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Sample records for copper corrosion test

  1. Testing Corrosion Inhibitors for the Conservation of Archaeological Copper and Copper Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Faltermeier

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a synopsis of the Ph.D. research undertaken at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. The aim was to evaluate corrosion inhibitors for use in the conservation of copper and copper alloy archaeological artefacts. The objective of this work was to acquire an insight into the performance of copper corrosion inhibitors, when applied to archaeological copper.

  2. Long term corrosion tests of OFHC-coppers in simulated repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.; Varis, P.

    1993-03-01

    This research program 'long term corrosion tests of OFHC-coppers in simulated repository conditions' was planned to provide an experimental evaluation with respect to the theoretical calculations and forecasts made for the corrosion behaviour of OFHC-coppers in bentonite ground water environments at temperatures between 20-80 deg C. The aim of this study in the first place was to evaluate the effects of ground water composition, bentonite and temperature on the equilibrium and possible corrosion reactions between OFHC coppers and the simulated repository environment. The tests were started in 1987 and this final report includes the results obtained after 72 months exposure time. (orig.)

  3. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz [Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-12-15

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 {mu}m were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  4. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  5. Corrosion rate of copper in aqueous lithium bromide concentrated solutions at room temperature by immersion tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Portero, M.J.; Garcia-Anton, J.; Guinon-Segura, J.L.; Perez-Herranz, V. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Concentrated solutions of lithium bromide (LiBr) are widely used in absorption refrigeration and heating systems. However, LiBr solutions can cause serious corrosion problems in structural materials (copper, steels, and other metals) in an absorption plant. The aim of the present work was the study of the corrosion rate of copper in 400 and 700 g/L (4.61 and 8.06 M) LiBr solutions pre-nitrogenous or pre-oxygenated at room temperature by immersion tests. The corroded copper concentration was determined with two techniques: weight-loss method and polarographic method. The corrosion curves of copper in LiBr solutions at room temperature as a function of the exposure time showed a similar tendency, and were fitted to a power function such as: C = kt{sup b}, where C was the corroded copper quantity per unit area (mg/cm{sup 2}), t was the exposure time (h), k was the corrosion coefficient, and b was the time exponent. From the corrosion coefficient values (k) it was deduced that the corrosion rate of copper in LiBr solutions at room temperature followed the order: 400 g/L (bubble of O{sub 2}) > 400 g/L (bubble of N{sub 2}) > 700 g/L (bubble of O{sub 2}) > 700 g/L (bubble of N{sub 2}). (authors)

  6. Corrosion behaviour of high copper dental amalgams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, A U J; Ng, B L; Blackwood, D J

    2004-06-01

    This study evaluated the corrosion behaviour of two high copper dental amalgam alloys [Dispersalloy (Dentsply-Caulk) and Tytin (Kerr)] in different electrolytes. Amalgam specimens were prepared, coupled to a copper wire, cemented into glass tubes and polished to a 600-grit finish. A corrosion cell was prepared using a carbon counter-electrode, a standard calomel electrode as the reference and amalgam as the working electrode. The alloys were tested in the following mediums at 37 degrees C: (i) artificial saliva based on Fusayama's solution (FS), (ii) artificial saliva with citric acid adjusted to pH 4.0 (FC) and (iii) 1% sodium chloride solution (SC). Corrosion potentials (E(corr)) and corrosion rates (I(corr)) were determined using potentiostatic and impedance spectroscopy methods. Data was subjected to anova/Scheffe's post hoc test at 0.05 significance level. For both alloys, the corrosion potential in FS was significantly greater than in SC. Corrosion potential of Tytin in FS and SC was also significantly greater than in FC. The corrosion rate of Dispersalloy in FC was significantly greater than in FS and SC. For Tytin, corrosion rate in SC was significantly greater than in FS and FC. Although no significant difference in corrosion potential/rate was observed between the alloys when tested in FS, significant differences were observed when electrochemical testing was carried out in FC and SC. The corrosion behaviour of high copper amalgam alloys are both material and environment dependent. Certain food substances may increase the corrosion of high copper amalgams.

  7. Corrosion of copper alloys in sulphide containing district heting systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1999-01-01

    Copper and some copper alloys are prone to corrosion in sulphide containing geothermal water analogous to corrosion observed in district heating systems containing sulphide due to sulphate reducing bacteria. In order to study the corrosion of copper alloys under practical conditions a test...... was carried out at four sites in the Reykjavik District Heating System. The geothermal water chemistry is different at each site. The corrosion rate and the amount and chemical composition of deposits on weight loss coupons of six different copper alloys are described after exposure of 12 and 18 months......, respectively. Some major differences in scaling composition and the degree of corrosion attack are observed between alloys and water types....

  8. Copper corrosion experiments under anoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollila, Kaija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-06-15

    This report gives results from the corrosion experiments with copper under anoxic conditions. The objective was to study whether hydrogen-evolving corrosion reaction could occur. Copper foil samples were exposed in deaerated deionized water in Erlenmeyer flasks in the glove box with inert atmosphere. Four corrosion experiments (Cu1, Cu2, Cu3 and Cu4) were started, as well as a reference test standing in air. Cu1 and Cu2 had gas tight seals, whereas Cu3 and Cu4 had palladium foils as hydrogen permeable enclosure. The test vessels were stored during the experiments in a closed stainless steel vessel to protect them from the trace oxygen of the gas atmosphere and light. After the reaction time of three and a half years, there were no visible changes in the copper surfaces in any of the tests in the glove box, in contrast the Cu surfaces looked shiny and unaltered. The Cu3 test was terminated after the reaction time of 746 days. The analysis of the Pd-membrane showed the presence of H2 in the test system. If the measured amount of 7.2{center_dot}10{sup 5} mol H{sub 2} was the result of formation of Cu{sub 2}O this would correspond to a 200 nm thick corrosion layer. This was not in agreement with the measured layer thickness with SIMS, which was 6{+-}1 nm. A clear weight loss observed for the Cu3 test vessel throughout the test period suggests the evaporation of water through the epoxy sealing to the closed steel vessel. If this occurred, the anaerobic corrosion of steel surface in humid oxygen-free atmosphere could be a source of hydrogen. A similar weight loss was not observed for the parallel test (Cu4). The reference test standing in air showed visible development of corrosion products.

  9. Corrosion inhibitor testing in archaeological conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Faltermeier

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Metal objects from archaeological contexts often suffer serious damage by corrosion. Various methods for inhibiting corrosion have been developed, but their effects need to be evaluated. Here new research is described on how treatments to inhibit the corrosion of copper and copper-alloy artefacts may be tested.

  10. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  11. Technical note 4. Corrosion of copper canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szakalos, Peter; Seetharaman, Seshadri

    2012-06-01

    Objectives of the project: In this review assignment, SKB's treatment of copper corrosion processes or mechanisms in SR-Site shall be reviewed both for the anticipated oxic and anoxic repository environments. The reviewer(s) shall consider if corrosion and corrosion mechanisms of the copper canisters in different possible evolutionary repository environments have been properly described. The objectives of this initial review phase in the area of copper corrosion is to achieve a broad coverage of SR-Site and its supporting references and in particular identify the need for complementary information and clarifications to be delivered by SKB. Summary by the authors: It is expected that the inflow of ground water to the deposition holes and tunnels in the Forsmark repository will be very slow. Thus, it might take some few hundred years up to thousand years before the deposition holes are filled with ground water and it might take 6000 years or more before the bentonite buffer is fully water saturated and pressurized. The copper canisters will therefore meet to two completely different environments: 1. An initial period of several hundreds of years when copper is exposed to gaseous corrosion. 2. And then to aqueous corrosion. From a corrosion point of view the first 1000 years are the most critical for the copper canister since pure, or phosphorus alloyed copper, is not designed to cope with corrosion at elevated temperatures. The outer copper surface temperature is expected to reach 100 deg C within some decades after closure of the repository and then slowly cool down to around 50 deg C after 1000 years. The gaseous corrosion is treated in SKB's safety assessment as being only dependent on oxygen gas and thus easily estimated by an oxygen mass-balance calculation. This simple model has no scientific support since several corrosive trace gases, such as sulphurous and nitrous compounds, operates together with water molecules (moisture) and the corrosion product consists

  12. Dresden 1 Radiation Level Reduction Program. Intergranular corrosion tests of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel in Dow NS-1, and stress corrosion cracking tests of Type-304 stainless steel and carbon and low alloy steels in Dow copper rinse solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.L.

    1978-09-01

    Corrosion tests were performed to evaluate the extent of intergranular attack on sensitized Type-304 stainless steel by a proprietary Dow Chemical solvent, NS-1, which is to be used in the chemical cleaning of the Dresden 1 primary system. In addition, tests were performed to evaluate stress corrosion cracking of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel and post-weld heat-treated ASTM A336-F1, A302-B, and A106-B carbon and low alloy steels in a solution to be used to remove residual metallic copper from the Dresden 1 primary system surfaces following the chemical cleaning. No evidence of deleterious corrosion was observed in either set of tests

  13. Bioorganic compounds as copper corrosion inhibitors in hydrocarbon media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Martina; Wiklund, Per; Leygraf, Christofer

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The corrosion protection of Cu in oil by four bioorganic compounds was examined. ► Utilising the techniques of ellipsometry, AAS and a standard IEC corrosion test. ► It was concluded that adenine and purine exhibited a surface passivating effect. ► Cysteine and histidine did not exhibit a surface passivating effect. - Abstract: The corrosion protection of copper by four bioorganic compounds; adenine, purine, cysteine and histidine, in hydrocarbon media has been examined by in situ ellipsometry, atom absorption spectroscopy and a standard corrosion test. Adenine and purine were found to irreversibly bind to the copper surface. The amount of dissolved copper was severely lowered and the copper surface appeared unaffected. It was concluded that adenine and purine exhibited a surface passivating effect, whereas the effect of cysteine and histidine was significantly lower. The influence on oxidation stability of the medium by addition of the compounds was examined and found to be minor.

  14. Surface films and corrosion of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilden, J.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1999-03-01

    In Sweden and Finland the spent nuclear fuel is planned to be encapsulated in cast iron canisters that have an outer shield made of copper. The copper shield is responsible for the corrosion protection of the canister construction. General corrosion of the copper is not expected to be the limiting factor in the waste repository environment when estimating the life-time of the canister construction. However, different forms of localised corrosion, i.e. pitting, stress corrosion cracking, or environmentally assisted creep fracture may cause premature failure of the copper shield. Of the probable constituents in the groundwater, nitrites, chlorides, sulphides and carbonates have been suggested to promote localised corrosion of copper. The main assumption made in planning this research program is that the surface films forming on copper in the repository environment largely determine the susceptibility of copper to the different forms of localised corrosion. The availability of reactants, which also may become corrosion rate limiting, is investigated in several other research programs. This research program consists of a set of successive projects targeted at characterising the properties of surface films on copper in repository environment containing different detrimental anions. A further aim was to assess the significance of the anion-induced changes in the stability of the oxide films with regard to localised corrosion of copper. This report summarises the results from a series of investigations on properties of surface films forming on copper in water of pH = 8.9 at temperature of 80 deg C and pressure of 2 MPa. The main results gained so far in this research program are as follows: The surface films forming on copper in the thermodynamic stability region of monovalent copper at 80 deg C consist of a bulk part (about 1 mm thick) which is a good ionic and electronic conductor, and an outer, interfacial layer (0.001 - 0.005 mm thick) which shows p-type semiconductor

  15. Grain boundary corrosion of copper canister material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennell, P.A.H.; Graham, A.J.; Smart, N.R.; Sofield, C.J.

    2001-03-01

    The proposed design for a final repository for spent fuel and other long-lived residues in Sweden is based on the multi-barrier principle. The waste will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, which will then be placed in granite bedrock and surrounded by compacted bentonite clay. The canister design is based on a thick cast inner container fitted inside a corrosion-resistant copper canister. During fabrication of the outer copper canisters there will be some unavoidable grain growth in the welded areas. As grains grow they will tend to concentrate impurities within the copper at the new grain boundaries. The work described in this report was undertaken to determine whether there is any possibility of enhanced corrosion at grain boundaries within the copper canister. The potential for grain boundary corrosion was investigated by exposing copper specimens, which had undergone different heat treatments and hence had different grain sizes, to aerated artificial bentonite-equilibrated groundwater with two concentrations of chloride, for increasing periods of time. The degree of grain boundary corrosion was determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy. AFM showed no increase in grain boundary 'ditching' for low chloride groundwater. In high chloride groundwater the surface was covered uniformly with a fine-grained oxide. No increases in oxide thickness were observed. No significant grain boundary attack was observed using optical microscopy either. The work suggests that in aerated artificial groundwaters containing chloride ions, grain boundary corrosion of copper is unlikely to adversely affect SKB's copper canisters

  16. Corrosion Resistance and Durability of Superhydrophobic Copper Surface in Corrosive NaCl Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Yao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Artificial superhydrophobic copper surfaces play an important role in modern applications such as self-cleaning and dropwise condensation; however, corrosion resistance and durability often present as major concerns in such applications. In this study, the anti-corrosion properties and mechanical durability of superhydrophobic copper surface have been investigated. The superhydrophobic copper surfaces were achieved with wet chemical etching and an immersion method to reduce the complexity of the fabrication process. The surface structures and materials were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR. The corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of the superhydrophobic copper surface were characterized after immersing surfaces in a 3.5 wt % NaCl solution. The chemical stability of the superhydrophobic copper surface in the NaCl solution for a short period of time was also evaluated. An abrasion test and an ultrasound oscillation were conducted to confirm that the copper surface contained durable superhydrophobic properties. In addition, an atomic force microscope was employed to study the surface mechanical property in the corrosion conditions. The present study shows that the resulting superhydrophobic copper surface exhibit enhanced corrosion resistance and durability.

  17. Corrosion Resistance of Copper Coatings Deposited by Cold Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnicki, M.; Baszczuk, A.; Jasiorski, M.; Małachowska, A.

    2017-12-01

    In the article, a study of corrosion resistance of copper and copper-based cermet (Cu+Al2O3 and Cu+SiC) coatings deposited onto aluminum alloy substrate using the low-pressure cold spraying method is presented. The samples were subjected to two different corrosion tests at room temperature: (1) Kesternich test and (2) a cyclic salt spray test. The selected tests were allowed to simulate service conditions typical for urban, industrial and marine environment. Examination of corroded samples included analysis changes on the coating surface and in the microstructure. The physicochemical tests were carried out using x-ray diffraction to define corrosion products. Moreover, microhardness and electrical conductivity measurements were conducted to estimate mechanical and physical properties of the coatings after corrosion tests. XRD analysis clearly showed that regardless of corrosion conditions, for all samples cuprite (Cu2O) was the main product. However, in the case of Cu+Al2O3 cermet coating, chlorine- and sulfate-containing phases such as Cu2Cl(OH)3 (paracetamite) and Cu3(SO4)(OH)4 (antlerite) were also recorded. This observation gives better understanding of the lowest microstructure changes observed for Cu+Al2O3 coating after the corrosion tests. This is also a justification for the lowest decrease in electrical conductivity registered after the corrosion tests for this coating.

  18. Ontario Hydro studies on copper corrosion under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion rate of copper is generally greater in aerated solutions containing sulphide; also, in the presence of sulphide there is the fear that pitting may occur. Experiments have been carried out to study the corrosion of copper in deaerated groundwater/bentonite slurries with and without added sulphide for exposure periods from two months to one year. The groundwater contains 6500 ppm of chloride and 1000 ppm of sulphate. Tests were also performed in the presence of a 150 rad/h radiation field. In deaerated slurries at 75C the corrosion rate is less than 2 μm/a. With one addition of 10 mg/l sulphide, the rate increases by a factor of ten. With daily sulphide additions to deaerated solutions the corrosion rate initially falls but then rises and stabilizes after 15 days. In aerated solutions the corrosion increases over the first 25 days and then stabilizes. The corrosion rate of copper reached a steady value in 15 to 30 days. Rates are higher in aerated solutions, but the effect of adding sulphide is not so marked in aerated solutions as in unaerated solutions. The highest corrosion rate, less than 150 μm/a, was observed in aerated slurries saturated with sulphide. For deaerated solutions in the absence of sulphide the corrosion rate increases with temperature, but in aerated solutions the rate decreases. For solutions containing added sulphide the influence of temperature is negligible. The effect of a radiation field may be beneficial; in the presence of a radiation field the corrosion rate is less than 20 μm/a. After descaling the coupons showed a high density of irregularly shaped pits both in the presence and absence of sulphide, resulting from intergranular attack. The pitting factor for the highest corrosion rate is around 15

  19. Influence of silicon, copper and cobalt on corrosion cracking and pitting corrosion in 03Kh18N30 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapovalov, Eh.T.; Ul'yanin, E.A.; Kazakova, G.V.; Sorokina, N.A.; Gal'tsov, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of alloying low carbon 18Cr-30Ni steel with silicon (up to 5.1%), copper (up to 5.4%), cobalt (up to 15.3%) on the resistance to corrosion cracking and pitting corrosion, is studied. Tests on uniaxial tension are carried out in 42% MgCl 2 solution and gravimetric studies in 10% FeCl 3 x6H 2 O. It is established that alloying steel of the Kh18N30 type with silicon increases strength and resistance to corrosion cracking. Copper and cobalt decrease a resistance to pitting corrosion but somewhat increase a resistance to corrosion cracking

  20. EFFECT OF COPPER ON PASSIVITY AND CORROSION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-30

    Jun 30, 2014 ... alloys. Corrosion parameters in H2SO4 1N solution have been established by carrying out electrochemical studies such as potentiodynamic (Tafel polarization and linear polarization,. LP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The coupled effect copper/microstructure is discussed. Alloying ...

  1. Atmospheric corrosion effects on copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franey, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Studies have been performed on the naturally formed patina on various copper samples. Samples have been obtained from structures at AT and T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (40,2,1 and <1 yr) and the Statue of Liberty (100 yr). The samples show a distinct layering effect, that is, the copper base material shows separate oxide and basic sulfate layers on all samples, indicating that patina is not a homogeneous mixture of oxides and basic sulfates

  2. Corrosion of copper and copper alloys in a basaltic repository environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brehm, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion testing done on copper and copper alloys in support of the basalt repository program is discussed. Tests were performed under anoxic conditions at 50C, 100C, 150C and 200C in the presence of a saturated basalt-bentonite packing. Tests were also performed in an air/steam mixture at temperatures between 150C and 200C. Some tests, particularly those in air/steam mixtures, were done in the presence of radiation fields of 10 2 , 10 3 or 10 4 rad/h. Exposure periods were up to 28 months. A synthetic groundwater, Grande Ronde ≠4, was used. The materials studied were ASTM B402μm·a for copper and 17 μm·a for cupronickel, but the average rates were muμm·a was obtained. The rates at longer times were less than a third of this value. Corrosion increased monotonically with time and temperature. Chalcocite (Cu 2 S) was the corrosion product at 200C. There was no detectable radiation effect, and no pitting was observed. In air/steam corrosion was uniform with no pitting. Linear corrosion was observed for pure copper. The maximum corrosion penetration after 25 months was 0.13 mm at 300C; cupronickel corroded more slowly, with a maximum penetration of 0.045mm after 25 months. Cuprite (Cu 2 O) and tenorite (CuO) were identified on cupronickel, but only Cu 2 O on copper. A pronounced radiation effect was seen at 250C, but not at 150C; the surface film morphology was different under irradiation. In the short term the presence of packing increased the corrosion rate. 5 refs

  3. Copper Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Iron-binding Capacity (TIBC, UIBC) Trichomonas Testing Triglycerides Troponin Tryptase Tumor Markers Uric Acid Urinalysis Urine ... play a role in the regulation of iron metabolism , formation of connective tissue , energy production at the ...

  4. Influence of sulfide concentration on the corrosion behavior of pure copper in synthetic seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Kawasaki, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion rate and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of pure copper under anaerobic conditions were studied by immersion tests and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in synthetic seawater containing Na 2 S. The corrosion rate was increased with sulfide concentration both in simple saline solution and in bentnite-sand mixture. The results of SSRT showed that copper was susceptible to intergranular attack; selective dissolution at lower sulfide concentration (less than 0.005 M) and SCC at higher sulfide concentration (0.01 M). It was expected that if the sulfide concentration in groundwater is less than 0.001 M, pure copper is possible to exhibit superior corrosion resistance under anaerobic condition evident by very low corrosion rates and immunity to SCC. In such a low sulfide environment, copper overpack has the potential to achieve super-long lifetimes exceeding several tens of thousands years according to long-term simulations of corrosion based on diffusion of sulfide in buffer material

  5. Influences of Corrosive Sulfur on Copper Wires and Oil-Paper Insulation in Transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Oil-impregnated paper is widely used in power transmission equipment as a reliable insulation. However, copper sulphide deposition on oil-paper insulation can lead to insulation failures in power transformers. This paper presents the influences of copper sulfur corrosion and copper sulphide deposition on copper wires and oil-paper insulation in power transformers. Thermal aging tests of paper-wrapped copper wires and bare copper wires in insulating oil were carried out at 130 °C and 150 °C in laboratory. The corrosive characteristics of paper-wrapped copper wires and bare copper wires were analyzed. Dielectric properties of insulation paper and insulating oil were also analyzed at different stages of the thermal aging tests using a broadband dielectric spectrometer. Experiments and analysis results show that copper sulfide deposition on surfaces of copper wires and insulation paper changes the surface structures of copper wires and insulation paper. Copper sulfur corrosion changes the dielectric properties of oil-paper insulation, and the copper sulfide deposition greatly reduces the electrical breakdown strength of oil-paper insulation. Metal passivator is capable of preventing copper wires from sulfur corrosion. The experimental results are helpful for investigations for fault diagnosis of internal insulation in power transformers.

  6. The corrosion of copper in compacted clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F.; Ryan, S.R.; Litke, C.D

    1997-12-01

    The uniform corrosion behaviour of copper has been investigated in the presence of compacted clay under simulated disposal vault conditions. The compacted clay is used to simulate the buffer material that would surround copper nuclear fuel waste containers in a Canadian disposal vault. The effect of the speciation of dissolved Cu has been investigated using three synthetic groundwaters of different salinity and various dissolved [O{sub 2}]. The formation of cuprous species is favoured by low [O{sub 2}] and high [C1{sup -}], with Cu(II) species formed at high [O{sub 2}] and low [C1{sup -}]. Because the Na-bentonite clay is a cation-exchange material, positively charged Cu(II) species are found to adsorb more strongly than negatively charged CuC1{sup -} complexes. The impact of the Cu speciation on four experimental parameters is reported: the corrosion rate, the interfacial [Cu] in the clay, the [Cu] profile through the clay layer, and the Cu(l):Cu(ll) ratio in the precipitated corrosion products. In agreement with previous studies, the overall rate-controlling process is believed to be the diffusion of dissolved Cu away from the corroding surface. Adsorption acts as a driving force for corrosion by immobilizing dissolved Cu. Under the conditions used in these experiments, the diffusion of dissolved O{sub 2} to the Cu surface was not rate controlling. (author)

  7. Metallic copper corrosion rates, moisture content, and growth medium influence survival of copper ion-resistant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elguindi, J; Moffitt, S; Hasman, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    of moisture present, copper content of alloys, type of medium used, and type of bacteria. We examined antibiotic- and copper ion-resistant strains of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium isolated from pig farms following the use of copper sulfate as feed supplement. The results showed rapid killing...... of both copper ion-resistant E. coli and E. faecium strains when samples in rich medium were spread in a thin, moist layer on copper alloys with 85% or greater copper content. E. coli strains were rapidly killed under dry conditions, while E. faecium strains were less affected. Electroplated copper...... surface corrosion rates were determined from electrochemical polarization tests using the Stern-Geary method and revealed decreased corrosion rates with benzotriazole and thermal oxide coating. Copper ion-resistant E. coli and E. faecium cells suspended in 0.8% NaCl showed prolonged survival rates...

  8. Effect of menthol coated craft paper on corrosion of copper in HCl ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    copper corrosion by menthol was studied by weight loss and electrochemical studies. 2. Experimental. 2.1 Materials and apparatus. Copper strips of 99⋅9% purity were used for the gravimetric and electrochemical measurements. For the gravimetric test, specimens of copper were made with dimensions of. 5 × 1 × 0⋅1 cm ...

  9. A mechanistic study of the uniform corrosion of copper in compacted clay-sand soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litke, C.D.; Ryan, S.R.; King, F.

    1992-08-01

    The results of a study of the mechanism of uniform corrosion of copper under simulated nuclear fuel waste disposal conditions are presented. Evidence is given that suggests that the rate-controlling process is the transport of copper corrosion products away from the corroding surface. In the experiments described here, the copper diffused through a column of compacted clay-sand buffer. The properties of the buffer material, especially its ability to sorb copper species, are significant in determining the rate of uniform corrosion of copper. The evidence that copper diffusion is rate-controlling stems from the effect of γ-radiation on the tests. In the presence of γ-radiation, copper diffused farther along the column of compacted buffer material than in the unirradiated tests, but the corrosion rate was lower. These two effects can be best explained in terms of a slow copper-diffusion process. Irradiation is thought to reduce the extent of sorption of copper by the clay component of the buffer. This results in a more mobile copper species and a smaller interfacial flux of copper (i.e., a lower corrosion rate)

  10. Accelerated cyclic corrosion tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prošek T.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated corrosion testing is indispensable for material selection, quality control and both initial and residual life time prediction for bare and painted metallic, polymeric, adhesive and other materials in atmospheric exposure conditions. The best known Neutral Salt Spray (NSS test provides unrealistic conditions and poor correlation to exposures in atmosphere. Modern cyclic accelerated corrosion tests include intermittent salt spray, wet and dry phases and eventually other technical phases. They are able to predict the material performance in service more correctly as documented on several examples. The use of NSS should thus be restricted for quality control.

  11. Corrosion behavior of copper-base materials in a gamma-irradiated environment; Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunker, W.H.

    1990-09-01

    Specimens of three copper-base materials were corrosion tested with gamma radiation exposure dose rates in the range of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 3} R/h to 4.9 {times} 10{sup 5} R/h. Materials used were pure copper, 7% aluminum bronze and 30% copper-nickel. Exposures were performed in moist air at 95{degree}C and 150{degree}C and liquid Well J-13 water at 95{degree}C, for periods of up to 16 months. Specimens were monitored for uniform weight loss, stress-induced corrosion and crevice corrosion. Specimen surfaces were examined visually at 10X magnification as well as by Auger Electron Spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and metallography. Corrosion was not severe in any of the cases. In general, the pure copper was corroded most uniformly while the copper-nickel was the least reproducibly corroded. 11 refs, 40 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. Corrosion behavior of copper-base materials in a gamma-irradiated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunker, W.H.

    1990-09-01

    Specimens of three copper-base materials were corrosion tested with gamma radiation exposure dose rates in the range of 1.9 x 10 3 R/h to 4.9 x 10 5 R/h. Materials used were pure copper, 7% aluminum bronze and 30% copper-nickel. Exposures were performed in moist air at 95 degree C and 150 degree C and liquid Well J-13 water at 95 degree C, for periods of up to 16 months. Specimens were monitored for uniform weight loss, stress-induced corrosion and crevice corrosion. Specimen surfaces were examined visually at 10X magnification as well as by Auger Electron Spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and metallography. Corrosion was not severe in any of the cases. In general, the pure copper was corroded most uniformly while the copper-nickel was the least reproducibly corroded. 11 refs, 40 figs., 15 tabs

  13. ( Momordica balsamina Linn.) Leaf Extract on Copper Corrosion in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inhibition of copper corrosion in acidic medium by ethanolic extract of Momordica balsamina leaves was investigated. Findings reveal that the rate of copper corrosion increases with increasing temperature of the medium but decreases as the concentration of the Momordica balsamina extract added to the medium ...

  14. Corrosion testing facilities in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, R.; Subramanian, Venu

    1981-01-01

    Major types of corrosion tests, establishment of specifications on corrosion testing and scope of their application in practice are briefly described. Important organizations in the world which publish specifications/standards are listed. Indian organizations which undertake corrosion testing and test facilities available at them are also listed. Finally in an appendix, a comprehensive list of specifications relevant to corrosion testing is given. It is arranged under the headings: environmental testing, humidity tests, salt spray/fog tests, immersion tests, specification corrosion phenomena, (tests) with respect to special corrosion media, (tests) with respect to specific corrosion prevention methods, and specific corrosion tests using electrical and electrochemical methods (principles). Each entry in the list furnishes information about: nature of the test, standard number, and its specific application. (M.G.B.)

  15. Corrosion of copper in alkaline chloride environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    2002-08-01

    The available literature information on the corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of copper in alkaline environments has been reviewed. The purpose of the review was to assess the impact of an alkaline plume from cementitious material on the corrosion behaviour of a copper canister in an SKB-3 type repository. The effect of the evolution of the environmental conditions within the repository have been considered, including the effects of temperature, redox conditions, pore-water salinity and pH. If the pore-water pH increases prior to the establishment of anoxic conditions, the canister surface will passivate as the pore-water pH exceeds a value of ∼ pH 9. Passivation will result from the formation of a duplex Cu 2 O/Cu(OH) 2 film. The corrosion potential will be determined by the equilibrium potential for the Cu 2 O/Cu(OH) 2 couple under oxic conditions, or by the Cu/Cu 2 O redox couple under anoxic conditions (in the absence of sulphide). Pitting corrosion is only likely to occur early in the evolution of the repository environment, whilst the canister is still relatively cool ( 2 available to support localised corrosion, and prior to the increase in pore-water pH and salinity. The subsequent increase in canister surface temperature, pore-water pH and salinity, and decrease in O 2 will make pit initiation less likely, although the canister will remain passive provided the pore-water pH is maintained above pH 9. The higher the pore-water pH, the more strongly the canister is passivated and the less likely the surface is to undergo localised attack. If the pore-water salinity increases prior to the increase in pH, there could be a period of active canister corrosion before passivation occurs.Under these circumstances, the corrosion potential will be a true mixed potential, determine by the relative kinetics of Cu dissolution as CuCl 2 - and of the reduction of O 2 . The development of anoxic conditions and an increase in pore-water sulphide concentration will

  16. Copper canisters for nuclear high level waste disposal. Corrosion aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werme, L.; Sellin, P.; Kjellbert, N.

    1992-10-01

    A corrosion analysis of a thick-walled copper canister for spent fuel disposal is discussed. The analysis has shown that there are no rapid mechanisms that may lead to canister failure, indicating an anticipated corrosion service life of several millions years. If further analysis of the copper canister is considered, it should be concentrated on identifying and evaluating processes other than corrosion, which may have a potential for leading to canister failure. (au)

  17. Mechanical and corrosion behaviors of developed copper-based metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manvandra Kumar; Gautam, Rakesh Kumar; Prakash, Rajiv; Ji, Gopal

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates mechanical properties and corrosion resistances of cast copper-tungsten carbide (WC) metal matrix composites (MMCs). Copper matrix composites have been developed by stir casting technique. Different sizes of micro and nano particles of WC particles are utilized as reinforcement to prepare two copper-based composites, however, nano size of WC particles are prepared by high-energy ball milling. XRD (X-rays diffraction) characterize the materials for involvement of different phases. The mechanical behavior of composites has been studied by Vickers hardness test and compression test; while the corrosion behavior of developed composites is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. The results show that hardness, compressive strength and corrosion resistance of copper matrix composites are very high in comparison to that of copper matrix, which attributed to the microstructural changes occurred during composite formation. SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) reveals the morphology of the corroded surfaces.

  18. SITE-94. CAMEO: A model of mass-transport limited general corrosion of copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worgan, K.J.; Apted, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the technical basis for the CAMEO code, which models the general, uniform corrosion of a copper canister either by transport of corrodants to the canister, or by transport of corrosion products away from the canister. According to the current Swedish concept for final disposal of spent nuclear fuels, extremely long containment times are achieved by thick (60-100 mm) copper canisters. Each canister is surrounded by a compacted bentonite buffer, located in a saturated, crystalline rock at a depth of around 500 m below ground level. Three diffusive transport-limited cases are identified for general, uniform corrosion of copper: General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of sulphide to the canister surface under reducing conditions; General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of oxygen to the canister surface under mildly oxidizing conditions; General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of copper chloride away from the canister surface under highly oxidizing conditions. The CAMEO code includes general corrosion models for each of the above three processes. CAMEO is based on the well-tested CALIBRE code previously developed as a finite-difference, mass-transfer analysis code for the SKI to evaluate long-term radionuclide release and transport in the near-field. A series of scoping calculations for the general, uniform corrosion of a reference copper canister are presented

  19. Atmospheric corrosion of copper under wet/dry cyclic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EL-Mahdy, Gamal A. [Department of Metallurgical System Engineering, Yonsei University, 134-Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-Ku, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-01

    The polarization resistance of copper subjected to NaCl and an ammonium sulfate solution under wet/dry cycling conditions was monitored using an EIS impedance technique. The copper samples were exposed to 1 h of immersion using different solutions of pH, temperature and surface orientation and 7 h of drying. The copper plates corroded more substantially on the skyward side than those for a ground ward side. The degree of protection copper oxide provides decrease in an acidic medium (pH 4) more than in a neutral medium (pH 7). The corrosion rate of copper increases rapidly during the initial stages of exposure then decreases slowly and eventually attains the steady state during the last stages of exposure. The corrosion products were analyzed using X-ray diffraction. The corrosion mechanism for copper studied under wet/dry cyclic conditions was found to proceed under the dissolution-precipitation mechanism.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of copper canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada)); Newman, Roger (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    2010-12-15

    A critical review is presented of the possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper canisters in a deep geological repository in the Fennoscandian Shield. Each of the four main mechanisms proposed for the SCC of pure copper are reviewed and the required conditions for cracking compared with the expected environmental and mechanical loading conditions within the repository. Other possible mechanisms are also considered, as are recent studies specifically directed towards the SCC of copper canisters. The aim of the review is to determine if and when during the evolution of the repository environment copper canisters might be susceptible to SCC. Mechanisms that require a degree of oxidation or dissolution are only possible whilst oxidant is present in the repository and then only if other environmental and mechanical loading conditions are satisfied. These constraints are found to limit the period during which the canisters could be susceptible to cracking via film rupture (slip dissolution) or tarnish rupture mechanisms to the first few years after deposition of the canisters, at which time there will be insufficient SCC agent (ammonia, acetate, or nitrite) to support cracking. During the anaerobic phase, the supply of sulphide ions to the free surface will be transport limited by diffusion through the highly compacted bentonite. Therefore, no HS. will enter the crack and cracking by either of these mechanisms during the long term anaerobic phase is not feasible. Cracking via the film-induced cleavage mechanism requires a surface film of specific properties, most often associated with a nano porous structure. Slow rates of dissolution characteristic of processes in the repository will tend to coarsen any nano porous layer. Under some circumstances, a cuprous oxide film could support film-induced cleavage, but there is no evidence that this mechanism would operate in the presence of sulphide during the long-term anaerobic period because copper sulphide

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Fraser; Newman, Roger

    2010-12-01

    A critical review is presented of the possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper canisters in a deep geological repository in the Fennoscandian Shield. Each of the four main mechanisms proposed for the SCC of pure copper are reviewed and the required conditions for cracking compared with the expected environmental and mechanical loading conditions within the repository. Other possible mechanisms are also considered, as are recent studies specifically directed towards the SCC of copper canisters. The aim of the review is to determine if and when during the evolution of the repository environment copper canisters might be susceptible to SCC. Mechanisms that require a degree of oxidation or dissolution are only possible whilst oxidant is present in the repository and then only if other environmental and mechanical loading conditions are satisfied. These constraints are found to limit the period during which the canisters could be susceptible to cracking via film rupture (slip dissolution) or tarnish rupture mechanisms to the first few years after deposition of the canisters, at which time there will be insufficient SCC agent (ammonia, acetate, or nitrite) to support cracking. During the anaerobic phase, the supply of sulphide ions to the free surface will be transport limited by diffusion through the highly compacted bentonite. Therefore, no HS. will enter the crack and cracking by either of these mechanisms during the long term anaerobic phase is not feasible. Cracking via the film-induced cleavage mechanism requires a surface film of specific properties, most often associated with a nano porous structure. Slow rates of dissolution characteristic of processes in the repository will tend to coarsen any nano porous layer. Under some circumstances, a cuprous oxide film could support film-induced cleavage, but there is no evidence that this mechanism would operate in the presence of sulphide during the long-term anaerobic period because copper sulphide

  2. Effect of the degree of compaction of bentonite on the general corrosion rate of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saario, Timo; Betova, Iva; Kinnunen, Petri; Heinonen, Jussi; Lilja, Christina

    2004-01-01

    Since 1996 VTT Industrial Systems has co-ordinated a research programme, that has been funded by Finnish and Swedish radiation and nuclear safety authorities, concentrating on the durability of copper canisters in different corrosive environments. According to the Scandinavian final disposal vault concept, a copper canister is an essential barrier for the release of radionuclides. It can be damaged in use in two different ways, either mechanically or due to corrosion. The mechanical failure may be caused for example by the tectonic movement or uneven wetting and following swelling of bentonite. The corrosion failure, on the other hand, may be caused by three different mechanisms, namely general corrosion, pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The factors affecting the occurrence of different corrosion failures have been studied extensively especially in Finland, Sweden and Canada during the last decade. As a result, some factors (e.g. stress corrosion caused by the nitrites) have been excluded, but others, such as the localised corrosion caused by sulfides, are still to be studied. The present work concerns the effect of the degree of bentonite compaction on the general corrosion rate of copper in a final disposal vault environment of radioactive waste. The feasibility of two sensors - an on-line corrosion rate monitoring sensor and a modified reference electrode, has been tested with respect to copper corrosion in MX80 bentonite saturated with highly saline groundwater in conditions closely simulating those in a nuclear waste repository. In addition, weight loss coupons were used to allow a comparison of the on-line and off-line corrosion rate measurement techniques. Two different degrees of compaction of bentonite were used in tests which extended for one month. The corrosion rate measured with the on-line probe shows a high value initially, and tends towards very low values after a roughly ten hour exposure. Based on both the weight loss and on

  3. The evaluation of corrosion inhibitors for application to copper and copper alloy archaeological artefacts

    OpenAIRE

    Faltermeier, R.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis concerns corrosion inhibiting compounds which slow the deterioration of archaeological copper artefacts. Benzotriazole (BTA) and 2-Amino- 5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (AMT) have been applied as corrosion inhibitors in archaeological conservation. A search was conducted for similar compounds that could be applied in the conservation of copper and copper alloys. According to a list of requirements specific to archaeological conservation, six new inhibitors were tes...

  4. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80 degrees C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either open-quotes satisfactoryclose quotes (2-20 mpy) or open-quotes excellentclose quotes (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment

  5. Corrosion resistance of a copper canister for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The report presents an evaluation of copper as canister material for spent nuclear fuel. The evaluation is made from the viewpoint of corrosion and applies to a concept of 1977. Supplementary corrosion studies have been performed. The report includes 9 appendices which deal with experimental data. (G.B.)

  6. Surface Modelling of Nanostructured Copper Subjected to Erosion-Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama M. Irfan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed considerable advancements in nanostructured material synthesis and property characterization. However, there still exists some deficiency in the mechanical and surface property characterization of these materials. In this paper, the erosion corrosion (E-C behavior of nanostructured copper was studied. The nanostructured copper was produced through severe plastic deformation (SPD by applying four passes of equal channel angular pressing (ECAP. The combined effects of the testing time, impact velocity, and concentration of erosive solid particles (i.e., sand concentration on the E-C behavior of nanostructured copper were then examined. Based on a defined domain for the testing time, impact velocity, and sand concentration, E-C tests were performed for numerous combinations of test points via the slurry pot method. The test points were selected using the face-centered center composite design of experiments to enable visualization of the test results through surface plots. The extent of E-C on the test specimens was determined by measuring the mass loss. Polynomial regression and Kriging were used to fit surfaces to the experimental data, which were subsequently used to generate surface plots. The results showed that the E-C of nanostructured copper is best described by a quadratic function of testing time, velocity, and erosive solid particle concentration. The results also revealed that E-C increases with an increasing testing time, impact velocity, and erosive solid particle concentration. In addition, it was observed that the effect of the erosive solid particles on E-C is further intensified by an increased impact velocity.

  7. Copper corrosion under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F. [Integrity Corrosion Consulting Ltd, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Taxen, C. [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Werme, L. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 20 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear disposal repository located in he Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long- term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature.Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion before and during saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer by groundwater, general and localized corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. Much has been learnt about the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters over the past 20 years. The majority of the information reviewed here is drawn from the Swedish/Finnish and Canadian programmes. Despite differences in scientific approach, and canister and repository design, the results of these two programmes both suggest that copper provides an excellent corrosion barrier in an underground repository. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid.

  8. Copper corrosion under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Ahonen, L.; Taxen, C.; Vuorinen, U.; Werme, L.

    2001-12-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 20 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear disposal repository located in he Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long- term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature.Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion before and during saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer by groundwater, general and localized corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. Much has been learnt about the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters over the past 20 years. The majority of the information reviewed here is drawn from the Swedish/Finnish and Canadian programmes. Despite differences in scientific approach, and canister and repository design, the results of these two programmes both suggest that copper provides an excellent corrosion barrier in an underground repository. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid

  9. Copper corrosion under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Ahonen, L.; Taxen, C.; Vuorinen, U.; Werme, L.

    2002-01-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 20 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear disposal repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion before and during saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer by groundwater, general and localized corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. Much has been learnt about the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters over the past 20 years. The majority of the information reviewed here is drawn from the Swedish/Finnish and Canadian programmes. Despite differences in scientific approach, and canister and repository design, the results of these two programmes both suggest that copper provides an excellent corrosion barrier in an underground repository. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid. (orig.)

  10. Thermodynamic data for copper. Implications for the corrosion of copper under repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdomenech, I.; Taxen, C.

    2000-08-01

    The stability of copper canisters has a central role in the safety concept for the planned nuclear spent fuel repository in Sweden. The corrosion of copper canisters will be influenced by the chemical and physical environment in the near-field of the repository, and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations provide the basis for understanding this system. Thermodynamic data have been selected in this work for solids and aqueous species in the system: Cu - H 2 O - H + - H 2 - F - - Cl - - S 2- - SO 4 2- - NO 3 - - NO 2 - - NH 4 + PO 4 3- - CO 3 2+ . For some reactions and compounds, for which no experimental information on temperature effects was available, entropy and heat capacity values have been estimated. The compiled data were used to calculate thermodynamic equilibria for copper systems up to 100 deg C. The stability of copper in contact with granitic groundwaters has been illustrated using chemical equilibrium diagrams, with he following main conclusions: Dissolved sulphide and O 2 in groundwater are the most damaging components for copper corrosion. If available, HS - will react quantitatively with copper to form a variety of sulphides. However, sulphide concentrations in natural waters are usually low, because it forms sparingly soluble solids with transition metals, including Fe(II), which is wide-spread in reducing environments. Chloride can affect negatively copper corrosion. High concentrations (e.g., [Cl - ]TOT > 60 g/l) may be unfavourable for the general corrosion of copper in combination with in the following circumstances: Low pH ( + . The negative effects of Cl - are emphasised at higher temperatures. The chloride-enhancement of general corrosion may be beneficial for localised corrosion: pitting and stress corrosion cracking. The concept of redox potential, E H , has been found to be inadequate to describe copper corrosion in a nuclear repository. The available amounts of oxidants/reductants, and the stoichiometry of the corrosion reactions are

  11. Pitting corrosion of copper. An equilibrium - mass transport study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taxen, C. [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-08-01

    A mathematical model for the propagation of corrosion pits is described and used to calculate the potentials below which copper is immune to pitting. The model uses equilibrium data and diffusion coefficients and calculates the stationary concentration profiles of 26 aqueous species from the bulk water outside a corrosion pit to the site of the metal dissolution. Precipitation of oxides and salts of copper is considered. Studied conditions include water compositions from tap waters to seawater at the temperatures 25 deg C and 75 deg C. Carbonate and sulphate are aggressive towards copper because of complex formation with divalent copper. Carbonate is less aggressive in a corrosion pit than outside at the pH of the bulk. Carbonate carries acidity out from the pit, favours oxide formation and may prevent the initiation of acidic corrosion pits. The concentration profiles are used to estimate the maximum propagation rates for a corrosion pit. A high potential is found to be the most important factor for the rate of propagation. The levels of potential copper can sustain, as corrosion potentials are discussed in terms of the stability of cuprous oxide as a cathode material for oxygen reduction relative to non-conducting cupric phases.

  12. Testing methodologies for corrosion fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Delmotte, Edward; Micone, Nahuel; De Waele, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Offshore constructions are subjected to cyclic loading conditions. This situation is combined with the corrosive nature of the surrounding environment. It is of actual concern whether the combined effect is more damaging or not than the superposition of each effect independently. This literature review first introduces the reader to corrosion fatigue. Thereafter a critical comparison of some typical lab-scale fatigue corrosion test setups is given. Special emphasis is devoted to the instru...

  13. Development of Copper Corrosion Products and Relation between Surface Appearance and Corrosion Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Tru, Nguyen Nhi; Yoshino, Tsujino; Yasuki, Maeda

    2008-01-01

    Copper was exposed unsheltered and sheltered in four humid tropical sites, representing urban, urban-industrial, urban-marine and rural environments. The corrosion rates and the sequence of corrosion product formation are presented and discussed in relation with climatic and atmospheric pollution parameters. Chemical compositions of corrosion products were found to depend on environments and duration of exposure. In all environments, cuprite was the predominating corrosion product that formed first and continuously increased during the exposure. Among the sulphur-containing corrosion products, posnjakite and brochantite were more frequently found and the first formed earlier. Nantokite was the most common chlorine-containing products for most cases, except the high-chloride environment, where atacamite was detected instead. The corrosion rate of copper was well indicated by the colour of patina. The red-purple colour corresponded to the high corrosion rate and the greenish grey colour corresponded to the low corrosion rate. Corrosion rate of sheltered copper in urban-marine environment increased with the exposure time

  14. Severe corrosion of copper in a highly alkaline egg white solution due to a biuret corrosion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xun; Hu, Wenyuan; Yang, Shan; Li, Zhaoqian; Pei, Chonghua; Zhou, Yong; Yin, Guanfu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Egg whites can accelerate the corrosion of copper. • The corrosion rate of copper is closely related to the pH values. • The mechanism of the strong corrosion is due to a biuret corrosion reaction. - Abstract: Through investigating the interaction between copper metal and egg whites as well as the effects of pH, oxygen and the species of alkalis on copper corrosion rate, an unusual severe corrosion of copper metal in a highly alkaline egg white solution was found. The mechanism was investigated through detailed characterizations using a scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV–visible absorption spectroscopy. The severe corrosion was mainly due to the formation of a hydroxyl–peptide–copper multicomponent stable soluble complex, which the biuret reaction also produces

  15. Corrosion of the copper canister in the repository environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, H.P.; Eriksson, Sture [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    The present report accounts for studies on copper corrosion performed at Studsvik Material AB during 1997-1999 on commission by SKI. The work has been focused on localised corrosion and electrochemistry of copper in the repository environment. The current theory of localised copper corrosion is not consistent with recent practical experiences. It is therefore desired to complete and develop the theory based on knowledge about the repository environment and evaluations of previous as well as recent experimental and field results. The work has therefore comprised a thorough compilation and up-date of literature on copper corrosion and on the repository environment. A selection of a 'working environment', defining the chemical parameters and their ranges of variation has been made and is used as a fundament for the experimental part of the work. Experiments have then been performed on the long-range electrochemical behaviour of copper in selected environments simulating the repository. Another part of the work has been to further develop knowledge about the thermodynamic limits for corrosion in the repository environment. Some of the thermodynamic work is integrated here. Especially thermodynamics for the system Cu-Cl-H-O up to 150 deg C and high chloride concentrations are outlined. However, there is also a rough overview of the whole system Cu-Fe-Cl-S-C-H-O as a fundament for the discussion. Data are normally accounted as Pourbaix diagrams. Some of the conclusions are that general corrosion on copper will probably not be of significant importance in the repository as far as transportation rates are low. However, if such rates were high, general corrosion could be disastrous, as there is no passivation of copper in the highly saline environment. The claim on knowledge of different kinds of localised corrosion and pitting is high, as pitting damages can shorten the lifetime of a canister dramatically. Normal pitting can happen in oxidising environment, but

  16. Corrosion of the copper canister in the repository environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H.P.; Eriksson, Sture

    1999-12-01

    The present report accounts for studies on copper corrosion performed at Studsvik Material AB during 1997-1999 on commission by SKI. The work has been focused on localised corrosion and electrochemistry of copper in the repository environment. The current theory of localised copper corrosion is not consistent with recent practical experiences. It is therefore desired to complete and develop the theory based on knowledge about the repository environment and evaluations of previous as well as recent experimental and field results. The work has therefore comprised a thorough compilation and up-date of literature on copper corrosion and on the repository environment. A selection of a 'working environment', defining the chemical parameters and their ranges of variation has been made and is used as a fundament for the experimental part of the work. Experiments have then been performed on the long-range electrochemical behaviour of copper in selected environments simulating the repository. Another part of the work has been to further develop knowledge about the thermodynamic limits for corrosion in the repository environment. Some of the thermodynamic work is integrated here. Especially thermodynamics for the system Cu-Cl-H-O up to 150 deg C and high chloride concentrations are outlined. However, there is also a rough overview of the whole system Cu-Fe-Cl-S-C-H-O as a fundament for the discussion. Data are normally accounted as Pourbaix diagrams. Some of the conclusions are that general corrosion on copper will probably not be of significant importance in the repository as far as transportation rates are low. However, if such rates were high, general corrosion could be disastrous, as there is no passivation of copper in the highly saline environment. The claim on knowledge of different kinds of localised corrosion and pitting is high, as pitting damages can shorten the lifetime of a canister dramatically. Normal pitting can happen in oxidising environment, but there is

  17. Synergistic effects of additives to benzotriazole solutions applied as corrosion inhibitors to archaeological copper and copper alloy artefacts.

    OpenAIRE

    Golfomitsou, S.

    2006-01-01

    Benzotriazole (BTA) is a corrosion inhibitor extensively used for the stabilisation of active corrosion of archaeological copper and copper alloys. However, BTA often fails to effectively retard corrosion when applied on heavily corroded artefacts. Although there are numerous studies about its mode of action on clean copper, there is no comprehensive understanding about the way it is bonded to corroded copper. This thesis aimed to understand and compare BTA and its mode of action on clean and...

  18. In vitro and in vivo corrosion evaluation of nickel-chromium- and copper-aluminum-based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, O F; Miranda, W G; Muench, A

    2000-09-01

    The low resistance to corrosion is the major problem related to the use of copper-aluminum alloys. This in vitro and in vivo study evaluated the corrosion of 2 copper-aluminum alloys (Cu-Al and Cu-Al-Zn) compared with a nickel-chromium alloy. For the in vitro test, specimens were immersed in the following 3 corrosion solutions: artificial saliva, 0.9% sodium chloride, and 1.0% sodium sulfide. For the in vivo test, specimens were embedded in complete dentures, so that one surface was left exposed. The 3 testing sites were (1) close to the oral mucosa (partial self-cleaning site), (2) surface exposed to the oral cavity (self-cleaning site), and (3) specimen bottom surface exposed to the saliva by means of a tunnel-shaped perforation (non-self-cleaning site). Almost no corrosion occurred with the nickel-chromium alloy, for either the in vitro or in vivo test. On the other hand, the 2 copper-aluminum-based alloys exhibited high corrosion in the sulfide solution. These same alloys also underwent high corrosion in non-self-cleaning sites for the in vivo test, although minimal attack was observed in self-cleaning sites. The nickel-chromium alloy presented high resistance to corrosion. Both copper-aluminum alloys showed considerable corrosion in the sulfide solution and clinically in the non-self-cleaning site. However, in self-cleaning sites these 2 alloys did not show substantial corrosion.

  19. Inhibition Effect of 1-Butyl-4-Methylpyridinium Tetrafluoroborate on the Corrosion of Copper in Phosphate Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scendo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the concentration of 1-Butyl-4-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate (4MBPBF4 as ionic liquid (IL on the corrosion of copper in 0.5 M PO43− solutions of pH 2 and 4 was studied. The research involved electrochemical polarization method, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM technique. The results obtained showed that the inhibition efficiency of corrosion of copper increases with an increase in the concentration of 4MBPBF4 but decreases with increasing temperature. The thermodynamic functions of corrosion analysis and adsorptive behavior of 4MBPBF4 were carried out. During the test, the adsorption of the inhibitor on the copper surface in the phosphate solutions was found to obey the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and had a physical mechanism.

  20. Quality Assurance Review of SKB's Copper Corrosion Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, Tamara D.; Hicks, Timothy W.

    2010-06-01

    SKB is preparing a license application for the construction of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. This application will be supported by the safety assessment SR-Site for the post-closure phase. The assessment of long-term safety is based on a broad range of experimental results from laboratory scale, intermediate scale and up to full scale experiments. It is essential that there is a satisfactory level of assurance that experiments have been carried out with sufficient quality, so that results can be considered to be reliable within the context of their use in safety assessment. The former named authority, SKI, has initiated a series of reviews of SKB's methods of quality assurance and their implementation. This quality assurance review is focused on the work of copper corrosion being conducted in at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in Aespoe, LOT and Miniature canister (Minican) experiments. In order for the reviewers to get a broad understanding of the issue of copper corrosion both SKB reports as well as the viewpoint of MKG was collected prior to commencement of the actual review task. The purpose of this project is to assess SKB's quality assurance with the view of providing input for the preparation of the SR-Site safety assessment. This has been achieved by examination of the corrosion part of the LOT and Minican experiments using a check list, visits to the relevant facilities, and meetings with contractors and a few members of the SKB staff. The same approach for quality assurance reviews has been used earlier in similar review tasks. During the quality review of the selected projects, several QA- related issues of different degree of severity was noted by the reviewers. The most significant finding was that SKB has chosen to present only selected real-time corrosion monitoring data in TR-09-20. This was surprising and SSM expect that SKB will analyse the reason for this thoroughly. The reviewers also made other observations which can be

  1. Assessment of corrosion failure in copper tube of refrigerator unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Harun; Hafizal Yazid; Zaiton Selamat; Mohd Shariff Sattar; Muhamamd Jalil

    2007-01-01

    The copper tubes of the refrigerator unit have been coated with red and white color paints. According to the date of purchase and complaint recorded, the tube leaked after operation about one year. It was observed that the tubes became black and green in color at U-bend of the tube. No corrosion occurred on the internal surface of the tube. The leaking started at outer surface of the tube. The leaking started at outer surface and propagated to the internal surface of the tubes. The leaking damage was caused by corrosive species either from atmospheric corrosion or the paint contained chloride and sulfur elements. The corrosive species of sulfur and chlorine were a main factor in pitting corrosion. (author)

  2. Susceptibility of copper to general and pitting corrosion in highly saline groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity

    2001-01-01

    In Sweden and Finland the spent nuclear fuel is planned to be encapsulated in cast iron canisters that have an outer shield made of copper, which is responsible for the corrosion protection. In this work the susceptibility of Cu OFP to general and pitting corrosion was investigated in highly saline groundwater at T = 80 deg C and p = 14 MPa using electrochemical techniques in autoclave conditions. The effect of pressure was investigated by conducting tests at p = 2, 7 and 14 MPa. The main observations made are: Because pressure has a clear effect on the voltammetric and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy response of Cu OFP, this kind of tests should be performed at the representative pressure of 14 MPa; The corrosion potential of Cu OFP in all test runs was in the range of -0.15 V{sub SHE} < E{sub CORR} < -0.08 V{sub SHE}; At the corrosion potential active dissolution (corrosion) of Cu OFP takes place. The corrosion rate based on weight loss measurements of corrosion coupons after a seven day exposure was, 0.02 mm/year; The measurement results are in line with the thermodynamic calculations presented in the SKI Report 98:19, concerning the influence of Cl{sup -} content on the dissolution of copper.

  3. An assessment of corrosion life of copper overpack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, A.; Taniguchi, N.

    1999-08-01

    Corrosion life of copper overpack is estimated on the basis of current understandings of copper corrosion processes. The assessment is based on the mass balance. Oxygen and sulfide were taken into account as corrosive species. The sulfate existing in bentonite is assumed to be reduced to sulfide by sulfate reducing bacteria and corrodes copper overpacks. Pitting is involved in the assesment using two methods. One method is use of pitting factor acquired from analysis of archeological artifacts. The other is use of extreme value statistical technique. The time evolution of parameters for cumulative probability distribution function, Gumbel distribution, was estimated using the data from copper specimens buried in various soil and archeological artifacts of the bronze age. The pitting depth for 1000 years is estimated using the parameters for probability distribution function. The result of estimation shows 39-mm is the maximum penetration for 1000 years. Natural analogue data suggest the corrosion rate of 3 mm/1000 years. Therefore the estimation is considered to be conservative. (author)

  4. (TBBI) on copper corrosion in 1 M nitric acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NIAMIEN PAULIN

    thiobenzylbenzimidazole (TBBI) on copper corrosion in 1M HNO3 medium were studied, using weight loss method, at 25 to 65°C and concentrations of 5.10-5M to 10-3M. The results showed that the two compounds had fairly good inhibiting properties for ...

  5. Copper anode corrosion affects power generation in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping

    2013-07-16

    Non-corrosive, carbon-based materials are usually used as anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In some cases, however, metals have been used that can corrode (e.g. copper) or that are corrosion resistant (e.g. stainless steel, SS). Corrosion could increase current through galvanic (abiotic) current production or by increasing exposed surface area, or decrease current due to generation of toxic products from corrosion. In order to directly examine the effects of using corrodible metal anodes, MFCs with Cu were compared with reactors using SS and carbon cloth anodes. MFCs with Cu anodes initially showed high current generation similar to abiotic controls, but subsequently they produced little power (2 mW m-2). Higher power was produced with microbes using SS (12 mW m-2) or carbon cloth (880 mW m-2) anodes, with no power generated by abiotic controls. These results demonstrate that copper is an unsuitable anode material, due to corrosion and likely copper toxicity to microorganisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Thermodynamic data for copper. Implications for the corrosion of copper under repository conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puigdomenech, I. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Taxen, C. [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-08-01

    The stability of copper canisters has a central role in the safety concept for the planned nuclear spent fuel repository in Sweden. The corrosion of copper canisters will be influenced by the chemical and physical environment in the near-field of the repository, and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations provide the basis for understanding this system. Thermodynamic data have been selected in this work for solids and aqueous species in the system: Cu - H{sub 2}O - H{sup +} - H{sub 2} - F{sup -} - Cl{sup -} - S{sup 2-} - SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} - NO{sub 3}{sup -} - NO{sub 2}{sup -} - NH{sub 4}{sup +} PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} - CO{sub 3}{sup 2+} . For some reactions and compounds, for which no experimental information on temperature effects was available, entropy and heat capacity values have been estimated. The compiled data were used to calculate thermodynamic equilibria for copper systems up to 100 deg C. The stability of copper in contact with granitic groundwaters has been illustrated using chemical equilibrium diagrams, with he following main conclusions: Dissolved sulphide and O{sub 2} in groundwater are the most damaging components for copper corrosion. If available, HS{sup -} will react quantitatively with copper to form a variety of sulphides. However, sulphide concentrations in natural waters are usually low, because it forms sparingly soluble solids with transition metals, including Fe(II), which is wide-spread in reducing environments. Chloride can affect negatively copper corrosion. High concentrations (e.g., [Cl{sup -}]TOT > 60 g/l) may be unfavourable for the general corrosion of copper in combination with in the following circumstances: Low pH (< 4 at 25 deg C, or < 5 at 100 deg C). The presence of other oxidants than H{sup +}. The negative effects of Cl{sup -} are emphasised at higher temperatures. The chloride-enhancement of general corrosion may be beneficial for localised corrosion: pitting and stress corrosion cracking. The concept of redox potential, E

  7. Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

  8. Corrosion protective poly(o-ethoxyaniline) coatings on copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhari, Sudeshna; Patil, P.P. [Department of Physics, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425001, Maharashtra (India)

    2007-12-01

    Poly(o-ethoxyaniline) (POEA) coatings were synthesized on copper (Cu) by electrochemical polymerization of o-ethoxyaniline in aqueous salicylate solution by using cyclic voltammetry. These coatings were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The performance of POEA as protective coating against corrosion of Cu in aqueous 3% NaCl was assessed by the potentiodynamic polarization technique and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results of the potentiodynamic polarization and EIS studies demonstrate that the POEA coating has ability to protect the Cu against corrosion. The corrosion potential was about 0.330 V versus SCE more positive in aqueous 3% NaCl for the POEA coated Cu than that of uncoated Cu and reduces the corrosion rate of Cu almost by a factor of 140. (author)

  9. CORROSION OF COPPER PIPES JOINTS IN SIMULATED OPERATING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Dodek

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Joining of copper pipes used for liquid media transport are made as demountable and fixation joints. This work deals with corrosion behavior of the joints made by soft soldering, hard soldering and fitting. Corrosion properties of the joints were studied after 11 month exposition in conditions simulated the operating environment. The experiment was made in the 3% NaCl solution, at temperature 20° C for 16 hours and at 80° C for 8 hours per day, the solution was flowing 8 hours by the average rate 0,27 m.s-1. Evaluation of the joints corrosion attacks was made visually, by light and electron microscopy with chemical analyses of corrosion products.

  10. CORROSION OF COPPER PIPES JOINTS IN SIMULATED OPERATING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Dodek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Joining of copper pipes used for liquid media transport are made as demountable and fixation joints. This work deals with corrosion behavior of the joints made by soft soldering, hard soldering and fitting. Corrosion properties of the joints were studied after 11 month exposition in conditions simulated the operating environment. The experiment was made in the 3% NaCl solution, at temperature 20° C for 16 hours and at 80° C for 8 hours per day, the solution was flowing 8 hours by the average rate 0,27 m.s-1. Evaluation of the joints corrosion attacks was made visually, by light and electron microscopy with chemical analyses of corrosion products.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of the Initial Corrosion of Four Brands of High Copper Dental Amalgams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Mortazavi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Many attempts have been made in order to evaluate the amalgam corrosion behavior as an indicator of biocompatibility. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the initial corrosion of four different brands of dental amalgams. Materials and Methods: Four different types of commercial high copper dental amalgam were studied. A special mold was used and twenty-one samples of each type of commercial dental amalgams were prepared. X-ray diffraction technique was used to investigate the microstructure of freshly prepared specimens. Electrochemical potentiodynamic tests were performed in physiological solutions in order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of freshly prepared sample of four brands of dental amalgams. The physiological solutions were the Ringer’s solution and physiological normal saline. Five replicate tests on each group of specimens were performed. Tafel extrapolation and linear polarization methods determined corrosion potentials and corrosion current densities. The mean value and standard deviations of the results were calculated. The mean values were statistically compared by ANOVA and Duncan methods at 95% level of confidence. Results: Gamma-2 phase was present in freshly prepared sample of each type of commercial amalgam. The results showed statistically significant differences between the mean corrosion current density values of freshly prepared sample of four brands of amalgams (P<0.05. The freshly prepared specimen of Sybraloy dental amalgam possesses the higher initial corrosion resistance than the other three, and Cinaalloy dental amalgam possesses the lowest corrosion resistance. This trend is independent to the type of physiological environment. Conclusion: Initial corrosion resistance of each type of commercial dental amalgam is much less than its corrosion resistance that could be obtained after one week. From the viewpoint of the corrosion behavior as an indication of

  12. Stress corrosion cracking and dealloying of copper-gold alloy in iodine vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvez, M.F.; Bianchi, G.L.; Galvele, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of copper-gold alloy in iodine vapor was studied and the results were analyzed under the scope of the surface mobility stress corrosion cracking mechanism. The copper-gold alloy undergoes stress corrosion cracking in iodine. Copper iodide was responsible of that behavior. The copper-gold alloy shows two processes in parallel: stress corrosion cracking and dealloying. As was predicted by the surface mobility stress corrosion cracking mechanism, the increase in strain rate induces an increase in the crack propagation rate. (Author)

  13. Polystyrene films as barrier layers for corrosion protection of copper and copper alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Románszki, Loránd; Datsenko, Iaryna; May, Zoltán; Telegdi, Judit; Nyikos, Lajos; Sand, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Dip-coated polystyrene layers of sub-micrometre thickness (85-500nm) have been applied on copper and copper alloys (aluminium brass, copper-nickel 70/30), as well as on stainless steel 304, and produced an effective barrier against corrosion and adhesion of corrosion-relevant microorganisms. According to the dynamic wettability measurements, the coatings exhibited high advancing (103°), receding (79°) and equilibrium (87°) contact angles, low contact angle hysteresis (6°) and surface free energy (31mJ/m(2)). The corrosion rate of copper-nickel 70/30 alloy samples in 3.5% NaCl was as low as 3.2μm/a (44% of that of the uncoated samples), and in artificial seawater was only 0.9μm/a (29% of that of the uncoated samples). Cell adhesion was studied by fluorescence microscopy, using monoculture of Desulfovibrio alaskensis. The coatings not only decreased the corrosion rate but also markedly reduced the number of bacterial cells adhered to the coated surfaces. The PS coating on copper gave the best result, 2×10(3)cells/cm(2) (1% of that of the uncoated control). © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Aluminium and Copper Composite Coatings Deposited by LPCS Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnicki M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the study of microstructure and corrosion resistance of composite coatings (Al+Al2O3 and Cu+Al2O3 deposited by Low Pressure Cold Spraying method (LPCS. The atmospheric corrosion resistance was examined by subjecting the samples to cyclic salt spray and Kesternich test chambers, with NaCl and SO2 atmospheres, respectively. The selected tests allowed reflecting the actual working conditions of the coatings. The analysis showed very satisfactory results for copper coatings. After eighteen cycles, with a total time of 432 hours, the samples show little signs of corrosion. Due to their greater susceptibility to chloride ions, aluminium coatings have significant corrosion losses.

  15. Fundamental aspects of stress corrosion cracking of copper relevant to the Swedish deep geologic repository concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran, Ganesh; Carcea, Anatolie; Ulaganathan, Jagan; Wang, Shengchun; Huang, Yin; Newman, Roger C. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-03-15

    Phosphorus-doped oxygen-free copper will be used as the outer barrier in canisters that will contain spent nuclear fuel in the proposed Swedish underground repository. The possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a concern, in view of isolated reports of cracking or intergranular corrosion of pure copper in sulfide solutions. This concern was addressed in the present work using copper tensile specimens provided by SKB. Methods included slow strain rate testing, constant strain tensile testing, electrochemical and surface analytical studies of corrosion products, and electron backscatter diffraction analysis of grain orientation effects on corrosion. The base solutions were prepared from NaCl or synthetic sea water with addition of varying amounts of sodium sulfide at room temperature and 80 degree Celsius. No SCC was found in any of the testing, for a range of sulfide concentrations from 5-50 mM at room temperature or 8 C, including tests where small anodic or cathodic potential displacements were applied from the open-circuit (corrosion) potential. Neither was SCC found in constant-strain immersion testing with very large strain. The Cu2S corrosion product is generally very coarse, fragile, and easily spalled off in severe corrosion environments, i.e. high sulfide concentration, high temperature, less perfect de aeration, etc. But it could also consist of very fine grains, relatively compact and adherent, on particular grain orientations when it was formed on an electro polished surface in a very well-deaerated solution. These orientations have not yet been identified statistically, although some preference for thin, adherent films was noted on orientations close to (100). The notion that the corrosion reaction is always controlled by inward aqueous-phase diffusion of sulfide may thus not be unconditionally correct for this range of sulfide concentrations; however it is hard to distinguish the role of diffusion within pores in the film. In the actual

  16. Copper and Lead Corrosion in a Full Scale Home Plumbning system Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The corrosion of household or premise plumbing materials (such as copper, brass, and solder) and the metal release that results from that corrosion can cause numerous problems, ranging from elevated lead and copper levels to blue water and copper pinhole leaks. If left untreate...

  17. Corrosion studies on copper and titanium-lead canisters for nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekbom, L.B.; Hannerz, K.; Henrikson, K.S.

    1980-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Safety Project (KBS) has proposed that spent non-processed nuclear fuel shall be disposed of by enclosing it in copper canisters or alternatively that reprocessed and vitrified waste shall be enclosed in a titanium canister with a lead lining. The canisters are to be placed in vertical drill-holes in rock, 500 m below ground and embedded in a buffer of sand and bentonite. The purpose of this arrangement is to raise several obstacles against fission products reaching the biosphere. The thick-walled canister is one of these obstacles, which is proposed to be a barrier for a considerable period of time. Corrosion is the limiting factor of the canister durability. The rate of corrosion is dependent on the amount and transport of corrosion reactants to the surface of the canister. The thermodynamic possibilities for various corrosion reactions on copper and lead under the prevailing conditions were studied, also with regard to bacterial influence. Entrapped atmospheric oxygen and sulphide in the ground water were found to be reactants of importance. The supply of oxygen and sulphide by diffusion was calculated, and hence the greatest possible corrosion. The corrosion attack may start as pitting but will penetrate into the thick metal wall at a decreasing rate. An expert group arrived at the conclusion that under given conditions the canisters will last for a very long time (hundreds of thousands of years for copper canisters). In order to verify the expected high corrosion resistance of titanium, laboratory tests have been carried out in environments, which must be considered to provide accelerated rather than simulated tests

  18. Corrosivity Index Copper and Steel at Two Locations in Villahermosa, Tabasco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejero-Rivas María Candelaria

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the atmospheric corrosion of copper and carbon steel made ​​in two environments Villahermosa, Tabasco for six months. The test site of the industrial zone started Villahermosa Institute of Technology (ITVH and rural-urban site at the Technological University of Tabasco (UTTAB. Aluminum in combination with a screw carbon steel provided the index marine corrosivity (MA, the brass screw gives the index of industrial corrosivity (IA; wire method of screw according to ASTM G116-93 was used and the plastic screw nylon gives the rate of rural-urban corrosivity (RUA. The determination of air pollutants (sulfur dioxide and chlorides, was with the methods of wet candle and sulfation plates according to ISO 9225. Morphology studies were performed on the corrosion products formed on the specimens screw, using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive. The corrosion products that formed on the surface of copper and carbon steel, having a bulb-shaped morphology characteristic of the addition of soluble salts, particularly sulphates and chlorides, were identified in the two stations.

  19. Corrosion of high purity copper as engineering barrier in deep geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa, Maité; Rodríguez Martín, A.; Farina Silvia, B.

    2013-01-01

    Pure copper with oxygen content below 5 ppm (to minimize segregation at grain boundaries) and doped with phosphorus (to increase creep resistance) is the chosen material for the corrosion-resistant barrier of the High Level Radioactive 2 Wastecontainers in the Swedish and Finnish repository models. These models include the construction of the repository below the water table, which is a reducing environment in which copper has excellent resistance to general and localized corrosion in aqueous electrolytes. The aim of this work is contribute to determine the durability of the material, given that deep geological repositories of HLW are designed to ensure the protection of the environment for periods of hundreds of thousands years. As a first step in a more general analysis the effects of chloride, one of the main aggressive species of corrosion, are evaluated. To this purpose corrosion potential was determined and anodic polarization curves were performed in deaerated solutions varying the chloride concentration between 0.01 and 1M and the temperature between 30 and 90°C. Several electrochemical techniques were used: the evolution of corrosion potential was measured, anodic polarization curves were obtained and electrochemical impedance tests were performed. The analysis was complemented with microscopic observations of the type of corrosive attack, as well as determinations of the eventual corrosion products formed using Energy-Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDS). Results show that the corrosion potential decreases with the increase of temperature and with the increase of chloride concentration. A correlation of the corrosion potential as a function of temperature and chloride concentration was obtained, with the purpose of making predictions in variable conditions.The current density increases both with temperature and with chloride concentration. A pitting potential is observed in certain conditions. (author)

  20. Corrosion behavior induced by LiCl-KCl in type 304 and 316 stainless steel and copper at low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee-Hyung Sim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of stainless steel (304 and 316 type and copper induced by LiCl-KCl at low temperatures in the presence of sufficient oxygen and moisture was investigated through a series of experiments (at 30°C, 40°C, 60°C, and 80°C for 24 hours, 48 hours, 72 hours, and 96 hours. The specimens not coated on one side with an aqueous solution saturated with LiCl-KCl experienced no corrosion at any temperature, not even when the test duration exceeded 96 hours. Stainless steel exposed to LiCl-KCl experienced almost no corrosion below 40°C, but pitting corrosion was observed at temperatures above 60°C. As the duration of the experiment was increased, the rate of corrosion accelerated in proportion to the temperature. The 316 type stainless steel exhibited better corrosion resistance than did the 304 type. In the case of copper, the rate of corrosion accelerated in proportion to the duration and temperature but, unlike the case of stainless steel, the corrosion was more general. As a result, the extent of copper corrosion was about three times that of stainless steel.

  1. A Comparison of Corrosion Behavior of Copper and Its Alloy in Pongamia pinnata Oil at Different Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi H. N. Parameswaran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oils are promising substitutes for petrodiesel as they can be produced from numerous oil seed crops that can be cultivated anywhere and have high energy contents, exhibiting clean combustion behavior with zero CO2 emission and negligible SO2 generation. The impact of biofuel on the corrosion of various industrial metals is a challenge for using biofuel as automotive fuel. Fuel comes in contact with a wide variety of metallic materials under different temperatures, velocities, and loads thereby causing corrosion during storage and flow of fuel. Hence, the present investigation compares the corrosion rates of copper and brass in Pongamia pinnata oil (O100, 3% NaCl, and oil blend with NaCl (O99 obtained by static immersion test and using rotating cage. The corrosivity and conductivity of the test media are positively correlated. This study suggested that the corrosivity of copper is higher than brass in Pongamia pinnata oil (PO.

  2. Corrosion and biofouling resistance evaluation of 90-10 copper-nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, Carol [Consultant to Copper Development Association, UK, Square Covert, Caynham, Ludlow, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Copper-nickel alloys for marine use were developed for naval applications in the early part of the 20. century with a view to improving the corrosion resistance of condenser tubes and seawater piping. They still enjoy widespread use today not only for many navies but also in commercial shipping, floating production, storage and off loading vessels (FPSOs), and in multistage flash desalination. The two popular alloys contain 90% or 70% copper and differ in strength and maximum sea water velocity levels they can handle but it is the 90-10 copper-nickel (CuNi10Fe1Mn) which is the more economic and extensively used. An additional benefit of this alloy is its high resistance to biofouling: in recent years this has led to sheathing developments particularly for structures and boat hulls. This paper provides a review of the corrosion and biofouling resistance of 90-10 copper-nickel based on laboratory test data and documented experience of the alloy in marine environments. Particular attention is given to exposure trials over 8 years in Langstone Harbour, UK, which have recently been completed by Portsmouth University on behalf of the Nickel Institute. These examined four sheathing products; plate and foil as well as two composite products with rubber backing. The latter involved copper-nickel granules and slit sheet. The trial results are consistent with the behaviour of the alloy in the overall review. There is an inherent high resistance to marine biofouling when freely exposed. Prolonged exposure to quiet conditions can result in some growth of marine organisms but this is loosely attached and can readily be removed by wiping or a light scraping. The good corrosion resistance of 90-10 copper-nickel in sea water is also confirmed and associated with the formation of a thin, complex, protective and predominantly cuprous oxide surface film, which forms and matures naturally on exposure to seawater. Sound initial oxide film formation is also known to help protect against

  3. Corrosion of mild steel, copper and brass in crude oil / seawater mixture

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi, S.; Sawant, S.S.; Wagh, A.B.

    Mild steel, copper and brass coupons were introduced in natural seawater containing varying amount of crude oil. Mild steel showed higher rate of corrosion in seawater containing oil and lower corrosion rate in natural as well as artificial seawater...

  4. Accelerated Degradation Test and Predictive Failure Analysis of B10 Copper-Nickel Alloy under Marine Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Ye, Tianyuan; Feng, Qiang; Yao, Jinghua; Wei, Mumeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the corrosion behavior of B10 copper-nickel alloy in marine environment. Accelerated degradation test under marine environmental conditions was designed and performed based on the accelerated testing principle and the corrosion degradation mechanism. With the prolongation of marine corrosion time, the thickness of Cu2O film increased gradually. Its corrosion product was Cu2(OH)3Cl, which increased in quantity over time. Cl− was the major factor responsible for the marine corrosion of copper and copper alloy. Through the nonlinear fitting of corrosion rate and corrosion quantity (corrosion weight loss), degradation data of different corrosion cycles, the quantitative effects of two major factors, i.e., dissolved oxygen (DO) and corrosion medium temperature, on corrosion behavior of copper alloy were analyzed. The corrosion failure prediction models under different ambient conditions were built. One-day corrosion weight loss under oxygenated stirring conditions was equivalent to 1.31-day weight loss under stationary conditions, and the corrosion rate under oxygenated conditions was 1.31 times higher than that under stationary conditions. In addition, corrosion medium temperature had a significant effect on the corrosion of B10 copper sheet. PMID:28793549

  5. Accelerated Degradation Test and Predictive Failure Analysis of B10 Copper-Nickel Alloy under Marine Environmental Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Ye, Tianyuan; Feng, Qiang; Yao, Jinghua; Wei, Mumeng

    2015-09-10

    This paper studies the corrosion behavior of B10 copper-nickel alloy in marine environment. Accelerated degradation test under marine environmental conditions was designed and performed based on the accelerated testing principle and the corrosion degradation mechanism. With the prolongation of marine corrosion time, the thickness of Cu₂O film increased gradually. Its corrosion product was Cu₂(OH)₃Cl, which increased in quantity over time. Cl - was the major factor responsible for the marine corrosion of copper and copper alloy. Through the nonlinear fitting of corrosion rate and corrosion quantity (corrosion weight loss), degradation data of different corrosion cycles, the quantitative effects of two major factors, i.e. , dissolved oxygen (DO) and corrosion medium temperature, on corrosion behavior of copper alloy were analyzed. The corrosion failure prediction models under different ambient conditions were built. One-day corrosion weight loss under oxygenated stirring conditions was equivalent to 1.31-day weight loss under stationary conditions, and the corrosion rate under oxygenated conditions was 1.31 times higher than that under stationary conditions. In addition, corrosion medium temperature had a significant effect on the corrosion of B10 copper sheet.

  6. Accelerated Degradation Test and Predictive Failure Analysis of B10 Copper-Nickel Alloy under Marine Environmental Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Sun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the corrosion behavior of B10 copper-nickel alloy in marine environment. Accelerated degradation test under marine environmental conditions was designed and performed based on the accelerated testing principle and the corrosion degradation mechanism. With the prolongation of marine corrosion time, the thickness of Cu2O film increased gradually. Its corrosion product was Cu2(OH3Cl, which increased in quantity over time. Cl− was the major factor responsible for the marine corrosion of copper and copper alloy. Through the nonlinear fitting of corrosion rate and corrosion quantity (corrosion weight loss, degradation data of different corrosion cycles, the quantitative effects of two major factors, i.e., dissolved oxygen (DO and corrosion medium temperature, on corrosion behavior of copper alloy were analyzed. The corrosion failure prediction models under different ambient conditions were built. One-day corrosion weight loss under oxygenated stirring conditions was equivalent to 1.31-day weight loss under stationary conditions, and the corrosion rate under oxygenated conditions was 1.31 times higher than that under stationary conditions. In addition, corrosion medium temperature had a significant effect on the corrosion of B10 copper sheet.

  7. The stress corrosion cracking of copper nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Litke, C.D.; Ikeda, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    The extent of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper nuclear waste containers is being predicted on the basis of a 'limited propagation' argument. In this argument, it is accepted that crack initiation may occur, but it is argued that the environmental conditions and material properties required for a through-wall crack to propagate will not be present. In this paper, the effect of one environmental parameter, the supply of oxidant (J ox ), on the crack growth rate is examined. Experiments have been conducted on two grades of Cu in NANO 2 environments using two loading techniques. The supply of oxidant has been varied either electrochemically in bulk solution using different applied current densities or by embedding the loaded test specimens in compacted buffer material containing O 2 as the oxidant. Measured and theoretical crack growth rates as a function of J ox are compared with the predicted oxidant flux to the containers in a disposal vault and an estimate of the maximum crack depth on a container obtained. (author)

  8. Fabricated super-hydrophobic film with potentiostatic electrolysis method on copper for corrosion protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peng; Qiu Ri; Zhang Dun; Lin Zhifeng; Hou Baorong

    2010-01-01

    A novel one-step potentiostatic electrolysis method was proposed to fabricate super-hydrophobic film on copper surface. The resulted film was characterized by contact angle tests, Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and electrochemical measurements. It could be inferred that the super-hydrophobic property resulted from the flower-like structure of copper tetradecanoate film. In the presence of super-hydrophobic film, the anodic and cathodic polarization current densities are reduced for more than five and four orders of magnitude, respectively. The air trapped in the film is the essential contributor of the anticorrosion property of film for its insulation, the copper tetradecanoate film itself acts as a 'frame' to trap air as well as a coating with inhibition effect. The super-hydrophobic film presents excellent inhibition effect to the copper corrosion and stability in water containing Cl - .

  9. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as...

  10. Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    cycle) AT1 0.24 AT5 2.4 k 1074 AT7 0.21 AT6 2.4 x 10-4 AT8 0.25 BIA 3.4 x 10-4 AT9 0.22 BL3 0.38 BL8 0.42 - .,14 of the specimen could be made common for...conditions in a cabi- net,79-82 and spray and fogs. 83-8 It was found35 that the data obtained in accelerated laboratory testing of metals in the presence...laboratory and outdoor exposure results. L4 29 F ,, . , • . .. -.. _.• ff’*• _, . . ._ • • • • 7 k. SALT SPRAY The salt- spray test involves exposure of

  11. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion in Copper and Nickel Seawater Piping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    Ambiente , pp. 163-170. product structure on the corrosion rate of Cu-Ni alloys. Stover, H. E. 1961. Premature failure of copper-nickel alloys...Sons Ltd. 441 pp. Quimica . Verink, E.D. and Pourbaix, M. 1971. Use of electrochemical Pope, D. H., Duquette, D. J., Johannes, A. H., and Wayner...Bacteria. 2nd Ed. Workshop on Biodeterioration (CONICET-NSF), pp. 43-63, 144pp. London: Cambridge University Press. Sao Paulo, Brazil: Aquatec Quimica . MTS Journal • Vol. 24, No. 3 • 17

  12. Monolayers and mixed-layers on copper towards corrosion protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinapi, F. [Fonds pour la Formation a la Recherche dans l' Industrie et dans l' Agriculture, Rue d' Egmont 5, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Julien, S.; Auguste, D.; Hevesi, L.; Delhalle, J. [Laboratory of Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Surfaces, University of Namur, FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Mekhalif, Z. [Laboratory of Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Surfaces, University of Namur, FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)], E-mail: zineb.mekhalif@fundp.ac.be

    2008-05-01

    In order to improve the protection abilities of (3-mercaptopropy)trimethoxysilane (MPTS) self-assembled monolayers on copper surfaces, mixed monolayers have been formed successfully by successive immersions in MPTS and in n-dodecanethiol (DT). A newly synthesised molecule, (11-mercaptoundecyl)trimethoxysilane (MUTS), has also been employed to form a thicker organic film on copper surfaces and, thereby, enhance the inhibitory action of the coating. The grafting has been confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), polarization modulation infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and water contact angle. The protective efficiency of each protective organic film has been evidenced by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and polarization curve measurements (CP). It was shown that the MUTS and unhydrolyzed MPTS/DT films exhibited significant corrosion protection properties.

  13. Effect of menthol coated craft paper on corrosion of copper in HCl ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Natural menthol was coated on craft paper by impregnation and studied as volatile corrosion inhibitor for copper in hydrochloric acid environment. The effect of menthol on copper corrosion was studied by gravimetric and electrochemical methods such as potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical.

  14. Is Copper Immune to Corrosion When in Contact With Water and Aqueous Solutions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Digby D.; Sharifi-Asl, Samin

    2011-03-01

    Objectives The aim of this project has been to increase knowledge and to contribute to the research community in the area of copper corrosion in a repository environment. For SSM, the most important subject is to provide better conditions for a science based evaluation of a repository for spent nuclear fuel. In this respect, this project aimed at conducting a comprehensive theoretical study on corrosion of copper in repository environment based on an expected composition of dissolved species in the groundwater in the Forsmark area. In addition the thermodynamic immunity of copper in pure anoxic water has been especially addressed as this was one of the initial conditions made by SKB for selecting copper as canister material. Results The authors have shown, in so-called corrosion Domain Diagrams, that copper in a thermodynamic sense can be considered as immune in pure anoxic water (without dissolved oxygen) only under certain conditions. It is shown that copper will corrode in pure anoxic water with very low concentrations of [Cu + ] and very low partial pressures of hydrogen gas. At higher concentrations of [Cu + ] and partial pressures of hydrogen, copper is found to be thermodynamically immune and will not corrode. The rate of copper corrosion in the repository water environment will thus depend on the transport of corrosion products away from the copper surface or the transport of corroding species to the copper surface. The degree to which this affects the corrosion of copper canisters in the repository environment has not been further studied. Still, the result shows that copper cannot be considered as thermodynamically immune in the presence of pure anoxic water, this implicate that one of SKB:s initial conditions for selecting copper as a canister material can be questioned. To what degree this may influence the corrosion of copper canisters in the repository environment still needs to be investigated. Of other species present in the water at repository

  15. Electrochemical study of stress corrosion cracking of copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malki, Brahim

    1999-01-01

    This work deals with the electrochemical study of stress corrosion of copper alloys in aqueous environment. Selective dissolution and electrochemical oxidation are two key-points of the stress corrosion of these alloys. The first part of this thesis treats of these aspects applied to Cu-Au alloys. Measurements have been performed using classical electrochemical techniques (in potentio-dynamic, potentio-static and galvano-static modes). The conditions of occurrence of an electrochemical noise is analysed using signal processing techniques. The impact on the behavior of Cu 3 Au are discussed. In the second part, the stress corrosion problem is addressed in the case of surface oxide film formation, in particular for Cu-Zn alloys. We have found useful to extend this study to mechanical stress oxidation mechanisms in the presence of an oscillating potential electrochemical system. The aim is to examine the influence of these new electrochemical conditions (galvano-static mode) on the behavior of stressed brass. Finally, the potential distribution at crack tip is calculated in order to compare the different observations [fr

  16. The effect of boron implantation on the corrosion behaviour, microhardness and contact resistance of copper and silver surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, O.; Johnson, E.; Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.

    1986-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of boron implantation on the corrosion resistance of electrical contacts, a number of pure copper, pure silver and copper edge connector samples have been implanted with boron (40 keV) to fluences of 5.10 20 m -2 and 2.10 21 m -2 . Atmospheric corrosion tests of the implanted species were conducted using the following exposures: H 2 S (12.5 ppm, 4 days), SO 2 (25 ppm, 21 days), saltfog (5% NaCl, 1 day), moist air (93% RH, 56 days), and hot/dry air (70 C, 56 days). The boron implantations lead to a significant reduction in the sulphidation rate of copper and silver. The corrosive film formed during exposure in H 2 S and SO 2 atmospheres is confined to pitted regions on the implanted areas, while a thick and relatively uniform film formation is observed on the unimplanted samples. The corrosion resistance of copper and silver in saltfog atmosphere is somewhat improved by boron implantation, whilst the results from exposures to moist air or hot/dry air are inconclusive. The improved corrosion behaviour is accompanied by an increase in the contact resistance and in the microhardness of the implanted samples. (orig.)

  17. Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

    1980-12-01

    Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

  18. Corrosion test on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Curtis, P.G.

    1996-01-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials in order to assist in selecting materials for package design and to help in designing longer-term corrosion tests. The corrosion solution was buffered near pH4, was in contact with air, and contained chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel-, and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron absorber elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron absorber elements were studied

  19. Electrochemical corrosion testing of metal waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D. P.; Peterson, J. J.; Katyal, H. K.; Keiser, D. D.; Hilton, B. A.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical corrosion tests have been conducted on simulated stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) metal waste form (MWF) samples. The uniform aqueous corrosion behavior of the samples in various test solutions was measured by the polarization resistance technique. The data show that the MWF corrosion rates are very low in groundwaters representative of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Galvanic corrosion measurements were also conducted on MWF samples that were coupled to an alloy that has been proposed for the inner lining of the high-level nuclear waste container. The experiments show that the steady-state galvanic corrosion currents are small. Galvanic corrosion will, hence, not be an important mechanism of radionuclide release from the MWF alloys

  20. A copper container corrosion model for the in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    1996-11-01

    Copper containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault are expected to undergo uniform corrosion and, possibly, pitting. The corrosion behaviour of the containers will be dictated by the evolution of environmental conditions within the disposal vault. The environment will evolve from an early warm, oxidizing phase, during which fast uniform corrosion and pitting may occur, to an indefinite period of cool, anoxic conditions, during which the container will only be susceptible to slow uniform corrosion. The results of corrosion and electrochemical studies of the uniform corrosion of Cu in O 2 -containing Cl - solutions are discussed and a detailed reaction mechanism presented. The relevant literature on pitting corrosion is briefly reviewed and models for the prediction of pit depth discussed. The potential for microbially influenced corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking is discussed, as are vapour-phase corrosion and the effects of β-radiation. The use of natural analogues for justifying long-term corrosion predictions is also considered. Finally, a model for uniform corrosion and pitting is presented and container lifetimes predicted. Copper containers having a minimum wall thickness of 25.4 mm are not predicted to fail by corrosion in periods 6 a. Thus, despite the assumption of poor rock quality made here, the safety of the entire disposal concept can be assured by the use of a long-lived container. (author). 125 refs., 1 tab., 24 figs

  1. Corrosion performance tests for reinforcing steel in concrete : test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The existing test method to assess the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel embedded in concrete, mainly : ASTM G109, is labor intensive, time consuming, slow to provide comparative results, and often expensive. : However, corrosion of reinforc...

  2. Decrease in cytotoxicity of copper-based intrauterine devices (IUD) pretreated with 6-mercaptopurine and pterin as biocompatible corrosion inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Florencia; Grillo, Claudiaa; Schilardi, Patricial; Rubert, Aldo; Benítez, Guillermo; Lorente, Carolina; de Mele, Mónica Fernández Lorenzo

    2013-01-23

    The copper intrauterine device (IUD) based its contraceptive action on the release of cupric ions from a copper wire. Immediately after the insertion, a burst release of copper ions occurs, which may be associated to a variety of side effects. 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) and pterin (PT) have been proposed as corrosion inhibitors to reduce this harmful release. Pretreatments with 1 × 10(-4) M 6-MP and 1 × 10(-4) M PT solutions with 1h and 3h immersion times were tested. Conventional electrochemical techniques, EDX and XPS analysis, and cytotoxicity assays with HeLa cell line were employed to investigate the corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of copper with and without treatments. Results showed that copper samples treated with PT and 6-MP solutions for 3 and 1 h, respectively, are more biocompatible than those without treatment. Besides, the treatment reduces the burst release effect of copper in simulated uterine solutions during the first week after the insertion. It was concluded that PT and 6-MP treatments are promising strategies able to reduce the side effects related to the "burst release" of copper-based IUD without altering the contraceptive action.

  3. Literature Survey of Copper Corrosion Modelling under Deep Geological Disposal Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Heui-Joo; Kook, Dong-Hak; Lee, Min-Soo; Choi, Heui-Joo

    2008-03-15

    As a one of the solution for the spent nuclear fuel problem, deep repository research have been under way in KAERI. To raise the resistance against repository cask corrosion, copper canister was adopted for the outer material of the cask. Duration of the repository with million year order makes the copper corrosion research under the repository environment very important and the corrosion modelling which could trace the real world precisely and predict the corrosion behavior very well is subsequently necessary. With in progress of plan to manufacture unique copper cask corresponding to our country repository system, survey for the preceding research papers in recent research direction and kernel points is expected to significant. This paper arranged the representative literatures for the important corrosion mechanism which are recently published.

  4. Accelerated Degradation Test and Predictive Failure Analysis of B10 Copper-Nickel Alloy under Marine Environmental Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Bo; Ye, Tianyuan; Feng, Qiang; Yao, Jinghua; Wei, Mumeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the corrosion behavior of B10 copper-nickel alloy in marine environment. Accelerated degradation test under marine environmental conditions was designed and performed based on the accelerated testing principle and the corrosion degradation mechanism. With the prolongation of marine corrosion time, the thickness of Cu2O film increased gradually. Its corrosion product was Cu2(OH)3Cl, which increased in quantity over time. Cl− was the major factor responsible for the marine c...

  5. An Electrochemical Investigation into the Corrosion Protection Properties of Coatings for the Active Metal Copper

    OpenAIRE

    Carragher, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    In the research presented in this thesis, corrosion protection films were synthesised and characterised. The films were based on polypyrrole (PPy) coatings doped with combinations of tartrate, oxalate and dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS) along with the incorporation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), and viologen films adsorbed at copper. The corrosion protective properties of these films were studied and compared to the uncoated copper substrate. They were assessed and stu...

  6. Corrosion and microfouling of copper and its alloys in a tropical marine waters of India (Mangalore)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Khandeparker, D.C.; Tulaskar, A.; Venkat, K.; Garg, A.

    Rate of corrosion, extent and nature of microfouling of copper, cupronickel 70/30 and cupronickel 90/10 have been studied for three different seasons at a station on the west coast of India. The corrosion rates for all the three materials are higher...

  7. Standard Test Method for Sandwich Corrosion Test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method defines the procedure for evaluating the corrosivity of aircraft maintenance chemicals, when present between faying surfaces (sandwich) of aluminum alloys commonly used for aircraft structures. This test method is intended to be used in the qualification and approval of compounds employed in aircraft maintenance operations. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information. 1.3 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific hazard statements appear in Section 9.

  8. Corrosion testing in flash tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, S.J.; Stead, N.J.

    1999-07-01

    As kraft pulp mills adopt modified cooking processes, an increasing amount of corrosion of carbon steel digester systems is being encountered. Many mills have had severe corrosion in the flash tanks, in particular, the first ({number{underscore}sign}1) flash tank. The work described in this report was aimed at characterizing the corrosion. Coupons of carbon steel, several stainless steels and titanium were exposed at two mills. At mill A, identical sets of coupons were exposed in the {number{underscore}sign}1 and {number{underscore}sign}2 flash tank. At mill B, three identical sets of coupons were placed in flash tank {number{underscore}sign}1. The results of the exposures showed that both carbon steel and titanium suffered high rates of general corrosion, while the stainless steels suffered varying degrees of localized attack. The ranking of the resistance of corrosion in the flash tank was the same ranking as would be expected in a reducing acid environment. In the light of the coupon results, organic acids is concluded to be the most likely cause of corrosion of the flash tanks.

  9. Corrosion Protection of Copper in 3% NaCl Solution by the Fabrication of Thiadiazole Monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durainatarajan, P; Prabakaran, M; Ramesh, S; Periasamy, V

    2018-08-01

    In this study, 2-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (2-MT) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was formed on copper electrode surface and the resulting 2-MT SAM on copper has been characterized using surface analytical techniques such as Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurement (CA). The existence of N and S in the EDX and FT-IR analysis showed that 2-MT molecules were self-assembled on the copper through N and S by chemisorption which indicates the formation of 2-MT SAM on copper surface. Corrosion protection performance of 2-MT SAM on copper was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization studies (PDS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Analysis of both electrochemical and SEM analysis results revealed excellent corrosion protection for the copper substrate.

  10. The Effect of Orthophosphate as a Copper Corrosion Inhibitor in High Alkalinity Drinking Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    in the near future. 7 2.2. Human Health Concerns In the human body, copper is a component of proteins that perform a range of functions...Studies have shown that on average, daily copper intake is 3200 μg. Copper comes from foods such as shellfish, meat, eggs, vegetables , nuts...dehydration synthesis, have a tendency to hydrolyze to orthophosphate in the presence of water, therefore altering their corrosion control mechanism (Cantor

  11. XPS response in the corrosion products analysis for copper exposed at clean air environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariaca, L.; Morcillo, M.; Feliu Jr, S.; Gonzalez, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this work is presented the obtained response for superficial analysis technique by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA), to determine the corrosion products formed during the copper exposure at environment without pollutants (clean air) at 50, 70 and 90 % of relative humidity at 35 Centigrade. One of the copper corrosion products most knew is Cu 2 O. This oxide is formed instantly to be exposed the copper at air. However in function of the exposure time and the relative humidity at it is exposed, the Cu 2 O oxide is transformed at Cu O and Cu(OH) 2 (Author)

  12. Effect of Sulfide Concentration on Copper Corrosion in Anoxic Chloride-Containing Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Decheng; Dong, Chaofang; Xu, Aoni; Man, Cheng; He, Chang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-04-01

    The structure and property of passive film on copper are strongly dependent on the sulfide concentration; based on this, a series of electrochemical methods were applied to investigate the effect of sulfide concentration on copper corrosion in anaerobic chloride-containing solutions. The cyclic voltammetry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that the corrosion products formed on copper in anaerobic sulfide solutions comprise Cu2S and CuS. And the corrosion resistance of copper decreased with increasing sulfide concentration and faster sulfide addition, owing to the various structures of the passive films observed by the atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope. A p-type semiconductor character was obtained under all experimental conditions, and the defect concentration, which had a magnitude of 1022-1023 cm-3, increased with increasing sulfide concentration, resulting in a higher rate of both film growth and dissolution.

  13. Pitting corrosion of copper in aqueous solutions containing phosphonic acid as an inhibitor. Hosuhon san wo inhibita toshite fukumu suiyoekichu ni okeru do no koshiku ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Y. (Muroran Univ., Hokkaido (Japan). Graduate School); Seri, O.; Tagashira, K. (Muroran Univ., Hokkaido (Japan)); Nagata, K. (Sumitomo Light Metal Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Technical Research Lab.)

    1993-09-15

    Phosphonic acid-based inhibitors that are poured into cooling water for copper-tube circulation systems for open heat-accumulators were studied on their influence on pitting corrosion of copper. Amino trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP) dissolved into distilled water to 50 ppm was used for the immersion corrosion test. The corrosion-proof effect of additives such as ZnSO4, benzotriazole (BTA) was tested too. 0.5 mm thick phosphate-treated copper plates with a hole of 5 mm in diameter were used as test specimens. Pitting corrosion on the copper plate occurred when ATMP, BTA and ZnSO4 coexisted. It was proved that SO4 [sup 2-] is essential since Na2SO4 in stead of ZnSO4 induced also corrosion. The pitting took place when 0.6 ppm or more of SO4 [sup 2-] was present in a BTA-added ATMP solution. It was observed that the pitting is prone to occur with increase of SO4 [sup 2-] and the number of pitting increases. The following relationship is established when pitting corrosion occurs; E[sub b] [le] E[sub corr], where the former is a potential value at which current density shows a steep increase and the latter is an average value of spontaneous electrode potential showing a plateau. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Synergistic Effect of L-Methionine and KI on Copper Corrosion Inhibition in HNO3 (1M)

    OpenAIRE

    Amel SEDIK; Sihem ABDERRAHMANE; Said BOUKERCHE; Abdelaziz HIMOUR; Amel GHARBI

    2014-01-01

    L-Methionine (L-Met) efficiency as a non-toxic corrosion inhibitor for copper in 1M HNO3 has been studied by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. Copper corrosion rate significant decrease was observed in the presence of L-Met at 10-4M. The Obtained Results from potentiodynamic polarization and impedance measurements are in good agreement. L-Methionine adsorption on copper surface follows Langmuir isotherm. L-Met free energy adsorption on copper...

  15. Galvanic corrosion of copper-cast iron couples in relation to the Swedish radioactive waste canister concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, N.R.; Fennell, P.A.H.; Rance, A.P.; Werme, L.O.

    2004-01-01

    To ensure the safe encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel rods for geological disposal, SKB are considering using the Copper-Iron Canister, which consists of an outer copper canister and an inner cast iron container. The canister will be placed into boreholes in the bedrock of a geologic repository and surrounded by bentonite clay. In the unlikely event of the outer copper canister being breached, water could enter the annulus between the inner and outer canister and at points of contact between the two metals there would be a possibility of galvanic interactions. To study this effect, copper-cast iron galvanic couples were set up in a number of different environments representing possible conditions in the SKB repository. The tests investigated two artificial pore-waters and a bentonite slurry, under aerated and deaerated conditions, at 30 deg. C and 50 deg. C. The currents passing between the coupled electrodes and the potential of the couples were monitored for several months. In addition, some bimetallic crevice specimens based on the multi-crevice assembly (MCA) design were used to simulate the situation where the copper canister will be in direct contact with the cast iron inner vessel. The effect of growing an oxide film on the surface of the cast iron prior to coupling it with copper was also investigated. The electrochemical results are presented graphically in the form of electrode potentials and galvanic corrosion currents as a function of time. The galvanic currents in aerated conditions were much higher than in deaerated conditions. For example, at 30 deg. C, galvanic corrosion rates as low as 0.02 μm/year were observed for iron in groundwater after de-aeration, but of the order of 100 μm/year for the cast iron at 50 deg. C in the presence of oxygen. The galvanic currents were generally higher at 50 deg. C than at 30 deg. C. None of the MCA specimens exhibited any signs of crevice corrosion under deaerated conditions. It will be shown that in deaerated

  16. Corrosion Rate of Copper and Iron in Seawater Based on Resistance Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmanto, W.H; Gunawan,; Nuryanto, Rahmad

    2002-01-01

    Copper and iron metal wire corrosion in artificial sea water have been investigated in three corrosion systems, in the (i) closed bath, (ii) opened or air exposed bath, and (iii) aerated bath. The aim of our investigation is to determine the effect of oxygen contained in the air to the metals' corrosivity. Artificial sea water was prepared by dissolving 173.59 g sodium chloride and 4.91 g potassium chloride in 7.00 kg of water at 230C.The corrosion experiment was carried out under the const...

  17. Synergistic effects of sodium lauroyl sarcosinate and glutamic acid in inhibition assembly against copper corrosion in acidic solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yinzhe; Zhang, Daquan; Zeng, Huijing; Xie, Bin; Gao, Lixin; Lin, Tong

    2015-11-01

    A self-assembled multilayer (SAM) from sodium lauroyl sarcosinate (SLS) and glutamic acid (GLU) is formed on copper surface. Its inhibition ability against copper corrosion is examined by electrochemical analysis and weight loss test. In comparison to SAM formed by just SLS or GLU, a synergistic effect is observed when the coexistence of SLS and GLU in SAM. The SLS/GLU SAM has an acicular multilayer structure, and SAM prepared under the condition of 5 mM SLS and 1 mM GLU shows the best protection efficiency. PM6 calculation reveals that the synergistic effect stems from interactions between SLS, GLU and cupric ions.

  18. Corrosion study on high power feeding of telecomunication copper cable in 5 wt.% CaSO4.2H2O solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsudin, Shaiful Rizam; Hashim, Nabihah; Ibrahim, Mohd Saiful Bahri; Rahman, Muhammad Sayuzi Abdul; Idrus, Muhammad Amin; Hassan, Mohd Rezadzudin; Abdullah, Wan Razli Wan

    2016-07-01

    The studies were carried out to find out the best powering scheme over the copper telephone line. It was expected that the application of the higher power feeding could increase the data transfer and capable of providing the customer's satisfaction. To realize the application of higher remote power feeding, the potential of corrosion problem on Cu cables was studied. The natural corrosion behaviour of copper cable in the 0.5% CaSO4.2H2O solution was studied in term of open circuit potential for 30 days. The corrosion behaviour of higher power feeding was studied by the immersion and the planned interval test to determine the corrosion rate as well as the effect of voltage magnitudes and the current scheme i.e. positive direct (DC+) and alternating current (AC) at about 0.40 ± 0.01 mA/ cm2 current density. In the immersion test, both DC+ and AC scheme showed the increasing of feeding voltage magnitude has increased the corrosion rate of Cu samples starting from 60 to 100 volts. It was then reduced at about 100 - 120 volts which may due to the passive and transpassive mechanism. The corrosion rate was slowly reduced further from 120 to 200 volts. Visually, the positively charged of Cu cable was seems susceptible to severe corrosion, while AC scheme exhibited a slight corrosion reaction on the surface. However, the planned interval test and XRD results showed the corrosion activity of the copper cable in the studied solution was a relatively slow process and considered not to be corroded as a partially protective scale of copper oxide formed on the surface.

  19. Vehicle accelerated corrosion test procedures for automotive in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Liza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An accelerated corrosion test, known as proving ground accelerated test, is commonly performed by automotive manufacturers to evaluate the corrosion performance of a vehicle. The test combines corrosion and durability inputs to detect potential failures that may occur during in-service conditions. Currently, the test is conducted at an external test center overseas. Such test is aimed to simulate the effects of one year accelerated corrosion in severe corrosive environment of the north-east and south east of America. However, the test results obtained do not correlate with the actual corrosion conditions observed in the Malaysian market, which is likely attributed to the different test environment of the tropical climate of vehicles in service. Therefore, a vehicle accelerated corrosion test procedure that suits the Malaysian market is proposed and benchmarked with other global car manufacturers that have their own dedicated corrosion test procedure. In the present work, a test track is used as the corrosion test ground and consists of various types of roads for structural durability exposures. Corrosion related facilities like salt trough, mud trough and gravel road are constructed as addition to the existing facilities. The establishment of accelerated corrosion test facilities has contributed to the development of initial accelerated corrosion test procedure for the national car manufacturer. The corrosion exposure is monitored by fitting test coupons at the underbody of test vehicle using mass loss technique so that the desired corrosion rate capable of simulating the real time corrosion effects for its target market.

  20. Adsorption behavior of caffeine as a green corrosion inhibitor for copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Fernando Sílvio de; Giacomelli, Cristiano; Gonçalves, Reinaldo Simões; Spinelli, Almir

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical and impedance experiments were carried out to evaluate the corrosion behavior of copper in aerated 0.1 mol L −1 H 2 SO 4 solutions in the presence of three xanthine derivatives with similar chemical structures. The corrosion rate of copper was found to increase in the presence of theophylline and theobromine and decrease in the presence of caffeine. The adsorption and inhibitory effect of caffeine on copper surfaces in aerated 0.1 mol L −1 H 2 SO 4 solutions were then investigated in detail by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and fluorescence experiments. The data obtained indicate that caffeine behaves as a cathodic-type inhibitor adsorbing onto the copper surface according to the Temkin isotherm, with the negative ∆G° ads value of − 31.1 kJ mol −1 signifying a spontaneous adsorption process. The corrosion inhibition efficiency increased with caffeine concentration in the range of 1.0–10.0 mmol L −1 . Furthermore, the EIS results obtained at the open-circuit potential and surface analysis (SEM, EDS and fluorescence) clearly demonstrated the adsorption of the organic compound onto the copper electrode. The contact angle measurements revealed the formation of a hydrophobic protective film. This film covers up to 72% of the total active surface, acts as a protective barrier and prevents interaction between the metal, water and oxygen molecules. - Highlights: ► We have investigated the adsorption and corrosion inhibition of caffeine on copper surfaces. ► Caffeine behaves as a cathodic-type inhibitor. ► Caffeine adsorbs onto copper surface according to Temkin isotherm. ► There exists the formation of a hydrophobic film that acts as a protective barrier. ► This corrosion inhibitor covers up to 72% of the total active surface of copper.

  1. Guided wave testing for touch point corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleyne, David

    2012-01-01

    Guided wave testing (GWT) is established in the petrochemical and related industries, primarily for the detection of corrosion flaws. Touch point corrosion at support positions in pipe-work has become a significant problem within many operating gas, chemical and petro-chemical plants world-wide, particularly as a high proportion of these plants have been operational for many decades. This article demonstrates how GWT using guided waves sent axially along the pipe can be performed for the detection and accurate classification of touchpoint corrosion. The major advantage of GWT methods for the detection of touch point corrosion is its ability to examine several support positions from a single easy to access transducer position. The strategy is then to prioritize or rank the condition of the pipe at the supports by removing those with negligible wall loss from scheduling for further inspection. Guided waves are accurate at detecting and classifying corrosion patches at support positions, but deep pits within such patches are more difficult to accurately identify. Examples using data from routine inspection testing are used to support the development of the methods and testing approaches presented. Recent developments of the interpretation methods, testing procedures and calibration methods have significantly enhanced the capabilities of GWT for this important application.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A REPRODUCIBLE SCREENING METHOD TO DETERMINE THE MECHANISM AND EFFECT OF ORGANIC ACIDS AND OTHER CONTAMINANTS ON THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM-FINNED COPPER-TUBE HEAT EXCHANGE COILS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard A. Corbett; Dave Severance

    2005-02-01

    Formicary corrosion is an insidious form of localized pitting corrosion. Notoya (1997b) wrote, ?In Japan, this type of corrosion is found in approximately 10% of cases of premature failure of copper tubes.? Attack characteristically features very small surface pits which are not visible to the un-aided eye, and random directional changes in the underlying copper metal. Attack is rapid. Failures have occurred before installation, shortly thereafter, or within several years later. Objectives of this Research Project Conduct an in depth literature search on the subject of formicary corrosion. Define the corrosion mechanism. Develop a test method that will reproduce formicary corrosion. Develop a test method for screening candidate materials that could cause formicary corrosion.

  3. The influence of molybdenum on stress corrosion in Ultra Low Carbon Steels with copper addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazur

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of molybdenum content on the process of stress corrosion of ultra-low carbon structural steels with the addition of copper HSLA (High Strength Low Alloy was analyzed. The study was conducted for steels after heat treatment consisting of quenching andfollowing tempering at 600°C and it was obtained microstructure of the tempered martensite laths with copper precipitates and the phaseLaves Fe2Mo type. It was found strong influence of Laves phase precipitate on the grain boundaries of retained austenite on rate anddevelopment of stress corrosion processes. The lowest corrosion resistance was obtained for W3 steel characterized by high contents ofmolybdenum (2.94% Mo which should be connected with the intensity precipitate processes of Fe2Mo phase. For steels W1 and W2which contents molybdenum equals 1.02% and 1.88%, respectively were obtained similar courses of corrosive cracking.

  4. Corrosion behavior of novel imitation-gold copper alloy with rare earth in 3.5% NaCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.L.; Li, Z.; Zhu, A.Y.; Luo, L.Y.; Liang, J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → The design alloy has better anti-tarnish property than that of H7211 alloy during salt-spray test. → The corrosion rate of design alloy is much lower than that of H7211 alloy as immersed in NaCl solution. → In the low frequency region, the capacitive behavior normally faded and diffusion process had a key role. → In the medium frequency region, the Bode pattern showed a capacitive behavior. -- Abstract: A novel imitation-gold copper alloy with rare earth was designed and prepared. The corrosion behavior of the alloy immersed in 3.5% NaCl solution and its anti-tarnish property in the salt spray for different days has been studied. The designed alloy (CuZnAlNiMeRe) has more excellent anti-tarnish property and lower corrosion rate than those of currency coinage materials of H7211 alloy (used in China). A uniform and compact of corrosion film has been formed after the designed alloy immersed in 3.5% NaCl solution. The corrosion current densities I corr of the alloy decreased while the polarization resistance R p increased with time. The capacitance of the corrosion product film C film of the alloy decreased while the charge transfer resistance R ct . The Warburg diffusion impedance W R and the resistance of the equivalent circuit R increased with time.

  5. Copper corrosion and its relationship to solar collectors:a compendium.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menicucci, David F.; Mahoney, Alan Roderick

    2007-07-01

    Copper has many fine qualities that make it a useful material. It is highly conductive of both heat and electricity, is ductile and workable, and reasonably resistant to corrosion. Because of these advantages, the solar water heating industry has been using it since the mid-1970s as the material of choice for collectors, the fundamental component of a solar water heating system. In most cases copper has performed flawlessly, but in some situations it has been known to fail. Pitting corrosion is the usual failure mode, but erosion can also occur. In 2000 Sandia National Laboratories and the Copper Development Association were asked to analyze the appearance of pin-hole leaks in solar collector units installed in a housing development in Arizona, and in 2002 Sandia analyzed a pitting corrosion event that destroyed a collector system at Camp Pendleton. This report includes copies of the reports and accounts of these corrosion failures, and provides a bibliography with references to many papers and articles that might be of benefit to the solar community. It consolidates in a single source information that has been accumulated at Sandia relative to copper corrosion, especially as it relates to solar water heaters.

  6. γ-radiation induced corrosion of copper in bentonite-water systems under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin Norrfors, K.; Björkbacka, Åsa; Kessler, Amanda; Wold, Susanna; Jonsson, Mats

    2018-03-01

    In this work we have experimentally studied the impact of bentonite clay on the process of radiation-induced copper corrosion in anoxic water. The motivation for this is to further develop our understanding of radiation-driven processes occurring in deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel where copper canisters containing the spent nuclear fuel will be embedded in compacted bentonite. Experiments on radiation-induced corrosion in the presence and absence of bentonite were performed along with experiments elucidating the impact irradiation on the Cu2+ adsorption capacity of bentonite. The experiments presented in this work show that the presence of bentonite clay has no or very little effect on the magnitude of radiation-induced corrosion of copper in anoxic aqueous systems. The absence of a protective effect similar to that observed for radiation-induced dissolution of UO2 is attributed to differences in the corrosion mechanism. This provides further support for the previously proposed mechanism where the hydroxyl radical is the key radiolytic oxidant responsible for the corrosion of copper. The radiation effect on the bentonite sorption capacity of Cu2+ (reduced capacity) is in line with what has previously been reported for other cations. The reduced cation sorption capacity is partly attributed to a loss of Al-OH sites upon irradiation.

  7. Evaluations of corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr plated and Zn-plated Fe Substrates Using an Electrolytic Corrosion Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaebong; Kim, Kyungwook; Park, Minwoo; Song, Taejun; Lee, Chaeseung; Lee, Euijong; Kim, Sangyeol

    2013-01-01

    An Eectrolytic Corrosion(EC) test method was evaluated by the comparison with Copper Accelerated Acetic Salt Spray(CASS) and Neutral Salt Spray(SS) tests. Those methods were applied in order to evaluate corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr plated and Zn-plated Fe substrates. The correlations between results obtained by different test methods were investigated. Results showed that the electrochemical method such as the EC test method was superior to the conventional methods such as CASS and SS, in terms of the quantitative accuracy and the test-time span. Furthermore, the EC test method provided the useful means to estimate the initiation of corrosion of each layer by monitoring the rest potentials of the coated layers such as Ni, Cr, and Zn on Fe substrate. With regard to test time spans, the EC test provided the 78 times and 182 times faster results than the CASS test in cases of Fe + 5μm Ni + 0.5 μm Cr and Fe + 20 μm Ni + 0.5 μm Cr respectively, while the EC test was 85 times faster results than the Salt Spray test in the case of Fe + 20 g/m 2 Zn. Therefore, the EC test can be the better method to evaluate the resistance to corrosion of coated layers than the conventional methods such as the SS test and the CASS

  8. Dissolution of copper in chloride/ammonia mixtures and the implications for the stress corrosion cracking of copper containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Greidanus, G.; Jobe, D.J.

    1999-05-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking is a possible failure mechanism for copper nuclear fuel waste disposal containers. One species known to cause the stress corrosion of copper alloys is ammonia. It is conceivable that ammonia could be produced in a disposal vault under certain, very specific conditions. There are a number of conditions, however, that mitigate against container failure by stress corrosion, one of which is the presence of chloride ions in deep Canadian Shield groundwaters. There are a number of reports in the literature that suggest that Cl - has an inhibitive effect on the stress corrosion of Cu alloys in ammonia solutions. The electrochemical behaviour of Cu in Cl - /ammonia solutions has been studied as a function of ammonia concentration, pH, the rate of mass transport and electrochemical potential. In particular, the effects of these parameters on the formation Of Cu 2 O films and the steady-state dissolution behaviour have been determined. All experiments were carried out in 0.1 mol·dm -3 NaC1 as a base solution. A series of aqueous speciation and equilibrium potential/pH diagrams are also presented for the quaternary system Cu-C1 - NH 3 /NH 4 + H 2 O. These diagrams are used to interpret the results of the electrochemical experiments reported here. In addition, it is demonstrated how these diagrams could be used to predict the time-dependence of the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of Cu containers in a disposal vault. (author)

  9. What determines the inhibition effectiveness of ATA, BTAH, and BTAOH corrosion inhibitors on copper?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokalj, Anton; Peljhan, Sebastijan; Finsgar, Matjaz; Milosev, Ingrid

    2010-11-24

    Three corrosion inhibitors for copper-3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATA), benzotriazole (BTAH), and 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (BTAOH)-were investigated by corrosion experiments and atomistic computer simulations. The trend of corrosion inhibition effectiveness of the three inhibitors on copper in near-neutral chloride solution is determined experimentally as BTAH ≳ ATA ≫ BTAOH. A careful analysis of the results of computer simulations based on density functional theory allowed to pinpoint the superior inhibiting action of BTAH and ATA as a result of their ability to form strong N-Cu chemical bonds in deprotonated form. While these bonds are not as strong as the Cl-Cu bonds, the presence of solvent favors the adsorption of inhibitor molecules onto the surface due to stronger solvation of the Cl(-) anions. Moreover, benzotriazole displays the largest affinity among the three inhibitors to form intermolecular aggregates, such as [BTA-Cu](n) polymeric complex. This is another factor contributing to the stability of the protective inhibitor film on the surface, thus making benzotriazole an outstanding corrosion inhibitor for copper. These findings cannot be anticipated on the basis of inhibitors' molecular electronic properties alone, thus emphasizing the importance of a rigorous modeling of the interactions between the components of the corrosion system in corrosion inhibition studies.

  10. Inhibition of copper corrosion in aerated hydrochloric acid solution by heterocyclic compounds containing a mercapto group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Daquan; Gao Lixin; Zhou Guoding

    2004-12-01

    Inhibition of copper corrosion by benzotriazole (BTA), 2-mercapto benzoxazole (MBO) and 2-mercapto benzimidazole (MBI) in 0.5 mol L{sup -1} HCl was investigated by weight-loss measurements, potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. MBI was shown to be the most effective inhibitor among those tested. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that the three compounds acted as anodic inhibitors, particularly MBI strongly suppressed anodic current densities. Molecular structure parameters of BTA, MBO and MBI were obtained by using an MM2 forcefield program and PPP-SCF quantum chemical calculation. It was found that MBI has higher levels of HOMO and LUMO energy and the larger {pi}-electron density.

  11. Corrosion of copper in oxygen-deficient groundwater with and without deep bedrock micro-organisms: Characterisation of microbial communities and surface processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huttunen-Saarivirta, E., E-mail: elina.huttunen-saarivirta@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Materials Performance, Kemistintie 3, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Rajala, P. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Materials Performance, Kemistintie 3, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Bomberg, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Geobiotechnology, Tietotie 2, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Carpén, L. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Materials Performance, Kemistintie 3, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Copper was exposed to groundwater with and without deep bedrock micro-organisms. • Biofilm composition was determined and correlated with the behaviour of copper. • Under biotic conditions, the film of Cu{sub 2}S formed on copper surfaces. • Bacterial pool was in a key role for the morphology and properties of Cu{sub 2}S film. • Under abiotic conditions, Cu{sub 2}O systematically developed on copper surfaces. - Abstract: Copper specimens were exposed to oxygen-deficient artificial groundwater in the presence and absence of micro-organisms enriched from the deep bedrock of the planned nuclear waste repository site at Olkiluoto island on the western coast of Finland. During the exposure periods of 4 and 10 months, the copper specimens were subjected to electrochemical measurements. The biofilm developed on the specimens and the water used in the exposures were subjected to microbiological analyses. Changes in the water chemistry were also determined and surfaces of the copper specimens were characterized with respect to the morphology and composition of the formed corrosion products. The results showed that under biotic conditions, redox of the water and open circuit potential (OCP) of the copper specimens were generally negative and resulted in the build-up of a copper sulphide, Cu{sub 2}S, layer due to the activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) that were included in the system. In the 4-month test, the electrochemical behaviour of the specimens changed during the exposure and alphaproteobactria Rhizobiales were the dominant bacterial group in the biofilm where the highest corrosion rate was observed. In the 10-month test, however, deltaproteobacteria SRB flourished and the initial electrochemical behaviour and the low corrosion rate of the copper were retained until the end of the test period. Under abiotic conditions, the positive water redox potential and specimen OCP correlated with the formation of copper oxide, Cu{sub 2}O

  12. Microstructural characterization of copper corrosion in aqueous and soil environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2005-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy has been used to investigate the surface films on pure copper after exposure to different aqueous and soil environments, containing chloride, sulfide and ammonium salts. The morphology of the films formed on copper surface in aqueous and soil environments was different for the same amount of pollutants. The surface films formed in soil environments were not homogenous in contrast to the films formed in aqueous environments. The damaging effect of chloride ions and the benign role of sulfide ions were revealed in both the environments. Local compositional analysis confirmed that the surface films formed on copper consisted predominantly of copper and oxygen

  13. Application of Corrosion Test for Austenitic SS 304 in PWR with Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance (EQCM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Seok; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jong Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2011-01-01

    The secondary system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is a loop composed of: a) steam generator, b) steam transport piping, c) steam turbine and d) condenser and some optional component. The materials of these components are mainly carbon steel, different grades of stainless steel, high nickel alloys (Inconel-600 and Incoloy-800), Copper alloys. Among these materials, austenitic stainless steel 304 is widely used in tubing for large-surface condenser exposed to seawater as coolant of steam condenser. Stainless steels show much greater resistance to erosion-corrosion than copper alloys used in steam condenser tubing and are also immune to ammonia attack, ammonia induced stress corrosion cracking. Also, the chloride induced stress corrosion cracking has not been reported in stainless steel tubing in power plant condenser. Nevertheless, it is well known that stainless steels are susceptible to pitting and crevice corrosion in the seawater environment including chloride ions. Metallic materials exposed to untreated seawater suffer the well-known phenomenon of fouling consisting of the formation of an unwanted deposit that covers the surfaces in contact with the water. Five types of fouling are usually considered as biological, corrosion, particulate, chemical and precipitation fouling. Pitting corrosion is aggravated by stagnant or low flow conditions in which sludge such as corrosion of copper alloys in the secondary system can form in the tube surface. From the operational maintenance viewpoint, pitting attack has destructive effect of structural materials on operation of NPP. Countermeasures such as copper alloys replacement, water chemistry control and chemical cleaning were implemented to mitigate the pitting. Although the many studies are performed macroscopically to reduce pitting corrosion in the secondary system, little work has been done to understand mechanism of fouling formation and to confirm the quantitative analysis of the fouling between the metal

  14. In vitro corrosion behaviour and microhardness of high-copper amalgams with platinum and indium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilikli, B G; Aydin, A; Işimer, A; Alpaslan, G

    1999-02-01

    Samples prepared from Luxalloy, GS-80, Permite-C and Logic and polished after 24 h by traditional methods were stored in polypropylene tubes containing phosphate-buffered saline solutions (pH 3.5 and 6.5) and distilled water. The amounts of mercury, silver, tin, copper, zinc, platinum and indium in the test solutions were determined at the first, second, eighth, 52nd and 78th week by atomic absorption spectrometry. At the end of the eighth week the amalgam samples were removed from solutions and evaluated by Rockwell Super Scial Microhardness tester. Statistically significant low amounts of metal ions were measured for Permite-C containing indium and Logic containing platinum. The microhardness test results showed that there were statistically significant increases in the microhardness of Permite-C and Logic. As a result it was shown that the amalgam samples were affected from corrosion conditions to different degrees. Sample of the Logic group that was stored in distilled water, showed smoother surface properties than other amalgam samples containing high copper. However, it was observed that samples of Permite-C group had the smoothest surface properties.

  15. Studies in pitting corrosion on archaeological bronzes. Copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresle, Aa.; Saers, J.; Arrhenius, B.

    1983-01-01

    Copper has been proposed as a canister material for use in the long-term storage of radioactive waste from nuclear power reactors. The storage period has been set to at least 100 000 years, during which time the copper cylinders must remain intact so that the contained waste has no possibility of leaking out. In this work, the pitting factor in archaelogical copper objects have been determined. The absolute values of the pitting factor obtained are generally very low. In the case of the most thoroughly studied material the pitting factor is only slightly more than three units. Nor does the native copper, with a presumed burial period of about 8000 years, exhibit particularly high values. In summary, it can therefore be concluded that the present study does not provide support for the assumption of extremely high pitting factors in copper-base material that has been buried for periods of several millenia. (G.B.)

  16. Copper Corrosion in Nuclear Waste Disposal: A Swedish Case Study on Stakeholder Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the founding principles, work program, and accomplishments of a Reference Group with both expert and layperson stakeholders for the corrosion of copper canisters in a proposed deep repository in Sweden for spent nuclear fuel. The article sets the Reference Group as a participatory effort within a broader context of…

  17. Pitting Corrosion of Copper in Waters with High pH and Low Alkalinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Localized or pitting corrosion of copper pipes used in household drinking-water plumbing is a problem for many water utilities and their customers. Extreme attack can lead to pinhole water leaks that may result in water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs. Water quality has b...

  18. Microelectrodes Based investigation of the Impacts of Water Chemistry on Copper and Iron Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of bulk drinking water quality on copper and iron pipe corrosion has been extensively studied. Despite past research, many have argued that bulk water quality does not necessarily reflect water quality near the water-metal interface and that such knowledge is necessary...

  19. Effect of Copper on Passivity and Corrosion Behavior of Fe-xC-5Cu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Copper on Passivity and Corrosion Behavior of Fe-xC-5Cu Alloy. ... Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences ... The metallurgical analyses, including, X-Ray diffraction (XRD), the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive analysis (EDX), and induction hardening characterization are ...

  20. Intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine against copper corrosion in hydrochloric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Daquan, E-mail: zhdq@sh163.net [Department of Environmental Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Xie Bin; Gao Lixin; Cai Qirui [Department of Environmental Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Joo, Hyung Goun; Lee, Kang Yong [Stress Analysis and Failure Design Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-31

    The corrosion protection of copper by glutamic acid, cysteine, glycine and their derivative (glutathione) in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid solution has been studied by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The inhibition efficiency of the organic inhibitors on copper corrosion increases in the order: glutathione > cysteine > cysteine + glutamic acid + glycine > glutamic acid > glycine. Maximum inhibition efficiency for cysteine reaches about 92.9% at 15 mM concentration level. The glutathione can give 96.4% inhibition efficiency at a concentration of 10 mM. The molecular structure parameters were obtained by PM3 (Parametric Method 3) semi-empirical calculation. The intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine moieties in glutathione is attributed to the lower energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E{sub LUMO}) level and to the excess hetero-atom adsorption centers and the bigger coverage on the copper surface.

  1. Intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine against copper corrosion in hydrochloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Daquan; Xie Bin; Gao Lixin; Cai Qirui; Joo, Hyung Goun; Lee, Kang Yong

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion protection of copper by glutamic acid, cysteine, glycine and their derivative (glutathione) in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid solution has been studied by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The inhibition efficiency of the organic inhibitors on copper corrosion increases in the order: glutathione > cysteine > cysteine + glutamic acid + glycine > glutamic acid > glycine. Maximum inhibition efficiency for cysteine reaches about 92.9% at 15 mM concentration level. The glutathione can give 96.4% inhibition efficiency at a concentration of 10 mM. The molecular structure parameters were obtained by PM3 (Parametric Method 3) semi-empirical calculation. The intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine moieties in glutathione is attributed to the lower energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E LUMO ) level and to the excess hetero-atom adsorption centers and the bigger coverage on the copper surface.

  2. Corrosion Inhibition of the Galvanic Couple Copper-Carbon Steel in Reverse Osmosis Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Carrillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the electrochemical behaviour of corrosion inhibition of the copper-carbon steel galvanic couple (Cu-CS, exposed to reverse osmosis water (RO used for rinsing of heat exchangers for heavy duty machinery, during manufacture. Molybdate and nitrite salts were utilized to evaluate the inhibition behaviour under galvanic couple conditions. Cu-CS couple was used as working electrodes to measure open circuit potential (OCP, potentiodynamic polarization (PP, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. The surface conditions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The most effective concentration ratio between molybdate and nitrite corrosion inhibitors was determined. The morphological study indicated molybdate deposition on the anodic sites of the galvanic couple. The design of molybdate-based corrosion inhibitor developed in the present work should be applied to control galvanic corrosion of the Cu-CS couple during cleaning in the manufacture of heat exchangers.

  3. Adsorption behavior of caffeine as a green corrosion inhibitor for copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Fernando Silvio de [Grupo de Estudos de Processos Eletroquimicos e Eletroanaliticos, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Giacomelli, Cristiano [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Av. Roraima 1000, 97119-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Goncalves, Reinaldo Simoes [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Spinelli, Almir, E-mail: almir.spinelli@ufsc.br [Grupo de Estudos de Processos Eletroquimicos e Eletroanaliticos, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-12-01

    Electrochemical and impedance experiments were carried out to evaluate the corrosion behavior of copper in aerated 0.1 mol L{sup -1} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions in the presence of three xanthine derivatives with similar chemical structures. The corrosion rate of copper was found to increase in the presence of theophylline and theobromine and decrease in the presence of caffeine. The adsorption and inhibitory effect of caffeine on copper surfaces in aerated 0.1 mol L{sup -1} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions were then investigated in detail by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and fluorescence experiments. The data obtained indicate that caffeine behaves as a cathodic-type inhibitor adsorbing onto the copper surface according to the Temkin isotherm, with the negative Increment G Degree-Sign {sub ads} value of - 31.1 kJ mol{sup -1} signifying a spontaneous adsorption process. The corrosion inhibition efficiency increased with caffeine concentration in the range of 1.0-10.0 mmol L{sup -1}. Furthermore, the EIS results obtained at the open-circuit potential and surface analysis (SEM, EDS and fluorescence) clearly demonstrated the adsorption of the organic compound onto the copper electrode. The contact angle measurements revealed the formation of a hydrophobic protective film. This film covers up to 72% of the total active surface, acts as a protective barrier and prevents interaction between the metal, water and oxygen molecules. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have investigated the adsorption and corrosion inhibition of caffeine on copper surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caffeine behaves as a cathodic-type inhibitor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caffeine adsorbs onto copper surface according to Temkin isotherm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There exists the formation of a hydrophobic film that acts as a

  4. Corrosion performance tests for reinforcing steel in concrete : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The existing test method used to assess the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel embedded in : concrete, mainly ASTM G 109, is labor intensive, time consuming, slow to provide comparative results, : and can be expensive. However, with corrosion...

  5. Dissolution of copper in chloride/ammonia mixtures and the implications for the stress corrosion cracking of copper containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F.; Greidanus, G.; Jobe, D.J

    1999-05-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking is a possible failure mechanism for copper nuclear fuel waste disposal containers. One species known to cause the stress corrosion of copper alloys is ammonia. It is conceivable that ammonia could be produced in a disposal vault under certain, very specific conditions. There are a number of conditions, however, that mitigate against container failure by stress corrosion, one of which is the presence of chloride ions in deep Canadian Shield groundwaters. There are a number of reports in the literature that suggest that Cl{sup -} has an inhibitive effect on the stress corrosion of Cu alloys in ammonia solutions. The electrochemical behaviour of Cu in Cl{sup -}/ammonia solutions has been studied as a function of ammonia concentration, pH, the rate of mass transport and electrochemical potential. In particular, the effects of these parameters on the formation Of Cu{sub 2}O films and the steady-state dissolution behaviour have been determined. All experiments were carried out in 0.1 mol{center_dot}dm{sup -3} NaC1 as a base solution. A series of aqueous speciation and equilibrium potential/pH diagrams are also presented for the quaternary system Cu-C1{sup -}NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 4{sup +}}H{sub 2}O. These diagrams are used to interpret the results of the electrochemical experiments reported here. In addition, it is demonstrated how these diagrams could be used to predict the time-dependence of the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of Cu containers in a disposal vault. (author)

  6. Effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Corrosion Behavior of AA2014 Aluminum – Copper Alloy Electron Beam Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Ramana, V. S. N.; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work pertains to the study of corrosion behavior of aluminum alloy electron beam welds. The aluminium alloy used in the present study is copper containing AA2014 alloy. Electron Beam Welding (EBW) was used to weld the alloys in annealed (O) condition. Microstructural changes across the welds were recorded and the effect of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) in T4 (Solutionized and naturally aged) condition on pitting corrosion resistance was studied. A software based PAR basic electrochemical system was used for potentio-dynamic polarization tests. From the study it is observed that weld in O condition is prone to more liquation than that of PWHT condition. This may be attributed to re-melting and solidification of excess eutectic present in the O condition of the base metal. It was also observed that slightly higher hardness values are recorded in O condition than that of PWHT condition. The pitting corrosion resistance of the PMZ/HAZ in PWHT condition is better than that of O condition. This is attributed to copper segregation at the grain boundaries of PMZ in O condition.

  7. Succinonitrile as a corrosion inhibitor of copper current collectors for overdischarge protection of lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Seon-Ha; Son, Mi-Young; Jung, Young Mee; Song, Hyun-Kon; Lee, Hochun

    2014-02-12

    Succinonitrile (SN) is investigated as an electrolyte additive for copper corrosion inhibition to provide overdischarge (OD) protection to lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The anodic Cu corrosion, occurring above 3.5 V (vs Li/Li(+)) in conventional LIB electrolytes, is suppressed until a voltage of 4.5 V is reached in the presence of SN. The corrosion inhibition by SN is ascribed to the formation of an SN-induced passive layer, which spontaneously develops on the copper surface during the first anodic scan. The passive layer is composed mainly of Cu(SN)2PF6 units, which is evidenced by Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements. The effects of the SN additive on OD protection are confirmed by using 750 mAh pouch-type full cells of LiCoO2 and graphite with lithium metal as a reference electrode. Addition of SN completely prevents corrosion of the copper current collector in the full cell configuration, thereby tuning the LIB chemistry to be inherently immune to the OD abuses.

  8. The Effects of Cassia Siamea Lam. Root Extract on the Corrosion and Kinetics of Corrosion Process of Copper in Alkaline Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Onen, A. I; Nwufo, B. T.; Ebenso, E. E.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of Cassia siamea lam. (CSL) root extract as a corrosion inhibitor of copper in 0.50 M NaOH solutions was investigated using absorbance difference technique at 30 °C and 40 °C. CSL root extract inhibited the corrosion of copper in 0.50 M NaOH solutions and the inhibition efficiency (% IE) increased to a maximum of 78.3±2.3% with increasing concentration of the extract but decreased with increasing temperature. The adsorption of CSL root extract on copper surface followed the Langmui...

  9. Corrosion of aluminium in copper-aluminium couples under a marine environment: Influence of polyaniline deposited onto copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera, Rosa, E-mail: rvera@ucv.c [Instituto de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avda. Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile); Verdugo, Patricia [Departamento de Quimica y Bioquimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaiso, Av. Gran Bretana 1111, Valparaiso (Chile); Orellana, Marco; Munoz, Eduardo [Instituto de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avda. Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The presence of Polyaniline in the Al-Cu system produces a decrease in the oxygen reduction reaction. {yields} In the marine enviroment, aluminium in Al-Cu couples, suffers pitting and exfoliation. {yields} The aluminium deterioration increases with chloride and enviromental sulphur dioxide presence, mainly when it is united to bare copper. - Abstract: In this study, we examined how aluminium corrosion in Al-Cu/PANI galvanic couples in a marine environment is influenced by deposition of polyaniline (PANI) on copper. Polarization curves and immersion assays in 0.1 M NaCl were performed. The morphologies of etched Al and corrosion products were observed by SEM, and the Al ions in solution were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. A reduction in aluminium damage due to galvanic corrosion was observed as a result of decreased effective area for the oxygen reduction reaction on Cu/PANI electrode. Furthermore, an electrochemical reduction of PANI from leucoemeraldine to emeraldine base is proposed.

  10. Corrosion of aluminium in copper-aluminium couples under a marine environment: Influence of polyaniline deposited onto copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera, Rosa; Verdugo, Patricia; Orellana, Marco; Munoz, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The presence of Polyaniline in the Al-Cu system produces a decrease in the oxygen reduction reaction. → In the marine enviroment, aluminium in Al-Cu couples, suffers pitting and exfoliation. → The aluminium deterioration increases with chloride and enviromental sulphur dioxide presence, mainly when it is united to bare copper. - Abstract: In this study, we examined how aluminium corrosion in Al-Cu/PANI galvanic couples in a marine environment is influenced by deposition of polyaniline (PANI) on copper. Polarization curves and immersion assays in 0.1 M NaCl were performed. The morphologies of etched Al and corrosion products were observed by SEM, and the Al ions in solution were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. A reduction in aluminium damage due to galvanic corrosion was observed as a result of decreased effective area for the oxygen reduction reaction on Cu/PANI electrode. Furthermore, an electrochemical reduction of PANI from leucoemeraldine to emeraldine base is proposed.

  11. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  12. Super-hydrophobic surfaces improve corrosion resistance of copper in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Tao; Yin, Yansheng; Chen, Shougang; Chang, Xueting; Cheng, Sha

    2007-01-01

    Pretreated by a n-tetradecanoic acid (CH 3 (CH 2 ) 12 COOH) etch, the super-hydrophobic film was formed on the fresh copper surface. The film structure was probed with contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results suggest that the structure of the film is similar to haulm or flower and the seawater contact angle is larger than 150 o . Moreover, the corrosion resistance of bare and modified samples in seawater were investigated by cyclic voltammograms (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Experimental results show that the corrosion rate of Cu with super-hydrophobic surface decreases dramatically because of its special microstructure

  13. (octadecylthio)benzotriazine on copper for corrosion protection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    foils for flexible circuits, heat sinks, wire bonding and solder- ing. However, the ..... is considered to be oriented parallel to the copper sur- face, while the ..... Series 10 182. Petkova G, Sokolova E, Raicheva S and Ivanov P 1998 J. Appl. Electrochem. 28 1067. Petrovic Z, Hukovic M M and Babic R 2008 Prog. Org. Coat. 61 1.

  14. (octadecylthio)benzotriazine on copper for corrosion protection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DOTBT) was formed on fresh copper surface obtained by etching with 7 N nitric acid at a room temperature of 30°C. The conditions for formation of the DOTBT nanofilm have been optimized by electrochemical impedance and electrochemical ...

  15. Critical review of the literature on the corrosion of copper by water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada))

    2010-12-15

    The conventional belief that copper is thermodynamically stable in oxygen-free water has been questioned by a research group from the Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm lead by Dr. Gunnar Hultquist. A critical review of the literature both in support of the proposed mechanism and that which argues against it has been conducted. The critical review has been supported by supplementary analyses, with particular focus on the scientific validity of the reported observations and their significance for the corrosion of a copper canister. It is found that: - the scientific evidence in support of the suggestion that water oxidises copper is not conclusive and there are many aspects which are unclear and contradictory, - despite a number of attempts, no other researchers have been able to reproduce the observations of Hultquist and co-workers, - even if correct, the mechanism is not important for copper canisters in a repository, both because of differences in the environmental conditions and because, even if corrosion did occur by this mechanism, it would quickly stop, and - there is no adverse impact on the lifetime of copper canisters due to this proposed, but unproven, mechanism

  16. Evaluation of corrosion degradation of amalgams by immersion and fracture test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horasawa, Noriko; Takahashi, Shigeo; Marek, Miroslav

    2003-12-01

    In this study an immersion and fracture test was used to evaluate the susceptibility of dental amalgams to degradation of their mechanical strength by corrosion. Specimens of each of the six types of high-copper amalgams and one type of low-copper amalgam were prepared and tested. Cylindrical specimens were grooved using a diamond cutoff blade and immersed in 1% NaCl to which H2O2 was added to increase the oxidation power. After two weeks of exposure the specimens and controls were fractured and the loss of strength was calculated. Two amalgams showed a significant loss of strength. The test procedure is relatively simple and does not require sophisticated electrochemical or analytical instrumentation. A higher resolution power might be achieved by increasing the severity of corrosion or the number of replicate tests.

  17. Corrosion and inhibition of copper in hydrocarbon solution on a molecular level investigated using neutron reflectometry and XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welbourn, Rebecca J.L.; Truscott, C.L.; Skoda, M.W. A.; Zarbakhsh, A.; Clarke, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Corrosion of CuO by sulphur in oil is inhibited by organic amine but not thiol. • Neutron reflection gives insight into the layer structure and composition. • The most well packed organic layer does not give the best corrosion protection. • Organic thiol selectively removes Cu(II) to leave a Cu(I) surface. - Abstract: The behaviour and molecular structure of three organic additives adsorbed from oil onto a copper surface rich in copper (II) oxide is presented. The variation in the ability of these three agents to prevent corrosion of the copper oxide surface by exposure to sulphur is also included. A combination of visible observations, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and neutron reflection (NR) are used to characterise both the adsorbed layer and underlying copper oxide. The model additives are chosen to represent ‘effective’, ‘intermediate’ and ‘ineffective’ inhibitors for copper.

  18. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerone C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of metal-based structures has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites to determine corrosion resistance in marine environments. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions of the corrosive environment. Their success for correlation to atmospheric exposure is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated laboratory testing, which often focuses on the electrochemical reactions that occur during corrosion conditions, has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long term service life of a metal despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard and their use is imperative, a method that correlates timescales from atmospheric exposure to accelerated testing would be very valuable. This work uses surface chemistry to interpret the chemical changes occurring on low carbon steel during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions with the objective of finding a correlation between its accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The current results of correlating data from marine atmospheric exposure conditions at the Kennedy Space Center beachside corrosion test site, alternating seawater spray, and immersion in typical electrochemical laboratory conditions, will be presented. Key words: atmospheric exposure, accelerated corrosion testing, alternating seawater spray, marine, correlation, seawater, carbon steel, long-term corrosion performance prediction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  19. Superhydrophobic copper surfaces fabricated by fatty acid soaps in aqueous solution for excellent corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenlong; Hu, Yuanyuan; Bao, Wenda; Xie, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yiran; Song, Aixin, E-mail: songaixin@sdu.edu.cn; Hao, Jingcheng

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • The superhydrophobic property can be realized in a much quicker process (7.5 min) in aqueous solution than in ethanol. • The fabrication process of superhydrophobic metal surfaces greatly increases the safety in industrial manufacture in commercial scale. • The superhydrophobic copper surfaces show excellent corrosion resistance. - Abstract: A simple and safe one-step immersion method was developed to obtain the stable superhydrophobic copper surfaces with excellent corrosion resistance ability using fatty acids in water-medium instead of ethanol. An organic alkali, N,N-dimethylcyclohexylamine (DMCHA), was chosen to solve the poor solubility of fatty acids in water and the high Krafft point of carboxylate salts with inorganic counterions. The superhydrophobic property can be realized in a much quicker process (7.5 min) in aqueous solution than in ethanol (more than 2 d), which is universally feasible for the fabrication of superhydrophobic metal surfaces in industry scale, thereby greatly increasing the safety in industrial manufacture.

  20. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methods—direct corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probes—to determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of “no reportable” to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in

  1. Simulation for fretting corrosion of tin-coated copper contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.Y.; Joo, H.G. [Stress Analysis and Failure Design Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 134, Sinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, D.K. [Research and Development Division, Hyundai-Kia Motors 772-1, Jangduk-dong, Hwaseong Gyeonggi 445-706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Y.W. [Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, P.O.Box 36, Goedong-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang Gyeongbuk 790-300 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    The simulations of contact resistance variation under various oxide fractions are conducted. The copper oxide is assigned on the contact area with various fractions by the random distribution technique. The calculated contact resistance at each oxide area fraction is compared with the experimental result. The increase in contact resistance results in an increased oxide area fraction. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  3. Post-test examination of a copper electrode from deposition hole 5 in the Prototype Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, Bo

    2013-04-01

    Three copper electrodes have been exposed for eight years in the outer section of the Prototype Repository at Aespoe. The electrodes were installed in the upper bentonite block of deposition hole 5 in May 2003. Most of the time the temperature of the electrodes has been somewhat below 35 deg C. The electrodes were retrieved for post-test examination in September 2011. This report presents results from electrochemical measurements and the post-test examination of one of the electrodes. The corrosion potential of the examined copper electrode was -40 mV SHE (2011-02-04) when part of the concrete plug to the outer section of the repository had been removed and made measurements possible. When the back-fill in the deposition tunnel had been removed it was 25 mV SHE (2011-09-12). Finally, before letting loose the copper electrode from the retrieved bentonite block, the corrosion potential was found to be 165 mV SHE (2011-11-15) being a sign of air ingress to the electrode/ bentonite interface. It was immediately obvious from the appearance of the copper electrode, when part of the surrounding bentonite had been removed, that both Cu(I) and Cu(II) corrosion products existed on the electrode surface. X-ray diffraction measurements also verified the presence of cuprite, Cu 2 O, and malachite, Cu 2 (OH) 2 CO 3 , on the electrode; however, paratacamite, Cu 2 (OH) 3 Cl, was not found. The performed Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy confirmed these observations. The corrosion product film, of which cuprite is the main part, was quite uneven and porous. No unmistakable signs of pitting have been found. The appearance of the copper electrode reminded of the coupons from the retrieved LOT test parcels, but was different from the appearance of the surface on the full-size canisters. For the latter blue-green Cu(II) corrosion products have not or only rarely been observed from visual examination immediately after removing the surrounding bentonite. Differences that

  4. Post-test examination of a copper electrode from deposition hole 5 in the Prototype Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Rosborg Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    Three copper electrodes have been exposed for eight years in the outer section of the Prototype Repository at Aespoe. The electrodes were installed in the upper bentonite block of deposition hole 5 in May 2003. Most of the time the temperature of the electrodes has been somewhat below 35 deg C. The electrodes were retrieved for post-test examination in September 2011. This report presents results from electrochemical measurements and the post-test examination of one of the electrodes. The corrosion potential of the examined copper electrode was -40 mV SHE (2011-02-04) when part of the concrete plug to the outer section of the repository had been removed and made measurements possible. When the back-fill in the deposition tunnel had been removed it was 25 mV SHE (2011-09-12). Finally, before letting loose the copper electrode from the retrieved bentonite block, the corrosion potential was found to be 165 mV SHE (2011-11-15) being a sign of air ingress to the electrode/ bentonite interface. It was immediately obvious from the appearance of the copper electrode, when part of the surrounding bentonite had been removed, that both Cu(I) and Cu(II) corrosion products existed on the electrode surface. X-ray diffraction measurements also verified the presence of cuprite, Cu{sub 2}O, and malachite, Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}, on the electrode; however, paratacamite, Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}Cl, was not found. The performed Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy confirmed these observations. The corrosion product film, of which cuprite is the main part, was quite uneven and porous. No unmistakable signs of pitting have been found. The appearance of the copper electrode reminded of the coupons from the retrieved LOT test parcels, but was different from the appearance of the surface on the full-size canisters. For the latter blue-green Cu(II) corrosion products have not or only rarely been observed from visual examination immediately after removing the surrounding

  5. Corrosion protection aspects of electrochemically synthesized poly(o-anisidine-co-o-toluidine) coatings on copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawar, Pritee [Department of Physics, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425001, Maharashtra (India); Gaikwad, A.B. [Center for Materials Characterization, National Chemical Laboratory, Pashan, Pune 411008, Maharashtra (India); Patil, P.P. [Department of Physics, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425001, Maharashtra (India)]. E-mail: pnmu@yahoo.co.in

    2007-05-25

    The poly(o-anisidine-co-o-toluidine) coatings were synthesized on copper substrates by electrochemical copolymerization of o-anisidine with o-toluidine using sodium salicylate as supporting electrolyte. These coatings were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The formation of the copolymer with the mixture of monomers in the aqueous sodium salicylate solution was ascertained by a critical comparison of the results obtained with the polymerization of the individual monomers, o-anisidine and o-toluidine, respectively. The corrosion protection aspects of poly(o-anisidine-co-o-toluidine) coatings to copper was investigated in aqueous 3% NaCl solution by potentiodynamic polarization technique and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results of the potentiodynamic polarization measurements and EIS studies showed that the poly(o-anisidine-co-o-toluidine) coatings provided the effective corrosion protection to copper than that of respective homopolymers. The corrosion rate is observed to depend on the feed ratio of o-toluidine used for the synthesis of the copolymer coatings.

  6. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Curtis, P.G.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel- and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron-absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. The stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on its chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high-chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. The results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility

  7. Electrodeposited Reduced Graphene Oxide Films on Stainless Steel, Copper, and Aluminum for Corrosion Protection Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkareem Mohammed Ali Al-Sammarraie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The enhancement of corrosion protection of metals and alloys by coating with simple, low cost, and highly adhered layer is still a main goal of many workers. In this research graphite flakes converted into graphene oxide using modified Hammers method and then reduced graphene oxide was electrodeposited on stainless steel 316, copper, and aluminum for corrosion protection application in seawater at four temperatures, namely, 20, 30, 40, and 50°C. All corrosion measurements, kinetics, and thermodynamics parameters were established from Tafel plots using three-electrode potentiostat. The deposited films were examined by FTIR, Raman, XRD, SEM, and AFM techniques; they revealed high percentages of conversion to the few layers of graphene with confirmed defects.

  8. Characterization of Corrosion Products on Carbon Steel Exposed to Natural Weathering and to Accelerated Corrosion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Altobelli Antunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to compare the corrosion products formed on carbon steel plates submitted to atmospheric corrosion in urban and industrial atmospheres with those formed after accelerated corrosion tests. The corrosion products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The specimens were exposed to natural weathering in both atmospheres for nine months. The morphologies of the corrosion products were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The main product found was lepidocrocite. Goethite and magnetite were also found on the corroded specimens but in lower concentrations. The results showed that the accelerated test based on the ASTM B117 procedure presented poor correlation with the atmospheric corrosion tests whereas an alternated fog/dry cycle combined with UV radiation exposure provided better correlation.

  9. Corrosion inhibition properties of pyrazolylindolenine compounds on copper surface in acidic media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebadi Mehdi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The corrosion inhibition performance of pyrazolylindolenine compounds, namely 4-(3,3-dimethyl-3H-indol-2-yl-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide (InPzTAm, 4-(3,3-dimethyl-3H-indol-2-yl-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothiohydrazide (InPzTH and 3,3-dimethyl-2-(1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl-3H-indole (InPzPh, on copper in 1M HCl solution is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, open circuit potential (OCP and linear scan voltammetry (LSV techniques. Results The results show that the corrosion rate of copper is diminished by the compounds with the inhibition strength in the order of: InPzTAm> InPzTH > InPzPh. The corrosion inhibition efficiencies for the three inhibitors are 94.0, 91.4 and 79.3, for InPzTAm, InPzTH and InPzPh respectively with the same inhibitor concentration (2 mM. Conclusion From the EIS, OCP and LSV results it was concluded that pyrazolylindolenine compounds with S-atom (with an amine group have illustrated better corrosion inhibition performance compared to hydrazine and phenyl group.

  10. Synchrotron based x-ray fluorescence microscopy confirms copper in the corrosion products of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Joseph E. Jakes; Grant T. Kirker; David Vine; Stefan Vogt

    2017-01-01

    Copper based waterborne wood preservatives are frequently used to extend the service life of wood products when subjected to frequent moisture exposure. While these copper based treatments protect the wood from fungal decay and insect attack, they increase the corrosion of metals embedded or in contact with the treated wood. Previous research has shown the most...

  11. The WR-1 corrosion test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.V.; Simmons, G.R.

    1978-07-01

    This report describes a new Corrosion Test Facility which has recently been installed in the WR-1 organic-cooled research reactor. The irradiation facility is a single insert, installed in a reactor site, which can deliver a fast neutron flux density of 2.65 x 10 17 neutrons/(m 2 .s) to specimens under irradiation. A self-contained controlled-chemistry cooling water circuit removes the gamma- and neutron-heat generated in the insert and specimens. Specimen temperatures typically vary from 245 deg C to 280 deg C across the insert core region. (author)

  12. Corrosion Control Test Method for Avionic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-25

    IFIED S• ’ECLASSIFICATION "’O14GRAOINU SC4 EMU LE 14 JJS’f’•UUr1N S AT& ME7N ’at .efil pot) Approved for public release; distribucion unlimited 17...Battery Output Increased Gradually as Compared to Normal Fog Effect S0 On 4,4 Took 25 min fur Battery Output to Stabilize S02 Off 2.2 1.8 ’Average...produced by carrier exposure except that there were localized areas where the normally white corrosion produces had a greenish tinge. Since these test

  13. The Study of Corrosion and Wear Resistance of Copper Composite Coatings with Inclusions of Carbon Nanomaterials in the Copper Metal Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktorija MEDELIENĖ

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the peculiarities of the behaviour of copper nanocomposite coatings with CNMs inclusions under the free corrosion conditions in the acidic medium. The parameters of corrosion current density (jcorr, anodic dissolution current density (ia and polarization resistance (Rp have been determined. In the acidic medium a stronger oxidation of nanostructured copper nanocomposites occurred. With longer immersion periods more corrosion products are formed, resulting in a increase in the polarization resistance (Rp of corrosion. Corrosion products cover the whole surface of the coatings and the corrosion rate (jcorr tends towards a steady value of 1.7×10-3 ¸ 2.1×10-3 A·cm-2 for all copper coatings studied: 1.7×10-3 A·cm-2 for both Cu and Cu-CNM1, 1.9×10-3 A·cm-2 - for Cu-CNM2 and 2.1×10-3 A·cm-2 - for Cu-CNM3 composite coatings. It has been established that nanocomposites possess a higher wear resistance as compared to that of pure copper. The damage of metal characterized as a depth scar (đ is lower. The roughness of the composites studied was found to be the essential factor affecting their wear resistance. Therefore, the wear resistance of nanocomposites is impaired when they are deposited on a hard steel substrate.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.2.481

  14. Whiskers and Localized Corrosion on Copper in Repository Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, Hans-Peter; Gillen, Peter

    2004-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that whiskers (thread/hair shaped structures) can form on copper in a sulphide containing environment. A remaining important question is whether the attack on the copper metal surface beneath a whisker is of a localized or of a general nature. This issue has not been clarified as whiskers are very fragile and have always detached and fallen off from the surface at some stage of handling. It has therefore been very difficult to link the growth root of the whisker to underlying structures in the metal surface. A study was therefore initiated to settle the important issue of the relation between whisker position and the type of underlying metal attack. The usage of a porous medium was originally planned to support the whiskers in order to keep them in place and by post examinations characterize the nature of the whisker roots and thus the type of attack on the metal. However, the early stages of the present experimental work clearly indicated that other ways of study were necessary. A photographic method for the registration and positioning of whisker growth was therefore developed. It proved to be a successful means to coordinate whisker position and to link it with the attack on the underlying metal. Shortage of sulphide in previous experiments caused a retarded growth rate of whiskers. Therefore, in present experiments the sulphide concentration was kept at a more constant level throughout an experiment and a hindered whisker growth did not limit the attack on underlying metal. Whiskers and substrates were observed with a video camera throughout an experiment and the phase composition was examined with Laser Raman Spectroscopy, LRS and the Raman video microscope. Post examinations were also performed using light optical microscopy. By combining the results from the optical methods it has been possible to distinguish two kinds of whisker roots (small/large diameter) with the underlying metal surface. It has also been demonstrated

  15. Workshop on Copper Corrosion and Buffer Erosion. Stockholm 15-17 September 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Peter; Bath, Adrian

    2011-02-01

    The workshop was convened to inform and advise SSM about the coupled processes of buffer erosion and enhanced canister corrosion that have been proposed as a potentially detrimental scenario in the long-term evolution of the engineered barrier system of a deep geological repository. It was an extension of the deliberations of SSM's BRITE advisory group on EBS issues and on SKB's approaches to the issues in the forthcoming SR-Site safety case. The workshop was planned to assist and advise SSM in its preparations for review of SKB.s license application and SR-Site submission. The potential for buffer erosion due to a future influx of dilute groundwater that induces bentonite to behave as a sol has been indicated by experiments carried out for SKB. It is generally considered that the most likely source and timing of such groundwater conditions will be the glacial stage of the normal evolution of the repository system, i.e. many tens of thousands of years into the future at least. The workshop considered, however, that potential causes of buffer erosion in the early post-closure period should also be considered. The main significance of buffer erosion for a safety case is that it would potentially lead to higher rates of corrosion of the copper canister. There are various physicochemical mechanisms that could be implicated in enhanced corrosion but basically they would involve (a) the failure of a diffusion controlled constraint on corrodant transport to and product transport away from the copper surface, and (b) the viability of microbially-mediated reactions producing higher concentrations of corrodants at or near to the copper surface. The general issues relating to corrosion had already been the theme for a previous workshop in 2005 (see Report SKI 2006:11), the outcomes of which formed the background for this workshop. Additional background was provided by SKB's interim safety case, SR-Can, and the regulatory authorities. responses to preliminary consideration of

  16. Ant-nest corrosion of copper tubing in air-conditioning units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastidas, D. M.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Ant-nest corrosion is a specific type of premature failure (2-3 months of copper tubes used in air-conditioning units causing the loss of refrigerant liquid and the consequent environment pollution. It is known that attack requires the simultaneous presence of moisture, oxygen and a corrodent, usually an organic acid, such as formic, acetic, propionic or butyric acid or other volatile organic substances like methanol, ethanol, formaldehyde or acetoaldehyde. Approximately 10% of all premature failures of copper tubes used in the heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC industry are the result of ant-nest corrosion. This type of corrosion usually occurs in thin-wall copper pipes, especially when copper is de-sulphurised, and is known by several names: formicary corrosion, unusual corrosion, branched pits, pinhole corrosion, etc.

    Corrosión por “nido de hormigas” es un tipo específico de fallo prematuro (2-3 meses que tiene lugar en tubos de cobre utilizados en sistemas de aire acondicionado originando la pérdida de líquido refrigerante y la consecuente contaminación ambiental. Es conocido que este tipo de ataque requiere la presencia simultánea de humedad, oxígeno y un medio agresivo, habitualmente un ácido orgánico, como fórmico, acético  propiónico o butírico u otras sustancias orgánicas volátiles tales como metanol, etanol, formaldehido o acetoaldehido. Aproximadamente el 10% de los fallos prematuros en tubos de cobre utilizados en calefacción, ventilación y en la industria de aire acondicionado son el resultado de corrosión por nido de hormigas. Frecuentemente, este tipo de corrosión tiene lugar en tubos de cobre de pared delgada, especialmente cuando el cobre es del tipo desulfurizado, y se conoce con varios nombres: corrosión por ácido fórmico, corrosión no habitual, picaduras ramificadas, corrosión con forma de alfiler, etc.

  17. Inhibition Effect of Glycerol on the Corrosion of Copper in NaCl Solutions at Different pH Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Lorenzo Chi-Ucán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory effect of glycerol on copper corrosion in aerated NaCl (0.5 M solutions at three pH values (4, 7, and 10 was evaluated. Inhibition efficiency was assessed with conventional electrochemical techniques: open circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance analysis. Glycerol reduced the corrosion rate of copper in NaCl solutions. The best inhibition effect (η≈83% was produced in alkaline (pH 10 chloride media. This effect can be ascribed to increased viscosity and the presence of copper-glycerol complexes.

  18. Effect of serine, threonine and glutamic acid on the corrosion of copper in aerated hydrochloric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Daquan; Cai Qirui; Gao Lixin [Department of Environmental Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Lee, Kang Yong [Stress Analysis and Failure Design Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 134, Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: KYL2813@yonsei.ac.kr

    2008-12-15

    The corrosion inhibition of three amino acid compounds on copper was investigated by electrochemical method. They suppressed cathodic current densities and shifted the corrosion potential towards more negative values. The interaction between amino acid and copper surface was certified by reflected FT-infrared spectroscopy. The quantum chemical parameters were obtained by PM3 semi-empirical calculation. Glutamic acid has the smaller net positive charge of nitrogen atom and the more net negative charge of oxygen atoms. The improved inhibition of glutamic acid was due to the stabilization of its adsorption on the copper surface by the oxygen atoms in its structure.

  19. Effect of serine, threonine and glutamic acid on the corrosion of copper in aerated hydrochloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Daquan; Cai Qirui; Gao Lixin; Lee, Kang Yong

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition of three amino acid compounds on copper was investigated by electrochemical method. They suppressed cathodic current densities and shifted the corrosion potential towards more negative values. The interaction between amino acid and copper surface was certified by reflected FT-infrared spectroscopy. The quantum chemical parameters were obtained by PM3 semi-empirical calculation. Glutamic acid has the smaller net positive charge of nitrogen atom and the more net negative charge of oxygen atoms. The improved inhibition of glutamic acid was due to the stabilization of its adsorption on the copper surface by the oxygen atoms in its structure

  20. Effect of Water Nutrient Pollution on Long-Term Corrosion of 90:10 Copper Nickel Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchers, Robert E

    2015-11-27

    Due to their good corrosion resistance, copper and copper alloys such as 90:10 Cu-Ni are used extensively in high-quality marine and industrial piping systems and also in marine, urban, and industrial environments. Their corrosion loss and pitting behaviour tends to follow a bi-modal trend rather than the classic power law. Field data for 90:10 copper nickel immersed in natural seawater are used to explore the effect of water pollution and in particular the availability of critical nutrients for microbiologically induced corrosion. It is shown, qualitatively, that increased dissolved inorganic nitrogen increases corrosion predominantly in the second, long-term, mode of the model. Other, less pronounced, influences are salinity and dissolved oxygen concentration.

  1. Coupled Transport/Reaction Modelling of Copper Canister Corrosion Aided by Microbial Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinsong Liu

    2006-04-01

    Copper canister corrosion is an important issue in the concept of a nuclear fuel repository. Previous studies indicate that the oxygen-free copper canister could hold its integrity for more than 100,000 years in the repository environment. Microbial processes may reduce sulphate to sulphide and considerably increase the amount of sulphides available for corrosion. In this paper, a coupled transport/reaction model is developed to account for the transport of chemical species produced by microbial processes. The corroding agents like sulphide would come not only from the groundwater flowing in a fracture that intersects the canister, but also from the reduction of sulphate near the canister. The reaction of sulphate-reducing bacteria and the transport of sulphide in the bentonite buffer are included in the model. The depth of copper canister corrosion is calculated by the model. With representative 'central values' of the concentrations of sulphate and methane at repository depth at different sites in Fennoscandian Shield the corrosion depth predicted by the model is a few millimetres during 10 5 years. As the concentrations of sulphate and methane are extremely site-specific and future climate changes may significantly influence the groundwater compositions at potential repository sites, sensitivity analyses have been conducted. With a broad perspective of the measured concentrations at different sites in Sweden and in Finland, and some possible mechanisms (like the glacial meltwater intrusion and interglacial seawater intrusion) that may introduce more sulphate into the groundwater at intermediate depths during future climate changes, higher concentrations of either/both sulphate and methane than what is used as the representative 'central' values would be possible. In worst cases. locally, half of the canister thickness could possibly be corroded within 10 5 years

  2. Acceptance Test Plan for Fourth-Generation Corrosion Monitoring Cabinet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the third-generation corrosion monitoring cabinet (Hiline Engineering Part No.0004-CHM-072-C01). This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer of the cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinet. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation

  3. The Effects of Cassia Siamea Lam. Root Extract on the Corrosion and Kinetics of Corrosion Process of Copper in Alkaline Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I Onen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Cassia siamea lam. (CSL root extract as a corrosion inhibitor of copper in 0.50 M NaOH solutions was investigated using absorbance difference technique at 30 °C and 40 °C. CSL root extract inhibited the corrosion of copper in 0.50 M NaOH solutions and the inhibition efficiency (% IE increased to a maximum of 78.3±2.3% with increasing concentration of the extract but decreased with increasing temperature. The adsorption of CSL root extract on copper surface followed the Langmuir adsorption model with the average heat of adsorption, Qads and free energy of adsorption, ΔGads of -8.98 kJmol-1 and -8.70 kJmol-1 respectively. A kinetic treatment of the data revealed a first order kinetics with respect to copper in the presence and absence of the extract.

  4. Analysis of Barrier Performance: Modelling of Copper corrosion scenarios with and without buffer erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benbow, Steven J.; Robinson, Peter C.; Watson, Sarah P.

    2011-02-01

    SKB have identified buffer erosion as a process that could potentially lead to increased corrosion of the copper canister. Buffer erosion can be caused by: the formation of bentonite (i.e., montmorillonite) colloids and their transport away from deposition holes in intersecting fractures containing dilute groundwaters (such as subglacial meltwaters); steep hydraulic gradients during buffer resaturation; or shearing of solid bentonite particles by rapidly flowing groundwater. Only colloidal removal of bentonite (the first of the processes listed) is considered in this study. The erosion of the bentonite leads to a reduction in density and swelling potential, and hence a lowering of transport resistances in the buffer that can make it easier for corrosive agents to transported to be the canister surface, resulting in increased levels of corrosion of the canister surface compared with those predicted in 'normal evolution' conditions. The reduction in bentonite density that follows as a consequence of erosion also leads to the possibility of breaching other safety functions of the buffer, for example prevention of canister sinking and resistance to shear deformation. These are not considered in this study. This report describes the modelling of copper corrosion processes in the SKB KBS-3 design concept. The modelling includes an initial representation of all relevant physical processes, but with some processes represented in more detail than others. This allows investigation of the impacts of the processes that are modelled on canister corrosion, allowing identification of the processes that impact most on the key performance measures for the EBS, which will help to focus modelling developments in future work. This work could be taken as the starting point in a longer-term modelling study in which the interactions between processes that affect canister corrosion are further investigated. Two high-level scenarios are considered in this work: a base case scenario in

  5. Corrosion resistance testing of high-boron-content stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrman, I.; Safek, V.

    1994-01-01

    Boron steels, i.e. stainless steels with boron contents of 0.2 to 2.25 wt.%, are employed in nuclear engineering for the manufacture of baskets or wells in which radioactive fissile materials are stored, mostly spent nuclear fuel elements. The resistance of such steels to intergranular corrosion and uniform corrosion was examined in the Strauss solution and in boric acid; the dependence of the corrosion rate of the steels on their chemical composition was investigated, and their resistance was compared with that of AISI 304 type steel. Corrosion resistance tests in actual conditions of ''wet'' compact storage (demineralized water or a weak boric acid solution) gave evidence that boron steels undergo nearly no uniform corrosion and, as electrochemical measurements indicated, match standard corrosion-resistant steels. Corrosion resistance was confirmed to decrease slightly with increasing boron content and to increase somewhat with increasing molybdenum content. (Z.S.). 3 tabs., 4 figs., 7 refs

  6. Stress corrosion testing of irradiated cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunde, L.; Olshausen, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    Samples from two fuel rods with different cladding have been stress corrosion tested by closed-end argon-iodine pressurization at 320 0 C. The fuel rods with stress relieved and recrystallized Zircaloy-2 had received burnups of 10.000 and 20.000 MWd/ton UO 2 , respectively. It was found that the SCC failure stress was unchanged or slightly higher for the irradiated than for the unirradiated control tubes. The tubes failed consistently in the end with the lowest irradiation dose. The diameter increase of the irradiated cladding during the test was 1.1% for the stress-relieved samples and 0.24% for the recrystallized samples. SEM examination revealed no major differences between irradiated and unirradiated cladding. A ''semi-ductile'' fracture zone in recrystallized material is described in some detail. (author)

  7. High temperature corrosion investigation in an oxyfuel combustion test rig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Bjurman, M.; Hjörnhede, A

    2014-01-01

    constructed by Brandenburg Technical University to gain understanding into oxyfuel firing. Two air‐cooled corrosion probes were exposed in this oxyfuel combustion chamber where the fuel was lignite. Gas composition was measured at the location of testing. Various alloys from a 2½ Cr steel, austenitic steels...... (perhaps carburized) zone was used as a measure of corrosion rates. The lowest alloyed steel had the highest corrosion rate, and the other austenitic and nickel alloys had much lower corrosion rates. Precipitates in the alloy adjacent the corrosion front were revealed for both Sanicro 28 and C‐276. However......Oxyfuel firing and subsequent capture of CO2 is a way to reduce CO2 emissions from coal‐fired boilers. Literature is summarized highlighting results which may contribute to understanding of the corrosion processes in an oxyfuel boiler.Tests were conducted in a 500 kWth oxyfuel test facility...

  8. Microbial induced corrosion (MIC) on DHP copper by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Bacillus megaterium strains in media simulating heater waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumelzu, E.; Cabezas, C.; Schoebitz, R.; Ugarte, R.; Rodriguez, E.D.; Rios, J.

    2003-01-01

    The complexity and diversity of microbial populations in water heating systems of steam generators make it necessary to study the magnitude of the metabolic activity of bacteria and biofilm development that may lead to degradation of metal components through microbial induced corrosion (MIC). Electrolytes simulating the conditions found in heater water networks were used to induce biofilm formation on DHP copper coupons by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans DSMZ and Bacillus megaterium C10, a commercial strain and an isolate from these waters, respectively. In order to enhance their action, industrial waters enriched with the minimum nutrient content such as sodium lactate and sodium sulphite for the DSMZ strain and glucose, proteose peptone and starch for the C10 strain were employed. Biofilm formation was studied under controlled temperature, time, shaking, pH and concentrations of the media used in this study. Then, the samples were electrochemically tested in an artificial solution of sea water as control medium, based on the hypothesis that the action of an aggressive biofilm/electrolyte medium generates damaged and non-damaged areas on the metal surface, and assuming that the sea water trial can detect the latter. Hence, a higher anodic current was associated with a lower degradation of the metal surface by the action of one of the media under study. All these trials were performed along with bacterial count, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Furthermore, it was possible to identify under which conditions MIC on DHP copper occurred and complex mechanisms from retention of cations to diffusion processes at the biofilm/tested media interface level were proposed. Surface corrosion by MIC took place on DHP copper; therefore, greater control on the treatment of industrial waters is highly desirable. (author)

  9. The effect of discontinuities on the corrosion behaviour of copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    2004-03-01

    Discontinuities may remain in the weld region of copper canisters following the final closure welding and inspection procedures. Although the shell of the copper canister is expected to exhibit excellent corrosion properties in the repository environment, the question remains what impact these discontinuities might have on the long-term performance and service life of the canister. A review of the relevant corrosion literature has been carried out and an expert opinion of the impact of these discontinuities on the canister lifetime has been developed. Since the amount of oxidant in the repository is limited and the maximum wall penetration is expected to be 2 O/Cu(OH) 2 film at a critical electrochemical potential determines where and when pits initiate, not the presence of pit-shaped surface discontinuities. The factors controlling pit growth and death are well understood. There is evidence for a maximum pit radius for copper in chloride solutions, above which the small anodic: cathodic surface area ratio required for the formation of deep pits cannot be sustained. This maximum pit radius is of the order of 0.1-0.5 mm. Surface discontinuities larger than this size are unlikely to propagate as pits, and pits generated from smaller discontinuities will die once they reach this maximum size. Death of propagating pits will be compounded by the decrease in oxygen flux to the canister as the repository environment becomes anoxic. Surface discontinuities could impact the SCC behaviour either through their effect on the local environment or via stress concentration or intensification. There is no evidence that surface discontinuities will affect the initiation of SCC by ennoblement of the corrosion potential or the formation of locally aggressive conditions. Stress concentration at pits could lead to crack initiation under some circumstances, but the stress intensity factor for the resultant cracks, or for pre-existing crack-like discontinuities, will be smaller than the

  10. Predicting the effects of microbial activity on the corrosion of copper nuclear fuel waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.

    1996-08-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of copper nuclear fuel waste containers may occur in a disposal vault located 500-1000 m underground in the granitic rock of the Canadian Shield. The extent and diversity of microbial activity in the vault is expected to be limited initially because of the aggressive conditions produced by γ-radiation, elevated temperatures and desiccation of the clay-based buffer in which the containers will be embedded. Experimental results on the heat- and radiation-sensitivity of the natural microbiota in buffer material are presented. The data suggest that the low water activity in the buffer material will severely limit the growth of microbes near the container. The most likely form of MIC involves sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Electrochemical experiments using a clay-covered copper electrode have shown that sulphide ions produced by SRB could diffuse through buffer material and induce corrosion of the container. A method to predict the long-term corrosion behaviour is presented. (author)

  11. Approaches chosen to predict the effect of different forms of corrosion on copper in disposal conditions of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojinov, M.; Kinnunen, P.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Hinttala, J.; Lilja, C.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents deterministic approaches chosen to predict the effect of stress corrosion cracking, creep, pitting corrosion and general corrosion on the lifetime of copper in disposal conditions of spent fuel. The interest in copper in Finland and Sweden is because of the plans to use it as a corrosion shield for the cast iron canister containing high activity nuclear waste. Our approach is based on assessing whether the occurrence of different types of corrosion can be excluded in the disposal conditions. If this is not the case, we shall recommend the maximum corrosion penetration to be predicted on the basis of experimental results and to assess whether this is below an acceptable level. We have applied this approach to show that the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking in the presence of nitrite ions in the disposal conditions can very likely be excluded. In addition, we have shown that assessing the occurrence of localised corrosion due to bicarbonate ions and the occurrence of general corrosion in the disposal conditions requires further experimental work. (authors)

  12. Electrochemical evaluation of inhibition efficiency of ciprofloxacin on the corrosion of copper in acid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanapackiam, P. [Department of Chemistry, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu, 641 014 (India); Rameshkumar, Subramaniam [Department of Chemistry, Sri Vasavi College, Erode, Tamilnadu, 638 316 (India); Subramanian, S.S. [Department of Chemistry, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu, 641 004 (India); Mallaiya, Kumaravel, E-mail: mkvteam.research@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu, 641 004 (India)

    2016-05-01

    The inhibition efficiency of ciprofloxacin on the corrosion of copper was studied in 1.0MHNO{sub 3} and 0.5MH{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization techniques. The corrosion inhibition action of ciprofloxacin was observed to be of mixed type in both the acid media, but with more of a cathodic nature. The experimental data were found to fit well with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The thermodynamic parameters such as adsorption equilibrium constant(K{sub ads}), free energy of adsorption(ΔG{sub ads}), activation energy(E{sub a}) and potential of zero charge(PZC) showed that the adsorption of ciprofloxacin onto copper surface involves both physisorption and chemisorption. - Highlights: • The inhibitor efficiency increases with increase in ciprofloxacin concentration. • Polarization measurements show that ciprofloxacin acts as a mixed type inhibitor. • The adsorption of the inhibitor on copper surface follows Langmuir adsorption isotherm. • The negative values of ΔG{sub ads} indicates that the adsorption is spontaneous and exothermic.

  13. Artificial patina formation onto copper-based alloys: Chloride and sulphate induced corrosion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carlo, G.; Giuliani, C.; Riccucci, C.; Pascucci, M.; Messina, E.; Fierro, G.; Lavorgna, M.; Ingo, G. M.

    2017-11-01

    Naturally grown patinas are typically detected onto the surface of modern copper-based artefacts and strictly affect their surface reactivity and appearance. The production of representative patinas is a key issues in order to obtain model systems which can be used for the development and validation of appropriate conservation materials and methods. In this study, we have prepared different artificial representative patinas by using a quaternary Cu-Sn-Zn-Pb alloy with chemical composition and metallurgical features similar to those of valuable modern works of art. In order to produce degradation products usually observed onto their surface, chloride and sulphate species were used to induce corrosion processes. Different patinas were produced by changing the nature of corrosive species and the set-up for the accelerated degradation. The composition and structural properties of the patinas were investigated by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results allow to identify degradation products and to distinguish copper hydroxychloride polymorphs and copper hydroxysulphates with similar structure. Our findings show that patina composition can be tailored by modifying the degradation procedure and patinas representative of modern artefacts made of quaternary Cu-Sn-Zn-Pb alloy can be obtained.

  14. Standard Practice for Use of Mattsson's Solution of pH 7.2 to Evaluate the Stress- Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Copper-Zinc Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the preparation and use of Mattsson's solution of pH 7.2 as an accelerated stress-corrosion cracking test environment for brasses (copper-zinc base alloys). The variables (to the extent that these are known at present) that require control are described together with possible means for controlling and standardizing these variables. 1.2 This practice is recommended only for brasses (copper-zinc base alloys). The use of this test environment is not recommended for other copper alloys since the results may be erroneous, providing completely misleading rankings. This is particularly true of alloys containing aluminum or nickel as deliberate alloying additions. 1.3 This practice is intended primarily where the test objective is to determine the relative stress-corrosion cracking susceptibility of different brasses under the same or different stress conditions or to determine the absolute degree of stress corrosion cracking susceptibility, if any, of a particular brass or brass component ...

  15. Study of the ability of self-assembled N-vinylcarbazole monolayers to protect copper against corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAI-XING WANG

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available N-Vinylcarbazole (NVC monolayers were self-assembled on copper surfaces. The electrochemical properties of the copper surfaces modified by NVC self-assembled monolayers (SAMs were investigated using polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS methods. The polarization measurements indicated that the NVC SAMs could reduce the rates of the anodic and cathodic reaction on the surface of copper electrodes in 0.5 mol dm-3 NaCl solution. The EIS results showed the NVC formed a closely packed film that was able to inhibit copper corrosion. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis of the copper samples and atomic adsorption analysis of the solution showed that the copper surfaces were covered by NVC SAMs, and the adsorption of NVC on the copper surfaces was accompanied with dissolution of Cu into the solution.

  16. The synergistic effect of Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and benzotriazole on the inhibition of copper corrosion in tetra-n-butylammonium bromide aerated aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, S.; Dong, J.; Guan, W.W.; Duan, J.M.; Jiang, R.Y. [Department of Applied Chemistry, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Feng, Z.P.; Song, W.J. [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, CAS, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2012-11-15

    The effect of Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and the mixture of benzotriazole (BTA) and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} (SP) on the corrosion of copper in 17 wt% (0.534 mol/L) tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (TBAB) aerated aqueous solution has been investigated by means of weight-loss test, potentiodynamic polarization test, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray techniques. The experimental results showed that a dosage of Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} stimulated the copper corrosion, and the corrosion rate increased with increasing Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} concentration, whereas the mixture of BTA and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} could protect copper in aqueous TBAB solution. The inhibition action of the mixture of BTA and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} on the corrosion of copper is mainly due to the inhibition of the anodic process of corrosion. The inhibition efficiency of a mixture consisting of 2 g/L BTA and 1 g/L Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} was about 96%. The mixture of BTA and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} inhibits the corrosion of copper better than BTA by itself, indicating that Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} has a synergistic role with BTA on the corrosion inhibition of copper in TBAB aqueous solution. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Microbially influenced corrosion of copper nuclear fuel waste containers in a Canadian disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    1996-11-01

    An assessment of the potential for microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of copper nuclear fuel waste containers in a Canadian disposal vault is presented. The assessment is based on a consideration of the microbial activity within a disposal vault, the reported cases of MIC of Cu alloys in the literature and the known corrosion behaviour of Cu. Because of the critical role of biofilms in the reported cases of MIC, their formation and properties are discussed in detail. Next, the literature on the MIC of Cu alloys is briefly reviewed. The various MIC mechanisms proposed are critically discussed and the implications for the corrosion of Cu containers considered. In the majority of literature cases, MIC depends on alternating aerated and deaerated environments, with accelerated corrosion being observed when fresh aerated water replaces stagnant water, e.g., the MIC of Cu-Ni heat exchangers in polluted seawater and the microbially influenced pitting of Cu water pipes. Finally, because of the predominance of corrosion by sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the MIC literature, the abiotic behaviour of Cu alloys in sulphide solutions is also reviewed. The effect of the evolving environment in a disposal vault on the extent and location of microbial activity is discussed. Biofilm formation on the container surface is considered unlikely throughout the container lifetime, but especially initially when the environmental conditions will be particularly aggressive. Microbial activity in areas of the vault away from the container is possible, however. Corrosion of the container could then occur if microbial metabolic by-products diffuse to the container surface. Sulphide, produced by the action of SRB are considered to be the most likely cause of container corrosion. It is concluded that the only likely form of MIC of Cu containers will result from sulphide produced by SRB diffusing to the container surface. A modelling procedure for predicting the extent of corrosion is

  18. Synthesis and characterization of corrosion protective poly(2,5-dimethylaniline) coatings on copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Vandana; Gaikwad, A. B.; Patil, P. P.

    2006-11-01

    Poly(2,5-dimethylaniline) coatings were synthesized on copper (Cu) by electrochemical polymerization of 2,5-dimethylaniline in aqueous salicylate solution by using cyclic voltammetry. The characterization of these coatings was carried out by cyclic voltammetry, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results of these characterizations indicate that the aqueous salicylate solution is a suitable medium for the electrochemical polymerization of 2,5-dimethylaniline to generate strongly adherent and smooth poly(2,5-dimethylaniline) coatings on Cu substrates. The performance of poly(2,5-dimethylaniline) as protective coating against corrosion of Cu in aqueous 3% NaCl was assessed by the potentiodynamic polarization technique. The results of the potentiodynamic polarization demonstrate that the poly(2,5-dimethylaniline) coating has ability to protect the Cu against corrosion. The corrosion potential was about 0.078 V versus SCE more positive in aqueous 3% NaCl for the poly(2,5-dimethylaniline) coated Cu than that of uncoated Cu and reduces the corrosion rate of Cu almost by a factor of 31.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of corrosion protective poly(2,5-dimethylaniline) coatings on copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinde, Vandana [Department of Physics, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425001, Maharashtra (India); Gaikwad, A.B. [Centre for Materials Characterization, National Chemical Laboratory, Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Patil, P.P. [Department of Physics, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425001, Maharashtra (India)]. E-mail: pnmu@yahoo.co.in

    2006-11-30

    Poly(2,5-dimethylaniline) coatings were synthesized on copper (Cu) by electrochemical polymerization of 2,5-dimethylaniline in aqueous salicylate solution by using cyclic voltammetry. The characterization of these coatings was carried out by cyclic voltammetry, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results of these characterizations indicate that the aqueous salicylate solution is a suitable medium for the electrochemical polymerization of 2,5-dimethylaniline to generate strongly adherent and smooth poly(2,5-dimethylaniline) coatings on Cu substrates. The performance of poly(2,5-dimethylaniline) as protective coating against corrosion of Cu in aqueous 3% NaCl was assessed by the potentiodynamic polarization technique. The results of the potentiodynamic polarization demonstrate that the poly(2,5-dimethylaniline) coating has ability to protect the Cu against corrosion. The corrosion potential was about 0.078 V versus SCE more positive in aqueous 3% NaCl for the poly(2,5-dimethylaniline) coated Cu than that of uncoated Cu and reduces the corrosion rate of Cu almost by a factor of 31.

  20. Corrosion behavior of super-hydrophobic surface on copper in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Tao; Chen Shougang; Cheng Sha; Tian Jintao; Chang Xueting [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Yin Yansheng [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)], E-mail: yys2003@ouc.edu.cn

    2007-11-01

    A novel super-hydrophobic film was prepared by myristic acid (n-tetradecanoic) chemically adsorbed onto the copper wafer. The film formation and its structure were characterized by means of water contact angle measurement, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The static contact angle for water on the surface of this organic film was measured to be as high as 158{sup o}. The formation of a composite interface composed of the flower-like surface nanostructures, water droplet and air trapped in the crevices was suggested to be responsible for the superior water-repellent property. The corrosion behavior of the super-hydrophobic surface was investigated with potentiodynamic polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Due to the 'air valleys' and 'capillarity' effects, the corrosion resistance of the material was improved remarkably.

  1. Corrosion behavior of super-hydrophobic surface on copper in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tao; Chen, Shougang; Cheng, Sha; Tian, Jintao; Chang, Xueting; Yin, Yansheng [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2007-11-01

    A novel super-hydrophobic film was prepared by myristic acid (n-tetradecanoic) chemically adsorbed onto the copper wafer. The film formation and its structure were characterized by means of water contact angle measurement, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The static contact angle for water on the surface of this organic film was measured to be as high as 158 . The formation of a composite interface composed of the flower-like surface nanostructures, water droplet and air trapped in the crevices was suggested to be responsible for the superior water-repellent property. The corrosion behavior of the super-hydrophobic surface was investigated with potentiodynamic polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Due to the 'air valleys' and 'capillarity' effects, the corrosion resistance of the material was improved remarkably. (author)

  2. NASA's Beachside Corrosion Test Site and Current Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Control Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard W.; Calle, Luz Marina; Johnston, Frederick; Montgomery, Eliza L.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    NASA began corrosion studies at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term corrosion protective coatings for carbon steel. KSC's Beachside Corrosion Test Site (BCTS), which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring, environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acid ic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous studies have identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad. This paper presents a historical overview of over 45 years of corrosion and coating evaluation studies and a description of the BCTS's current capabilities. Additionally, current research and testing programs involving chromium free coatings, environmentally friendly corrosion preventative compounds, and alternates to nitric acid passivation will be discussed.

  3. Synergistic Effect of L-Methionine and KI on Copper Corrosion Inhibition in HNO3 (1M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel SEDIK

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available L-Methionine (L-Met efficiency as a non-toxic corrosion inhibitor for copper in 1M HNO3 has been studied by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and potentiodynamic polarization. Copper corrosion rate significant decrease was observed in the presence of L-Met at 10-4M. The Obtained Results from potentiodynamic polarization and impedance measurements are in good agreement. L-Methionine adsorption on copper surface follows Langmuir isotherm. L-Met free energy adsorption on copper (-30 KJ mol-1 reveals an inhibition strong physical adsorption on copper surface. In order to evaluate the L-Met effect, L-Met and iodide ion’synergistic effect was used to prevent copper corrosion in nitric acid. It was found that inhibitor efficiency (IE reached 98.27 % in 1M solution containing 10-4M L-Met and 10- 3 M KI. The synergistic effect was attributed to iodide ions adsorption on copper surface, which facilitated the L-Met adsorption and an inhibitive film formation.

  4. Engineered Barrier System - Assessment of the Corrosion Properties of Copper Canisters. Report from a Workshop. Synthesis and extended abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Peter (ed.) [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (GB)] (and others)

    2006-03-15

    A general impression from literature studies, presentations by workshop participants and the informal hearing with SKB is that there is in general a strong basis for the handling of copper corrosion in safety assessment. Work has been ongoing in the area for many decades and there appears to be a consensus on several key aspects of corrosion, such as the existence of a threshold potential for localised corrosion. This is of key importance for the assessment of corrosion under repository conditions. Localised corrosion has to be evaluated for the initial oxygenated phase. There is a need to demonstrate that the corrosion profile in reality will be similar to those of small scale experiments, i.e. roughening without real pitting. There is also a need to develop a better and more transparent basis for assessing how much oxygen can be available during the early oxygenated phase. Regarding stress corrosion cracking, there is a need for a consistent and possibly more detailed explanation either why it can be completely disregarded, or accounted for by probabilistic methods. Copper is normally assumed to be resistant to corrosion in oxygen free environments. However, this is not correct for the extremely long time period of one million years covered by SKB's safety assessment. Copper will react with sulphide by reduction of water. This reaction is the basis for SKB's performance assessment model for copper corrosion. The key aspect of this model is the availability of sulphide. SKB may need to address in more detail the availability of sulphide from the groundwater and the buffer bentonite and its speciation and solubility behaviour. However, the most sensitive assumption in SKB's modelling appears to be the assumption of zero microbial activity in the buffer throughout the assessment time scale of 10{sup 6} years. A detailed justification of this assumption is needed and possibly also 'what-if' calculations to illustrate consequences if this

  5. Engineered Barrier System - Assessment of the Corrosion Properties of Copper Canisters. Report from a Workshop. Synthesis and extended abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Peter

    2006-03-01

    A general impression from literature studies, presentations by workshop participants and the informal hearing with SKB is that there is in general a strong basis for the handling of copper corrosion in safety assessment. Work has been ongoing in the area for many decades and there appears to be a consensus on several key aspects of corrosion, such as the existence of a threshold potential for localised corrosion. This is of key importance for the assessment of corrosion under repository conditions. Localised corrosion has to be evaluated for the initial oxygenated phase. There is a need to demonstrate that the corrosion profile in reality will be similar to those of small scale experiments, i.e. roughening without real pitting. There is also a need to develop a better and more transparent basis for assessing how much oxygen can be available during the early oxygenated phase. Regarding stress corrosion cracking, there is a need for a consistent and possibly more detailed explanation either why it can be completely disregarded, or accounted for by probabilistic methods. Copper is normally assumed to be resistant to corrosion in oxygen free environments. However, this is not correct for the extremely long time period of one million years covered by SKB's safety assessment. Copper will react with sulphide by reduction of water. This reaction is the basis for SKB's performance assessment model for copper corrosion. The key aspect of this model is the availability of sulphide. SKB may need to address in more detail the availability of sulphide from the groundwater and the buffer bentonite and its speciation and solubility behaviour. However, the most sensitive assumption in SKB's modelling appears to be the assumption of zero microbial activity in the buffer throughout the assessment time scale of 10 6 years. A detailed justification of this assumption is needed and possibly also 'what-if' calculations to illustrate consequences if this assumption turns out not to be

  6. Research process of nondestructive testing pitting corrosion in metal material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo ZHANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pitting corrosion directly affects the usability and service life of metal material, so the effective nondestructive testing and evaluation on pitting corrosion is of great significance for fatigue life prediction because of data supporting. The features of pitting corrosion are elaborated, and the relation between the pitting corrosion parameters and fatigue performance is pointed out. Through introducing the fundamental principles of pitting corrosion including mainly magnetic flux leakage inspection, pulsed eddy current and guided waves, the research status of nondestructive testing technology for pitting corrosion is summarized, and the key steps of nondestructive testing technologies are compared and analyzed from the theoretical model, signal processing to industrial applications. Based on the analysis of the signal processing specificity of different nondestructive testing technologies in detecting pitting corrosion, the visualization combined with image processing and signal analysis are indicated as the critical problems of accurate extraction of pitting defect information and quantitative characterization for pitting corrosion. The study on non-contact nondestructive testing technologies is important for improving the detection precision and its application in industries.

  7. Interactive Effects of Corrosion, Copper, and Chloramines on Legionella and Mycobacteria in Hot Water Plumbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, William J; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A

    2017-06-20

    Complexities associated with drinking water plumbing systems can result in undesirable interactions among plumbing components that undermine engineering controls for opportunistic pathogens (OPs). In this study, we examine the effects of plumbing system materials and two commonly applied disinfectants, copper and chloramines, on water chemistry and the growth of Legionella and mycobacteria across a transect of bench- and pilot-scale hot water experiments carried out with the same municipal water supply. We discovered that copper released from corrosion of plumbing materials can initiate evolution of >1100 times more hydrogen (H 2 ) from water heater sacrificial anode rods than does presence of copper dosed as soluble cupric ions. H 2 is a favorable electron donor for autotrophs and causes fixation of organic carbon that could serve as a nutrient for OPs. Dosed cupric ions acted as a disinfectant in stratified stagnant pipes, inhibiting culturable Legionella and biofilm formation, but promoted Legionella growth in pipes subject to convective mixing. This difference was presumably due to continuous delivery of nutrients to biofilm on the pipes under convective mixing conditions. Chloramines eliminated culturable Legionella and prevented L. pneumophila from recolonizing biofilms, but M. avium gene numbers increased by 0.14-0.76 logs in the bulk water and were unaffected in the biofilm. This study provides practical confirmation of past discrepancies in the literature regarding the variable effects of copper on Legionella growth, and confirms prior reports of trade-offs between Legionella and mycobacteria if chloramines are applied as secondary disinfectant residual.

  8. SERS and DFT study of copper surfaces coated with corrosion inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Muniz-Miranda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Azole derivatives are common inhibitors of copper corrosion due to the chemical adsorption occurring on the metal surface that gives rise to a protective film. In particular, 1,2,4-triazole performs comparable to benzotriazole, which is much more widely used, but is by no means an environmentally friendly agent. In this study, we have analyzed the adsorption of 1,2,4-triazole on copper by taking advantage of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS effect, which highlights the vibrational features of organic ligand monolayers adhering to rough surfaces of some metals such as gold, silver and copper. To ensure the necessary SERS activation, a roughening procedure was implemented on the copper substrates, resulting in nanoscale surface structures, as evidenced by microscopic investigation. To obtain sufficient information on the molecule–metal interaction and the formation of an anticorrosive thin film, the SERS spectra were interpreted with the aid of theoretical calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT approach.

  9. Double shell slurry low-temperature corrosion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Elmore, R.P.; Engel, D.W.

    1983-09-01

    A series of year-long tests have been completed on potential double shell slurry (DSS) compositions at temperatures up to 100 0 C. These tests have sought data on uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress-corrosion cracking. No indication of the latter two types of corrosion were observed within the test matrix. Corrosion rates after four months were generally below the 1 mpy (25 μm/y) design limit. By the end of twelve months all results were below this limit and, except for very concentrated mixtures, all were below 0.5 mpy. Prediction equations were generated from a model fitted to the data. The equations provide a rapid means of estimating the corrosion rate for proposed DSS compositions

  10. Probability density fittings of corrosion test-data: Implications on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the use of corrosion inhibitor admixture in concrete had been identified as an easy, effective and economical ... for acceptable reduction in corrosion rate had been recommended by others. The American .... immersed, longitudinally, in plastic bowls containing respective test solution of aggressive agent. Each of the first ...

  11. Direct current testing to measure corrosiveness of wood preservatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer; Donald S. Stone; James T. Gilbertson

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative test that mimics the corrosion behaviour of metals in contact with treated wood without using wood specimens would be of great value in rapidly evaluating the corrosiveness of new wood preservatives. The objective of this study was to determine whether the linear polarisation resistance of metals immersed in a solution of preservative chemicals is related...

  12. Effect of 1,2,4-triazole on galvanic corrosion between cobalt and copper in CMP based alkaline slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lei; Liu, Yuling; Wang, Chenwei; Han, Linan

    2018-04-01

    Cobalt has become a new type of barrier material with its unique advantages since the copper-interconnects in the great-large scale integrated circuits (GLSI) into 10 nm and below technical nodes, but cobalt and copper have severe galvanic corrosion during chemical–mechanical flattening. The effect of 1,2,4-triazole on Co/Cu galvanic corrosion in alkaline slurry and the control of rate selectivity of copper and cobalt were investigated in this work. The results of electrochemical experiments and polishing experiments had indicated that a certain concentration of 1,2,4-triazole could form a layer of insoluble and dense passive film on the surface of cobalt and copper, which reduced the corrosion potential difference between cobalt and copper. Meantime, the removal rate of cobalt and copper could be effectively controlled according to demand during the CMP process. When the study optimized slurry was composed of 0.5 wt% colloidal silica, 0.1 %vol. hydrogen peroxide, 0.05 wt% FA/O, 345 ppm 1,2,4-triazole, cobalt had higher corrosion potential than copper and the galvanic corrosion could be reduced effectively when the corrosion potential difference between them decreased to 1 mV and the galvanic corrosion current density reached 0.02 nA/cm2. Meanwhile, the removal rate of Co was 62.396 nm/min, the removal rate of Cu was 47.328 nm/min, so that the removal rate ratio of cobalt and copper was 1.32 : 1, which was a good amendment to the dishing pits. The contact potential corrosion of Co/Cu was very weak, which could be better for meeting the requirements of the barrier CMP. Project supported by the Major National Science and Technology Special Projects (No. 2016ZX02301003-004-007), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (No. F2015202267), and the Outstanding Young Science and Technology Innovation Fund of Hebei University of Technology (No. 2015007).

  13. Effects of Copper and Sulfur Additions on Corrosion Resistance and Machinability of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soon Tae; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Hyung Joon

    1999-01-01

    Effects of Cu and S on corrosion resistance and machinability of austenitic stainless steel were investigated using immersion test, metallographic examination, Auger surface analysis and tool life test with single point turning tools. Corrosion resistance of the experimental Cu containing alloys in 18.4N H 2 SO 4 at 80 ∼ 120 .deg. C and 3N HCl at 40 .deg. C decreased as S content increased. However, one of the experimental alloys (Fe- 18%Cr- 21%Ni-3.2%Mo- 1.6%W- 0.2%N- 3.1%Cu- 0.091%S) showed general and pitting corrosion resistance equivalent to that of CW12MW in highly concentrated SO 4 2- environment. The alloy also showed pitting corrosion resistance superior to super stainless steel such as 654SMO in Cl - environment. The reasons why the increase in S content deteriorated the corrosion resistance were first, that the number and size of (Mn, Cr)S sulfides having corrosion resistance lower than that of matrix increased, leading to pitting corrosion and second, that rapid dissolution of the matrix around the pits was caused by adsorbed S. However, the alloy containing 3.1 %Cu and 0.091 % S maintained high general and pitting corrosion resistance due to heavily enriched noble Cu through selective dissolution of active Fe and Ni. The tool life for 3.1 % Cu + 0.091 % S added alloy was about four times that of 0.06%Cu + 0.005% S added alloy due to high shear strain rate generated by Cu addition giving easy cross slip of dislocation, lubrication of ductile (Mn, Cr)S sulfides adhering to tool crater surface and low cutting force resulting from thin continuous sulfides formed in chips during machining

  14. Inhibition of Mild Copper Metal Corrosion in HNO3 Medium by Acid Extract of Azadirachta Indica Seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Sangeetha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of acid extract of dry azadirachta indica seed as corrosion inhibitor for mild copper metal in various concentration of (1 N,2 N and 3N HNO3 medium was investigated in the present study. Experimental methods include weight loss, determination of corrosion rate, inhibition efficiency and phytochemical analysis was studied. The results indicate azadirachta indica seed to be a good corrosion inhibitor of a mixed type and having efficiency as high as 95% at 1% inhibitor concentration in different time duration.

  15. Indoor accelerated corrosion test and marine field test of corrosion-resistant low-alloy steel rebars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrocell corrosion test and accelerated alternating wet–dry experiment combined with marine field test were employed to study the corrosion behavior of HRB400 carbon steel, 1.5Cr steel, and 5Cr steel in a simulated concrete pore solution and mortar. The macrocell current significantly decreases in samples added with Cr compared with that in HRB400 steel. The corrosion rate is decreased by Cr but increased by Cl−; as a consequence, the corrosion rates of 1.5Cr and 5Cr steel are lower than that of HRB400 steel. However, the corrosion products differ slightly in terms of the contents of α-FeOOH (goethite, γ-FeOOH (lepidocrocite, γ-Fe2O3, and Fe3O4 (maghemite or magnetite. The addition of Cr increases the content of the protective α-FeOOH and reduces the content of γ-FeOOH. Both ordinary and high-performance epoxy coatings remain intact after 1 year of marine field test. Among the bare steel rebars, HRB400 steel shows extensive localized corrosion on the surface, whereas 1.5Cr steel exhibits less severe corrosion. The scarcely visible corroded areas in 5Cr steel indicate that this rebar is in the passive state, consistent with results of the indoor accelerated test. Hence, the durability of concrete structures can be prolonged with the utilization of corrosion-resistant low-alloy rebars.

  16. Study by acoustic emission and electrochemical methods of the corrosion and the protection of the copper-zinc alloy (60/40) in neutral and alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assouli, B.

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this work is to study and characterize, by electrochemical methods and acoustic emission, the corrosion and the protection of the copper-zinc alloy (60/40) having a metallographic structure αβ'. The electrochemical measurements, in neutral, chlorinated or alkaline medium have allowed, to study the corrosion resistance of the copper-zinc and to show that the corrosion of this alloy, in the used media, is determined by a diffusional mechanism. The observations to the optical and scanning electron microscopes and the EDX analyzes have confirmed that this corrosion phenomenon is mainly due to the selective dissolution of the β' phase. The acoustic emission has shown, during this corrosion, the presence of two emissive sources whose initiation has been attributed to the relaxation of the micro- and macro- residual stresses of the α phase. These stresses have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and the salvoes emitted during the relaxation of these stresses have been discriminated by the characteristic frequencies and by the barycenter of their spectral density. The protection of this alloy has been carried out by the 2-mercapto-benzimidazole (MBI). This last compound has been tested both as inhibitor added directly in the corrosive medium and/or as polymer film previously deposited by an electrochemical way (p-MBI). The MBI is very efficient for an inhibition in a chlorinated alkaline medium. It is an interphase inhibitor. The p-MBI is efficient too in a neutral chlorinated medium and is moreover non pollutant for the environment. (O.M.)

  17. Electrochemical tests for pitting and crevice corrosion susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postlethwaite, J.

    1983-01-01

    Passive metals are being considered as container materials for the disposal of nuclear waste by deep burial. Localized corrosion is a potential problem and electrochemical techniques have an important role in the assessment of the susceptibility of these container materials to crevice and pitting corrosion. This paper critically reviews both the theoretical background and the experimental details of the electrochemical test methods presently used in both industrial and scientific studies of localized corrosion in both halide and non-halide solutions and identifies those areas where theory and experimental behaviour are in agreement and those areas for which there is neither well established theory nor an experimental test method

  18. Inhibiting effects of imidazole on copper corrosion in 1 M HNO3 solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woo-Jin

    2003-01-01

    The present work deals with the inhibiting effects of imidazole on the pure copper (Cu) corrosion in 1 M HNO 3 solution analysing potentiodynamic polarisation curves, potentiostatic anodic current transient, AC impedance spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). By adding imidazole to HNO 3 solution, the polarisation curves showed decrease in the corrosion current and the cathodic current, suggesting that imidazole acts as an effective cathodic inhibitor to Cu corrosion. From the measured anodic current transients, it is inferred that the protective Cu-imidazole complex film is simultaneously formed with the Cu oxide in the presence of imidazole during the early stage of the anodic polarisation. Analysis of the AC impedance spectra revealed that the values of the charge transfer resistance R ct obtained in imidazole-containing HNO 3 solution were greater than that value in imidazole-free one and at the same time steadily increased with immersion time to the constant value. Contrarily, the capacitance value was abruptly lowered from the double layer capacitance C dl to the complex film capacitance C cf in the progress of immersion time. Furthermore, the Warburg coefficient σ value for the ion diffusion through the complex film was observed to increase with immersion time. This means that the Cu(N-OH) complex film becomes thicker during immersion in the HNO 3 solution with imidazole through the inward growth of the N-rich outer layer to the O-rich inner layer, as well validated by XPS. Based upon the experimental results, it is suggested that the Cu corrosion in 1 M HNO 3 solution is efficiently inhibited with the addition of imidazole by retarding both the charge transfer on cathodic sites of the Cu surface in the early stage of immersion time and the subsequent ion diffusion through the steadily growing complex film

  19. Analysis of copper corrosion in compacted bentonite clay as a function of clay density and growth conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, K

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the relationships between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), growth conditions, bentonite densities and copper sulfide generation under circumstances relevant to underground, high-level radioactive waste repositories. Experiments took place 450 m underground, connected under in situ pressure to groundwater containing SRB. The microbial reduction of sulfate to sulfide and subsequent corrosion of copper test plates buried in compacted bentonite were analysed using radioactive sulfur (35SO4(2-)) as tracer. Mass distribution of copper sulfide on the plates indicated a diffusive process. The relationship between average diffusion coefficients (Ds) and tested density (rho) was linear. Ds (m2 s(-1))=-0.004xrho (kg m(-3))+8.2, decreasing by 0.2 Ds units per 50 kg m(-3) increase in density, from 1.2x10(-11) m2 s(-1) at 1750 kg m(-3) to 0.2x10(-11) m2 s(-1) at 2000 kg m(-3). It is possible that sulfide corrosion of waste canisters in future radioactive waste repositories depends mainly on sulfide concentration at the boundary between groundwater and the buffer, which in turn depends on SRB growth conditions (e.g., sulfate accessibility, carbon availability and electron donors) and geochemical parameters (e.g., presence of ferrous iron, which immobilizes sulfide). Maintaining high bentonite density is also important in mitigating canister corrosion. The sulfide diffusion coefficients can be used in safety calculations regarding waste canister corrosion. The work supports findings that microbial activity in compacted bentonite will be restricted. The study emphasizes the importance of growth conditions for sulfate reduction at the groundwater boundary of the bentonite buffer and linked sulfide production.

  20. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  1. Standard Operating Procedure for Accelerated Corrosion Testing at ARL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    to scribe nonferrous materials so as to prevent contamination of the substrate during the process. The "X" scribe is made by scribing 2 intersecting...may include GMW14872 Cyclic Corrosion Testing (typically Exterior, Exposure C), ASTM B117 Neutral Salt Fog Testing, ASTM G50 Atmospheric Corrosion...using the same cleaning procedures, contamination of the substrate is minimized during the scribe process. All partners adhering to guidelines and

  2. Functionalized pyranopyrazole molecules as corrosion inhibitors for mild copper metal in HCl solution: synthesis, theoretical studies, and physical investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashok; Kumar, Dinesh; Uday Manohar, Prashant; Pande, Surojit; Dalvi, Anshuman; Shukla, Paritosh

    2018-02-01

    Five substituted pyranopyrazole (PPZ) derivatives were chemically synthesized by conventional and microwave assisted synthesis (MWA) methodology. Their differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) analyses, and the corrosion inhibitor properties on mild copper metal in 1 M HCl solution were investigated by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), EDS (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy), and XRD (x-ray Diffraction) all of which showed good anti-corrosion behavior. Further, mechanical property investigations were also performed by measuring the tensile strength of the PPZ-adsorbed Cu-strips. Finally, the inhibition action was evaluated by quantum chemical parameters. All the experimental results pointed that the molecules acted as excellent anti-corrosion surface active agents for copper metal.

  3. Industrial Tests to Modify Molten Copper Slag for Improvement of Copper Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhengqi; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jian; Zhang, Feng; Yang, Congcong

    2018-04-01

    In this article, to improve the recovery of copper from copper slag by flotation process, industrial tests of the modification process involving addition of a composite additive into molten copper slag were conducted, and the modified slag was subjected to the flotation process to confirm the modification effect. The phase evolution of the slag in the modification process was revealed by thermodynamic calculations, x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that more copper was transformed and enriched in copper sulfide phases. The magnetite content in the modified slag decreased, and that of "FeO" increased correspondingly, leading to a better fluidity of the molten slag, which improved the aggregation and growth of fine particles of the copper sulfide minerals. Closed-circuit flotation tests of the original and modified slags were conducted, and the results show that the copper recovery increased obviously from 69.15% to 73.38%, and the copper grade of concentrates was elevated slightly from 20.24% to 21.69%, further confirming that the industrial tests of the modification process were successful. Hence, the modification process has a bright future in industrial applications for enhancing the recovery of copper from the copper slag.

  4. Kinetic modelling of bentonite-canister interaction. Long-term predictions of copper canister corrosion under oxic and anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wersin, P.; Spahiu, K.; Bruno, J.

    1994-09-01

    A new modelling approach for canister corrosion which emphasises chemical processes and diffusion at the bentonite-canister interface is presented. From the geochemical boundary conditions corrosion rates for both an anoxic case and an oxic case are derived and uncertainties thereof are estimated via sensitivity analyses. Time scales of corrosion are assessed by including calculations of the evolution of redox potential in the near field and pitting corrosion. This indicates realistic corrosion depths in the range of 10 -7 and 4*10 -5 mm/yr, respectively for anoxic and oxic corrosion. Taking conservative estimates, depths are increased by a factor of about 200 for both cases. From these predictions it is suggested that copper canister corrosion does not constitute a problem for repository safety, although certain factors such as temperature and radiolysis have not been explicitly included. The possible effect of bacterial processes on corrosion should be further investigated as it might enhance locally the described redox process. 35 refs, 11 figs, 6 tabs

  5. SR-XRD in situ monitoring of copper-IUD corrosion in simulated uterine fluid using a portable spectroelectrochemical cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayburn, Rosie A; Dowsett, Mark G; Sabbe, Pieter-Jan; Wermeille, Didier; Anjos, Jorge Alves; Flexer, Victoria; De Keersmaecker, Michel; Wildermeersch, Dirk; Adriaens, Annemie

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work is to study the initial corrosion of copper in the presence of gold when placed in simulated uterine fluid in order to better understand the evolution of active components of copper-IUDs. In order to carry out this study, a portable cell was designed to partially simulate the uterine environment and provide a way of tracking the chemical changes occurring in the samples in situ within a controlled environment over a long period of time using synchrotron spectroelectrochemistry. The dynamically forming crystalline corrosion products are determined in situ for a range of copper-gold surface ratios over the course of a 10-day experiment in the cell. It is concluded that the insoluble deposits forming over this time are not the origin of the anticonception mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cysteine as a non toxic corrosion inhibitor for copper alloys in conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravgaard, Mari; van Lanschot, Jettie

    2012-01-01

    studies of colour changes in the corrosion products. The results obtained in this article demonstrate that cysteine could be a non-toxic alternative to BTA. Cysteine performed as well as BTA on pre-corroded coupons with bronze disease in high humidity and showed acceptable results during testing...

  7. Effects of copper and titanium on the corrosion behavior of newly fabricated nanocrystalline aluminum in natural seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherif, El-Sayed M.; Ammar, Hany Rizk; Khalil, Khalil Abdelrazek

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We fabricated nanocrystalline Al and some of its alloys by mechanical alloying method. • The corrosion behavior of the fabricated materials in natural seawater was reported. • We found that Al suffers both uniform and localized corrosion in the seawater. • The presence of Cu significantly decreased the corrosion of Al. • The addition of Ti to the Al–Cu alloy presented more protection to Al against corrosion. - Abstract: Fabrication of a newly nanocrystalline Al and two of its alloys, namely Al–10%Cu; and Al–10%Cu–5%Ti has been carried out using mechanical alloying (MA) technique. The corrosion behavior of these materials in aerated stagnant Arabian Gulf seawater (AGSW) at room temperature has been reported. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP), chronoamperometric current-time (CCT) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive (EDX) investigations were employed to report the corrosion behavior of the fabricated materials. All results indicated that Al suffers both uniform and localized corrosion in the AGSW test solution. The presence of 10%Cu decreases the corrosion current density, the anodic and cathodic currents and corrosion rate and increases the corrosion resistance of Al. The addition of 5%Ti to the Al–10%Cu alloy produced further decreases in the corrosion parameters. Measurements together confirmed that the corrosion of the fabricated materials in AGSW decreases in the order Al > Al–10%Cu > Al–10%Cu–5%Ti

  8. Effects of copper and titanium on the corrosion behavior of newly fabricated nanocrystalline aluminum in natural seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherif, El-Sayed M., E-mail: esherif@ksu.edu.sa [Mechanical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, King Saud University, P.O. Box 800, Al-Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Electrochemistry and Corrosion Laboratory, Department of Physical Chemistry, National Research Centre , (NRC), Dokki, 12622, Cairo 8 (Egypt); Ammar, Hany Rizk [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez University, Suez (Egypt); Khalil, Khalil Abdelrazek [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez University, Suez (Egypt); Mechanical Design and Materials Department, Faculty of Energy Engineering, Aswan University, Aswan (Egypt)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We fabricated nanocrystalline Al and some of its alloys by mechanical alloying method. • The corrosion behavior of the fabricated materials in natural seawater was reported. • We found that Al suffers both uniform and localized corrosion in the seawater. • The presence of Cu significantly decreased the corrosion of Al. • The addition of Ti to the Al–Cu alloy presented more protection to Al against corrosion. - Abstract: Fabrication of a newly nanocrystalline Al and two of its alloys, namely Al–10%Cu; and Al–10%Cu–5%Ti has been carried out using mechanical alloying (MA) technique. The corrosion behavior of these materials in aerated stagnant Arabian Gulf seawater (AGSW) at room temperature has been reported. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP), chronoamperometric current-time (CCT) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive (EDX) investigations were employed to report the corrosion behavior of the fabricated materials. All results indicated that Al suffers both uniform and localized corrosion in the AGSW test solution. The presence of 10%Cu decreases the corrosion current density, the anodic and cathodic currents and corrosion rate and increases the corrosion resistance of Al. The addition of 5%Ti to the Al–10%Cu alloy produced further decreases in the corrosion parameters. Measurements together confirmed that the corrosion of the fabricated materials in AGSW decreases in the order Al > Al–10%Cu > Al–10%Cu–5%Ti.

  9. From laboratory corrosion tests to a corrosion lifetime for wood fasteners : progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Dominique Derome; Samuel V. Glass

    2010-01-01

    Determining a “corrosion-lifetime” for fasteners embedded in wood treated with recently adopted preservative systems depends upon successfully relating results of laboratory tests to in-service conditions. In contrast to laboratory tests where metal is embedded in wood at constant temperature and moisture content, the in-service temperature and moisture content of wood...

  10. Amino acids as corrosion inhibitors for copper in acidic medium: Experimental and theoretical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošev Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental electrochemical methods combined with quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the possibility of use various amino acids as “green” corrosion inhibitors for copper in 0.5 M HCl solution. Among eleven amino acids studied, cysteine achieved the highest inhibitor effectiveness reaching 52% at 10 mM concentration. Other amino acids reached achieved effectiveness less than 25%, some of them even acted as corrosion accelerators. Based on the experimental results, theoretical calculations and simulations were focused on cysteine and alanine. The electronic and reactivity parameters of their protonated forms in electrical double layer were evaluated by density functional calculations. In addition, molecular dynamic simulations were introduced to follow the adsorption behaviour of these two amino acids at the Cu(111 surface in the electrolyte solution. The results indicate that the orientation of both molecules is nearly parallel to the surface except of ammonium group which is directed away from the surface. Therefore, as the orientation of the cysteine and alanine molecules at the surface is similar, thiol functional group is responsible for superior inhibition efficiency of cysteine.

  11. Test manufacturing of copper canisters with cast inserts. Assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, C.G.

    1998-08-01

    The current design of canisters for the deep repository for spent nuclear fuel consists of an outer corrosion-protective copper casing in the form of a tubular section with lid and bottom and an inner pressure-resistant insert. The insert is designed to be manufactured by casting and inside are channels in which the fuel assemblies are to be placed. Over the last years, a number of full-scale manufacturing tests of all canister components have been carried out. The purpose has been to determine and develop the best manufacturing technique and to establish long-term contacts with the best suppliers of material and technology. Part of the work has involved the developing and implementing of a quality assurance system in accordance with ISO 9001, covering the whole chain from suppliers of material up to and including the delivery of assembled canisters. This report consists of a description of the design of the canister together with current drawings and complementary technical specifications stipulating, among other things, requirements placed on different materials. The different manufacturing methods that have been used are also described and commented on in both text and illustrations. For the manufacturing of copper tubes, the roll-forming of rolled plate to tube halves and longitudinal welding is a method that has been tested on a relatively large number of tubes by now, and that probably can be developed into a functioning production method. However, the very promising outcome of performed tests on seamless tube manufacturing, has resulted in a change in direction in tube manufacturing, focusing on continued testing of extrusion as well as pierce and draw processing in the immediate future. In connection with ongoing operations, new manufacturing tests of tubes with less material thickness will be carried out. Test manufacturing of cast inserts has resulted in the choice of nodular iron as material in the continued work. This improvement in design has resulted

  12. Inhibition of copper corrosion by the formation of Schiff base self-assembled monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Zheng; Han, Guo-Cheng; Chen, Shi-Liang; Chen, Zhencheng

    2016-12-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 4-((2-thiophenecarboxylic acid hydrazide) methylene) benzoic acid (HD2) (denoted as HD2-SAMs) were formed on copper surface. The SAMs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Polarization curve and weight loss methods indicated that the highest inhibition efficiency was 93.9% for CO2-saturated simulative oilfield water at a self-assembled time of 3 h. Potential-time curve, electrochemical impedance tests showed that HD2-SAMs on copper surface exhibited excellent inhibition effect at 30 °C. The adsorption behavior of HD2-SAMs on the copper surface followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, which was indicative of typically chemical adsorption. Quantum chemistry calculation showed that O and N atoms can interact with Cu atoms by coordination bonds which were the mainly active area of the adsorption of HD2 molecules.

  13. Standard Guide for Conducting Corrosion Tests in Field Applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures for conducting corrosion tests in plant equipment or systems under operating conditions to evaluate the corrosion resistance of engineering materials. It does not cover electrochemical methods for determining corrosion rates. 1.1.1 While intended primarily for immersion tests, general guidelines provided can be applicable for exposure of test specimens in plant atmospheres, provided that placement and orientation of the test specimens is non-restrictive to air circulation. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. See also 10.4.2.

  14. Effectiveness of using pure copper and silver coupon corrosivity monitoring (CCM) metal strips to measure the severity levels of air pollutants in indoor and outdoor atmospheres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Foax, LJ

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Severity levels of air pollutants rich in oxides, chlorides and sulphides were successfully measured in indoor and outdoor atmospheres using pure copper and silver coupon corrosivity monitoring (CCM) metal strips when the maximum exposure periods...

  15. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  16. Tendency of the 18-8 type corrosion-resistant steel to cracking in automatic building-up of copper and copper base alloys in argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramovich, V.R.; Andronik, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    Studied was the tendency of the 18-8 type corrosion-resistant steel to cracking during automatic building-up of copper and bronze in argon. The investigation was carried out on the 0kh18n10t steel in argon. It had been established, that the degree of copper penetration into the steel inceases with the increase in the time of the 0Kh18n10t steel contact with liquid copper. Liquid copper and copper base alloys have a detrimental effect on mechanical properties of the steel under external tensile load during intercontant. It is shown that in building-up of copper base alloys on the steel-0Kh18n10t, tendency of the steel to cracking decreases with increase in stiffness of a surfaced weld metal plate and with decrease in building-up energy per unit length. The causes of macrocracking in steel at building-up non-ferrous metals are explained. The technological procedures to avoid cracking are suggested

  17. The role of surface preparation in corrosion protection of copper with nanometer-thick ALD alumina coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirhashemihaghighi, Shadi; Światowska, Jolanta [PSL Research University, CNRS – Chimie ParisTech, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Maurice, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.maurice@chimie-paristech.fr [PSL Research University, CNRS – Chimie ParisTech, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Seyeux, Antoine; Klein, Lorena H. [PSL Research University, CNRS – Chimie ParisTech, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Salmi, Emma; Ritala, Mikko [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Marcus, Philippe [PSL Research University, CNRS – Chimie ParisTech, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • 10–50 nm thick alumina coatings were grown on copper by atomic layer deposition. • Surface smoothening by substrate annealing was studied as pre-deposition treatment. • Corrosion protection is promoted by pre-treatment for 10 nm but not for thicker films. • Local adhesion failure is assigned to the stresses accumulated in the thicker films. • Surface smoothening decreases the interfacial strength bearing the film stresses. - Abstract: Surface smoothening by substrate annealing was studied as a pre-treatment for improving the corrosion protection provided to copper by 10, 20 and 50 nm thick alumina coatings deposited by atomic layer deposition. The interplay between substrate surface state and deposited film thickness for controlling the corrosion protection provided by ultrathin barrier films is demonstrated. Pre-annealing at 750 °C heals out the dispersed surface heterogeneities left by electropolishing and reduces the surface roughness to less than 2 nm independently of the deposited film thickness. For 10 nm coatings, substrate surface smoothening promotes the corrosion resistance. However, for 20 and 50 nm coatings, it is detrimental to the corrosion protection due to local detachment of the deposited films. The weaker adherence of the thicker coatings is assigned to the stresses accumulated in the films with increasing deposited thickness. Healing out the local heterogeneities on the substrate surface diminishes the interfacial strength that is bearing the stresses of the deposited films, thereby increasing adhesion failure for the thicker films. Pitting corrosion occurs at the local sites of adhesion failure. Intergranular corrosion occurs at the initially well coated substrate grain boundaries because of the growth of a more defective and permeable coating at grain boundaries.

  18. Corrosion of metallic materials. Dry corrosion, aqueous corrosion and corrosion by liquid metal, methods of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, Max

    2015-01-01

    This book is based on a course on materials given in an engineering school. The author first gives an overview of metallurgy issues: metallic materials (pure metals, metallic alloys), defects of crystal lattices (point defects, linear defects or dislocations), equilibrium diagrams, steels and cast, thermal processing of steels, stainless steels, aluminium and its alloys, copper and its alloys. The second part addresses the properties and characterization of surfaces and interfaces: singularity of a metal surface, surface energy of a metal, energy of grain boundaries, adsorption at a material surface, metal-electrolyte interface, surface oxide-electrolyte interface, techniques of surface analysis. The third chapter addresses the electrochemical aspects of corrosion: description of the corrosion phenomenon, free enthalpy of a compound and free enthalpy of a reaction, case of dry corrosion (thermodynamic aspect, Ellingham diagram, oxidation mechanisms, experimental study, macroscopic modelling), case of aqueous corrosion (electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics, experimental determination of corrosion rate). The fourth part addresses the different forms of aqueous corrosion: generalized corrosion (atmospheric corrosion, mechanisms and tests), localized corrosion (galvanic, pitting, cracking, intergranular, erosion and cavitation), particular cases of stress cracking (stress corrosion, fatigue-corrosion, embrittlement by hydrogen), and bi-corrosion (of non alloyed steels, of stainless steels, and of aluminium and copper alloys). The sixth chapter addresses the struggle and the protection against aqueous corrosion: methods of prevention, scope of use of main alloys, geometry-based protection of pieces, use of corrosion inhibitors, use of organic or metallic coatings, electrochemical protection. The last chapter proposes an overview of corrosion types in industrial practices: in the automotive industry, in the oil industry, in the aircraft industry, and in the

  19. Probability density fittings of corrosion test-data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, corrosion test-data of steel-rebar in concrete were subjected to the fittings of the Normal, Gumbel and the Weibull probability distribution functions. This was done to investigate the suitability of the results of the fitted test-data, by these distributions, for modelling the effectiveness of C6H15NO3, triethanolamine ...

  20. The corrosion of copper in pure oxygen-free water; Korrosion av koppar i ren syrefritt vatten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Kenneth [SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, Boraas (Sweden)

    2012-02-15

    The overall objective of this study was to investigate whether further growth of copper oxides occurred during the 19 years the test tube with copper wires was stored at SP. Further more detailed analyzes have been added during the investigation. These assays have not only been focused on the copper wires but also the palladium closure plate, the test tube and the water in the test tube have come to be analyzed by a variety of techniques.

  1. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-08-01

    The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  2. Alternate immersion stress corrosion testing of 5083 aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.L.; Dringman, M.R.; Hausburg, D.E.; Jackson, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of Type 5083 aluminum--magnesium alloy in plate form and press-formed shapes was determined in the short transverse direction. C-ring type specimens were exposed to alternate immersion in a sodium chloride solution. The test equipment and procedure, with several innovative features, are described in detail. Statistical test results are listed for seven thermomechanical conditions. A certain processing scheme was shown to yield a work-strengthened part that is not sensitized with respect to stress corrosion cracking

  3. Alginate biopolymer as green corrosion inhibitor for copper in 1 M hydrochloric acid: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jmiai, A.; El Ibrahimi, B.; Tara, A.; El Issami, S.; Jbara, O.; Bazzi, L.

    2018-04-01

    The anti-corrosion behavior of sodium alginate (SA) on copper in the 1 M hydrochloric medium was carried out using weight loss and electrochemical measurements. The obtained results show that the inhibition increases with SA concentration and then reaches a maximum of 83% at a concentration of 0.1 mg L-1. The effect of temperature on the reactions of copper corrosion inhibition and analyzing the thermodynamic parameters revealed that the mode of adsorption has a physical nature and obeys the Langmuir isotherm. The surface morphology was performed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and atomic force microscopy. To better understand the adsorption mechanism, describing the relationship between inhibitory ability and the molecular structure of SA, quantum calculations using density functional theory were performed. Monte Carlo simulation approache was performed to know well of the relationship between the inhibition ability and molecular structure of alginate.

  4. Developing of corrosion and creep property test database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. J.; Jun, I.; Kim, J. S.; Ryu, W. S.

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion and creep characteristics database systems were constructed using the data produced from corrosion and creep test and designed to hold in common the data and programs of tensile, impact, fatigue characteristics database that was constructed since 2001 and others characteristics databases that will be constructed in future. We can easily get the basic data from the corrosion and creep characteristics database systems when we prepare the new experiment and can produce high quality result by compare the previous test result. The development part must be analysis and design more specific to construct the database and after that, we can offer the best quality to customers various requirements. In this thesis, we describe the procedure about analysis, design and development of the impact and fatigue characteristics database systems developed by internet method using jsp(Java Server pages) tool

  5. Mechanical Characterization and Corrosion Testing of X608 Al Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Catalini, David; Lavender, Curt A.; Rohatgi, Aashish

    2016-02-07

    This paper describes the mechanical characterization and corrosion testing of X608 Al alloy that is being considered for A-pillar covers for heavy-duty truck applications. Recently, PNNL developed a thermo-mechanical process to stamp A-pillar covers at room temperature using this alloy, and the full-size prototype was successfully stamped by a tier-1 supplier. This study was conducted to obtain additional important information related to the newly developed forming process, and to further improve its mechanical properties. The solutionization temperature, pre-strain and paint-bake heat-treatment were found to influence the alloy’s fabricability and mechanical properties. Natural aging effect on the formability was investigated by limiting dome height (LDH) tests. Preliminary corrosion experiments showed that the employed thermo-mechanical treatments did not significantly affect the corrosion behavior of Al X608.

  6. Corrosion inhibition of copper in neutral chloride media by a novel derivative of 1,2,4-triazole

    OpenAIRE

    Khiati, Zoulicka; Othman, A.A.; Sanchez-Moreno, M.; Bernard, Marie-Claude; Joiret, Suzanne; Sutter, Eliane; Vivier, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The efficiency of a new corrosion inhibitor, the bis-(4-amino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)-butane (BAMTB), on copper was investigated in an aerated 3% NaCl solution using various techniques. Voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to evaluate the inhibition efficiency of BAMTB. The surface layers were also characterized by Raman micro-spectroscopy and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy di...

  7. Purity test for copper-plating solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeld, F. B.

    1977-01-01

    Electrode configuration can be used to measure extent of impurities in acid-copper plating solution. It can be inserted into any plating tank and will show whether bath is clean or contaminated, within fifteen minutes.

  8. Inhibition of copper corrosion by the formation of Schiff base self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Liu, Zheng, E-mail: lisa4.6@163.com [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Han, Guo-Cheng, E-mail: hangc1981@163.com [School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Chen, Shi-Liang [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Chen, Zhencheng [School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The highest inhibition efficiency was 93.9% for CO{sub 2}-saturated simulative oilfield water. • HD2-SAMs on copper surface exhibited excellent inhibition effect at 30 °C. • The adsorption behavior of HD2-SAM followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. • The adsorption behavior of HD2-SAM is a typically chemical adsorption. - Abstract: Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 4-((2-thiophenecarboxylic acid hydrazide) methylene) benzoic acid (HD2) (denoted as HD2-SAMs) were formed on copper surface. The SAMs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Polarization curve and weight loss methods indicated that the highest inhibition efficiency was 93.9% for CO{sub 2}-saturated simulative oilfield water at a self-assembled time of 3 h. Potential-time curve, electrochemical impedance tests showed that HD2-SAMs on copper surface exhibited excellent inhibition effect at 30 °C. The adsorption behavior of HD2-SAMs on the copper surface followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, which was indicative of typically chemical adsorption. Quantum chemistry calculation showed that O and N atoms can interact with Cu atoms by coordination bonds which were the mainly active area of the adsorption of HD2 molecules.

  9. Inhibition effect of 4-amino-antipyrine on the corrosion of copper in 3 wt.% NaCl solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong Song; Chen Wen; Luo Hongqun [Key Laboratory of Eco-environments in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (Ministry of Education), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Li Nianbing, E-mail: linb@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Eco-environments in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (Ministry of Education), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-Amino-antipyrine (AAP) has inhibition behaviour for copper corrosion in 3.0 wt.% NaCl. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AAP acted as a mixed-type inhibitor with anodic predominance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption of AAP on the copper surface obeys the Langmuir isotherm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum chemical calculations were applied to explain the experimental results. - Abstract: The effect of 4-amino-antipyrine (AAP) on the corrosion of copper in 3.0 wt.% NaCl was investigated using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarisation, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results revealed that AAP acts as a mixed-type inhibitor with more pronounced effect on anodic domain and the inhibition efficiency decreases with increasing the temperature. The adsorption of AAP was found to obey the Langmuir isotherm. Surface characterisation was performed using scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Quantum chemical calculations show that AAP has large negative charge in nitrogen and oxygen atoms, which facilitates the adsorption of AAP on the copper surface.

  10. Experimental Investigation of the Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Welded AZ61A Magnesium Alloy Welds under Salt Spray Corrosion Test and Galvanic Corrosion Test Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dhanapal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extruded Mg alloy plates of 6 mm thick of AZ61A grade were butt welded using advanced welding process and friction stir welding (FSW processes. The specimens were exposed to salt spray conditions and immersion conditions to characterize their corrosion rates on the effect of pH value, chloride ion concentration, and corrosion time. In addition, an attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the corrosion rate of FSW welds in salt spray corrosion test and galvanic corrosion test using design of experiments. The corrosion morphology and the pit morphology were analyzed by optical microscopy, and the corrosion products were examined using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis. From this research work, it is found that, in both corrosion tests, the corrosion rate decreases with the increase in pH value, the decrease in chloride ion concentration, and a higher corrosion time. The results show the usage of the magnesium alloy for best environments and suitable applications from the aforementioned conditions. Also, it is found that AZ61A magnesium alloy welds possess low-corrosion rate and higher-corrosion resistance in the galvanic corrosion test than in the salt spray corrosion test.

  11. Comparative Stress Corrosion Cracking and General Corrosion Resistance of Annealed and Hardened 440 C Stainless Steel - New Techniques in Stress Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendreck, M. J.; Hurless, B. E.; Torres, P. D.; Danford, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) characteristics of annealed and hardened 440C stainless steel were evaluated in high humidity and 3.5-percent NaCl solution. Corrosion testing consisted of an evaluation of flat plates, with and without grease, in high humidity, as well as electrochemical testing in 3.5-percent NaCl. Stress corrosion testing consisted of conventional, constant strain, smooth bar testing in high humidity in addition to two relatively new techniques under evaluation at MSFC. These techniques involve either incremental or constant rate increases in the load applied to a precracked SE(B) specimen, monitoring the crack-opening-displacement response for indications of crack growth. The electrochemical corrosion testing demonstrated an order of magnitude greater general corrosion rate in the annealed 440C. All techniques for stress corrosion testing showed substantially better SCC resistance in the annealed material. The efficacy of the new techniques for stress corrosion testing was demonstrated both by the savings in time and the ability to better quantify SCC data.

  12. Facile fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with excellent mechanical abrasion and corrosion resistance on copper substrate by a novel method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fenghua; Yao, Kai

    2014-06-11

    A novel method for controllable fabrication of a superhydrophobic surface with a water contact angle of 162 ± 1° and a sliding angle of 3 ± 0.5° on copper substrate is reported in this Research Article. The facile and low-cost fabrication process is composed from the electrodeposition in traditional Watts bath and the heat-treatment in the presence of (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetradecyl) triethoxysilane (AC-FAS). The superhydrophobicity of the fabricated surface results from its pine-cone-like hierarchical micro-nanostructure and the assembly of low-surface-energy fluorinated components on it. The superhydrophobic surface exhibits high microhardness and excellent mechanical abrasion resistance because it maintains superhydrophobicity after mechanical abrasion against 800 grit SiC sandpaper for 1.0 m at the applied pressure of 4.80 kPa. Moreover, the superhydrophobic surface has good chemical stability in both acidic and alkaline environments. The potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy test shows that the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface has excellent corrosion resistance that can provide effective protection for the bare Cu substrate. In addition, the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface has self-cleaning ability. It is believed that the facile and low-cost method offer an effective strategy and promising industrial applications for fabricating superhydrophobic surfaces on various metallic materials.

  13. How copper corrosion can be retarded--New ways investigating a chronic problem for cellulose in paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyujin; Hofmann, Christa; Horsky, Monika; Potthast, Antje

    2015-12-10

    To better assess the stabilization effects of chemical treatments on Cu(II)-catalyzed cellulose degradation, we developed Cu(II)-containing model rag paper with typical copper corrosion characteristics using e-beam radiation. The paper can be prepared homogeneously and quickly compared to tedious pre-aging methods. Using the Cu(II)-containing model rag paper, the stabilization effects of various chemicals on Cu(II)-catalyzed degradation of cellulose were tested. Benzotriazol was highly effective in retarding the degradation of the Cu(II)-containing model rag paper under hot and humid aging condition, as well as under photo-oxidative stress. Tetrabutylammonium bromide reduced Cu(II)-catalyzed degradation of cellulose, but its efficacy was dependent on the accelerated aging conditions. The results with the alkaline treatments and gelatin treatment suggested that their roles in the degradation mechanisms of cellulose in the presence of Cu(II) differ from those of benzotriazol and tetrabutylammonium bromide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An update of the state-of-the-art report on the corrosion of copper under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada)); Lilja, Christina (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (Sweden)); Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden)); Pitkaenen, Petteri; Vaehaenen, Marjut (Posiva Oy (Finland))

    2010-12-15

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 30 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear waste repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical and microbiological conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion during the operational phase and in the bentonite prior to saturation of the buffer by groundwater, general and localised corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. This report is an updated version of that originally published in 2001/2002. The original material has been supplemented by information from studies carried out over the last decade. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid

  15. An update of the state-of-the-art report on the corrosion of copper under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F. [Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada); Lilja, C. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Pedersen, K. [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Molnlycke (Sweden); Pitkaenen, P.; Vaehaenen, M.

    2012-07-15

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 30 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear waste repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical and microbiological conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion during the operational phase and in the bentonite prior to saturation of the buffer by groundwater, general and localised corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. This report is an updated version of that originally published in 2001/2002. The original material has been supplemented by information from studies carried out over the last decade. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid. (orig.)

  16. An update of the state-of-the-art report on the corrosion of copper under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Fraser; Lilja, Christina; Pedersen, Karsten; Pitkaenen, Petteri; Vaehaenen, Marjut

    2010-12-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 30 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear waste repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical and microbiological conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion during the operational phase and in the bentonite prior to saturation of the buffer by groundwater, general and localised corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. This report is an updated version of that originally published in 2001/2002. The original material has been supplemented by information from studies carried out over the last decade. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid

  17. An update of the state-of-the-art report on the corrosion of copper under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Lilja, C.; Pedersen, K.; Pitkaenen, P.; Vaehaenen, M.

    2012-07-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 30 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear waste repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical and microbiological conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion during the operational phase and in the bentonite prior to saturation of the buffer by groundwater, general and localised corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. This report is an updated version of that originally published in 2001/2002. The original material has been supplemented by information from studies carried out over the last decade. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid. (orig.)

  18. Durability Tests of a Fiber Optic Corrosion Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher K.Y. Leung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Steel corrosion is a major cause of degradation in reinforced concrete structures, and there is a need to develop cost-effective methods to detect the initiation of corrosion in such structures. This paper presents a low cost, easy to use fiber optic corrosion sensor for practical application. Thin iron film is deposited on the end surface of a cleaved optical fiber by sputtering. When light is sent into the fiber, most of it is reflected by the coating. If the surrounding environment is corrosive, the film is corroded and the intensity of the reflected signal drops significantly. In previous work, the sensing principle was verified by various experiments in laboratory and a packaging method was introduced. In this paper, the method of multiplexing several sensors by optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR and optical splitter is introduced, together with the interpretation of OTDR results. The practical applicability of the proposed sensors is demonstrated in a three-year field trial with the sensors installed in an aggressive marine environment. The durability of the sensor against chemical degradation and physical degradation is also verified by accelerated life test and freeze-thaw cycling test, respectively.

  19. Effects of copper and titanium on the corrosion behavior of newly fabricated nanocrystalline aluminum in natural seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, El-Sayed M.; Ammar, Hany Rizk; Khalil, Khalil Abdelrazek

    2014-05-01

    Fabrication of a newly nanocrystalline Al and two of its alloys, namely Al-10%Cu; and Al-10%Cu-5%Ti has been carried out using mechanical alloying (MA) technique. The corrosion behavior of these materials in aerated stagnant Arabian Gulf seawater (AGSW) at room temperature has been reported. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP), chronoamperometric current-time (CCT) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive (EDX) investigations were employed to report the corrosion behavior of the fabricated materials. All results indicated that Al suffers both uniform and localized corrosion in the AGSW test solution. The presence of 10%Cu decreases the corrosion current density, the anodic and cathodic currents and corrosion rate and increases the corrosion resistance of Al. The addition of 5%Ti to the Al-10%Cu alloy produced further decreases in the corrosion parameters. Measurements together confirmed that the corrosion of the fabricated materials in AGSW decreases in the order Al > Al-10%Cu > Al-10%Cu-5%Ti.

  20. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a non-destructive test method to monitor the development of corrosion products as well as the corrosion-induced formation and propagation of cracks in cementitious materials. A parametric experimental investigation (utilizing x-ray attenuation measurement technique...

  1. Corrosion of copper containers prior to saturation of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Kolar, M.

    1997-12-01

    The buffer material surrounding the containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault will partially desiccate as a result of the elevated temperature at the container surface. This will lead to a period of corrosion in a moist air atmosphere. Corrosion will either take the form of slow oxidation if the container surface remains dry or aqueous electrochemical corrosion if the surface is wetted by a thin liquid film. The relevant literature is reviewed, from which it is concluded that corrosion should be uniform in nature, except if the surface is wetted, in which case localized corrosion is a possibility. A quantitative analysis of the extent and rate of uniform corrosion during the unsaturated period is presented. Two bounding cases are considered: first, the case of slow oxidation in moist air following either logarithmic or parabolic oxide-growth kinetics and, second, the case of electrochemically based corrosion occurring in a thin liquid film uninhibited by the growth of corrosion products. (author)

  2. Standard test method for determining susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of 2XXX and 7XXX Aluminum alloy products

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1998-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a uniform procedure for characterizing the resistance to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of high-strength aluminum alloy wrought products for the guidance of those who perform stress-corrosion tests, for those who prepare stress-corrosion specifications, and for materials engineers. 1.2 This test method covers method of sampling, type of specimen, specimen preparation, test environment, and method of exposure for determining the susceptibility to SCC of 2XXX (with 1.8 to 7.0 % copper) and 7XXX (with 0.4 to 2.8 % copper) aluminum alloy products, particularly when stressed in the short-transverse direction relative to the grain structure. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The inch-pound units in parentheses are provided for information. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and de...

  3. Mechanisms and energetics of surface reactions at the copper-water interface. A critical literature review with implications for the debate on corrosion of copper in anoxic water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Adam Johannes; Brinck, Tore [Applied Physical Chemistry, KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    In order to make a critical analysis of the discussion of corrosion of copper in pure anoxic water it is necessary to understand the chemical reactivity at the copper-water interface. Even though the most fundamental issue, i.e. the nature and existence of a hypothetical product that is thermodynamically stable, is still under debate, it is clear that if anoxic corrosion really exists, it must be initiated through oxidative surface reactions at the copper-water interface. This report presents a survey of the peer reviewed literature on the reactivity of copper surfaces in water. Reactions discussed involve molecular adsorption of water, dissociation of the OH-bonds in adsorbed water molecules and hydroxyl groups, the disproportionation/synproportionation equilibrium between hydroxyl groups/hydroxide ions, water molecules and atomic oxygen, the surface diffusion of adsorbed species, and the formation of hydrogen gas (molecular hydrogen). Experimental, as well as theoretical (quantum chemical) studies are reviewed. It is concluded that a limited amount of hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) should be formed as the result of dissociative water adsorption at certain copper surfaces. Quantitative estimates of the amounts of H2 that could form at the copper-water interface are made. Assuming that the water-cleavage/hydrogen-formation reaction proceeds on an ideal [110] or [100] surface until a hydroxyl monolayer (ML) is reached, the amount of H{sub 2} formed is {approx} 2.4 ng cm{sup -2} copper surface. Based on the literature cited, this is most likely possible, thermodynamically as well as kinetically. Although not proven, it is not unlikely that the reaction can proceed until an oxide ML is formed, which would give 4.8 ng cm{sup -2}. If the formation of an oxide ML is thermodynamically feasible the surface will probably react further, since Cu{sub 2}O(s) is known to activate and cleave the water molecule when it adsorbs at the Cu{sub 2}O(s) surface. Assuming the formation of a

  4. Durable Corrosion Resistance of Copper Due to Multi-Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Tiwari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-thin graphene coating has been reported to provide considerable resistance against corrosion during short-term exposures, however, there is great variability in the corrosion resistance due to graphene coating in different studies. It may be possible to overcome the problem of hampered corrosion protection ability of graphene that is caused due to defective single layer graphene by applying multilayer graphene. Systematic electrochemical characterization showed that the multilayer graphene coating developed in the study provided significant corrosion resistance in a chloride solution and the corrosion resistance was sustained for long durations (~400 h, which is attributed to the multilayer graphene.

  5. Corrosion processes of austenitic stainless steels and copper-based materials in gamma-irradiated aqueous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    The US Department of Energy is evaluating a site located at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, as a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The rock at the proposed repository horizon (above the water table) is densely welded, devitrified tuff, and the fluid environment in the repository is expected to be primarily air-steam. A more severe environment would be present in the unlikely case of intrusion of vadose groundwater into the repository site. For this repository location, austenitic stainless steels and copper-based materials are under consideration for waste container fabrication. This study focuses on the effects of gamma irradiation on the electrochemical mechanisms of corrosion for the prospective waste container materials. The radiolytic production of such species as hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid are shown to exert an influence on corrosion mechanisms and kinetics

  6. Erosion-corrosion resistance of engineering materials in various test conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rajahram, S.S; Harvey, T.J.; Wood, R.J.K.

    2009-01-01

    Erosion–corrosion is a complex phenomenon which involves the interaction between the mechanical processes of solid particle erosion and the electrochemical processes of corrosion. A whole range of issues is faced by a designer when trying to obtain relevant information on erosion–corrosion performance of a material. Amongst the constraints are the dispersed test conditions and test rigs available in the literature making comparisons and quantifying erosion–corrosion wear rates of different ma...

  7. The Impact of Water Quality, Corrosion Inhibitors and Plumbing Age on Copper Release in Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) in 1991, which established a copper action level of 1.3 mg/L in the consumers’ tap water. As a result, researchers have examined the effects of water chemistry on the solubility of copper to esta...

  8. Automated corrosion fatigue crack growth testing in pressurized water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceschini, L.J.; Liaw, P.K.; Rudd, G.E.; Logsdon, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes in detail a novel approach to construct a test facility for developing corrosion fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties in aggressive environments. The environment studied is that of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) at 288 0 C (550 0 F) and 13.8 MPa (200 psig). To expedite data generation, each chamber was designed to accommodate two test specimens. A common water recirculation and pressurization system was employed to service two test chambers. Thus, four fatigue crack propagation rate tests could be conducted simultaneously in the pressurized water environment. The data analysis was automated to minimize the typically high labor costs associated with corrosion fatigue crack propagation testing. Verification FCGR tests conducted on an ASTM A469 rotor steel in a room temperature air environment as well as actual PWR environment FCGR tests performed on an ASTM A533 Grade B Class 2 pressure vessel steel demonstrated that the dual specimen test facility is an excellent system for developing the FCGR properties of materials in adverse environments

  9. Study of the Effect of Sulfide Ions on the Corrosion Resistance of Copper for Use in Containers for High Level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbal Espinoza, Andrea Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    The work 'Study of sulfide ion on Resisting Copper Corrosion' is part of the project 'Study of Copper Corrosion in Underground Water Solution in Reducer Conditions', which the Department of Nuclear Materials, Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission is carrying out. These activities are important because of this metal's potential applications for handling and controlling contaminating wastes that are a product of using nuclear energy in electric generation. Copper has important mechanical properties and is also resistant to disintegration in corrosive environments, which is an important condition for its use in manufacturing of high level radioactive waste containers. This work is based on a study of cyclic volta metric curves, anodic and cathodic polarization and potentiostatic measurements, with which the potential range, sweep speed system, electrochemical reactions involved and corrosion speed could be defined. The microstructural characterization of the films was done by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and the chemical composition and surface contamination of the film were studied by photoelectron spectroscopy induced by X- rays (XPS), and the crystalline structure by X- ray Diffraction (XRD). Some noticeable results, such as low potentials (less than .7 V, in cathode direction) and high concentrations of sulfur make the formation of copper sulfides (I) and (II) possible; unlike the potential over .6 V, in anodic direction, where copper oxides (I) and (II) are formed, but they are inhibited by high sulfur concentrations. The morphological study of the copper surface has shown that the film that forms is more abundant and granular at higher cathodic potentials, forming small pits on the surface. The effect of the presence of sulfur ions is minimal, and the metal's deterioration is inhibited by other ions in the groundwater. The corrosion rate is greater as the sulfur concentration rises, and a time period of 20,000 years can be predicted for the total corrosion of

  10. Electrochemical techniques implementation for corrosion rate measurement in function of humidity level in grounding systems (copper and stainless steel) in soil samples from Tunja (Colombia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Y.; Guerrero, L.; Blanco, J.; Jimenez, C.; Vera-Monroy, S. P.; Mejía-Camacho, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, DC electrochemical techniques were used to determine the corrosion rate of copper and stainless-steel electrodes used in grounding, varying the level of humidity, in sandy loam and clay loam soils. The maximum corrosion potentials were: for copper -211 and -236mV and for stainless steel of -252 and -281mV, in sandy loam and clay loam respectively, showing that in sandy loam the values are higher, about 30mV. The mechanism by which steel controls corrosion is by diffusion, whereas in copper it is carried out by transfer of mass and charge, which affects the rate of corrosion, which in copper reached a maximum value of 5mm/yr and in Steel 0.8mm/yr, determined by Tafel approximations. The behaviour of the corrosion rate was mathematically adjusted to an asymptotic model that faithfully explains the C.R. as a function of humidity, however, it is necessary to define the relation between the factor □ established in the model and the precise characteristics of the soil, such as the permeability or quantity of ions present.

  11. 21 CFR 862.1190 - Copper test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copper test system. 862.1190 Section 862.1190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1190...

  12. Thermal cycling tests of actively cooled beryllium copper joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Linke, J.; Schuster, A.; Wiechers, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    Screening tests (steady state heating) and thermal fatigue tests with several kinds of beryllium-copper joints have been performed in an electron beam facility. Joining techniques under investigation were brazing with silver containing and silver-free braze materials, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and diffusion bonding (hot pressing). Best thermal fatigue performance was found for the brazed samples. (author)

  13. Structural state and geometric representation of a laser-welded joint between corrosion-resistant steel and titanium alloy with copper insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michurov, N. S.; Veretennikova, I. A.; Pugacheva, N. B.; Smirnova, E. O.

    2017-12-01

    The paper shows a characteristic structure of a welded joint between titanium alloy and corrosion-resistant steel, with a copper insert, produced by carbon dioxide laser welding. In the formation of the joint, the materials being welded are dissolved and mixed in the copper interlayer. The material of the welded joint is an oversaturated solid solution of Fe, Ni, Cr and Ti in the copper lattice with distributed TiFe, Ti(Fe, Cr)2 and CuTi2 intermetallic particles. A 10-150 µm thick diffusion zone with an altered chemical composition appears at the boundary with the steel, and a 50- 100 µm thick zone of the kind is formed at the boundary with the titanium alloy. The phase composition is determined and recrystallization maps at the boundaries of the welded joint are obtained. A geometric representation of a laser welded joint between titanium alloy and corrosion-resistant steel with a copper insert is constructed.

  14. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing - Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of metals to predict service life of metal-based structures in corrosive environments has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions similar to those of the corrosive environment. Their reliability to correlate to atmospheric exposure test results is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated corrosion testing has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long-term service life of a metal, despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard, and their use is crucial, a method that correlates timescales from accelerated testing to atmospheric exposure would be very valuable. This paper presents work that began with the characterization of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Beachside Corrosion Test Site. The chemical changes that occur on low carbon steel, during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions, were investigated using surface chemistry analytical methods. The corrosion rates and behaviors of panels subjected to long-term and accelerated corrosion conditions, involving neutral salt fog and alternating seawater spray, were compared to identify possible timescale correlations between accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The results, as well as preliminary findings on the correlation investigation, are presented.

  15. LIQUID AIR INTERFACE CORROSION TESTING FOR FY2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the corrosivity to carbon steel of the liquid-air interface of dilute simulated radioactive waste solutions. Open-circuit potentials were measured on ASTM A537 carbon steel specimens located slightly above, at, and below the liquid-air interface of simulated waste solutions. The 0.12-inch-diameter specimens used in the study were sized to respond to the assumed distinctive chemical environment of the liquid-air interface, where localized corrosion in poorly inhibited solutions may frequently be observed. The practical inhibition of such localized corrosion in liquid radioactive waste storage tanks is based on empirical testing and a model of a liquid-air interface environment that is made more corrosive than the underlying bulk liquid due to chemical changes brought about by absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide. The chemical changes were assumed to create a more corrosive open-circuit potential in carbon in contact with the liquid-air interface. Arrays of 4 small specimens spaced about 0.3 in. apart were partially immersed so that one specimen contacted the top of the meniscus of the test solution. Two specimens contacted the bulk liquid below the meniscus and one specimen was positioned in the vapor space above the meniscus. Measurements were carried out for up to 16 hours to ensure steady-state had been obtained. The results showed that there was no significant difference in open-circuit potentials between the meniscus-contact specimens and the bulk-liquid-contact specimens. With the measurement technique employed, no difference was detected between the electrochemical conditions of the meniscus versus the bulk liquid. Stable open-circuit potentials were measured on the specimen located in the vapor space above the meniscus, showing that there existed an electrochemical connection through a thin film of solution extending up from the meniscus. This observation supports the Hobbs-Wallace model of the development

  16. Corrosion Protection of Copper Using Al2O3, TiO2, ZnO, HfO2, and ZrO2Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubert, James S; Hill, Grant T; Gotsch, Hannah N; Gremaud, Antoine P; Ovental, Jennifer S; Williams, Philip S; Oldham, Christopher J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2017-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a viable means to add corrosion protection to copper metal. Ultrathin films of Al 2 O 3 , TiO 2 , ZnO, HfO 2 , and ZrO 2 were deposited on copper metal using ALD, and their corrosion protection properties were measured using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). Analysis of ∼50 nm thick films of each metal oxide demonstrated low electrochemical porosity and provided enhanced corrosion protection from aqueous NaCl solution. The surface pretreatment and roughness was found to affect the extent of the corrosion protection. Films of Al 2 O 3 or HfO 2 provided the highest level of initial corrosion protection, but films of HfO 2 exhibited the best coating quality after extended exposure. This is the first reported instance of using ultrathin films of HfO 2 or ZrO 2 produced with ALD for corrosion protection, and both are promising materials for corrosion protection.

  17. Burst tests on pipeline containing short uniform depth corrosion defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, Adilson C. [PETROBRAS R and D Center, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freire, Jose Luiz de F.; Domingues, Ronaldo D.; Diniz, Jorge L.C. [Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper the burst tests of three tubular specimens are presented. In these tests the tubular specimens were loaded with internal pressure only. The specimens were cut from a longitudinal welded tube made of API 5L X80 steel with a nominal outside diameter of 457.2 mm (18 in) and a nominal wall thickness of 7.93 mm (0.312 in). Each of the three specimens had one external short uniform depth corrosion defect, machined using spark erosion. Measurements were carried out in order to determine the actual dimensions of each tubular specimen and its respective defect. Tensile specimens and impact test specimens were tested to determine material properties. The failure pressures measured in the laboratory tests are compared with those predicted by four assessments methods, namely: the ASME B31G method, the RSTRENG 085dL method, the DNV RP-F101 method for single defects and the RPA method. (author)

  18. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm by a copper-bearing 317L-Cu stainless steel and its corrosion resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Da; Xu, Dake; Yang, Chunguang; Chen, Jia; Shahzad, M Babar; Sun, Ziqing; Zhao, Jinlong; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke; Wang, Guixue

    2016-12-01

    The present study investigated the antibacterial performance, corrosion resistance and surface properties of antibacterial austenitic 317L-Cu stainless steel (317L-Cu SS). After 4.5wt% copper was added to 317L stainless steel (317L SS), the new alloy underwent solid solution and aging heat treatment. Fluorescent staining using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) revealed that the 317L-Cu SS showed strong antibacterial efficacy, achieving a 99% inhibition rate of sessile Staphylococcus aureus cells after 5days. The corrosion data obtained by potentiodynamic polarization curves indicated that in comparison with 317L SS, the pitting potential and corrosion current density of 317L-Cu slightly decreased due to the addition of Cu. The 317L-Cu SS exhibited no cytotoxicity against zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The experimental results in this study demonstrated that the new alloy has potential applications in medical and daily uses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Nondestructive testing diagnosis for corrosion and welding by means of hydrostatic test and gamma ray tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Alex E.; Dantas, Carlos C.; Nery, Marcelo S.; Barbosa, Jose Maria A.; Rolim, Tiago L.; Melo, Silvio B.; Lima, Emerson A.O., E-mail: alex.emoura@ufpe.be, E-mail: ccd@ufpe.br, E-mail: tlr@ufpe.br, E-mail: sbm@ufpe.br, E-mail: eal@poli.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Diagnoses of light and severe corrosion process in steel tubes are carried out and results are presented. The material discontinuity in metallic pieces was investigated and signals from gamma source detection shown defect present or no defect present. Samples taken from street illumination posts were placed in computerized gamma ray scan to investigate corrosion effect. Scanning at three angles 0 deg, 60 deg and 120 deg degrees with five repetitions provide data set sufficient to a statistical analysis. Samples taken from small diameter steel tubes with light corrosion were analyzed too. Comparing corrosion-free samples detection of transmission gamma ray shows that along with diameter reduction a random density distribution takes place with severe corrosive process. The asymmetry induced in sample density provided to be effective for diagnosis of light corrosion by means of straight-line slope obtained in gamma profile. Structural integrity of steel pipes affected by welding process and defect propagation due to Hydrostatic Testing - HT was simulated by numerical finite element method and data comparison with experimental gamma tomography was carried out. Samples of pipes with preexisting defect on the welding region were submitted to hydrostatic tests over working pressure and a correlation between defect degree and structural resistance was evaluated. (author)

  20. Testing of intergranular and pitting corrosion in sensitized welded joints of austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bore V. Jegdic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pitting corrosion resistance and intergranular corrosion of the austenitic stainless steel X5Cr Ni18-10 were tested on the base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal. Testing of pitting corrosion was performed by the potentiodynamic polarization method, while testing of intergranular corrosion was performed by the method of electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation with double loop. The base metal was completely resistant to intergranular corrosion, while the heat affected zone showed a slight susceptibility to intergranular corrosion. Indicators of pitting corrosion resistance for the weld metal and the base metal were very similar, but their values are significantly higher than the values for the heat affected zone. This was caused by reduction of the chromium concentration in the grain boundary areas in the heat affected zone, even though the carbon content in the examined stainless steel is low (0.04 wt. % C.

  1. Mechanisms of Copper Corrosion in Aqueous Environments. A report from the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste's scientific workshop, on November 16, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    In 2010 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKB, plans to submit its license application for the final repository of spent nuclear fuel. The proposed method is the so-called KBS-3 method and implies placing the spent nuclear fuel in copper canisters, surrounded by a buffer of bentonite clay, at 500 m depth in the bedrock. The site selected by SKB to host the repository is located in the municipality of Oesthammar on the Swedish east coast. The copper canister plays a key role in the design of the repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. The long-term physical and chemical stability of copper in aqueous environments is fundamental for the safety evolution of the proposed disposal concept. However, the corrosion resistance of copper has been questioned by results obtained under anoxic conditions in aqueous solution. These observations caused some head-lines in the Swedish newspapers as well as public and political concerns. Consequently, the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste organized a scientific workshop on the issue 'Mechanisms of Copper Corrosion in Aqueous Environments'. The purpose of the workshop was to address the fundamental understanding of the corrosion characteristics of copper regarding oxygen-free environments, and to identify what additional information is needed to assess the validity of the proposed corrosion mechanism and its implication on the containment of spent nuclear fuel in a copper canister. This seminar report is based on the presentations and discussions at the workshop. It also includes written statements by the members of the expert panel

  2. Standard test method for measuring pH of soil for use in corrosion testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1995-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the pH of a soil in corrosion testing. The principle use of the test is to supplement soil resistivity measurements and thereby identify conditions under which the corrosion of metals in soil may be accentuated (see G 57 - 78 (1984)). 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  3. Development of an Accelerated Test Method for the Determination of Susceptibility to Atmospheric Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical rationale is presented for use of a repetitive cyclic current reversal voltammetric technique for characterization of localized corrosion processes, including atmospheric corrosion. Applicability of this proposed experimental protocol is applied to characterization of susceptibility to crevice and pitting corrosion, atmospheric corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Criteria upon which relative susceptibility is based were determined and tested using two iron based alloys commonly in use at NASA-Kennedy; A36 (a low carbon steel) and 4130 (a low alloy steel). Practicality of the procedure was demonstrated by measuring changes in anodic polarization behavior during high frequency current reversal cycles of 25 cycles per second with 1 mA/sq cm current density amplitude in solutions containing Cl anions. The results demonstrated that, due to excessive polarization which affects conductivity of barrier corrosion product layers, A36 was less resistant to atmospheric corrosion than its 4130 counterpart; behavior which was also demonstrated during exposure tests.

  4. Corrosion Behavior of Pure Copper Surrounded by Hank's Physiological Electrolyte at 310 K (37 °C) as a Potential Biomaterial for Contraception: An Analogy Drawn Between Micro- and Nano-grained Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah-alhosseini, Arash; Imantalab, Omid; Vafaeian, Saeed; Ansari, Ghazaleh

    2017-08-01

    This work aims to evaluate the corrosion behavior of pure copper from the microstructural viewpoint for a biomedical application, namely intrauterine devices. For this purpose, Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques were used to evaluate the corrosion behavior of annealed pure copper (with the average grain size of 45 ± 1 µm) and nano-grained microstructure in physiological electrolyte of Hank at 310 K (37 °C). Pure copper in nanoscale grain size, typically an average of 90 ± 5 nm, was successfully made by eight-cycle accumulative roll bonding process at room temperature. On the basis of Tafel polarization results, it was revealed that nano-grained sample had lower corrosion current density and more noble corrosion potential for prolonged exposure in Hank's physiological solution at 310 K (37 °C). In addition, the EIS results showed that the nano-grained sample had more corrosion resistance compared to the coarse-grained one for long-time immersion.

  5. Modification and upgradation of corrosion fatigue testing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, A.; Qamar, R.

    2006-08-01

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and Corrosion Fatigue (CF) are important tests which are performed to check the integrity of structural materials operating in different environments, such as nuclear power system, steam and gas turbines, aircraft marine structure, pipelines and bridges. To establish the environmental testing facility on laboratory scale, NMD acquired a computerized (286 Based PC) electromechanical testing machine from M/S CorTest, USA. This machine was commissioned at NMD in 1989. Since then it has been utilized to test and qualify the materials provided by different establishments of PAEC for SCC and CF behavior. However, in October 2004, computer attached to the machine was corrupted and became out of order. Users were handicapped because there was no any alternate system i.e. Manual control tower to operate the machine. Then users approached to Computer Division to investigate the malfunctioning at the computer. Therefore, upon complete checkup of system, it was diagnosed that there was a serious problem in the hard disk and mother board of the computer. Much difficulty was faced in retrieving the application software from the obsolete 286 computer system. Then the basic aim was to replace the old computer with Pentium System. But with Pentium system application software was not working. Since we have already recovered full application software package including source programs, so all the seventeen programs has been thoroughly studied. Four programs had to be modified according to the new hardware. Now the new Pentium system with modified software has been interfaced with the machine. Machine was tested for the both types of above mentioned tests and compared with previous results. The performance of machine was confirmed satisfactory on the new setup. (author)

  6. Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Hernan E.

    The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

  7. Short-term corrosion probe testing; Korrosionsprovning med korttidsexponerade sondprovet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegberg, Jan [Vattenfall utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    2003-05-01

    A novel method for corrosion testing with short-term exposure of corrosion samples has been evaluated by trials in boilers fired fully or partly with biofuels. Sample rings of steels SS2216 and X20 were exposed in varying flue gas environments in the superheater region at the Idbaecken plant (Nykoeping) and the Sandvik 2 plant (Vaexjoe) under varying exposure times (12, 48 and 336 hours) and at three different material temperatures (400, 500 and 600 deg C). A longer trial was also performed at Idbaecken with one constant regulating temperature (500 deg C) and exposure times from 2 weeks up till 9 weeks. The thickness was measured before and after exposure in fixed positions. The rings were weighed and deposits were analysed in order to record the environment next to the corrosion samples. The method was able to detect differences in materials loss between the different samples. Increasing temperature and time gave as expected increasing materials loss. Because of widely varying weather conditions during the firing season the variations in load has from time to time had a larger effect on the flue gas composition than the additives that were injected to make the flue gas less aggressive. This has made the results from the exposures with and without additive more difficult to interpret but the dependence of the boiler load is clear. At exposure times shorter than two weeks (and at 400 deg C also at two weeks) the response in materials loss is less clear, negative values of materials loss occur, indicating that the limit of resolution is reached. The measured metal losses should be 15-20 gm or larger. The Vaexjoe samples show higher materials loss for the shorter exposure times than the ldbaecken samples, in spite of the less aggressive fuel in Vaexjoe. This is explained by a higher flue gas temperature at the testing position in the Vaexjoe plant. A higher temperature means a higher corrosion rate, but also higher vapour pressure for alkali chlorides. The highest

  8. Quick corrosion cracking test methods for high strength stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurnich, L.Ya.; Shubadeeva, L.I.; Erofeeva, V.L.; Lashchevskij, V.B.

    1994-01-01

    Quicks method for testing high strength stainless steels during 10h under atmospheric and sea conditions has been developed. It is shown that (NH 4 ) 2 Se 2 O 8 - 13.5+-1 g/l, NaCl - 40+-2g/l, H 2 SO 4 -5g/l solution at 50+-2 C temperature is recommended for quick tests for tendency to corrosion cracking during. Development of steels and technologies of their treatment. Tests of steels of 08Kh15N5D2T, 07Kh16N6, 20Kh13, 40Kh13, 13Kh15N4AMD and other types can be performed in boiling solutions: H 2 SO 4 (55 ml/l)+CuSO 4 (110 g/l) or MgCl 2 (200 g/l hexahydrate)

  9. Standard practice for conducting atmospheric corrosion tests on metals

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers and defines conditions for exposure of metals and alloys to the weather. It sets forth the general procedures that should be followed in any atmospheric test. It is presented as an aid in conducting atmospheric corrosion tests so that some of the pitfalls of such testing may be avoided. As such, it is concerned mainly with panel exposures to obtain data for comparison purposes. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of whoever uses this standard to consult and establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  10. Corrosion protection ability of self-assembled monolayer of 3-amino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole on copper electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkumar, Ganesan; Sethuraman, Mathur Gopalakrishnan, E-mail: mgsethu@rediffmail.com

    2014-07-01

    The self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 3-amino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole (AMTa) was formed on a copper surface and characterized using cyclic voltammetry, Fourier Transform Infra-red spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Quantum chemical calculations suggested the stronger interaction between AMTa and copper. The protection ability of SAM has been evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The formed monolayer showed significant protection ability in 1% NaCl medium. The enhanced corrosion protection ability could be due to the compact film structure which blocks the electron transfer from the solution to AMTa monolayer modified copper substrate. - Highlights: • Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of AMTa has been achieved on copper surface. • Monolayer formed has been duly characterized. • SAM of AMTa has been shown to offer significant protection to copper in NaCl medium.

  11. Demonstration through EPR tests of the sensitivity of austeno-ferritic steels to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Nathalie

    1997-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels can be sensitised to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under some conditions (heat treatments, welding). The aim of this work is to contribute to the validation of the EPR (Electrochemical Potentiodynamic Reactivation) test in order to determine conditions for normalisation. This method, based on the dissolution of chromium depleted areas due to precipitation of σ-phase, provides a degree of sensitisation to intergranular corrosion. The test is broaden considering the mechanical stress by the way of slow strain rate tests, performed in chloride magnesium and in a solution similar to the EPR solution. A metallurgical study puts on the precipitates and the structural modifications due to welding and heat treatments, in order to make a critical analysis of the EPR test. (author) [fr

  12. Intergranular corrosion testing of austenitic stainless steels in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whillock, G.O.H.; Dunnett, B. F. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, BNFL, B170, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    In hot strong nitric acid solutions, stainless steels exhibit intergranular corrosion. Corrosion rates are often measured from immersion testing of specimens manufactured from the relevant material (e.g. plate or pipe). The corrosion rates, measured from weight loss, are found to increase with time prior to reaching steady state, which can take thousands of hours to achieve. The apparent increase in corrosion rate as a function of time was found to be an artefact due to the surface area of the specimen's being used in the corrosion rate calculations, rather than that of the true area undergoing active corrosion i.e. the grain boundaries. The steady state corrosion rate coincided with the onset of stable grain dropping, where the use of the surface area of the specimen to convert the weight loss measurements to corrosion rates was found to be appropriate. This was confirmed by sectioning of the specimens and measuring the penetration depths. The rate of penetration was found to be independent of time and no induction period was observed. A method was developed to shorten considerably the testing time to reach the steady state corrosion rate by use of a pre-treatment that induces grain dropping. The long-term corrosion rates from specimens which were pre-treated was similar to that achieved after prolonged testing of untreated (i.e. initially ground) specimens. The presence of cut surfaces is generally unavoidable in the simple immersion testing of specimens in test solutions. However, inaccuracy in the results may occur as the measured corrosion rate is often influenced by the orientation of the microstructure, the highest rates typically being observed on the cut surfaces. Two methods are presented which allow deconvolution of the corrosion rates from immersion testing of specimens containing cut surfaces, thus allowing reliable prediction of the long-term corrosion rate of plate surfaces. (authors)

  13. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipa, M.; Blanchet, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tore supra (TS) has used from the beginning of operation in 1989 actively cooled plasma facing components. Since the operation and baking temperature of all in vessel components has been defined to be up to 230 deg. C at 40 bars, a special water chemistry of the cooling water plant was suggested in order to avoid eventual water leaks due to corrosion (general corrosion, galvanic corrosion, stress corrosion, etc.) at relative high temperatures and pressures in tubes, pipes, bellows, water boxes, coils, etc. From the beginning of TS operation, in vessel components (e.g. wall protection panels, limiters, ergodic divertor coils, neutralisers and diagnostics) represented a unique combination of metals in the hydraulic circuit mainly such as stainless steel, Inconel, CuCrZr, Nickel and Copper. These different materials were joined together by welding (St to St, Inconel to Inconel, CuCrZr to CuCrZr and CuCrZr to St-St via a Ni sleeve adapter), brazing (St-St to Cu and Cu-LSTP), friction (CuCrZr and Cu to St-St), explosion (CuCrZr to St-St) and memory metal junction (Cryo-fit to Cu - only test sample). Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralized water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/ 7.0 (25 deg. C/ 200 deg. C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 deg. C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal

  14. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipa, M.; Blanchet, J. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Cellier, F. [Framatome, Centre Technique, 71 - Saint Marcel (France)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tore supra (TS) has used from the beginning of operation in 1989 actively cooled plasma facing components. Since the operation and baking temperature of all in vessel components has been defined to be up to 230 deg. C at 40 bars, a special water chemistry of the cooling water plant was suggested in order to avoid eventual water leaks due to corrosion (general corrosion, galvanic corrosion, stress corrosion, etc.) at relative high temperatures and pressures in tubes, pipes, bellows, water boxes, coils, etc. From the beginning of TS operation, in vessel components (e.g. wall protection panels, limiters, ergodic divertor coils, neutralisers and diagnostics) represented a unique combination of metals in the hydraulic circuit mainly such as stainless steel, Inconel, CuCrZr, Nickel and Copper. These different materials were joined together by welding (St to St, Inconel to Inconel, CuCrZr to CuCrZr and CuCrZr to St-St via a Ni sleeve adapter), brazing (St-St to Cu and Cu-LSTP), friction (CuCrZr and Cu to St-St), explosion (CuCrZr to St-St) and memory metal junction (Cryo-fit to Cu - only test sample). Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralized water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/ 7.0 (25 deg. C/ 200 deg. C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 deg. C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal

  15. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood : gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Rebecca J. Sichel; Donald S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27oC at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The...

  16. Effect of Copper on Corrosion of Forged AlSi1MgMn Automotive Suspension Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koktas, Serhan; Gokcil, Emre; Akdi, Seracettin; Birol, Yucel

    2017-09-01

    Recently, modifications in the alloy composition and the manufacturing process cycle were proposed to achieve a more uniform structure with no evidence of coarse grains across the section of the AlSi1MgMn alloys. Cu was added to the AlSi1MgMn alloy to improve its age hardening capacity without a separate solution heat treatment. However, Cu addition degrades the corrosion resistance of this alloy due to the formation of Al-Cu precipitates along the grain boundaries that are cathodic with respect to the aluminum matrix and thus encourage intergranular corrosion. The present work was undertaken to identify the impact of Cu addition on the corrosion properties of AlSi1MgMn alloys with different Cu contents. A series of AlSi1MgMn alloys with 0.06-0.89 wt.% Cu were tested in order to identify an optimum level of Cu addition.

  17. Relationships between stress corrosion cracking tests and utility operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Allen

    1999-10-22

    Several utility steam generator and stress corrosion cracking databases are synthesized with the view of identifying the crevice chemistry that is most consistent with the plant cracking data. Superheated steam and neutral solution environments are found to be inconsistent with the large variations in the observed SCC between different plants, different support plates within a plant, and different crevice locations. While the eddy current response of laboratory tests performed with caustic chemistries approximates the response of the most extensively affected steam generator tubes, the crack propagation kinetics in these tests differ horn plant experience. The observations suggest that there is a gradual conversion of the environment responsible for most steam generator ODSCC from a concentrated, alkaline-forming solution to a progressively more steam-enriched environment.

  18. Materials testing and corrosion investigations at KFKI AEKI Materials Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, G.; Balog, J.; Kerner, Zs. (and others)

    2004-07-01

    The paper summarises the experimental studies started at the end of the '90s at Materials Department of KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute (AEKI) in the following research areas: high temperature oxidation kinetics of Zr alloys, high temperature reference electrode testing and stress induced ECP(electrochemical potential) changes in metals. 1. High temperature hydrothermal oxidation of Zr and the properties of Zr oxides were studied by a comparative autoclave test to further our knowledge about the mechanistic understanding of the corrosion phenomenon. The layer thicknesses were determined by weight gain measurements, Rutherford backscattering (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrochemical impedance spectra were taken regularly in situ both as a function of oxidation time and temperature, whereas photoelectrochemical response was measured ex situ at room temperature, under illumination with visible light. 2. Within the frame of the LIRES project (supported by the EC within the EURATOM FP5), three high temperature reference electrodes were tested: (i) external Ag/AgCl reference electrode from NRI, Rez, Plc, (ii) Pt-Ir alloy hydrogen electrode from Studsvik Nuclear AB, (iii) Pdhydride reference electrode - Pd(Pt) double polarised active electrode - from VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. 3. The effect of mechanical stress on electrode potential was studied under zero current conditions. Silver wires in contact with silver-nitrate solutions were exposed to tensile stress and the variation of potential was measured in a two-electrode cell. The study aimed as a first step toward a more detailed theoretical and experimental work aimed to reveal the key factors of the stress corrosion cracking phenomenon. 4. The results of chemical and radiochemical analyses of the primary circuit coolant liquid, obtained between 1995 and 1999 at the four VVER-type blocks of the Paks (Hungary) nuclear power station, were

  19. Screening of soil corrosivity by field testing: Results and design of an electrochemical soil corrosion probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars vendelbo; Bruun, Niels Kåre

    1996-01-01

    The corrosivity of different types of soil have been assessed by exposing carbon-steel plates at 50 different locations in Denmark for an extended period of time. The investigations included weight loss measurements and analysis of the chemical compositions of the corrosion products formed on the...... and hydrogen absorption rates. In addition, traditional carbon-steel 3-electrode arrangements allow for performance of any kind of electrochemical meaurement (EIS, polarisation curves, LPR-measurements, galvanostatic pulse etc.).......The corrosivity of different types of soil have been assessed by exposing carbon-steel plates at 50 different locations in Denmark for an extended period of time. The investigations included weight loss measurements and analysis of the chemical compositions of the corrosion products formed...... on the plates during exposure. An electrochemical soil corrosion probe has been designed and manufactured allowing for simultaneous measurements of several qauntities to predict corrosion. The probe consists of individual sections capable of measuring redox-potential, corrosion potential, soil resistivity...

  20. Mechanisms of Corrosion of Copper-Nickel Alloys in Sulfide-Polluted Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    aerated seawater, but the major constituent is thought to be Cu2.362 7 Also varying amounts of Cu2 (OH) 3 C1, Cu(OH) 2 , CuO , CuCl 2 , Cu3 (OH) 2...The surface corrosion product is most likely Cu 2 0. It is a p-type semiconductor , and an IR drop develops across the oxide between the A anodic and...corrosion product, composed mainly of Cu20, is a p-type semiconductor product, cmposd minly Cu 20 doped with the Ni, Fe, and Cl. CU 2 0 M Cu 2 0 Cu 20 M 4p

  1. The potential for stress corrosion cracking of copper containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    1996-09-01

    The potential for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper nuclear fuel waste containers in a conceptual Canadian disposal vault has been assessed through a review of the literature and comparison of those environmental factors that cause SCC with the expected disposal environment. Stress-corrosion cracking appears to be an unlikely failure mode for Cu containers in a Canadian disposal vault because of a combination of environmental factors. Most importantly, there is only a relatively short period during which the containers will be undergoing strain when cracking should be possible at all, and then cracking is not expected because of the absence of known SCC agents, such as NH 3 , NO 2 - or organic acids. In addition, other environmental factors will mitigate SCC, namely, the presence of C1 - and its effect on film properties and the limited supply of oxidants. These arguments, to greater or lesser extent, apply to the three major mechanisms proposed for SCC of Cu alloys in aqueous solutions: film-rupture/anodic dissolution, tarnish rupture and film-induced cleavage. Detailed reviews of the SCC literature are presented as Appendices. The literature on the SCC of Cu (>99 wt.% Cu) is reviewed, including studies carried out in a number of countries under nuclear waste disposal conditions. Because of similarities with the behaviour of Cu, the more extensive literature on the SCC of α-brass in ammonia solutions is also reviewed. (author). 140 refs., 3 tabs., 25 figs

  2. The study of marine corrosion of copper alloys in chlorinated condenser cooling circuits: the role of microbiological components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Maria L; Doma, Jemimah; Sztyler, Magdalena; Beech, Iwona; Cristiani, Pierangela

    2014-06-01

    The present paper reports the on-line monitoring of corrosion behavior of the CuNi 70:30 and Al brass alloys exposed to seawater and complementary offline microbiological analyses. An electrochemical equipment with sensors specifically set for industrial application and suitable to estimate the corrosion (by linear polarization resistance technique), the biofilm growth (by the BIOX electrochemical probe), the chlorination treatment and other physical-chemical parameters of the water has been used for the on-line monitoring. In order to identify and better characterize the bacteria community present on copper alloys, tube samples were collected after a long period (1year) and short period (2days) of exposition to treated natural seawater (TNSW) and natural seawater (NSW). From the collected samples, molecular techniques such as DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and identification by sequencing were performed to better characterize and identify the microbial biodiversity present in the samples. The monitoring data confirmed the significant role played by biofouling deposition against the passivity of these Cu alloys in seawater and the positive influence of antifouling treatments based on low level dosages. Molecular analysis indicated biodiversity with the presence of Marinobacter, Alteromonas and Pseudomonas species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermodynamic studies on corrosion inhibition of aqueous solutions of amino/carboxylic acids toward copper by EMF measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spah, Manjula; Spah, Dal Chand; Deshwal, Balraj; Lee, Seungmoon; Chae, Yoon-Keun; Park, Jin Won

    2009-01-01

    Electromotive force (E) measurements were made on an electrochemical cell [Cu x Hg|CuCl 2 (m) in a solvent S|AgCl-Ag] (where S is a dilute aqueous solution (0.01 m) of amino acid (glycine, alanine, methionine and glutamic acid) or aliphatic carboxylic acid (formic acid, acetic acid, n-butyric acid and glutaric acid)) at 30 deg. C. These measured E values were used to compute the dissociation constants (K 1 and K 2 ) and the degree of dissociation (α 1 and α 2 ) by iterative procedures. The standard cell potential (E o ) and the mean activity coefficient (γ ± ) of CuCl 2 were also determined. The E o data were next used to evaluate the Gibbs energy of transfer (ΔG tr 0 ) of CuCl 2 from water to dilute aqueous solutions of the amino/carboxylic acids. The negative ΔG tr 0 values suggested that these acids act as potential corrosion inhibitors. The magnitudes of ΔG tr 0 values show that the amino acids act as better corrosion inhibitors towards copper than the aliphatic carboxylic acids.

  4. Electrochemical Study on Corrosion Inhibition of Copper in Hydrochloric Acid Medium and the Rotating Ring-Disc Voltammetry for Studying the Dissolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Satpati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution characteristics of copper in hydrochloric acid medium and the effect of 4-amino 1,2,4-triazole (ATA on the corrosion process have been studied using conventional electrochemical techniques and rotating ring-disc electrodes (RRDEs. Corrosion potential (corr and corrosion current density (corr were obtained by Tafel extrapolation methods. Charge transfer resistance (ct and double-layer capacitance (dl were obtained from the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. ATA was shown to be an effective inhibitor for the copper-corrosion inhibition in acid medium. The corrosion rate was retarded in presence of inhibitors mainly because of the adsorption of the inhibitor on the electrode surface. Adsorption of the inhibitor on the metal surface was found to follow the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Standard free energy change of the adsorption process (Δ0ad was calculated to be −54.3 kJ mol−1; such a large negative value of Δ0ad suggests the prescence of a chemisorption process.

  5. In situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of electrochemical corrosion of copper in aqueous NaHCO3 solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Peng; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Borondics, Ferenc; Glans, Per-Anders; West, Mark W.; Chang, Ching-Lin; Salmeron, Miquel; Guo, Jinghua

    2010-03-31

    A novel electrochemical setup has been developed for soft x-ray absorption studies of the electronic structure of electrode materials during electrochemical cycling. In this communication we illustrate the operation of the cell with a study of the corrosion behavior of copper in aqueous NaHCO3 solution via the electrochemically induced changes of its electronic structure. This development opens the way for in situ investigations of electrochemical processes, photovoltaics, batteries, fuel cells, water splitting, corrosion, electrodeposition, and a variety of important biological processes.

  6. Study of the propolis extract as a corrosion inhibitor of copper alloy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These results were supplemented by IR Spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX spectrum of chemical composition. The metal solution interface is simulated as a physical model by using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Keywords: Copper Alloy, Propolis extract, ethylene glycol; ...

  7. Corrosion control in water supply systems: effect of pH, alkalinity, and orthophosphate on lead and copper leaching from brass plumbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Y S; Elefsiniotis, P

    2009-10-01

    This study explored the potential of lead and copper leaching from brass plumbing in the Auckland region of New Zealand. A five-month field investigation, at six representative locations, indicated that Auckland's water can be characterized as soft and potentially corrosive, having low alkalinity and hardness levels and a moderately alkaline pH. More than 90% of the unflushed samples contained lead above the maximum acceptable value (MAV) of 10 microg/L (New Zealand Standards). In contrast, the copper level of unflushed samples remained consistently below the corresponding MAV of 2 mg/L. Flushing however reduced sharply metal concentrations, with lead values well below the MAV limit. Generally, metal leaching patterns showed a limited degree of correlation with the variations in temperature, dissolved oxygen and free chlorine residual at all sampling locations. Furthermore, a series of bench-scale experiments was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of pH and alkalinity adjustment, as well as orthophosphate addition as corrosion control tools regarding lead and copper dissolution. Results demonstrated that lead and copper leaching was predominant during the first 24 hr of stagnation, but reached an equilibrium state afterwards. Since the soluble fraction of both metals was small (12% for lead, 29% for copper), it is apparent that the non-soluble compounds play a predominant role in the dissolution process. The degree of leaching however was largely affected by the variations in pH and alkalinity. At pH around neutrality, an increase in alkalinity promoted metal dissolution, while at pH 9.0 the effect of alkalinity on leaching was marginal. Lastly, addition of orthophosphate as a corrosion inhibitor was more effective at pH 7.5 or higher, resulting in approximately 70% reduction in both lead and copper concentrations.

  8. In situ corrosion tests on HLW glass as part of a larger approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Iseghem, P. [Waste and Disposal Research Unit, SCK.CEN, Mol (Belgium)

    1997-07-01

    In-situ corrosion tests were performed on various candidate high-level waste glasses in the underground laboratory in clay underneath SCK x CEN. The tests exposed the glass samples directly to the Boom clay rock, for maximum durations of 7.5 years. We succeeded to interpret the corrosion data at 90 deg C in terms of dissolution mechanisms, and we concluded that the glass composition has a determining effect on the corrosion stability. The data from our in-situ tests were of high relevance for estimating the long-term behaviour of the glasses. The long-term in-situ tests provide corrosion data which show different trends than other corrosion tests, e.g. shorter duration tests in Boom clay, or tests in deionized water. The initial dissolution rate using MCC1 test at 90 deg C is about the same for the three glasses discussed, but the longest duration in Boom clay at 90 deg C shows a difference in mass loss of about 25 times. We finally present some ideas on how the corrosion tests can meet the needs, such as the modelling of the glass corrosion or providing input in the performance assessment. (author)

  9. In situ corrosion tests on HLW glass as part of a larger approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Iseghem, P.

    1997-01-01

    In-situ corrosion tests were performed on various candidate high-level waste glasses in the underground laboratory in clay underneath SCK x CEN. The tests exposed the glass samples directly to the Boom clay rock, for maximum durations of 7.5 years. We succeeded to interpret the corrosion data at 90 deg C in terms of dissolution mechanisms, and we concluded that the glass composition has a determining effect on the corrosion stability. The data from our in-situ tests were of high relevance for estimating the long-term behaviour of the glasses. The long-term in-situ tests provide corrosion data which show different trends than other corrosion tests, e.g. shorter duration tests in Boom clay, or tests in deionized water. The initial dissolution rate using MCC1 test at 90 deg C is about the same for the three glasses discussed, but the longest duration in Boom clay at 90 deg C shows a difference in mass loss of about 25 times. We finally present some ideas on how the corrosion tests can meet the needs, such as the modelling of the glass corrosion or providing input in the performance assessment. (author)

  10. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  11. Electrochemical noise of the erosion-corrosion of copper in relation with its hydrodynamic parameters; Ruido electroquimico de la erosion-corrosion en cobre: su relacion con los parametros hidrodinamicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda, I.; Romero, M.; Malo, J.M.; Uruchurtu, J.

    2010-07-01

    This work presents the electrochemical noise results obtained of the surface degradation on copper, due to erosion corrosion phenomena, which were a function of the hydrodynamic parameters of the system (fluid movement). A modified rotating cylinder (RC) comprising three ring electrodes under two rotating speeds (880 and 1750 rpm with a Reynolds numbers 1486 Re and 2972 Re, respectively) were used. Characteristic electrochemical noise spectra as a function of the hydrodynamic parameters were found, as well as surface attack intensities the noise signal. An increase and a more uniform attack due to particle impact was related to larger particle size and lesser erosion corrosion intensity, in the form of more localized attack over the surface, was obtained for smaller ones. Erosion corrosion attack presents characteristic electrochemical current and potential noise signals, according to the laminar or transitional turbulent regime and particle size added. (Author).

  12. Study on the correlation between long-term exposure tests and accelerated corrosion tests by the combined damage of salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Soon; Lee, Min Woo [Sangmyung University, Chunan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Interest in the durability assessment and structural performance has increased according to an increase of concrete structures in salt damage environment recent years. Reliable way ensuring the most accelerated corrosion test is a method of performing the rebar corrosion monitoring as exposed directly to the marine test site exposure. However, long-term exposure test has a disadvantage because of a long period of time. Therefore, many studies on reinforced concrete in salt damage environments have been developed as alternatives to replace this. However, accelerated corrosion test is appropriate to evaluate the critical chlorine concentration in the short term, but only accelerated test method, is not easy to get correct answer. Accuracy of correlation acceleration test depends on the period of the degree of exposure environments. Therefore, in this study, depending on the concrete mix material, by the test was performed on the basis of the composite degradation of the salt damage, and investigate the difference of corrosion initiation time of the rebar, and indoor corrosion time of the structure, of the marine environment of the actual environments were investigated. The correlation coefficient was derived in the experiment. Long-term exposure test was actually conducted in consideration of the exposure conditions submerged zone, splash zone and tidal zone. The accelerated corrosion tests were carried out by immersion conditions, and by the combined deterioration due to the carbonation and accelerated corrosion due to wet and dry condition.

  13. Study on the correlation between long-term exposure tests and accelerated corrosion tests by the combined damage of salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Soon; Lee, Min Woo

    2014-01-01

    Interest in the durability assessment and structural performance has increased according to an increase of concrete structures in salt damage environment recent years. Reliable way ensuring the most accelerated corrosion test is a method of performing the rebar corrosion monitoring as exposed directly to the marine test site exposure. However, long-term exposure test has a disadvantage because of a long period of time. Therefore, many studies on reinforced concrete in salt damage environments have been developed as alternatives to replace this. However, accelerated corrosion test is appropriate to evaluate the critical chlorine concentration in the short term, but only accelerated test method, is not easy to get correct answer. Accuracy of correlation acceleration test depends on the period of the degree of exposure environments. Therefore, in this study, depending on the concrete mix material, by the test was performed on the basis of the composite degradation of the salt damage, and investigate the difference of corrosion initiation time of the rebar, and indoor corrosion time of the structure, of the marine environment of the actual environments were investigated. The correlation coefficient was derived in the experiment. Long-term exposure test was actually conducted in consideration of the exposure conditions submerged zone, splash zone and tidal zone. The accelerated corrosion tests were carried out by immersion conditions, and by the combined deterioration due to the carbonation and accelerated corrosion due to wet and dry condition

  14. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipa, M.; Blanchet, J.; Cellier, F.

    2007-01-01

    Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralised water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/7.0 (25 C/200 C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal combinations survived the test campaign without stress corrosion cracking, with the exception of the memory metal junction (creep in Cu) and the bellows made of St-St 316L and Inconel 625 while 316 Ti bellows survived. In contrary to the vacuum brazed Cu-LSTP to St-St samples, some of flame brazed Cu to St-St samples failed either in the braze joint or in the copper structure itself. For comparison, a spot weld of an inflated 316L panel sample, filled voluntary with a caustic solution of pH 11.5 (25 C), failed after 90 h of testing (intergranular cracking at the spot weld), while an identical sample containing AVT water of pH 9.0 (25 C) survived without damage. The results of these tests, performed during 1986 and 1997, have never been published and therefore are presented more in detail in this paper since corrosion in hydraulic circuits is also an issue of ITER. Up to day, the TS cooling water plant operates with an above mentioned water treatment and no water leaks have been detected on in-vessel components originating from water corrosion at high temperature and high pressure. (orig.)

  15. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipa, M. [CEA/DSM/DRFC Centre de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul lez Durance (France); Blanchet, J.; Cellier, F. [Framatome, 71 - Saint Marcel (France). Centre Technique

    2007-07-01

    Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralised water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/7.0 (25 C/200 C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal combinations survived the test campaign without stress corrosion cracking, with the exception of the memory metal junction (creep in Cu) and the bellows made of St-St 316L and Inconel 625 while 316 Ti bellows survived. In contrary to the vacuum brazed Cu-LSTP to St-St samples, some of flame brazed Cu to St-St samples failed either in the braze joint or in the copper structure itself. For comparison, a spot weld of an inflated 316L panel sample, filled voluntary with a caustic solution of pH 11.5 (25 C), failed after 90 h of testing (intergranular cracking at the spot weld), while an identical sample containing AVT water of pH 9.0 (25 C) survived without damage. The results of these tests, performed during 1986 and 1997, have never been published and therefore are presented more in detail in this paper since corrosion in hydraulic circuits is also an issue of ITER. Up to day, the TS cooling water plant operates with an above mentioned water treatment and no water leaks have been detected on in-vessel components originating from water corrosion at high temperature and high pressure. (orig.)

  16. Corrosion testing in flash tanks of kraft pulp mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, S.J.; Stead, N.J.

    1999-11-01

    The corrosion observed in the first flash tanks in kraft pulp mills with modified cooking practices was characterized. Coupons of carbon steel (CS), several stainless steels (SS), and Ti were exposed at two mills. At one mill, identical sets of coupons were exposed in the No. 1 and No. 2 flash tank. At the other mill, three identical sets of coupons were placed in flash tank No. 1. The results of the exposures showed that both CS and Ti suffered high rates of general corrosion, while the SS suffered varying degrees of localized attack. The ranking of the corrosion resistance in the flash tank was the same that would be expected in a reducing acid environment. Attack by organic acids was concluded to be the most likely cause of corrosion of the flash tanks.

  17. Test methods for microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, B.; Wagner, P.; Mansfeld, F.

    1992-01-01

    Electrochemical techniques such as measurements of corrosion and redox potentials, polarization curves, polarization resistance, electrochemical impedance and electrochemical noise have been used to evaluate the impact of marine microorganisms on corrosion processes. Surface analytical techniques including microbiological culturing, scanning electron microscopy, microprobes and microelectrodes have been used to characterize metal surfaces after exposure to marine waters. A combination of electrochemical, surface analytical and microbiological techniques is the most promising approach for determining mechanisms of MIC

  18. Preparation and testing of corrosion and spallation-resistant coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, John P. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Cavalli, Matthew N. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2016-06-30

    its standard oxidation, spallation, and corrosion testing, which was scheduled for completion in the spring of 2016. However, because of commercial demands, the tests were not completed by the time of this report except some initial spallation tests at 1150°C. In those tests, several of the APMT plates separated from the CM247LC, likely because of the remaining aluminum oxide scale on the surface of the CM247LC. This implies that surface preparation may need to include machining to remove the oxide scale before bonding rather than just sandblasting. In previous tensile testing at 950°C, the breaks in the tensile samples always occurred in the APMT and not at the joints. Gasifier sampling was completed to determine what types of trace contaminants may occur in cleaned and combusted syngas and that could lead to corrosion or deposition in turbines firing coal syngas. The sampling was done from a pressurized fluidized-bed gasifier and a pressurized entrained-flow gasifier. The particles captured on a filter from syngas were typically 0.2 to 0.5 μm in diameter, whereas those captured from the combusted syngas were slightly larger and more spherical. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory showed that the particles do not contain any metals and have an atomic composition almost identical to that of the polycarbonate filter. This indicates that the particles are primarily soot-based and not formed from volatilization of metals in the gasifiers.

  19. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Corrosion Test Report (Phase 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, W. C.; Fritz, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the results of the corrosion tests that were performed to aid in the selection of the construction materials for multi-function waste tanks to be built in the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. Two alloys were tested: 304L and Alloy 20 austenitic stainless steel. The test media were aqueous solutions formulated to represent the extreme of the chemical compositions of waste to be stored in the tanks. The results summerized by alloy are as follows: For 304L the tests showed no stress-corrosion cracking in any of the nine test solutions. The tests showed pitting in on of the solutions. There were no indications of any weld heat-tint corrosion, nor any sign of preferential corrosion in the welded areas. For Alloy 20 the tests showed no general, pitting, or stress-corrosion cracking. One crevice corrosion coupon cracked at the web between a hole and the edge of the coupon in one of the solutions. Mechanical tests showed some possible crack extension in the same solution. Because of the failure of both alloys to meet test acceptance criteria, the tank waste chemistry will have to be restricted or an alternative alloy tested

  20. Gallium-cladding compatibility testing plan. Phases 1 and 2: Test plan for gallium corrosion tests. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.F.; Morris, R.N.

    1998-05-01

    This test plan is a Level-2 document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water-Reactor Mixed-Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. The plan summarizes and updates the projected Phases 1 and 2 Gallium-Cladding compatibility corrosion testing and the following post-test examination. This work will characterize the reactions and changes, if any, in mechanical properties that occur between Zircaloy clad and gallium or gallium oxide in the temperature range 30--700 C

  1. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; McDonald, I.G.; Moore, B.T.; Silva, V.M.

    1988-10-01

    The corrosion behaviour of four tungsten alloys has been evaluated through weight loss measurements after total immersion in both distilled water insight into the mechanism of corrosion was afforded by an examination of the and 5% sodium chloride solutions. Some insight the mechanism of corrosion was afforded by using the Scanning Electron Microscopy and through an analysis of the corrosion products. Pure tungsten and all the alloys studied underwent corrosion during the tests, and in each case the rare of corrosion in sodium chloride solution was markedly less than that in distilled water. A 95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe alloy was found to be the most corrosion resistant of the alloys under the experimental conditions. Examination of the data shows that for each of the tests, copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. 9 refs., 7 tabs., 12 figs

  2. Investigation of the cut-edge corrosion of organically-coated galvanized steel after accelerated atmospheric corrosion test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reşit Yıldız

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cut edge corrosion of organically coated (epoxy, polyurethane and polyester galvanized steel was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Measurements were performed on specimens that had been tested in an accelerated atmospheric corrosion test. The samples were subjected to 10 s fogging and 1 h awaiting cycles in an exposure cabinet (120 and 180 days with artificial acid rain solution. According to the investigation, the coatings were damaged from the cut edge into the sheet, this distance was about 0.8 cm. These defects were more pronounced at after 180 days in proportion to after 120 days.

  3. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W.; Girshik, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1998-06-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, laboratory experiments were performed on a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings by exposing them to fireside corrosion tests which simulated a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, RA253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, Ta-modified 310, NF 709, 690 clad, 671 clad, and 800HT for up to approximately 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW, coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy were exposed for 4,483, 11,348, and 15,883 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after the full 15,883 hours of exposure. A previous topical report has been issued for the 4,483 hours of exposure.

  4. Design and testing of corrosion damaged prestressed concrete joists: the Pescara Benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Evangelista, A.; De Leonardis, A.; Valente, C.; Zuccarino, L.

    2011-07-01

    An experimental campaign named the Pescara benchmark and devoted to study the dynamic behaviour of corroded p.c. joists has been conducted. The steel corrosion reduces the area of the reinforcement and causes cracking of concrete so that r/c members are subjected to loss of strength and stiffness. It is of interest to evaluate the corrosion level at which the damage can be detected through signal processing procedures and how close such level is to the r/c member safety limits. Joists of current industrial production having different steel to concrete ratios are tested in different laboratory conditions. Dynamic tests involve either free vibrations and forced vibrations due to a moving mass simulating actual traffic loads in railway bridges. The paper discusses the rationale of the tests including the set up of the artificial corrosion, the static characterization of the joist and the dynamic tests in the different stages of corrosion experienced.

  5. KSC lubricant testing program. [lubrication characteristics and corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, B. J.; Bryan, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate the performance of various lubricants in use and considered for use at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The overall objectives of the program were to: (1) determine the lubrication characteristics and relative corrosion resistance of lubricants in use and proposed for use at KSC; (2) identify materials which may be equivalent to or better than KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC greases; and (3) identify or develop an improved lubricating oil suitable for use in liquid oxygen (LOX) pumps at KSC. It was concluded that: (1) earth gel thickened greases are very poor corrosion preventive materials in the KSC environment; (2) Halocarbon 25-5S and Braycote 656 were suitable substiutes for KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC respectively; and (3) none of the oils evaluated possessed the necessary inertness, lubricity, and corrosion prevention characteristics for the KSC LOX pumping systems in their present configuration.

  6. Development of Copper Canister through Cold Sprayed Coating Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Jong Won; Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, Jong Youl; Jeong, Jong Tae; Kim, Sung Ki; Cho, Dong Keun

    2007-12-01

    General thickness of a copper canister is 5 cm for a underground disposal application. The lower limit of a thickness is determined by a forging technology. But many experts in this area agrees that the thickness 1 cm is enough at the underground disposal for the life time of 1,000,000 years. Thus new technology is suggested for the making 1 cm thickness copper canister, that is a cold spray coating method(CSC). In this report, the CSC is examined and the technical possibility for making copper canister is measured. The overview of CSC and its characteristics are discussed. Various copper particles for the CSC are analyzed and the formed coating layers are examined to find their porosity and uniformity. A Tafa copper particle and Chang-sung copper particle are selected for making 1 cm thick test specimen. Using the CSC specimens, tensile test and XRD analysis are performed. As a corrosion evaluation, a electrochemical test such as a polarization test is done, together with humid corrosion test and chloric acid immersion test. Through the corrosion tests, it is tried to confirm that the CSC is valuable method for making a copper canister. Consequently, it is confirmed that the CSC method is very usful for making 1 cm thick copper canister. the porosity of CSC layer is very low at 0.3 in case of Tafa copper layer. In corrosion tests, the CSC layers are very stable in active environments. It is hard to say that the difference of processing method but the purity of copper is important for the corrosion rate evaluation. The CSC method is very effective method for making 1 cm thick copper canister, It is hoped that the CSC method is applied in a HLW underground disposal system in the future

  7. Development of Copper Canister through Cold Sprayed Coating Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Jong Won; Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, Jong Youl; Jeong, Jong Tae; Kim, Sung Ki; Cho, Dong Keun

    2007-12-15

    General thickness of a copper canister is 5 cm for a underground disposal application. The lower limit of a thickness is determined by a forging technology. But many experts in this area agrees that the thickness 1 cm is enough at the underground disposal for the life time of 1,000,000 years. Thus new technology is suggested for the making 1 cm thickness copper canister, that is a cold spray coating method(CSC). In this report, the CSC is examined and the technical possibility for making copper canister is measured. The overview of CSC and its characteristics are discussed. Various copper particles for the CSC are analyzed and the formed coating layers are examined to find their porosity and uniformity. A Tafa copper particle and Chang-sung copper particle are selected for making 1 cm thick test specimen. Using the CSC specimens, tensile test and XRD analysis are performed. As a corrosion evaluation, a electrochemical test such as a polarization test is done, together with humid corrosion test and chloric acid immersion test. Through the corrosion tests, it is tried to confirm that the CSC is valuable method for making a copper canister. Consequently, it is confirmed that the CSC method is very usful for making 1 cm thick copper canister. the porosity of CSC layer is very low at 0.3 in case of Tafa copper layer. In corrosion tests, the CSC layers are very stable in active environments. It is hard to say that the difference of processing method but the purity of copper is important for the corrosion rate evaluation. The CSC method is very effective method for making 1 cm thick copper canister, It is hoped that the CSC method is applied in a HLW underground disposal system in the future.

  8. Electroless Copper Deposition: A Sustainable Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutnahorsky, Marika Renee

    A sustainable electroless copper coating process was developed for plating automotive fasteners shaped from AISI 9255 low carbon, high silicon steel. The objective was to minimize the ionic and organic species present in each step of the plating process. A sulfuric acid solution inhibited with quinine was defined to clean the steel prior to plating. The corrosivity of the solution was examined through electrochemical and weight loss measurements to evaluate the efficiency of the cleaning process at high temperatures and high acid concentrations. An electroless copper coating process was then developed using a simple copper sulfate chemistry inhibited with quinine to extend the possible operating window. Finally, benzotriazole was evaluated as a possible anti-oxidant coating. Accelerated thioacetamide corrosion tests were used to evaluate the corrosion inhibition of benzotriazole on copper coatings.

  9. Effect of copper addition on mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and antibacterial property of 316L stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Tong; Shahzad, M Babar; Xu, Dake; Sun, Ziqing; Zhao, Jinlong; Yang, Chunguang; Qi, Min; Yang, Ke

    2017-02-01

    The effects of addition of different Cu content (0, 2.5 and 3.5wt%) on mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and antibacterial performance of 316L austenitic stainless steel (SS) after solution and aging treatment were investigated by mechanical test, transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electrochemical corrosion, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and antibacterial test. The results showed that the Cu addition and heat treatment had no obvious influence on the microstructure with complete austenite features. The yield strength (YS) after solution treatment was almost similar, whereas the aging treatment obviously increased the YS due to formation of tiny Cu-rich precipitates. The pitting and protective potential of the solution treated Cu-bearing 316L SS in 0.9wt% NaCl solution increased with increasing Cu content, while gradually declined after aging, owing to the high density Cu-rich precipitation. The antibacterial test proved that higher Cu content and aging were two compulsory processes to exert good antibacterial performance. The XPS results further indicated that aging enhanced the Cu enrichment in passive film, which could effectively stimulate the Cu ions release from the surface of passive film. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Testing the permeability and corrosion resistance of micro-mechanically interlocked joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov-Nielsen, Jeppe; Holm, Allan Hjarbæk; Højsholt, Rune

    2011-01-01

    Micro-mechanical interlocking (MMI) can be applied to create new and interesting composite materials. We have employed laser structuring to achieve MMI between stainless steel and plastic with extremely high joint strength. However, the water permeability and corrosion resistance of the joint must...... be taken in order not to degrade the corrosion resistance of the sample to an unacceptable level....... is conducted. The permeability seems to be consistent with the Hagen–Poiseuille equation independent of the laser structuring technique and is orders of magnitudes larger than the diffusion rate through the plastic. Two different types of corrosion tests have been undertaken, and we show that care must...

  11. Electrochemical testing of passivity state and corrosion resistance of supermartensitic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lasek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On low interstitial - supermartensitic stainless steels (X1CrNiMo 12-5-1, X2CrNiMo 13-6-2, X1CrNiMo 12-6-2 the electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out and the passive state stability and localized corrosion resistance were compared and evaluated. The effect of quenching and tempering as well as the changes in microstructure on polarisation curves and corrosion properties at room temperature were established. Small differences in chemical composition of steels were also registered on their corrosion parameters changes and resistance.

  12. Operation corrosion test of austenitic steel bends for supercritical coal boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cizner J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion tests of both annealed and not annealed bends of HR3C and S304H steels in operation conditions of black and brown coal combustion boilers in EPRU and EDE. After a long-term exposure, the samples were assessed gravimetrically and metallographically. The comparison of annealed and unannealed states showed higher corrosion rates in the annealed state; corrosion of the sample surface did not essentially differ for compression and tensile parts of the beams. Detailed assessment of both steels is described in detail in this study.

  13. Corrosion Testing of Stainless Steel Fuel Cell Hardware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01

    Metal hardware is gaining increasing interest in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) development as a possible alternative to machined graphite hardware because of its potential for low-cost manufacturing combined with its intrinsic high conductivity, minimal permeability and advantageous mechanical properties. A major barrier to more widespread use of metal hardware has been the susceptibility of various metals to corrosion. Few pure metals can withstand the relatively aggressive environment of a fuel cell and thus the choices for hardware are quite limited. Precious metals such as platinum or gold are prohibitively expensive and so tend to be utilized as coatings on inexpensive substrates such as aluminum or stainless steel. The main challenge with coatings has been to achieve pin-hole free surfaces that will remain so after years of use. Titanium has been used to some extent and though it is very corrosion-resistant, it is also relatively expensive and often still requires some manner of surface coating to prevent the formation of a poorly conducting oxide layer. In contrast, metal alloys may hold promise as potentially low-cost, corrosion-resistant materials for bipolar plates. The dozens of commercially available stainless steel and nickel based alloys have been specifically formulated to offer a particular advantage depending upon their application. In the case of austenitic stainless steels, for example, 316 SS contains molybdenum and a higher chromium content than its more common counterpart, 304 SS, that makes it more noble and increases its corrosion resistance. Likewise, 316L SS contains less carbon than 316 SS to make it easier to weld. A number of promising corrosion-resistant, highly noble alloys such as Hastelloy{trademark} or Duplex{trademark} (a stainless steel developed for seawater service) are available commercially, but are expensive and difficult to obtain in various forms (i.e. wire screen, foil, etc.) or in small amounts for R and D

  14. Electrochemistry of stress corrosion cracking of brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seleet, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of pure copper and two brass (copper-zinc alloy) compositions (80/20 and 60/39) was studied in several ammoniacal and nonammoniacal aqueous solutions at open circuit potential, applying a constant load technique. The SCC tests, using tensile stress and loop specimens, showed pure copper to be immune in all solutions tested, the αΒ'-brass (60/39) alloy to be most susceptible to SCC, and the (80/20) alloy to have intermediate SCC susceptibility. The electrochemical tests (corrosion potential and Tafel plots) were utilized to prove the validity of the dissolution mechanism for the SCC propagation in solution with intermediate corrosion rates (∼0.1 2 ). The electrochemical tests were also used to predict the preferential dissolution of zinc (dezincification) in noncomplexing solutions, and the higher dissolution of copper (than that of zinc) in complexing solutions. The formation of intermediate cuprous complexes was detected using a rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE) composed of a brass (80/20) disc and platinum ring, in ammonium chloride-cupric chloride solution. At very low corrosion rates, the stress corrosion cracking (is present) is assumed to operate by the brittle mechanical fracture mechanism in solution where ammonium ions (NH 4 + ) can be generated

  15. NF ISO 10270. Corrosion of metals and alloys. Aqueous corrosion tests of zirconium alloys used in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    This international standard prescribes the determination of the mass gain and the superficial control of zirconium and zirconium alloy products after a corrosion test performed in water at 360 deg. C and in steam at 400 deg. C or more. A pressure of 10.3 MPa (1500 psi) is applied during the tests performed in vapor. This standard applies to welded and molded products, to powder metallurgy products and to filler metals for welding application. The method has been widely used in the development of new alloys and new techniques of thermal treatment and in the evaluation of welding techniques. (J.S.)

  16. A Time-Variant Reliability Model for Copper Bending Pipe under Seawater-Active Corrosion Based on the Stochastic Degradation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Liao, Baopeng; Li, Mengmeng; Ren, Yi; Feng, Qiang; Yang, Dezhen

    2018-03-27

    In the degradation process, the randomness and multiplicity of variables are difficult to describe by mathematical models. However, they are common in engineering and cannot be neglected, so it is necessary to study this issue in depth. In this paper, the copper bending pipe in seawater piping systems is taken as the analysis object, and the time-variant reliability is calculated by solving the interference of limit strength and maximum stress. We did degradation experiments and tensile experiments on copper material, and obtained the limit strength at each time. In addition, degradation experiments on copper bending pipe were done and the thickness at each time has been obtained, then the response of maximum stress was calculated by simulation. Further, with the help of one kind of Monte Carlo method we propose, the time-variant reliability of copper bending pipe was calculated based on the stochastic degradation process and interference theory. Compared with traditional methods and verified by maintenance records, the results show that the time-variant reliability model based on the stochastic degradation process proposed in this paper has better applicability in the reliability analysis, and it can be more convenient and accurate to predict the replacement cycle of copper bending pipe under seawater-active corrosion.

  17. A Time-Variant Reliability Model for Copper Bending Pipe under Seawater-Active Corrosion Based on the Stochastic Degradation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the degradation process, the randomness and multiplicity of variables are difficult to describe by mathematical models. However, they are common in engineering and cannot be neglected, so it is necessary to study this issue in depth. In this paper, the copper bending pipe in seawater piping systems is taken as the analysis object, and the time-variant reliability is calculated by solving the interference of limit strength and maximum stress. We did degradation experiments and tensile experiments on copper material, and obtained the limit strength at each time. In addition, degradation experiments on copper bending pipe were done and the thickness at each time has been obtained, then the response of maximum stress was calculated by simulation. Further, with the help of one kind of Monte Carlo method we propose, the time-variant reliability of copper bending pipe was calculated based on the stochastic degradation process and interference theory. Compared with traditional methods and verified by maintenance records, the results show that the time-variant reliability model based on the stochastic degradation process proposed in this paper has better applicability in the reliability analysis, and it can be more convenient and accurate to predict the replacement cycle of copper bending pipe under seawater-active corrosion.

  18. The effect of moisture content on the corrosion of fasteners embedded in wood subjected to alkaline copper quaternary treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Samuel V. Glass; Dominique Derome

    2014-01-01

    This paper characterizes the corrosion rate of embedded fasteners as a function of wood moisture content using gravimetric and electrochemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion rate increased with moisture content before reaching a plateau. The phases present in the corrosion products, as analyzed using X-ray diffraction, are generally consistent...

  19. Hot corrosion testing of Ni-based alloys and coatings in a modified Dean rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Jason Reid

    Gas turbine blades are designed to withstand a variety of harsh operating conditions. Although material and coating improvements are constantly administered to increase the mean time before turbine refurbishment or replacement, hot corrosion is still considered as the major life-limiting factor in many industrial and marine gas turbines. A modified Dean rig was designed and manufactured at Tennessee Technological University to simulate the accelerated hot corrosion conditions and to conduct screening tests on the new coatings on Ni-based superalloys. Uncoated Ni-based superalloys, Rene 142 and Rene 80, were tested in the modified Dean rig to establish a testing procedure for Type I hot corrosion. The influence of surface treatments on the hot corrosion resistance was then investigated. It was found that grit-blasted specimens showed inferior hot corrosion resistance than that of the polished counterpart. The Dean rig was also used to test model MCrAlY alloys, pack cementation NiAl coatings, and electro-codeposited MCrAlY coatings. Furthermore, the hot corrosion attack on the coated-specimens were also assessed using a statistical analysis approach.

  20. In-situ hot corrosion testing of candidate materials for exhaust valve spindles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihlet, Uffe; Hoeg, Harro A.; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2011-01-01

    Cr1Nb matrix has been produced, and put into service for 2,200 hours allowing a unique in-situ corrosion test. 10 high Cr alloys have been tested this way. The corrosion appearance is found to be a factor of not only the chemical composition but also the production method. HIPd material with high Cr...... used, exhaust valve spindles in marine diesel engines are subjected to high temperatures and stresses as well as molten salt induced corrosion. To investigate candidate materials for future designs which will involve the HIP process, a spindle with Ni superalloy material samples inserted in a HIPd Ni49...... content and low content of Fe and Mo is found to be the best choice for hot corrosion resistance....

  1. Review of test methods used to determine the corrosion rate of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to give an overview of test methods previously used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. This article reviews the test methods used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood by breaking the experiments into three groups: exposure tests, accelerated exposure tests, and electrochemical tests....

  2. Model tests for corrosion influence of electrode surface on electroosmosis in marine sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lingwei; Li, Jinzhu; Shi, Hanru

    2017-11-01

    The corrosion of metal electrodes is inevitable on electroosmosis in soil. Surface corrosion of electrodes is also one of the reasons for increasing energy consumption in electroosmosis treatment. A series of laboratory tests were conducted employing three kinds of materials, aluminium, steel, and brass. To explore the impact of surface corrosion degree on electroosmosis, metal electrodes were pretreated with durations 0 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 36 h. After the pretreatment, corroded electrodes are used as anodes on electroosmosis. Water discharge, current, voltage potential were measured during the tests; water content was also tested at three points after the electroosmosis. The results showed that aluminium was better than steel in electroosmotic drainage while brass provided the worst dewatering performance. Surface corrosion did not influence the aluminium and steel on electroosmosis in marine sludge, but brass did. In the pretreatment of brass electrodes, corrosion rate had started to slow down at later periods, with the deterioration rate of dewatering reduced afterwards. As the results showed, it is not recommended to employ those easily deteriorated electrode materials from surface corrosion in practical engineering, such as brass; electrode material with higher electroosmosis exchange rate is recommended, such as aluminium.

  3. Investigations into the corrosion resistance of copper aluminium alloys. Effect of phosphorus as corrosion resistant third alloying element in the ternary system CuAl20P1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allwardt, A.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of phosphorus on the corrosion resistance of Al-bronzes is studied in detail in this work. A literature review showed that there are a lot of things known about the microstructure and the mechanical properties of Al-bronzes. In spite of their corrosion resistance the corrosion properties and the structure of the protective oxide films of Al-bronzes were seldom a matter of interest. Systematic studies of the influence of different alloying elements on the oxide film and the corrosion properties are rare. Therefore, it is not possible to predict the corrosion resistance of Al-bronzes, made by alloying particular elements. The high corrosion resistance of the new alloy CuAl 20 P 1 was the reason to investigate the influence of phosphorus on the corrosion properties of Al-bronzes in more detail. A systematic study of the microstructure and the corrosion properties of Cu, CuP x , CuAl 20 and CuAl 20 P x offers an insight into the effect of aluminium and phosphorus on the formation of the oxide film on Al-bronzes. It was found that there exists a critical amount of 1 at.-% of phosphorus. Above and below this amount the corrosion resistance becomes worse. This behaviour could be explained by XPS-and electrochemical measurements. Although there are still some questions about the influence of phosphorus on the corrosion resistance of Al-bronzes, this work has produced some important results, which in the future may be helpful to develop new high corrosion resistant Al-bronzes more efficiently: - on clean surface Al-bronze, the oxidation of Al and Cu takes place simultaneously, - Al promotes the formation of Cu 2 O but impedes the formation of Cu(II)-oxide/-hydride in neutral solutions, - P impedes the formation of Cu 2 O and as a consequence promotes the formation of aluminium oxide. This results in a higher amount of Al in the oxide film on the surface of the alloy, which leads to a better corrosion resistance. (author) figs., tabs., 106 refs

  4. Swell-based in situ oxide removal methods for PDMS-copper particle composite corrosion sensing elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Teng; Pan, Feng; Hutson, Jeremy; Srinivas, Keerthi; King, Jerry; Spearot, Douglas; Huang, Adam

    2012-04-01

    A micro-corrosion sensor technology utilizing PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) and micro/nano -metal particles, as the sensing element, was proposed and currently under-development. One of the key challenges encountered is the removal of the native oxides inherently existing on the metal particles. Numerous techniques were experimented to counter this problem, with swell-based protocols being identified as the most promising solution. Swelling of the composite enhances the diffusion of oxide etchants into and etched oxides out of the material matrix. Two different swelling characterizations, utilizing liquid-based solvents and supercritical CO2 emersions, will be presented here. In terms of compatibility, common microfabrication solvents were used to evaluate the former, while supercritical CO2 is often used in the release of stiction sensitive microstructures. Both methods are classified as low temperature techniques (less than 100 degrees Celcius). Commonly, the composite exhibits a swelling ratio of 10-20%, exhibiting more sensitive to the percentage content of the metal particles albeit well below those reported in literature for pure cross -linked PDMS. The swelling time-constant is found to be on the order of minutes (CO2) to tens of minutes (liquid solvent) while oxide removal for cubed coupons with 6.35mm on each side is on the order of hours. Also in both cases, the oxide etching performance is dependent on the amount of dilation of the material and the mixing compatibility between the swelling agent and the etchant (such as acetic acid and hexafluoroacetylacetone, respectively for copper oxides). The etch

  5. Lithuanian Quarry Aggregates Concrete Effects of Alkaline Corrosion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurimas Rutkauskas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate alkaline corrosion of cement in concrete is going to respond in sodium and potassium hydroxide (lye with active SiO2 found in some aggregates. During this reaction, the concrete has resulted in significant internal stresses which cause deformation of the concrete, cracking and disintegration. The reaction is slow and concrete signs of decomposition appear only after a few months or years. The study used two different aggregates quarries. Studies show that Lithuania gravel contaminated with reactive particles having amorphous silicon dioxide reacting with cement in sodium and potassium hydroxide and the resulting alkaline concrete corrosion. It was found that, according to AAR 2 large aggregates include Group II – potentially reactive because of their expansion after 14 days, higher than 0.1%.

  6. Moessbauer Characterization of Rust Obtained in an Accelerated Corrosion Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, K. E.; Morales, A. L.; Arroyave, C. E.; Barrero, C. A.; Cook, D. C.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed drying-humectation cyclical processes (CEBELCOR) on eight A36 low carbon steel coupons in NaCl solutions containing 1x10 -2 M and 1x10 -1 M concentrations. The main purpose of these experiments is to contribute to the understanding of the conditions for akaganeite formation. Additionally, and with the idea to perform a complete characterization of the rust, this work also considers the formation of other iron oxide phases. The corrosion products were characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Gravimetric analysis demonstrates that the coupons presented high corrosion rates. Magnetite/maghemite was common in the rust stuck to the steel surface, whereas akaganeite was present only in traces. In the rust collected from the solutions, i.e., the rust that goes away from the metal surface easily, a magnetite/maghemite was not present and akaganeite showed up in larger quantities. These results support the idea that high concentrations of Cl - ions are required for the akaganeite formation. We concluded that akaganeite is not easily bonded to the rust layer; this may lead to the formation of a less protective rust layer and to higher corrosion rates.

  7. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TESTING OF TANKS 241-AN-102 & 241-AP-107 & 241-AP-108 IN SUPPORT OF ULTRASONIC TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WYRWAS RB; DUNCAN JB

    2008-11-20

    This report presents the results of the corrosion rates that were measured using electrochemical methods for tanks 241-AN-102 (AN-102), 241-AP-107 (AP 107), and 241-AP-108 (AP-108) performed under test plant RPP-PLAN-38215. The steel used as materials of construction for AN and AP tank farms was A537 Class 1. Test coupons of A537 Class 1 carbon steel were used for corrosion testing in the AN-107, AP-107, and AP-108 tank waste. Supernate will be tested from AN-102, AP-107, and Ap-108. Saltcake testing was performed on AP-108 only.

  8. Material testing of copper by extrusion-cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Segalina, F.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    was developed and implemented on a CNC lathe. An investigation was carried out extrusion-cutting copper discs using high-speed-steel cutting tools at 100 m/min cutting speed. Flow stress values for copper under machining-relevant conditions were obtained from measurement of the extrusion-cutting force...

  9. Sensitivity and specificity of copper sulphate test in determining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The accuracy of the copper sulphate method for the rapid screening of prospective blood donors has been questioned because this rapid screening method may lead to false deferral of truly eligible prospective blood donors. Objective: This study was aimed at determining the sensitivity and specificity of copper ...

  10. Field test corrosion experiments in Denmark with biomass fuels Part I Straw firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Karlsson, A; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    to investigate corrosion: a) the exposure of metal rings on water/air cooled probes, b) the exposure of test tubes in a test superheater, and c) the exposure of test tubes in existing superheaters. Thus both austenitic steels and ferritic steels were exposed in the steam temperature range of 450-600°C...

  11. Study on corrosion test techniques in lead bismuth eutectic flow. Joint research report in JFY2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    The evaluation of corrosion behaviors of core and structural materials in lead bismuth eutectic is one of the key issues for the utilization of lead bismuth eutectic as a coolant of the primary loops of lead bismuth cooled fast breeder reactors (FBRs) and the intermediate heat transport media of new-type steam generators of the sodium cooled FBRs. The purpose of the present study is to establish corrosion test techniques in lead bismuth eutectic flow. The techniques of steel corrosion test and oxygen control in flowing lead bismuth eutectic, and the technologies of a lead bismuth flow test at high temperature and high velocity were developed through corrosion test using a lead bismuth flow test loop of the Tokyo Institute of Technology in JFY2002. The major results are summarized as follows: (1) Techniques of fabrication, mount and rinse of corrosion specimens, measurement method of weight loss, and SEM/EDX analysis method have been established through lead bismuth corrosion test. (2) Weight losses were measured, corrosion and lead bismuth-adhered layers and eroded parts were observed in two 1000 hr-corrosion tests, and the results were compared with each other for twelve existing steels including ODS, F82H and SUH-3. (3) An oxygen sensor made of zirconia electrolyte structurally resistant to thermal stress and thermal shock was developed and tested in the lead bismuth flow loop. Good performance has been obtained. (4) An oxygen control method by injecting argon and hydrogen mixture gas containing steam into lead bismuth was applied to the lead bismuth flow loop, and technical issues for the development of the oxygen control method were extracted. (5) Technical measures for freezing and leakage of lead bismuth in the flow loop were accumulated. (6) Technical measures for flow rate decrease/blockage due to precipitation of oxide and corrosion products in a low temperature section of the lead bismuth flow loop were accumulated. (7) Electromagnetic flow meters with MI

  12. Cooperative tests on crack initiation and crack propagation in stress corrosion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takao; Iwadate, Tadao; Ebara, Ryuichiro; Umeyama, Yoshio; Yokobori, Takeo.

    1992-01-01

    In order to ensure the safety of machinery and structures in corrosive environment, the development of corrosion resistant materials and the research on the techniques of evaluating materials in corrosive environment have been carried out. At present, the life due to crack development is discussed by fracture mechanics, and the evaluation of life in corrosive environment can be done with a certain degree of accuracy. In order to collect the unified data which become the base of life evaluation, the standardization of the testing method is desirable. This cooperative tests were carried out for the purpose of collecting the information on the life evaluation techniques in stress corrosion environment. As the object, the large LP turbine rotors for nuclear power generation were taken up, and the tests on the crack initiation and crack propagation were carried out. As the test environment, the accelerated test in 38% NaOH + 0.01% CuO aqueous solution on ASTM A470 3% Ni-Cr-Mo-V steel was carried out. The results are reported. (K.I.)

  13. Moessbauer Studies of Corrosion Products Developed in Prohesion Test over Galvanized Steel Sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapponi, M.; Perez, T.; Ramos, C.; Saragovi, C.

    2003-01-01

    Precoated galvanized steel sheets were submitted to Prohesion test (PT) and to outdoor marine exposure test (OT). The corrosion products were different in both cases. Goethite, lepidocrocite, pyrite and magnetite were found in the Prohesion test samples; the presence of akaganeite cannot be discarded. Surprisingly greigite was detected in these samples, suggesting in addition a located microbiological corrosion process. On the other hand, goethite, lepidocrocite, magnetite, akaganeite and silicates were found in outdoor exposure samples. This study allows the conclusion that in the Prohesion G-85 test the corrosion mechanism is different from that in the marine atmosphere for the analyzed samples and could not be used to predict the performance of this type of outdoor exposed materials.

  14. Performance Analysis of Retrofitted Tribo-Corrosion Test Rig for Monitoring In Situ Oil Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpith Siddaiah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oils and lubricants, once extracted after use from a mechanical system, can hardly be reused, and should be refurbished or replaced in most applications. New methods of in situ oil and lubricant efficiency monitoring systems have been introduced for a wide variety of mechanical systems, such as automobiles, aerospace aircrafts, ships, offshore wind turbines, and deep sea oil drilling rigs. These methods utilize electronic sensors to monitor the “byproduct effects” in a mechanical system that are not indicative of the actual remaining lifecycle and reliability of the oils. A reliable oil monitoring system should be able to monitor the wear rate and the corrosion rate of the tribo-pairs due to the inclusion of contaminants. The current study addresses this technological gap, and presents a novel design of a tribo-corrosion test rig for oils used in a dynamic system. A pin-on-disk tribometer test rig retrofitted with a three electrode-potentiostat corrosion monitoring system was used to analyze the corrosion and wear rate of a steel tribo-pair in industrial grade transmission oil. The effectiveness of the retrofitted test rig was analyzed by introducing various concentrations of contaminants in an oil medium that usually leads to a corrosive working environment. The results indicate that the retrofitted test rig can effectively monitor the in situ tribological performance of the oil in a controlled dynamic corrosive environment. It is a useful method to understand the wear–corrosion synergies for further experimental work, and to develop accurate predictive lifecycle assessment and prognostic models. The application of this system is expected to have economic benefits and help reduce the ecological oil waste footprint.

  15. Magnesium alloys: predicting in vivo corrosion with in vitro immersion testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jemimah; Shadanbaz, Shaylin; Kirkland, Nicholas T; Stace, Edward; Woodfield, Tim; Staiger, Mark P; Dias, George J

    2012-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have been proposed as degradable replacements to commonly used orthopedic biomaterials such as titanium alloys and stainless steel. However, the corrosion of Mg in a physiological environment remains a difficult characteristic to accurately assess with in vitro methods. The aim of this study was to identify a simple in vitro immersion test that could provide corrosion rates similar to those observed in vivo. Pure Mg and five alloys (AZ31, Mg-0.8Ca, Mg-1Zn, Mg-1Mn, Mg-1.34Ca-3Zn) were immersed in either Earle's balanced salt solution (EBSS), minimum essential medium (MEM), or MEM-containing 40 g/L bovine serum albumin (MEMp) for 7, 14, or 21 days before removal and assessment of corrosion by weight loss. This in vitro data was compared to in vivo corrosion rates of the same materials implanted in a subcutaneous environment in Lewis rats for equivalent time points. The results suggested that, for the alloys investigated, the EBSS buffered with sodium bicarbonate provides a rate of degradation comparable to those observed in vivo. In contrast, the addition of components such as (4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid) (HEPES), vitamins, amino acids, and albumin significantly increased corrosion rates. Based on these findings, it is proposed that with this in vitro protocol, immersion of Mg alloys in EBSS can be used as a predictor of in vivo corrosion. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Vapor Space Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gray, J. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, B. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murphy, T. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hicks, K. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-30

    As part of an integrated program to better understand corrosion in the high level waste tanks, Hanford has been investigating corrosion at the liquid/air interface (LAI) and at higher areas in the tank vapor space. This current research evaluated localized corrosion in the vapor space over Hanford double shell tank simulants to assess the impact of ammonia and new minimum nitrite concentration limits, which are part of the broader corrosion chemistry limits. The findings from this study showed that the presence of ammonia gas (550 ppm) in the vapor space is sufficient to reduce corrosion over the short-term (i.e. four months) for a Hanford waste chemistry (SY102 High Nitrate). These findings are in agreement with previous studies at both Hanford and SRS which showed ammonia gas in the vapor space to be inhibitive. The presence of ammonia in electrochemical test solution, however, was insufficient to inhibit against pitting corrosion. The effect of the ammonia appears to be a function of the waste chemistry and may have more significant effects in waste with low nitrite concentrations. Since high levels of ammonia were found beneficial in previous studies, additional testing is recommended to assess the necessary minimum concentration for protection of carbon steel. The new minimum R value of 0.15 was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion in the vapor space. The pitting that occurred, however, did not progress over the four-month test. Pits appeared to stop growing, which would indicate that pitting might not progress through wall.

  17. Field Testing of Rapid Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Control of Steel in Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry E.; Alexander, Joshua B.; Kupwade-Patil,Kunal; Calle, Luz Marina

    2009-01-01

    This work field tested the use of electrokinetics for delivery of concrete sealing nanoparticles concurrent with the extraction of chlorides. Several cylinders of concrete were batched and placed in immersion at the Kennedy Space Center Beach Corrosion Test Site. The specimens were batched with steel reinforcement and a 4.5 wt.% (weight percent) content of sodium chloride. Upon arrival at Kennedy Space Center, the specimens were placed in the saltwater immersion pool at the Beach Corrosion Test Site. Following 30 days of saltwater exposure, the specimens were subjected to rapid chloride extraction concurrent with electrokinetic nanoparticle treatment. The treatments were operated at up to eight times the typical current density in order to complete the treatment in 7 days. The findings indicated that the short-term corrosion resistance of the concrete specimens was significantly enhanced as was the strength of the concrete.

  18. Shadow corrosion testing in the INCA facility in the Studsvik R2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystrand, A.C.; Lassing, A.

    1999-01-01

    Shadow corrosion is a phenomenon which occurs when zirconium alloys are in contact with or in proximity to other metallic objects in a boiling water reactor environment (BWR, RBMK, SGHWR etc.). An enhanced corrosion occurs on the zirconium alloy with the appearance of a 'shadow' of the metallic object. The magnitude of the shadow corrosion can be significant, and is potentially limiting for the lifetime of certain zirconium alloy components in BWRs and other reactors with a similar water chemistry. In order to evaluate the suitability of the In-Core Autoclave (INCA) in the Studsvik R2 materials testing reactor as an experimental facility for studying shadow corrosion, a demonstration test has been performed. A number of test specimens consisting of Zircaloy-2 tubing in contact with Inconel were exposed in an oxidising water chemistry. Some of the specimens were placed within the reactor core and some above the core. The conclusion of this experiment after post irradiation examination is that it is possible to use the INCA facility in the Studsvik R2 reactor to develop a significant level of shadow corrosion after only 800 hours of irradiation. (author)

  19. Corrosion Testing in Support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, G.

    2000-11-07

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium Project is part of the United States Department of Energy strategy to meet the nation's tritium needs. The project involves the design of a proton beam accelerator, which will produce tritium through neutron/proton interaction with helium-3. Design, construction and operation of this one-of-a-kind facility will involve the utilization of a wide variety of materials exposed to unique conditions, including elevated temperature and high-energy mixed-proton and -neutron spectra. A comprehensive materials test program was established by the APT project which includes the irradiation of structural materials by exposure to high-energy protons and neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Real-time corrosion measurements were performed on specially designed corrosion probes in water irradiated by an 800 MeV proton beam. The water test system provided a means for measuring water chemistry, dissolved hydroge n concentration, and the effects of water radiolysis and water quality on corrosion rate. The corrosion probes were constructed of candidate APT materials alloy 718, 316L stainless steel, 304L stainless steel, and 6061 Aluminum (T6 heat treatment), and alternate materials 5052 aluminum alloy, alloy 625, and C276. Real-time corrosion rates during proton irradiation increased with proton beam current. Efforts are continuing to determine the effect of proton beam characteristics and mixed-particle flux on the corrosion rate of materials located directly in the proton beam. This paper focuses on the real-time corrosion measurements of materials located in the supply stream and return stream of the water flow line to evaluate effects of long-lived radiolysis products and water chemistry on the corrosion rates of materials. In general, the corrosion rates for the out-of-beam probes were low and were affected mainly by water conductivity. The data indicate a water conductivity threshold e

  20. Assessment of copper resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in nitrite solutions by means of joint analysis of acoustic emission measurements, deformation diagrams, qualitative and quantitative fractography, and non-linear fracture mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanzhin, V.G.; Nikulin, S.A. [Moscow State Inst. of Steel and Alloys (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-01

    A study of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper in 0.1M NaNO{sub 2} aqueous solution is presented. The fracture kinetics was monitored by measuring the acoustic emission (AE) signals. Macro- and micro-fractography analysis, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), was employed to investigate the fracture mechanisms. Estimates of stress intensity factor, KI, and J-integral were derived in order to assess the resistance of copper to stress corrosion cracking. Two kinds of SCC tests under continuous circulation of the corrosive solution were employed in the present study: 1. Constant extension rate (2x10{sup -6}/s) tests on pre-cracked, middle tension (MT) panel specimens. 2. Tests on pre-cracked, compact tension (CT) specimens at a fixed (by a fixing bolt) opening of the crack walls ({delta} = 0.3 mm, K{sub i} = 27 MPax{radical}m). The time base for these tests was about two months. After the completion of the SCC test, the CT specimen was additionally tested, under a constant-rate (0.02 mm/s) off-center extension. In the both kinds of tests, the SCC fracture kinetics is found to exhibit two typical stages: Stage 1: SCC initiation stage (after a certain incubation period, T{sub i}, measured to be T{sub i} {approx_equal} 3-4 hours for MT specimens under constant extension, the corresponding stress was {sigma} {approx_equal} 40-70 MPa, and T{sub i} {approx_equal} 200 hours for CT specimens under a fixed crack wall opening). Stage 2: Active fracture process (SCC macro-fracture) distinguished by strong AE pulses (which are registered after time T{sub 2} {approx_equal} 8 hours for MT specimens and T{sub 2} {approx_equal} 800 hours for CT specimens). Fractography analysis has shown that the zone of SCC fracture in MT specimens extends to approximately 1,500 {mu}m. A 400-700 {mu}m deep zone of brittle transgranular fracture, which included small areas showing characteristic SCC 'striations', was observed adjacent to the fatigue pre-crack area. At higher

  1. Comparative electrochemical investigation of the effect of aging on corrosion of dental amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Wala M

    2007-01-01

    To investigate corrosion in dental amalgam and evaluate the effects of composition and long-term aging on the alloy's corrosion behavior. A sample of high-copper and low-copper formulations was employed. Corrosion tests were performed using a 3-electrode polarization cell. Anodic polarization curves were drawn, and the potential and the current density corresponding to the first anodic peak were registered. Scanning electron microscopy was performed, and the different metallurgical phases of the alloy's microstructure were examined and analyzed chemically using an energy-dispersive x-ray technique. The amalgams' corrosion behavior was evaluated at 1 week and after aging in a simulated oral environment for 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA)Scheffe post hoc test at a .05 significance level. The potential values recorded by the high-copper amalgam were higher (P amalgam than in the high-copper alloy. For both formulations the potentials increased significantly (P amalgam. High-copper amalgam exhibited better resistance to corrosion than the low-copper alloy. Aging in a simulated oral environment improved corrosion behavior for both high- and low-copper amalgams.

  2. Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Poloski, Adam P.

    2007-08-17

    This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from the sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. The proposed testing builds on the approach and laboratory test findings for both K Basin sludge and simulated sludge garnered during prior testing from September 2006 to March 2007. The outlined testing in this plan is designed to yield further understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions, the effects of compositional and process variations and the effectiveness of various strategies to mitigate the observed high shear strength phenomenon observed during the prior testing. These tests are designed to provide process validation and refinement vs. process development and design input. The expected outcome is to establish a level of understanding of the chemistry such that successful operating strategies and parameters can be implemented within the confines of the existing STP corrosion vessel design. In July 2007, the DOE provided direction to FH regarding significant changes to the scope of the overall STP. As a result of the changes, FH directed PNNL to stop work on most of the planned activities covered in this test plan. Therefore, it is unlikely the testing described here will be performed. However, to preserve the test strategy and details developed to date, the test plan has been published.

  3. Development of new corrosion inhibitor tested on mild steel supported by electrochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeeb, Hussein Jwad; Luaibi, Hasan Mohammed; Dakhil, Rifaat Mohammed; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A.; Gaaz, Tayser Sumer

    2018-03-01

    Mild steel is a metal which is commonly used in industrials and manufacturing of equipment for most industries round the world. It is cheaper cost compared with the other metals and its durable, hard and easy-to-wear physical properties make it a major choice in the manufacture of equipment parts. The main problem through the uses of mild steel in industry is its resistance against corrosion, especially in acidic solutions. This case led to raise the cost of maintenance of equipment that used mild steel and as a result increased costs for the company. Organic corrosive inhibitors that also act as green chemicals, 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol have been synthesized. This inhibitor is tested as corrosion inhibitor on a mild steel sample MS in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution (HCl) using electrochemical measurements test includes PD (Potentiodynamic), EIS (Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy), OCP (Open circuit potential) and EFM (electrochemical frequency modulation). The obtained results indicate that 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol acts as a good corrosion inhibitor for mild steel sample in HCl solution with efficiency above 90%. Changes in the impedance parameters postulated adsorption on the mild steel specimens' surfaces of, which it going to the formation of protective coating layer. It also shows that 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol corrosion inhibitors are effective in helping to reduce and slow down the corrosion process that occurs on mild steel surface in hydrochloric acid solution. Increase of corrosion inhibitor concentration provides a protective layer of mild steel. However, this protective layer becomes weak when the temperature of the solution increases.

  4. Development of new corrosion inhibitor tested on mild steel supported by electrochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Jwad Habeeb

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild steel is a metal which is commonly used in industrials and manufacturing of equipment for most industries round the world. It is cheaper cost compared with the other metals and its durable, hard and easy-to-wear physical properties make it a major choice in the manufacture of equipment parts. The main problem through the uses of mild steel in industry is its resistance against corrosion, especially in acidic solutions. This case led to raise the cost of maintenance of equipment that used mild steel and as a result increased costs for the company. Organic corrosive inhibitors that also act as green chemicals, 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol have been synthesized. This inhibitor is tested as corrosion inhibitor on a mild steel sample MS in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution (HCl using electrochemical measurements test includes PD (Potentiodynamic, EIS (Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, OCP (Open circuit potential and EFM (electrochemical frequency modulation. The obtained results indicate that 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol acts as a good corrosion inhibitor for mild steel sample in HCl solution with efficiency above 90%. Changes in the impedance parameters postulated adsorption on the mild steel specimens' surfaces of, which it going to the formation of protective coating layer. It also shows that 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol corrosion inhibitors are effective in helping to reduce and slow down the corrosion process that occurs on mild steel surface in hydrochloric acid solution. Increase of corrosion inhibitor concentration provides a protective layer of mild steel. However, this protective layer becomes weak when the temperature of the solution increases. Keywords: Hydroxybenzylideneaminomethy, Potentiodynamic, Electrochemical frequency modulation, Impedance

  5. Corrosion tests of 316L and Hastelloy C-22 in simulated tank waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, M.J.; Pitman, S.G.

    2000-01-01

    Both the 316L stainless steel and Hastelloy C-22 gave satisfactory corrosion performance in the simulated test environments. They were subjected to 100 day weight loss corrosion tests and electrochemical potentiodynamic evaluation. This activity supports confirmation of the design basis for the materials of construction of process vessels and equipment used to handle the feed to the LAW-melter evaporator. BNFL process and mechanical engineering will use the information derived from this task to select material of construction for process vessels and equipment

  6. Surface preparation for residual stress measurement of an accelerated corrosion tested welded marine steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Residual stress measurement is often required for the assessment of structural integrity of components. Measurement of residual stress in corrosion tested specimens is challenging owing to the difficulty of accessing the surface because of the rust layer. This study explored the potential methods for the surface preparation of an ultrasonically-peened and accelerated corrosion tested DH36 marine steel fillet welded specimen to ease the way for subsequent residual stress measurement using neutron diffraction and the contour method. We find that hydroblasting introduces compressive residual stress at the surface that will alter the surface stress to be measured

  7. Skin corrosion and irritation test of sunscreen nanoparticles using reconstructed 3D human skin model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghye Choi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Effects of nanoparticles including zinc oxide nanoparticles, titanium oxide nanoparticles, and their mixtures on skin corrosion and irritation were investigated by using in vitro 3D human skin models (KeraSkinTM and the results were compared to those of an in vivo animal test. Methods Skin models were incubated with nanoparticles for a definite time period and cell viability was measured by the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2.5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. Skin corrosion and irritation were identified by the decreased viability based on the pre-determined threshold. Results Cell viability after exposure to nanomaterial was not decreased to the pre-determined threshold level, which was 15% after 60 minutes exposure in corrosion test and 50% after 45 minutes exposure in the irritation test. IL-1α release and histopathological findings support the results of cell viability test. In vivo test using rabbits also showed non-corrosive and non-irritant results. Conclusions The findings provide the evidence that zinc oxide nanoparticles, titanium oxide nanoparticles and their mixture are ‘non corrosive’ and ‘non-irritant’ to the human skin by a globally harmonized classification system. In vivo test using animals can be replaced by an alternative in vitro test.

  8. Laboratory testing of waste glass aqueous corrosion; effects of experimental parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey has been performed to assess the effects of the temperature, glass surface area/leachate volume ratio, leachant composition, leachant flow rate, and glass composition (actual radioactive vs. simulated glass) used in laboratory tests on the measured glass reaction rate. The effects of these parameters must be accounted for in mechanistic models used to project glass durability over long times. Test parameters can also be utilized to highlight particular processes in laboratory tests. Waste glass corrosion results as water diffusion, ion-exchange, and hydrolysis reactions occur simultaneously to devitrify the glass and release soluble glass components into solution. The rates of these processes are interrelated by the affects of the solution chemistry and glass alteration phases on each process, and the dominant (fastest) process may change as the reaction progresses. Transport of components from the release sites into solution may also affect the observed corrosion rate. The reaction temperature will affect the rate of each process, while other parameters will affect the solution chemistry and which processes are observed during the test. The early stages of corrosion will be observed under test conditions which maintain dilute leachates and the later stages will be observed under conditions that generate more concentrated leachate solutions. Typically, water diffusion and ion-exchange reactions dominate the observed glass corrosion in dilute solutions while hydrolysis reactions dominant in more concentrated solutions. Which process(es) controls the long-term glass corrosion is not fully understood, and the long-term corrosion rate may be either transport- or reaction-limited

  9. An accurately controllable imitative stress corrosion cracking for electromagnetic nondestructive testing and evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka; Uchimoto, Tetsuya; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We propose a method to simulate stress corrosion cracking. ► The method offers nondestructive signals similar to those of actual cracking. ► Visual and eddy current examinations validate the method. - Abstract: This study proposes a simple and cost-effective approach to fabricate an artificial flaw that is identical to stress corrosion cracking especially from the viewpoint of electromagnetic nondestructive evaluations. The key idea of the approach is to embed a partially-bonded region inside a material by bonding together surfaces that have grooves. The region is regarded as an area of uniform non-zero conductivity from an electromagnetic nondestructive point of view, and thus simulates the characteristics of stress corrosion cracking. Since the grooves are introduced using electro-discharge machining, one can control the profile of the imitative stress corrosion cracking accurately. After numerical simulation to evaluate the spatial resolution of conventional eddy current testing, six specimens made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel were fabricated on the basis of the results of the simulations. Visual and eddy current examinations were carried out to demonstrate that the artificial flaws well simulated the characteristics of actual stress corrosion cracking. Subsequent destructive test confirmed that the bonding did not change the depth profiles of the artificial flaw.

  10. Corrosion of amalgams under sliding wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, K; Meletis, E I

    1996-05-01

    During mastication, dental amalgams are simultaneously subjected to corrosion by the oral environment and to a sliding-wear process by biting forces. In the present study, the effect of sliding wear on the corrosion behavior of two high-copper dental amalgams was investigated. An experimental apparatus was utilized that allows electrochemical testing under sliding-wear conditions. Corrosion potential measurements and anodic polarization scans were conducted in 0.1 M NaCl solution under sliding wear to characterize the behavior of two commercial, high-copper, single composition dental amalgams. In addition, long duration tests were conducted to assess possible corrosion and wear synergistic effects. The results showed that sliding wear caused a sharp reduction in the corrosion potential, a significant increase in the corrosion rate and a decrease in the repassivation rate of both amalgams. These effects are due to the mechanical removal by the wear process of the surface protective film formed on dental amalgams. The simultaneous action of sliding wear and corrosion can also induce embrittlement that leads to cracking. The present evidence suggests that this cracking may be one of the major contributors to marginal failures of dental amalgam restorations.

  11. Accelerated corrosion testing, evaluation and durability design of bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Pereira, Ruben Mario

    2003-06-01

    In the last few years, the effectiveness of cement grout in galvanized or polyethylene ducts, the most widely used corrosion protection system for multistrand bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons, has been under debate, due to significant tendon corrosion damage, several reported failures of individual tendons as well as a few collapses of non-typical structures. While experience in the USA has been generally good, some foreign experience has been less than satisfactory. This dissertation is part of a comprehensive research program started in 1993, which has the objectives to examine the use of post-tensioning in bridge substructures, identify durability concerns and existing technology, develop and carry out an experimental testing program, and conclude with durability design guidelines. Three experimental programs were developed: A long term macrocell corrosion test series, to investigate corrosion protection for internal tendons in precast segmental construction; a long term beam corrosion test series, to examine the effects of post-tensioning on corrosion protection as affected by crack width; and, a long term column corrosion test series, to examine corrosion protection in vertical elements. Preliminary design guidelines were developed previously in the overall study by the initial researchers, after an extensive literature review. This dissertation scope includes continuation of exposure testing of the macrocell, beam and column specimens, performing comprehensive autopsies of selected specimens and updating the durability design guidelines based on the exposure testing and autopsy results. After autopsies were performed, overall findings indicate negative durability effects due to the use of mixed reinforcement, small concrete covers, galvanized steel ducts, and industry standard or heat-shrink galvanized duct splices. The width of cracks was shown to have a direct negative effect on specimen performance. Grout voids were found to be detrimental to the

  12. Study of the effect of the NO{sub 2} in the atmospheric corrosion of copper; Estudio del efecto del NO{sub 2} en la corrosion atmosferica del cobre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariaca Rodriguez, Liboria

    1997-12-31

    Factors as the increase of the power consumption and the development of new combustion technologies, together with the increasing campaigns for the diminution of the SO{sub 2} emissions, have given rise to an increase of the relative importance of other atmospheric polluting agents, among which the nitrogen oxides occupy preponderant place. This new situation has motivated that during the last years greater attention is appearing to the effect these oxides can have on the stability of the materials. However, the results still are scarce and sometimes contradictory. With the purpose of contributing to the understanding of the effect of the NO{sub x} in the atmospheric corrosion, the investigation that is shown here was made. The effect that the NO{sub 2} has in the atmospheric corrosion of copper was studied, considering cases with and without the simultaneous presence of SO{sub 2}, with different relative humidities (RH) and temperatures of the atmospheric air. For this purpose one resorted to the simulation of atmospheres of interest by means of laboratory chambers that allowed the control of the temperature, RH and the contamination level. In each atmosphere completely clean copper coupons were exposed, and withdrawn at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Gravimetric analyses of gain and loss of mass and one complete characterization the corrosion products formed was made, mainly by means of X ray diffraction techniques by grazing angle (DRS), and photo electronic X ray spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA). Also, the applicability in these conditions of the electrochemical techniques of DC (RP, CP and RE) and of alternating current (EIE). From the results obtained it is worth mentioning as the more important the following ones: The corrosion of copper in atmospheres contaminated solely with NO{sub 2} depends fundamentally on the RH, not existing, as in the case of other metals, a critical RH (CRH), from which the kinetics of the corrosion process increases; all the opposite, the copper

  13. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 4 – Integrated chemical effects testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Amir; LaBrier, Daniel; Blandford, Edward; Howe, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Integrated test explored the material release of a postulated large break LOCA. • Aluminum concentration was very low (<0.1 mg/L) throughout the test duration. • Zinc concentration was low (<1 mg/L) in TSP-buffered system. • Calcium release showed two distinguished release zones: prompt and meta-stable. • Copper and iron has no distinguishable concentration up to first 24 h of testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of an integrated chemical effects experiment executed under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) at the Vogtle nuclear power plant, operated by the Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNOC). This test was conducted for closure of a series of bench scale experiments conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum (Howe et al., 2015) and zinc (Pease et al., 2015) from metallic surfaces, and calcium from NUKON fiberglass insulation (Olson et al., 2015) . The integrated test was performed in the Corrosion/Chemical Head Loss Experimental (CHLE) facility with representative amounts of zinc, aluminum, carbon steel, copper, NUKON fiberglass, and latent debris. The test was conducted using borated TSP-buffered solution under a post-LOCA prototypical temperature profile lasting for 30 days. The results presented in this article demonstrate trends for zinc, aluminum, and calcium release that are consistent with separate bench scale testing and previous integrated tests under TSP conditions. The release rate and maximum concentrations of the released materials were slightly different than the separate effect testing as a result of different experimental conditions (temperature, surface area-to-water volume ratio) and/or the presence of other metals and chemicals in the integrated test. Samples of metal coupons and fiberglass were selected for analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy

  14. Corrosion Testing of Thermal Spray Coatings in a Biomass Co-Firing Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Oksa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale use of biomass and recycled fuel is increasing in energy production due to climate and energy targets. A 40% cut in greenhouse gas emission compared to 1990 levels and at least a 27% share of renewable energy consumption are set in EU Energy Strategy 2030. Burning fuels with high content of corrosive species such as chlorine and heavy metals causes deterioration of boiler components, shortened lifetime, limited availability of a plant and hence higher maintenance and investment costs and lower thermal and economic efficiency. Coatings can be applied to protect the critical boiler components against high temperature corrosion. In this study, five thermal spray coatings were tested in an actual biomass co-firing boiler for 1300 h with a measurement probe. The coatings were analyzed after the exposure by metallographic means and scanning electron microscope/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope (SEM/EDX. The deposits formed on the specimens were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence. At 550 °C, the coatings showed excellent corrosion performance compared to reference material ferritic steel T92. At 750 °C, tube material A263 together with NiCr and NiCrTi had the highest corrosion resistance. To conclude, thermal spray coatings can offer substantial corrosion protection in biomass and recycled fuel burning power plants.

  15. Diagnostic of corrosion defects in steam generator tubes using advanced signal processing from Eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formigoni, Andre L.; Lopez, Luiz A.N.M.; Ting, Daniel K.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the Brazilian Angra I PWR nuclear power plant went into a programmed shutdown for substitution of its Steam Generator (SG) which life was shortened due to stress corrosion in its tubes. The total cost of investment were around R$724 million. The signals generated during an Eddy-current Testing (ECT) inspection in SG tubes of nuclear plant allows for the localization and dimensioning of defects in the tubes. The defects related with corrosion generate complex signals that are difficult to analyze and are the most common cause in SG replacement in nuclear power plants around the world. The objective of this paper is the development of a methodology that allows for the characterization of corrosion signals by ECT inspections applied in the heat exchangers tubes of SG of a nuclear power plant. In this present work, the aim is to investigate distributed type defects by inducing controlled corrosion in sample tubes of different materials The ECT signals obtained from these samples tubes with corrosion implanted, will be analyzed using Zetec ECT equipment, the MIZ-17ET and its probes. The data acquisition will use a NI PC A/D CARD 700 card and the LabVIEW program. Subsequently, we will apply mathematical tools for signal processing like time windowed Fast Fourier transforms and Wavelets transforms, in MATLAB platform, which will allow effectiveness to remove the noises and to extract representative characteristics for the defect being analyzed. Previously obtained results as well as the proposal for the future work will be presented. (author)

  16. Environmental degradation of mechanical properties of grey cast iron with different copper contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rahman, M.; Abd El-Mageed, A.M.; Abu El-Ainin, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, different percentages of copper were added to grey cast iron to investigate its effect on microstructures, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of the tested cast iron. Mechanical testing included hardness, tension, compression and impact, while corrosion testing was conducted by immersing specimens in 1 mol HC1 for different exposure times (120, 240, 360, 480, and 600 hrs). It was found that the copper addition had a remarkable effect on graphite morphology, as well as, pearlite and ferrite existing. Copper content proved to affect mechanical properties, improving these properties up to 2%, after which a decrease was noticed. Copper addition has no noticeable effect on percentage tensile strain to fracture, however, it has an obvious effect on the percentage compressive strain to fracture, especially for 2.0 % copper addition. The alloys containing 0.0 % and 1.0 % copper recorded the lower corrosion resistance, while those containing 2.0 % and 4.0 % copper addition gave the higher corrosion resistance. Also, the corrosion rate decreased with the increase of copper content. A change in the angle of fracture in compression was noticed for corroded specimens from about 55 to 90 degrees as exposure time increases. (author)

  17. Testing the permeability and corrosion resistance of micro-mechanically interlocked joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byskov-Nielsen, Jeppe; Holm, Allan H.; Højsholt, Rune; Sá, Pedro; Balling, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Micro-mechanical interlocking (MMI) can be applied to create new and interesting composite materials. We have employed laser structuring to achieve MMI between stainless steel and plastic with extremely high joint strength. However, the water permeability and corrosion resistance of the joint must be examined. For many industrially relevant applications it is important to keep water away from certain parts and to prevent the sample from corroding. A thorough study of the permeability of the interconnected samples at different temperatures and after employing different laser-structuring techniques is conducted. The permeability seems to be consistent with the Hagen-Poiseuille equation independent of the laser structuring technique and is orders of magnitudes larger than the diffusion rate through the plastic. Two different types of corrosion tests have been undertaken, and we show that care must be taken in order not to degrade the corrosion resistance of the sample to an unacceptable level.

  18. Field test corrosion experiences when co-firing straw and coal: 10 year status within Elsam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus Berg; Montgomery, Melanie; Larsen, Ole Hede

    2007-01-01

    In Denmark, straw is utilised for the generation of energy and district heating in power plants. Combustion of straw gives rise to high contents of potassium chloride and some sulphur dioxide in the flue gas. These compounds can lead to deposits with high content of potassium chloride and potassium...... sulphate on superheater tubes resulting in increased corrosion rates. From field experimental results this paper show, that by co-firing straw with coal, corrosion rates can be brought down to an acceptable level. This paper firstly deals with the results from a demonstration program co-firing coal...... and straw at the 150 MW pulverized coal fired boiler Studstrup unit 1. Two exposure series lasting 3000 hours each were performed for co-firing 10 and 20% of straw (% energy basis) with coal. Using built in test tubes in the hot end of the actual superheaters and air/water cooled corrosion probes...

  19. In situ corrosion testing of various nickel alloys at Måbjerg waste incineration plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Hansson, A. N.; Jensen, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of waste in Denmark is disposed via waste to energy (WTE) incineration plants which are fabricated from carbon steel. However, due to the increasing corrosiveness of waste over the years, more corrosion resistant alloys are required. In Denmark, Inconel 625 (UNSN06625) is the weld...... overlay material currently being used to give improved corrosion resistance. In order to assess the use of alternative nickel alloys, test panels have been manufactured and inserted into Måbjerg waste incineration plant. Inconel 625 as a 50% weld overlay, two layered weld overlay and as a spiral weld...... overlay was exposed. Other nickel materials exposed were weld overlay Alloy 686, Alloy 50 and Sumitomo Super 625 coextruded tube. Exposure has been undertaken from 2003 to 2009 in the first pass and 2005–2009 in the second pass, and sections have been removed and investigated during this period...

  20. Development of Improved Accelerated Corrosion Qualification Test Methodology for Aerospace Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    project proposed against 2009 Strategic Environmental Research and Development (SERDP) Statement of Need “ Dynamic Accelerated Corrosion Test Protocol...Temperature and humidity cycling • Dynamic mechanical loading Four contracts awarded; final reports due ~Feb 2015: • Systems and Materials Research...Example: ASTM D7869 – ( Xenon Arc UV + water spray) 20 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited (Case

  1. Matching marine corrosion: new accelerated test gives good correlation with outdoor exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeflaak, M.

    2004-01-01

    An extensive study of the corrosion resistance of a large number and a large variety of coatings systems for steel protection has been carried out. With these, three types of accelerated tests have been correlated with observerations from two years of outdoor exposure in a marine environment, and a

  2. Copper corrosion in irradiated environments. The influence of H2O2 on the electrochemistry of copper dissolution in HC1 electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyrl, W.H.; Bell, B.T.; Atanasoski, R.T.; Glass, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    The anodic dissolution of copper has been examined in deaerated, 0.1 M HCl aqueous solution in the presence of H 2 O 2 . Concentrations of H 2 O 2 up to 0.2 M were studied at a rotating copper disk-platinum ring electrode. The open circuit potential (OCP) of copper was found to depend on both peroxide concentration and rotation rate. The OCP shifts towards more positive values with increasing H 2 O 2 concentration (C) and decreasing rotation rate (Omega). The dependence of OCP on (C/Omega/sup 1/2/) was the same as for oxygenated solutions reported earlier [1], at small values of (C/Omega/sup 1/2/). At higher values of (C/Omega/sup 1/2/), departure from the expected behavior was observed. The current-voltage curves for anodic dissolution of copper were also influenced by the presence of peroxide. The curves recorded with the potential scanned in the positive direction showed the expected 60 mV slope, but the reverse scans showed significant departures. At a given potential scan rate, hysteresis was observed which was larger for higher H 2 O 2 concentrations, lower rotation rates, and more positive anodic potential limits. Monitoring the cuprous ions at the outer Pt ring revealed that there was a complex set of events taking place at the copper surface, including film formation and the appearance of cupric ions. 13 references, 7 figures

  3. Fretting corrosion tests on orthopedic plates and screws made of ASTM F138 stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Teodoro dos Santos

    Full Text Available Introduction Although there has been significant progress in the design of implants for osteosynthesis, the occurrence of failures in these medical devices are still frequent. These implants are prone to suffer from fretting corrosion due to micromotion that takes place between the screw heads and plate holes. Consequently, fretting corrosion has been the subject of research in order to understand its influence on the structural integrity of osteosynthesis implants. The aim of this paper is to correlate the surface finish characteristics of bone plate-screw systems with fretting corrosion. Methods The surface finish (machined and polished of five specimens taken from three commercial dynamic compression plates (DCP were evaluated. For testing, the specimens were fixed with bone screws, immersed in a solution of 0.90% NaCl and subjected to a rocking motion with an amplitude of 1.70 mm and frequency of 1.0 Hz for 1.0 × 106 cycles, according to the ASTM F897 standard. Both, plate and screws were manufactured in Brazil with ASTM F138 stainless steel. Results Flaws on the hole countersink area and on the screw thread of some specimens were identified stereoscopically. At the end of the test all the specimens showed evidence of fretting corrosion with an average metal loss of 4.80 mg/million cycles. Conclusion An inadequate surface finish in some areas of the plates and screws may have favored the incidence of damage to the passive film, accelerating the fretting corrosion at the interfaces between the plate hole countersink and the screw head. Keywords Osteosynthesis, DCP, Bone plate, Screw, Fretting corrosion, Stainless steel.

  4. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 01-1-065 Accelerated Corrosion Durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-15

    the ACDT events. The corrosion mechanisms are accelerated through the use of an environmental chamber that provides a high temperature, high humidity...Scribes may be made on various surfaces of the test item. These scribes are meant to test the coating adhesion properties along with its...duplicates the rough cobblestone road found in many parts of the world. The course is useful as a standard rough road for accelerated tests of

  5. Effect of cerium addition on corrosion behaviour of AZ61 + XCe alloy under salt spray test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manivannan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of Mg–6Al–1Zn + XCe (where X = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 wt% Ce alloys, aged for 18 h at different temperatures of 180 °C, 200 °C, 220 °C and 240 °C, was studied in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. The salt spray test was conducted in accordance with ASTM-B117 standard (fog test. The corrosion morphologies, corrosion rate and the composition of the corrosion products were investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Optical Microscopy (OM and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM techniques. The results show the cerium addition and ageing treatment has significantly influenced the corrosion morphologies and the corrosion rate. In AZ61 alloy, the intermetallic β (Mg17Al12 phase acts as a corrosion barrier and upon ageing the Al4Ce phase precipitates along the α grain boundaries. The precipitation modifies the β phase to form more continuous network which subsequently reduces the corrosion attack in the chlorine environment. Salt spray test result shows the AZ61 alloy with 1.5 wt% Ce aged at 220 °C exhibits the better corrosion resistance.

  6. Application of the thin electrolyte layer technique to corrosion testing of dental materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledvina, Martin

    Proper simulation of the oral environment for the corrosion testing of dental materials is crucial for determining corrosion rates and mechanisms correctly. In this study, the thin electrolyte layer technique (TET) was characterized and employed to investigate the importance of the chemical composition of the testing environment on the outcome of electrochemical tests. The thickness of the electrolyte layer in TET is only 0.5 mm and contains only 20 muL of electrolyte. This arrangement simulates the physical characteristics of the oral environment and facilitates testing in human saliva. Oxygen availability for reduction on the sample surface was determined, using cathodic polarization of Pt in borate buffer, to be lower in TET than in traditional (bulk electrolyte) techniques. Appreciable differences were found during polarization experiments on 316 L SS in saline and artificial saliva. Oxygen content was found to play a significant role in the corrosivity of various species contained in artificial saliva. Potentiodynamic polarization employing human saliva in TET on 316L SS proved to be very different from tests performed in artificial saliva. This was believed to be due to the presence of organic species, specifically proteins, contained in human saliva. This was further confirmed by cyclic polarization and corrosion current measurements of four commercial nickel-chromium (NiCr) alloys with varying amounts of Be. For this phase of the experiment, artificial saliva (AS), AS with 1% albumin, AS with 1% of mucin and parotid human saliva were employed as electrolytes. The results obtained in the various electrolytes depended on the composition, microstructure, stability of passive film, and the presence of casting porosity of the alloys tested. Proteins had insignificant effect on alloys with highly stable passive films, whereas, corrosion rates increased substantially in those alloys with compromised passive film formation. Proteins, especially mucin, lowered the

  7. Standard Practice for Making and Using U-Bend Stress-Corrosion Test Specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for making and using U-bend specimens for the evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking in metals. The U-bend specimen is generally a rectangular strip which is bent 180° around a predetermined radius and maintained in this constant strain condition during the stress-corrosion test. Bends slightly less than or greater than 180° are sometimes used. Typical U-bend configurations showing several different methods of maintaining the applied stress are shown in Fig. 1. 1.2 U-bend specimens usually contain both elastic and plastic strain. In some cases (for example, very thin sheet or small diameter wire) it is possible to form a U-bend and produce only elastic strain. However, bent-beam (Practice G 39 or direct tension (Practice G 49)) specimens are normally used to study stress-corrosion cracking of strip or sheet under elastic strain only. 1.3 This practice is concerned only with the test specimen and not the environmental aspects of stress-corrosion testing which are discus...

  8. Electrochemical corrosion studies on copper-base waste package container materials in unirradiated 0.1 N NaNO3 at 95 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkaya, M.; Verink, E.D. Jr.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1988-05-01

    Three candidate materials were investigated in this study in terms of their electrochemical corrosion behavior in unirradiated 0.1 N NaNO 3 solutions at 95 degrees C. Anodic polarization experiments were conducted to determine the passive current densities, pitting potentials, and other parameters, together with Cyclic Current Reversal Voltammetry tests to evaluate the stability and protectiveness of the passive oxides formed. X-ray diffraction and Auger Electron Spectroscopy were used for identification of the corrosion products as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy for the surface morphology studies. 2 refs., 22 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Corrosion behaviour of AISI 304 stainless steel with Cu coatings in H 2SO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M. C.; Coy, A. E.; Arrabal, R.; Viejo, F.; M'hich, A.

    2007-09-01

    The work addresses the influence of cementation and electrodeposition of copper coatings on the corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel immersed in 30 wt.% H 2SO 4 at temperatures of 25 and 50 °C. Corrosion process was evaluated by gravimetric tests, DC measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The specimen surfaces were analysed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction. The corrosion performance of AISI 304 stainless steel in sulphuric acid solution was greatly improved by copper coatings. The amount of copper deposited by the cementation process was sufficient to protect the stainless steel of corrosion. A greater amount of copper obtained by electrodeposition treatments does not supply further improvement in the corrosion behaviour. The improved corrosion resistance is related to copper dissolution at the initial stages of immersion tests and the presence of Cu 2+ in the solution, which makes the medium more oxidizing, increasing the stability of the passive layer. In addition, the presence of copper at the surface reduces the overpotential of cathodic reaction, enabling the transition from an active region to the passive one.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking tests for low carbon stainless steels with work hardened layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Junichi; Kikuchi, Masahiko; Tsukada, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    To avoid introduction of Cr depletion at grain boundaries by welding process, low carbon stainless steels (SSs) were used in corrosive environment as one of countermeasures for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). Recently, it is reported that SCCs were introduced at portion with work hardened layer although low carbon SSs had been used at core shrouds and primary loop recirculation piping in Boiling Water Reactors. To simulate and examine the phenomenon, mechanical working, metallographic observation, hardness test and SCC tests in chloride solutions were conducted for low carbon SSs. From the results of metallographic observation and hardness test, it was confirmed that slip bands were observed around the surface and hardened layer was introduced by mechanical working. From the results of SCC tests, it was noticed that cracks which introduced from the surface, had grown into the matrix. It is thought that low carbon SSs with work hardened layer have susceptibility to SCC from the above. (author)

  11. Some important considerations in the development of stress corrosion cracking test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, R. P.; Novak, S. R.; Williams, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of some of the precaution needs the development of fracture-mechanics based test methods for studying stress corrosion cracking involves. Following a review of pertinent analytical fracture mechanics considerations and of basic test methods, the implications for test corrosion cracking studies of the time-to-failure determining kinetics of crack growth and life are examined. It is shown that the basic assumption of the linear-elastic fracture mechanics analyses must be clearly recognized and satisfied in experimentation and that the effects of incubation and nonsteady-state crack growth must also be properly taken into account in determining the crack growth kinetics, if valid data are to be obtained from fracture-mechanics based test methods.

  12. Structural analysis and intergranular corrosion tests of AISI 316L steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonawská, Z; Svoboda, M; Sozańska, M; Krístková, M; Sojka, J; Dagbert, C; Hyspecká, L

    2006-10-01

    Pure AISI 316L steel is investigated after solution heat treatment (1050 degrees C/H(2)O) and structural sensitization (650 degrees C). Two quite different intergranular corrosion tests are used to determine the degree of structural sensitization due to the precipitation of secondary phases along the grain boundaries (mainly the M(23)C(6) and sigma-phase): the oxalic acid etch test and the electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation test. Generally, the dissolution of chromium-rich carbides (M(23)C(6)) is provoked by oxalic acid etch tests, whereas the chromium-depleted zones, in the vicinity of chromium-rich carbides (M(23)C(6)), are attacked by electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation tests. Both intergranular corrosion tests are used to determine the maximum degree of structural sensitization. Thus structural analysis by carbon replicas reveals the Laves phase, and both the M(23)C(6) and (Cr,Mo)(x)(Fe,Ni)(y) phases. The results of intergranular corrosion tests are related to the findings of the structural analysis.

  13. Standard practice for conducting wire-on-bolt test for atmospheric galvanic corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the evaluation of atmospheric galvanic corrosion of any anodic material that can be made into a wire when in contact with a cathodic material that can be made into a threaded rod. 1.2 When certain materials are used for the anode and cathode, this practice has been used to rate the corrosivity of atmospheres. 1.3 The wire-on-bolt test was first described in 1955 (1), and has since been used extensively with standard materials to determine corrosivity of atmospheres under the names CLIMAT Test (CLassify Industrial and Marine ATmospheres) (2-5) and ATCORR (ATmospheric CORRosivity) (6-9). 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations p...

  14. Brief description of out-of-pile test facilities for study in corrosion and fission product behaviour in flowing sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizawa, K.; Sekiguchi, N.; Atsumo, H.

    1976-01-01

    The experimental methods to perform tests for study in corrosion and fission products behaviour in flowing sodium are outlined. Flow diagrams for the activated materials and fission products behaviour test loop are given

  15. Microstructural stability of zirconia-alumina composite coatings during hot corrosion test at 1050 {sup o}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyvani, A., E-mail: akeyvani@ut.ac.i [School of Metallurgy and Materials, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saremi, M., E-mail: saremi@ut.ac.i [School of Metallurgy and Materials, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heydarzadeh Sohi, M., E-mail: mhsohi@ut.ac.i [School of Metallurgy and Materials, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-09-10

    In the present work hot corrosion behavior of plasma sprayed zirconia-alumina coatings on Ni-base, IN-738, super alloy substrate was studied compared with normal zirconia. Hot corrosion resistance of the coatings was measured at 1050 {sup o}C using an atmospheric electrical furnace and a fused mixture of vanadium pentoxide and sodium sulfate salt. The hot corrosion test duration was 4 h in each cycle, while the specimens were cooled in the furnace. The general and peripheral conditions of the specimens were inspected. If there were any cracks or spallation in coating wedge the test was stopped, the time was recorded and coating microstructure was studied. Composite coatings of zirconia-alumina having alumina as a top coat or a mixed zirconia-alumina layer, showed better resistance in hot corrosion tests. It was concluded that alumina overlay on zirconia has promoted the hot corrosion resistance of the coatings.

  16. Probability density fittings of corrosion test-data: Implications on C 6 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This was done to investigate the suitability of the results of the fitted test-data, by these distributions, for modelling the effectiveness of C6H15NO3, triethanolamine (TEA), admixtures on the corrosion of steel-rebar in concrete in NaCl and in H2SO4 test-media. For this, six different concentrations of TEA were admixed in ...

  17. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry; Alexander, Joshua; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal; Calle, Luz marina

    2010-01-01

    Electrokinetic Nanoparticle (EN) treatment was used as a rapid repair measure to mitigate chloride induced corrosion of reinforced concrete in the field. EN treatment uses an electric field to transport positively charged nanoparticles to the reinforcement through the concrete capillary pores. Cylindrical reinforced concrete specimens were batched with 4.5 wt % salt content (based on cement mass). Three distinct electrokinetic treatments were conducted using high current density (up to 5 A/m2) to form a chloride penetration barrier that was established in 5 days, as opposed to the traditional 6-8 weeks, generally required for electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE). These treatments included basic EN treatment, EN with additional calcium treatment, and basic ECE treatment. Field exposures were conducted at the NASA Beachside Corrosion Test Site, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. The specimens were subjected to sea water immersion at the test site as a posttreatment exposure. Following a 30-day post-treatment exposure period, the specimens were subjected to indirect tensile testing to evaluate treatment impact. The EN treated specimens exhibited 60% and 30% increases in tensile strength as compared to the untreated controls and ECE treated specimens respectively. The surfaces of the reinforcement bars of the control specimens were 67% covered by corrosion products. In contrast, the EN treated specimens exhibited corrosion coverage of only 4%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a dense concrete microstructure adjacent to the bars of the treated specimens as compared to the control and ECE specimens. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis of the polished EN treated specimens showed a reduction in chloride content by a factor of 20 adjacent to the bars. This study demonstrated that EN treatment was successful in forming a chloride penetration barrier rapidly. This work also showed that the chloride barrier was effective when samples were exposed to

  18. Synthesis of published and unpublished corrosion data from long term tests of fasteners embedded in wood : calculation of corrosion rates and the effect of corrosion on lateral joint strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2011-01-01

    In the past 5 years, several accelerated test methods have been developed to measure the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. It is desirable to contrast these accelerated results against those of long term exposure tests. While there have been several published long-term exposure tests performed on metals in treated wood, the data from these studies could not be...

  19. Accelerated corrosion test for metal drainage pipes : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    This study represents an attempt to develop an accelerated test which would assist the highway engineer in evaluating the usefulness of a new type of coated steel culvert. The test method was to be short in duration (in the order of days), and the re...

  20. Investigation of thermally sensitised stainless steels as analogues for spent AGR fuel cladding to test a corrosion inhibitor for intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whillock, Guy O. H.; Hands, Brian J.; Majchrowski, Tom P.; Hambley, David I.

    2018-01-01

    A small proportion of irradiated Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel cladding can be susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when stored in pond water containing low chloride concentrations, but corrosion is known to be prevented by an inhibitor at the storage temperatures that have applied so far. It may be necessary in the future to increase the storage temperature by up to ∼20 °C and to demonstrate the impact of higher temperatures for safety case purposes. Accordingly, corrosion testing is needed to establish the effect of temperature increases on the efficacy of the inhibitor. This paper presents the results of studies carried out on thermally sensitised 304 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steels, investigating their grain boundary compositions and their IGSCC behaviour over a range of test temperatures (30-60 °C) and chloride concentrations (0.3-10 mg/L). Monitoring of crack initiation and propagation is presented along with preliminary results as to the effect of the corrosion inhibitor. 304 stainless steel aged for 72 h at 600 °C provided a close match to the known pond storage corrosion behaviour of spent AGR fuel cladding.

  1. Standard practice for preparation and use of direct tension stress-corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing, preparing, and using ASTM standard tension test specimens for investigating susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking. Axially loaded specimens may be stressed quantitatively with equipment for application of either a constant load, constant strain, or with a continuously increasing strain. 1.2 Tension test specimens are adaptable for testing a wide variety of product forms as well as parts joined by welding, riveting, or various other methods. 1.3 The exposure of specimens in a corrosive environment is treated only briefly because other standards are being prepared to deal with this aspect. Meanwhile, the investigator is referred to Practices G35, G36, G37, and G44, and to ASTM Special Technical Publication 425 (1).

  2. Summary of INCO corrosion tests in power plant flue gas scrubbing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoxie, E.C.; Tuffnell, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    Corrosion tests in a number of flue-gas desulfurization units have shown that carbon steel, low alloy steels, and Type 304L stainless steel are inadequate in the wet portions of the scrubbers. Type 316L stainless steel is sometimes subject to localized corrosive attack in scrubber environments with certain combinations of pH and chloride content. A corollary is that corrosion of Type 316L stainless steel might be controlled by control of scrubbing media pH and chloride content. Although an attempt was made to correlate the pitting and crevice corrosion obtained on the Type 316 stainless steel test samples with chloride and pH measurements, relatively wide scatter in the data indicated only a modest correlation. This is attributed to variations in local conditions, especially beneath deposits, that differ from the liquor samples obtained for analysis, to processing upsets, to temperature differences, and to some extent to inaccuracies in measurement of pH and chloride levels. The data do show, however, that molybdenum as an alloying element in stainless steels and high nickel alloys was very beneficial in conferring resistance to localized attack in scrubber environments. High nickel alloys containing appreciable amounts of molybdenum such as Hastelloy alloy C-276 and Inconel alloy 625 can be used for critical components. Chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steels has generally not been a problem in FGD scrubbers, apparently because operating temperatures are comparatively low. An exception is reheater tubing where some failures have occurred because of elevated temperatures in conjunction with condensate that forms during shut-down periods or carryover of chloride laden mist from the scrubber. This problem can be overcome by proper alloy selection or maintaining dry conditions

  3. Corrosion Testing of Low-Activity Waste Glasses Fiscal Year 1998 Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BP McGrail; CW Lindenmeier; HT Schaef; PF Martin

    1998-11-25

    Analytical results are presented on the chemical composition and other physical properties of a glass, given the identification BNFL-A-S98, made at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory' that is representative of the low-activity waste glass composition proposed by BNFL, Inc.* for immobilization of envelope A double-shell tank wastes at the Hanford Site. This glass was prepared for use in a testing program to be conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and at Argonne National Laboratory for the purpose of characterizing its long-term corrosion behavior. Detailed examination of the glass microstructure using transmission electron microscopy showed structural features indicative of amorphous phase separation. A remelt was performed on a smaller batch (100 g) to ensure rapid cooling. The glass microstructure was reexamined and showed no evidence of phase separation. Selected long-term (some to 860 d) product consistency tests were terminated, and the leachates were analyzed on tests with three other representative low-activity waste glass formulations (L8- 1, L8-3, and L8-7). The results showed no evidence of corrosion rate acceleration at three times the duration of tests where another well-studied glass, LD6-5412, had been completely altered under identical test conditions. These tests (and others not discussed in this report) provide clear evidence that low-activity waste glasses with at least 20 mass% Na20 can be made that have excellent long-term corrosion resistance. However, glass composition has a large impact on long-term behavior and so careful experiments with several different techniques are essential to ensuring that a particular glass will have good long-term corrosion resistance.

  4. Influence of pH and Chloride Concentration on the Corrosion Behavior of Unalloyed Copper in NaCl Solution: A Comparative Study Between the Micro and Macro Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemie Adriaens

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of pH and chloride concentration on the electrochemical corrosion of copper in aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl media were studied at the micro scale using a microcapillary droplet cell and at the macro scale using a conventional large scale cell. Using an experimental design strategy, electrochemical response surface models of copper versus pH and NaCl concentration were constructed with the minimum number of experiments required. Results show that the electrochemical behavior of copper under corrosive media shows significant differences between the micro and macro scale experiments. At the micro scale, the pit initiation of copper occurs at more negative potentials for high NaCl concentrations and alkaline pH values. Also, the micro scale potentiostatic measurements indicate higher stabilised passive currents at high NaCl concentrations and low (acidic pH values. At the macro scale, the pH is shown to have a greater influence on the corrosion potential. The chloride concentration is the most significant factor in the passive current case while at the micro scale the effect of these two factors on the passive current was found to be the same. The surface morphology of the formed patina on the corroded copper in both micro and macro systems reveal a more significant role of the chloride concentration on the structure and the grain size of the patinas. Finally, micro and macro electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of copper at various NaCl concentrations and pH values demonstrates a different behavior of copper after several potentiodynamic polarization cycles.

  5. 49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... attached to the pipeline so as to minimize stress concentration on the pipe. (c) Each bared test lead wire and bared metallic area at point of connection to the pipeline must be coated with an electrical...

  6. Standard guide for conducting exfoliation corrosion tests in aluminum alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1992-01-01

    1.1 This guide differs from the usual ASTM standard in that it does not address a specific test. Rather, it is an introductory guide for new users of other standard exfoliation test methods, (see Terminology G 15 for definition of exfoliation). 1.2 This guide covers aspects of specimen preparation, exposure, inspection, and evaluation for conducting exfoliation tests on aluminum alloys in both laboratory accelerated environments and in natural, outdoor atmospheres. The intent is to clarify any gaps in existent test methods. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The inch-pound units given in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Corrosion in seawater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, S.

    1988-01-01

    Highly alloyed stainless steels have been exposed to natural chlorinated and chlorine-free seawater at 35 deg. C. Simulated tube-tubesheet joints, weld joints and galvanic couples with titanium, 90/10 CuNi and NiAl bronze were tested and evaluated for corrosion. The corrosion rates of various anode materials - zinc, aluminium and soft iron - were also determined. Finally the risk of hydrogen embrittlement of tubes of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection was studied. An attempt was also made to explain the cracking mechanism of the ferritic steels by means of transmission electron microscopy. One important conclusion of the project is that chlorinated seawater is considerably more corrosive to stainless steels than chlorine-free water, whereas chlorination reduces the rate of galvanic corrosion of copper materials coupled to stainless steels. Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection of carbon steel or cast iron in the same structure can be avoided by strict potentiostatic control of the applied potential. (author)

  8. Study of the corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy weddings in NaCl solutions by gravimetric tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segarra, J. A.; Calderon, B.; Portoles, A.

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the corrosion behavior of commercial AZ31 welded plates in aqueous chloride media was investigated by means of gravimetric techniques and Neutral Salt Spray tests (NSS). The AZ31 samples tested were welded using Gas Tugsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and different filler materials. Material microstructures were investigated by optical microscopy to stablish the influence of those microstructures in the corrosion behavior. Gravimetric and NSS tests indicate that the use of more noble filler alloys for the sample welding, preventing the reduction of aluminum content in weld beads, does not imply a better corrosion behavior. (Author)

  9. Identification of commercially available alloys for corrosion-resistant metallic reinforcement and test methods for evaluating corrosion-resistant reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A literature review was conducted with the goal of identifying alternative low-cost corrosion-resistant steel reinforcement materials. The most promising alternate reinforcing materials seen to date that are less expensive than 300 series stainless s...

  10. Standard guide for conducting and evaluating galvanic corrosion tests in electrolytes

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1981-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers conducting and evaluating galvanic corrosion tests to characterize the behavior of two dissimilar metals in electrical contact in an electrolyte under low-flow conditions. It can be adapted to wrought or cast metals and alloys. 1.2 This guide covers the selection of materials, specimen preparation, test environment, method of exposure, and method for evaluating the results to characterize the behavior of galvanic couples in an electrolyte. Note 1—Additional information on galvanic corrosion testing and examples of the conduct and evaluation of galvanic corrosion tests in electrolytes are given in Refs (1) through (7). 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicabil...

  11. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  12. Study of the corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy weldings in NaCl solutions by gravimetric tests

    OpenAIRE

    Segarra, José A.; Calderón, Borja; Portolés, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the corrosion behavior of commercial AZ31 welded plates in aqueous chloride media was investigated by means of gravimetric techniques and Neutral Salt Spray tests (NSS). The AZ31 samples tested were welded using Gas Tugsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and different filler materials. Material microstructures were investigated by optical microscopy to stablish the influence of those microstructures in the corrosion behavior. Gravimetric and NSS tests indicate that the use of more noble ...

  13. Zirconium alloys with small amounts of iron and copper or nickel show improved corrosion resistance in superheated steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, S.; Youngdahl, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Heat treating various compositions of zirconium alloys improve their corrosion resistance to superheated steam at temperatures higher than 500 degrees C. This increases their potential as fuel cladding for superheated-steam nuclear-fueled reactors as well as in autoclaves operating at modest pressures.

  14. Probability density fittings of corrosion test-data: Implications on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    half-circuit potential test data of other inhibitors in reported studies that had been submitted else- where (Okeniyi et al .... with the concrete to prevent leaching of the admixture solution into the wooden mould. Each of ... this connection, the instrument, through a true potentiostatic circuit, null any residual poten- tial difference ...

  15. Neutron irradiation test of copper alloy/stainless steel joint materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hirokazu; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    As a study about the joint technology of copper alloy and stainless steel for utilization as cooling piping in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), Al 2 O 3 -dispersed strengthened copper or CuCrZr was jointed to stainless steel by three kinds of joint methods (casting joint, brazing joint and friction welding method) for the evaluation of the neutron irradiation effect on joints. A neutron irradiation test was performed to three types of joints and each copper alloy. The average value of fast neutron fluence in this irradiation test was about 2 x 10 24 n/m 2 (E>1 MeV), and the irradiation temperature was about 130degC. As post-irradiation examinations, tensile tests, hardness tests and observation of fracture surface after the tensile tests were performed. All type joints changed to be brittle by the neutron irradiation effect like each copper alloy material, and no particular neutron irradiation effect due to the effect of joint process was observed. On the casting and friction welding, hardness of copper alloy near the joint boundary changed to be lower than that of each copper alloy by the effect of joint procedure. However, tensile strength of joints was almost the same as that of each copper alloy before/after neutron irradiation. On the other hand, tensile strength of joints by brazing changed to be much lower than CuAl-25 base material by the effect of joint process before/after neutron irradiation. Results in this study showed that the friction welding method and the casting would be able to apply to the joint method of piping in ITER. This report is based on the final report of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA). (author)

  16. Effects of water chemistry and fluid dynamics on wall thinning behavior. Part 2. Evaluation of influential factors by flow accelerated corrosion tests and prediction of corrosion potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Domae, Masafumi; Yoneda, Kimitoshi; Inada, Fumio

    2010-01-01

    Understanding of mechanism of Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) phenomenon is desired for the rational wall thickness management and the prevention of FAC. In the previous study, we proposed a FAC model by considering the diffusion of dissolved species. The FAC model reproduced qualitatively well-known effect of major water chemistry parameters on FAC rate. The quantitative prediction was a subject of the FAC model. The FAC model is necessary to be verified and modified by the experimental study. The corrosion-potential measurement of the carbon steel is promising technique to monitor the effectiveness of the water chemical countermeasure against FAC of carbon steel piping at feed water system in power plant. It is required to evaluate the correlation between FAC rate and the corrosion potential. In this study, the effects of the water chemistry and fluid dynamics on FAC rates are evaluated by the FAC test of carbon steel. FAC rates are decreased remarkably with the increase in pH more than 10 and the increase in Cr content more than 0.8 wt%. The FAC rate is decreased with the increase in dissolved oxygen concentration, and ECP of specimen increases corresponding to the decrease of FAC rate. Moreover, the electrochemical model, which can predict the corrosion potential of carbon steel, is developed. The calculated corrosion potential of carbonsteel in deaerated nutral solution at 140degC is -0.6 V (SHE), which is close to the experimental result. (author)

  17. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel and Aluminum in Sodium Hydroxide: Field Failure and Laboratory Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Prawoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Through an investigation of the field failure analysis and laboratory experiment, a study on (stress corrosion cracking SCC behavior of steel and aluminum was performed. All samples were extracted from known operating conditions from the field failures. Similar but accelerated laboratory test was subsequently conducted in such a way as to mimic the field failures. The crack depth and behavior of the SCC were then analyzed after the laboratory test and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking was studied. The results show that for the same given stress relative to ultimate tensile strength, the susceptibility to SCC is greatly influenced by heat treatment. Furthermore, it was also concluded that when expressed relative to the (ultimate tensile strength UTS, aluminum has similar level of SCC susceptibility to that of steel, although with respect to the same absolute value of applied stress, aluminum is more susceptible to SCC in sodium hydroxide environment than steel.

  18. Corrosion and Deterioration Testing in the Humid Tropic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-21

    SAMPLE TEST INSPECTION DATA SHEET ................... B-1 C. IMPORTANCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL PARAMETERS C-1 D. DESCRIPTION OF EXPOSURE SITES...increase the chances of detecting material/materiel degradation. Environmental parameters normally considered for site selection include the...sample of data presented in narrative form is provided below: “The acetate samples in the compost pile showed an immediate and significant weight loss

  19. Corrosion test of coated steel sheets using hem model. Hem model wo mochiita kakushu hyomen shori koban no fushoku shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, S.; Sakai, H.; Iwai, M.; Arimura, M. (Kobe Steel, Ltd., Kobe (Japan))

    1993-10-01

    The outdoor exposure corrosion test results of the hem model attached inside an automotive door for two years (May, 1986 - May, 1988) were reported as well as the cyclic corrosion test results of the hem model including cyclic salt spray, drying and wetting repeated 200 times. The hem models were made of some kinds of surface treated steel sheets such as electrogalvanizing one, and coated by dipping phosphating and cation electrodeposition like practical automotive coating. As a result, the corrosion depth of the hem models showed the largest value around the top of lapped panel portions, and under-film corrosion conditions of the hem models and temperature/humidity measurement results suggested a cyclic dry/wet condition inside a door. In the exposure test, the corrosion depth decreased with an increase in Zn coating weight indicating the clear effect of a coating weight on a corrosion depth resistance, however, in the cyclic corrosion test, no clear protective effect of Zn coating was obtained. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Simulation of natural corrosion by vapor hydration test: seven-year results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, J.S.; Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the alteration behavior of synthetic basalt and SRL 165 borosilicate waste glasses that had been reacted in water vapor at 70 degrees C for time periods up to seven years. The nature and extent of corrosion of glasses have been determined by characterizing the reacted glass surface with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Alteration in 70 degrees C laboratory tests was compared to that which occurs at 150-200 degrees C and also with Hawaiian basaltic glasses of 480 to 750 year old subaerially altered in nature. Synthetic basalt and waste glasses, both containing about 50 percent wt SiO 2 were found to react with water vapor to form an amorphous hydrated gel that contained small amounts of clay, nearly identical to palagonite layers formed on naturally altered basaltic glass. This result implies that the corrosion reaction in nature can be simulated with a vapor hydration test. These tests also provide a means for measuring the corrosion kinetics, which are difficult to determine by studying natural samples because alteration layers have often spelled off the samples and we have only limited knowledge of the conditions under which alteration occurred

  1. The Fatigue in Aircraft Corrosion Testing (FACT) Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    environments were lruoratory air and 5 . ,.ueuus NaCi salt spray acidified with H2S04 to pH 4, hot’ oL a nominal temperature o- 295 K. The salt spray tests...conditions under which failures initiate in areas where primer is more or less continuously present and there is plenty of time for chromate to leach out...sufficient duration to allow time for chromate to leach out of chromate-containing primers into the corrodent. 9.8 References i. R.J.. Wanhill and J.J

  2. Stress corrosion test of Al- Zn- Mg alloys with and without Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.C.; Garlipp, W.

    1982-01-01

    Two aluminium alloys 1 and 2 with the respectives compositions 6,10 wt% Zn; 1,58 wt% Mg; 0,24 wt% Cu and 6,25 wt% Zn; 2,03 wt% Mg; 0,24 wt% Cu; 0,078 wt% Nb, was cast, annealed, extruded and cold rolled to 10% of the initial area. Samples was made for tensile testing and stress corrosion cracking in accord with the recommended standard test. After quench from 460 0 C they was preaged at 100 0 C, 6 hours and aged again at 160 0 C in different times. The tests revealed better properties for the alloys 2. (Author) [pt

  3. Preparation and testing of corrosion and spallation-resistant coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, John

    2012-09-30

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is designed to determine if plating APMT, a specific highly oxidation-resistant oxide dispersion-strengthened FeCrAl alloy made by Kanthal, onto nickel-based superalloy turbine parts is a viable method for substantially improving the lifetimes and maximum use temperatures of the parts. The method for joining the APMT plate to the superalloys is called evaporative metal bonding. It involves placing a thin foil of zinc (Zn) between the plate and the superalloy, clamping them together, and heating in an atmosphere-controlled furnace. Upon heating, the Zn melts and dissolves the oxide skins of the alloys at the bond line, allowing the two alloys to diffuse into each other. The Zn then diffuses through the alloys and evaporates from their surfaces. Laboratory testing has shown that the diffusion rate of Zn through the FeCrAl alloy is much faster than through the nickel superalloys. This means that the FeCrAl will serve as a sink for the Zn bonding alloy during the evaporative metal bonding process. Also, the testing has shown that the Zn diffusion mechanism is bulk diffusion, and not intergranular. This is a surprise. However, it means that quantification of the Zn diffusivities in these samples will be significantly simpler than would have been the case if grain boundary diffusion dominated. In addition to the laboratory testing, gas impinger and particulate samples are being collected from a combustor firing syngas and natural gas to determine what types of microcontaminants may reach a turbine firing syngas. The syngas is created in one of two different pilot-scale pressurized coal gasifiers. The initial analysis of the impinger solutions was for standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 29 determination of hazardous metals and did not include major element analysis. When syngas is fired, the amount of Mn in the combustor gas increases substantially. Halogens (Br2 and Cl2) and hydrogen

  4. Thermal Cycling and High-Temperature Corrosion Tests of Rare Earth Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Gitzhofer, François

    2017-12-01

    Lutetium and yttrium silicates, enriched with an additional secondary zirconia phase, environmental barrier coatings were synthesized by the solution precursor plasma spraying process on silicon carbide substrates. A custom-made oven was designed for thermal cycling and water vapor corrosion testing. The oven can test four specimens simultaneously and allows to evaluate environmental barrier performances under similar corrosion kinetics compared to turbine engines. Coatings structural evolution has been observed by SEM on the polished cross sections, and phase composition has been analyzed by XRD. All coatings have been thermally cycled between 1300 °C and the ambient temperature, without spallation, due to their porosity and the presence of additional secondary phase which increases the thermal cycling resistance. During water vapor exposure at 1200 °C, rare earth disilicates showed a good stability, which is contradictory with the literature, due to impurities—such as Si- and Al-hydroxides—in the water vapor jets. The presence of vertical cracks allowed the water vapor to reach the substrate and then to corrode it. It has been observed that thin vertical cracks induced some spallation after 24 h of corrosion.

  5. Standard practice for preparation and use of Bent-Beam stress-corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing, preparing, and using bent-beam stress-corrosion specimens. 1.2 Different specimen configurations are given for use with different product forms, such as sheet or plate. This practice applicable to specimens of any metal that are stressed to levels less than the elastic limit of the material, and therefore, the applied stress can be accurately calculated or measured (see Note 1). Stress calculations by this practice are not applicable to plastically stressed specimens. Note 1—It is the nature of these practices that only the applied stress can be calculated. Since stress-corrosion cracking is a function of the total stress, for critical applications and proper interpretation of results, the residual stress (before applying external stress) or the total elastic stress (after applying external stress) should be determined by appropriate nondestructive methods, such as X-ray diffraction (1). 1.3 Test procedures are given for stress-corrosion testing by ex...

  6. Standard test method for measurement of corrosion potentials of Aluminum alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for measurement of the corrosion potential (see Note 1) of an aluminum alloy in an aqueous solution of sodium chloride with enough hydrogen peroxide added to provide an ample supply of cathodic reactant. Note 1—The corrosion potential is sometimes referred to as the open-circuit solution or rest potential. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Moore, B.T.

    1988-12-01

    The behaviour of four high-density sintered tungsten alloys has been evluated and compared with that of pure tungsten. Rates of corrosion during the cyclic humidity and the salt mist tests were ascertained from weight loss measurements. Insight into the corrosion mechanism was gained from the nature of the corrosion products and an examination of the corroded surfaces. In the tests, the alloy 95% W, 2.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe was the most corrosion resistant. The data showed that copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. Both attack on the tungsten particles and the binder phase were observed together with tungsten grain loss. 6 refs., 3 tabs.,

  8. Evaluation of taper joints with combined fatigue and crevice corrosion testing: Comparison to human explanted modular prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reclaru, L., E-mail: lucien.reclaru@pxgroup.com [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Brooks, R.A. [Orthopaedic Research, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University of Cambridge, Box 180 Hills Road, CB2 0QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Zuberbühler, M. [Smith and Nephew Orthopaedics AG, Schachenalle 29, 5001 Aarau (Switzerland); Eschler, P.-Y.; Constantin, F. [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Tomoaia, G. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hateganu of Cluj-Napoca, Dept. of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2014-01-01

    The requirement for revision surgery of total joint replacements is increasing and modular joint replacement implants have been developed to provide adjustable prosthetic revision systems with improved intra-operative flexibility. An electrochemical study of the corrosion resistance of the interface between the distal and proximal modules of a modular prosthesis was performed in combination with a cyclic fatigue test. The complexity resides in the existence of interfaces between the distal part, the proximal part, and the dynamometric screw. A new technique for evaluating the resistance to cyclic dynamic corrosion with crevice stimulation was used and the method is presented. In addition, two components of the proximal module of explanted Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb prostheses were investigated by optical and electron microscopy. Our results reveal that: The electrolyte penetrates into the interface between the distal and proximal modules during cyclic dynamic fatigue tests, the distal module undergoes cracking and corrosion was generated at the interface between the two models; The comparison of the explanted proximal parts with the similar prostheses evaluated following cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion testing showed that there were significant similarities indicating that this method is suitable for evaluating materials used in the fabrication of modular prostheses. - Highlights: • Electrochemical crevice corrosion testing combined with fatigue test conducted on Ti6Al7Nb and Ti6Al4V modular prostheses • Cations released from integral prostheses • Comparison of human explanted modular prostheses with the similar prostheses evaluated in cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion.

  9. Evaluation of taper joints with combined fatigue and crevice corrosion testing: Comparison to human explanted modular prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reclaru, L.; Brooks, R.A.; Zuberbühler, M.; Eschler, P.-Y.; Constantin, F.; Tomoaia, G.

    2014-01-01

    The requirement for revision surgery of total joint replacements is increasing and modular joint replacement implants have been developed to provide adjustable prosthetic revision systems with improved intra-operative flexibility. An electrochemical study of the corrosion resistance of the interface between the distal and proximal modules of a modular prosthesis was performed in combination with a cyclic fatigue test. The complexity resides in the existence of interfaces between the distal part, the proximal part, and the dynamometric screw. A new technique for evaluating the resistance to cyclic dynamic corrosion with crevice stimulation was used and the method is presented. In addition, two components of the proximal module of explanted Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb prostheses were investigated by optical and electron microscopy. Our results reveal that: The electrolyte penetrates into the interface between the distal and proximal modules during cyclic dynamic fatigue tests, the distal module undergoes cracking and corrosion was generated at the interface between the two models; The comparison of the explanted proximal parts with the similar prostheses evaluated following cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion testing showed that there were significant similarities indicating that this method is suitable for evaluating materials used in the fabrication of modular prostheses. - Highlights: • Electrochemical crevice corrosion testing combined with fatigue test conducted on Ti6Al7Nb and Ti6Al4V modular prostheses • Cations released from integral prostheses • Comparison of human explanted modular prostheses with the similar prostheses evaluated in cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion

  10. Manufacturing method for intragranular stress corrosion cracking-induced test specimen for stainless steel pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futagawa, Kiyoshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a manufacturing step for intragranular stress corrosion cracking-induced for stainless steel pipelines, pipe are abutted against with each other and welded, and a heat affected portion is applied with a sensitizing heat treatment. Further, a crevice jig is attached near the heat affected portion at the inner surface of the pipe and kept in a chlorine ion added water under high temperature and high pressure at a predetermined period of time. If tap water is used instead of purified water for C.P.T. test in a step of forming sample of IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking), since the chlorine ion concentration in the tap water is relatively high, TGSCC (intragranular stress corrosion crackings caused in all of the samples. A heat input and an interlayer temperature are determined for the material of stainless pipe having a carbon content of more than 0.05% so that the welding residual stress on the inner surface is applied as tension. The condition for the heat treatment is determined as, for example, 500degC x 24hr, and the samples are kept under water at high temperature and high pressure applied with chlorine ions for 500 to 200hours. As a result, since samples of TGSCC can be formed by utilizing the manufacturing step for IGSCC, there is no requirement for providing devices for applying environmental factors separately. (N.H.)

  11. Corrosion testing of selected packaging materials for disposal of high-level waste glass in rock-salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.; Fiehn, B.; Halm, G.

    1991-01-01

    In previous corrosion studies performed in salt brines, unalloyed steels, Ti 99.8-Pd and Hastelloy C4 have proved to be the most promising materials for long-term resistant packagings to be used in heat-generating waste (vitrified HLW, spent fuel) disposal in rock-salt formations. Investigations of the iron-base materials Ni-Resist D2 and D4, cast iron and Si-cast iron have also been carried out in order to complete the results available to date. The three steels (fine-grained steel, low-carbon steel, cast steel) investigated and Ti 99.8-Pd resisted pitting and crevice corrosion as well as stress-corrosion cracking under all test conditions. Gamma dose-rates of 1 Gy/h - 100 Gy/h or H 2 S concentrations in the brines as well as welding and explosion plating did not influence noticeably the corrosion behaviour of the materials. Furthermore, the determined corrosion rates of the steels (50 μm/a-250 μm/a, depending on the test conditions) are intercomparable and imply technically acceptable corrosion allowances for the thick-walled containers discussed. For Ti 99.8-Pd no detectable corrosion was observed. By contrast, Hastelloy C4 proved susceptible to pitting and crevice corrosion at gamme dose-rates higher than 1 Gy/h and in the presence of H 2 S (25 mg/l) in Q-brine. The materials Ni Resist D2 and D4, cast iron and Si-cast iron corroded at negligible rates in the in-situ experiments performed in rock salt/limited amounts of NaCI-brine. Nevertheless, these materials must be ruled out as container materials because they have proved to be susceptible to pitting and intergranular corrosion in previous laboratory studies conducted with MgCI 2 -rich brine (Q-brine) in excess. 15 refs.; 29 figs.; 7 tabs

  12. Corrosion inhibitors for solar-heating and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1979-01-01

    Report describes results of tests conducted to evaluate abilities of 12 candidate corrosion inhibitors to protect aluminum, steel, copper, or stainless steel at typical conditions encountered in solar heating and cooling systems. Inhibitors are based on sodium salts including nitrates, borates, silicates, and phosphates.

  13. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Songjie; Zhang Zuogui; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Zhang Boping

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  14. Integrating IMS Learning Design and IMS Question and Test Interoperability using CopperCore Service Integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogten, Hubert; Martens, Harrie; Nadolski, Rob; Tattersall, Colin; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Vogten, H., Martens, H., Nadolski, R., Tattersall, C., van Rosmalen, P., & Koper, R. (2006). Integrating IMS Learning Design and IMS Question and Test Interoperability using CopperCore Service Integration. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks

  15. CopperCore Service Integration, Integrating IMS Learning Design and IMS Question and Test Interoperability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogten, Hubert; Martens, Harrie; Nadolski, Rob; Tattersall, Colin; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Vogten, H., Martens, H., Nadolski, R., Tattersall, C., Rosmalen, van, P., Koper, R., (2006). CopperCore Service Integration, Integrating IMS Learning Design and IMS Question and Test Interoperability. Proceedings of the 6th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (pp.

  16. Stress corrosion cracking test with slow strain rate and constant current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1976-01-01

    A rapid electrochemical tensile test was developed for evaluating stress corrosion crack initiation in carbon steel. Constant anodic current was imposed on smooth-bar tensile specimens as the specimens were slowly strained to fracture at cross-head speeds of 1.3 x 10 -6 /sec. Equivalent response results were obtained for all ductility properties measured; uniform elongation, total elongation and reduction of area. Total elongation was chosen as the index for stress corrosion crack initiation. An equation was developed that allowed calculation of total elongation of specimens in electrolytes (test solutions) with composition ranges of 1.5 to 5.5 M nitrate, 0 to 3.5 M nitrite, and 0 to 5.0 M hydroxide, and a temperature range of 50 0 C to 100 0 C. A minimum of 13 percent total elongation was selected to indicate the possible initiation of cracking in A 285-B steel alloy. The test was used to evaluate relative aggressiveness of synthetic nuclear wastes on A 285-B carbon steel and the relative resistances of several steels to given solution compositions. Test results formed one of the bases for setting temperature limits and concentration limits for several ions in nuclear wastes that are stored in carbon steel tanks at the Savannah River Plant

  17. Study of corrosion behaviour in saturated bentonite barrier Corroben

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azkarate, I.; Insausti, M.; Medina, V.

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion behavior in saturated bentonite of various candidate metallic materials, to be used in the fabrication of containers of high level radioactive waste granite repositories, has been studied in this project. Due to the multi-barrier concept in which the canisters are surrounded by a clay barrier of compacted bentonite blocks, special attention has been paid to the characterization of corrosion products and the interaction between these and the repository sealing bentonite. The following metallic materials have been studied: S355 carbon steel, AISI 316L stainless steel, Cu-ETP electrolytic copper and Cu30Ni alloy. Samples of the alloys have been embedded in saturated bentonite to a water content of 25%, and compacted. The obtained pastilles have been introduced in autoclaves and tested at different temperatures and times ranging from one to 18 months. Once tests have concluded, several parameters have been evaluated: corrosion morphology, general corrosion rates calculated by gravimetric methods, nature and composition of the corrosion products and penetration of the corrosion products into the bentonite. Experimental data obtained are used to developed models of the corrosion behavior of canisters under disposal conditions. Results show that S355 carbon steel has suffered the highest general corrosion attack, with average corrosion rates of 10 per year and maximum penetration of 100 measured in specimens tested at 75C during 18 months. The most common analyzed corrosion product has been siderite, FeCO3. Formation of siderite, in the test conditions, effectively passivated the steel because of its stable and adherent feature. In test carried out at 25 and 5 C, sulfur rich corrosion products are observed, thus indicating a microbiologically corrosion phenomena due to the metabolic activity of bacteria present in the bentonite. No appreciable general corrosion rates, nor sensitivity to localized corrosion, has been observed in the AISI 316L stainless steel

  18. Copper avoidance and mortality of juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta) in tests with copper-sulfate-treated water from West Branch Reservoir, Putnam County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Baudanza, T.P.

    2001-01-01

    Copper-avoidance tests and acute-toxicity (mortality) tests on hatchery-reared, young-of- the-year brown trout (salmo trutta) were conducted with water from West Branch Reservoir to assess the avoidance response to copper sulfate treatment, which is used occasionally by New York City Department of Environmental Protection to decrease phytoplankton populations in the reservoir. Avoidance-test results indicate that juvenile brown trout tend to avoid dissolved copper concentrations greater than about 55 μg/L (micrograms per liter), which is the approximate avoidance-response threshold. The mean net avoidance response of brown trout to dissolved copper concentrations of 70 and 100 μg/L, and possibly 80 μg/L, was significantly different (at α= 0.1) from the mean net avoidance response of fish to control (untreated) water and to treated water at most other tested concentrations. Mortality-test results indicate that the 96-hr median lethal concentration (LC50) of dissolved copper was 61.5 μg/L. All (100 percent) of the brown trout died at a dissolved copper concentration of 85 μg/L, many died at concentrations of 62 μg/L and 70 μg/L, and none died in the control waters (7 μg/L) or at concentrations of 10, 20, or 45 μg/L. The estimated concentration of dissolved copper that caused fish mortality (threshold) was 53.5 μg/L, virtually equivalent to the avoidance-response threshold.Additional factors that could affect the copper-avoidance and mortality response of individual brown trout and their populations in West Branch Reservoir include seasonal variations in certain water-quality parameters, copper-treatment regimes, natural fish distributions during treatment, and increased tolerance due to acclimation. These warrant additional study before the findings from this study can be used to predict the effects that copper sulfate treatments have on resident fish populations in New York City reservoirs.

  19. Combined Mini-Cylex & Disk Acceleration Tests in Type K Copper.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maines, Warren Russell [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kittell, David E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hobbs, Michael L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    We combined the miniature cylinder expansion test (Mini-Cylex), with the Disk Acceleration Test (DAX) using Type K copper, Picatinny Liquid Explosive, and photonic Doppler velocimetry. We estimated the CJ state using plate reverberation methods at the test cap. We extracted velocities at 2, 7, and 10 volume expansions to fit Jones-Wilkins-Lee Equation of State at the tube wall. And we estimated Gurney velocity both at the test cap and tube wall. Our experiments and simulations are within expected uncertainty. The test and the analysis effectively reduce costs while keeping similar fidelity compared with more expensive tests.

  20. Corrosion testing of filter papers made with J-M 475 and J-M 753 glass fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, G.S.; Wiggins, F.N.; Weber, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    Results of static tests conducted on the fibers, and dynamic tests conducted on the papers are reported. The tests were conducted using H 2 O, HNO 3 , H 2 So 4 , HCl, NaOH, and NH 4 OH as the corrosive media. (U.S.)

  1. Development and tests of molybdenum armored copper components for MITICA ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavei, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.pavei@igi.cnr.it; Marcuzzi, Diego; Rizzolo, Andrea; Valente, Matteo [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti, 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Böswirth, Bernd; Greuner, Henri [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    In order to prevent detrimental material erosion of components impinged by back-streaming positive D or H ions in the megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement beam source, a solution based on explosion bonding technique has been identified for producing a 1 mm thick molybdenum armour layer on copper substrate, compatible with ITER requirements. Prototypes have been recently manufactured and tested in the high heat flux test facility Garching Large Divertor Sample Test Facility (GLADIS) to check the capability of the molybdenum-copper interface to withstand several thermal shock cycles at high power density. This paper presents both the numerical fluid-dynamic analyses of the prototypes simulating the test conditions in GLADIS as well as the experimental results.

  2. Development and tests of molybdenum armored copper components for MITICA ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavei, Mauro; Böswirth, Bernd; Greuner, Henri; Marcuzzi, Diego; Rizzolo, Andrea; Valente, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    In order to prevent detrimental material erosion of components impinged by back-streaming positive D or H ions in the megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement beam source, a solution based on explosion bonding technique has been identified for producing a 1 mm thick molybdenum armour layer on copper substrate, compatible with ITER requirements. Prototypes have been recently manufactured and tested in the high heat flux test facility Garching Large Divertor Sample Test Facility (GLADIS) to check the capability of the molybdenum-copper interface to withstand several thermal shock cycles at high power density. This paper presents both the numerical fluid-dynamic analyses of the prototypes simulating the test conditions in GLADIS as well as the experimental results.

  3. Development and tests of molybdenum armored copper components for MITICA ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavei, Mauro; Marcuzzi, Diego; Rizzolo, Andrea; Valente, Matteo; Böswirth, Bernd; Greuner, Henri

    2016-01-01

    In order to prevent detrimental material erosion of components impinged by back-streaming positive D or H ions in the megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement beam source, a solution based on explosion bonding technique has been identified for producing a 1 mm thick molybdenum armour layer on copper substrate, compatible with ITER requirements. Prototypes have been recently manufactured and tested in the high heat flux test facility Garching Large Divertor Sample Test Facility (GLADIS) to check the capability of the molybdenum-copper interface to withstand several thermal shock cycles at high power density. This paper presents both the numerical fluid-dynamic analyses of the prototypes simulating the test conditions in GLADIS as well as the experimental results

  4. The effect of conditioning agents on the corrosive properties of molten urea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, D E; Nguyen, D T; Norton, M M; Parker, B R; Daniels, L E

    1991-01-01

    From the process case histories of the failure of several heat exchanger tube bundles, it was revealed that molten urea containing lignosulfonate as a granulation conditioning-hardening agent (Urea LS[trademark]) is corrosive to Types 304 and 316 stainless steel. The results of field and laboratory immersion corrosion tests indicated that the corrosivity of molten urea is strongly dependent on the process temperature rather than the conditioner composition. At temperatures below 295F, molten Urea LS[trademark] is not aggressive to these stainless steels. However, at temperatures above 300F, the corrosion of these stainless steels is extremely severe. The corrosion rate of Types 304, 304L, 316, and 316L is as high as hundreds of mils per year. The corrosion mechanism tends to be more general than localized. The results of the laboratory corrosion test also revealed that among alloying elements, copper is detrimental to corrosion resistance of stainless steel exposed to molten Urea LS[trademark], chromium is the most beneficial, and nickel has only a minor effect. Thus, copper-free and chromium stainless steels have superior corrosion resistance to the molten Urea LS[trademark] at a wide range of temperatures up to 345F.

  5. Standard Test Method for Stress-Corrosion of Titanium Alloys by Aircraft Engine Cleaning Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method establishes a test procedure for determining the propensity of aircraft turbine engine cleaning and maintenance materials for causing stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloy parts. 1.2 The evaluation is conducted on representative titanium alloys by determining the effect of contact with cleaning and maintenance materials on tendency of prestressed titanium alloys to crack when subsequently heated to elevated temperatures. 1.3 Test conditions are based upon manufacturer's maximum recommended operating solution concentration. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see and .

  6. Plastic Behavior and Fracture of Aluminum and Copper in Torsion Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressan, Jose Divo

    2007-01-01

    Present work investigates the plastic behavior, work hardening and the beginning of plastic instabilities, of cylindrical specimens deformed by high speed cold plastic torsion tests and at low speed tensile test. The tests were carried out in a laboratory torsion test equipment and an universal tensile test machine. The tensile tests were performed at room temperature in an universal testing machine at low strain rate of 0.034/s. Experimental torsion tests were carried out at constant angular speed that imposed a constant shear strain rate to the specimen. In the tests, the rotation speed were set to 62 rpm and 200 rpm which imposed high strain rates of about 2/s and 6.5/s respectively. The torsion tests performed at room temperature on annealed commercial pure copper and aluminum. Two types of torsion specimen for aluminum were used: solid and tubular. The solid aluminum specimen curves presented various points of maximum torque. The tubular copper specimens showed two points of maximum. Shear bands or shear strain localization at specimen were possibly the mechanism of maximum torque points formation. The work hardening coefficient n and the strain rate sensitivity parameter m were evaluated from the equivalent stress versus strain curve from tensile and torsion tests. The n-value remained constant whereas the m-value increased ten folds for aluminum specimens: from tensile test m= 0.027 and torsion test m= 0.27. However, the hardening curves were sigmoidal

  7. Field tests of the efficacy of zinc and fatty amine in preventing colonization by copper-tolerant fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan Lebow; Bessie Woodward; Steven Halverson; Michael West

    2012-01-01

    Ground-contact durability of stakes treated with acidic copper formulations was evaluated. All test formulations incorporated copper, dimethylcocoamine and propanoic acid; one set of formulations also included zinc. Sapwood stakes cut from the southern pine group were pressure-treated to a range of retentions with each formulation and placed into plots within Harrison...

  8. Report on Electrochemcial Corrosion Testing of 241-SY-102 Grab Samples from the 2012 Grab Sampling Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, Richard B.; Lamothe, Margaret E.

    2013-05-30

    This report describes the results of the electrochemical testing performed on tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples that were collected in support of corrosion mitigation. The objective of the work presented here was to determine corrosion resistance of tank SY-102 to the grab samples collected using electrochemical methods up to 50°C as well as to satisfy data quality objectives. Grab samples were collected at multiple elevations from Riser 003. The electrochemical corrosion testing was planned to consist of linear polarization resistance testing (LPR) and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) testing at 50°C. The temperature would be lowered to 40 °C and the test repeated if the CPP curve indicated pitting corrosion at 50°C. Ifno pitting was indicated by the CPP curve, then a duplicate scan would be repeated at 50°C to confirm the first result. The testing would be complete if the duplicate CPP scan was consistent with the first. This report contains the CPP results of the testing of grab sample 2SY-12-03 and 2SY-12-03DUP composite sample tested under these conditions. There was no indication of pitting at 50°C, and the duplicate scan was in agreement with the first scan. Since no further testing was required, a third scan with a shorter rest time was performed and is present in this report.

  9. Standard Test Methods for Detecting Susceptibility to Intergranular Corrosion in Wrought, Nickel-Rich, Chromium-Bearing Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover two tests as follows: 1.1.1 Method A, Ferric Sulfate-Sulfuric Acid Test (Sections 3-10, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting the boiling ferric sulfate—50 % sulfuric acid test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to intergranular corrosion (see Terminology G 15), which may be encountered in certain service environments. The uniform corrosion rate obtained by this test method, which is a function of minor variations in alloy composition, may easily mask the intergranular corrosion components of the overall corrosion rate on alloys N10276, N06022, N06059, and N06455. 1.1.2 Method B, Mixed Acid-Oxidizing Salt Test (Sections 11-18, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting a boiling 23 % sulfuric + 1.2 % hydrochloric + 1 % ferric chloride + 1 % cupric chloride test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to display a step function increa...

  10. A Simplified Test for Blanching Susceptibility of Copper Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U.; Humphrey, Donald; Setlock, John

    2003-01-01

    GRCop-84 (Cu-8Cr-4Nb) is a dispersion-strengthened alloy developed for space-launch rocket engine applications, as a liner for the combustion chamber and nozzle ramp. Its main advantage over rival alloys, particularly NARloy-Z (Cu-Ag-Zr), the current liner alloy, is in high temperature mechanical properties. Further validation required that the two alloys be compared with respect to service performance and durability. This has been done, under conditions resembling those expected in reusable launch engine applications. GRCop-84 was found to have a superior resistance to static and cyclic oxidation up to approx. 700 C. In order to improve its performance above 700 C, Cu-Cr coatings have also been developed and evaluated. The major oxidative issue with Cu alloys is blanching, a mode of degradation induced by oxidation-reduction fluctuations in hydrogen-fueled engines. That fluctuation cannot be addressed with conventional static or cyclic oxidation testing. Hence, a further evaluation of the alloy substrates and Cu-Cr coating material necessitated our devising a test protocol that involves oxidaton-reduction cycles. This paper describes the test protocols used and the results obtained.

  11. Analyses of copper from a prototype capsule 5 and 6; Analyser av koppar fraan prototypkapsel 5 och 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taxen, Claes; Lundholm, Martin; Persson, Dan; Jakobsson, Dan; Sedlakova, Miroslava; Randelius, Mats; Karlsson, Oskar; Rydgren, Pontus; Kimab, Swerea

    2012-12-15

    'Prototype' is a series of experiments where SKB, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, expose the full scale copper canisters under conditions intended to be representative of a repository for spent nuclear fuel, however, without radioactivity (SKB 2012) . Copper from one of these installations, deposition 5, has been studied for corrosion . Samples were also taken from the capsule that had been exposed in deposition 6. Drill cores across the capsule wall has been documented regarding microstructure. All samples have been exposed for about seven years in the prototype repository. Studies carried out leads to the following conclusions: Regarding the ring on top of the capsule from the deposition 5; There are local corrosion with a depth of 3-5 microns. The general or uniform corrosion that has occurred can not be quantified. The relatively sharp traces of processing of the material before exposure indicates that the general corrosion was minor. Small amounts of corrosion product has been detected in surface analysis. The surface profile on the copper surface, aside from the grooves after processing and areas of local corrosion, are relatively even. Metallographic examination of cross section shows no tendency to pitting or intergranular corrosion. Analysis for hydrogen by melting a quantity of metal does not show any increased hydrogen content. Regarding the material of the capsule from the deposition 6: The capsule has not been specifically tested for corrosion. Cross sections of drill cores through the copper canister has been documented and metallo graphically exhibits nothing remarkable.

  12. Measurements of the corrosion of low-carbon steel drums under environmental conditions at Hanford: One-year test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the methods used to expose low-carbon steel drums to atmospheric and soil corrosion and describes the methods used to examine specimens retrieved from both types of tests. These drums are being tested to meet requirements of radioactive waste storage for both low-level radioactive wastes and transuranic wastes

  13. Annual report, spring 2015. Alternative chemical cleaning methods for high level waste tanks-corrosion test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-06

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel when interacted with the chemical cleaning solution composed of 0.18 M nitric acid and 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid. This solution has been proposed as a dissolution solution that would be used to remove the remaining hard heel portion of the sludge in the waste tanks. This solution was combined with the HM and PUREX simulated sludge with dilution ratios that represent the bulk oxalic cleaning process (20:1 ratio, acid solution to simulant) and the cumulative volume associated with multiple acid strikes (50:1 ratio). The testing was conducted over 28 days at 50°C and deployed two methods to invest the corrosion conditions; passive weight loss coupon and an active electrochemical probe were used to collect data on the corrosion rate and material performance. In addition to investigating the chemical cleaning solutions, electrochemical corrosion testing was performed on acidic and basic solutions containing sodium permanganate at room temperature to explore the corrosion impacts if these solutions were to be implemented to retrieve remaining actinides that are currently in the sludge of the tank.

  14. Critical study of test methods in stress corrosion cracking. Application to stainless steels in chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajana, Lotfi

    1985-01-01

    The transposition of results obtained in laboratory to the prediction of in-service material resistance is a crucial problem in the case of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The search for a SCC test which allows a reliable and realistic classification of stainless steels in chloride environments requires a choice of adequate electrolytes and of mechanical solicitation mode. In this research, the author first justifies the choice of an environment which could be representative of actual service conditions in the case of 5 grades of austenitic steels and 1 grade of austeno-ferric steel. Using a computerized data acquisition and processing system, the author compares the information obtained with two types of test: under constant load and under slow strain rate [fr

  15. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks, and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  16. Examination of the 1970 National Bureau of Standards Underground Corrosion Test Welded Stainless STeel Coupons from Site D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. R. Zirker; M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder; T. L. Trowbridge

    2008-01-01

    A 1970 study initiated by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), buried over 6000 corrosion coupons or specimens of stainless steel Types 201, 202, 301, 304, 316, 409, 410, 430, and 434. The coupons were configured as sheet metal plates, coated plates, cross-welded plates, U-bend samples, sandwiched materials, and welded tubes. All coupons were of various heat-treatments and cold worked conditions and were buried at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the United States. The NBS scientists dug five sets of two trenches at each of the six sites. In each pair of trenches, they buried duplicate sets of stainless steel coupons. The NBS study was designed to retrieve coupons after one year, two years, four years, eight years, and x years in the soil. During the first eight years of the study, four of five planned removals were completed. After the fourth retrieval, the NBS study was abandoned, and the fifth and final set of specimens remained undisturbed for over 33 years. In 2003, an interdisciplinary research team of industrial, university, and national laboratory investigators were funded under the United States Department of Energy’s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP; Project Number 86803) to extract part of the remaining set of coupons at one of the test sites, characterize the stainless steel underground corrosion rates, and examine the fate and transport of metal ions into the soil. Extraction of one trench at one of the test sites occurred in April 2004. This report details only the characterization of corrosion found on the 14 welded coupons–two cross welded plates, six U-bends, and six welded tubes–that were retrieved from Site D, located near Wildwood, NJ. The welded coupons included Type 301, 304, 316, and 409 stainless steels. After 33 years in the soil, corrosion on the coupons varied according to alloy. This report discusses the stress corrosion cracking and

  17. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Alexander, Joshua B.; Cardenas, Henry E.; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    2008-01-01

    This work examines field performance of nanoscale pozzolan treatments delivered el ctrokinetically to suppress chloride induced corrosion of concrete reinforcement. The particles are 20 nm silica spheres coated with 2 nm alumina particles that carry a net positive charge. Earlier work demonstrated that the alumina particles were stripped from the silica carriers and formed a dense phase with an interparticle spacing that is small enough to inhibit the transport of solvated chlorides. A D.C. field was used to inject the particles into the pores of concrete specimens, directly toward the mild steel bars that were embedded within each 3 inch diameter by 6 inch length concrete specimen. The voltage was held constant at 25 v per inch of concrete cover for a period of 7 days. These voltages permitted current densities as high as 3 A/sq m. During the final 3 days, a 1 molar solution of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate was used to provide a source of calcium to facilitate stronger and more densified phase formation within the pores. In a departure from prior work the particle treatments were started concurrent with chloride extraction in order to determine if particle delivery would inhibit chloride transport. Following treatment the specimens were immersed in seawater for 4 weeks. After this posttreatment exposure, the specimens were tested for tensile strength and the steel reinforcement was examined for evidence of corrosion. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted to assess impact on microstructure.

  18. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Form Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Damage tolerance testing development was required to help qualify a new spin forming dome fabrication process for the Ares 1 program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). One challenge of the testing was due to the compound curvature of the dome. The testing was developed on a sub-scale dome with a diameter of approximately 40 inches. The simulated service testing performed was based on the EQTP1102 Rev L 2195 Aluminum Lot Acceptance Simulated Service Test and Analysis Procedure generated by Lockheed Martin for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank. This testing is performed on a specimen with an induced flaw of elliptical shape generated by Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) and subsequent fatigue cycling for crack propagation to a predetermined length and depth. The specimen is then loaded in tension at a constant rate of displacement at room temperature until fracture occurs while recording load and strain. An identical specimen with a similar flaw is then proof tested at room temperature to imminent failure based on the critical offset strain achieved by the previous fracture test. If the specimen survives the proof, it is then subjected to cryogenic cycling with loads that are a percentage of the proof load performed at room temperature. If all cryogenic cycles are successful, the specimen is loaded in tension to failure at the end of the test. This standard was generated for flat plate, so a method of translating this to a specimen of compound curvature was required. This was accomplished by fabricating a fixture that maintained the curvature of the specimen rigidly with the exception of approximately one-half inch in the center of the specimen containing the induced flaw. This in conjunction with placing the center of the specimen in the center of the load train allowed for successful testing with a minimal amount of bending introduced into the system. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were performed using the typical double beam assembly and with 4

  19. The analysis of beryllium-copper diffusion joint after HHF test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiniatouline, R.N.; Mazul, I.V.; Rubkin, S.Y.

    1995-01-01

    The development of beryllium-copper joints which can withstand to relevant ITER divertor conditions is one of the important tasks at present time. One of the main problem for beryllium-copperjoints, is the inter-metallic layers, the strength and life time of joints significantly depends from the width and contents of the intermetallic layers. The objective of this work is to study the diffusion joint of TGP-56 beryllium to OFHC copper after thermal response and thermocyclic tests with beryllium-copper mockup. The BEY test were performed at e-beam facility (EBTS, SNLA). The following methods were used for analyses: the roentgenographic analysis; X-ray spectrum analysis; the fracture graphic analysis. During the investigation the followed studies were done: the analysis of diffusion boundary Be-Cu, which was obtained at the crossection of one of the tiles, the analysis of the debonded surfaces of a few beryllium tiles and corresponding copper parts; the analysis of upper surface of one of the tiles after HHF tests. The results of this work have showed that: the joint roentgenographic and elements analyses indicated the following phases in the diffusion zone: Cu 2 Be (∼170 μm), CuBe (∼30μm), CuBe 2 (∼1 μm) and solid solution of copper in beryllium. The phases Cu 2 Be, CuBe and solid solution of copper in beryllium were indicated using quantitative microanalysis and phases CuBe, CuBe 2 , Cu, Be - by roentgenographic analysis; the source of fracture (initial crack) is located in the central part of the tiles, the crack caused by the influence of residual stresses during cooling of a mock-up after fabrication and developed under the conditions of slow elastic-plastic growing during the process of thermal fatigue testing. The analysis gives the important data about joint's quality and also may be used for any type of joints and its comparison for ITER applications

  20. Investigation of the chemical and electrochemical phenomena in the chemical mechanical planarization of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), a polishing process in which uneven surfaces of a copper film deposited on a wafer are planarized using chemically active slurry containing sub-micron abrasive particles, is key for the metallization of multilevel copper interconnection wires on integrated circuits by damascene processes. The present dissertation study investigates the electrochemical and chemical behavior of copper in aqueous solutions containing chemical reagents representative of those in CMP slurries, and the effects of these chemical constituents, with the aim of improving our understanding of the chemical processes responsible, at least in part, for planarization and material removal in copper CMP, and providing mechanistic and quantitative information for developing comprehensive predictive CMP removal models that incorporate chemical, electrochemical and mechanical factors. In the first part of the dissertation, the passivation behavior of copper in solutions containing hydrogen peroxide and glycine was examined, using various characterization techniques including electrochemical polarization curve measurements, copper coupon exposure tests, and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements. Polarization curves were measured with a rotating disk copper electrode in glycine solution, in the presence and absence of hydrogen peroxide, to understand the role of hydrogen peroxide in the oxidative dissolution and passivation of copper. Weight loss and copper solubilization measurements were conducted by exposing copper coupons to glycine solutions containing hydrogen peroxide, with various concentrations, at different solution pHs, to characterize the development and degree of the peroxide-induced passivation of copper and to obtain the kinetics of copper dissolution, in order to gain insight into the passivation mechanisms of copper in the peroxide-glycine-based solutions. The Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) measurements were conducted with

  1. Test for Acute Toxicity of Copper, Cadmium, and Mercury in Five Marine Species

    OpenAIRE

    PRATO, Ermelinda; BIANDOLINO, Francesca; SCARDICCHIO, Christian

    2006-01-01

    : The acute toxicity of copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg) to the marine invertebrates Gammarus aequicauda, Corophium insidiosum, Idotea baltica, Sphaeroma serratum, and Mytilus galloprovincialis were evaluated by static bioassays and calculation of the LC50 (lethality concentration for 50%). Hg was more toxic to Gammarus aequicauda, Corophium insidiosum, Idotea baltica, Sphaeroma serratum, and Mytilus galloprovincialis than Cu and Cd. Cu was the least toxic of the metals tested.

  2. Study of biofuels corrosiveness; Estudo da corrosividade de biocombustiveis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Rafaela da Conceicao; Branco, Lucas da Paz Nogueira; Guimaraes, Maria Jose de Oliveria Cavalcanti; Seidl, Peter Rudolf [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    The replacement of crude oil derivatives with biofuels is part of an energy strategy, in which efficiency and conservation should play a leading role. The renewable nature of biodiesel is based in the fact that it is derived from raw materials from agricultural activities, instead of petroleum. Thinking about the increasingly production of biodiesel and its storage to make the proper mixtures, the corrosion of biodiesel tanks can occur over time. The copper corrosion test is used as the standard method for biodiesel corrosivity, however it is designed for diesel fuel from petroleum. Petrodiesel contains sulfur, which attacks the copper alloys. Since biodiesel is free of this element, it should be characterized in a different way. This work intends to analyze existing methodologies in order to evaluate the corrosivity of biodiesel. A literature search was performed in Web of Science database, selecting keywords for a comprehensive search. For the final analysis, a selection of papers classified according to publication year, country and main subject covered was used. Research on biofuels corrosivity is recent and major countries where published (USA, Malaysia and Brazil) which have advantages in terms of size and production of oil seeds. Biodiesel is more corrosive than petroleum diesel, but there is no sufficient evidences as to verify if the level of corrosion found in biodiesel is within acceptable limits for automotive components. Ferrous alloys are more resistant to biodiesel attack than non-ferrous alloys. Among non-ferrous alloys, copper and lead alloys are the most vulnerable, followed by aluminum. It is necessary to develop appropriate methodologies to determine and characterize the corrosivity of biodiesel on engine parts and alloys used in its manufacture and storage. (author)

  3. A digital image method of spot tests for determination of copper in sugar cane spirits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, Kenia Dias; Suarez, Willian Toito; dos Reis, Marina Ferreira; de Oliveira Krambeck Franco, Mathews; Moreira, Renata Pereira Lopes; dos Santos, Vagner Bezerra

    2017-10-01

    In this work the development and validation of analytical methodology for determination of copper in sugarcane spirit samples is carried out. The digital image based (DIB) method was applied along with spot test from the colorimetric reaction employing the RGB color model. For the determination of copper concentration, it was used the cuprizone - a bidentate organic reagent - which forms with copper a blue chelate in an alkaline medium. A linear calibration curve over the concentration range from 0.75 to 5.00 mg L- 1 (r2 = 0.9988) was obtained and limits of detection and quantification of 0.078 mg L- 1 and 0.26 mg L- 1 were acquired, respectively. For the accuracy studies, recovery percentages ranged from 98 to 104% were obtained. The comparison of cooper concentration results in sugar cane spirits using the DIB method and Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry as reference method showed no significant differences between both methods, which were performed using the paired t-test in 95% of confidence level. Thus, the spot test method associated with DIB allows the use of devices as digital cameras and smartphones to evaluate colorimetric reaction with low waste generation, practicality, quickness, accuracy, precision, high portability and low-cost.

  4. A study on the corrosion test of equipment material handling hot molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Jeong, M.S.; Hong, S.S.; Cho, S.H.; Shin, Y.J.; Park, H.S.; Zhang, J.S.

    1999-02-01

    On this technical report, corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels of SUS 316L and SUS 304L in molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O has been investigated in the temperature range of 650 - 850 dg C. Corrosion products of SUS 316L in molten salt consisted of two layers, an outer layer of LiCrO 2 and inner layer of Cr 2 O 3 .The corrosion layer was uniform in molten salt of LiCl, but the intergranular corrosion occurred in addition to the uniform corrosion in mixed molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O. The corrosion rate increased slowly with the increase of temperature up to 750 dg C, but above 750 dg C rapid increase in corrosion rate observed. SUS 316L stainless steel showed slower corrosion rate and higher activation energy for corrosion than SUS 304L, exhibiting higher corrosion resistance in the molten salt. In heat-resistant alloy, dense protective oxide scale of LiCrO 2 was formed in molten salt of LiCl. Whereas in mixed molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O, porous non-protective scale of Li(Cr, Ni, Fe)O 2 was formed. (Author). 44 refs., 4 tabs., 16 figs

  5. Application of gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements after accelerated corrosion tests of steel embedded in mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffó, Gustavo, E-mail: duffo@cnea.gov.ar [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Gerencia Materiales, Depto. Corrosión, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gaillard, Natalia [Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mariscotti, Mario; Ruffolo, Marcelo [Tomografía de Hormigón Armado S.A. (THASA), Reclus 2017, 1609 Boulogne, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-08-15

    The accelerated corrosion by the impressed current technique is widely used in studies of concrete durability since it has the advantage that tests can be carried out within reasonable periods of time. In the present work the relationship between the applied current density and the resulting damage on the reinforcing steel, by applying optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements, was studied by means of the implementation of accelerated corrosion tests on reinforced mortar. The results show that the efficiency of the applied current is between 1 and 77%, regardless of the applied current density, the water/cement ratio and the mortar cover depth of the specimens. The results show the applicability of the gamma-ray radiography technique to detect localized corrosion of steel rebars in laboratory specimens.

  6. Fabrication of imitative stress corrosion cracking using diffusion bonding for the development of nondestructive testing and evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study reports a method to fabricate imitative stress corrosion cracking suitable for the development of nondestructive testing and evaluation methods. The method is to embed a partially-bonded region, which simulates the characteristics of stress corrosion cracking, inside a material by bonding together surfaces having artificial grooves. Since the sizes of the grooves are smaller than the spatial resolution of nondestructive testing method applied, the material property realized can be regarded as uniform as the actual stress corrosion cracking. The grooves are introduced using mechanical machining, which enables one to control the characteristics of the simulated flaw. Four specimens made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel are fabricated. The method is demonstrated by visual and eddy current examinations. (author)

  7. Advances in corrosion testing of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel Zelinka; D.S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    A January 2004 change in the regulation of wood preservatives used in the U.S.has increased the use of newer wood preservatives, such as alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ) and copper azole (CuAz). These preservatives contain high amounts of cupric ions, which may be reduced to copper metal at the expense of less noble steel and galvanized fasteners in the wood....

  8. Copper hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-01-01

    . As a metal, it possesses many of the same qualities as nickel, which is a known strong sensitizer. Cumulative data on subjects with presumed related symptoms and/or suspected exposure showed that a weighted average of 3.8% had a positive patch test reaction to copper. We conclude that copper is a very weak...... hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common...

  9. Electrochemical, Polarization, and Crevice Corrosion Testing of Nitinol 60, A Supplement to the ECLSS Sustaining Materials Compatibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier trials, electrochemical test results were presented for six noble metals evaluated in test solutions representative of waste liquids processed in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Subsequently, a seventh metal, Nitinol 60, was added for evaluation and subjected to the same test routines, data analysis, and theoretical methodologies. The previous six test metals included three titanium grades, (commercially pure, 6Al-4V alloy and 6Al-4V low interstitial alloy), two nickel-chromium alloys (Inconel(RegisteredTrademark) 625 and Hastelloy(RegisteredTrademark) C276), and one high-tier stainless steel (Cronidur(RegisteredTrademark) 30). The three titanium alloys gave the best results of all the metals, indicating superior corrosive nobility and galvanic protection properties. For this current effort, the results have clearly shown that Nitinol 60 is almost as noble as titanium, being very corrosion-resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals electrochemically and during long-term exposure. is also quite noble as it is very corrosion resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals from both an electrochemical perspective and long-term crevice corrosion scenario. This was clearly demonstrated utilizing the same techniques for linear, Tafel and cyclic polarization, and galvanic coupling of the metal candidate as was done for the previous study. The high nobility and low corrosion susceptibility for Nitinol 60 appear to be intermediate to the nickel/chromium alloys and the titanium metals with indications that are more reflective of the titanium metals in terms of general corrosion and pitting behavior.

  10. A Study of Protection of Copper Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E. A.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    Volatile treatment of high capacity boiler water with hydrazine and ammonia is studied. Ammonia comes from the decomposition of excess hydrazine injected to treat dissolved oxygen. Ammonia is also injected for the control of pH. To find an effect of such ammonia on the copper alloy, the relations between pH and iron, and ammonia and copper are studied. Since the dependence of corrosion of iron on pH differs from that of copper, a range of pH was selected experimentally to minimize the corrosion rates of both copper and iron. Corrosion rates of various copper alloys are also compared

  11. phytochemicals as green corrosion inhibitors in various corrosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    with aggressive environment is one among the acceptable practices used to reduce and/or prevent corrosion. ... may exhibit electrochemical activity such as corrosion inhibition (Davis et al. 2001). Some of their results ... zinc and copper in both HCl and H2SO4 acid solutions using gravimetric and polarization measurement ...

  12. The stress-corrosion behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys: A comparison of test methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1982-01-01

    Two powder metallurgy processed (Al-Li-Cu) alloys with and without Mg addition were studied in aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution during the alternate immersion testing of tuning fork specimens, slow crack growth tests using fracture mechanics specimens, and the slow strain rate testing of straining electrode specimens. Scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography were used to demonstrate the character of the interaction between the Al-Li-Cu alloys and the selected environment. Both alloys are susceptible to SC in an aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution under the right electrochemical and microstructural conditions. Each test method yields important information on the character of the SC behavior. Under all conditions investigated, second phase particles strung out in rows along the extrusion direction in the alloys were rapidly attacked, and played principal role in the SC process. With time, larger pits developed from these rows of smaller pits and under certain electrochemical conditions surface cracks initiated from the larger pits and contributed directly to the fracture process. Evidence to support slow crack growth was observed in both the slow strain rate tests and the sustained immersion tests of precracked fracture mechanics specimens. The possible role of H2 in the stress corrosion cracking process is suggested.

  13. Corrosion test plan to guide canister material selection and design for a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCright, R.D.; van Konynenburg, R.A.; Ballou, L.B.

    1983-11-01

    Corrosion rates and the mode of corrosion attack form a most important basis for selection of canister materials and design of a nuclear waste package. Type 304L stainless steel was selected as the reference material for canister fabrication because of its generally excellent corrosion resistance in water, steam and air. However, 304L may be susceptible to localized and stress-assisted forms of corrosion under certain conditions. Alternative alloys are also investigated; these alloys were chosen because of their improved resistance to these forms of corrosion. The fabrication and welding processes, as well as the glass pouring operation for defense and commercial high-level wastes, may influence the susceptibility of the canister to localized and stress forms of corrosion. 12 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  14. Simulation of Mechanical Stress on Stainless Steel for Pb-Bi Corrosion Test by Using ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwanto, D.; Mustari, A. P. A.; Budiman, B. A.

    2017-03-01

    Pb-Bi eutectic with its advantageous is proposed to be utilized as a coolant in the GEN IV type of rSeactor. However, high temperature corrosion when contact with stainless steels is one of the issues of Pb-Bi eutectic utilization. It is known that in the environment of high temperature Pb-Bi, mechanical strength of stainless steel may decrease. Thus, simulation of mechanical stress working on stainless steel during in-situ bending test by using ABAQUS was conducted. Several bending degrees were simulated at high temperature to obtain the mechanical stress information. Temperature condition was strongly affect the stress vs. displacement profile. The reported mechanical strength reduction percentage was used to draw predicted mechanical stress under high temperature Pb-Bi environment.

  15. Utilization of coal mining wastes a filling material in reinforced earth structures: reinforcement corrosion tests; Utilizacion de los esteriles del carbon como material de relleno en estructuras de tierra reforzada: pruebas de corrosion de armaduras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Canibano, J.; Pardo, F.; Sopena, L.; Torres, M.; Perez, J.J.; Martinez, C.; Gonzlaez, M.R. [Laboratorio Geotecnia CEDEX (Spain)

    1996-09-01

    In this article are summarized the tests carried out with different types of reinforcing elements and several coal mining wastes in order to determine the occurrence or not of corrosion processes caused by mine stones in the reinforcing elements. (Author)

  16. Stress corrosion cracking of the tubing materials for nuclear steam generators in an environment containing lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, Uh Chul; Lee, Eun Hee; Hwang, Seong Sik

    2004-01-01

    Steam generator tube materials show a high susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in an environment containing lead species and some nuclear power plants currently have degradation problems associated with lead-induced stress corrosion cracking in a caustic solution. Effects of an applied potential on SCC is tested for middle-annealed Alloy 600 specimens since their corrosion potential can be changed when lead oxide coexists with other oxidizing species like copper oxide in the sludge. In addition, all the steam generator tubing materials used for nuclear power plants being operated and currently under construction in Korea are tested in a caustic solution with lead oxide. (author)

  17. Corrosion product identification and relative rates of corrosion of candidate metals in an irradiated air-steam environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Swayambunathan, V.; Tani, B.S.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Previously reported work by others indicates that dicopper trihydroxide nitrate, Cu 2 NO 3 (OH) 3 , forms on copper and copper alloys subjected to irradiated moist air near room temperature. We have performed experiments over a range of temperature and humidity, and have found that this species is formed at temperatures up to at least 150 degree C if low to intermediate relative humidities are present. At 150 degree C and 100% relative humidity, only Cu 2 O and CuO were observed. The relative general corrosion rates of the copper materials tested in 1-month experiments at dose rates of 0.7 and 2.0 kGy/h were Cu > 70/30 Cu--Ni > Al-bronze. High-nickel alloy 825 showed no observable corrosion. 29 refs., 4 tabs

  18. Supercritical water loop design for corrosion and water chemistry tests under irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzickova, Mariana; Hajek, Petr; Vsolak, Rudolf; Kysela, Jan [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, Reactor Services Division, Husinec (Czech Republic); Smida, Stepan [H and D Engineering, Praha (Czech Republic); Petr, Jan [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, Praha (Czech Republic)

    2008-03-15

    An experimental loop operating with water at supercritical conditions (25MPa, 600 .deg. C in the test section) is designed for operation in the research reactor LVR-15 in UJV Rez, Czech Republic. The loop should serve as an experimental facility for corrosion tests of materials for in-core as well as out-of-core structures, for testing and optimization of suitable water chemistry for a future HPLWR and for studies of radiolysis of water at supercritical conditions, which remains the domain where very few experimental data are available. At present, final necessary calculations (thermalhydraulic, neutronic, strength) are being performed on the irradiation channel, which is the most challenging part of the loop. The concept of the primary and auxiliary circuits has been completed. The design of the loop shall be finished in the course of the year 2007 to start the construction, out-of-pile testing to verify proper functioning of all systems and as such to be ready for in-pile tests by the end of the HPLWR Phase 2 European project by the end of 2009.

  19. Test Plan And Procedure For The Examination Of Tank 241-AY-101 Multi-Probe Corrosion Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyrwas, R.B.; Page, J.S.; Cooke, G.S.

    2012-01-01

    This test plan describes the methods to be used in the forensic examination of the Multi-probe Corrosion Monitoring System (MPCMS) installed in the double-shell tank 241-AY-101 (AY-101). The probe was designed by Applied Research and Engineering Sciences (ARES) Corporation. The probe contains four sections, each of which can be removed from the tank independently (H-14-107634, AY-101 MPCMS Removable Probe Assembly) and one fixed center assembly. Each removable section contains three types of passive corrosion coupons: bar coupons, round coupons, and stressed C-rings (H-14-l07635, AY-101 MPCMS Details). Photographs and weights of each coupon were recorded and reported on drawing H-14-107634 and in RPP-RPT-40629, 241-AY-101 MPCMS C-Ring Coupon Photographs. The coupons will be the subject of the forensic analyses. The purpose of this examination will be to document the nature and extent of corrosion of the 29 coupons. This documentation will consist of photographs and photomicrographs of the C-rings and round coupons, as well as the weights of the bar and round coupons during corrosion removal. The total weight loss of the cleaned coupons will be used in conjunction with the surface area of each to calculate corrosion rates in mils per year. The bar coupons were presumably placed to investigate the liquid-air-interface. An analysis of the waste level heights in the waste tank will be investigated as part of this examination.

  20. The effect of heat treatment and test parameters on the aqueous stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history and test technique, under sustained load in natural seawater, 3.3 percent NaCl solution, distilled water, and high humidity air was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, threshold, and the extension of corrosion fatigue data to sustained load conditions. Stress history effects were found to be most important in that they controlled incubation period, initial crack growth rates, and apparent threshold.

  1. Prévision de la corrosion des coussinets et corrélation avec l'essai sur moteur Petter W1 L Predicting Bearing Wear and Correlation with the Petter W1 L Engine Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desvard A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Parmi les essais exigés par les spécifications européennes et américaines pour huiles de moteurs, il existe un essai de résistance à la corrosion des coussinets de bielles en cuivre-plomb (tableau 1. Ces essais sont effectués sur moteurs monocylindre Petter W1 L ou Labeco CLR (tableau 2. Des résultats de corrosion obtenus sur le moteur Petter W1 L, avec des huiles de calibrage, sont donnés (tableau 4 et les courbes de corrosion en fonction du temps d'essai sont représentées figure 1. En utilisant ces mêmes huiles, un groupe de travail du GFC*, chargé de développer des méthodes d'essai laboratoire de présélection, a mis au point un test basé sur le suivi de la corrosion d'une éprouvette de plomb, en présence de cuivre, immergée dans le lubrifiant à évaluer, lorsque celui-ci est soumis à des conditions d'oxydation sévères, en présence d'air, à haute température (fig. 2. Les résultats obtenus sont en parfaite concordance avec les résultats sur moteurs (tableau 5 et fig. 3. Par ailleurs, ces essais mettent en évidence une excellente répétabilité (fig. 4,et une excellente reproductibilité (fig. 5 et 6 de la méthode de laboratoire. * GFC : Groupement Français de Coordination, pour le développement des essais de performance des combustibles, des lubrifiants pour moteurs et autres fluides utilisés dans les transports. Among the tests required by European and American specifications for motor oils, there is a test of the corrosion resistance of copper-lead bearings (Table 1. These tests are performed in single-cylinder Petter W1 L engines or Labeco CLR engines (Table 2. The corrosion results obtained with the Petter W1 L engine, for calibration oils, are given (Table 4, and the corrosion curves as a function of time are shown in Fig. 1. By using the same oils, a GFC working group responsible for developing laboratory preselection test methods has developed a test based on the determining of the corrosion of a lead

  2. The polymer cement of sulfur as an alternative for the recycling of phosphogypsum. Corrosion testing of cements enriched with phosphogypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Lopez, F. A.; Navarro, N.; Sanchez, M.; Sanz, B.; Ballesteros, O.; Higueras, E.; Roman, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of the use of cement for the recycling of materials is seen today as sustainable solution of the fertilizer industry for production of matches (NORM). In this paper presents some results of corrosion tests performed on these cements modified using buffer solutions of different pH. The analytical determinations in these matrices are new challenges. (Author)

  3. Corrosion of metals in wood : comparing the results of a rapid test method with long-term exposure tests across six wood treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Donald S. Stone

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares two methods of measuring the corrosion of steel and galvanized steel in wood: a long-term exposure test in solid wood and a rapid test method where fasteners are electrochemically polarized in extracts of wood treated with six different treatments. For traditional wood preservatives, the electrochemical extract method correlates with solid wood...

  4. Effects of hardness and test temperature on the stress-corrosion cracking susceptibility of carbon steel in simulated BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Guen; Akashi, Masatsune

    1998-01-01

    Carbon steels which are used for such as water supply line, core spray line, and clean up heat exchanger in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Plant, are main structural materials as well as an austenitic stainless steels, and Ni based alloys. It has been well known that carbon steels can become susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in BWR primary coolant water environments, i.e., the high-temperature, high-purity water containing dissolved oxygen. Nevertheless, their sensitivity of SCC appears to be markedly smaller compared to that of weld-sensitized Type 304 stainless steels, whole failure has often been observed. This paper examines the critical condition, especially effects of hardness, and temperature for the initiation of SCC by means of Slow Strain Rate Tensile (SSRT) test, and Creviced Bent Beam (CBB) test as laboratory accelerated tests. It has been shown that, (1) Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) initiates over hardness of Hv 400 for single bead weld material, simulated corner weld; (2) in middle temperature domain around 160 to 190degC range, so many stress-corrosion cracks initiate, but each crack is not so deep, on the other hand, in high temperature domain, stress-corrosion cracks initiate few in number, but each cracks is developed so deep. (author)

  5. Inspection of piping wall loss with flow accelerated corrosion accelerated simulation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyung Ha; Kim, Ji Hak; Hwang, Il Soon; Lee, Na Young; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) has become a hot issue for aging of passive components. Ultrasonic Technique (UT) has been adopted to inspect the secondary piping of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). UT, however, uses point detection method, which results in numerous detecting points and thus takes time. We developed an Equipotential Switching Direct Current Potential Drop (ES-DCPD) method to monitor the thickness of piping that covers wide range of piping at once time. Since the ES-DCPD method covers area, not a point, it needs less monitoring time. This can be a good approach to broad carbon steel piping system such as secondary piping of NPPs. In this paper, FAC accelerated simulation test results is described. We realized accelerated FAC phenomenon by 2 times test: 23.7% thinning in 216.7 hours and 51% thinning in 795 hours. These were monitored by ES-DCPD and traditional UT. Some parameters of water chemistry are monitored and controlled to accelerate FAC process. As sensitive factors on FAC, temperature and pH was changed during the test. The wall loss monitored results reflected these changes of water chemistry successfully. Developed electrodes are also applied to simulation loop to monitor water chemistry. (author)

  6. Stress corrosion cracking tests on electron beam welded carbon steel specimens in carbonate-bicarbonate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkins, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking tests have been performed on tapered carbon steel test pieces containing electron beam welds with a view to defining susceptibility to such cracking in a carbonate-bicarbonate solution at 90 C and an appropriate electrode potential. The tests involved applying cyclic loads to the specimens and it is shown that the threshold stress for cracking reduces linearly with increase in the magnitude of the cyclic load component. Extrapolation of these trends to zero fluctuating stress indicates static load threshold stresses in the vicinity of the yield stress (i.e. about 300 N/mm 2 for parent plate without a weld, 400 N/mm 2 for specimens with welds on one side only and 600 N/mm 2 for specimens having welds penetrating through the thickness of the specimen). The averages of the maximum crack velocities observed were least for parent plate material and greatest for weld metal, the former being essentially intergranular in morphology and the latter mostly transgranular, with heat affected zone material being intermediate between these extremes. (author)

  7. Corrosion test on coating systems in the presence of sea-salt fine particles using small specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozawa, Seiichi; Ouchi, Koki; Ito, Akihiko.

    1982-01-01

    A large number of industrial plants and facilities of Japan is often constructed on the seaside area, and so steel materials of these plants and facilities are mostly located under the corrosive environment by sea-salt fine particles. These steel materials are, of course, protected by means of paints, platings or other galvanic protection methods, but some problems to investigate seem still to remain for gaining the better corrosion prevention in such a corrosive environment. In this paper, the results of outdoor atmospheric exposure test by using the small painted specimens are described. The exposure test was practised on the seashore at Tokai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute for fourteen months. In this test, it was proved that blasting and control of film thickness could somewhat improve the grade of rust prevention of the exposed specimens, but that melamine-alkyd resin painting systems (total film thickness; 12 -- 36 μm) were generally insufficient for a long time rust prevention system in the presence of sea-salt fine particles. On the other hand, the specimens using zinc rich paint primer or hot dip galvanizing as undercoatings (total film thickness; 173 -- 495 μm) showed the perfect corrosion resistant properties against the corrosive environment of the test site under the influence of sea-salt fine particles. Moreover, even the specimens of the paint films which were artificially scratched in the shape of cross cut got hardly rust on the bare steel area and no deterioration was found on the paint films. (author)

  8. Corrosion protection performance of palm and mineral oil media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Nik Sani, W.B.; Ani, F.N.; Masjuki, H.H.

    2002-01-01

    In European forest, especially Scandinavian, almost all forest machines are filled with biodegradable fluid. The fluid is of synthetic type. The ratio between the lowest cost of mineral oil and the synthetic fluid is about 1:4. The high cost of this biodegradable fluid can be a major obstacle to be used in developing countries. Malaysia and South East Asia are known for its natural beauties. However, a spill of mineral based oils to their land and seas may result in long term water and soil contamination. Thus crop or agricultural based oil product can provide the solution to this problem. However, considering the demand placed on the oil in service, the service performance such as relation to component compatibility with the crop based oil is crucial to be investigated. The ability of crop based oils to protect and reduce corrosion formation is still unexplored. It is important for each oil to preserve its oxidation stability and remain non-corrosive during service. This paper reports the results of copper corrosion tests. The test includes mass change monitoring, oxide scales and microscopic analysis using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Relative Increase of total acid number and weight loss during copper immersion has proved that metal corrosion in contact with oil was caused by oil degradation that produces acidic compounds. Coppers that were immersed in oil temperature of 60 0 C show that increase of temperature in presence of transition metal induces oil degradation. (Author)

  9. The Non-Destructive Test of Steel Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Bridges Using a Micro-Magnetic Sensor