs and chlorine consumption in copper pipe under stagnant flow conditions were investigated. Experiments for the same water held in glass bottles were performed for comparison. Results showed that although THMs levels firstly increased in the presence of chlorine in copper pipe, faster decay of chlorine as compared to the glass bottle affected the rate of THMs formation. The analysis of water phase was supplemented by surface analysis of corrosion scales using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX). The results showed the scales on the pipe surface mainly consisted of Cu(2)O, CuO and Cu(OH)(2) or CuCO(3). Designed experiments confirmed that the fast depletion of chlorine in copper pipe was mainly due to effect of Cu(2)O, CuO in corrosion scales on copper pipe. Although copper(II) and copper oxides showed effect on THMs formation, the rapid consumption of chlorine due to copper oxide made THM levels lower than that in glass bottles after 4h. The transformations of CF, DCBM and CDBM to BF were accelerated in the presence of copper(II), cupric oxide and cuprous oxide. The effect of pH on THMs formation was influenced by effect of pH on corrosion of copper pipe. When pH was below 7, THMs levels in copper pipe was higher as compared to glass bottle, but lower when pH was above 7.

  13. Genetic basis for nitrate resistance in Desulfovibrio strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah eKorte

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate is an inhibitor of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB. In petroleum production sites, amendments of nitrate and nitrite are used to prevent SRB production of sulfide that causes souring of oil wells. A better understanding of nitrate stress responses in the model SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, will strengthen predictions of environmental outcomes. Nitrate inhibition of SRB has historically been considered to result from the generation of small amounts of nitrite, to which SRB are quite sensitive. Here we explored the possibility that nitrate might inhibit SRB by a mechanism other than through nitrite inhibition. We found that nitrate-stressed D. vulgaris cultures grown in lactate-sulfate conditions eventually grew in the presence of high concentrations of nitrate, and their resistance continued through several subcultures. Nitrate consumption was not detected over the course of the experiment, suggesting adaptation to nitrate. With high-throughput genetic approaches employing TnLE-seq for D. vulgaris and a pooled mutant library of D. alaskensis, we determined the fitness of many transposon mutants of both organisms in nitrate stress conditions. We found that several mutants, including homologs present in both strains, had a greatly increased ability to grow in the presence of nitrate but not nitrite. The mutated genes conferring nitrate resistance included the gene encoding the putative Rex transcriptional regulator (DVU0916/Dde_2702, as well as a cluster of genes (DVU0251-DVU0245/Dde_0597-Dde_0605 that is poorly annotated. Follow-up studies with individual D. vulgaris transposon and deletion mutants confirmed high-throughput results. We conclude that, in D. vulgaris and D. alaskensis, nitrate resistance in wild-type cultures is likely conferred by spontaneous mutations. Furthermore, the mechanisms that confer nitrate resistance may be different from those that confer nitrite resistance.

  14. Organic Nitrates: A Complex Family of Atmospheric Trace Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballschmiter, K.; Fischer, R. G.; Grünert, A.; Kastler, J.; Schneider, M.; Woidich, S.

    2003-04-01

    Biogenic and geogenic hydrocarbons are the precursors of organic nitrates that are formed as tropospheric photo-oxidation products in the presence of NOx. Air chemistry leads to a very complex pattern of nitric acid esters: alkyl nitrates, aryl-alkyl nitrates, and bifunctional nitrates like alkyl dinitrates, hydroxy alkyl nitrates and carbonyl alkyl nitrates. We have analyzed the pattern of organic nitrates in air samples after adsorption/thermal desorption (low volume sampling-LVS) or adsorption/solvent desorption (high volume sampling-HVS) by capillary gas chromatography with electron capture (ECD) and mass spectrometric detection (MSD) using air aliquotes of 100 up to 3000 liters on column. The complexity of the organic nitrates found in air requires a group pre-separation by normal phase liquid chromatography. A detection limit per compound of 0.005 ppt(v) is achieved by our approach. We have synthesized a broad spectrum of organic nitrates as reference compounds. Air samples were taken from central Europe, the US West (Utah, Nevada, California), and the North- and South Atlantic including Antarctica. Levels and patterns of the regional and global occurrence of the various groups of C1-C12 organic nitrates including dinitrates and hydroxy nitrates and nitrates of isoprene (2-methylbutadiene) are presented. Werner G., J. Kastler, R. Looser, K. Ballschmiter: "Organic nitrates of isoprene as atmospheric trace compounds" Angewandte Chemie - International Edition (1999) 38: 1634-1637. Woidich S., O. Froescheis, O. Luxenhofer, K. Ballschmiter: "EI- and NCI-mass spectrometry of arylalkyl nitrates and their occurrence in urban air" Fresenius J. Anal. Chem. (1999) 364 : 91-99. Kastler, J; Jarman, W; Ballschmiter, K.: "Multifunctional organic nitrates as constituents in European and US urban photo-smog" Fresenius J. Anal. Chem. (2000) 368:244-249. Schneider M., K. Ballschmiter: "C3-C14 alkyl nitrates in remote South Atlantic air" Chemosphere (1999) 38: 233-244. Fischer

  15. recovery of copper(ii) and chromium(iii) from nitrate medium with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guerdouh A and Barkat D

    2016-05-01

    May 1, 2016 ... Laboratory of chemical molecular and environment, Department of Industrial Chemistry,. Faculty of Science and Technology, Biskra University, 07000 Biskra, Algeria. Received: 17 ... http://www.jfas.info. Research Article ...

  16. Copper: From neurotransmission to neuroproteostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Opazo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Copper is critical for the Central Nervous System (CNS development and function. In particular, different studies have shown the effect of copper at brain synapses, where it inhibits Long Term Potentation (LTP and receptor pharmacology. Paradoxically, according to recent studies copper is required for a normal LTP response. Copper is released at the synaptic cleft, where it blocks glutamate receptors, which explain its blocking effects on excitatory neurotransmission. Our results indicate that copper also enhances neurotransmission through the accumulation of PSD95 protein, which increase the levels of AMPA receptors located at the plasma membrane of the post-synaptic density. Thus, our findings represent a novel mechanism for the action of copper, which may have implications for the neurophysiology and neuropathology of the CNS. These data indicate that synaptic configuration is sensitive to transient changes in transition metal homeostasis. Our results suggest that copper increases GluA1 subunit levels of the AMPA receptor through the anchorage of AMPA receptors to the plasma membrane as a result of PSD-95 accumulation. Here, we will review the role of copper on neurotransmission of CNS neurons. In addition, we will discuss the potential mechanisms by which copper could modulate neuronal proteostasis (neuroproteostasis in the CNS with focus in the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, which is particularly relevant to neurological disorders such Alzheimer’s disease (AD where copper and protein dyshomeostasis may contribute to neurodegeneration. An understanding of these mechanisms may ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to control metal and synaptic alterations observed in AD patients.

  17. Catalytic Decomposition of Hydroxylammonium Nitrate Ionic Liquid: Enhancement of NO Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambreau, Steven D; Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L; Leone, Stephen R

    2017-05-18

    Hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) is a promising candidate to replace highly toxic hydrazine in monopropellant thruster space applications. The reactivity of HAN aerosols on heated copper and iridium targets was investigated using tunable vacuum ultraviolet photoionization time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry. The reaction products were identified by their mass-to-charge ratios and their ionization energies. Products include NH3, H2O, NO, hydroxylamine (HA), HNO3, and a small amount of NO2 at high temperature. No N2O was detected under these experimental conditions, despite the fact that N2O is one of the expected products according to the generally accepted thermal decomposition mechanism of HAN. Upon introduction of iridium catalyst, a significant enhancement of the NO/HA ratio was observed. This observation indicates that the formation of NO via decomposition of HA is an important pathway in the catalytic decomposition of HAN.

  18. Influence of chalcopyrite structure on their leaching by sodium nitrate in sulphuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Sokić

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During the chalcopyrite leaching by sodium nitrate and sulfuric acid solution, leaching rate decreases with increasing the time and a part of chalcopyrite mineral grains remains in the leach residue. In chalcopyrite concentrate, 95.5 % of chalcopyrite mineral occurs as in liberated grains, and the rest is in association with gangue minerals, which is very favorably from the aspect of hydrometallurgical treatment. Complex forms, like impregnations and complex intergrowths, do not exist. After experiments carried out, leaching of copper achieved 84 % at temperature 80 o C and time 240 min. In the all leach residues, 97 % chalcopyrite mineral grains occur as liberated with highly corroded surfaces. Therefore, the structural assembly of chalcopyrite grains is favorable and no reason to reduce the leaching rate in the final stage of reaction. Reason for this is elemental sulfur, which was formed during the reaction, precipitated at the particle surfaces, and slowed down the leaching rate in the final stage of leaching process.

  19. Nitric oxide accumulation and protein tyrosine nitration as a rapid and long distance signalling response to salt stress in sunflower seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Anisha; Yadav, Sunita; Baluška, František; Bhatla, Satish Chander

    2015-08-18

    Sensing of salt stress by sunflower seedlings accompanies temporal and spatial modulation of intracellular nitric oxide (NO) accumulation and protein tyrosine nitration as markers of nitrosative stress. Employing a novel NO-specific probe for NO localization (a copper derivative of 4-methoxy-2-(1H-naphtho(2,3-d)imidazol-2-yl)phenol; MNIP-Cu) synthesized in author's laboratory, immunological analysis of tyrosine nitrated proteins by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and Western blot analysis, these rapid signalling events have been investigated. MNIP-Cu reveals the distribution of NO in whole seedlings. Preferential and enhanced NO localization around oil bodies (OBs) in cotyledons within 48 h of salt-stressed seedlings exhibits rapid transport of nitrosative stress signal from roots to the cotyledons. Immunological analysis reveals enhanced gradient of tyrosine nitrated proteins in salt-stressed roots from tip to the differentiating zone and from columella to the deep-seated cells. Western blot analysis shows that at least eight major cytosolic proteins exhibit enhanced tyrosine nitration in seedling roots in response to salt stress. Present observations provide strong evidence for rapid NO accumulation in salt stressed sunflower seedling roots and cotyledons and its impact on enhanced tyrosine nitration of cytosolic and OB proteins, as a mechanism to provide longevity to OBs for seedling survival under the salt stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment with coated layer double hydroxide clays decreases the toxicity of copper-contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Deanne; Nar, Mangesh; D'Souza, Nandika Anne; Glenn, J Brad; Klaine, Stephen J; Roberts, Aaron P

    2014-05-01

    Copper is a common pollutant found in watersheds that exerts toxic effects on both invertebrates and vertebrates. Layer double hydroxide (LDH) clays are able to adsorb a wide range of contaminants through ion-exchange mechanisms. Coating LDH clays with various materials alters the aggregation of clay particles into the nano-size range, thus increasing relative surface area and offering great potential for contaminant remediation. The goal of this study was to determine if treatment with coated LDH clays decreases the toxicity of copper-containing solutions to Daphnia magna. Four LDH clays with different coatings used to alter hydrophobicity were as follows: used: Na(+) montmorillonite, Zn-Al LDH-nitrate, Zn-Al LDH-stearate, and Zn-Al LDH-carbonate. It was determined that coated LDH clays decreased copper toxicity by decreasing bioavailability and that smaller aggregate sizes decreased bioavailability the most. 96 h LC50 values increased by as much as 4.2 times with the treatment of the solutions with 100 mg/L LDH clay. Copper analysis of the clay and solutions indicated that the clays work by decreasing copper bioavailability by way of a binding mechanism. Coated LDH clays hold promise as a small-scale remediation tool or as an innovative tool for toxicity identification and evaluation characterization of metals.

  1. Carbonyl Alkyl Nitrates as Trace Constituents in Urban Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woidich, S.; Gruenert, A.; Ballschmiter, K.

    2003-04-01

    Organic nitrates, esters of nitric acid, significantly contribute to the entire pool of odd nitrogen (NOY) in the atmosphere. Organic nitrates are formed in NO rich air by degradation of alkanes and alkenes initiated by OH and NO3 radicals during daytime and nighttime, respectively. Bifunctional organonitrates like the alkyl dinitrates and hydroxy alkyl nitrates are formed primarily from alkenes. The two main sources for Alkenes are traffic emissions and naturally occurring terpenes. So far a broad spectrum of alkyl dinitrates and hydroxy alkyl nitrates including six different isoprene nitrates has been identified in urban and marine air (1-3). We report here for the first time about the group of C4 C7 carbonyl alkyl nitrates as trace constituents in urban air collected on the campus of the University of Ulm Germany, and in the downtown area of Salt Lake City, Utah. Air sampling was done by high volume sampling (flow rate 25 m3/h) using a layer of 100 g silica gel (particle diameter 0.2 - 0.5 mm) as adsorbent. The organic nitrates were eluted from the silica gel by pentane/acetone (4:1, w/w) and the extract was concentrated to a volume of 500 µL for a group separation using normal phase HPLC. Final analysis was performed by high resolution capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detection as well as by mass selective detection in the (CH4)NCI mode using NO2- = m/e 46 as the indicator mass. The carbonyl alkyl nitrates were identified by self synthesized reference standards . So far we have identified eight non-branched a-carbonyl alkyl nitrates (vicinal carbonyl alkyl nitrates), two b-carbonyl alkyl nitrates and one g-carbonyl alkyl nitrate with carbon chains ranging from C4 to C7. The mixing ratios are between 0.05 and 0.30 ppt(v) for daytime samples and are two to three times higher for samples taken at night. (1) M. Schneider, O. Luxenhofer, Angela Deißler, K. Ballschmiter: 2C1-C15 Alkyl Nitrates, Benzyl Nitrate, and Bifunctional Nitrates

  2. Jiangxi Copper Corporation Builds 900,000-Ton Copper Production Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>The Eastward Refined Copper Expansion Pro- ject of Guixi Smelting Plant under Jiangxi Copper Corporation has output its first lot of Copper cathode,marking the company’s pos- session of a 900,000-ton copper production ca- pacity.Thus the company further strengthens its position as the top 3 of the copper world.

  3. [Nitrate removal by a strain of nitrate-dependent Fe (II) -oxidizing bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yu; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Qian; Ji, Bin; Chen, Dan; Sun, Yu-Chong; Tian, Jun

    2014-04-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterial strain, named W5, was isolated from the sediment of the East Lake in Wuhan. Strain W5 was studied for its characteristics of denitrification and nitrogen removal. According to its physiological and biochemical characteristics and the analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, strain W5 was identified as Microbacterium sp. The optimal denitrification performance can be obtained under conditions of NO3(-) -N 40 mg x L(-1), Fe2+ 500 mg x L(-1) and pH 6.8-7.0. After one week of cultivation under optimal conditions, nitrate removal percentage reached 87.0%. During the process of the culture, the nitrite nitrogen concentration was no more than 0.31 mg x L(-1) and there was no ammonia nitrogen production. It was indicated that the nitrate was mostly converted into N2. The consumption rate of Fe2+ was 95.2%.

  4. Impact of copper toxicity on stone-head cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) in hydroponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajid; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Shahzad, Ahmad Naeem; Khan, Hafiz Azhar Ali; Anees, Moazzam; Haider, Muhammad Saleem; Fatima, Ammara

    2015-01-01

    Arable soils are frequently subjected to contamination with copper as the consequence of imbalanced fertilization with manure and organic fertilizers and/or extensive use of copper-containing fungicides. In the present study, the exposure of stone-head cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) to elevated Cu(2+) levels resulted in leaf chlorosis and lesser biomass yield at ≥2 µ M. Root nitrate content was not statistically affected by Cu(2+) levels, although it was substantially decreased at ≥5 µ M Cu(2+) in the shoot. The decrease in nitrate contents can be related to lower nitrate uptake rates because of growth inhibition by Cu-toxicity. Shoot sulfate content increased strongly at ≥2 µ M Cu(2+) indicating an increase in demand for sulfur under Cu stress. Furthermore, at ≥2 µM concentration, concentration of water-soluble non-protein thiol increased markedly in the roots and to a smaller level in the shoot. When exposed to elevated concentrations of Cu(2+) the improved sulfate and water-soluble non-protein thiols need further studies for the evaluation of their direct relation with the synthesis of metal-chelating compounds (i.e., phytochelatins).

  5. Impact of copper toxicity on stone-head cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata in hydroponics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Ali

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Arable soils are frequently subjected to contamination with copper as the consequence of imbalanced fertilization with manure and organic fertilizers and/or extensive use of copper-containing fungicides. In the present study, the exposure of stone-head cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata to elevated Cu2+ levels resulted in leaf chlorosis and lesser biomass yield at ≥2 µ M. Root nitrate content was not statistically affected by Cu2+ levels, although it was substantially decreased at ≥5 µ M Cu2+ in the shoot. The decrease in nitrate contents can be related to lower nitrate uptake rates because of growth inhibition by Cu-toxicity. Shoot sulfate content increased strongly at ≥2 µ M Cu2+ indicating an increase in demand for sulfur under Cu stress. Furthermore, at ≥2 µM concentration, concentration of water-soluble non-protein thiol increased markedly in the roots and to a smaller level in the shoot. When exposed to elevated concentrations of Cu2+ the improved sulfate and water-soluble non-protein thiols need further studies for the evaluation of their direct relation with the synthesis of metal-chelating compounds (i.e., phytochelatins.

  6. Nitration of Hsp90 on Tyrosine 33 Regulates Mitochondrial Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Maria C; Ricart, Karina C; Gonzalez, Analía S; Dennys, Cassandra N; Nelson, Pascal A; Janes, Michael S; Mehl, Ryan A; Landar, Aimee; Estévez, Alvaro G

    2015-07-31

    Peroxynitrite production and tyrosine nitration are present in several pathological conditions, including neurodegeneration, stroke, aging, and cancer. Nitration of the pro-survival chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in position 33 and 56 induces motor neuron death through a toxic gain-of-function. Here we show that nitrated Hsp90 regulates mitochondrial metabolism independently of the induction of cell death. In PC12 cells, a small fraction of nitrated Hsp90 was located on the mitochondrial outer membrane and down-regulated mitochondrial membrane potential, oxygen consumption, and ATP production. Neither endogenous Hsp90 present in the homogenate nor unmodified and fully active recombinant Hsp90 was able to compete with the nitrated protein for the binding to mitochondria. Moreover, endogenous or recombinant Hsp90 did not prevent the decrease in mitochondrial activity but supported nitrated Hsp90 mitochondrial gain-of-function. Nitrotyrosine in position 33, but not in any of the other four tyrosine residues prone to nitration in Hsp90, was sufficient to down-regulate mitochondrial activity. Thus, in addition to induction of cell death, nitrated Hsp90 can also regulate mitochondrial metabolism, suggesting that depending on the cell type, distinct Hsp90 nitration states regulate different aspects of cellular metabolism. This regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis by nitrated Hsp90 could be of particular relevance in cancer cells. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Nitrate removal using different carbon substrates in a laboratory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyyed Ebrahim; Heidarpour, Manouchehr; Mostafazadeh-Fard, Behrouz

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural fields have been frequently identified as major contributors of nitrate leaching into surface and ground waters. Tile drains can act as direct pathways, transferring leached nitrate to surface water. Bioreactor filters are useful for the removal of nitrate from drainage waters; however, these filters require an external carbon supply to sustain denitrification. In this study, four organic carbon sources including wood, barley straw, rice husks, and date palm leaf, were used to enhance denitrification and the effects of water velocity and influent nitrate concentration on the nitrate removal were evaluated. Cumulative nitrate removal was highest for the date palm leaf treatments and was lowest for the wood treatments. The effects were in decreasing order for date palm leaf, barley straw, rice husks, and wood, respectively. The performance of the biofilters improved with increasing influent nitrate concentration and decreasing water velocity, allowing for high nitrate removal rates to be achieved. The results showed that all of the treatments had reduced the effluent nitrate concentrations below the USEPA maximum contaminant level for drinking water of 45 mg L(-1) nitrate at the end of the study.

  8. Nitrate removal using Brevundimonas diminuta MTCC 8486 from ground water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, S; Selvakumar, R; Sathishkumar, M; Swaminathan, K; Lakshmanaperumalsamy, P; Singh, A; Jain, S K

    2009-01-01

    Brevundimonas diminuta MTCC 8486, isolated from marine soil of coastal area of Trivandrum, Kerala, was used for biological removal of nitrate from ground water collected from Kar village of Pali district, Rajasthan. The organism was found to be resistance for nitrate up to 10,000 mg L(-1). The optimum growth conditions for biological removal of nitrate were established in batch culture. The effect of carbon sources on nitrate removal was investigated using mineral salt medium (MSM) containing 500 mg L(-1) of nitrate to select the most effective carbon source. Among glucose and starch as carbon source, glucose at 1% concentration increased the growth (182+/-8.24 x 10(4) CFU mL(-1)) and induced maximum nitrate reduction (86.4%) at 72 h. The ground water collected from Kar village, Pali district of Rajasthan containing 460+/-5.92 mg L(-1) of nitrate was subjected to three different treatment processes in pilot scale (T1 to T3). Higher removal of nitrate was observed in T2 process (88%) supplemented with 1% glucose. The system was scaled up to 10 L pilot scale treatment plant. At 72 h the nitrate removal was observed to be 95% in pilot scale plant. The residual nitrate level (23+/-0.41 mg L(-1)) in pilot scale treatment process was found to be below the permissible limit of WHO.

  9. Reductive denitrification of nitrate by scrap iron filings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Zhi-wei; XU Xin-hua; WANG Da-hui

    2005-01-01

    Reduction of nitrate by zero-valent iron is a highly exergonic reaction that has long been known to occur. Use of scrap iron filings (SIF) as the PRB (Permeable Reactive Barrier) material can be used to recycle certain by-products, and identify cheaper replacements for expensive conventional PRB materials, especially pure metallic iron. The feasibility of reductive denitrification of nitrate by SIF was studied by batch experiments. Operational parameters such as pH value, SIF dosage and initial concentration of nitrate were investigated. The removal efficiency of nitrate reached 80% under the conditions of pH of 2.5, nitrate initial concentration of 45 mg/L and SIF dosage of 100 g/L within 4 h. Results indicated that nitrate removal is inversely related to pH. Low pH value condition favors for the nitrate transformation. Different from the results of others who studied nitrate reduction using iron powder, we found that there was a lag time before nitrate reduction occurs, even at low pH. Finally, the possible mechanism of nitrate reduction by Fe0 is discussed.

  10. Growing patterns to produce 'nitrate-free' lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Mircea Dumitru; Muntean, Daniela-Lucia; Fülöp, Ibolya; Modroiu, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Vegetables can contain significant amounts of nitrate and, therefore, may pose health hazards to consumers by exceeding the accepted daily intake for nitrate. Different hydroponic growing patterns were examined in this work in order to obtain 'nitrate-free lettuces'. Growing lettuces on low nitrate content nutrient solution resulted in a significant decrease in lettuces' nitrate concentrations (1741 versus 39 mg kg(-1)), however the beneficial effect was cancelled out by an increase in the ambient temperature. Nitrate replacement with ammonium was associated with an important decrease of the lettuces' nitrate concentration (from 1896 to 14 mg kg(-1)) and survival rate. An economically feasible method to reduce nitrate concentrations was the removal of all inorganic nitrogen from the nutrient solution before the exponential growth phase. This method led to lettuces almost devoid of nitrate (10 mg kg(-1)). The dried mass and calcinated mass of lettuces, used as markers of lettuces' quality, were not influenced by this treatment, but a small reduction (18%, p lettuces and their modifications are also discussed in the paper. It is possible to obtain 'nitrate-free' lettuces in an economically feasible way.

  11. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: A hidden source of nitrite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike eBalk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests.The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  12. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M; Keuskamp, Joost A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  13. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike

    2015-03-02

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  14. Secondary Copper Industry Entered Rapid Growth Period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    In China’s copper output,secondary copper accounts for about 40%,for power cable industry,the usage percentage of secondary copper is about 50%.Under the favorable policy of the government to vigorously support recycling industry,secondary copper rod enterprises begin to expand,and are confident toward the industry’s potentials.

  15. Unravelling the Chemical Nature of Copper Cuprizone

    OpenAIRE

    Messori, L.; Casini, A.; C.Gabbiani; Sorace, L.; Muniz-Miranda, M.; Zatta, P

    2007-01-01

    During the last 50 years, formation of the highly chromogenic copper cuprizone complex has been exploited for spectrophotometric determinations of copper although the precise chemical nature of the resulting species has never been ascertained; we eventually show here, in contrast to current opinion, that copper cuprizone is a copper(III) complex.

  16. Impact of ammonium nitrate and sodium nitrate on tadpoles of Alytes obstetricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garriga, Núria; Montori, A; Llorente, G A

    2017-07-01

    The presence of pesticides, herbicides and fertilisers negatively affect aquatic communities in general, and particularly amphibians in their larval phase, even though sensitivity to pollutants is highly variable among species. The Llobregat Delta (Barcelona, Spain) has experienced a decline of amphibian populations, possibly related to the reduction in water quality due to the high levels of farming activity, but also to habitat loss and alteration. We studied the effects of increasing ammonium nitrate and sodium nitrate levels on the survival and growth rate of Alytes obstetricans tadpoles under experimental conditions. We exposed larvae to increasing concentrations of nitrate and ammonium for 14 days and then exposed them to water without pollutants for a further 14 days. Only the higher concentrations of ammonium (>33.75 mg/L) caused larval mortality. The growth rate of larvae was reduced at ≥22.5 mg/L NH4(+), although individuals recovered and even increased their growth rate once exposure to the pollutant ended. The effect of nitrate on growth rate was detected at ≥80 mg/L concentrations, and the growth rate reduction in tadpoles was even observed during the post-exposure phase. The concentrations of ammonium with adverse effects on larvae are within the range levels found in the study area, while the nitrate concentrations with some adverse effect are close to the upper range limit of current concentrations in the study area. Therefore, only the presence of ammonium in the study area is likely to be considered of concern for the population of this species, even though the presence of nitrate could cause some sublethal effects. These negative effects could have an impact on population dynamics, which in this species is highly sensitive to larval mortality due to its small clutch size and prolonged larval period compared to other anuran amphibians.

  17. Secondary Copper Consumption and Location in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> China is short of copper resources and is alsothe second largest copper consuming country inthe world.The way to overcome the contradic-tion between the resource shortage and fastgrowth in consumption is to import copper rawmaterial in large quantities.Since the 1990’s,China’s import quantity of copper scrap hasincreased considerably.During the last twoyears,China has imported copper scrap worthof US$2.25 billion,1.32 times of the value ofimported copper concentrates in the same pe-riod.China is one of the biggest copper scrap

  18. A structural and theoretical study of the alkylammonium nitrates forefather: Liquid methylammonium nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontrani, Lorenzo; Caminiti, Ruggero; Salma, Umme; Campetella, Marco

    2017-09-01

    We present here a structural and vibrational analysis of melted methylammonium nitrate, the simplest compound of the family of alkylammonium nitrates. The static and dynamical features calculated were endorsed by comparing the experimental X-ray data with the theoretical ones. A reliable description cannot be obtained with classical molecular dynamics owing to polarization effects. Contrariwise, the structure factor and the vibrational frequencies obtained from ab initio molecular dynamics trajectories are in very good agreement with the experiment. A careful analysis has provided additional information on the complex hydrogen bonding network that exists in this liquid.

  19. Protein nitration in biological aging: proteomic and tandem mass spectrometric characterization of nitrated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, Jaroslaw; Schöneich, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Proteomic techniques for the identification of 3-nitrotyrosine-containing proteins in various biological systems are described with emphasis on the direct mass spectrometric detection and sequencing of 3-nitrotyrosine-containing peptides. Strengths and weaknesses of various separation and mass spectrometric techniques are discussed. Some examples for the MS/MS analysis of nitrated peptides obtained from aging rat heart and skeletal muscle are provided, such as nitration of Tyr105 of the mitochondrial electron-transfer flavoprotein and Tyr14 of creatine kinase.

  20. NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J.

    2011-02-01

    This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves

  1. Effect of Sodium Nitrate and Nitrate Reducing Bacteria on Methane Production and Fermentation with Buffalo Rumen Liquor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillanatham Civalingam Sakthivel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate can serve as a terminal electron acceptor in place of carbon dioxide and inhibit methane emission in the rumen and nitrate reducing bacteria might help enhance the reduction of nitrate/nitrite, which depends on the type of feed offered to animals. In this study the effects of three levels of sodium nitrate (0, 5, 10 mM on fermentation of three diets varying in their wheat straw to concentrate ratio (700:300, low concentrate, LC; 500:500, medium concentrate, MC and 300:700, high concentrate, HC diet were investigated in vitro using buffalo rumen liquor as inoculum. Nitrate reducing bacteria, isolated from the rumen of buffalo were tested as a probiotic to study if it could help in enhancing methane inhibition in vitro. Inclusion of sodium nitrate at 5 or 10 mM reduced (p<0.01 methane production (9.56, 7.93 vs. 21.76 ml/g DM; 12.20, 10.42 vs. 25.76 ml/g DM; 15.49, 12.33 vs. 26.86 ml/g DM in LC, MC and HC diets, respectively. Inclusion of nitrate at both 5 and 10 mM also reduced (p<0.01 gas production in all the diets, but in vitro true digestibility (IVTD of feed reduced (p<0.05 only in LC and MC diets. In the medium at 10 mM sodium nitrate level, there was 0.76 to 1.18 mM of residual nitrate and nitrite (p<0.01 also accumulated. In an attempt to eliminate residual nitrate and nitrite in the medium, the nitrate reducing bacteria were isolated from buffalo adapted to nitrate feeding and introduced individually (3 ml containing 1.2 to 2.3×106 cfu/ml into in vitro incubations containing the MC diet with 10 mM sodium nitrate. Addition of live culture of NRBB 57 resulted in complete removal of nitrate and nitrite from the medium with a further reduction in methane and no effect on IVTD compared to the control treatments containing nitrate with autoclaved cultures or nitrate without any culture. The data revealed that nitrate reducing bacteria can be used as probiotic to prevent the accumulation of nitrite when sodium nitrate is used to reduce

  2. New masking procedure for selective complexometric determination of copper(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R P

    1972-11-01

    A study has been made of a new masking procedure for highly selective complexometric determination of copper(II), based on decomposition of the copper-EDTA complex at pH 5-6. Among the various combinations of masking agents tried, ternary masking mixtures comprising a main complexing agent (thiourea), a reducing agent (ascorbic acid) and an auxiliary complexing agent (thiosemicarbazide or a small amount of 1,10-phenanthroline or 2,2'-dipyridyl) have been found most suitable. An excess of EDTA is added and the surplus EDTA is back-titrated with lead (or zinc) nitrate with Xylenol Orange as indicator (pH 5-6). A masking mixture is then added to decompose the copper-EDTA complex and the liberated EDTA is again back-titrated with lead (or zinc) nitrate. The following cations do not interfere: Ag(+), Hg(2+), Pb(2+), Ni(2+), Bi(3+), As(3+), Al(3+), Sb(3+), Sn(4+), Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cr(3+) and moderate amounts of Fe(3+) and Mn(2+). The notable feature is that consecutive determination of Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) can be conveniently carried out in the presence of other cations.

  3. Potential foliar fertilizers with copper and zinc dual micronutrients in nanocrystal suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Li, Li; Du, Yumei; Hampton, Marc A.; Nguyen, Anh V.; Huang, Longbin; Rudolph, Victor; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-11-01

    Control preparation, aqueous stability, and ion release of several Cu-Zn-containing crystals in suspensions have been investigated as potential dual micronutrient foliar fertilizers. These crystals were prepared by quick co-precipitation through simultaneously adding potassium hydroxide and copper salt solutions into zinc salt solution, and characterized in structure and composition with XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM, and ICP in detail. As-prepared Cu-Zn mixed hydroxide nitrate was identified as a two-phase mixture while Cu-Zn mixed hydroxide sulfate as a single-phase compound. These crystals are all sheet-like in morphology and stable in aqueous solutions with pH 5-9. No phase change was detected after the samples were kept in shelf for >3 months, suggesting that these crystals have long shelf lives. In terms of ion release, Cu-Zn mixed hydroxide nitrate and Cu-Zn mixed hydroxide sulfate can afford 4 and 1 mg L-1 of Cu2+, respectively, which could be suitable for different levels of copper deficiency in plants. Moreover, both compounds can provide 38-39 mg L-1 of Zn2+ in aqueous suspensions. Thus, our findings suggest that as-prepared compounds can be potentially applied as long-term foliar fertilizers to simultaneously correct deficiencies of copper and zinc in various crops.

  4. Accumulation of Nitrate in Vegetables and Its Possible Implications to Human Health

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Shao-ting; ZHANG Yong-song; LIN Xian-yong

    2007-01-01

    In recent times, there are two kinds of completely opposite viewpoints about the impacts of nitrate on human health. To further objectively understand the effects of nitrate on human health, both of harmfulness and possible benefits of nitrate to human body, it is discussed in this review from the aspects of nitrate accumulation in vegetables, the source of nitrate ingested into human body, and the transformation of nitrate in human body, as well as the pathogenesis and physiological functions of nitrate metabolism.

  5. The effect of soot on ammonium nitrate species and NO2 selective catalytic reduction over Cu-zeolite catalyst-coated particulate filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Oana; Tamm, Stefanie; Stenfeldt, Marie; Olsson, Louise

    2016-02-28

    A selective catalytic reduction (SCR)-coated particulate filter was evaluated by means of dynamic tests performed using NH3, NO2, O2 and H2O. The reactions were examined both prior to and after soot removal in order to study the effect of soot on ammonium nitrate formation and decomposition, ammonia storage and NO2 SCR. A slightly larger ammonia storage capacity was observed when soot was present in the sample, which indicated that small amounts of ammonia can adsorb on the soot. Feeding of NO2 and NH3 in the presence of O2 and H2O at low temperature (150, 175 and 200°C) leads to a large formation of ammonium nitrate species and during the subsequent temperature ramp using H2O and argon, a production of nitrous oxides was observed. The N2O formation is often related to ammonium nitrate decomposition, and our results showed that the N2O formation was clearly decreased by the presence of soot. We therefore propose that in the presence of soot, there are fewer ammonium nitrate species on the surface due to the interactions with the soot. Indeed, we do observe CO2 production during the reaction conditions also at 150°C, which shows that there is a reaction with these species and soot. In addition, the conversion of NOx due to NO2 SCR was significantly enhanced in the presence of soot; we attribute this to the smaller amount of ammonium nitrate species present in the experiments where soot is available since it is well known that ammonium nitrate formation is a major problem at low temperature due to the blocking of the catalytic sites. Further, a scanning electron microscopy analysis of the soot particles shows that they are about 30-40 nm and are therefore too large to enter the pores of the zeolites. There are likely CuxOy or other copper species available on the outside of the zeolite crystallites, which could have been enhanced due to the hydrothermal treatment at 850°C of the SCR-coated filter prior to the soot loading. We therefore propose that soot is

  6. Evaluating Ecosystem Services for Reducing Groundwater Nitrate Contamination: Nitrate Attenuation in the Unsaturated and Saturated Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrates are the most common type of groundwater contamination in agricultural regions. Environmental policies targeting nitrates have focused on input control (e.g., restricted fertilizer application), intermediate loads control (e.g., reduce nitrate leached from crop fields), and final loads control (e.g., reduce catchment nitrate loads). Nitrate loads can be affected by hydrological processes in both unsaturated and saturated zones. Although many of these processes have been extensively investigated in literature, they are commonly modeled as exogenous to farm management. A couple of recent studies by scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory show that in some situations nitrate attenuation processes in the unsaturated/saturated zone, particularly denitrification, can be intensified by certain management practices to mitigate nitrate loads. Therefore, these nitrate attenuation processes can be regarded as a set of ecosystem services that farmers can take advantage of to reduce their cost of complying with environmental policies. In this paper, a representative California dairy farm is used as a case study to show how such ecosystem attenuation services can be framed within the farm owner's decision-making framework as an option for reducing groundwater nitrate contamination. I develop an integrated dynamic model, where the farmer maximizes discounted net farm profit over multiple periods subject to environmental regulations. The model consists of three submodels: animal-waste-crop, hydrologic, and economic model. In addition to common choice variables such as irrigation, fertilization, and waste disposal options, the farmer can also endogenously choose from three water sources: surface water, deep groundwater (old groundwater in the deep aquifer that is not affected by farm effluent in the short term), and shallow groundwater (drainage water that can be recycled via capture wells at the downstream end of the farm). The capture wells not only

  7. An Introduction to Copper Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    There are 11 genetic types of copper deposit in China, three of which (porphyry,contact metasomatic and VMS types) are the most important. The copper deposits distribute widely both temporally and spatially in China. The features of copper ores in China are mostly poor in copper tenor and complex in metal associated. The copper metallogeny in China predominantly occurs in three metallogenic megadomains, namely the circum-Pacific, the paleo-Asian and the Tethys-Himalayan.

  8. Glucose elevates NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 protein levels and nitrate transport activity independently of its HEXOKINASE1-mediated stimulation of NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Femke; Thodey, Kate; Lejay, Laurence V; Bevan, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Mineral nutrient uptake and assimilation is closely coordinated with the production of photosynthate to supply nutrients for growth. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), nitrate uptake from the soil is mediated by genes encoding high- and low-affinity transporters that are transcriptionally regulated by both nitrate and photosynthate availability. In this study, we have studied the interactions of nitrate and glucose (Glc) on gene expression, nitrate transport, and growth using glucose-insensitive2-1 (gin2-1), which is defective in sugar responses. We confirm and extend previous work by showing that HEXOKINASE1-mediated oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) metabolism is required for Glc-mediated NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 (NRT2.1) expression. Treatment with pyruvate and shikimate, two products derived from intermediates of the OPPP that are destined for amino acid production, restores wild-type levels of NRT2.1 expression, suggesting that metabolites derived from OPPP metabolism can, together with Glc, directly stimulate high levels of NRT2.1 expression. Nitrate-mediated NRT2.1 expression is not influenced by gin2-1, showing that Glc does not influence NRT2.1 expression through nitrate-mediated mechanisms. We also show that Glc stimulates NRT2.1 protein levels and transport activity independently of its HEXOKINASE1-mediated stimulation of NRT2.1 expression, demonstrating another possible posttranscriptional mechanism influencing nitrate uptake. In gin2-1 plants, nitrate-responsive biomass growth was strongly reduced, showing that the supply of OPPP metabolites is essential for assimilating nitrate for growth.

  9. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Meusinger, Carl; Erbland, Joseph;

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [" Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis...... in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate (15N, 17O, and 18O) provide...... additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters...

  10. Impact of weather variability on nitrate leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Karl; Premrov, Alina; Hackett, Richard; Coxon, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    The loss of nitrate (NO3 - N) to water via leaching and overland flow contributes to eutrophication of freshwaters, transitional and near coastal waters with agriculture contributing significantly to nitrogen (N) loading to these water. Environmental regulations, such as the Nitrates and Water Framework Directives, have increased constraints on farmers to improve N management in regions at risk of NO3--N loss to water. In addition, farmers also have to manage their systems within a changing climate as the imapcts of climate change begin to impact resulting in more frequent extreme events such as floods and droughts. The objective of this study was to investigate the link between weather volatility and the concentration of leached NO3--N spring barley. Leaching was quantified under spring barley grown on a well-drained, gravelly sandy soil using ceramic cup samplers over 6 drainage years under the same farming practices and treatments. Soil solution NO3--N concentrations under spring barley grown by conventional inversion ploughing and reduced tillage were compared to weather parameters over the period. Weather was recorded at a national Met Eireann weather station on site. Soil solution NO3--N varied significantly between years. Within individual years NO3--N concentrations varied over the drainage season, with peak concentrations generally observed in the autumn time, decreasing thereafter. Under both treatments there was a three-fold difference in mean annual soil solution NO3--N concentration over the 6 years with no change in the agronomic practices (crop type, tillage type and fertiliser input). Soil solution nitrate concentrations were significantly influenced by weather parameters such as rainfall, effective drainage and soil moisture deficit. The impact of climate change in Ireland could lead to increased NO3--N loss to water further exacerbating eutrophication of sensitive estuaries. The increased impact on eutrophication of waters, related to climatic

  11. Endogenously nitrated proteins in mouse brain: links to neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacksteder, Colette A; Qian, Wei-Jun; Knyushko, Tatyana V; Wang, Haixing; Chin, Mark H; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Smith, Desmond J; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2006-07-04

    Increased abundance of nitrotyrosine modifications of proteins have been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types and play a role in the redox regulation of normal metabolism. To identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic data set identifying 7792 proteins from a whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in the identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. More than half of the nitrated proteins that have been identified are involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces an increased level of nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high-resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, a characteristic consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. In addition, most sequences contain cysteines or methionines proximal to nitrotyrosines, contrary to suggestions that these amino acid side chains prevent tyrosine nitration. More striking is the presence of a positively charged moiety near the sites of nitration, which is not observed for non-nitrated tyrosines. Together, these observations suggest a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration and that cellular nitrating conditions play a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain.

  12. NITRATE REMOVAL FROM WATER USING SURFACE-MODIFIED ULTRAFILTRATION MEMBRANES

    OpenAIRE

    Habuda-Stanić, Mirna; Nujić, Marija; Santo, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Elevated nitrate concentrations in natural water sources are a worldwide concern due to the extensive levels of soil N-fertilization. This study investigates three commercially available polyethersulfone (PES) ultrafiltration (UF) membranes with different molecular weight cut-offs (5, 10, and 30 kDa), which we modified with a cationic surfactant, cetylpyridinium chloride to improve their nitrate removal. The nitrate removal efficiency of these membranes was examinated as functions of initial ...

  13. Removal of ammonia from aqueous solutions by catalytic oxidation with copper-based rare earth composite metal materials: catalytic performance, characterization, and cytotoxicity evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Mao Hung

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) has an important use in the chemical industry and is widely found in industrial wastewater.For this investigation of copper-based rare earth composite metal materials,aqueous solutions containing 400 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a batch-bed reactor with a catalyst prepared by the co-precipitation of copper nitrate,lanthanum nitrate and cerium nitrate.Barely any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation without a catalyst,but about 88% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over the catalysts at 423 K with an oxygen partial pressure of 4.0 MPa.The catalytic redox behavior was determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV).Furthermore,the catalysts were characterized using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX),which showed that the catalytic behavior was related to the metal oxide properties of the catalyst.In addition,the copper-lanthanum-cerium composite-induced cytotoxicity in the human lung MRC-5 cell line was tested,and the percentage cell survival was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetra-zolium (MTS) analysis in vitro.No apparent cytotoxicity was observed when the human lung cells were exposed to the copper-lanthanum-cerium composite.

  14. Peroxidase catalyzed nitration of tryptophan derivatives. Mechanism, products and comparison with chemical nitrating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Alberto; Nicolis, Stefania; Roncone, Raffaella; Casella, Luigi; Monzani, Enrico

    2004-07-01

    The enzymatic nitration of tryptophan derivatives by oxidation of nitrite has been studied using lactoperoxidase and horseradish peroxidase, and compared with the chemical nitration produced by nitrogen dioxide and peroxynitrite. HPLC, mass spectra and NMR analysis of the mixture of products clearly show that nitration occurs at position 4-, 6-, 7-, and N1 of the indole ring, and nitrosation at position N1. Kinetic studies performed on peroxidase/NO2-/H2O2 systems showed substrate saturation behavior with all the tryptophan derivatives employed. The rate dependence on nitrite concentration was found to be linear with horseradish peroxidase while it exhibited saturation behavior with lactoperoxidase. The composition of the product mixture depends on the nitrating agent. While the production of 4-nitro, 6-nitro, 7-nitro and N1-nitro derivatives follows a similar trend, indicating that they are formed according to a similar mechanism, the ratio between the N1-nitroso derivative and other derivatives depends markedly on the nitrite concentration when tryptophan modification is performed by the peroxidase/H2O2/nitrite systems. Analysis of the data indicates that at low nitrite concentration the enzymatic reaction occurs through the classical peroxidase cycle. At high nitrite concentration the reaction proceeds through a different intermediate that we assume to be a protein bound peroxynitrite species.

  15. Immobilization of nitrate reductase onto epoxy affixed silver nanoparticles for determination of soil nitrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Veena; Hooda, Vinita

    2015-08-01

    Epoxy glued silver nanoparticles were used as immobilization support for nitrate reductase (NR). The resulting epoxy/AgNPs/NR conjugates were characterized at successive stages of fabrication by scanning electron microscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The immobilized enzyme system exhibited reasonably high conjugation yield (37.6±0.01 μg/cm(2)), with 93.54±0.88% retention of specific activity. Most favorable working conditions of pH, temperature and substrate concentration were ascertained to optimize the performance of epoxy/AgNPs/NR conjugates for soil nitrate quantification. The analytical results for soil nitrate determination were consistent, reliable and reproducible. Minimum detection limit of the method was 0.05 mM with linearity from 0.1 to 11.0 mM. The % recoveries of added nitrates (0.1 and 0.2 mM) wereEpoxy/AgNPs bound NR had a half-life of 18 days at 4 °C and retained 50% activity after 15 reuses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Calvin J [Lakewood, CO; Miedaner, Alexander [Boulder, CO; Van Hest, Maikel [Lakewood, CO; Ginley, David S [Evergreen, CO; Nekuda, Jennifer A [Lakewood, CO

    2011-11-15

    Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

  17. The Revovery of Copper and Cobalt from Oxidized Copper Ore and Converter Slag

    OpenAIRE

    ZİYADANOĞULLARI, Berrin; ZİYADANOĞULLARI, Recep

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for obtaining copper and cobalt from oxidized copper ore and converter slag. In order to convert the copper and cobalt into sulfate compounds the main step was to roast the samples obtained by sulfurization and transfer the samples into solution. First the oxidized copper ore was roasted, followed by the mixture of converter slag and oxidized copper ore. Since the levels of copper and cobalt were low, the sulfurization process was carri...

  18. Genome Sequences of Two Copper-Resistant Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Copper-Fed Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthje, Freja L.; Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller;

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of two copper-resistant Escherichia coli strains were determined. These had been isolated from copper-fed pigs and contained additional putative operons conferring copper and other metal and metalloid resistances.......The draft genome sequences of two copper-resistant Escherichia coli strains were determined. These had been isolated from copper-fed pigs and contained additional putative operons conferring copper and other metal and metalloid resistances....

  19. NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY DURING HEAT SHOCK IN WINTER WHEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimenko S.B.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrates are the basic source of nitrogen for the majority of plants. Absorption and transformation of nitrates in plants are determined by external conditions and, first of all, temperature and light intensity. The influence of the temperature increasing till +40 0С on activity of nitrate reductase was studied. It is shown, that the rise of temperature was accompanied by sharp decrease of activity nitrate reductase in leaves of winter wheat, what, apparently, occurred for the account deactivations of enzyme and due to its dissociation.

  20. Electrochemical Studies of Nitrate-Induced Pitting in Carbon Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapp, P.E.

    1998-12-07

    The phenomenon of pitting in carbon steel exposed to alkaline solutions of nitrate and chloride was studied with the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization technique. Open-circuit and pitting potentials were measured on specimens of ASTM A537 carbon steel in pH 9.73 salt solutions at 40 degrees Celsius, with and without the inhibiting nitrite ion present. Nitrate is not so aggressive a pitting agent as is chloride. Both nitrate and chloride did induce passive breakdown and pitting in nitrite-free solutions, but the carbon steel retained passivity in solutions with 0.11-M nitrite even at a nitrate concentration of 2.2 M.

  1. Endogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links To Neurodegenerative Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacksteder, Colette A.; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Wang, Haixing H.; Chin, Mark H.; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2006-07-04

    Increased nitrotyrosine modification of proteins has been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types; emerging evidence suggests its additional role in redox regulation of normal metabolism. In order to identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic dataset identifying 7,792 proteins from whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. Over half of the nitrated proteins identified have been reported to be involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces increased nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, characteristics consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. More striking is the five-fold greater nitration of tyrosines having nearby basic sidechains, suggesting electrostatic attraction of basic groups with the negative charge of peroxynitrite. Together, these results suggest that elevated peroxynitrite generation plays a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain and provides a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration.

  2. Regioselective nitration of aromatic substrates in zeolite cages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Esakkidurai; M Kumarraja; K Pitchumani

    2003-04-01

    Phenol is nitrated regioselectively by fuming nitric acid inside the cages of faujasite zeolites (dependent on the loading level) and a remarkable orthoselectivity is observed in solid state nitration. Toluene and chlorobenzene also containing ortho-/para-orienting substituents, undergo faster nitration, though the regioselectivity is less significant in zeolite media. The results are explained on the basis of diffusion and binding of phenol inside zeolite, which facilitate regioselectivity (and which is absent in toluene and chlorobenzene). Other advantages of employing zeolites as media for mild and selective nitration are also highlighted.

  3. Thioploca spp: filamentous sulfur bacteria with nitrate vacuoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, BB; Gallardo, VA

    1999-01-01

    communities of large Thioploca species live along the Pacific coast of South America and in other upwelling areas of high organic matter sedimentation with bottom waters poor in oxygen and rich in nitrate. Each cell of these thioplocas harbors a large liquid vacuole which is used as a storage for nitrate...... with a concentration of lip to 506 mM. The nitrate is used as an electron acceptor for sulfide oxidation and the bacteria may grow autotrophically or mixotrophically using acetate or other organic molecules as carbon source. The filaments stretch up into the overlying seawater, from which they take up nitrate...

  4. Hot Spots and Persistence of Nitrate in Aquifers Across Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Dwivedi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate-N (NO3 -- N is one of the most pervasive contaminants in groundwater. Nitrate in groundwater exhibits long-term behavior due to complex interactions at multiple scales among various geophysical factors, such as sources of nitrate-N, characteristics of the vadose zone and aquifer attributes. To minimize contamination of nitrate-N in groundwater, it is important to estimate hot spots (>10 mg/L of NO3 -- N, trends and persistence of nitrate-N in groundwater. To analyze the trends and persistence of nitrate-N in groundwater at multiple spatio-temporal scales, we developed and used an entropy-based method along with the Hurst exponent in two different hydrogeologic settings: the Trinity and Ogallala Aquifers in Texas at fine (2 km × 2 km, intermediate (10 km × 10 km and coarse (100 km × 100 km scales. Results show that nitrate-N exhibits long-term persistence at the intermediate and coarse scales. In the Trinity Aquifer, overall mean nitrate-N has declined with a slight increase in normalized marginal entropy (NME over each decade from 1940 to 2008; however, the number of hot spots has increased over time. In the Ogallala Aquifer, overall mean nitrate-N has increased with slight moderation in NME since 1940; however, the number of hot spots has significantly decreased for the same period at all scales.

  5. Anoxic Activated Sludge Monitoring with Combined Nitrate and Titrimetric Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B.; Gernaey, Krist; Vanrolleghem, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental procedure for anoxic activated sludge monitoring with combined nitrate and titrimetric measurements is proposed and evaluated successfully with two known carbon sources, (-)acetate and dextrose. For nitrate measurements an ion-selective nitrate electrode is applied to allow...... was with the carbon source in excess, since excess nitrate provoked nitrite build-up thereby complicating the data interpretation. A conceptual model could quantitatively describe the experimental observations and thus link the experimentally measured proton production with the consumption of electron acceptor...... and carbon source during denitrification....

  6. Significant accumulation of nitrate in Chinese semi-humid croplands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junyu; Gu, Baojing; Schlesinger, William H.; Ju, Xiaotang

    2016-04-01

    Soil nitrate is important for crop growth, but it can also leach to groundwater causing nitrate contamination, a threat to human health. Here, we report a significant accumulation of soil nitrate in Chinese semi-humid croplands based upon more than 7000 samples from 141 sites collected from 1994 to 2015. In the 0-4 meters depth of soil, total nitrate accumulation reaches 453 ± 39, 749 ± 75, 1191 ± 89, 1269 ± 114, 2155 ± 330 kg N ha-1 on average in wheat, maize, open-field vegetables (OFV), solar plastic-roofed greenhouse vegetables (GHV) and orchard fields, respectively. Surprisingly, there is also a comparable amount of nitrate accumulated in the vadose-zone deeper than 4 meters. Over-use of N fertilizer (and/or manure) and a declining groundwater table are the major causes for this huge nitrate reservoir in the vadose-zone of semi-humid croplands, where the nitrate cannot be denitrified due to the presence of oxygen and lack of carbon sources. Future climatic change with more extreme rainfall events would increase the risk of accumulated nitrate moving downwards and threatening groundwater nitrate contamination.

  7. Majorana Electroformed Copper Mechanical Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overman, Nicole R.; Overman, Cory T.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Edwards, Danny J.; Hoppe, Eric W.

    2012-04-30

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize ultra high purity electroformed copper for a variety of detector components and shielding. A preliminary mechanical evaluation was performed on the Majorana prototype electroformed copper material. Several samples were removed from a variety of positions on the mandrel. Tensile testing, optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and hardness testing were conducted to evaluate mechanical response. Analyses carried out on the Majorana prototype copper to this point show consistent mechanical response from a variety of test locations. Evaluation shows the copper meets or exceeds the design specifications.

  8. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    can be successfully treated, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis. Serum ferritin values, transferrin saturation and genetic analysis are used when diagnosing haemochromatosis. The diagnostics of Wilson's disease depends on the use of urinary copper values, serum ceruloplasmin and liver...

  9. Decomposition of 2-chloroethylethylsulfide on copper oxides to detoxify polymer-based spherical activated carbons from chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, S; Hofmann, J; Möller, A; Schrage, C; Giebelhausen, J M; Böhringer, B; Gläser, R

    2013-11-15

    For the decomposition of chemical warfare agents, a hybrid material concept was applied. This consists of a copper oxide-containing phase as a component with reactive functionality supported on polymer-based spherical activated carbon (PBSAC) as a component with adsorptive functionality. A corresponding hybrid material was prepared by impregnation of PBSAC with copper(II)nitrate and subsequent calcination at 673K. The copper phase exists predominantly as copper(I)oxide which is homogeneously distributed over the PBSAC particles. The hybrid material containing 16 wt.% copper on PBSAC is capable of self-detoxifying the mustard gas surrogate 2-chloroethylethylsulfide (CEES) at room temperature. The decomposition is related to the breakthrough behavior of the reactant CEES, which displaces the reaction product ethylvinylsulfide (EVS). This leads to a combined breakthrough of CEES and EVS. The decomposition of CEES is shown to occur catalytically over the copper-containing PBSAC material. Thus, the hybrid material can even be considered to be self-cleaning.

  10. Does the evidence about health risks associated with nitrate ingestion warrant an increase of the nitrate standard for drinking water?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Nigel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several authors have suggested that it is safe to raise the health standard for nitrate in drinking water, and save money on measures associated with nitrate pollution of drinking water resources. The major argument has been that the epidemiologic evidence for acute and chronic health effects related to drinking water nitrate at concentrations near the health standard is inconclusive. With respect to the chronic effects, the argument was motivated by the absence of evidence for adverse health effects related to ingestion of nitrate from dietary sources. An interdisciplinary discussion of these arguments led to three important observations. First, there have been only a few well-designed epidemiologic studies that evaluated ingestion of nitrate in drinking water and risk of specific cancers or adverse reproductive outcomes among potentially susceptible subgroups likely to have elevated endogenous nitrosation. Positive associations have been observed for some but not all health outcomes evaluated. Second, the epidemiologic studies of cancer do not support an association between ingestion of dietary nitrate (vegetables and an increased risk of cancer, because intake of dietary nitrate is associated with intake of antioxidants and other beneficial phytochemicals. Third, 2–3 % of the population in Western Europe and the US could be exposed to nitrate levels in drinking water exceeding the WHO standard of 50 mg/l nitrate, particularly those living in rural areas. The health losses due to this exposure cannot be estimated. Therefore, we conclude that it is not possible to weigh the costs and benefits from changing the nitrate standard for drinking water and groundwater resources by considering the potential consequences for human health and by considering the potential savings due to reduced costs for nitrate removal and prevention of nitrate pollution.

  11. Nitration of pollen aeroallergens by nitrate ion in conditions simulating the liquid water phase of atmospheric particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiani, Alessandra; Bruschi, Maurizio; Citterio, Sandra; Bolzacchini, Ezio; Ferrero, Luca; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Asero, Riccardo; Perrone, Maria Grazia

    2016-12-15

    Pollen aeroallergens are present in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) where they can be found in coarse biological particles such as pollen grains (aerodynamic diameter dae>10μm), as well as fragments in the finest respirable particles (PM2.5; daeNitration of tyrosine residues in pollen allergenic proteins can occur in polluted air, and inhalation and deposition of these nitrated proteins in the human respiratory tract may lead to adverse health effects by enhancing the allergic response in population. Previous studies investigated protein nitration by atmospheric gaseous pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide and ozone. In this work we report, for the first time, a study on protein nitration by nitrate ion in aqueous solution, at nitrate concentrations and pH conditions simulating those occurring in the atmospheric aerosol liquid water phase. Experiments have been carried out on the Bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein and the recombinant Phleum pratense allergen (Phl p 2) both in the dark and under UV-A irradiation (range 4-90Wm(-2)) to take into account thermal and/or photochemical nitration processes. For the latter protein, modifications in the allergic response after treatment with nitrate solutions have been evaluated by immunoblot analyses using sera from grass-allergic patients. Experimental results in bulk solutions showed that protein nitration in the dark occurs only in dilute nitrate solutions and under very acidic conditions (pHnitration is always observed (at pH0.5-5) under UV-A irradiation, both in dilute and concentrated nitrate solutions, being significantly enhanced at the lowest pH values. In some cases, protein nitration resulted in an increase of the allergic response. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. New infrared spectroscopic database for bromine nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Georg; Birk, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared measurements of bromine nitrate have been performed in the spectral region 675-1400 cm-1 at 0.014 cm-1 spectral resolution. Absorption cross sections were derived from 38 spectra covering the temperature range from 203 to 296 K and air pressure range from 0 to 190 mbar. For line-by-line analysis, further spectra were recorded at 0.00094 cm-1 spectral resolution at 223 and 293 K. The sample was synthesized from ClONO2 and Br2. Band strengths of the bands ν3 around 803 cm-1 and ν2 around 1286 cm-1 were determined from three pure BrONO2 measurements at different temperatures and pressures. Number densities in the absorption cell were derived from pressure measurements of the purified sample taking into account small amounts of impurities determined spectroscopically. Resulting band strengths are Sν3 = 2.872(52) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1 and Sν2 = 3.63(15) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1. Absorption cross sections of all measurements were scaled to these band strengths. Further data reduction was achieved with an interpolation scheme based on two-dimensional polynomials in ln(pressure) and temperature. The database is well-suited for remote-sensing application and should reduce the atmospheric bromine nitrate error budget substantially.

  13. {gamma}-radiolysis of uranous nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisel, Isabelle; Lebouille, Odile; Rossetti, Thomas [CEA ValRHo - BP 17171 - 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The knowledge of uranous nitrate solutions stability under radiolysis effect is of interest for all the processes aiming its co-conversion into a solid form with other actinides. In the presence of hydrazine, the oxidation of U(IV) to U(VI) under {gamma}-radiolysis ({sup 137}Cs) is due to the reaction with water radiolysis products, mainly hydrogen peroxide. Its kinetic law is of order 0. In addition, the zero order hydrazine consumption reaction, leads to the accumulation of hydrazoic acid related to its oxidation by nitrous acid himself generated by the radiolysis of the nitric acid. Lastly, the increase of acidity of the solution with a stoichiometry of 1.5 compared to uranium indicates multiple reactions. In absence of hydrazine, uranous nitrate is very quickly oxidized by the nitric and solutions acidity increases according to a complex mechanism catalysed by the nitrous acid. Results are not found to be sensitive to dose rate between 10 and 300 Gy/min. (authors)

  14. Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D. (Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Cheektowaga, NY (United States))

    1992-10-07

    The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F[sup [minus

  15. Thermal decomposition of supported lithium nitrate catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Maria Lucia [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, 5730, San Luis (Argentina); Lick, Ileana Daniela [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP), Calle 47 No 257, La Plata, 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ponzi, Marta Isabel [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, 5730, San Luis (Argentina); Castellon, Enrique Rodriguez; Jimenez-Lopez, Antonio [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia. Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Ponzi, Esther Natalia, E-mail: eponzi@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP), Calle 47 No 257, La Plata, 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-02-20

    New catalysts for soot combustion were prepared by impregnation of different supports (SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) with a LiNO{sub 3} solution and then characterized by means of FTIR, XPS, TGA and UV-vis spectroscopy, whereby the presence of lithium nitrate in the prepared catalysts was identified and quantified. The soot combustion rate using this series of catalysts (LiNO{sub 3}/support) was compared with the activity of a series of impregnated catalysts prepared using LiOH (Li{sub 2}O/supports). Catalysts prepared using LiNO{sub 3} are found to be more active than those prepared using LiOH. The catalytic performance was also studied with a NO/O{sub 2} mixture in the feed, demonstrating that NO increases the combustion rate of soot, probably as a consequence of lithium oxide forming an 'in situ' nitrate ion.

  16. Assessing the Role of Sewers and Atmospheric Deposition as Nitrate Contamination Sources to Urban Surface Waters using Stable Nitrate Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, M. T.; Elliott, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    Excess nitrate (NO3-) contributes to the overall degraded quality of streams in many urban areas. These systems are often dominated by impervious surfaces and storm sewers that can route atmospherically deposited nitrogen, from both wet and dry deposition, to waterways. Moreover, in densely populated watersheds there is the potential for interaction between urban waterways and sewer systems. The affects of accumulated nitrate in riverine and estuary systems include low dissolved oxygen, loss of species diversity, increased mortality of aquatic species, and general eutrophication of the waterbody. However, the dynamics of nitrate pollution from each source and it’s affect on urban waterways is poorly constrained. The isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate have been proven effective in helping to distinguish contamination sources to ground and surface waters. In order to improve our understanding of urban nitrate pollution sources and dynamics, we examined nitrate isotopes (δ15N and δ18O) in base- and stormflow samples collected over a two-year period from a restored urban stream in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (USA). Nine Mile Run drains a 1,600 hectare urban watershed characterized by 38% impervious surface cover. Prior work has documented high nitrate export from the watershed (~19 kg NO3- ha-1 yr-1). Potential nitrate sources to the watershed include observed sewer overflows draining directly to the stream, as well as atmospheric deposition (~23 kg NO3- ha-1 yr-1). In this and other urban systems with high percentages of impervious surfaces, there is likely minimal input from nitrate derived from soil or fertilizer. In this presentation, we examine spatial and temporal patterns in nitrate isotopic composition collected at five locations along Nine Mile Run characterized by both sanitary and combined-sewer cross-connections. Preliminary isotopic analysis of low-flow winter streamwater samples suggest nitrate export from Nine Mile Run is primarily influenced by

  17. Use of copper radioisotopes in investigating disorders of copper metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camakaris, J.; Voskoboinik, I.; Brooks, H.; Greenough, M. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia). Department of Genetics; Smith, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Radiopharmaceuticals Division; Mercer, J. [Deakin University, Rusden Campus, Clayton, VIC (Australia). Centre of Cellular and Molecular Biology

    1998-12-31

    Full text: Copper is an essential trace element for life as a number of vital enzymes require it. Copper deficiency can lead to neurological disorders, osteoporosis and weakening of arteries. However Cu is also highly toxic and homeostatic mechanisms have evolved to maintain Cu at levels which satisfy requirements but do not cause toxicity. Toxicity is mediated by the oxidative capacity of Cu and its ability to generate toxic free radicals. There are several acquired and inherited diseases due to either Cu toxicity or Cu deficiency. The study of these diseases facilitates identification of genes and proteins involved in copper homeostasis, and this in turn will provide rational therapeutic approaches. Our studies have focused on Menkes disease in humans which is an inherited and usually lethal copper deficiency. Using copper radioisotopes {sup 64}Cu (t 1/2 = 12.8 hr) and {sup 67}Cu (t 1/2 = 61 hr) we have studied the protein which is mutated in Menkes disease. This is a transmembrane copper pump which is responsible for absorption of copper into the body and also functions to pump out excess Cu from cells when Cu is elevated. It is therefore a vital component of normal Cu homeostasis. We have provided the first biochemical evidence that the Menkes protein functions as a P-type ATPase Cu pump (Voskoboinik et al., FEBS Letters, in press) and these data will be discussed. The assay involved pumping of radiocopper into purified membrane vesicles. Furthermore we have transfected normal and mutant Menkes genes into cells and are carrying out structure-function studies. We are also studying the role of amyloid precursor protein (APP) as a Cu transport protein in order to determine how Cu regulates this protein and its cleavage products. These studies will provide vital information on the relationship between Cu and APP and processes which lead to Alzheimers disease

  18. A modified procedure for measuring oxygen-18 content of nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Aly, A. I. M.; Abdel Monem, N.; Hanafy, M.; Gomaa, H. E.

    2012-11-01

    SummaryMass spectrometric analysis of O-isotopic composition of nitrate has many potential applications in studies of environmental processes. Through this work, rapid, reliable, precise, broadly applicable, catalyst-free, low-priced and less labor intensive procedure for measuring δ18O of nitrate using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer has been developed and implemented. The conditions necessary to effect complete nitrate recovery and complete removal of other oxygen containing anions and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) without scarifying the isotopic signature of nitrate were investigated. The developed procedure consists of two main parts: (1) wet chemistry train for extraction and purification of nitrate from the liquid matrix; (2) off-line pyrolysis of extracted nitrate salt with activated graphite at 550 °C for 30 min. The conditions necessary to effect complete nitrate recovery and complete removal of other oxygen containing compounds were investigated. Dramatic reduction in processing times needed for analysis of δ18O of nitrate at natural abundance level was achieved. Preservation experiments revealed that chloroform (99.8%) is an effective preservative. Isotopic contents of some selected nitrate salts were measured using the modified procedure and some other well established methods at two laboratories in Egypt and Germany. Performance assessment of the whole developed analytical train was made using internationally distributed nitrate isotopes reference materials and real world sample of initial zero-nitrate content. The uncertainty budget was evaluated using the graphical nested hierarchal approach. The obtained results proved the suitability for handling samples of complicated matrices. Reduction of consumables cost by about 80% was achieved.

  19. Nitrate in the Columbia Aquifer, central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    A study of nitrate in water from 604 wells tapping the Columbia aquifer on the Delmarva Peninsula in eastern Maryland describes the factors that affect nitrate variability. Samples were collected from 196 randomly selected wells and analyzed for nitrogen species. Many were also analyzed for major ions. In addition, results of 313 nitrate analyses were randomly selected from county health department files. About 95 analyses of water samples collected from 1945 to 1978 were also evaluated. The frequency distribution of the nitrate analyses is bimodal, with 25 percent of the sample ranging from 0 to about 0.42 milligrams per liter (mg/L) nitrate as nitrogen (N), and the median is about 0.1 mg/L; the rest ranges from 0.42 to 58 mg/L, and the median is about 5.9 mg/L. The overall median nitrate concentration is about 3.5 mg/L as N. Over half of the samples had nitrate concentrations of 3 mg/L as N or higher, indicating that the water in the aquifer has been affected by human activity. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations exceeded the water-quality standard of 10 mg/L in 15 percent of the samples established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The major factors affecting nitrate concentration are the presence of a nitrogen source, hydrogeological conditions, and the soil drainage. Sites with poorly drained soils may have a lower nitrate concentration either because the soils block the entrance of nitrate into the aquifer or because the aquifer under a poorly drained soil is associated with a chemical environment that promotes denitrification. (USGS)

  20. Natural polyphenols may ameliorate damage induced by copper overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, Nathalie; Tacconi de Alaniz, María J; Marra, Carlos Alberto

    2012-02-01

    The effect of the simultaneous exposure to transition metals and natural antioxidants frequently present in food is a question that needs further investigation. We aimed to explore the possible use of the natural polyphenols caffeic acid (CA), resveratrol (RES) and curcumin (CUR) to prevent damages induced by copper-overload on cellular molecules in HepG2 and A-549 human cells in culture. Exposure to 100μM/24h copper (Cu) caused extensive pro-oxidative damage evidenced by increased TBARS, protein carbonyls and nitrite productions in both cell types. Damage was aggravated by simultaneous incubation with 100μM of CA or RES, and it was also reflected in a decrease on cellular viability explored by trypan blue dye exclusion test and LDH leakage. Co-incubation with CUR produced opposite effects demonstrating a protective action which restored the level of biomarkers and cellular viability almost to control values. Thus, while CA and RES might aggravate the oxidative/nitrative damage of Cu, CUR should be considered as a putative protective agent. These results could stimulate further research on the possible use of natural polyphenols as neutralizing substances against the transition metal over-exposure in specific populations such as professional agrochemical sprayers and women using Cu-intrauterine devices.

  1. Improving Beneficiation of Copper and Iron from Copper Slag by Modifying the Molten Copper Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqi Guo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, a new technology was developed to improve the beneficiation of copper and iron components from copper slag, by modifying the molten slag to promote the mineralization of valuable minerals and to induce the growth of mineral grains. Various parameters, including binary basicity, dosage of compound additive, modification temperature, cooling rate and the end point temperature of slow cooling were investigated. Meanwhile, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS was employed to determine the mineralogy of the modified and unmodified slag, as well as to reveal the mechanisms of enhancing beneficiation. The results show that under the proper conditions, the copper grade of rougher copper concentrate was increased from 6.43% to 11.04%, iron recovery of magnetic separation was increased significantly from 32.40% to 63.26%, and other evaluation indexes were changed slightly, in comparison with unmodified copper slag. Moreover, matte and magnetite grains in the modified slag aggregated together and grew obviously to the mean size of over 50 μm, resulting in an improvement of beneficiation of copper and iron.

  2. Renal cortex copper concentration in acute copper poisoning in calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Fazzio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate the diagnostic value of renal cortex copper (Cu concentration in clinical cases of acute copper poisoning (ACP. A total of 97 calves that died due to subcutaneous copper administration were compiled in eleven farms. At least, one necropsy was conducted on each farm and samples for complementary analysis were taken. The degree of autolysis in each necropsy was evaluated. The cases appeared on extensive grazing calf breeding and intensive feedlot farms, in calves of 60 to 200 kg body weight. Mortality varied from 0.86 to 6.96 %, on the farms studied. The first succumbed calf was found on the farms between 6 and 72 hours after the susbcutaneous Cu administration. As discrepancies regarding the reference value arose, the local value (19.9 parts per million was used, confirming the diagnosis of acute copper poisoning in 93% of the analyzed kidney samples. These results confirm the value of analysis of the cortical kidney Cu concentration for the diagnosis of acute copper poisoning.

  3. Copper metallurgy at the crossroads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habashi F.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper technology changed from the vertical to the horizontal furnace and from the roast reaction to converting towards the end of the last century. However, the horizontal furnace proved to be an inefficient and polluting reactor. As a result many attempts were made to replace it. In the past 50 years new successful melting processes were introduced on an industrial scale that were more energy efficient and less polluting. In addition, smelting and converting were conducted in a single reactor in which the concentrate was fed and the raw copper was produced. The standing problem in many countries, however, is marketing 3 tonnes of sulfuric acid per tonne of copper produced as well as emitting large amounts of excess SO2 in the atmosphere. Pressure hydrometallurgy offers the possibility of liberating the copper industry from SO2 problem. Heap leaching technology has become a gigantic operation. Combined with solvent extraction and electrowinning it contributes today to about 20% of copper production and is expected to grow. Pressure leaching offers the possibility of liberating the copper industry from SO2 problem. The technology is over hundred years old. It is applied for leaching a variety of ores and concentrates. Hydrothermal oxidation of sulfide concentrates has the enormous advantage of producing elemental sulfur, hence solving the SO2 and sulfuric acid problems found in smelters. Precipitation of metals such as nickel and cobalt under hydrothermal conditions has been used for over 50 years. It has the advantage of a compact plant but the disadvantage of producing ammonium sulfate as a co-product. In case of copper, however, precipitation takes place without the need of neutralizing the acid, which is a great advantage and could be an excellent substitute for electrowinning which is energy intensive and occupies extensive space. Recent advances in the engineering aspects of pressure equipment design open the door widely for increased

  4. Is nitrate an endocrine active compound in fish?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, M. P.; Kinnberg, Karin Lund; Bjerregaard, Poul;

    concentrations around or below the limits for drinking water). Nitrate concentrations in streams may be elevated due to releases from agricultural practices. The effects of nitrate and nitrite on endocrine relevant endpoints were investigated in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and brown trout (Salmo trutta). Zebrafish...

  5. Distribution and Sources of Nitrate-Nitrogen in Kansas Groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A. Townsend

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Kansas is primarily an agricultural state. Irrigation water and fertilizer use data show long- term increasing trends. Similarly, nitrate-N concentrations in groundwater show long-term increases and exceed the drinking-water standard of 10 mg/l in many areas. A statistical analysis of nitrate-N data collected for local and regional studies in Kansas from 1990 to 1998 (747 samples found significant relationships between nitrate-N concentration with depth, age, and geographic location of wells. Sources of nitrate-N have been identified for 297 water samples by using nitrogen stable isotopes. Of these samples, 48% showed fertilizer sources (+2 to +8 and 34% showed either animal waste sources (+10 to +15 with nitrate-N greater than 10 mg/l or indication that enrichment processes had occurred (+10 or above with variable nitrate-N or both. Ultimate sources for nitrate include nonpoint sources associated with past farming and fertilization practices, and point sources such as animal feed lots, septic systems, and commercial fertilizer storage units. Detection of nitrate from various sources in aquifers of different depths in geographically varied areas of the state indicates that nonpoint and point sources currently impact and will continue to impact groundwater under current land uses.

  6. determination of nitrate concentrations in dutsin-ma fadama land ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... (January to October) using Spectrophotometric measurement, to determine the level of nitrate in the water. ... treatment practices, such as sedimentation or pH adjustment with ... nitrate in the surface water of Tunga – Kawo irrigation scheme and ... colour of the skin, particularly around the eyes and mouth.

  7. Aromatic nitrations by mixed acid. Fast liquid-liquid regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaldivar, J.M.; Zaldivar, J.M.; Molga, E.J.; Alos, M.A.; Hernandez, H.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1996-01-01

    Aromatic nitration by mixed acid was selected as a specific case of heterogeneous liquid-liquid reaction. An extensive experimental programme was followed using adiabatic and heat flow calorimetry and pilot reactor experiments, supported by chemical analysis. A series of nitration experiments was

  8. Nitrate leaching and pesticide use in energy crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Uffe

    2006-01-01

    Nitrate leaching measured below willow and miscanthus is very low from the established crops. Pesticide use in energy crops is low as well.......Nitrate leaching measured below willow and miscanthus is very low from the established crops. Pesticide use in energy crops is low as well....

  9. Spatial assessment of animal manure spreading and groundwater nitrate pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Infascelli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate concentration in groundwater has frequently been linked to non-point pollution. At the same time the existence of intensive agriculture and extremely intensive livestock activity increases the potential for nitrate pollution in shallow groundwater. Nitrate used in agriculture could cause adverse effects on human and animal health. In order to evaluate the groundwater nitrate pollution, and how it might evolve in time, it is essential to develop control systems and to improve policies and incentives aimed at controlling the amount of nitrate entering downstream water systems. The province of Caserta in southern Italy is characterized by high levels of animal manure loading. A comparison between manure nitrogen production and nitrate concentration in groundwater was carried out in this area, using geostatistical tools and spatial statistics. The results show a discrepancy between modelling of nitrate leaching and monitoring of the groundwater and, moreover, no spatial correlation between nitrogen production in livestock farms and nitrate concentration in groundwater, suggesting that producers are not following the regulatory procedures for the agronomic use of manure. The methodology developed in this paper could be applied also in other regions in which European Union fertilization plans are not adequately followed.

  10. Evaluation of nitrate and nitrite destruction/separation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1997-08-29

    This report describes and evaluates four types of nitrate and nitrite destruction and separation technologies that could be used to treat the aqueous, alkaline, nitrate-bearing mixed waste that is generated by the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The technologies considered in this report include thermal, hydrothermal, chemical, and electrochemical technologies.

  11. INVESTIGATION OF SENSITIVITY OF FERTILIZER GRADE AMMONIUM NITRATE TO EXPLOSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to determine the probable cause and mechanism of the explosion of cargoes of fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate on shipboard at Texas City...undergo explosion and in turn initiate the explosion of unconsumed nitrate fertilizer . A hypothesis of the mechanism of the Texas City disaster was established on this basis. (Author)

  12. Nitrate and nitrite in biology, nutrition and therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundberg, J.O.; van Faassen, E.E.H.; Gladwin, M.T.; Ahluwalia, A.; Benjamin, N.

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic nitrate and nitrite from endogenous or dietary sources are metabolized in vivo to nitric oxide (NO) and other bioactive nitrogen oxides. The nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway is emerging as an important mediator of blood flow regulation, cell signaling, energetics and tissue responses to hypoxia.

  13. Removal of Nitrate From Aqueous Solution Using Rice Chaff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Nitrate is largely dissolved in the surface and ground water, due to its high solubility. Continual uptake of nitrite through drinking water can lead to problems and diseases (such as blue baby for humans, especially children. Objectives The aim of this study was to develop a new and inexpensive method for the removal of nitrate from water. In this regard, the possibility of using chaff for removal of nitrate from aqueous solutions was studied and the optimum operating conditions of nitrate removal was determined. Materials and Methods This is a cross-sectional study conducted in laboratory scale. The UV spectrophotometer at a wavelength of maximum absorbance (220 nm was used to determine the nitrate concentration. The effect of pH, amount of chaff, temperature, and contact time were investigated. Results The result of this study revealed that chaff as an absorbent could remove nitrate from solutions, and the efficiency of adsorption increased as contact time increased from 5 to 30 minutes, amount of chaff increased from 1 to 3 g, temperature increased in a range of 300 - 400°C and the amount of pH decreased from 10 to 3. The maximum adsorption rate was around pH 3 (53.14%. Conclusions It was shown that the removal efficiency of nitrate was directly proportional to the amount of chaff, temperature, and contact time but inversely to the pH. This study showed that nitrate removal by chaff is a promising technique.

  14. [Accumulation of nitrates in carrot root--agronomical consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, D; Otto, C; Mars, S

    1980-01-01

    This paper deals with the effects of various parameters involved in plant nitrogen metabolism, on the nitrate content in carrot roots. Level of mineral nitrogen supply, activity of leaves and light intensity have been taken into account in factorial experiments. Results are discussed with a view to the improvement of the quality of root production with respect to their nitrate content.

  15. Robust options to remove nitrate and phosphate from tile drainage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Stefan; Gerritse, Jan; Stuurman, Roelof; Chardon, W.J.; Talens, René

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse emission from agricultural land is a major, persistent source of nitrogen and phosphorus in surface waters. In this contribution, we present field experiments of a series of robust options to remove nitrate and phosphorus at
    field drainage level. Nitrate removal was enhanced by stimulati

  16. Assessment of nitrate concentration in groundwater in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdula'aly, Abdulrahman I; Al-Rehaili, Abdullah M; Al-Zarah, Abdullah I; Khan, Mujahid A

    2010-02-01

    Contamination of groundwater by nitrate is considered a global problem. Nitrates are introduced in the groundwater from a variety of sources like agricultural activities, poor sewer system, wastewaters, and industrial activities. In the present research, a survey of wells (n = 1,060) was undertaken in all 13 regions of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to assess the contained nitrate (NO(3)) levels. The results indicated variation in nitrate levels from 1.1 to 884.0 mg/L as NO(3) throughout the Kingdom. The average nitrate levels in milligrams per liter as NO(3) were as follows in descending order: 65.7 (Jizan), 60.3 (Asir), 60.0 (Qassim), 51.3 (Hail), 41.8 (Makkah Al Mukaramma), 41.3 (Madina Al Munnawara), 38.0 (Al Baha), 37.0 (Najran), 30.7, (Tabouk), 25.2 (Eastern Province), 18.8 (Riyadh), 15.8 (Al Jouf), and 9.1 (Hadwed Shamalyah). The results indicated that nitrate levels exceeded the maximum contaminant limits for drinking water (45 mg/L as NO(3)) in a number of wells (n = 213) in different regions of the Kingdom. The maximum and minimum wells exceeding the maximum contaminant limits for nitrate in drinking water were in Jizan (52.6%) and Hadwed Shamalyah (4.9%), respectively. Most of the wells which exceeded the maximum allowed limits for nitrate were in the areas which were used for agricultural and residential purposes.

  17. Iron-mediated effects on nitrate reductase in marine phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, K.R.; Stolte, W.; Baar, H.J.W. de

    1994-01-01

    The potential activity of nitrate reductase was determined in uni-algal cultures in the laboratory and in natural marine phytoplankton assemblages. In the laboratory bioassays, distinct differences in nitrate reductase activity were observed in iron replete versus depleted cultures for Emiliania hux

  18. Nitrate, Nitrite, and Ammonium Variability in Drinking Water Distribution Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schullehner, Jörg; Stayner, Leslie; Hansen, Birgitte

    2017-03-09

    Accurate assessments of exposure to nitrate in drinking water is a crucial part of epidemiological studies investigating long-term adverse human health effects. However, since drinking water nitrate measurements are usually collected for regulatory purposes, assumptions on (1) the intra-distribution system variability and (2) short-term (seasonal) concentration variability have to be made. We assess concentration variability in the distribution system of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, and seasonal variability in all Danish public waterworks from 2007 to 2016. Nitrate concentrations at the exit of the waterworks are highly correlated with nitrate concentrations within the distribution net or at the consumers' taps, while nitrite and ammonium concentrations are generally lower within the net compared with the exit of the waterworks due to nitrification. However, nitrification of nitrite and ammonium in the distribution systems only results in a relatively small increase in nitrate concentrations. No seasonal variation for nitrate, nitrite, or ammonium was observed. We conclude that nitrate measurements taken at the exit of the waterworks are suitable to calculate exposures for all consumers connected to that waterworks and that sampling frequencies in the national monitoring programme are sufficient to describe temporal variations in longitudinal studies.

  19. Nitrate Water Activities, Science Study Aid No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Intended to supplement a regular program, this pamphlet provides background information, related activities, and suggestions for other activities on the subject of nitrate as a water pollutant. Two activities related to plant nutrient pollution, nitrate filtration and measuring mitrate used by plants, are explained in detail, outlining objectives,…

  20. More answers to the still unresolved question of nitrate tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas; Gori, Tommaso

    2013-09-01

    Organic nitrates are traditionally felt to be a safe adjuvant in the chronic therapy of patients with coronary artery disease. Despite their long use, progress in the understanding of the pharmacology and mechanism of action of these drugs has been achieved only in the last two decades, with the identification of the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of nitrate tolerance, with, the discovery of the ancillary effects of nitrates, and with the demonstration that nitrate therapy has important chronic side effects that might modify patients' prognosis. These advances are however mostly confined to the molecular level or to studies in healthy volunteers, and the true impact of organic nitrates on clinical outcome remains unknown. Complicating this issue, evidence supports the existence of important differences among the different drugs belonging to the group, and there are reasons to believe that the nitrates should not be treated as a homogeneous class. As well, the understanding of the effects of alternative nitric oxide (NO) donors is currently being developed, and future studies will need to test whether the properties of these new medications may compensate and prevent the abnormalities imposed by chronic nitrate therapy. Intermittent therapy with nitroglycerin and isosorbide mononitrate is now established in clinical practice, but they should neither be considered a definitive solution to the problem of nitrate tolerance. Both these strategies are not deprived of complications, and should currently be seen as a compromise rather than a way fully to exploit the benefits of NO donor therapy.

  1. Heat transfer behavior of molten nitrate salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Apurba K.; Clark, Michael M.; Teigen, Bard C.; Fiveland, Woodrow A.; Anderson, Mark H.

    2016-05-01

    The usage of molten nitrate salt as heat transfer fluid and thermal storage medium decouples the generation of electricity from the variable nature of the solar resource, allowing CSP plants to avoid curtailment and match production with demand. This however brings some unique challenges for the design of the molten salt central receiver (MSCR). An aspect critical to the use of molten nitrate (60wt%/40wt% - NaNO3/KNO3) salt as heat transfer fluid in the MSCR is to understand its heat transfer behavior. Alstom collaborated with the University of Wisconsin to conduct a series of experiments and experimentally determined the heat transfer coefficients of molten nitrate salt up to high Reynolds number (Re > 2.0E5) and heat flux (q″ > 1000 kW/m2), conditions heretofore not reported in the literature. A cartridge heater instrumented with thermocouples was installed inside a stainless steel pipe to form an annular test section. The test section was installed in the molten salt flow loop at the University of Wisconsin facility, and operated over a range of test conditions to determine heat transfer data that covered the expected operating regime of a practical molten salt receiver. Heat transfer data were compared to widely accepted correlations found in heat transfer literature, including that of Gnielinski. At lower Reynolds number conditions, the results from this work concurred with the molten salt heat transfer data reported in literature and followed the aforementioned correlations. However, in the region of interest for practical receiver design, the correlations did not accurately model the experimentally determined heat transfer data. Two major effects were observed: (i) all other factors remaining constant, the Nusselt numbers gradually plateaued at higher Reynolds number; and (ii) at higher Reynolds number a positive interaction of heat flux on Nusselt number was noted. These effects are definitely not modeled by the existing correlations. In this paper a new

  2. Green and controllable metal-free nitrification and nitration of arylboronic acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuai Wang; Chun Chun Shu; Tao Wang; Jian Yu; Guo Bing Yan

    2012-01-01

    A novel and green nitrating reagent has been developed for the nitrification and nitration of arylboronic acids,which can be controlled by the reaction conditions.The process provides an attractive alternative to the traditional nitration protocols.

  3. Transcriptional networks in the nitrate response of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Elena A; Álvarez, José M; Moyano, Tomás C; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen is an essential macronutrient for plants and its availability is a key determinant of plant growth and development and crop yield. Besides their nutritional role, N nutrients and metabolites are signals that activate signaling pathways that modulate many plant processes. Because the most abundant inorganic N source for plants in agronomic soils is nitrate, much of the work to understand plant N-signaling has focused on this nutrient. Over the last years, several studies defined a comprehensive catalog of nitrate-responsive genes, involved in nitrate transport, metabolism and a variety of other processes. Despite significant progress in recent years, primarily using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, the molecular mechanisms by which nitrate elicits changes in transcript abundance are still not fully understood. Here we highlight recent advancements in identifying key transcription factors and transcriptional mechanisms that orchestrate the gene expression response to changes in nitrate availability in A. thaliana.

  4. Photooxidation of cellulose nitrate: new insights into degradation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthumeyrie, Sebastien; Collin, Steeve; Bussiere, Pierre-Olivier; Therias, Sandrine

    2014-05-15

    Cellulose nitrate (or nitrocellulose) has received considerable interest due to its uses in various applications, such as paints, photographic films and propellants. However, it is considered as one of the primary pollutants in the energetic material industries because it can be degraded to form polluting chemical species. In this work, the UV light degradation of cellulose nitrate films was studied under conditions of artificially accelerated photooxidation. To eliminate the reactivity of nitro groups, the degradation of ethylcellulose was also investigated. Infrared spectroscopy analyses of the chemical modifications caused by the photooxidation of cellulose nitrate films and the resulting formation of volatile products revealed the occurrence of de-nitration and the formation of oxidation photoproducts exhibiting lactone and anhydride functions. The impact of these chemical modifications on the mechanical and thermal properties of cellulose nitrate films includes embrittlement and lower temperatures of ignition when used as a propellant.

  5. Thermodynamics of the formation of complexes of copper(II) ions and glycylglycine in aqueous solutions at 298 K according to calorimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochergina, L. A.; Emel'yanov, A. V.

    2015-04-01

    Heat effects of the interaction between glycylglycine and copper(II) nitrate solutions are measured by direct calorimetry at a [metal] : [ligand] ratio of 1 : 5 and at different pH values of the solution. The measurements are made at a temperature of 298.15 K and ionic strengths of 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75. KNO3 is used as a background electrolyte. The thermodynamic characteristics of complex formation by the peptide and copper(II) ions in aqueous solutions are determined. Standard enthalpies of the formation of complex particles in aqueous solutions are calculated.

  6. RIXS of Ammonium Nitrate using OCEAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, John; Jach, Terrence; Mueller, Matthias; Unterumsberger, Rainer; Beckhoff, Burkhard

    The ocean code allows for calculations of near-edge x-ray spectroscopies using a GW/Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) approach. Here we present an extension of the code for calculating resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). Recent work has shown that peak-specific broadening of nitrogen K α emission in nitrates is due to a valence-band lifetime that is an order of magnitude shorter than that of the nitrogen 1s hole, an inversion of the usual assumption that valence holes have longer lifetimes than core-level holes. Using the BSE, including GW corrections to the DFT energies, as implemented in ocean we are able to compare calculations of RIXS with measured spectra of the same. By utilizing an approach free from fitting parameters we are able to identify the origins of various broadening effects observed in experiment.

  7. Removal of gadolinium nitrate from heavy water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.

    2000-03-22

    Work was conducted to develop a cost-effective process to purify 181 55-gallon drums containing spent heavy water moderator (D2O) contaminated with high concentrations of gadolinium nitrate, a chemical used as a neutron poison during former nuclear reactor operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These drums also contain low level radioactive contamination, including tritium, which complicates treatment options. Presently, the drums of degraded moderator are being stored on site. It was suggested that a process utilizing biological mechanisms could potentially lower the total cost of heavy water purification by allowing the use of smaller equipment with less product loss and a reduction in the quantity of secondary waste materials produced by the current baseline process (ion exchange).

  8. Thermal Decomposition of Nitrated Tributyl Phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paddleford, D.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Institute of Technology, GA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Contact between tributyl phosphate and aqueous solutions of nitric acid and/or heavy metal nitrate salts at elevated temperatures can lead to exothermic reactions of explosive violence. Even though such operations have been routinely performed safely for decades as an intrinsic part of the Purex separation processes, several so-called ``red oil`` explosions are known to have occurred in the United States, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. The most recent red oil explosion occurred at the Tomsk-7 separations facility in Siberia, in April 1993. That explosion destroyed part of the unreinforced masonry walls of the canyon-type building in which the process was housed, and allowed the release of a significant quantity of radioactive material.

  9. Hydrogels made from chitosan and silver nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozicki, Marek; Kołodziejczyk, Marek; Szynkowska, Małgorzata; Pawlaczyk, Aleksandra; Leśniewska, Ewa; Matusiak, Aleksandra; Adamus, Agnieszka; Karolczak, Aleksandra

    2016-04-20

    This work describes a gelation of chitosan solution with silver nitrate. Above the critical concentration of chitosan (c*), continuous hydrogels of chitosan-silver can be formed. At lower concentrations, the formation of nano- and micro-hydrogels is discussed. The sol-gel analysis was performed to characterise the hydrogels' swelling properties. Moreover, the following were employed: (i) mechanical testing of hydrogels, (ii) inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) for the measurement of silver concentration, (iii) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the morphology of products obtained, and (iv) dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-vis spectrophotometry to examine products formed at low concentration of chitosan (chydrogels were used for modification of cotton fabric in order to give it antimicrobial properties. The products obtained acted against Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis apart from the chitosan used that showed no such activity.

  10. Water rotational jump driven large amplitude molecular motions of nitrate ions in aqueous potassium nitrate solution

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Puja; Bagchi, Biman

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous potassium nitrate solution reveal a highly complex rotational dynamics of nitrate ions where, superimposed on the expected continuous Brownian motion, are large amplitude angular jumps that are coupled to and at least partly driven by similar large amplitude jump motions in water molecules which are associated with change in the hydrogen bonded water molecule. These jumps contribute significantly to rotational and translational motions of these ions. We explore the detailed mechanism of these correlated (or, coupled) jumps and introduce a new time correlation function to decompose the coupled orientational- jump dynamics of solvent and solute in the aqueous electrolytic solution. Time correlation function provides for the unequivocal determination of the time constant involved in orientational dynamics originating from making and breaking of hydrogen bonds. We discover two distinct mechanisms-both are coupled to density fluctuation but are of different types.

  11. Nitrate removal by nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation in an upflow denitrifying biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Wang, Hongyu; Yang, Kai; Sun, Yuchong; Tian, Jun

    2015-01-01

    A continuous upflow biofilm reactor packed with ceramsite was constructed for nitrate removal under an anaerobic atmosphere without an organic carbon source. Denitrifying bacteria, Pseudomonas sp. W1, Pseudomonas sp. W2 and Microbacterium sp. W5, were added to the bioreactor as inocula. Nitrate concentration, nitrite accumulation and nitrogen removal efficiency in the effluent were investigated under various conditions set by several parameters including pH, hydraulic retention time (HRT), ratios of carbon to nitrogen (C/N) and temperature. The results illustrated that the maximum removal efficiency of nitrogen was 85.39%, under optimum reaction parameters, approximately pH 6.5-7, HRT = 48 hours and C/N = 13.1:1 at temperature of 30 °C, which were determined by experiment.

  12. Tyrosine-Nitrated Proteins: Proteomic and Bioanalytical Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batthyány, Carlos; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Lima, Analía; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael

    2017-03-01

    "Nitroproteomic" is under active development, as 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins constitutes a footprint left by the reactions of nitric oxide-derived oxidants that are usually associated to oxidative stress conditions. Moreover, protein tyrosine nitration can cause structural and functional changes, which may be of pathophysiological relevance for human disease conditions. Biological protein tyrosine nitration is a free radical process involving the intermediacy of tyrosyl radicals; in spite of being a nonenzymatic process, nitration is selectively directed toward a limited subset of tyrosine residues. Precise identification and quantitation of 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins has represented a "tour de force" for researchers. Recent Advances: A small number of proteins are preferential targets of nitration (usually less than 100 proteins per proteome), contrasting with the large number of proteins modified by other post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, acetylation, and, notably, S-nitrosation. Proteomic approaches have revealed key features of tyrosine nitration both in vivo and in vitro, including selectivity, site specificity, and effects in protein structure and function. Identification of 3-nitrotyrosine-containing proteins and mapping nitrated residues is challenging, due to low abundance of this oxidative modification in biological samples and its unfriendly behavior in mass spectrometry (MS)-based technologies, that is, MALDI, electrospray ionization, and collision-induced dissociation. The use of (i) classical two-dimensional electrophoresis with immunochemical detection of nitrated proteins followed by protein ID by regular MS/MS in combination with (ii) immuno-enrichment of tyrosine-nitrated peptides and (iii) identification of nitrated peptides by a MIDAS™ experiment is arising as a potent methodology to unambiguously map and quantitate tyrosine-nitrated proteins in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 313-328.

  13. Proteome responses to nitrate in bioethanol production contaminant Dekkera bruxellensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Adauto Gomes Barbosa; Pestana-Calsa, Maria Clara; de Morais, Marcos Antonio; Calsa, Tercilio

    2014-06-02

    Dekkera bruxellensis is an industrially relevant yeast, especially in bioethanol production. The capacity of D. bruxellensis to assimilate nitrate can confer advantages of this yeast over Saccharomyces cerevisiae at industrial conditions. In the present work we present the consequences of nitrate assimilation, using ammonium as reference, to the proteomics of D. bruxellensis. Thirty-four protein spots were overproduced in nitrate medium and were identified by MS-TOF/TOF analysis and were putatively identified by using local Mascot software. Apart from the overexpression of genes of nitrate metabolism, ATP synthesis and PPP and TCA pathways previously reported, cultivation on nitrate induced overproduction of glycolytic enzymes, which corroborate the high energy demand and NADH availability for nitrate assimilation. Overproduction of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) protein was also observed. Proteomic profile of D. bruxellensis cultivated in nitrate and described in the present work agrees with the hypothesis of metabolic flux regulation, making available the energy in the form of NADH to support nitrate assimilation. This work contributes with an initial picture of proteins presenting differential accumulation in industrial contaminant yeast, in strict association with possible metabolic responses to nitrate as sole nitrogen source in cultivation medium. The present study investigated the gene expression at translational level of yeast D. bruxellensis for nitrate assimilation. This study corroborated with biological models that consider the ability to assimilate this nitrogen source confers advantages on this yeast during the fermentation process industry. However, larger studies are needed in this way as our group is investigating new proteins under LC-MS/MS approach. Together, these studies will help in understanding the operation of networks and cellular regulation of the process of assimilation of nitrogen sources for the D. bruxellensis, unravelling new aspects of

  14. The effect of nitrate on ethylene biofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Hun, E-mail: lee323@alumni.purdue.edu [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Purdue University, 225 South University St., West Lafayette, 47907-2093 IN (United States); Li, Congna; Heber, Albert J. [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Purdue University, 225 South University St., West Lafayette, 47907-2093 IN (United States)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ethylene biofiltration strongly depends on nitrate concentrations and media types. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine reduced N supply can increase ethylene removals in biofilters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perlite medium is better for ethylene biofiltration than activated carbon medium. - Abstract: This study investigated the effects of filter media types and nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations in nutrient solutions on C{sub 2}H{sub 4} biofiltration. A new nutrient solution with zero NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration was supplied to two perlite-bed biotrickling filters, two perlite-bed biofilters, and two GAC (Granular Activated Carbon)-bed biofilters, while the other with 2 g L{sup -1} of NO{sub 3}{sup -} was used for the other two GAC biofilters. All reactors underwent a total test duration of over 175 days with an EBRT (Empty Bed Residence Time) of 30 s, inlet gas flow rate of 7 L min{sup -1}, and inlet C{sub 2}H{sub 4} concentrations of 20-30 mg m{sup -3}. NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration and media type significantly affected the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} removal efficiencies in all types of biofiltration. The perlite media with no NO{sub 3}{sup -} achieved C{sub 2}H{sub 4} removal efficiencies 10-50% higher than the others. A NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration as high as 2 g L{sup -1} in the original nutrient solution may act as an inhibitor that suppresses the growth or activity of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} degraders. In addition, the perlite media resulted in higher C{sub 2}H{sub 4} removal efficiencies than GAC media, because the hydrophilic surface of the perlite leads to a higher moisture content and thus to favorable microbial growth.

  15. ARRAYS OF BOTTLES OF PLUTONIUM NITRATE SOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-09-01

    In October and November of 1981 thirteen approaches-to-critical were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas® reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were sponsored by Rockwell Hanford Operations because of the lack of experimental data on the criticality of arrays of bottles of Pu solution such as might be found in storage and handling at the Purex Facility at Hanford. The results of these experiments were used “to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in criticality safety assessments of [the] plant configurations” (Ref. 1). Data for this evaluation were collected from the published report (Ref. 1), the approach to critical logbook, the experimenter’s logbook, and communication with the primary experimenter, B. Michael Durst. Of the 13 experiments preformed 10 were evaluated. One of the experiments was not evaluated because it had been thrown out by the experimenter, one was not evaluated because it was a repeat of another experiment and the third was not evaluated because it reported the critical number of bottles as being greater than 25. Seven of the thirteen evaluated experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments. A similar experiment using uranyl nitrate was benchmarked as U233-SOL-THERM-014.

  16. Intermittent rainstorms cause pulses of nitrogen, phosphorus, and copper in leachate from compost in bioretention systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullane, Jessica M; Flury, Markus; Iqbal, Hamid; Freeze, Patrick M; Hinman, Curtis; Cogger, Craig G; Shi, Zhenqing

    2015-12-15

    Bioretention systems rely on vegetation and mixtures of soil, sand, and compost to filter stormwater runoff. However, bioretention systems can also leach metals and nutrients, and compost may be a major contributor to this leaching. To safely implement bioretention systems, it is crucial to determine the composition of compost leachate. We characterized and quantified the leachate composition of compost following intermittent, simulated storm events. Columns of municipal compost were irrigated to simulate 6-month, 24-hour rain storms in the Seattle-Tacoma region. Outflow was analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity (EC), particulate concentration, surface tension, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrogen, phosphorus, and copper. Results indicate a decrease of chemical concentrations over the course of individual storms and following repeated storms, but each new storm released another peak of constituents. The decrease in phosphorus, copper, and DOC concentrations with repeated storms was slower than for nitrate and EC. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that the DOC consisted mainly of aliphatic and aromatic components typical of fulvic and humic acids. Less than 3% of the original copper content from the compost leached out even after nine storm events. Nonetheless, copper concentrations in the leachate exceeded regulatory discharge standards. Our results show that compost can serve as a sustained source of leaching of nutrients and metals.

  17. Speciation Analysis of Serum Copper by Ultrafiltration Com-bined with Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-Hua; MA Hui-Min; MA Quan-Li; LIANG Shu-Chuan

    2001-01-01

    UItrafiltration combined with graphite furnace atomic absorp-tion spectrometry(GFAAS)was used to study protein binding and speciation of copper in human serum..UItrafiltration was carried out using a cell unit ultrafiltration membraoes having a nominal cut-off of 10,000Dalton.The effects of var-ious experimental factors including the kind and concentration of electrolyte,sample storge,pH,pressure and the precon-ditioning of the membranes on the speciation analysis of serum copper by ultrafiltration were examined.It was observed that 4.5±2.3% of the total copper in serum was ultrafiltrable and this value did not seem to be influenced by the total serum ele-mental concentration,the PH (6.5——10) adn the pressure(≤1.5kg/cm2).the preconditioning of the ultrafiltration system with 0.1mol/L calcium nitrate can overcome the adsorption loss of copper effectively,and the addition of tris-HCI sohtion (pH 7.4)to serum accelerates the ultrafiltration.The present method was proved to be suitable for speciation analysis for its simplicity,rapidity,small sample reuqirement and easy con-trol.The results obtained with the method are accurate and reliable.

  18. REMOVAL OF ADDED NITRATE IN COTTON BURR COMPOST, MULCH COMPOST, AND PEAT: MECHANISMS AND POTENTIAL USE FOR GROUNDWATER NITRATE REMEDIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted batch tests on the nature and kinetics of removal of added nitrate in cotton burr compost, mulch compost, and sphagnum peat that may be potentially used in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for groundwater nitrate remediation. A rigorous steam autoclaving protocol (...

  19. REMOVAL OF ADDED NITRATE IN COTTON BURR COMPOST, MULCH COMPOST, AND PEAT: MECHANISMS AND POTENTIAL USE FOR GROUNDWATER NITRATE REMEDIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted batch tests on the nature and kinetics of removal of added nitrate in cotton burr compost, mulch compost, and sphagnum peat that may be potentially used in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for groundwater nitrate remediation. A rigorous steam autoclaving protocol (...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1125 - Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (chlorophyllin-copper complex). 73.1125 Section 73.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT....1125 Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin is a green to black powder obtained from chlorophyll...

  1. 21 CFR 73.2125 - Potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). 73.2125 Section 73.2125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... § 73.2125 Potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). (a) Identity...

  2. Testing Corrosion Inhibitors for the Conservation of Archaeological Copper and Copper Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Faltermeier

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a synopsis of the Ph.D. research undertaken at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. The aim was to evaluate corrosion inhibitors for use in the conservation of copper and copper alloy archaeological artefacts. The objective of this work was to acquire an insight into the performance of copper corrosion inhibitors, when applied to archaeological copper.

  3. The link between copper and Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchase, Rupert

    2013-01-01

    Wilson's disease (hepatolenticular degeneration) is a rare inherited autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism leading to copper accumulation in the liver and extrahepatic organs such as the brain and cornea. Patients may present with combinations of hepatic, neurological and psychiatric symptoms. Copper is the therapeutic target for the treatment of Wilson's disease. But how did copper come to be linked with Wilson's disease? The answer encompasses a study of enzootic neonatal ataxia in lambs in the 1930s, the copper-chelating properties of British Anti-Lewisite, and the chemical analysis for copper of the organs of deceased Wilson's disease patients in the mid-to-late 1940s. Wilson's disease is one of a number of copper-related disorders where loss of copper homeostasis as a result of genetic, nutritional or environmental factors affects human health.

  4. Determination of copper in clarified apple juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiner, Michaela; Juranović Cindrić, Iva; Kröppl, Michaela; Stingeder, Gerhard

    2010-03-24

    Inorganic copper compounds are not considered as synthetic fertilizers for apple trees as they are traditional fertilizers. Thus, they are used in organic farming for soil or foliar applications. The European Union is for health reasons interested in reducing copper in apple orchards. Because the fertilizer application rate affects the nutrition of apples, the applied copper might also be reflected in the copper concentration of apple juices. Thus, the determination of copper is of concern for investigating the application of copper-containing fertilizers. Samples of clarified apple juice commercially available in the European market were analyzed for their copper content. Prior to quantification by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, the juices were processed by a microwave-assisted digestion system using HNO(3). All samples were also measured directly after dilution with HNO(3). The copper concentrations measured using both methods were all below the limit of detection (17 microg/L).

  5. Synthesis of aminoarenethiolato-copper(I) complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperotto, E.; van Klink, G.P.M.; van Koten, G.

    2008-01-01

    Copper(I)-mediated reactions have recently become the choice for large industrial scale applications, since copper is environmentally friendly and cheaper than other transition metals already explored. However, most organocopper compounds still present several limitations including the sensitivity t

  6. Global assessment of undiscovered copper resources

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Deposits, prospects, and permissive tracts for porphyry and sediment-hosted copper resources worldwide, with estimates of undiscovered copper resources. pCu_tracts...

  7. EFFECT OF COPPER ON PASSIVITY AND CORROSION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-30

    Jun 30, 2014 ... metallic copper enriched on the surface film of austenitic stainless ... Dispersed inclusions of this phase can influence the stability of .... two microstructures showed that copper concentration possessed a non-uniform chemical.

  8. Copper tolerance and virulence in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladomersky, Erik; Petris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element for all aerobic organisms. It functions as a cofactor in enzymes that catalyze a wide variety of redox reactions due to its ability to cycle between two oxidation states, Cu(I) and Cu(II). This same redox property of copper has the potential to cause toxicity if copper homeostasis is not maintained. Studies suggest that the toxic properties of copper are harnessed by the innate immune system of the host to kill bacteria. To counter such defenses, bacteria rely on copper tolerance genes for virulence within the host. These discoveries suggest bacterial copper intoxication is a component of host nutritional immunity, thus expanding our knowledge of the roles of copper in biology. This review summarizes our current understanding of copper tolerance in bacteria, and the extent to which these pathways contribute to bacterial virulence within the host. PMID:25652326

  9. Conductometric nitrate biosensor based on methyl viologen/Nafion/nitrate reductase interdigitated electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuejiang, Wang; Dzyadevych, Sergei V; Chovelon, Jean-Marc; Renault, Nicole Jaffrezic; Ling, Chen; Siqing, Xia; Jianfu, Zhao

    2006-04-15

    A highly sensitive, fast and stable conductometric enzyme biosensor for determination of nitrate in water is reported for the first time. The biosensor electrodes were modified by methyl viologen mediator mixed with nitrate reductase (NR) from Aspergillus niger by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde in the presence of bovine serum albumin and Nafion((R)) cation-exchange polymer. The process parameters for the fabrication of the enzyme electrode and various experimental variables such as pH, the enzyme loading and time of immobilization in glutaralaldehyde vapor were investigated with regard to their influence on sensitivity, limit of detection, dynamic range and operational and storage stability. The biosensor can reach 95% of steady-state conductance value in about 15s. Linear calibration in the range of 0.02 and 0.25 mM with detection limits of 0.005 mM nitrate was obtained with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. When stored in 5 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) at 4 degrees C, the sensor showed good stability over 2 weeks.

  10. Non-vacuum processed Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} thin films: Influence of copper precursor on structural, optical and morphological properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslan, Ferhat, E-mail: ferhataslan@harran.edu.tr; Tumbul, Ahmet

    2014-11-05

    Highlights: • Non-vacuum sol–gel prepared CZTS thin films. • CZTS has been prepared with different copper precursors. • The remarkable effect of copper precursor on the CZTS films was identified. • The CZTS films exhibited kesterite phase with a (1 1 2) plane preferred orientation. - Abstract: In this study, thin film of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) has been successfully deposited by sol–gel dip-coating method on glass substrates. In the sol–gel process, glacial acetic acid, ethanol and triethanolamine were used as solvent and stabilizer. Three different copper precursors of copper (III) nitrate hemipentahydrate, copper (II) 2-ethylhexanoate and copper (II) acetate in the solution were used to obtain CZTS thin films. Effect of copper precursor on the structural, morphological and optical properties was investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy studies showed that CZTS thin films exhibited kesterite structure with a (1 1 2) plane preferred orientation and Raman shift of 336 cm{sup −1}, respectively.

  11. Fractionation of Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopes During Microbial Nitrate Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, M. F.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Reichert, P.; Barbieri, A.; McKenzie, J. A.

    2001-12-01

    Lakes represent an important continental sink of fixed nitrogen. Besides the burial of particulate nitrogen, fixed nitrogen is eliminated from lakes by emission of N2 and N2O to the atmosphere during dissimilative nitrate reduction within suboxic and anoxic waters or sediments. The understanding and quantification of this efficient nitrogen removal process in eutrophic lakes is crucial for nitrogen budget modelling and the application and evaluation of lake restoration measures. In order to use natural abundance N and O isotope ratios as tracers for microbial nitrate reduction and to obtain quantitative estimates on its intensity, it is crucial to constrain the associated isotope fractionation. This is the first report of nitrogen and oxygen isotope effects associated with microbial nitrate reduction in lacustrine environments. Nitrate reduction in suboxic and anoxic waters of the southern basin of Lake Lugano (Switzerland) is demonstrated by a progressive nitrate depletion coupled to increasing δ 15N and δ 18O values for residual nitrate. 15N and 18O enrichment factors (ɛ ) were estimated using a closed-system (Rayleigh-distillation) model and a dynamic reaction-diffusion model. Calculated enrichment factors ɛ ranged between -11.2 and -22‰ for 15N and between -6.6 and -11.3‰ for 18O with both nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation being greatest during times with the highest nitrate reduction rates. The closed-system model neglects vertical diffusive mixing and does not distinguish between sedimentary and water-column nitrate reduction. Therefore, it tends to underestimate the intrinsic isotope effect of microbial nitrate reduction. Based upon results from earlier studies that indicate that nitrate reduction in sediments displays a highly reduced N-isotope effect (Brandes and Devol, 1997), model-derived enrichment factors could be used to discern the relative importance of nitrate reduction in the water column and in the sediment. Sedimentary nitrate

  12. Preparation of Pure Copper Powder from Acidic Copper Chloride Waste Etchant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The method for the recycling of copper from copper chloride solution was developed. This process consists of extraction of copper, purification and particle size reduction. In the first step, reductive metal scraps were added to acidic copper chloride waste enchants produced in the PCB industry to obtain copper powder.Composition analysis showed that this powder contained impurities such as Fe, Ni, and water. So, drying and purification were carried out by using microwave and a centrifugal separator. Thereby the copper powder had a purity of higher than 99% and spherical form in morphology. The copper powder size was decreased by ball milling.

  13. Coating of a steel wire with copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, K. N.; Dubskii, G. A.; Nefed'ev, A. A.; Derevyanko, D. V.

    2016-03-01

    The process of coating of a steel wire with liquid copper at a high speed (>1 m/s) is considered. The results of long-term studies of copperizing under laboratory conditions and electron-microscopic investigation of the copper-steel adhesion are used to develop a mathematical model for coating of a steel wire with copper and to create a commercial setup to implement this process.

  14. Canine Models for Copper Homeostasis Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoyan Wu; Leegwater, Peter A. J.; Hille Fieten

    2016-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace nutrient metal involved in a multitude of cellular processes. Hereditary defects in copper metabolism result in disorders with a severe clinical course such as Wilson disease and Menkes disease. In Wilson disease, copper accumulation leads to liver cirrhosis and neurological impairments. A lack in genotype-phenotype correlation in Wilson disease points toward the influence of environmental factors or modifying genes. In a number of Non-Wilsonian forms of copper me...

  15. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings or... heavier wall pipe listed in Table C1 of ASME/ANSI B16.5. [Amdt. 192-62, 54 FR 5628, Feb. 6, 1989, as...

  16. Modulation of tau phosphorylation by environmental copper

    OpenAIRE

    Voss, Kellen; Harris, Christopher; Ralle, Martina; Duffy, Megan; Murchison, Charles; Joseph F. Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Background The transition metal copper enhances amyloid β aggregation and neurotoxicity, and in models of concomitant amyloid and tau pathology, copper also promotes tau aggregation. Since it is not clear if the effects of environmental copper upon tau pathology are dependent on the presence of pathological amyloid β, we tested the effects of copper overload and complexing in disease models which lack pathological amyloid β. Methods We used cell culture and transgenic murine models to test th...

  17. Canine Models for Copper Homeostasis Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoyan Wu; Leegwater, Peter A.J.; Hille Fieten

    2016-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace nutrient metal involved in a multitude of cellular processes. Hereditary defects in copper metabolism result in disorders with a severe clinical course such as Wilson disease and Menkes disease. In Wilson disease, copper accumulation leads to liver cirrhosis and neurological impairments. A lack in genotype-phenotype correlation in Wilson disease points toward the influence of environmental factors or modifying genes. In a number of Non-Wilsonian forms of copper me...

  18. Tensile behavior of nanocrystalline copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, P.G.; Weertman, J.R. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Eastman, J.A. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Materials Science Div.

    1995-11-01

    High density nanocrystalline copper produced by inert gas condensation was tested in tension. Displacements were measured using foil strain gauges, which greatly improved the accuracy of the strain data. The Young`s modulus of nanocrystalline copper was found to be consistent with that of coarse-grained copper. Total elongations of {approx} 1% were observed in samples with grain sizes less than 50 nm, while a sample with a grain size of 110 nm exhibited more than 10% elongation, perhaps signifying a change to a dislocation-based deformation mechanism in the larger-grained material. In addition, tensile tests were performed as a function of strain rate, with a possible trend of decreased strength and increased elongation as the strain rate was decreased.

  19. Monitoring copper in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshe, J M

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring copper metabolism in patients with Wilson's disease is not an exact science. At present, there are no simple methods of estimating the total body load of this metal. Indirect methods must therefore be used. A survey of the current literature shows that most approaches rely on the determination of blood and urine copper concentration. Both these should decrease with treatment. In parallel with decreased copper concentration, there should be subsequent improvement in more routine laboratory tests including liver and renal function, blood count parameters, and clotting factors. Lack of compliance is revealed by a reversal of this trend. This chapter critically reviews current testing methods and describes other approaches that may be helpful.

  20. Mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Takacs, L.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    The mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide with iron was induced in a Fritsch P-6 planetary mill, using WC vial filled with argon and WC balls. Samples milled for specific intervals were analyzed by XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Most of the reaction takes place during the first 10 min...... of milling and only FeS and Cu are found after 60 min. The main chemical process is accompanied by phase transformations of the sulfide phases as a result of milling. Djurleite partially transformed to chalcocite and a tetragonal copper sulfide phase before reduction. The cubic modification of FeS was formed...... first, transforming to hexagonal during the later stages of the process. The formation of off-stoichiometric phases and the release of some elemental sulfur by copper sulfide are also probable....

  1. Copper tolerance of Trichoderma species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić-Petrović Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some Trichoderma strains can persist in ecosystems with high concentrations of heavy metals. The aim of this research was to examine the variability of Trichoderma strains isolated from different ecosystems, based on their morphological properties and restriction analysis of ITS fragments. The fungal growth was tested on potato dextrose agar, amended with Cu(II concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 10 mmol/l, in order to identify copper-resistant strains. The results indicate that some isolated strains of Trichoderma sp. show tolerance to higher copper concentrations. Further research to examine the ability of copper bioaccumulation by tolerant Trichoderma strains is needed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31080 i br. III 43010

  2. Amyloid beta modulated the selectivity of heme-catalyzed protein tyrosine nitration: an alternative mechanism for selective protein nitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Can; Li, Hailing; Gao, Zhonghong

    2012-10-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is a post-translational modification associated with numerous pathological conditions. The biological consequences of this modification strongly depend on the site selectivity. Unfortunately, to date there is still no reliable model for predicting the selectivity of protein tyrosine nitration. Previously, we found that amyloid beta (Aβ) changed the selectivity of enolase tyrosine nitration upon binding to heme. It seemed that there was a link between the hydrophilicity of Aβ and the site-specific tyrosine nitration. We further investigated the role of the hydrophilicity of the molecules that bind to heme in the selectivity of protein tyrosine nitration. We found that Aβ(1-16), Aβ(1-20), and Aβ(1-40), upon binding to heme and interacting with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in a site-specific manner, differently modulated the site selectivity of heme-catalyzed GAPDH tyrosine nitration. The modulation is associated with the hydrophilicity of the Aβ peptides, which changed the surrounding environment of the heme. At the same time, the Aβ-heme complexes were found to be more effective at inactivating GAPDH than heme alone, and the selective tyrosine nitration that was catalyzed by Aβ-heme played an important role. These findings suggest an alternative mechanism for the selectivity of protein tyrosine nitration, which may lead to a better understanding of the factors that influence protein tyrosine nitration selectivity and the important roles of Aβ and heme in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, where Aβ accumulation and Aβ-dependent protein nitration play central roles.

  3. Effects of Amino Acids Replacing Nitrate on Growth, Nitrate Accumulation, and Macroelement Concentrations in Pak-choi (Brassica chinensis L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A hydroponic experiment was carried out to determine the influence of replacing 20% of nitrate-N in nutrient solutions with 20 individual amino acids on growth, nitrate accumulation, and concentrations of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) in pak-choi (Brassica chinensis L.) shoots. When 20% of nitrate-N was replaced with arginine (Arg)compared to the full nitrate treatment, pak-choi shoot fresh and dry weights increased significantly (P ≤ 0.05), but when 20% of nitrate-N was replaced with alanine (Ala), valine (Val), leucine (Leu), isoleucine (Ile), proline (Pro), phenylalanine (Phe), methionine (Met), aspartic acid (Asp), glutamic acid (Glu), lysine (Lys), glycine (Gly), serine (Ser), threonine(Thr), cysteine (Cys), and tyrosine (Tyr), shoot fresh and dry weights decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05). After replacing 20% of nitrate-N with asparagine (Asn) and glutamine (Gln), shoot fresh and dry weights were unaffected. Compared to the full nitrate treatment, amino acid replacement treatments, except for Cys, Gly, histidine (His), and Arg, significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.05) nitrate concentrations in plant shoots. Except for Cys, Leu, Pro, and Met, total N concentrations in plant tissues of the other amino acid treatments significantly increased (P ≤ 0.05). Amino acids also affected total P and K concentrations, but the effects differed depending on individual amino acids. To improve pak-choi shoot quality, Gln and Asn, due to their insignificant effects on pak-choi growth, their significant reduction in nitrate concentrations, and their increase in macroelement content in plants, may be used to partially replace nitrate-N.

  4. Plasma nitrate clearance in mice: modeling of the systemic production of nitrate following the induction of nitric oxide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veszelovsky, E; Holford, N H; Thomsen, L L; Knowles, R G; Baguley, B C

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is produced in mammals by the enzyme NO synthase (NOS) in response to a number of agents, including the experimental antitumour agent flavone acetic acid (FAA) and the cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). NO is converted rapidly in the presence of oxygen, water and haemoglobin to oxidation products, largely nitrate. To quantitate the production of nitric oxide it is necessary to know the clearance of nitrate. The concentration of nitrite and nitrate ion in the plasma of C3H and BDF1 (C57BL6 x DBA2) mice was assessed before and after injection of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. Nitrite was covered rapidly to nitrate and the kinetics of elimination of nitrate were determined. There was no significant difference between results obtained with different mouse strains, between levels of nitrite and nitrate, or between i.p. and i.v. administration, and the observations were therefore combined. The volume of distribution of nitrate was 0.71 +/- 0.04 l/kg and the clearance was 0.32 +/- 0.02 l/h-1/kg-1 (plasma half-life, 1.54 h). Using previously published data, we developed a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model that relates the production of TNF in response to administration of FAA, the enhancement of NOS activity in response to TNF, and the elevation of plasma nitrate in response to NO production. This information permits the prediction from observed plasma nitrate values of the amount of NOS induced in vivo.

  5. The Nitrate App: Enhancing nutrient best management practice adoption and targeting via instantaneous, on-farm nitrate data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozemeijer, J.; De Geus, D.; Ekkelenkamp, R.

    2016-12-01

    Sociological surveys suggest that farmers understand that agriculture contributes to nutrient pollution but the same surveys also indicate that in the absence of on-farm nitrate data, farmers assume someone else is causing the problem. This tendency to overestimate our own abilities is common to all of us and often described as "Lake Wobegon Syndrome" after the mythical town where "where all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average." We developed the Nitrate App for smartphones to enable farmers and citizens to collect and share nitrate concentration measurements. The app accurately reads and interprets nitrate test strips, directly displays the measured concentration, and gives the option to share the result. The shared results are immediately visualised in the online Delta Data Viewer. Within this viewer, user group specific combinations of background maps, monitoring data, and study area characteristics can be configured. Through the Nitrate App's mapping function project managers can more accurately target conservation practices to areas with the highest nitrate concentrations and loads. Furthermore, we expect that the actual on-farm data helps to overcome the "Lake Wobegon Effect" and will encourage farmers to talk to specialists about the right nutrient best management practices (BMP's) for their farm. After implementing these BMP's, the farmers can keep monitoring to evaluate the reduction in nitrate losses. In this presentation, we explain the Nitrate App technology and present the results of the first field applications in The Netherlands. We expect this free to download app to have wide transferability across watershed projects worldwide focusing on nitrate contamination of groundwater or surface water. Its simple design requires no special equipment outside of the nitrate test strips, a reference card, and a smartphone. The technology is also transferable to other relevant solutes for which test strips

  6. LIWU Copper Plans to Get Listed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>According to recently-released "Notice con-cerning Environmental Protection Checks for IPO of Sichuan LIWU Copper Co., Ltd.", Sichuan LIWU Copper Co., Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as LIWU Copper) plans to issue 68 million shares, and all the funds raised will be

  7. Canine Models for Copper Homeostasis Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Leegwater, Peter A J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074236539; Fieten, Hille|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314112596

    2016-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace nutrient metal involved in a multitude of cellular processes. Hereditary defects in copper metabolism result in disorders with a severe clinical course such as Wilson disease and Menkes disease. In Wilson disease, copper accumulation leads to liver cirrhosis and neurolog

  8. Extra-Hepatic Storage of Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Damsgaard, Else; Horn, N.

    1975-01-01

    The distribution of copper among the organs of an aborted, male foetus, expected to develop Menkes' syndrome, was entirely different from the distribution in 4 normal foetuses. Copper concentrations determined by neutron activation analysis showed a considerably reduced content in the liver......, but increased concentrations in the other organs analysed; total foetal copper was normal....

  9. Quanwei Copper Processing Base Put Into Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>Quanwei (Tongling) Copper Co.,Ltd’s copper processing base in Tongling of Anhui Province has been put into operation at the end of De- cember last year. It is reported that the copper processing project, invested by Zhengwei (Shenzhen) Technology

  10. Study on copper adsorption on olivine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The copper adsorption on olivine supplied by A/S Olivine production plant at Aheim in western Norway has been studied. The factors which affect the uptake of copper have been evaluated. The results reveal that the equilibrium pH in aqueous solution has the greatest influence on the copper adsorption thanks to the competitive adsorption between proton and copper ions, and the adsorption of copper to olivine increases rapidly with the pH increasing from 4 to 6. The initial copper concentration and olivine dose also possess significant effect on copper adsorption. The adsorption efficieny of copper increases with the increase of olivine dose or the decrease of initial copper concentration at the same pH. The ionic strength effect on the adsorption has also been investigated, but it owns little effect on the adsorption process of copper due to the formation of inner sphere surface complexation of copper on olivine. The experimental data show that olivine has a high acid buffer capacity and is an effective adsorbent for copper.

  11. Canine Models for Copper Homeostasis Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Leegwater, Peter A J; Fieten, Hille

    2016-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace nutrient metal involved in a multitude of cellular processes. Hereditary defects in copper metabolism result in disorders with a severe clinical course such as Wilson disease and Menkes disease. In Wilson disease, copper accumulation leads to liver cirrhosis and neurolog

  12. Preparation of Copper-loaded Microcapsule Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Jalšenjak

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Novel copper-loaded chitosan or chitosan/alginate based microcapsules formulations have been presented. It was shown that prolonged release of copper from microcapsules accompanied with possible prolonged presence of copper on leaves is useful in crop protection.

  13. Preparation of Copper-loaded Microcapsule Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Jalšenjak

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Novel copper-loaded chitosan or chitosan/alginate based microcapsules formulations have been presented. It was shown that prolonged release of copper from microcapsules accompanied with possible prolonged presence of copper on leaves is useful in crop protection.

  14. Canine Models for Copper Homeostasis Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Leegwater, Peter A J; Fieten, Hille

    2016-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace nutrient metal involved in a multitude of cellular processes. Hereditary defects in copper metabolism result in disorders with a severe clinical course such as Wilson disease and Menkes disease. In Wilson disease, copper accumulation leads to liver cirrhosis and

  15. Copper coating specification for the RHIC arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2010-12-01

    Copper coating specifications for the RHIC arcs are given. Various upgrade scenarios are considered and calculations of resistive wall losses in the arcs are used to constrain the necessary quality and surface thickness of a copper coating. We find that 10 {mu}m of high purity copper will suffice.

  16. Distribution of Copper in Rats Submitted to Treatment With Copper Aspirinate

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, Weiping; Yang, Yikun; Xiong, Huizhou; Lu, Ying; Yang, Rong

    1998-01-01

    The distribution of copper in Sprague – Dawley rats following a three month oral administration of 0,10 or 50mg/kg copper aspirinate has been investigated. Metal content was determined by ICP – AES in blood, brain, kidney, liver, lung, spleen, and dejection. The results show that treatment with copper aspirinate did not cause accumulation of copper in rats and excess ingested copper was excreted through feces.

  17. Chinalco Straightened Out Copper Assets, and Delegated Stock Equity of Yunnan Copper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>Immediately after the news that Chinalco transferred 58%stock equity of Yunnan Copper Group to its wholly-owned subsidiary China Copper Corporation Limited free of charge was disclosed on July 9,many individual investors couldn’t help but to think:Does it mean China Copper Corporation Limited will assemble assets for overall listing?At present,among main copper business companies under China Copper Corporation

  18. A copper vapor laser by using a copper-vapor-complex reaction at a low temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Kano, Toshiyuki; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    A copper vapor laser performance by using ametal-vapor-complex reaction (Cu+AlBr3) is reported. The laser operation is obtained at a low temperature without externalheating because of the AlBr3 vapors evaporating at a room temperature. The copper vapor laser using this metal-vapor-complex reaction has an advantage of deposition-free of a metallic copper to the laser tube wall, which is different from the copper halide and the organometallic copper lasers.

  19. Copper metabolism and copper-mediated alterations in the metabolism of cultured astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Scheiber, Ivo Florin

    2012-01-01

    Copper is an essential element that is required for a variety of important cellular functions. Since not only copper deficiency, but also excess of copper can seriously affect cellular functions, cellular copper metabolism is tightly regulated. Disturbances of copper homeostasis are the underlying defect of the inherited diseases Menkes and Wilson s disease and have also been linked to several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer s disease and Parkinson s disease. Known astrocytes f...

  20. Rheological Analysis of Binary Eutectic Mixture of Sodium and Potassium Nitrate and the Effect of Low Concentration CuO Nanoparticle Addition to Its Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Lasfargues

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the characterisation and demonstration of Newtonian behaviour of salt at both high and low shear rate for sodium and potassium nitrate eutectic mixture (60/40 ranging from 250 °C to 500 °C. Analysis of published and experimental data was carried out to correlate all the numbers into one meaningful 4th order polynomial equation. Addition of a low amount of copper oxide nanoparticles to the mixture increased viscosity of 5.0%–18.0% compared to the latter equation.

  1. Rheological Analysis of Binary Eutectic Mixture of Sodium and Potassium Nitrate and the Effect of Low Concentration CuO Nanoparticle Addition to Its Viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu Lasfargues; Hui Cao; Qiao Geng; Yulong Ding

    2015-01-01

    This paper is focused on the characterisation and demonstration of Newtonian behaviour of salt at both high and low shear rate for sodium and potassium nitrate eutectic mixture (60/40) ranging from 250 °C to 500 °C. Analysis of published and experimental data was carried out to correlate all the numbers into one meaningful 4th order polynomial equation. Addition of a low amount of copper oxide nanoparticles to the mixture increased viscosity of 5.0%–18.0% compared to the latter equation.

  2. Nitrate-Bridged One-Dimension Coordination Polymer Self-Assembled from a N4O2-Tetraiminodiphenolate Dicopper(II Macrocyclic Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar da Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we report on the synthesis and single crystal X-ray structure characterization of [{Cu2(tidf(μ-NO3}∞]ClO4 (tidf = a Robson type macrocyclic ligand obtained upon condensation of 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol and 1,3-diaminopropane. The coordination geometry around the copper(II is square-pyramidal and has [Cu2(tidf]2+ units connected to each other through nitrate bridges extending as a one-dimension coordination polymer. The compound exhibits an extensive supramolecular structure supported by nonclassic hydrogen bonding between C-H⋯Operchlorate and C-H⋯Onitrate.

  3. Protein tyrosine nitration in pea roots during development and senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpas, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is a post-translational modification mediated by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that is associated with nitro-oxidative damage. No information about this process is available in relation to higher plants during development and senescence. Using pea plants at different developmental stages (ranging from 8 to 71 days), tyrosine nitration in the main organs (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits) was analysed using immunological and proteomic approaches. In the roots of 71-day-old senescent plants, nitroproteome analysis enabled the identification a total of 16 nitrotyrosine-immunopositive proteins. Among the proteins identified, NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), an enzyme involved in the carbon and nitrogen metabolism, redox regulation, and responses to oxidative stress, was selected to evaluate the effect of nitration. NADP-ICDH activity fell by 75% during senescence. Analysis showed that peroxynitrite inhibits recombinant cytosolic NADP-ICDH activity through a process of nitration. Of the 12 tyrosines present in this enzyme, mass spectrometric analysis of nitrated recombinant cytosolic NADP-ICDH enabled this study to identify the Tyr392 as exclusively nitrated by peroxynitrite. The data as a whole reveal that protein tyrosine nitration is a nitric oxide-derived PTM prevalent throughout root development and intensifies during senescence. PMID:23362300

  4. Treatment of nitrate contaminated water using an electrochemical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Feng, Chuanping; Zhang, Zhenya; Yang, Shengjiong; Sugiura, Norio

    2010-08-01

    Treatment of nitrate contaminated water which is unsuitable for biological removal using an electrochemical method with Fe as a cathode and Ti/IrO(2)-Pt as an anode in an undivided cell was studied. In the absence and presence of 0.50 g/L NaCl, the nitrate-N decreased from 100.0 to 7.2 and 12.9 mg/L in 180 min, respectively, and no ammonia and nitrite by-products were detected in the presence of NaCl. The nitrate reduction rate increased with increasing current density, with the nitrate reduction rate constant k(1) increasing from 0.008 min(-1) (10 mA/cm(2)) to 0.016 min(-1) (60 mA/cm(2)) but decreasing slightly with increasing NaCl concentration. High temperature favoured nitrate reduction and the reaction followed first order kinetics. The combination of the Fe cathode and Ti/IrO(2)-Pt anode was suitable for nitrate reduction between initial pH values 3.0 and 11.0. e.g. k(1)=0.010 min(-1) (initial pH 3.0) and k(1)=0.013 min(-1) (initial pH 11.0). Moreover, the surface of all used cathodes appeared rougher than unused electrodes, which may have increased the nitrate reduction rate (4-6%). Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nitrate pollution study in the aquifer of Dakar (Senegal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandia, A A; Diop, E S; Gaye, C B; Travi, Y

    2000-01-01

    Dakar is a peninsula inhabited by a population of about 2 million people in 1996. In some dug wells and piezometers, the nitrate content (NO3.) in the groundwater is above the World Health Organization (WHO) limit of 50 mg/l. In the unconfined part of the aquifer of the peninsula, all the samples from wells are contaminated by high nitrate contents which increased over time from 100 mg/l in 1987 to more than 250 mg/l in 1996. Only a limited area is affected by nitrate pollution in the confined layer. The results indicate anthropogenic pollution, a fact which indicates the increasing risk of pollution of drinking-water resources. Studies in the unsaturated zone and familiarity with the sanitation practices in the area indicate that the horizontal and vertical flux are linked mainly to defective septic tanks and direct organic waste elimination into the soil by more than 40% of the inhabitants. The correlation between tritium values (3H) and nitrate shows that the source of nitrate is recent. The relation of oxygen 18 (18O) to deuterium (2H) in water with high nitrate levels indicates that the concentrations of nitrate have been identified in evaporated points.

  6. Reduction of nitrate by bimetallic Fe/Ni nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Haiyan; Xiu, Zongming; Chen, Jiawei; Cao, Wenping; Guo, Yifei; Li, Tielong; Jin, Zhaohui

    2012-09-01

    Bimetallic Fe/Ni nanoparticles were synthesized and their nitrate reduction capacity was studied. Nitrate (354 mg L(-1), equal to 5.71 mmol L(-1)) reduction was performed using Fe/Ni nanoparticles with various Ni contents (1.0, 5.0, 10 and 20%) in an unbuffered condition. Optimum nitrate reduction rate (1.03 +/- 0.087 x 10(-4) mol x min(-1) x greduc(-1)) was obtained with 5.0% nano-scale Fe/Ni, while only 25% nitrate (1.05 +/- 0.091 x 10(-5) mol x min(-1) x greduc(-1)) was transformed by nano-scale Fe(0) within the same reaction time, which means that these bimetallic nanoparticles are obviously more reactive than monometallic nano-scale Fe(0). For this bimetallic system a near-neutral initial pH (6.5) is more favourable than an acidic condition (2.0 and 4.0). Relatively air-stable nano-scale Fe/Ni particles were developed by slowly aging them for 22 h and exhibited similar reactivity to freshly synthesized nano-scale Fe(0). Although undesirable transformation of nitrate (91.0 +/- 0.37%) to ammonium was observed in this study, Fe/Ni particles showed a much higher nitrate reduction rate and an optimum reduction rate at near-neutral pH, which may have important implications for nitrate-contaminated site remediation.

  7. Nitrate in groundwater of the United States, 1991-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, Karen R.; Nolan, Bernard T.; Rupert, Michael G.; Dubrovsky, Neil M.

    2010-01-01

    An assessment of nitrate concentrations in groundwater in the United States indicates that concentrations are highest in shallow, oxic groundwater beneath areas with high N inputs. During 1991-2003, 5101 wells were sampled in 51 study areas throughout the U.S. as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. The well networks reflect the existing used resource represented by domestic wells in major aquifers (major aquifer studies), and recently recharged groundwater beneath dominant land-surface activities (land-use studies). Nitrate concentrations were highest in shallow groundwater beneath agricultural land use in areas with well-drained soils and oxic geochemical conditions. Nitrate concentrations were lowest in deep groundwater where groundwater is reduced, or where groundwater is older and hence concentrations reflect historically low N application rates. Classification and regression tree analysis was used to identify the relative importance of N inputs, biogeochemical processes, and physical aquifer properties in explaining nitrate concentrations in groundwater. Factors ranked by reduction in sum of squares indicate that dissolved iron concentrations explained most of the variation in groundwater nitrate concentration, followed by manganese, calcium, farm N fertilizer inputs, percent well-drained soils, and dissolved oxygen. Overall, nitrate concentrations in groundwater are most significantly affected by redox conditions, followed by nonpoint-source N inputs. Other water-quality indicators and physical variables had a secondary influence on nitrate concentrations.

  8. Modeling groundwater nitrate concentrations in private wells in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, David C.; Nolan, Bernard T.; Flory, Abigail R.; DellaValle, Curt T.; Ward, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of drinking water by nitrate is a growing problem in many agricultural areas of the country. Ingested nitrate can lead to the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds, potent carcinogens. We developed a predictive model for nitrate concentrations in private wells in Iowa. Using 34,084 measurements of nitrate in private wells, we trained and tested random forest models to predict log nitrate levels by systematically assessing the predictive performance of 179 variables in 36 thematic groups (well depth, distance to sinkholes, location, land use, soil characteristics, nitrogen inputs, meteorology, and other factors). The final model contained 66 variables in 17 groups. Some of the most important variables were well depth, slope length within 1 km of the well, year of sample, and distance to nearest animal feeding operation. The correlation between observed and estimated nitrate concentrations was excellent in the training set (r-square = 0.77) and was acceptable in the testing set (r-square = 0.38). The random forest model had substantially better predictive performance than a traditional linear regression model or a regression tree. Our model will be used to investigate the association between nitrate levels in drinking water and cancer risk in the Iowa participants of the Agricultural Health Study cohort.

  9. Circuit Design for Sensor Detection Signal Conditioner Nitrate Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robeth Manurung

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate is one of macro nutrients very important for agriculture. The availability of nitrate in soil is limited because it is very easy to leaching by rain, therefore nitrate could be contaminated ground water by  over-process of fertilizer. This process could also produce inefficiency in agriculture if it happened continuesly without pre-analysis of farm field. The answer those problems, it is need to develop the ion sensor system to measure concentrations of nitrat in soil. The system is consist of nitrate ion sensor device, signal conditioning and data acquisition circuit. The design and fabrications of signal conditioning circuit which integrated into ion nitrate sensor system and will apply for agriculture. This sensor has been used amperometric with three electrodes configuration: working, reference  and auxiliarry; the ion senstive membrane has use conductive polymer. The screen printing technique has been choosen to fabricate electrodes and deposition technique for ion sensitive membrane is electropolymerization. The characterization of sensor has been conducted using nitrate standard solution with range of concentration between 1 µM–1 mM. The characterization has shown that sensor has a good response with cureent output between 2.8–4.71 µA, liniearity factor is 99.65% and time response 250 second.

  10. Isoprene nitrates: preparation, separation, identification, yields, and atmospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Lockwood

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Isoprene is an important atmospheric volatile organic compound involved in ozone production and NOx (NO+NO2 sequestration and transport. Isoprene reaction with OH in the presence of NO can form either isoprene hydroxy nitrates ("isoprene nitrates" or convert NO to NO2 which can photolyze to form ozone. While it has been shown that isoprene nitrate production can represent an important sink for NOx in forest impacted environments, there is little experimental knowledge of the relative importance of the individual isoprene nitrate isomers, each of which has a different fate and reactivity. In this work, we have identified the 8 individual isomers and determined their total and individual production yields. The overall yield of isoprene nitrates at atmospheric pressure and 295 K was found to be 0.070(+0.025/−0.015. Three isomers, representing nitrates resulting from OH addition to a terminal carbon, represent 90% of the total IN yield. We also determined the ozone rate constants for three of the isomers, and have calculated their atmospheric lifetimes, which range from ~1–2 h, making their oxidation products likely more important as atmospheric organic nitrates and sinks for nitrogen.

  11. In vivo protein tyrosine nitration in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Juste, Jorge; Colom-Moreno, Rosa; León, José

    2011-01-01

    Nitration of tyrosine (Y) residues of proteins is a low abundant post-translational modification that modulates protein function or fate in animal systems. However, very little is known about the in vivo prevalence of this modification and its corresponding targets in plants. Immunoprecipitation, based on an anti-3-nitroY antibody, was performed to pull-down potential in vivo targets of Y nitration in the Arabidopsis thaliana proteome. Further shotgun liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomic analysis of the immunoprecipitated proteins allowed the identification of 127 proteins. Around 35% of them corresponded to homologues of proteins that have been previously reported to be Y nitrated in other non-plant organisms. Some of the putative in vivo Y-nitrated proteins were further confirmed by western blot with specific antibodies. Furthermore, MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight) analysis of protein spots, separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis from immunoprecipitated proteins, led to the identification of seven nitrated peptides corresponding to six different proteins. However, in vivo nitration sites among putative targets could not be identified by MS/MS. Nevertheless, an MS/MS spectrum with 3-aminoY318 instead of the expected 3-nitroY was found for cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Reduction of nitroY to aminoY during MS-based proteomic analysis together with the in vivo low abundance of these modifications made the identification of nitration sites difficult. In turn, in vitro nitration of methionine synthase, which was also found in the shotgun proteomic screening, allowed unequivocal identification of a nitration site at Y287. PMID:21378116

  12. Magnesium nitrate attenuates blood pressure rise in SHR rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilskersts, Reinis; Kuka, Janis; Liepinsh, Edgars; Cirule, Helena; Gulbe, Anita; Kalvinsh, Ivars; Dambrova, Maija

    2014-01-01

    The administration of magnesium supplements and nitrates/nitrites decreases arterial blood pressure and attenuates the development of hypertension-induced complications. This study was performed to examine the effects of treatment with magnesium nitrate on the development of hypertension and its complications in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. Male SHR rats with persistent hypertension at the age of 12-13 weeks were allocated to two groups according to their arterial blood pressure. Rats from the control group received purified water, while the experimental animals from the second group received magnesium nitrate dissolved in purified water at a dose of 50 mg/kg. After four weeks of treatment, blood pressure was measured, the anatomical and functional parameters of the heart were recorded using an ultrasonograph, vascular reactivity was assayed in organ bath experiments and the cardioprotective effects of magnesium nitrate administration was assayed in an ex vivo experimental heart infarction model. Treatment with magnesium nitrate significantly increased the nitrate concentration in the plasma (from 62 ± 8 μmol/l to 111 ± 8 μmol/L), and attenuated the increase in the arterial blood pressure. In the control and magnesium nitrate groups, the blood pressure rose by 21 ± 3 mmHg and 6 ± 4 mmHg, respectively. The administration of magnesium nitrate had no effect on the altered vasoreactivity, heart function or the size of the heart infarction. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that magnesium nitrate effectively attenuates the rise in arterial blood pressure. However, a longer period of administration or earlier onset of treatment might be needed to delay the development of complications due to hypertension.

  13. Electrochemical nucleation and growth of copper and copper alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wenbo

    This dissertation aims to contribute to a fundamental understanding of the physicochemical processes occurring in electrochemical nucleation and growth. To this end, the effects of various anions (chloride (Cl-), sulfate (SO42-) and sulfamate (NH2SO 3-)) on the electrochemical kinetics and the mechanism of copper reduction, as well as on the microstructure of the resulting films, were studied. On the basis of this work, the deposition of copper alloys (Cu-Ag with positive heat of mixing, Cu-Au with negative heat of mixing) was investigated with the main objective to achieve an insight on the role of solid state thermodynamics on the electrocrystallization process. Chloride ions cause two competing effects: at low chloride concentration the formation of an adsorbed chloride layer introduces an additional reaction pathway, resulting in an overall depolarization of the reduction process with no significant change of the Tafel slope. At high chloride concentration, complexation phenomena induce a cathodic polarization of the deposition process and a decrease in the Tafel slope. Chlorides cause a decrease in the density and an increased size of copper nuclei. Sulfamate depolarizes copper reduction the most and results in the largest nucleus density. Chloride promotes the faceting, and dendritic growth of copper deposits along direction by introducing interfacial anisotropy. Addition of Ag in the solution or in the electrode substrate enhances copper deposition and results in an additional reduction peak. Codeposition of Cu-Ag increases nucleus density and decreases nucleus size. Such enhancement of copper deposition, the increase in nucleus density and the decrease in nucleus size by Ag could be due to the continued formation of a surface alloy of Cu-Ag and the fast interface dynamics of Ag deposition. Cu can be underpotentially codeposited in the Cu-Au alloy. Homogeneous solid solutions are grown under conditions of underpotential deposition of Cu, while precipitation

  14. Protein tyrosine nitration in cellular signal transduction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Vasily A.; Mikkelsen, Ross B.

    2015-01-01

    How specificity and reversibility in tyrosine nitration are defined biologically in cellular systems is poorly understood. As more investigations identify proteins involved in cell regulatory pathways in which only a small fraction of that protein pool is modified by nitration to affect cell function, the mechanisms of biological specificity and reversal should come into focus. In this review experimental evidence has been summarized to suggest that tyrosine nitration is a highly selective modification and under certain physiological conditions fulfills the criteria of a physiologically relevant signal. It can be specific, reversible, occurs on a physiological time scale, and, depending on a target, can result in either activation or inhibition. PMID:20843272

  15. Electrolytic Removal of Nitrate From CELSS Crop Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Guillermo; Sager, John

    1996-01-01

    The controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) resource recovery system is a waste processing system using aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors to recover plant nutrients and secondary foods from inedible biomass. Crop residues contain significant amounts of nitrate which presents two problems: (1) both CELSS biomass production and resource recovery consume large quantities of nitric acid, (2) nitrate causes a variety of problems in both aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors. A technique was proposed to remove the nitrate from potato inedible biomass leachate and to satisfy the nitric acid demand using a four compartment electrolytic cell.

  16. Soybean nitrate reductase activity influenced by manganese nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Damien P., Heenan; Lindsay C., Campbell; Department of Agronomy and Horticultural Science, University of Sydney

    1980-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation by soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merrill cvv. Lee and Bragg] was investigated in plants grown in solution culture at manganese concentrations of 0, 1.8 and 275 μM and at day-night temperatures of 33-28℃ and 22-17℃. Manganese deficiency occurred in plants of both cultivars grown at 0 μM Mn; under these conditions, leaf nitrate concentration increased in both cultivars and nitrate reductase activity in vivo but not in vitro was reduced. High solution Mn (275 μM) produced sympt...

  17. Electrochemical behaviour of alkaline copper complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C L Aravinda; S M Mayanna; V R Muralidharan

    2000-10-01

    A search for non-cyanide plating baths for copper resulted in the development of alkaline copper complex baths containing trisodium citrate [TSC] and triethanolamine [TEA]. Voltammetric studies were carried out on platinum to understand the electrochemical behaviour of these complexes. In TSC solutions, the deposition of copper involves the slow formation of a monovalent species. Adsorption of this species obeys Langmuir isotherm. In TEA solutions the deposition involves the formation of monovalent ions obeying the non-activated Temkin isotherm. Conversion of divalent to monovalent copper is also slow. In TEA and TSC alkaline copper solutions, the predominant species that undergo stepwise reduction contain only TEA ligands

  18. Inorganic nitrate promotes the browning of white adipose tissue through the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lee D; Ashmore, Tom; Kotwica, Aleksandra O; Murfitt, Steven A; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J; Griffin, Julian L

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic nitrate was once considered an oxidation end product of nitric oxide metabolism with little biological activity. However, recent studies have demonstrated that dietary nitrate can modulate mitochondrial function in man and is effective in reversing features of the metabolic syndrome in mice. Using a combined histological, metabolomics, and transcriptional and protein analysis approach, we mechanistically defined that nitrate not only increases the expression of thermogenic genes in brown adipose tissue but also induces the expression of brown adipocyte-specific genes and proteins in white adipose tissue, substantially increasing oxygen consumption and fatty acid β-oxidation in adipocytes. Nitrate induces these phenotypic changes through a mechanism distinct from known physiological small molecule activators of browning, the recently identified nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway. The nitrate-induced browning effect was enhanced in hypoxia, a serious comorbidity affecting white adipose tissue in obese individuals, and corrected impaired brown adipocyte-specific gene expression in white adipose tissue in a murine model of obesity. Because resulting beige/brite cells exhibit antiobesity and antidiabetic effects, nitrate may be an effective means of inducing the browning response in adipose tissue to treat the metabolic syndrome.

  19. The effect of peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst MnTBAP on aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 nitration by organic nitrates: role in nitrate tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollace, Vincenzo; Muscoli, Carolina; Dagostino, Concetta; Giancotti, Luigino Antonio; Gliozzi, Micaela; Sacco, Iolanda; Visalli, Valeria; Gratteri, Santo; Palma, Ernesto; Malara, Natalia; Musolino, Vincenzo; Carresi, Cristina; Muscoli, Saverio; Vitale, Cristiana; Salvemini, Daniela; Romeo, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Bioconversion of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) into nitric oxide (NO) by aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH-2) is a crucial mechanism which drives vasodilatory and antiplatelet effect of organic nitrates in vitro and in vivo. Oxidative stress generated by overproduction of free radical species, mostly superoxide anions and NO-derived peroxynitrite, has been suggested to play a pivotal role in the development of nitrate tolerance, though the mechanism still remains unclear. Here we studied the free radical-dependent impairment of ALDH-2 in platelets as well as vascular tissues undergoing organic nitrate ester tolerance and potential benefit when using the selective peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst Mn(III) tetrakis (4-Benzoic acid) porphyrin (MnTBAP). Washed human platelets were made tolerant to nitrates via incubation with GTN for 4h. This was expressed by attenuation of platelet aggregation induced by thrombin (40U/mL), an effect accompanied by GTN-related induction of cGMP levels in platelets undergoing thrombin-induced aggregation. Both effects were associated to attenuated GTN-induced nitrite formation in platelets supernatants and to prominent nitration of ALDH-2, the GTN to NO metabolizing enzyme, suggesting that GTN tolerance was associated to reduced NO formation via impairment of ALDH-2. These effects were all antagonized by co-incubation of platelets with MnTBAP, which restored GTN-induced responses in tolerant platelets. Comparable effect was found under in in vivo settings. Indeed, MnTBAP (10mg/kg, i.p.) significantly restored the hypotensive effect of bolus injection of GTN in rats made tolerants to organic nitrates via chronic administration of isosorbide-5-mononitrate (IS-5-MN), thus confirming the role of peroxynitrite overproduction in the development of tolerance to vascular responses induced by organic nitrates. In conclusion, oxidative stress subsequent to prolonged use of organic nitrates, which occurs via nitration of ALDH-2, represents a key event

  20. Crystallization of copper metaphosphate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Byeong-Soo; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the valence state of copper in copper metaphosphate glass on the crystallization behavior and glass transition temperature has been investigated. The crystallization of copper metaphosphate is initiated from the surface and its main crystalline phase is copper metaphosphate (Cu(PO)3),independent of the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)). However, the crystal morphology, the relative crystallization rates, and their temperature dependences are affected by the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu (total)) ratio in the glass. On the other hand, the totally oxidized glass crystallizes from all over the surface. The relative crystallization rate of the reduced glass to the totally oxidized glass is large at low temperature, but small at high temperature. The glass transition temperature of the glass increases as the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)) ratio is raised. It is also found that the atmosphere used during heat treatment does not influence the crystallization of the reduced glass, except for the formation of a very thin CuO surface layer when heated in air.

  1. Spectroscopic studies of copper enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, D.M.; Moog, R.; Zumft, W.; Koenig, S.H.; Scott, R.A.; Cote, C.E.; McGuirl, M.

    1986-05-01

    Several spectroscopic methods, including absorption, circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), X-ray absorption, resonance Raman, EPR, NMR, and quasi-elastic light-scattering spectroscopy, have been used to probe the structures of copper-containing amine oxidases, nitrite reductase, and nitrous oxide reductase. The basic goals are to determine the copper site structure, electronic properties, and to generate structure-reactivity correlations. Collectively, the results on the amine oxidases permit a detailed model for the Cu(II) sites in these enzymes to be constructed that, in turn, rationalizes the ligand-binding chemistry. Resonance Raman spectra of the phenylhydrazine and 2,4-dinitrophenyl-hydrazine derivatives of bovine plasma amine oxidase and models for its organic cofactor, e.g. pyridoxal, methoxatin, are most consistent with methoxatin being the intrinsic cofactor. The structure of the Cu(I) forms of the amine oxidases have been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS); the copper coordination geometry is significantly different in the oxidized and reduced forms. Some anomalous properties of the amine oxidases in solution are explicable in terms of their reversible aggregation, which the authors have characterized via light scattering. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases display several novel spectral properties. The data suggest that new types of copper sites are present.

  2. Copper complexes as chemical nucleases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhil R Chakravarty; Pattubala A N Reddy; Bidyut K Santra; Anitha M Thomas

    2002-08-01

    Redox active mononuclear and binuclear copper(II) complexes have been prepared and structurally characterized. The complexes have planar N-donor heterocyclic bases like 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), dipyridoquinoxaline (dpq) and dipyridophenazine (dppz) ligands that are suitable for intercalation to B-DNA. Complexes studied for nuclease activity have the formulations [Cu(dpq)2(H2O)] (ClO4)2.H2O (1), [{CuL(H2O)}2(-ox)](ClO4)2 (L = bpy, 2; phen, 3; dpq, 4; and dppz, 5) and [Cu(L)(salgly)] (L = bpy, 6; phen, 7; dpq, 8; and dppz, 9), where salgly is a tridentate Schiff base obtained from the condensation of glycine and salicylaldehyde. The dpq complexes are efficient DNA binding and cleavage active species. The dppz complexes show good binding ability but poor nuclease activity. The cleavage activity of the bis-dpq complex is significantly higher than the bis-phen complex of copper(II). The nuclease activity is found to be dependent on the intercalating nature of the complex and on the redox potential of the copper(II)/copper(I) couple. The ancillary ligand plays a significant role in binding and cleavage activity.

  3. Copper proteomes, phylogenetics and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaria, Leonardo; Bertini, Ivano; Williams, Robert J P

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of our study of the connection between the changing environment and the changing use of particular elements in organisms in the course of their combined evolution (Decaria, Bertini and Williams, Metallomics, 2010, 2, 706). Here we treat the changes in copper proteins in historically the same increasingly oxidising environmental conditions. The study is a bioinformatic analysis of the types and the numbers of copper domains of proteins from 435 DNA sequences of a wide range of organisms available in NCBI, using the method developed by Andreini, Bertini and Rosato in Accounts of Chemical Research 2009, 42, 1471. The copper domains of greatest interest are found predominantly in copper chaperones, homeostatic proteins and redox enzymes mainly used outside the cytoplasm which are in themselves somewhat diverse. The multiplicity of these proteins is strongly marked. The contrasting use of the iron and heme iron proteins in oxidations, mostly in the cytoplasm, is compared with them and with activity of zinc fingers during evolution. It is shown that evolution is a coordinated development of the chemistry of elements with use of novel and multiple copies of their proteins as their availability rises in the environment.

  4. CopperCore Service Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogten, Hubert; Martens, Harrie; Nadolski, Rob; Tattersall, Colin; van Rosmalen, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    In an e-learning environment there is a need to integrate various e-learning services like assessment services, collaboration services, learning design services and communication services. In this article we present the design and implementation of a generic integrative service framework, called CopperCore Service Integration (CCSI). We will…

  5. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia over copper-cerium composite catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jie-Chung; Hung, Chang-Mao; Yang, Sheng-Fu

    2004-01-01

    This work considers the oxidation of ammonia (NH3) by selective catalytic oxidation (SCO) over a copper (Cu)-cerium (Ce) composite catalyst at temperatures between 150 and 400 degrees C. A Cu-Ce composite catalyst was prepared by coprecipitation of copper nitrate and cerium nitrate at various molar concentrations. This study also considers how the concentration of influent NH3 (500-1000 ppm), the space velocity (72,000-110,000 hr(-1)), the relative humidity (12-18%) and the concentration of oxygen (4-20%) affect the operational stability and the capacity for removing NH3. The effects of the O2 and NH3 content of the carrier gas on the catalyst's reaction rate also are considered. The experimental results show that the extent of conversion of NH3 by SCO in the presence of the Cu-Ce composite catalyst was a function of the molar ratio. The NH3 was removed by oxidation in the absence of Cu-Ce composite catalyst, and approximately 99.2% NH3 reduction was achieved during catalytic oxidation over the Cu-Ce (6:4, molar/molar) catalyst at 400 degrees C with an O2 content of 4%. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of NH3 in the gaseous phase was also monitored at a gas hourly space velocity of less than 92,000 hr(-1).

  6. Reactivity test between beryllium and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kato, M. [NGK Insulators, Ltd., Aichi-ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium has been expected for using as plasma facing material on ITER. And, copper alloy has been proposed as heat sink material behind plasma facing components. Therefore, both materials must be joined. However, the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper alloy does not clear in detail. For example, other authors reported that beryllium reacted with copper at high temperature, but it was not obvious about the generation of reaction products and increasing of the reaction layer. In the present work, from this point, for clarifying the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper, the out-of-pile compatibility tests were conducted with diffusion couples of beryllium and copper which were inserted in the capsule filled with high purity helium gas (6N). Annealing temperatures were 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700{degrees}C, and annealing periods were 100, 300 and 1000h. Beryllium specimens were hot pressed beryllium, and copper specimens were OFC (Oxygen Free Copper).

  7. Friction stir welding of copper alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Shuhua; Liu Meng; Wang Deqing; Xu Zhenyue

    2007-01-01

    Copper plates,brass plates and copper/brass plates were friction stir welded with various parameters. Experimental results show that the microstructure of the weld is characterized by its much finer grains as contrasted with the coarse grains of parent materials and the heat-affected zones are very narrow. The microhardness of the copper weld is a little higher than that of parent plate. The microhardness of brass weld is about 25% higher than that of parent material. The tensile strength of copper joints increases with increasing welding speed in the test range. The range of parameters to obtain good welds for copper is much wider than that for brass. When different materials were welded, the position of copper plate before welding affected the quality of FSW joints. If the copper plate was put on the advancing side of weld, the good quality of weld could be got under proper parameters.

  8. Catastrophic Oxidation of Copper: A Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousov, V. V.; Klimashin, A. A.

    2012-10-01

    A brief review of the current understanding of copper accelerated oxidation in the presence of low-melting oxides (Bi2O3, MoO3, and V2O5) is given. Special attention is paid to the kinetics, thermodynamics, and mechanisms of accelerated oxidation of copper. The mechanisms of two stages (fast and superfast) of the copper accelerated oxidation are considered. It is shown that the fast oxidation of copper occurs by a diffusion mechanism. Oxygen diffusion along the liquid channels in the oxide scale is the rate-limiting step in the overall mechanism. The superfast oxidation of copper occurs by a fluxing mechanism. Realization of the particular mechanism depends on the mass ratio of low-melting oxide to the metal. The mass ratios of low-melting oxide to the metal and the oxygen partial pressures for superfast oxidation of copper are established. A model of the fast oxidation of copper is discussed.

  9. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.

    1999-11-23

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  10. Reaction of lanthanide nitrates with macrocyclic amidoacylhydrazones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinka, E.V.; Bondarev, M.L.; Bel' tyukova, S.V.; Poleuktov, N.S.; Nazarenko, N.A.

    1987-09-01

    This paper deals with a study of the reaction of neodymium and europium nitrates with 3,5,14,16-tetraazasubstituted dibenzo (d,j) (1,2,6,9,13,14) hexaazahexadeca-2,4,10,12-tetraene-7,8,15,16-tetraones. The authors carried out the investigations by means of conductimetry, UV luminescence, IR spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy. Conductimetric titrations of the neodymium complexes were carried out on an OK-102/1 conductimeter. The luminescence spectra of the europium ion in the region of the /sup 5/D/sub 0/ ..-->.. /sup 7/F/sub 1/ and /sup 5/D/sub 0/ ..-->.. /sup 7/F/sub 2/ transitions (550-620 nm) were recorded on an ISP-51 spectrograph with an FEP-1 photoelectric attachment, using excitation by an SVD-120A mercury quartz lamp. The UV spectra of solutions of the compounds and the IR spectra of the solid substances in KBr disks were recorded on SpecordUViS and UR-20 spectrophotometers, respectively, and the mass spectra on a Varian Mat-112 spectrometer.

  11. Ammonium nitrate: a promising rocket propellant oxidizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen; Jain

    1999-06-30

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) is extensively used in the area of fertilizers and explosives. It is present as the major component in most industrial explosives. Its use as an oxidizer in the area of propellants, however, is not as extensive as in explosive compositions or gas generators. With the growing demand for environmental friendly chlorine free propellants, many attempts have been made of late to investigate oxidizers producing innocuous combustion products. AN, unlike the widely used ammonium perchlorate, produces completely ecofriendly smokeless products. Besides, it is one of the cheapest and easily available compounds. However, its use in large rocket motors is restricted due to some of its adverse characteristics like hygroscopicity, near room temperature phase transformation involving a volume change, and low burning rate (BR) and energetics. The review is an attempt to consolidate the information available on the various issues pertaining to its use as a solid propellant oxidizer. Detailed discussions on the aspects relating to phase modifications, decomposition chemistry, and BR and energetics of AN-based propellants, are presented. To make the review more comprehensive brief descriptions of the history, manufacture, safety, physical and chemical properties and various other applications of the salt are also included. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. Preparation of GdBCO Thin Film by Ex-situ Process using Nitrate Precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byeong Joo; Le, Chul Sun; Lee, Jong Beom; Lee, Hee Gyoun; Hong, Gye Won [Korea Polytechnic University, Siheung (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Hun; Moon, Sung Hyun [SuNAM Co., Anseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Many research groups have been manufacturing coated conductor by various processes such as PLD, MOD, and MOCVD, but the methods with production cost suitable for wide and massive application of coated conductor did not develop yet. Spray pyrolysis method adopting ultrasonic atomization was tried as one of the possible option. GdBCO precursor films have been deposited on IBAD substrate by spray pyrolysis method at low temperature and converted to GdBCO by post heat treatment. Ultrasonic atomization was used to generate fine droplets from precursor solution of Gd, Ba, and Cu nitrate dissolved in water. Primary GdBCO films were deposited at 500 degree C and oxygen partial pressure of 1 torr. After that, the films were converted at various temperatures and low oxygen partial pressures. C-Axis oriented films were obtained IBAD substrates at conversion temperature of around 870 degree C and oxygen partial pressures of 500 mtorr - 1 torr in a vacuum. Thick c-axis epitaxial film with the thickness of 0.4 - 0.5 {mu}m was obtained on IBAD substrate. C-axis epitaxial GdBCO films were successfully prepared by ex-situ methods using nitrate precursors on IBAD metal substrate. Converted GdBCO films have very dense microstructures with good grain connectivity. EDS composition analysis of the film showed a number of Cu-rich phase in surface. The precursor solution having high copper concent with the composition of Gd : Ba : Cu = 1 : 2 : 4 showed the better grain connectivity and electrical conductivity.

  13. On the optimum conditions for the reduction of nitrate to nitrite by cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nydahl, F

    1976-05-01

    The variables of direct importance in the reduction of nitrate to nitrite by a metallic reductant such as cadmium used in a reductor column are discussed with special reference to the determination of nitrate as nitrite in very dilute solutions, e.g., natural waters. As a result of these considerations the effect of flow-rate (expressed as bed-volumes min ), pH, temperature, chloride concentration and various types of reductor cadmium on the yield of nitrite is investigated. The effect of dissolved oxygen in the sample solution on pH and cadmium concentration in the reduced solution is demonstrated. At constant pH a maximum yield of nitrite is obtained at a certain flow-rate, which is explained as the result of a rapid formation and simultaneously proceeding slow reduction of nitrite. With increasing pH this maximum is shifted to lower flow-rates, and grows broader whilst the yield at maximum approaches 100%; at pH 9.5 a yield of 99.9 +/- 0.1% is obtained. The temperature has little effect on the reduction rate in the interval 20-30 degrees but at 10 degrees the reduction is noticeably slower. Chloride ions have a strongly retarding effect on the reduction rate but the yield at maximum is not affected. Electrolytically precipitated cadmium, filings of pure cadmium or amalgamated pure cadmium all give practically the same yield at maximum though some differences in reduction rate are observed. Impure cadmium or copper-cadmium and silver-cadmium, owing to the formation of galvanic cells with higher reducing power, give a high reduction rate, which also applies to nitrite, causing a poorer yield at maximum. The practical consequences of the results are thoroughly discussed.

  14. Radiation resistance of copper alloys at high exposure levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, F.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Zinkle, S.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Copper alloys are currently being considered for high heat flux applications in fusion power devices. A review is presented of the results of two separate series of experiments on the radiation response of copper and copper alloys. One of these involved pure copper and boron-doped copper in the ORR mixed spectrum reactor. The other series included pure copper and a wide array of copper alloys irradiated in the FFTF fast reactor 16 refs., 13 figs.

  15. Abnormal Copper Homeostasis: Mechanisms and Roles in Neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Manto

    2014-01-01

    As a cofactor of proteins and enzymes involved in critical molecular pathways in mammals and low eukaryotes, copper is a transition metal essential for life. The intra-cellular and extra-cellular metabolism of copper is under tight control, in order to maintain free copper concentrations at very low levels. Copper is a critical element for major neuronal functions, and the central nervous system is a major target of disorders of copper metabolism. Both the accumulation of copper and copper d...

  16. Smelting chlorination method applied to removal of copper from copper slags

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李磊; 王华; 胡建杭

    2015-01-01

    In order to reasonably utilize the iron resources of copper slags, the smelting chlorination process was used to remove copper from copper slags. Higher holding temperature and O2 flow rate are beneficial to increasing copper removal rate. However, the Cu2O mode is formed by the reaction of surplus O2 and CuCl with O2 flow rate increasing over 0.4 L/min, causing CuCl volatilization rate and copper removal rate to decrease. The resulting copper removal rate of 84.34%is obtained under the optimum conditions of holding temperature of 1573 K, residence time of 10 min, CaCl2 addition amount of 0.1 (mass ratio of CaCl2 and the copper slag) and oxygen flow rate of 0.4 L/min. The efficient removal of copper from copper slags through chlorination is feasible.

  17. Grain Refinement of Deoxidized Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balart, María José; Patel, Jayesh B.; Gao, Feng; Fan, Zhongyun

    2016-10-01

    This study reports the current status of grain refinement of copper accompanied in particular by a critical appraisal of grain refinement of phosphorus-deoxidized, high residual P (DHP) copper microalloyed with 150 ppm Ag. Some deviations exist in terms of the growth restriction factor ( Q) framework, on the basis of empirical evidence reported in the literature for grain size measurements of copper with individual additions of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.5 wt pct of Mo, In, Sn, Bi, Sb, Pb, and Se, cast under a protective atmosphere of pure Ar and water quenching. The columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) has been observed in copper, with an individual addition of 0.4B and with combined additions of 0.4Zr-0.04P and 0.4Zr-0.04P-0.015Ag and, in a previous study, with combined additions of 0.1Ag-0.069P (in wt pct). CETs in these B- and Zr-treated casts have been ascribed to changes in the morphology and chemistry of particles, concurrently in association with free solute type and availability. No further grain-refining action was observed due to microalloying additions of B, Mg, Ca, Zr, Ti, Mn, In, Fe, and Zn (~0.1 wt pct) with respect to DHP-Cu microalloyed with Ag, and therefore are no longer relevant for the casting conditions studied. The critical microalloying element for grain size control in deoxidized copper and in particular DHP-Cu is Ag.

  18. Nitration of Polystyrene Part-I Effect of Molecular Weight of Polymer on Nitration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bajaj

    1967-01-01

    Full Text Available Polystyrene in the molecular weight range, 3.67*10/Sup4 to 47.86*10/Sup10 has been nitrated in fuming nitric acid at 50 Degree C and degree of substitution of nitro group per monomeric unit in the polymer chains varying from 1.03 to 1.11 has been obtained. Molecular weight of the initial polymers have been found no appreciable effect on the degree of substitution. Degradation of the polymer chain is, however, found to be more pronounced in high molecular weight polymers.

  19. Mechanisms of peroxynitrite-mediated nitration of tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaydin, Hakan; Houk, K N

    2009-05-01

    The mechanisms of tyrosine nitration by peroxynitrous acid or nitrosoperoxycarbonate were investigated with the CBS-QB3 method. Either the protonation of peroxynitrite or a reaction with carbon dioxide gives a reactive peroxide intermediate. Peroxynitrous acid-mediated nitration of phenol occurs via unimolecular decomposition to give nitrogen dioxide and hydroxyl radicals. Nitrosoperoxycarbonate also undergoes unimolecular decomposition to give carbonate and nitrogen dioxide radicals. The reactions of tyrosine with the hydroxyl or carbonate radicals give a phenoxy radical intermediate. The reaction of the nitrogen dioxide with this radical intermediate followed by tautomerization gives nitrated tyrosine in both cases. According to CBS-QB3 calculations, the rate-limiting step for the nitration of phenol is the decomposition of peroxynitrous acid or nitrosoperoxycarbonate.

  20. Biological nitrate removal using wheat straw and PLA as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhenxing; Hu, Jun; Wang, Jianlong

    2012-01-01

    Biological nitrate removal using wheat straw and polylactic acid (PLA) as both carbon source and biofilm support was investigated. The results showed that biofilm could develop on the surface of wheat straw within 15 d, the denitrification rate was 0.067 mg-N/(g-wheat straw x h) and nitrate removal efficiency was about 100%. For PLA, the time required for biofilm development was 40 d, the denitrification rate was 0.0026 mg-N/(g-PLA x h) and nitrate removal efficiency could also reach 100%. Temperature had a substantial influence on the denitrification performance of both wheat straw and PLA. The FTIR analysis and SEM observation confirmed that wheat straw and PLA were used for denitrification, and explained some reasons for the differences between the two substrates. The wheat straw was superior to PLA when used as carbon source for nitrate removal, in terms of the denitrification rate.

  1. Cyclic Voltammetric Responses of Nitrate Reductase on Chemical Modified Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YaRuSONG; HuiBoSHAO; 等

    2002-01-01

    Electrochemistry of nitrate reductases (NR) incorporated into 2-aminoethanethiol self-assembled on the gold electrode and polyacrylamide cast on the pyrolytic graphite electrode was examined. NR on chemical modified electrode showed electrochemical cyclic voltammetric responses in phosphate buffers.

  2. The optical properties of alkali nitrate single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan'ev, Vladimir; Miklin, Mikhail

    2000-08-01

    Absorption of non-polarized light by a uniaxial crystal has been studied. The degree of absorption polarization has been calculated as a function of the ratio of optical densities in the region of low and high absorbances. This function is proposed for analysis of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of uniaxial crystal absorption spectra. Non-polarized light spectra of alkali nitrate single crystals, both pure and doped with thallium, have been studied. It is shown that the absorption band at 300 nm is due to two transitions, whose intensities depend on temperature in various ways. There is a weak band in a short wavelength range of the absorption spectrum of potassium nitrate crystal, whose intensity increases with thallium doping. The band parameters of alkali nitrate single crystals have been calculated. Low-energy transitions in the nitrate ion have been located.

  3. Nitrate reducing activity pervades surface waters during upwelling.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Halarnekar, R.; Malik, A.; Vijayan, V.; Varik, S.; RituKumari; Jineesh V.K.; Gauns, M.U.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Nitrate reducing activity (NRA) is known to be mediated by microaerophilic to anaerobic bacteria and generally occurs in the sub-surface waters. However, we hypothesize that NRA could become prominent in the surface waters during upwelling. Hence...

  4. Deprotection of oximes using urea nitrate under microwave irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P T Perumal; M Anniyappan; D Muralidharan

    2004-08-01

    A new mild and efficient method for the cleavage of oximes to carbonyl compounds using readily available urea nitrate in acetonitrile-water (95 : 5), under microwave irradiation within 2 min, in good yields is reported.

  5. The copper metallome in prokaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, Christopher; McDevitt, Sylvia Franke

    2013-01-01

    As a trace element copper has an important role in cellular function like many other transition metals. Its ability to undergo redox changes [Cu(I) ↔ Cu(II)] makes copper an ideal cofactor in enzymes catalyzing electron transfers. However, this redox change makes copper dangerous for a cell since it is able to be involved in Fenton-like reactions creating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cu(I) also is a strong soft metal and can attack and destroy iron-sulfur clusters thereby releasing iron which can in turn cause oxidative stress. Therefore, copper homeostasis has to be highly balanced to ensure proper cellular function while avoiding cell damage.Throughout evolution bacteria and archaea have developed a highly regulated balance in copper metabolism. While for many prokaryotes copper uptake seems to be unspecific, others have developed highly sophisticated uptake mechanisms to ensure the availability of sufficient amounts of copper. Within the cytoplasm copper is sequestered by various proteins and molecules, including specific copper chaperones, to prevent cellular damage. Copper-containing proteins are usually located in the cytoplasmic membrane with the catalytic domain facing the periplasm, in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria, or they are secreted, limiting the necessity of copper to accumulate in the cytoplasm. To prevent cellular damage due to excess copper, bacteria and archaea have developed various copper detoxification strategies. In this chapter we attempt to give an overview of the mechanisms employed by bacteria and archaea to handle copper and the importance of the metal for cellular function as well as in the global nutrient cycle.

  6. Variations of serum copper values in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukelić Jelka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Copper is essential micronutrient and has an important role in the human body. The serum copper increases during pregnancy and is doubled at full term. Lower levels of serum copper in pregnancy are connected with some pathological conditions. Objective. The aim of this study was to estimate the levels of serum copper in normal and pathological pregnancies, comparing them with values of serum copper in non-pregnant women, to determine if serum copper is lower in some pathological pregnancies and if this is of some importance. Methods. A total of 2170 plasma samples for copper analyses were made in the following groups: healthy non-pregnant women; healthy pregnant women from the 5th-40th gestational week, during the first delivery stage and during the first three postpartum weeks, in pregnant women with habitual abortion, imminent abortion, abortion in progress, missed abortion (9th-24th weeks, missed labour and premature rupture of membranes (29th-40th weeks. Levels of serum copper were determined by colorimetric technique of bathocuproin with disulphate as a chromogen. Results. Serum copper values in non-pregnant women range from 11.6-25.8 μmol/L. In healthy pregnant women, there is a constant trend of the increase of serum copper. The mean serum copper values revealed three significant peaks at the 22nd, 27th and 35th gestational week. Serum copper values in the patients with some pathological pregnancies in relation to the serum copper values of the healthy pregnant women were significantly lower. Conclusion. Serum copper values can be used as an indicator of some pathological pregnancies.

  7. Variations of serum copper values in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukelić, Jelka; Kapamadzija, Aleksandra; Petrović, Djordje; Grujić, Zorica; Novakov-Mikić, Aleksandra; Kopitović, Vesna; Bjelica, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Copper is essential micronutrient and has an important role in the human body. The serum copper increases during pregnancy and is doubled at full term. Lower levels of serum copper in pregnancy are connected with some pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to estimate the levels of serum copper in normal and pathological pregnancies, comparing them with values of serum copper in non-pregnant women, to determine if serum copper is lower in some pathological pregnancies and if this is of some importance. A total of 2170 plasma samples for copper analyses were made in the following groups: healthy non-pregnant women; healthy pregnant women from the 5th-40th gestational week, during the first delivery stage and during the first three postpartum weeks, in pregnant women with habitual abortion, imminent abortion, abortion in progress, missed abortion (9th-24th weeks), missed labour and premature rupture of membranes (29th-40th weeks). Levels of serum copper were determined by colorimetric technique of bathocuproin with disulphate as a chromogen. Serum copper values in non-pregnant women range from 11.6-25.8 micromol/L. In healthy pregnant women, there is a constant trend of the increase of serum copper. The mean serum copper values revealed three significant peaks at the 22nd, 27th and 35th gestational week. Serum copper values in the patients with some pathological pregnancies in relation to the serum copper values of the healthy pregnant women were significantly lower. Serum copper values can be used as an indicator of some pathological pregnancies.

  8. Nitrate leaching from short-hydroperiod floodplain soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Huber

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have shown the importance of riparian zones to reduce nitrate (NO3 contamination coming from adjacent agricultural land. Much less is known about nitrogen (N transformations and nitrate fluxes in riparian soils with short hydroperiods (1–3 days of inundation and there is no study that could show whether these soils are a N sink or source.

    Within a restored section of the Thur River in NE Switzerland, we measured nitrate concentrations in soil solutions as an indicator of the net nitrate production. Samples were collected along a quasi-successional gradient from frequently inundated gravel bars to an alluvial forest, at three different depths (10, 50 and 100 cm over a one-year period. Along this gradient we quantified N input (atmospheric deposition and sedimentation and N output (leaching to create a nitrogen balance and assess the risk of nitrate leaching from the unsaturated soil to the groundwater.

    Overall, the main factor explaining the differences in nitrate concentrations was the variability in soil texture and volumetric water content (VWC at field capacity (FC. In subsoils with high VWC at FC and VWC near 100 % FC, high nitrate concentrations were observed, often exceeding the Swiss and EU groundwater quality criterions of 400 and 800 μmol l−1, respectively. High sedimentation rates of river-derived nitrogen led to apparent N retention up to 200 kg N ha−1 yr−1 in the frequently inundated zones. By contrast, in the mature alluvial forest, nitrate leaching exceeded total N input most of the time. As a result of the large soil N pools, high amounts of nitrate were produced by nitrification and up to 94 kg N-NO3 ha−1 yr−1 were leached into the groundwater. Thus, during flooding when water fluxes are high, nitrate from soils can contribute up to 11 % to the total nitrate load in groundwater.

  9. Nitrate leaching from short-hydroperiod floodplain soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Huber

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have shown the importance of riparian zones to reduce nitrate (NO3 contamination coming from adjacent agricultural land. Much less is known about nitrogen (N transformations and nitrate fluxes in riparian soils with short hydroperiods (1–3 days of inundation and there is no study that could show whether these soils are a N sink or source. Within a restored section of the Thur River in NE Switzerland, we measured nitrate concentrations in soil solutions as an indicator of the net nitrate production. Samples were collected along a quasi-successional gradient from frequently inundated gravel bars to an alluvial forest, at three different depths (10, 50 and 100 cm over a one-year period. Along this gradient we quantified N input (atmospheric deposition and sedimentation and N output (leaching to create a nitrogen balance and assess the risk of nitrate leaching from the unsaturated soil to the groundwater. Overall, the main factor explaining the differences in nitrate concentrations was the field capacity (FC. In subsoils with high FCs and VWC near FC, high nitrate concentrations were observed, often exceeding the Swiss and EU groundwater quality criterions of 400 and 800 μmol L−1, respectively. High sedimentation rates of river-derived nitrogen led to apparent N retention up to 200 kg N ha−1 yr−1 in the frequently inundated zones. By contrast, in the mature alluvial forest, nitrate leaching exceeded total N input most of the time. As a result of the large soil N pools, high amounts of nitrate were produced by nitrification and up to 94 kg N-NO3 ha−1 yr−1 were leached into the groundwater. Thus, during flooding when water fluxes are high, nitrate from soils can contribute up to 11% to the total nitrate load in groundwater.

  10. A Plasmodium falciparum copper-binding membrane protein with copper transport motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choveaux David L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copper is an essential catalytic co-factor for metabolically important cellular enzymes, such as cytochrome-c oxidase. Eukaryotic cells acquire copper through a copper transport protein and distribute intracellular copper using molecular chaperones. The copper chelator, neocuproine, inhibits Plasmodium falciparum ring-to-trophozoite transition in vitro, indicating a copper requirement for malaria parasite development. How the malaria parasite acquires or secretes copper still remains to be fully elucidated. Methods PlasmoDB was searched for sequences corresponding to candidate P. falciparum copper-requiring proteins. The amino terminal domain of a putative P. falciparum copper transport protein was cloned and expressed as a maltose binding fusion protein. The copper binding ability of this protein was examined. Copper transport protein-specific anti-peptide antibodies were generated in chickens and used to establish native protein localization in P. falciparum parasites by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Six P. falciparum copper-requiring protein orthologs and a candidate P. falciparum copper transport protein (PF14_0369, containing characteristic copper transport protein features, were identified in PlasmoDB. The recombinant amino terminal domain of the transport protein bound reduced copper in vitro and within Escherichia coli cells during recombinant expression. Immunolocalization studies tracked the copper binding protein translocating from the erythrocyte plasma membrane in early ring stage to a parasite membrane as the parasites developed to schizonts. The protein appears to be a PEXEL-negative membrane protein. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum parasites express a native protein with copper transporter characteristics that binds copper in vitro. Localization of the protein to the erythrocyte and parasite plasma membranes could provide a mechanism for the delivery of novel anti-malarial compounds.

  11. Conserved Active Site Residues Limit Inhibition of a Copper-Containing Nitrite By Small Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocheva, E.I.; Eltis, L.D.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-05-26

    The interaction of copper-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 ( AfNiR) with each of five small molecules was studied using crystallography and steady-state kinetics. Structural studies revealed that each small molecule interacted with the oxidized catalytic type 2 copper of AfNiR. Three small molecules (formate, acetate and nitrate) mimic the substrate by having at least two oxygen atoms for bidentate coordination to the type 2 copper atom. These three anions bound to the copper ion in the same asymmetric, bidentate manner as nitrite. Consistent with their weak inhibition of the enzyme ( K i >50 mM), the Cu-O distances in these AfNiR-inhibitor complexes were approximately 0.15 A longer than that observed in the AfNiR-nitrite complex. The binding mode of each inhibitor is determined in part by steric interactions with the side chain of active site residue Ile257. Moreover, the side chain of Asp98, a conserved residue that hydrogen bonds to type 2 copper-bound nitrite and nitric oxide, was either disordered or pointed away from the inhibitors. Acetate and formate inhibited AfNiR in a mixed fashion, consistent with the occurrence of second acetate binding site in the AfNiR-acetate complex that occludes access to the type 2 copper. A fourth small molecule, nitrous oxide, bound to the oxidized metal in a side-on fashion reminiscent of nitric oxide to the reduced copper. Nevertheless, nitrous oxide bound at a farther distance from the metal. The fifth small molecule, azide, inhibited the reduction of nitrite by AfNiR most strongly ( K ic = 2.0 +/- 0.1 mM). This ligand bound to the type 2 copper center end-on with a Cu-N c distance of approximately 2 A, and was the only inhibitor to form a hydrogen bond with Asp98. Overall, the data substantiate the roles of Asp98 and Ile257 in discriminating substrate from other small anions.

  12. Accumulation and hyperaccumulation of copper in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, V.; Trnkova, L.; Huska, D.; Babula, P.; Kizek, R.

    2009-04-01

    Copper is natural component of our environment. Flow of copper(II) ions in the environment depends on solubility of compounds containing this metal. Mobile ion coming from soil and rocks due to volcanic activity, rains and others are then distributed to water. Bio-availability of copper is substantially lower than its concentration in the aquatic environment. Copper present in the water reacts with other compounds and creates a complex, not available for organisms. The availability of copper varies depending on the environment, but moving around within the range from 5 to 25 % of total copper. Thus copper is stored in the sediments and the rest is transported to the seas and oceans. It is common knowledge that copper is essential element for most living organisms. For this reason this element is actively accumulated in the tissues. The total quantity of copper in soil ranges from 2 to 250 mg / kg, the average concentration is 30 mg / kg. Certain activities related to agriculture (the use of fungicides), possibly with the metallurgical industry and mining, tend to increase the total quantity of copper in the soil. This amount of copper in the soil is a problem particularly for agricultural production of food. The lack of copper causes a decrease in revenue and reduction in quality of production. In Europe, shows the low level of copper in total 18 million hectares of farmland. To remedy this adverse situation is the increasing use of copper fertilizers in agricultural soils. It is known that copper compounds are used in plant protection against various illnesses and pests. Mining of minerals is for the development of human society a key economic activity. An important site where the copper is mined in the Slovakia is nearby Smolníka. Due to long time mining in his area (more than 700 years) there are places with extremely high concentrations of various metals including copper. Besides copper, there are also detected iron, zinc and arsenic. Various plant species

  13. Protein tyrosine nitration: A new challenge in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Chaki, Mounira; Leterrier, Marina; Juan B Barroso

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide metabolism in plant cells has a relative short history. Nitration is a chemical process which consists of introducing a nitro group (-NO2) into a chemical compound. in biological systems, this process has been found in different molecules such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that can affect its function. This mini-review offers an overview of this process with special emphasis on protein tyrosine nitration in plants and its involvement in the process of nitrosative stress.

  14. Occurrence of nitrate in Tanzanian groundwater aquifers: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisante, Eliapenda; Muzuka, Alfred N. N.

    2017-03-01

    More than 25 % of Tanzanian depends on groundwater as the main source of water for drinking, irrigation and industrial activities. The current trend of land use may lead to groundwater contamination and thus increasing risks associated with the usage of contaminated water. Nitrate is one of the contaminants resulting largely from anthropogenic activities that may find its way to the aquifers and thus threatening the quality of groundwater. Elevated levels of nitrate in groundwater may lead to human health and environmental problems. The current trend of land use in Tanzania associated with high population growth, poor sanitation facilities and fertilizer usage may lead to nitrate contamination of groundwater. This paper therefore aimed at providing an overview of to what extent human activities have altered the concentration of nitrate in groundwater aquifers in Tanzania. The concentration of nitrate in Tanzanian groundwater is variable with highest values observable in Dar es Salaam (up to 477.6 mg/l), Dodoma (up to 441.1 mg/l), Tanga (above 100 mg/l) and Manyara (180 mg/l). Such high values can be attributed to various human activities including onsite sanitation in urban centres and agricultural activities in rural areas. Furthermore, there are some signs of increasing concentration of nitrate in groundwater with time in some areas in response to increased human activities. However, reports on levels and trends of nitrate in groundwater in many regions of the country are lacking. For Tanzania to appropriately address the issue of groundwater contamination, a deliberate move to determine nitrate concentration in groundwater is required, as well as protection of recharge basins and improvement of onsite sanitation systems.

  15. EFFECTS OF POTASSIUM NITRATE ON SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF BRACKETS

    OpenAIRE

    Carrillo Barreto, Diana; Duarte Gómez, Diana; González Acuña, María E.; Madero Gómez, Sandra M.; Morales García, Harold; Delgado, Linda P.; Ordóñez Monak, Ivonne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: During 2010 the degree research “Effects of potassium nitrate on shear bond strength of brackets” was carried out at Universidad Cooperativa de Colombia in Bogota. Objective: To determine whether the use of desensitizing with potassium nitrate affects the bond bracket strength to enamel. Materials and Methods: Forty-five human premolar teeth were randomly allocated in three groups (n = 15 each). Group 1: control (not treated), Group 2: desensitizer treated and after 24-hour brac...

  16. Molecular recognition of nitrated fatty acids by PPAR[gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Jifeng; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Martynowski, Dariusz; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva T.; Kovach, Amanda; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Baker, Paul R.S.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Chen, Y. Eugene; Xu, H. Eric (Pitt); (Michigan); (Van Andel); (Morehouse-MED)

    2010-03-08

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) regulates metabolic homeostasis and adipocyte differentiation, and it is activated by oxidized and nitrated fatty acids. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPAR{gamma} ligand binding domain bound to nitrated linoleic acid, a potent endogenous ligand of PPAR{gamma}. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal the molecular basis of PPAR{gamma} discrimination of various naturally occurring fatty acid derivatives.

  17. Occurrence of nitrate in Tanzanian groundwater aquifers: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisante, Eliapenda; Muzuka, Alfred N. N.

    2015-03-01

    More than 25 % of Tanzanian depends on groundwater as the main source of water for drinking, irrigation and industrial activities. The current trend of land use may lead to groundwater contamination and thus increasing risks associated with the usage of contaminated water. Nitrate is one of the contaminants resulting largely from anthropogenic activities that may find its way to the aquifers and thus threatening the quality of groundwater. Elevated levels of nitrate in groundwater may lead to human health and environmental problems. The current trend of land use in Tanzania associated with high population growth, poor sanitation facilities and fertilizer usage may lead to nitrate contamination of groundwater. This paper therefore aimed at providing an overview of to what extent human activities have altered the concentration of nitrate in groundwater aquifers in Tanzania. The concentration of nitrate in Tanzanian groundwater is variable with highest values observable in Dar es Salaam (up to 477.6 mg/l), Dodoma (up to 441.1 mg/l), Tanga (above 100 mg/l) and Manyara (180 mg/l). Such high values can be attributed to various human activities including onsite sanitation in urban centres and agricultural activities in rural areas. Furthermore, there are some signs of increasing concentration of nitrate in groundwater with time in some areas in response to increased human activities. However, reports on levels and trends of nitrate in groundwater in many regions of the country are lacking. For Tanzania to appropriately address the issue of groundwater contamination, a deliberate move to determine nitrate concentration in groundwater is required, as well as protection of recharge basins and improvement of onsite sanitation systems.

  18. Nitrate assimilation in plant shoots depends on photorespiration

    OpenAIRE

    Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Cousins, Asaph B.; Bloom, Arnold J

    2004-01-01

    Photorespiration, a process that diminishes net photosynthesis by ≈25% in most plants, has been viewed as the unfavorable consequence of plants having evolved when the atmosphere contained much higher levels of carbon dioxide than it does today. Here we used two independent methods to show that exposure of Arabidopsis and wheat shoots to conditions that inhibited photorespiration also strongly inhibited nitrate assimilation. Thus, nitrate assimilation in both dicotyledonous and monocotyledono...

  19. REMEDIATION OF NITRATE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER USING A BIOBARRIER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. STRIETELMEIER; M. ESPINOSA

    2001-01-01

    A biobarrier system has been developed for use in remediating shallow alluvial groundwater. This barrier is made from highly porous materials that are relatively long-lasting, carbon-based (to supply a limiting nutrient in nitrate destruction, in most cases), extremely inexpensive, and easy to replace. In a series of laboratory studies, we have determined the effectiveness of this barrier at destroying nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater from Mortandad Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This groundwater was obtained from a monitoring well, MCO-5, which is located in the flowpath of the discharge waters from the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Water with elevated nitrate levels was discharged from this plant for many years. Recently, the nitrate levels have been brought under the discharge limits. However, the historical discharge has resulted in a nitrate plume in the alluvial groundwater in this canyon. The LANL Multi-Barrier project was initiated in 1999 to develop a system of barriers that would prevent the transport of radionuclides, metals, colloids and other contaminants, including nitrate and perchlorate, further down the canyon in order to protect populations down-gradient. The biobarrier will be part of this Multi-Barrier system. We have demonstrated the destruction of nitrate at levels up to 6.5-9.7 mM nitrate (400-600 mg/L), and that of perchlorate at levels of about 4.3 {micro}M perchlorate (350 ppb). We have quantified the populations of microorganisms present in the biofilm that develops on the biobarrier. The results of this research will be discussed along with other potential applications of this system.

  20. REMEDIATION OF NITRATE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER USING A BIOBARRIER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. STRIETELMEIR; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    A biobarrier system has been developed for use in remediating shallow alluvial groundwater. This barrier is made from highly porous materials that are relatively long-lasting, carbon-based (to supply a limiting nutrient in nitrate destruction, in most cases), and extremely inexpensive and easy to emplace. In a series of laboratory studies, we have determined the effectiveness of this barrier at destroying nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater from Mortandad Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This groundwater was obtained from a monitoring well, MCO-5, which is located in the flowpath of the discharge waters from the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Water with elevated nitrate levels has been discharged from this plant for many years, until recently when the nitrate levels have been brought under the discharge limits. However, the historical discharge has resulted in a nitrate plume in the alluvial groundwater in this canyon. The LANL Multi-Barrier project was initiated this past year to develop a system of barriers that would prevent the transport of radionuclides, metals, colloids and other contaminants, including nitrate and perchlorate, further down the canyon in order to protect populations down-gradient. The biobarrier. will be part of this Multi-Barrier system. We have demonstrated the destruction of nitrate at levels up to 6.5-9.7 mhl nitrate (400-600 mg/L), and that of perchlorate at levels of about 4.3 {micro}M perchlorate (350 ppb). We have quantified the populations of microorganisms present in the biofilm that develops on the biobarrier. The results of this research will be discussed along with other potential applications of this system.