WorldWideScience

Sample records for copper carbides

  1. Tungsten-yttria carbide coating for conveying copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Albert J.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for providing a carbided-tungsten-yttria coating on the interior surface of a copper vapor laser. The surface serves as a wick for the condensation of liquid copper to return the condensate to the interior of the laser for revolatilization.

  2. Investigations of Interface Properties in Copper-Silicon Carbide Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chmielewski M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the technological aspects of the interface formation in the copper-silicon carbide composite and its effect on the material’s microstructure and properties. Cu-SiC composites with two different volume content of ceramic reinforcement were fabricated by hot pressing (HP and spark plasma sintering (SPS technique. In order to protect SiC surface from its decomposition, the powder was coated with a thin tungsten layer using plasma vapour deposition (PVD method. Microstructural analyses provided by scanning electron microscopy revealed the significant differences at metal-ceramic interface. Adhesion force and fracture strength of the interface between SiC particles and copper matrix were measured. Thermal conductivity of composites was determined using laser flash method. The obtained results are discussed with reference to changes in the area of metal-ceramic boundary.

  3. Thermal properties of wood-derived silicon carbide and copper-silicon carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappecena, Kristen E.

    Wood-derived ceramics and composites have been of interest in recent years due to their unique microstructures, which lead to tailorable properties. The porosity and pore size distribution of each wood type is different, which yields variations in properties in the resultant materials. The thermal properties of silicon carbide ceramics and copper-silicon carbide composites derived from wood were studied as a function of their pore structures. Wood was pyrolyzed at temperatures ranging from 300-2400°C to yield porous carbon. The progression toward long-range order was studied as a function of pyrolyzation temperature. Biomorphic silicon carbide (bioSiC) is a porous ceramic material resulting from silicon melt infiltration of these porous carbon materials. BioSiC has potential applicability in many high temperature environments, particularly those in which rapid temperature changes occur. To understand the behavior of bioSiC at elevated temperatures, the thermal and thermo-mechanical properties were studied. The thermal conductivity of bioSiC from five precursors was determined using flash diffusivity at temperatures up to 1100°C. Thermal conductivity results varied with porosity, temperature and orientation, and decreased from 42-13 W/mK for porosities of 43-69%, respectively, at room temperature. The results were compared with to object-oriented finite-element analysis (OOF). OOF was also used to model and understand the heat-flow paths through the complex bioSiC microstructures. The thermal shock resistance of bioSiC was also studied, and no bioSiC sample was found to fail catastrophically after up to five thermal shock cycles from 1400°C to room temperature oil. Copper-silicon carbide composites have potential uses in thermal management applications due to the high thermal conductivity of each phase. Cu-bioSiC composites were created by electrodeposition of copper into bioSiC pores. The detrimental Cu-SiC reaction was avoided by using this room temperature

  4. Production of copper-niobium carbide nanocomposite powders via mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, M.T. [INETI-DMTP, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: tmarques@ineti.pt; Livramento, V. [INETI-DMTP, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [INETI-DMTP, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Almeida, A. [IST-Dep. Eng. de Materiais, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Vilar, R. [IST-Dep. Eng. de Materiais, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-06-15

    Nanocrystalline niobium carbide was synthesed in situ in a copper matrix during high-energy milling of elemental powders. Three powder batches were produced with nominal compositions of 5, 10 and 20 vol.% NbC. Characterisation by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy indicates that early during the milling process a carbide dispersion is formed within a nanostructured copper matrix. After annealing at 873 K, the carbide structure and particle size are maintained, reflecting the ability of the microstructure to resist to coarsening. The hardness levels attained are more than twice those of nanostructured copper.

  5. THE PRODUCTION OF PURE ABSOLUTE ALCOHOL WITH CALCIUM CARBIDE AND ANHYDROUS COPPER SULPHATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, R E; Smith, L T

    1925-09-01

    (1) The above is recommended as an economical, convenient and quick method for producing absolute alcohol on a laboratory scale. If the distillation is executed with free flame, excessive or careless heating must be avoided near the end of the operation because of the copper acetylide in the residue. (2) Calcium carbide is recommended over potassium permanganate or anhydrous copper sulphate as a qualitative reagent in detecting traces of water in alcohol.

  6. Chromium and copper influence on the nodular cast iron with carbides microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gumienny

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper chromium to 1,00% and copper to 1,50% influence at constant molybdenum content of about 1,50% on the nodular cast ironwith carbides microstructure has been presented. It was found, that as a result of synergic addition of above-mentioned elements there isthe possibility obtaining an ausferrite in nodular cast iron with carbides castings. Conditions have been given, when in nodular cast iron with carbides at cooling at first in the form, then air-cooling austenite transformation to upper bainite, its mixture with lower bainite, martensite or ausferrite takes place. Transformations proceed during cooling and the crystallization of cast iron have been determined and the casting hardness has been presented.

  7. Co-precipitation of copper and niobium carbide in a low carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, Michael Scott

    Co-precipitation of niobium carbide and body-centered cubic (BCC) copper in ferrite was investigated as a high strength, low carbon, chromium-free alternative to conventional high performance structural steels that rely on a tempered martensitic microstructure. Theoretical nucleation and growth rate models for BCC copper and niobium carbide were constructed using calculated thermodynamic driving forces in conjunction with classical theories for the homogeneous nucleation and subsequent growth of coherent, spherical precipitates. The maximum calculated nucleation and growth rates for niobium carbide were found to be 1.0 x 106 nuclei/cm3s at 666°C and 1.0 nm/s at 836°C, respectively, for an austenitizing temperature of 1170°C. For BCC copper in ferrite, the maximum calculated nucleation and growth rates were determined to be 8.0 x 1015 nuclei/cm 3s at 612°C and 0.038 nm/s at 682°C, respectively, for all austenitizing temperatures. Three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) microscopy revealed the presence of nano-scale BCC copper clusters in approximately the same number density predicted by the theoretical nucleation model. Using an experimentally determined "effective" activation energy for copper in iron, the normalized theoretical nucleation rate curve compared very well with the normalized hardness response after 5 minutes of aging and effectively described the experimental short-time aging behavior of a low carbon, niobium bearing steel. The size and morphological evolution as well as the growth and coarsening behavior of copper precipitates were investigated through conventional TEM during isothermal direct aging at 550°C for a niobium and niobium-free steel. Although niobium carbide precipitation was not characterized, niobium additions provided increased hardness upon direct aging and showed a much higher resistance to overaging, than a niobium-free steel, for long isothermal aging times. In both steels for aging times up to five hours, both 9R type and BCC

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of In-situ Copper-Niobium Carbide Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhailawati, H.; Othman, R.; Bui, D. L.; Umemoto, M.

    2008-03-01

    In this work, synthesis of copper matrix composite powder reinforced by in situ niobium carbide particle was prepared by mechanical alloying of elemental powder and subsequent heat treatment. Elemental powders of Cu-Nb-C correspond to Cu-40wt%Nb-10%wtC composition was milled for 54 hours at room temperature in a planetary ball mill. The effect of heat treatment temperature on the formation of niobium carbide was analyzed. Characterization by X-ray diffraction was done on the milled powder and heat-treated powder in order to investigate NbC formation. Results indicate that NbC began to precipitate after mechanical alloying for about 54h with heat treatment temperature of 900 °C and 1000 °C.

  9. Effects of Implant Copper Layer on Diamond Film Deposition on Cemented Carbides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The deposition of high-quality diamond films and their adhesion on cemented carbides are strongly influenced by the catalytic effect of cobalt under typical deposition conditions.Decreasing Co content on the surface of the cemented carbide is often used for the diamond filmdeposition. But the leaching of Co from the WC-Co substrate leading to a mechanical weak surface often causes a poor adhesion. In this paper we adopted an implant copper layer preparedby vaporization to improve the mechanical properties of the Co-leached substrate. The diamondfilms were grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from CH4 :H2 gas mixture. Thecross section and the morphology of the diamond film were characterized by scanning electronmicroscopy (SEM). The non-diamond content in the film was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy.The effects of pretreatment on the concentrations of Co and Cu near the interfacial region wereexamined by energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) equipped with SEM. The adhesion of the diamondon the substrate was evaluated with a Rockwell-type hardness tester. The results indicate that thediamond films prepared with implant copper layer have a good adhesion to the cemented carbidesubstrate due to the recovery of the mechanical properties of the Co-depleted substrate after thecopper implantation and the formation of less amorphous carbon between the substrate and thediamond film.

  10. Synthesis of copper-niobium carbide composite powder by in situ processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Zuhailawati [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: zuhaila@eng.usm.my; Othman, Radzali; Long, Bui Duc [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Umemoto, Minoru [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan)

    2008-09-22

    The in situ formation of niobium carbide (NbC) particles was investigated during mechanical alloying process as well as subsequent heat-treatment. Initial starting powders of Cu, Nb and C were used with a composition of Cu-40 wt% Nb-10 wt% C which was corresponding to Cu-40 vol% NbC. A mixture of this powder system was milled in an argon atmosphere for four different durations, i.e., 15 h, 31 h, 42 h and 54 h. X-ray diffraction was used to verify the formation of NbC. No NbC was formed after the milling process. The in situ formation of NbC in a copper matrix only took place after heat-treatment at 900 deg. C. Longer milling time resulted in the formation of NbC phase with more intense X-ray diffraction peaks due to powder refinement.

  11. Investigation on Interface Structure and Wear-resistant Properties of HVOF Sprayed Carbides Coating onto Copper Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Li-feng; ZHANG Heng-jin; WEI Ying-hui; YAN Kai; HU Lan-qing; XU Bing-she

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we deposited carbides on copper substrate by High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying. The structure of the coating and microstructure of the substrate-coating interface have been investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We observed the worn surface of the coating and investigated the wear mechanism. The results show that the microstructure of the interface between HVOF sprayed coating and substrate which consists of the amorphous layers, nanocrystalls in the coating and dislocation cells in copper substrate,etc. is complex. The amorphous layers are formed from heated adhesion after rapidly cooling, while the nanocrystalls come from the fragmentation of half-molten carbides. At the same time we found that the wear-resistant properties of the WC-Co coating is better than that of Cr3C2-NiCr coating at room temperature. The early wear-resistance of the HVOF sprayed coating is poor because of the roughness of its surface or bad bond of hard composite particles. The high velocity of molten droplets is propitious to fill up the interspaces between carbides, so as to make the coating more compact and reduce its porosities, thus the wear-resistance of carbides coatings is improved.

  12. Investigation on Interface Structure and Wear-resistant Properties of HVOF Sprayed Carbides Coating onto Copper Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOULi-feng; ZHANGHeng-jin; WEIYing-hui; YANKai; HULan-qing; XUBing-she

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we deposited carbides on copper substrate by High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying. The structure of the coating and microstructure of the substrate-coating interface have been investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We observed the worn surface of the coating and investigated the wear mechanism. The results show that the microstructure of the interface between HVOF sprayed coating and substrate which consists of the amorphous layers, nanocrystalls in the coating and dislocation cells in copper substrate, etc. is complex. The amorphous layers are formed from heated adhesion after rapidly cooling, while the nanocrystalls come from the fragmentation of half-molten carbides. At the same time we found that the wear-resistant properties of the WC-Co coating is better than that of Cr3C2-NiCr coating at room temperature. The early wear-resistance of the HVOF sprayed coating is poor because of the roughness of its surface or bad bond of hard composite particles. The high velocity of molten droplets is propitious to fill up the interspaces between carbides, so as to make the coating more compact and reduce its porosities, thus the wear-resistance of carbides coatings is improved.

  13. Characterization of boron carbide particulate reinforced in situ copper surface composites synthesized using friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiskumar, R., E-mail: sathiscit2011@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Murugan, N., E-mail: murugan@cit.edu.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, V V College of Engineering, Tisaiyanvilai, 627 657 Tamil Nadu (India); Vijay, S.J., E-mail: vijayjoseph@karunya.edu [Centre for Research in Metallurgy (CRM), School of Mechanical Sciences, Karunya University, Coimbatore, 641 114 Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-10-15

    Friction stir processing has evolved as a novel solid state technique to fabricate surface composites. The objective of this work is to apply the friction stir processing technique to fabricate boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites and investigate the effect of B{sub 4}C particles and its volume fraction on microstructure and sliding wear behavior of the same. A groove was prepared on 6 mm thick copper plates and packed with B{sub 4}C particles. The dimensions of the groove was varied to result in five different volume fractions of B{sub 4}C particles (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 vol.%). A single pass friction stir processing was done using a tool rotational speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 40 mm/min and an axial force of 10 kN. Metallurgical characterization of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites was carried out using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The sliding wear behavior was evaluated using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results indicated that the B{sub 4}C particles significantly influenced the area, dispersion, grain size, microhardness and sliding wear behavior of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites. When the volume fraction of B{sub 4}C was increased, the wear mode changed from microcutting to abrasive wear and wear debris was found to be finer. Highlights: • Fabrication of Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composite by friction stir processing • Analyzing the effect of B{sub 4}C particles on the properties of Cu/B4C surface composite • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles reduced the area of surface composite. • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles enhanced the microhardness and wear rate. • B{sub 4}C particles altered the wear mode from microcutting to abrasive.

  14. In situ production of tantalum carbide nanodispersoids in a copper matrix by reactive milling and hot extrusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manotas-Albor, Milton, E-mail: manotasm@uninorte.edu.co [Grupo de Investigación en Física Aplicada, Departamento de Física, Universidad del Norte, Km. 5 vía a Puerto Colombia, Barranquilla (Colombia); Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile); Vargas-Uscategui, Alejandro [Laboratorio de Materiales a Nanoescala, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Tupper Av. 2069, Santiago (Chile); Palma, Rodrigo [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile); Mosquera, Edgar [Laboratorio de Materiales a Nanoescala, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Tupper Av. 2069, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-06-15

    Highlights: • Tantalum carbide nanodispersoids were obtained in a copper matrix. • Nanodispersoids were obtained by means of reactive milling followed by hot extrusion. • Hexane was used as the liquid medium for the reactive mechanical alloying process. • Hexane provides the carbon (C) needed for the process. • The reaction of tantalum carbide formation takes place in the hot extrusion. - Abstract: This paper presents a study of the in situ production of tantalum carbide nanodispersoids in a copper matrix. The copper matrix composites were produced by means of reactive milling in hexane (C{sub 6}H{sub 14}) followed by hot extrusion. The composite materials were characterized by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Vickers micro-hardness. The effect of milling time was analyzed in 10, 20 and 30 h in a composite with a nominal composition Cu–5 vol.% TaC. A systematic increase of the dislocations density and the carbon concentration were observed when the milling time was increased, whereas the crystallite size of the composite matrix decreased. The material milled for 30 h and hot-extruded showed a density of 9037 kg m{sup −3} (98.2% densification) and a softening resistance of 204 HV; however the latter value showed an abrupt drop after an annealing treatment at 923 K for 1 h. Finally, the TEM analysis showed the presence of tantalum carbide (Ta{sub 4}C{sub 3}) nanodispersoids.

  15. Electrical Resistivity, Tribological Behaviour of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Nanoboron Carbide Particles Reinforced Copper Hybrid Composites for Pantograph Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Selvakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the influence and contribution of multiwalled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT–boron carbide (B4C to the mechanical and tribological properties of copper matrix composites. Different weight fractions of nano- B4C-containing fixed-weight fractions of MWCNT-reinforced copper composites were prepared using the entrenched cold-press sintering method of powder metallurgy. The wear losses of sintered Cu–MWCNT–B4C composites were investigated by conducting sliding tests in a pin-on-disc apparatus. The addition of reinforcements showed enhancements in the hardness and wear properties of the composites due to the uniform dispersion of the secondary reinforcement in the copper matrix and the self-lubricating effect of the MWCNTs. The effects of the nanoparticle distribution in the matrix, the worn surface morphology, and the elemental composition of the composites were characterized using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The electrical resistivity of the fabricated copper hybrid composite preforms was evaluated using a four-point probe tester. Our results highlight the use of experiential reinforcing limits of B4C on the wear and electrical and mechanical behaviour of copper composites.

  16. Role of friction stir processing parameters on microstructure and microhardness of boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Sathiskumar; N Murugan; I Dinaharan; S J Vijay

    2013-12-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was applied to fabricate boron carbide (B4C) particulate reinforced copper surface composites. The effect of FSP parameters such as tool rotational speed, processing speed and groove width on microstructure and microhardness was investigated. A groove was contrived on the 6mm thick copper plates and packed with B4C particles. FSP was carried out using five various tool rotational speeds, processing speeds and groove widths. Optical and scanning electron microscopies were employed to study the microstructure of the fabricated surface composites. The results indicated that the selected FSP parameters significantly influenced the area of surface composite, distribution of B4C particles and microhardness of the surface composites. Higher tool rotational speed and lower processing speed produced an excellent distribution of B4C particles and higher area of surface composite due to higher frictional heat, increased stirring and material tranportation. The B4C particles were bonded well to the copper matrix and refined the grains of copper due to the pinning effect of B4C particles. B4C particles retained the original size and morphology because of its small size and minimum sharp corners in the morphology.

  17. Effect of composition of titanium in silver-copper-titanium braze alloy on dissimilar laser brazing of binder-less cubic boron nitride and tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechi, Yoshihisa; Nagatsuka, Kimiaki; Nakata, Kazuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Laser brazing with Ti as an active element in silver-copper alloy braze metal has been carried out for binder-less cubic boron nitride and tungsten carbide, using silver-copper- titanium braze alloys with titanium content that varied between 0.28 mass% and 1.68 mass%. Observations of the interface using electron probe microanalysis and scanning acoustic microscopy show that efficient interface adhesion between binder-less cubic boron nitride and the silver-copper-titanium braze alloy was achieved for the braze with a titanium content of 0. 28 mass%.

  18. Copper-to-silicon-carbide joints development for Future CLIC Hom Dampers

    CERN Document Server

    Gil Costa, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic-to-metal joints have been of paramount importance for the nuclear and aeronautic industry since the last century. In this document, two different approaches to the Cu-to-SiC joining are briefly described and discussed. The first approach consists of an intermediate piece of lower Coefficient of Thermal Expansion than copper aiming to reduce the expansion mismatch with the ceramic during the brazing cycle. Soldering is selected as a second attempt, whose lower joining temperature reduces the absolute expansion difference between Cu and SiC. In addition, four SiC metallization processes are proposed and some of them have been also tested and discussed.

  19. Spark plasma sintering of mechanically alloyed in situ copper-niobium carbide composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, B.D. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan); Othman, R. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Umemoto, M. [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan); Zuhailawati, H., E-mail: zuhaila@eng.usm.m [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2010-09-03

    A Cu-NbC composite with high electrical conductivity and high microhardness was synthesized by mechanical alloying and densified using spark plasma sintering (SPS). Mixtures of Cu-NbC powders corresponding to volume fractions of 1, 5, 15 and 25 vol% NbC were milled in a high energy planetary mill under argon atmosphere for 30 h using ethanol as process control agent. The Cu-NbC as-milled powder was sintered using spark plasma sintering temperatures between 900 and 1000 {sup o}C. X-ray diffraction investigation showed that NbC started to form in the copper matrix during ball milling and the reaction between Nb and C was completed after 10 min of SPS sintering. Electrical conductivity and density of the Cu-15 vol% NbC composite increased with increasing sintering temperature. The results showed the superior properties of SPS-prepared Cu-NbC composite: electrical conductivity is almost 4 times higher and microhardness is 3.5 times higher than with normal sintering. A highest density of 98% and electrical conductivity of 45.6% IACS were obtained in the Cu-1 vol% NbC composite. The highest microhardness of 452.9 Hv was achieved in the Cu-25 vol% NbC composite.

  20. PYROLYTIC CARBIDE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    and injector design changes were made to improve the quality of the carbide produced. Niobium carbide and tantalum carbide coated nozzles are described...Additional data for pyrolytic niobium carbide and hafnium carbide is also presented. (Author)

  1. Consolidation of dispersion strengthened copper-niobium carbide composite prepared by in situ and ex situ methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuhailawati, H. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: zuhaila@eng.usm.my; Yong, T.L. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2009-04-15

    In this paper, Cu-20vol%NbC composite was prepared by in situ and ex situ processing methods. In in situ method, a mixture of Cu-Nb-C was mechanically alloyed in a high energy planetary mill while in ex situ method, a mixture of Cu-NbC powder was mixed in a low energy ball mill. Consolidation of the composite powder was systematically studied by pressing the powder at different compaction pressures, i.e. in the range of 350-650 MPa, followed with sintering at 900 deg. C for an hour. The presence of the NbC particle in copper matrix of the Cu-Nb-C sintered sample has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. In situ composite has higher hardness and electrical conductivity than its counterpart due to a homogenous distribution of fine NbC particle and good NbC-Cu adhesion bonding. Higher compaction pressure has increased the hardness, electrical conductivity and density of the composites.

  2. Low resistance barrier layer for isolating, adhering, and passivating copper metal in semiconductor fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weihs, Timothy P. (Baltimore, MD); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palto Alto, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

  3. Titanium Carbide-Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-08

    titanium carbide , titanium carbide with free graphite, titanium carbide /vanadium carbide alloy with free graphite, and titanium carbide with...from melts. The test pins were drawn across hot pressed titanium carbide wear plates with 5 newtons of normal force. The lowest friction coefficient at...22 C was 0.12 obtained with pure titanium carbide . The lowest friction coefficient at 900 C was 0.19 obtained with titanium carbide with boron and

  4. SILICON CARBIDE FOR SEMICONDUCTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This state-of-the-art survey on silicon carbide for semiconductors includes a bibliography of the most important references published as of the end...of 1964. The various methods used for growing silicon carbide single crystals are reviewed, as well as their properties and devices fabricated from...them. The fact that the state of-the-art of silicon carbide semiconductors is not further advanced may be attributed to the difficulties of growing

  5. Silicon Carbide Shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free-standing silicon carbide shapes are produced by passing a properly diluted stream of a reactant gas, for example methyltrichlorosilane, into a...reaction chamber housing a thin walled, hollow graphite body heated to 1300-1500C. After the graphite body is sufficiently coated with silicon carbide , the...graphite body is fired, converting the graphite to gaseous CO2 and CO and leaving a silicon carbide shaped article remaining.

  6. A Study of the Microstructural Basis for the Strength and Toughness Properties of As-Quenched and Quenched and Tempered High Copper HSLA-100 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    Incoherent FCC Copper Precipitates Decorating Dislocations and a Large Niobium Carbide or Carbonitride (arrowed) ...... ................. 49 Figure 39 TEM...shows incoherent FCC precipitates. Figure 38 also shows a niobium carbide or carbonitride that has now precipitated in the overaged condition. These...Figure 38 TEM Image Showing Incoherent FCC Copper Precipitates Decorating Dislocations and a Large Niobium Carbide or Carbonitride (arrowed) Figure 39

  7. SILICON CARBIDE DATA SHEETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    These data sheets present a compilation of a wide range of electrical, optical and energy values for alpha and beta- silicon carbide in bulk and film...spectrum. Energy data include energy bands, energy gap and energy levels for variously-doped silicon carbide , as well as effective mass tables, work

  8. Thermal Transport in Refractory Carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal energy transport mechanisms in titanium carbide and zirconium carbide have been studied. Several compositions of vanadium carbide alloyed...with titanium carbide were used. The electronic component of the thermal conductivity exceeded the values computed using the classical value for L in

  9. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, Dennis E. [Applied Research Associates, Southwest Division, 4300 San Mateo Blvd NE, A-220, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110-129 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20–60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable

  10. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Dennis E.

    2015-04-01

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20-60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable mechanistic

  11. Titanium Carbide: Nanotechnology, Properties, Application

    OpenAIRE

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Garbuzova, A. K.; Valuev, Denis Viktorovich

    2015-01-01

    The paper develops scientific and technological bases for fabrication of titanium carbide which is a nanocomponent of composite materials. The authors determine optimum technology specifications and the main titanium carbide properties: fineness of titaniferous raw materials, carbide-forming agent quantity, set temperature of plasma flow, tempering temperature, titanium carbide yield, productivity, specific surface, size and shape of particles. The paper includes equations to describe how the...

  12. Titanium Carbide: Nanotechnology, Properties, Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Garbuzova, A. K.; Valuev, D. V.

    2015-09-01

    The paper develops scientific and technological bases for fabrication of titanium carbide which is a nanocomponent of composite materials. The authors determine optimum technology specifications and the main titanium carbide properties: fineness of titaniferous raw materials, carbide-forming agent quantity, set temperature of plasma flow, tempering temperature, titanium carbide yield, productivity, specific surface, size and shape of particles. The paper includes equations to describe how the major specifications of the fabrication technique influence the content of titanium carbide and free carbon in the end product.

  13. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  14. Precipitation behavior during thin slab thermomechanical processing and isothermal aging of copper-bearing niobium-microalloyed high strength structural steels: The effect on mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); Jia, Z. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); O' Malley, R. [Nucor Steel Decatur, LLC Sheet Mill, 4301, Iverson Blvd., Trinity, AL 35673 (United States); Jansto, S.J. [CBMM-Reference Metals Company, 1000 Old Pond Road, Bridgeville, PA 15017 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Copper does not significantly influence toughness. {yields} Copper precipitation during aging occurs at dislocations. {yields} Precipitation of copper and carbides is mutually exclusive. - Abstract: We describe here the precipitation behavior of copper and fine-scale carbides during thermo-mechanical processing and isothermal aging of copper-bearing niobium-microalloyed high strength steels. During thermo-mechanical processing, precipitation of {epsilon}-copper occurs in polygonal ferrite and at the austenite-ferrite interface. In contrast, during isothermal aging, nucleation of {epsilon}-copper precipitation occurs at dislocations. In the three different chemistries investigated, the increase in strength associated with copper during aging results only in a small decrease in impact toughness, implying that copper precipitates do not seriously impair toughness, and can be considered as a viable strengthening element in microalloyed steels. Precipitation of fine-scale niobium carbides occurs extensively at dislocations and within ferrite matrix together with vanadium carbides. In the presence of titanium, titanium carbides act as a nucleus for niobium carbide formation. Irrespective of the nature of carbides, copper precipitates and carbides are mutually exclusive.

  15. Characterization of Silicon Carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The various electrical and structural measurement techniques for silicon carbide are described. The electrical measurements include conductivity, resistivity, carrier concentration, mobility, doping energy levels, and lifetime. The structural measurements include polytype determination and crystalline perfection. Both bulk and epitaxial films are included.

  16. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  17. Chemical Analysis Methods for Silicon Carbide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Keyin

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1 General and Scope This Standard specifies the determination method of silicon dioxide, free silicon, free carbon, total carbon, silicon carbide, ferric sesquioxide in silicon carbide abrasive material.

  18. From boron carbide to glass: Absorption of an elongated high-speed projectile in brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, B. V.

    2016-09-01

    Penetration into boron carbide of an elongated high-speed projectile in the form of a copper jet produced by an explosion of a cumulative charge is studied. The efficiency of absorption of a copper jet in different brittle materials for evaluating their protective ability is compared. Conditions for the absence of the influence of the lateral unloading wave on the penetration zone, which provide the minimum penetration depth, are determined.

  19. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  20. ENTIRELY AQUEOUS SOLUTION-GEL ROUTE FOR THE PREPARATION OF ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE, HAFNIUM CARBIDE AND THEIR TERNARY CARBIDE POWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Changrui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An entirely aqueous solution-gel route has been developed for the synthesis of zirconium carbide, hafnium carbide and their ternary carbide powders. Zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl₂.8H₂O, malic acid (MA and ethylene glycol (EG were dissolved in water to form the aqueous zirconium carbide precursor. Afterwards, this aqueous precursor was gelled and transformed into zirconium carbide at a relatively low temperature (1200 °C for achieving an intimate mixing of the intermediate products. Hafnium and the ternary carbide powders were also synthesized via the same aqueous route. All the zirconium, hafnium and ternary carbide powders exhibited a particle size of ∼100 nm.

  1. The use of calcium carbide in one-pot synthesis of symmetric diaryl ethynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Wu, Huayue; Liu, Zhiqing; Zhong, Ping; Zhang, Lin; Huang, Xiaobo; Cheng, Jiang

    2006-12-14

    An efficient Pd-catalyzed copper and amine free coupling reaction of acetylene and aryl bromides was achieved with calcium carbide as an acetylene source, using inorganic base and easily prepared, air-stable aminophosphine ligand in common organic solvents, providing symmetric diaryl ethynes in one-pot with yields ranged from moderate to excellent.

  2. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  3. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties.

  4. Technology of Iron Carbide Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Bahgat

    2006-01-01

    Iron carbides are very promising metallurgical products and can be used for steelmaking process, where it plays as an alternative raw material with significant economic advantages. Also it has many other applications,e.g. catalysts, magnets, sensors. The present review investigates the different properties and uses of the iron carbides. The commercial production and the different varieties for the iron carbides synthesis (gaseous carburization, mechanochemical synthesis, laser pyrolysis, plasma pyrolysis, chemical vapor deposition and ion implantation) were reviewed. Also the effect of different factors on the carburization process like gas composition, raw material, temperature, reaction time, catalyst presence and sulfur addition was indicated.

  5. Microstructural Study of Titanium Carbide Coating on Cemented Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorinen, S.; Horsewell, Andy

    1982-01-01

    Titanium carbide coating layers on cemented carbide substrates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural variations within the typically 5µm thick chemical vapour deposited TiC coatings were found to vary with deposit thickness such that a layer structure could...... be delineated. Close to the interface further microstructural inhomogeneities were obsered, there being a clear dependence of TiC deposition mechanism on the chemical and crystallographic nature of the upper layers of the multiphase substrate....

  6. Ballistic Evaluation of rolled Homogeneous Steel Armor with Tungsten Carbide and Titanium Carbide Facing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-12-01

    LABORATORIES BALLISTIC EVALUATION OF ROLLED HMtOGE14EOUS STEEL ASWKR f VITH TUNGSTEN CARBIDE AND TITANIUM CARBIDE FACING (U) TECHNICAL REPORT NO. WAL...carbide steel and titanium carbide steel composite armor when attacked by cal. .40 H19B WC cores, cal. .0 AP W2 projectiles, ZOIN fragment simulating...determine the effectiveness of tungsten car- bide (WC) and titanium carbide (TIC) facing on steel armor for the defeat of steel and tungsten carbide

  7. Studies of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Zhila

    Silicon carbide semiconductor technology is continuing to advance rapidly. The excellent physical and electronic properties of silicon carbide recently take itself to be the main focused power device material for high temperature, high power, and high frequency electronic devices because of its large band gap, high thermal conductivity, and high electron saturation drift velocity. SiC is more stable than Si because of its high melting point and mechanical strength. Also the understanding of the structure and properties of semiconducting thin film alloys is one of the fundamental steps toward their successful application in technologies requiring materials with tunable energy gaps, such as solar cells, flat panel displays, optical memories and anti-reflecting coatings. Silicon carbide and silicon nitrides are promising materials for novel semiconductor applications because of their band gaps. In addition, they are "hard" materials in the sense of having high elastic constants and large cohesive energies and are generally resistant to harsh environment, including radiation. In this research, thin films of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride were deposited in a r.f magnetron sputtering system using a SiC target. A detailed analysis of the surface chemistry of the deposited films was performed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy whereas structure and morphology was studied atomic force microscopy (AFM), and nonoindentation.

  8. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, M., E-mail: Marialuisa.Gentile@manchester.ac.uk [Centre for Nuclear Energy Technology (C-NET), School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Xiao, P. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Abram, T. [Centre for Nuclear Energy Technology (C-NET), School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC–5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd{sub 3}Si and SiO{sub 2} phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd{sub 2}Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO{sub 2} phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiC{sub x}O{sub y} phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation.

  9. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, M.; Xiao, P.; Abram, T.

    2015-07-01

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC-5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd3Si and SiO2 phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd2Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO2 phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiCxOy phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation.

  10. Laser melting of uranium carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utton, C. A.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Jardin, R.; Noel, H.; Guéneau, C.; Manara, D.

    2009-03-01

    In the context of the material research aimed at supporting the development of nuclear plants of the fourth Generation, renewed interest has recently arisen in carbide fuels. A profound understanding of the behaviour of nuclear materials in extreme conditions is of prime importance for the analysis of the operation limits of nuclear fuels, and prediction of possible nuclear reactor accidents. In this context, the main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of laser induced melting experiments on stoichiometric uranium carbides; UC, UC1.5 and UC2. Measurements were performed, at temperatures around 3000 K, under a few bars of inert gas in order to minimise vaporisation and oxidation effects, which may occur at these temperatures. Moreover, a recently developed investigation method has been employed, based on in situ analysis of the sample surface reflectivity evolution during melting. Current results, 2781 K for the melting point of UC, 2665 K for the solidus and 2681 K for the liquidus of U2C3, 2754 K for the solidus and 2770 K for the liquidus of UC2, are in fair agreement with early publications where the melting behaviour of uranium carbides was investigated by traditional furnace melting methods. Further information has been obtained in the current research about the non-congruent (solidus-liquidus) melting of certain carbides, which suggest that a solidus-liquidus scheme is followed by higher ratio carbides, possibly even for UC2.

  11. Thermal conductivity of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbide is necessary to evaluate its potential for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. Measurements have been conducted of the thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide BxC samples as a function of composition (x in the range from 4 to 9), temperature (300-1700 K), and temperature cycling. These data, in concert with density and specific-heat data, yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results are discussed in terms of a structural model that has been previously advanced to explain the electronic transport data. Some novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are briefly discussed.

  12. Reinforcement of tungsten carbide grains by nanoprecipitates in cemented carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingwei; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Haibin; Hou, Chao; Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Xilong

    2016-10-14

    In contrast to the conventional method that obtains a high fracture strength of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbides by reducing WC grain size to near-nano or nanoscale, a new approach has been developed to achieve ultrahigh fracture strength by strengthening the WC grains through precipitate reinforcement. The cemented carbides were prepared by liquid-state sintering the in situ synthesized WC-Co composite powders with a little excess carbon and pre-milled Cr3C2 particles having different size scales. It was found that the nanoscale dispersed particles precipitate in the WC grains, which mainly have a coherent or semi-coherent interface with the matrix. The pinning effect of the nanoparticles on the motion of dislocations within the WC grains was observed. The mechanisms for the precipitation of nanoparticles in the WC grains were discussed, based on which a new method to enhance the resistance against the transgranular fracture of cemented carbides was proposed.

  13. Reinforcement of tungsten carbide grains by nanoprecipitates in cemented carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingwei; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Haibin; Hou, Chao; Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Xilong

    2016-10-01

    In contrast to the conventional method that obtains a high fracture strength of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbides by reducing WC grain size to near-nano or nanoscale, a new approach has been developed to achieve ultrahigh fracture strength by strengthening the WC grains through precipitate reinforcement. The cemented carbides were prepared by liquid-state sintering the in situ synthesized WC-Co composite powders with a little excess carbon and pre-milled Cr3C2 particles having different size scales. It was found that the nanoscale dispersed particles precipitate in the WC grains, which mainly have a coherent or semi-coherent interface with the matrix. The pinning effect of the nanoparticles on the motion of dislocations within the WC grains was observed. The mechanisms for the precipitation of nanoparticles in the WC grains were discussed, based on which a new method to enhance the resistance against the transgranular fracture of cemented carbides was proposed.

  14. Friction and metal transfer for single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with transition metals (tungsten, iron, rhodium, nickel, titanium, and cobalt), copper, and aluminum. Results indicate the coefficient of friction for a silicon carbide-metal system is related to the d bond character and relative chemical activity of the metal. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of silicon carbide in sliding. The chemical activity of metal to silicon and carbon and shear modulus of the metal may play important roles in metal transfer and the form of the wear debris. The less active and greater resistance to shear the metal has, with the exception of rhodium and tungsten, the less transfer to silicon carbide.

  15. Copper hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-10-01

    The world production of copper is steadily increasing. Although humans are widely exposed to copper-containing items on the skin and mucosa, allergic reactions to copper are only infrequently reported. To review the chemistry, biology and accessible data to clarify the implications of copper hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common. As a metal, it possesses many of the same qualities as nickel, which is a known strong sensitizer. Cumulative data on subjects with presumed related symptoms and/or suspected exposure showed that a weighted average of 3.8% had a positive patch test reaction to copper. We conclude that copper is a very weak sensitizer as compared with other metal compounds. However, in a few and selected cases, copper can result in clinically relevant allergic reactions.

  16. Copper transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  17. Copper hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-01-01

    hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common...

  18. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Creep in Sintered Alpha Silicon Carbide and Niobium Carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-18

    CARBIDE AND NIOBIUM CARBIDE Supported by 30 F (DMR-812-0804) and ARO (MIPR’s 43-48, 127-83, 141-84) U August, 1985 NCSU .LET tow A CL School of Engineering...SILICON CARBIDE AND NIOBIUM CARBIDE Supported by NSF (DMR-812-0804) and ARO (MIPR’s 43-48, 127-83, 141-84) August, 1985 L. U. 1’ ’’ b b MASTER COPY - FOR...and Mechanisms of Creep in Sintered May 1, 1982-June 15, 1985 Alpha Silicon Carbide and Niobium Carbide 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(*) 11

  19. Joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel through diffusion welding; Stellingen behorende bij het proefschrift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krugers, Jan-Paul

    1993-01-19

    In this thesis, the results are presented of a study dealing with joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel AIS316 by means of diffusion welding. Welding experiments were carried out without and with the use of a metallic intermediate, like copper, nickel and copper-nickel alloys at various conditions of process temperature, process time, mechanical pressure and interlayer thickness. Most experiments were carried out in high vacuum. For reasons of comparison, however, some experiments were also carried out in a gas shielded environment of 95 vol.% Ar and 5 vol.% H2.

  20. Effect of Addition of Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and Silicon Carbide (SiC) on Properties of Electroless Nickel Alloy Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yu-cheng; HU Xiao-ye; WANG Wen-fang; HUANG Xin-min

    2004-01-01

    Electroless nickel (copper)-phosphorus-silicon carbide (SiC)-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composite coatings were prepared by adding SiC and PTFE into electroless nickel (copper)-phosphorus alloy baths. The effects of addition of SiC and PTFE on depositing rate, microhardness, wear resistance and anti-friction of the resulted composite coatings were studied. The results indicated that electroless nickel (copper)-phosphorus alloy coatings were greatly improved in depositing rate, microhardness, wear resistance and antifriction by co-deposited proper amount of SiC and PTFE.

  1. Effect of Filler and Heat Treatment on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of the Brazed Joint between Carbide Tip and Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winardi, Y.; Triyono; Wijayanta, A. T.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the effect of filler and heat treatment on the physical and mechanical properties of the brazed joint carbide tip and steel was investigated. Tip carbide YG6 and low carbon steel (SS400) is joining by torch brazing with two filler metals, silver, and copper filler. Heat treatment was performed in induction furnace. Microstructure and shear strength of the brazed joint have been investigated. Many silver filler layer are formed on the surface of the base metal rather then using copper filler. The highest shear strength is achieved using a silver filler metal at temperatur 725°C. The highest shear load is 18.62 kN.

  2. Thermo-Mechanical Characterization of Silicon Carbide-Silicon Carbide Composites at Elevated Temperatures Using a Unique Combustion Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-10

    F THERMO-MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SILICON CARBIDE - SILICON CARBIDE COMPOSITES AT ELEVATED...MECHANICAL CTERIZATION OF SILICON CARBIDE -SILIC BIDE COMPOSITES AT LEVATED TEMPER S USING A UNIQUE COMBUSTION FACILITY DISSERTATI N Ted T. Kim...THERMO-MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SILICON CARBIDE - SILICON CARBIDE COMPOSITES AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES USING A UNIQUE COMBUSTION FACILITY

  3. [Calcium carbide of different crystal formation synthesized by calcium carbide residue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong-yuan; Kang, Ming; Jiang, Cai-rong; Tu, Ming-jing

    2006-04-01

    To recycle calcium carbide residue effectively, calcium carbide of different crystal form, including global aragonite, calcite and acicular calcium carbide was synthesized. Both the influence of pretreatment in the purity of calcium carbide, and the influence of temperatures of carbonization reaction, release velocity of carbon dioxide in the apparition of calcium carbide of different crystal form were studied with DTA-TG and SEM. The result shows that calcium carbide residue can take place chemistry reaction with ammonia chlorinate straight. Under the condition that pH was above 7, the purity of calcium carbide was above 97%, and the whiteness was above 98. Once provided the different temperatures of carbonization reaction and the proper release velocity of carbon dioxide, global aragonite, calcite and acicular calcium carbide were obtained.

  4. Development of boron carbide-copper cermets. Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The status of a program to develop a B/sub 4/C-Cu cermet for Breeder Reactor spent-fuel shipping cask neutron shields is presented. It is shown that inspectable 6 to 7 cm thick 60 to 70 volume percent B/sub 4/C cermets can be fabricated using hot isostatic powder processing procedures. An alternative manufacturing method, rheocasting, also appears to be a promising, perhaps more cost-effective method for producing these cermets. Recommendations for further development of these manufacturing processes are given.

  5. Conduction mechanism in boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, Seebeck-coefficient, and Hall-effect measurements have been made on single-phase boron carbides, B(1-x)C(x), in the compositional range from 0.1 to 0.2 X, and between room temperature and 1273 K. The results indicate that the predominant conduction mechanism is small-polaron hopping between carbon atoms at geometrically inequivalent sites.

  6. Advanced microstructure of boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut; Shalamberidze, Sulkhan

    2012-09-26

    The rhombohedral elementary cell of the complex boron carbide structure is composed of B(12) or B(11)C icosahedra and CBC, CBB or B□B (□, vacancy) linear arrangements, whose shares vary depending on the actual chemical compound. The evaluation of the IR phonon spectra of isotopically pure boron carbide yields the quantitative concentrations of these components within the homogeneity range. The structure formula of B(4.3)C at the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range is (B(11)C) (CBC)(0.91) (B□B)(0.09) (□, vacancy); and the actual structure formula of B(13)C(2) is (B(12))(0.5)(B(11)C)(0.5)(CBC)(0.65)(CBB)(0.16) (B□B)(0.19), and deviates fundamentally from (B(12))CBC, predicted by theory to be the energetically most favourable structure of boron carbide. In reality, it is the most distorted structure in the homogeneity range. The spectra of (nat)B(x)C make it evident that boron isotopes are not randomly distributed in the structure. However, doping with 2% silicon brings about a random distribution.

  7. Investigation of Infiltrated and Sintered Titanium Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-04-01

    taneive investigations in this field during the ’time preceding this contract, and concentrated their effort® On titanium carbide as the’ refractospy...component • The Basic work of this investigation consisted of? X, KpälfiCÄVtloh and refinement of cOmätrcial grades of titanium carbide hj...facilitate a comparison between the different methods» an investigation was then carried out with composite bodies* consisting of titanium carbide asd

  8. Shock-wave strength properties of boron carbide and silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E.

    1994-02-01

    Time-resolved velocity interferometry measurements have been made on boron carbide and silicon carbide ceramics to assess dynamic equation-of-state and strength properties of these materials. Hugoniot pecursor characteristics, and post-yield shock and release wave properties, indicated markedly different dynamic strength and flow behavior for the two carbides.

  9. Silicon carbide fibers and articles including same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E; Griffith, George W

    2015-01-27

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  10. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  11. Tribology of carbide derived carbon films synthesized on tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlustochowicz, Marcin

    Tribologically advantageous films of carbide derived carbon (CDC) have been successfully synthesized on binderless tungsten carbide manufactured using the plasma pressure compaction (P2CRTM) technology. In order to produce the CDC films, tungsten carbide samples were reacted with chlorine containing gas mixtures at temperatures ranging from 800°C to 1000°C in a sealed tube furnace. Some of the treated samples were later dechlorinated by an 800°C hydrogenation treatment. Detailed mechanical and structural characterizations of the CDC films and sliding contact surfaces were done using a series of analytical techniques and their results were correlated with the friction and wear behavior of the CDC films in various tribosystems, including CDC-steel, CDC-WC, CDC-Si3N4 and CDC-CDC. Optimum synthesis and treatment conditions were determined for use in two specific environments: moderately humid air and dry nitrogen. It was found that CDC films first synthesized at 1000°C and then hydrogen post-treated at 800°C performed best in air with friction coefficient values as low as 0.11. However, for dry nitrogen applications, no dechlorination was necessary and both hydrogenated and as-synthesized CDC films exhibited friction coefficients of approximately 0.03. A model of tribological behavior of CDC has been proposed that takes into consideration the tribo-oxidation of counterface material, the capillary forces from adsorbed water vapor, the carbon-based tribofilm formation, and the lubrication effect of both chlorine and hydrogen.

  12. Titanium Carbide Bipolar Plate for Electrochemical Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaConti, Anthony B.; Griffith, Arthur E.; Cropley, Cecelia C.; Kosek, John A.

    1998-05-08

    Titanium carbide comprises a corrosion resistant, electrically conductive, non-porous bipolar plate for use in an electrochemical device. The process involves blending titanium carbide powder with a suitable binder material, and molding the mixture, at an elevated temperature and pressure.

  13. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  14. Hydroxide catalysis bonding of silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veggel, A.A. van; Ende, D.A. van den; Bogenstahl, J.; Rowan, S.; Cunningham, W.; Gubbels, G.H.M.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2008-01-01

    For bonding silicon carbide optics, which require extreme stability, hydroxide catalysis bonding is considered [Rowan, S., Hough, J. and Elliffe, E., Silicon carbide bonding. UK Patent 040 7953.9, 2004. Please contact Mr. D. Whiteford for further information: D.Whiteford@admin.gla.ac.uk]. This techn

  15. Ligand sphere conversions in terminal carbide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Reinholdt, Anders; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Metathesis is introduced as a preparative route to terminal carbide complexes. The chloride ligands of the terminal carbide complex [RuC(Cl)2(PCy3)2] (RuC) can be exchanged, paving the way for a systematic variation of the ligand sphere. A series of substituted complexes, including the first exam...

  16. Process for making silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salavatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  17. Graphene Nanoplatelet Reinforced Tantalum Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    reinforced metals: copper /tungsten and copper /molybdenum. J Mech Phys Solids 1965;13:329–50. [27] Lourie O, Cox DM, Wagner HD. Buckling and collapse of...plasma sintering Micro- pillar Deformability Aluminum Composite93/$ - see front matter & 2013 Elsevier B.V. A x.doi.org/10.1016/j.msea.2013.03.022...synthesized by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The concentration of BNNT is varied as 0, 2 and 5 vol% in the aluminum matrix. Micro- pillar compression testing

  18. Precipitating Mechanism of Carbide in Cold-Welding Surfacing Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanbin ZHANG; Dengyi REN

    2004-01-01

    Carbides in a series of cold-welding weld metals were studied by means of SEM, TEM and EPMA, and the forming mechanism of carbide was proposed according to their distribution and morphology. Due to their different carbide-forming tendency, Nb and Ti could combine with C to form particulate carbide in liquid weld metal and depleted the carbon content in matrix, while V induced the carbide precipitated along grain boundary. But too much Nb or Ti alone resulted in coarse carbide and poor strengthened matrix. When suitable amount of Nb, Ti and V coexisted in weld metal, both uniformly distributed particulate carbide and well strengthened matrix could be achieved. It was proposed that the carbide nucleated on the oxide which dispersed in liquid weld metal, and then grew into multi-layer complex carbide particles by epitaxial growth. At different sites, carbide particles may present as different morphologies.

  19. Hydrothermal synthesis of xonotlite from carbide slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxin Cao; Fei Liu; Qian Lin; Yu Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Carbide slag was used as the calcareous materials for the first time to prepare xonotlite via dynamic hydrothermal synthesis.The effects of influential factors including different calcination temperatures,pretreatment methods of the carbide slag and process param-eters of hydrothermal synthesis on the microstructure and morphology of xonotlite were explored using XRD and SEM techniques.The results indicate that the carbide slag after proper calcination could be used to prepare pure xonotlite;and different calcination tern-peratures have little effect on the crystallinity of synthesized xonotlitc,but have great impact on the morphology of secondary particles.The different pretreatment methods of the carbide slag pose great impact on the crystallinity and morphology of secondary particles of xonotlite.Xonotlite was also synthesized from pure CaO under the salne experimental conditions as that prepared from calcined carbide slag for comparison.Little amount of impurities in carbide slag has no effect on the mechanism of hydrothermal synthesizing xonotlite from carbide slag.

  20. Influences of copper on solidification structure and hardening behavior of high chromium cast irons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; XIONG Ji; FAN Hong-yuan; SHEN Bao-luo; GAO Sheng-ji

    2008-01-01

    The influences of copper on microstructure and the hardening behavior of high chromium cast irons subjected to sub-critical treatment were investigated.The results show that the mierostructure of the as-cast high chromium cast irons consists of retained austenite,martensite and M7 C3 type eutectic carbide.When copper is added into high chromium cast irons,austenite and carbide contents are increased.The increased addition of copper content from 0%to 1.84%leads to the increase of austenite and carbide from 15.9%and 20.0% to 61.0%and 35.5%,respectively.In the process of sub-critical treatment,the retained austenite in the matrix can be precipitated into secondary carbides and then transforms into martensite in cooling process,which causes the secondary hardening of the alloy under sub-critical treatment.High chromium cast irons containing copper in sub-critical treatment appear the second hardening curve peak due to the precipitation of copper from supersaturated matrix.

  1. Formation of nanoscale titanium carbides in ferrite: an atomic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yanan; Hodgson, Peter; Kong, Lingxue; Gao, Weimin

    2016-03-01

    The formation and evolution of nanoscale titanium carbide in ferrite during the early isothermal annealing process were investigated via molecular dynamics simulation. The atomic interactions of titanium and carbon atoms during the initial formation process explained the atoms aggregation and carbides formation. It was found that the aggregation and dissociation of titanium carbide occurred simultaneously, and the composition of carbide clusters varied in a wide range. A mechanism for the formation of titanium carbide clusters in ferrite was disclosed.

  2. Tribochemical interactions of boron carbides against steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogotsi, Yu.G. (Univ. Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Keramik im Maschinenbau (Germany)); Koval' chenko, A.M.; Kossko, I.A. (Inst. for Problems of Materials Science, Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine))

    1992-04-15

    Auger electron spectroscopy and electron microscopy were used to investigate the surface chemistry and tribological properties of boron carbide sliding against steel. It was revealed that the interacting process was accompanied by the diffusion of the ceramic elements into steel and by the oxidation of the steel and ceramic surfaces due to the oxygen presence in the atmosphere. It was established that the oxidation process in air or during friction tests leads to a graphitized layer on the boron carbide surface under the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} film. It was demonstrated that the oxidation caused a decrease in the friction coefficient of boron carbide sliding against steel. (orig.).

  3. Characterization of Nanometric-Sized Carbides Formed During Tempering of Carbide-Steel Cermets

    OpenAIRE

    Matus K.; Pawlyta M.; Matula G.; Gołombek K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article of this paper is to present issues related to characterization of nanometric-sized carbides, nitrides and/or carbonitrides formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. Closer examination of those materials is important because of hardness growth of carbide-steel cermet after tempering. The results obtained during research show that the upswing of hardness is significantly higher than for high-speed steels. Another interesting fact is the displacement of secondary ...

  4. Thermal Expansion of Hafnium Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    Since hafnium carbide (HfC) has a melting point of 7029 deg. F, it may have many high-temperature applications. A literature search uncovered very little information about the properties of HfC, and so a program was initiated at the Lewis Research Center to determine some of the physical properties of this material. This note presents the results of the thermal expansion investigation. The thermal-expansion measurements were made with a Gaertner dilatation interferometer calibrated to an accuracy of +/- 1 deg. F. This device indicates expansion by the movement of fringes produced by the cancellation and reinforcement of fixed wave-length light rays which are reflected from the surfaces of two parallel quartz glass disks. The test specimens which separate these disks are three small cones, each approximately 0.20 in. high.

  5. Carbothermal synthesis of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janney, M.A.; Wei, G.C.; Kennedy, C.R.; Harris, L.A.

    1985-05-01

    Silicon carbide powders were synthesized from various silica and carbon sources by a carbothermal reduction process at temperatures between 1500 and 1600/sup 0/C. The silica sources were fumed silica, methyltrimethoxysilane, and microcrystalline quartz. The carbon sources were petroleum pitch, phenolic resin, sucrose, and carbon black. Submicron SiC powders were synthesized. Their morphologies included equiaxed loosely-bound agglomerates, equiaxed hard-shell agglomerates, and whiskers. Morphology changed with the furnace atmosphere (argon, nitrogen, or nitrogen-4% hydrogen). The best sintering was observed in SiC derived from the fumed-silica-pitch and fumed-silica-sucrose precursors. The poorest sintering was observed in SiC derived from microcrystalline quartz and carbon black. 11 refs., 16 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Effect of Addition of Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and Silicon Carbide (SIC) on Properties of Electroless Nickel AHoy Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUYu-cheng; HUXiao-ye; WANGWen.fang; HUANGXin-min

    2004-01-01

    Electroless nickel (copper)-phosphorus-silicon carbide (SiC)-polytetrafluorocthylene(PTFE) composite coatigs were prepared by adding SiC and PTFE into electroless nickel(copper)-phosphorus alloy baths.The effects of addition of SiC and PTFE on depositing rate.microhardness.wear resistance and anti-fiction of the resulted composite coatings were studied.The results indicated that electroless nickel(copper).phosphorus alloy coatings were grealty improved in depositing rate,microhardness,wear resistance and antifriction by co-deposited proper amount of SiC and PTFE.

  7. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J E; Bhakhri, V; Hao, R; Prior, T J; Scheler, T; Gregoryanz, E; Chhowalla, M; Giulani, F

    2015-01-14

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

  8. Calcium carbide poisoning via food in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Per, Hüseyin; Kurtoğlu, Selim; Yağmur, Fatih; Gümüş, Hakan; Kumandaş, Sefer; Poyrazoğlu, M Hakan

    2007-02-01

    The fast ripening of fruits means they may contain various harmful properties. A commonly used agent in the ripening process is calcium carbide, a material most commonly used for welding purposes. Calcium carbide treatment of food is extremely hazardous because it contains traces of arsenic and phosphorous. Once dissolved in water, the carbide produces acetylene gas. Acetylene gas may affect the neurological system by inducing prolonged hypoxia. The findings are headache, dizziness, mood disturbances, sleepiness, mental confusion, memory loss, cerebral edema and seizures. We report the case of a previously healthy 5 year-old girl with no chronic disease history who was transferred to our Emergency Department with an 8-h history of coma and delirium. A careful history from her father revealed that the patient ate unripe dates treated with calcium carbide.

  9. Selective etching of silicon carbide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Di; Howe, Roger T.; Maboudian, Roya

    2006-12-19

    A method of etching silicon carbide using a nonmetallic mask layer. The method includes providing a silicon carbide substrate; forming a non-metallic mask layer by applying a layer of material on the substrate; patterning the mask layer to expose underlying areas of the substrate; and etching the underlying areas of the substrate with a plasma at a first rate, while etching the mask layer at a rate lower than the first rate.

  10. Combustion synthesis of novel boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harini, R. Saai; Manikandan, E.; Anthonysamy, S.; Chandramouli, V.; Eswaramoorthy, D.

    2013-02-01

    The solid-state boron carbide is one of the hardest materials known, ranking third behind diamond and cubic boron nitride. Boron carbide (BxCx) enriched in the 10B isotope is used as a control rod material in the nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption cross section and other favorable physico-chemical properties. Conventional methods of preparation of boron carbide are energy intensive processes accompanied by huge loss of boron. Attempts were made at IGCAR Kalpakkam to develop energy efficient and cost effective methods to prepare boron carbide. The products of the gel combustion and microwave synthesis experiments were characterized for phase purity by XRD. The carbide formation was ascertained using finger-print spectroscopy of FTIR. Samples of pyrolized/microwave heated powder were characterized for surface morphology using SEM. The present work shows the recent advances in understanding of structural and chemical variations in boron carbide and their influence on morphology, optical and vibrational property results discussed in details.

  11. Metamagnetism of η-carbide-type transition-metal carbides and nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waki, T.; Terazawa, S.; Umemoto, Y.; Tabata, Y.; Sato, K.; Kondo, A.; Kindo, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2011-09-01

    η-carbide-type transition-metal compounds include the frustrated stella quadran-gula lattice. Due to characteristics of the lattice, we expect subtle transitions between frustrated and non-frustrated states. Here, we report metamagnetic transitions newly found in η-carbide-type compounds Fe3W3C, Fe6W6C and Co6W6C.

  12. Mirror Surface Grinding of Steel Bonded Carbides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The steel bonded carbide, a composite material, is very difficult to be machined to a fine finish mirror surface. In this paper, an electrolytic in-process dressing (ELID) grinding with metallic bond super-hard abrasive wheel was developed for grinding steel bonded carbide GT35. Factors affecting ELID grinding performance were analyzed by an atomic force microscope (AFM). Based on the analysis of AFM topography of the fine ground mirror surface of the steel bonded carbide, a schematic diagram of the mechanism of micro-removal of the ground surface was described. The AFM topography also shows that the hard brittle carbide particles, on the surface of steel bonded carbide, were machined out by ductile cutting. Since the grinding cracks in the ground surface are due to temperature gradient, temperature distribution in the grinding area was analyzed by finite element method (FEM). Experimental results indicate that a good mirror surface with Ra<0.02pm can be obtained by the developed ELID grinding system.

  13. Chemical Modification Methods of Nanoparticles of Silicon Carbide Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Anton S. Yegorov; Vitaly S. Ivanov; Alexey V. Antipov; Alyona I. Wozniak; Kseniia V. Tcarkova.

    2015-01-01

    silicon carbide exhibits exceptional properties: high durability, high thermal conductivity, good heat resistance, low thermal expansion factor and chemical inactivity. Reinforcement with silicon carbide nanoparticles increases polymer’s tensile strength and thermal stability.Chemical methods of modification of the silicon carbide surface by means of variety of reagents from ordinary molecules to macromolecular polymers are reviewed in the review.The structure of silicon carbide surface layer...

  14. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  15. Metallicity of boron carbides at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekura, Haruhiko; Shirai, Koun; Yanase, Akira

    2010-03-01

    Electronic structure of semiconducting boron carbide at high pressure has been theoretically investigated, because of interests in the positive pressure dependence of resistivity, in the gap closure, and in the phase transition. The most simplest form B12(CCC) is assumed. Under assumptions of hydrostatic pressure and neglecting finite-temperature effects, boron carbide is quite stable at high pressure. The crystal of boron carbide is stable at least until a pressure higher than previous experiments showed. The gap closure occurs only after p=600 GPa on the assumption of the original crystal symmetry. In the low pressure regime, the pressure dependence of the energy gap almost diminishes, which is an exceptional case for semiconductors, which could be one of reasons for the positive pressure dependence of resistivity. A monotonous increase in the apex angle of rhombohedron suggests that the covalent bond continues to increase. The C chain inserted in the main diagonal of rhombohedral structure is the chief reason of this stability.

  16. Ionisation Potentials of Metal Carbide Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryza, Viktoras; Addicoat, M.; Gascooke, Jason; Buntine, Mark; Metha, Gregory

    2006-03-01

    Photo-Ionisation Efficiency (PIE) experiments have been performed on gas phase niobium and tantalum carbide clusters to determine their ionisation potentials (IPs). For TanCm (n = 3-4, m = 0-4) clusters an oscillatory behaviour is observed such that clusters with an odd number of carbon atoms have higher IPs and clusters with an even number of carbons have lower IPs. Excellent agreement is found with relative IPs calculated using density functional theory for the lowest energy structures, which are consistent with the development of a 2x2x2 face-centred nanocrystal. For the niobium carbide clusters we observe the species Nb4C5 and Nb4C6. Initial calculations suggest that these clusters contain carbon-carbon bonding. Interestingly, the stoichiometry for Nb4C6 is half that of a metcar, M8C12. Preliminary data will also be shown on bimetallic-carbide clusters.

  17. Fabrication of thorium bearing carbide fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Rueben L.; Herbst, Richard J.; Johnson, Karl W. R.

    1981-01-01

    Thorium-uranium carbide and thorium-plutonium carbide fuel pellets have been fabricated by the carbothermic reduction process. Temperatures of 1750.degree. C. and 2000.degree. C. were used during the reduction cycle. Sintering temperatures of 1800.degree. C. and 2000.degree. C. were used to prepare fuel pellet densities of 87% and >94% of theoretical, respectively. The process allows the fabrication of kilogram quantities of fuel with good reproducibility of chemicals and phase composition. Methods employing liquid techniques that form carbide microspheres or alloying-techniques which form alloys of thorium-uranium or thorium-plutonium suffer from limitation on the quantities processed of because of criticality concerns and lack of precise control of process conditions, respectively.

  18. Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajoure, Meloud, E-mail: Tajoore2000@yahoo.com [MechanicalEng.,HIHM,Gharian (Libya); Tajouri, Ali, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Abuzriba, Mokhtar, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com [Materials and Metallurgical Eng., UOT, Tripoli (Libya); Akreem, Mosbah, E-mail: makreem@yahoo.com [Industrial Research Centre,Tripoli (Libya)

    2013-12-16

    The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A and the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Crystalline Silicon Carbide Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan; Ding, Weiqiang; Aidun, Daryush K

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the mechanical properties of crystalline silicon carbide nanowires, synthesized with a catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition method, were characterized with nanoscale tensile testing and mechanical resonance testing methods inside a scanning electron microscope. Tensile testing of individual silicon carbide nanowire was performed to determine the tensile properties of the material including the tensile strength, failure strain and Young's modulus. The silicon carbide nanowires were also excited to mechanical resonance in the scanning electron microscope vacuum chamber using mechanical excitation and electrical excitation methods, and the corresponding resonance frequencies were used to determine the Young's modulus of the material according to the simple beam theory. The Young's modulus values from tensile tests were in good agreement with the ones obtained from the mechanical resonance tests.

  20. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  1. Titanium carbide nanocrystals in circumstellar environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Helden, G; Tielens, A G; van Heijnsbergen, D; Duncan, M A; Hony, S; Waters, L B; Meijer, G

    2000-04-14

    Meteorites contain micrometer-sized graphite grains with embedded titanium carbide grains. Although isotopic analysis identifies asymptotic giant branch stars as the birth sites of these grains, there is no direct observational identification of these grains in astronomical sources. We report that infrared wavelength spectra of gas-phase titanium carbide nanocrystals derived in the laboratory show a prominent feature at a wavelength of 20.1 micrometers, which compares well to a similar feature in observed spectra of postasymptotic giant branch stars. It is concluded that titanium carbide forms during a short (approximately 100 years) phase of catastrophic mass loss (>0.001 solar masses per year) in dying, low-mass stars.

  2. Ablation of carbide materials with femtosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, Gabriel; Romano, Valerio; Weber, Heinz P.; Sentis, Marc; Marine, Wladimir

    2003-01-01

    The response of cemented tungsten carbide and of titanium carbonitride was investigated with respect to damage and ablation properties, under interaction with ultrashort laser pulses. These carbide materials present high microhardness and are of significant interest for tribological applications. The experiments were carried out in air with a commercial Ti:sapphire laser at energy densities on the target up to 6.5 J/cm 2. The irradiated target surfaces were analyzed with optical, SEM and AFM techniques and the damage and ablation threshold values were determined using the measured spot diameters and the calculated incident energy density distributions.

  3. Silicon carbide microsystems for harsh environments

    CERN Document Server

    Wijesundara, Muthu B J

    2011-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Microsystems for Harsh Environments reviews state-of-the-art Silicon Carbide (SiC) technologies that, when combined, create microsystems capable of surviving in harsh environments, technological readiness of the system components, key issues when integrating these components into systems, and other hurdles in harsh environment operation. The authors use the SiC technology platform suite the model platform for developing harsh environment microsystems and then detail the current status of the specific individual technologies (electronics, MEMS, packaging). Additionally, methods

  4. Ultrarapid microwave synthesis of superconducting refractory carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallance, Simon R. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University Nottingham (United Kingdom); Round, David M. [School of Chemistry, University Nottingham (United Kingdom); Ritter, Clemens [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Cussen, Edmund J. [WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Kingman, Sam [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Gregory, Duncan H. [WestCHEM, Department of Chemistry, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-26

    Nb{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x}C Carbides can be synthesized by high power MW methods in less than 30 s. In situ and ex situ techniques probing changes in temperature and dielectric properties with time demonstrate that the reactions self-terminate as the loss tangent of the materials decreases. The resulting carbides are carbon deficient and superconducting; T{sub c} correlates linearly to unit cell volume, reaching a maximum at NbC. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Ultra-rapid processing of refractory carbides; 20 s synthesis of molybdenum carbide, Mo2C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Simon R; Kingman, Sam; Gregory, Duncan H

    2007-02-21

    The microwave synthesis of molybdenum carbide, Mo(2)C, from carbon and either molybdenum metal or the trioxide has been achieved on unprecedented timescales; Ex- and in-situ characterisation reveals key information as to how the reaction proceeds.

  6. Production of carbide-free thin ductile iron castings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Ashraf Sheikh

    2008-01-01

    The fast cooling rate of thin ductile iron castings requires special consideration to produce carbide-free castings. Extraor-dinary care was taken to select the charge to produce castings of 100-mm long round bars with 16-ram diameter. The castings show the presence of carbides in the bars. Seven melts were made with different temperatures and with different compositions to get rid of carbides. After chemical analyses, it was found that the extra purity of the charge with less than 0.008wt% sulfur in the castings was the cause of carbides. To remove the carbides fi'om the castings, sulfur should be added to the charge.

  7. Method of preparing a porous silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moene, R.; Tazelaar, F.W.; Makkee, M.; Moulijn, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Abstract of NL 9300816 (A) Described is a method of preparing a porous silicon carbide suitable for use as a catalyst or as a catalyst support. Porous carbon is provided with a catalyst which is suitable for catalysing gasification of carbon with hydrogen, and with a catalyst suitable for cataly

  8. Casimir force measurements from silicon carbide surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-01-01

    Using an atomic force microscope we performed measurements of the Casimir force between a gold-coated (Au) microsphere and doped silicon carbide (SiC) samples. The last of these is a promising material for devices operating under severe environments. The roughness of the interacting surfaces was mea

  9. Boron carbide morphology changing under purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatullin, I. A.; Sivkov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Boron carbide synthesized by using coaxial magnetoplasma accelerator with graphite electrodes was purified by two different ways. XRD-investigations showed content changing and respectively powder purification. Moreover TEM-investigations demonstrated morphology changing of product under purification that was discussed in the work.

  10. High-temperature carbidization of carboniferous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, B. A.; Grass, V. E.; Nadutkin, A. V.; Nazarova, L. Yu.

    2009-08-01

    Processes of thermal metamorphism of carboniferous rocks have been studied experimentally. The conditions of high-temperature interaction of shungite carbon with components of the contained rocks, leading to formation of carbide compounds, have been determined. The results of this investigation contribute to the works on searching for new raw material for prospective material production.

  11. Titanium carbide nanocrystals in circumstellar environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Helden, G; Tielens, ACGM; van Heijnsbergen, D; Duncan, MA; Hony, S; Waters, LBFM; Meijer, G.

    2000-01-01

    Meteorites contain micrometer-sized graphite grains with embedded titanium carbide grains. Although isotopic analysis identifies asymptotic giant branch stars as the birth sites of these grains, there is no direct observational identification of these grains in astronomical sources. We report that i

  12. Bioactivation of biomorphous silicon carbide bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Julia; Hoppe, Alexander; Müller, Frank A; Raya, Carmen T; Fernández, Julián M; Greil, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Wood-derived silicon carbide (SiC) offers a specific biomorphous microstructure similar to the cellular pore microstructure of bone. Compared with bioactive ceramics such as calcium phosphate, however, silicon carbide is considered not to induce spontaneous interface bonding to living bone. Bioactivation by chemical treatment of biomorphous silicon carbide was investigated in order to accelerate osseointegration and improve bone bonding ability. Biomorphous SiC was processed from sipo (Entrandrophragma utile) wood by heating in an inert atmosphere and infiltrating the resulting carbon replica with liquid silicon melt at 1450°C. After removing excess silicon by leaching in HF/HNO₃ the biomorphous preform consisted of β-SiC with a small amount (approximately 6wt.%) of unreacted carbon. The preform was again leached in HCl/HNO₃ and finally exposed to CaCl₂ solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared analyses proved that oxidation of the residual carbon at the surface induced formation of carboxyl [COO⁻] groups, which triggered adsorption of Ca(2+), as confirmed by XPS and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy measurements. A local increase in Ca(2+) concentration stimulated in vitro precipitation of Ca₅(PO₄)₃OH (HAP) on the silicon carbide preform surface during exposure to simulated body fluid, which indicates a significantly increased bone bonding activity compared with SiC.

  13. Method of preparing a porous silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moene, R.; Tazelaar, F.W.; Makkee, M.; Moulijn, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Abstract of NL 9300816 (A) Described is a method of preparing a porous silicon carbide suitable for use as a catalyst or as a catalyst support. Porous carbon is provided with a catalyst which is suitable for catalysing gasification of carbon with hydrogen, and with a catalyst suitable for cataly

  14. Silicon Carbide Technologies for Lightweighted Aerospace Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    silicon carbide (SiC) based materials. It is anticipated that SiC can be utilized for most applications from cryogenic to high temperatures. This talk will focus on describing the SOA for these (near term) SiC technology solutions for making mirror structural substrates, figuring and finishing technologies being investigated to reduce cost time

  15. Casimir forces from conductive silicon carbide surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi Ghozotkhar, Mehdi; Svetovoy, V. B.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-01-01

    Samples of conductive silicon carbide (SiC), which is a promising material due to its excellent properties for devices operating in severe environments, were characterized with the atomic force microscope for roughness, and the optical properties were measured with ellipsometry in a wide range of fr

  16. CLAD CARBIDE NUCLEAR FUEL, THERMIONIC POWER, MODULES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The general objective is to evaluate a clad carbide emitter, thermionic power module which simulates nuclear reactor installation, design, and...performance. The module is an assembly of two series-connected converters with a single common cesium reservoir. The program goal is 500 hours

  17. Boron Carbides As Thermo-electric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Report reviews recent theoretical and experimental research on thermoelectric materials. Recent work with narrow-band semiconductors demonstrated possibility of relatively high thermoelectric energy-conversion efficiencies in materials withstanding high temperatures needed to attain such efficiencies. Among promising semiconductors are boron-rich borides, especially boron carbides.

  18. Titanium carbide nanocrystals in circumstellar environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Helden, G.; Tielens, Acgm; van Heijnsbergen, D.; Duncan, M. A.; Hony, S.; Waters, Lbfm; Meijer, G.

    2000-01-01

    Meteorites contain micrometer-sized graphite grains with embedded titanium carbide grains. Although isotopic analysis identifies asymptotic giant branch stars as the birth sites of these grains, there is no direct observational identification of these grains in astronomical sources. We report that i

  19. Method of preparing a porous silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moene, R.; Tazelaar, F.W.; Makkee, M.; Moulijn, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Abstract of NL 9300816 (A) Described is a method of preparing a porous silicon carbide suitable for use as a catalyst or as a catalyst support. Porous carbon is provided with a catalyst which is suitable for catalysing gasification of carbon with hydrogen, and with a catalyst suitable for

  20. Porous molybdenum carbide nano-octahedrons synthesized via confined carburization in metal-organic frameworks for efficient hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao Bin; Xia, Bao Yu; Yu, Le; Yu, Xin-Yao; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2015-03-11

    Electrochemical water splitting has been considered as a promising approach to produce clean and sustainable hydrogen fuel. However, the lack of high-performance and low-cost electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction hinders the large-scale application. As a new class of porous materials with tunable structure and composition, metal-organic frameworks have been considered as promising candidates to synthesize various functional materials. Here we demonstrate a metal-organic frameworks-assisted strategy for synthesizing nanostructured transition metal carbides based on the confined carburization in metal-organic frameworks matrix. Starting from a compound consisting of copper-based metal-organic frameworks host and molybdenum-based polyoxometalates guest, mesoporous molybdenum carbide nano-octahedrons composed of ultrafine nanocrystallites are successfully prepared as a proof of concept, which exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic performance for hydrogen production from both acidic and basic solutions. The present study provides some guidelines for the design and synthesis of nanostructured electrocatalysts.

  1. Copper allergy from dental copper amalgam?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardsson, Lars; Björkner, Bert; Karlsteen, Magnus; Schütz, Andrejs

    2002-05-06

    A 65-year-old female was investigated due to a gradually increasing greenish colour change of her plastic dental splint, which she used to prevent teeth grinding when sleeping. Furthermore, she had noted a greenish/bluish colour change on the back of her black gloves, which she used to wipe her tears away while walking outdoors. The investigation revealed that the patient had a contact allergy to copper, which is very rare. She had, however, had no occupational exposure to copper. The contact allergy may be caused by long-term exposure of the oral mucosa to copper from copper-rich amalgam fillings, which were frequently used in childhood dentistry up to the 1960s in Sweden. The deposition of a copper-containing coating on the dental splint may be caused by a raised copper intake from drinking water, increasing the copper excretion in saliva, in combination with release of copper due to electrochemical corrosion of dental amalgam. The greenish colour change of the surface of the splint is probably caused by deposition of a mixture of copper compounds, e.g. copper carbonates. Analysis by the X-ray diffraction technique indicates that the dominant component is copper oxide (Cu2O and CuO). The corresponding greenish/bluish discoloration observed on the back of the patient's gloves may be caused by increased copper excretion in tears.

  2. Processing development of 4 tantalum carbide-hafnium carbide and related carbides and borides for extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballa, Osama Gaballa Bahig

    Carbides, nitrides, and borides ceramics are of interest for many applications because of their high melting temperatures and good mechanical properties. Wear-resistant coatings are among the most important applications for these materials. Materials with high wear resistance and high melting temperatures have the potential to produce coatings that resist degradation when subjected to high temperatures and high contact stresses. Among the carbides, Al4SiC4 is a low density (3.03 g/cm3), high melting temperature (>2000°C) compound, characterized by superior oxidation resistance, and high compressive strength. These desirable properties motivated this investigation to (1) obtain high-density Al4SiC4 at lower sintering temperatures by hot pressing, and (2) to enhance its mechanical properties by adding WC and TiC to the Al4SiC4. Also among the carbides, tantalum carbide and hafnium carbide have outstanding hardness; high melting points (3880°C and 3890°C respectively); good resistance to chemical attack, thermal shock, and oxidation; and excellent electronic conductivity. Tantalum hafnium carbide (Ta4HfC 5) is a 4-to-1 ratio of TaC to HfC with an extremely high melting point of 4215 K (3942°C), which is the highest melting point of all currently known compounds. Due to the properties of these carbides, they are considered candidates for extremely high-temperature applications such as rocket nozzles and scramjet components, where the operating temperatures can exceed 3000°C. Sintering bulk components comprised of these carbides is difficult, since sintering typically occurs above 50% of the melting point. Thus, Ta4 HfC5 is difficult to sinter in conventional furnaces or hot presses; furnaces designed for very high temperatures are expensive to purchase and operate. Our research attempted to sinter Ta4HfC5 in a hot press at relatively low temperature by reducing powder particle size and optimizing the powder-handling atmosphere, milling conditions, sintering

  3. Copper Products Capacity Expansion Stimulate the Copper Consumption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>The dramatic growth of copper consumption in China can directly be seen from the expansion of copper products capacity.According to sta- tistics,in the past 4 years,the improvement on the balance of trade on copper bar,copper,and copper alloy and copper wire & cable has driven the growth of copper consumption a lot.

  4. Antwerp Copper Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadum, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    In addition to presenting a short history of copper paintings, topics detail artists’ materials and techniques, as well as aspects of the copper industry, including mining, preparation and trade routes.......In addition to presenting a short history of copper paintings, topics detail artists’ materials and techniques, as well as aspects of the copper industry, including mining, preparation and trade routes....

  5. Copper and copper proteins in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Sergio; Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology.

  6. Recent trends in silicon carbide device research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munish Vashishath

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC has revolutionised semiconductor power device performance. It is a wide band gap semiconductor with an energy gap wider than 2eV and possesses extremely high power, high voltage switching characteristics and high thermal, chemical and mechanical stability. The SiC wafers are available in 6H, 4H, 2H and 3C polytypes. Because of its wide band gap, the leakage current of SiC is many orders of magnitude lower than that of silicon. Also, forward resistance of SiC power devices is approximately 200 times lower than that of conventional silicon devices. The breakdown voltage of SiC is 8-10 times higher than that of silicon. In this paper, silicon carbide Schottky barrier diodes, power MOSFETs, UMOSFET, lateral power MOSFET, SIT (static induction transistor, and nonvolatile memories are discussed along with their characteristics and applications.

  7. Probing Field Emission from Boron Carbide Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Ji-Fa; GAO Hong-Jun; BAO Li-Hong; WANG Xing-Jun; HUI Chao; LIU Fei; LI Chen; SHEN Cheng-Min; WANG Zong-Li; GU Chang-Zhi

    2008-01-01

    High density boron carbide nanowires are grown by an improved carbon thermal reduction technique. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy lose spectroscopy of the sample show that the synthesized nanowires are B4 C with good crystallization. The field emission measurement for an individual boron nanowire is performed by using a Pt tip installed in the focused ion beam system. A field emission current with enhancement factor of 106 is observed and the evolution process during emission is also carefully studied. Furthermore, a two-step field emission with stable emission current density is found from the high-density nanowire film. Our results together suggest that boron carbide nanowires are promising candidates for electron emission nanodevices.

  8. Behavior of disordered boron carbide under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchini, Giovanni; McCauley, James W; Chhowalla, Manish

    2006-07-21

    Gibbs free-energy calculations based on density functional theory have been used to determine the possible source of failure of boron carbide just above the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL). A range of B4C polytypes is found to be stable at room pressure. The energetic barrier for shock amorphization of boron carbide is by far the lowest for the B12(CCC) polytype, requiring only 6 GPa approximately = P(HEL) for collapse under hydrostatic conditions. The results clearly demonstrate that the collapse of the B12(CCC) phase leads to segregation of B12 and amorphous carbon in the form of 2-3 nm bands along the (113) lattice direction, in excellent agreement with recent transmission electron microscopy results.

  9. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  10. Nonlinear optical imaging of defects in cubic silicon carbide epilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, Stefan G; Tranca, Denis E; Matei, Alecs; Stanciu, George A

    2014-06-11

    Silicon carbide is one of the most promising materials for power electronic devices capable of operating at extreme conditions. The widespread application of silicon carbide power devices is however limited by the presence of structural defects in silicon carbide epilayers. Our experiment demonstrates that optical second harmonic generation imaging represents a viable solution for characterizing structural defects such as stacking faults, dislocations and double positioning boundaries in cubic silicon carbide layers. X-ray diffraction and optical second harmonic rotational anisotropy were used to confirm the growth of the cubic polytype, atomic force microscopy was used to support the identification of silicon carbide defects based on their distinct shape, while second harmonic generation microscopy revealed the detailed structure of the defects. Our results show that this fast and noninvasive investigation method can identify defects which appear during the crystal growth and can be used to certify areas within the silicon carbide epilayer that have optimal quality.

  11. Electron-Spin Resonance in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles; Venturini, Eugene L.; Azevedo, Larry J.; Emin, David

    1987-01-01

    Samples exhibit Curie-law behavior in temperature range of 2 to 100 K. Technical paper presents studies of electron-spin resonance of samples of hot pressed B9 C, B15 C2, B13 C2, and B4 C. Boron carbide ceramics are refractory solids with high melting temperatures, low thermal conductives, and extreme hardnesses. They show promise as semiconductors at high temperatures and have unusually large figures of merit for use in thermoelectric generators.

  12. Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yusheng

    2011-06-14

    Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

  13. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  14. Characterization of boron carbide with an electron microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteudi, G.; Ruste, J.

    1983-01-01

    Within the framework of a study of heterogeneous materials (Matteudi et al., 1971: Matteudi and Verchery, 1972) thin deposits of boron carbide were characterized. Experiments using an electronic probe microanalyzer to analyze solid boron carbide or boron carbide in the form of thick deposits are described. Quantitative results on boron and carbon are very close to those obtained when applying the Monte Carlo-type correction calculations.

  15. Field Emission of Thermally Grown Carbon Nanostructures on Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    thermal decomposition of silicon carbide does not utilize a catalyst, therefore relatively defect free. One drawback to this method, however is that the CNT...In this thesis, silicon carbide samples are patterned to create elevated emission sites in an attempt to minimize the field emission screening effect...Patterning is accomplished by using standard photolithography methods to implement a masking nickel layer on the silicon carbide . Pillars are created

  16. Delivering carbide ligands to sulfide-rich clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt, Anders; Herbst, Konrad; Bendix, Jesper

    2016-02-01

    The propensity of the terminal ruthenium carbide Ru(C)Cl2(PCy3)2 (RuC) to form carbide bridges to electron-rich transition metals enables synthetic routes to metal clusters with coexisting carbide and sulfide ligands. Electrochemical experiments show the Ru≡C ligand to exert a relatively large electron-withdrawing effect compared with PPh3, effectively shifting redox potentials.

  17. Sintering of nano crystalline silicon carbide by doping with boron carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Datta; A K Bandyopadhyay; B Chaudhuri

    2002-06-01

    Sinterable nano silicon carbide powders of mean particle size (37 nm) were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type alpha silicon carbide having mean particle size of 0.39 m (390 nm). Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of boron carbide of 0.5 wt% together with carbon of 1 wt% at 2050°C at vacuum (3 mbar) for 15 min. Nearly 99% sintered density was obtained. The mechanism of sintering was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. This study shows that the mechanism is a solid-state sintering process. Polytype transformation from 6H to 4H was observed.

  18. Silicon carbide sintered body manufactured from silicon carbide powder containing boron, silicon and carbonaceous additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    A silicon carbide powder of a 5-micron grain size is mixed with 0.15 to 0.60 wt% mixture of a boron compound, i.e., boric acid, boron carbide (B4C), silicon boride (SiB4 or SiB6), aluminum boride, etc., and an aluminum compound, i.e., aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, aluminum carbide, etc., or aluminum boride (AlB2) alone, in such a proportion that the boron/aluminum atomic ratio in the sintered body becomes 0.05 to 0.25 wt% and 0.05 to 0.40 wt%, respectively, together with a carbonaceous additive to supply enough carbon to convert oxygen accompanying raw materials and additives into carbon monoxide.

  19. Chemical Modification Methods of Nanoparticles of Silicon Carbide Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton S. Yegorov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available silicon carbide exhibits exceptional properties: high durability, high thermal conductivity, good heat resistance, low thermal expansion factor and chemical inactivity. Reinforcement with silicon carbide nanoparticles increases polymer’s tensile strength and thermal stability.Chemical methods of modification of the silicon carbide surface by means of variety of reagents from ordinary molecules to macromolecular polymers are reviewed in the review.The structure of silicon carbide surface layer and the nature of modificator bonding with the surface of SiC particles are reviewed. General examples of surface modification methodologies and composite materials with the addition of modified SiC are given.

  20. Carbides in Nodular Cast Iron with Cr and Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In these paper results of elements microsegregation in carbidic nodular cast iron have been presented. A cooling rate in the centre of the cross-section and on the surface of casting and change of moulding sand temperature during casting crystallization and its self-cooling have been investigated. TDA curves have been registered. The linear distribution of elements concentration in an eutectic grain, primary and secondary carbides have been made. It was found, that there are two kinds of carbides: Cr and Mo enriched. A probable composition of primary and secondary carbides have been presented.

  1. Silicon Carbide Corrugated Mirrors for Space Telescopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trex Enterprises Corporation (Trex) proposes technology development to manufacture monolithic, lightweight silicon carbide corrugated mirrors (SCCM) suitable for...

  2. HEAT-RESISTANT MATERIAL WITH SILICON CARBIDE AS A BASE,

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new high-temperature material, termed SG-60, is a silicon carbide -graphite composite in which the graphite is the thermostability carrier since it...is more heat-conducting and softer (heat conductivity of graphite is 0.57 cal/g-cm-sec compared with 0.02 cal/g-cm-sec for silicon carbide ) while... silicon carbide is the carrier of high-temperature strength and hardness. The high covalent bonding strength of the atoms of silicon carbide (283 kcal

  3. Chemical state of fission products in irradiated uranium carbide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yasuo; Iwai, Takashi; Ohmichi, Toshihiko

    1987-12-01

    The chemical state of fission products in irradiated uranium carbide fuel has been estimated by equilibrium calculation using the SOLGASMIX-PV program. Solid state fission products are distributed to the fuel matrix, ternary compounds, carbides of fission products and intermetallic compounds among the condensed phases appearing in the irradiated uranium carbide fuel. The chemical forms are influenced by burnup as well as stoichiometry of the fuel. The results of the present study almost agree with the experimental ones reported for burnup simulated carbides.

  4. Characterization of silicon-silicon carbide ceramic derived from carbon-carbon silicon carbide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vijay K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Varanasi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Krenkel, Walter [Univ. of Bayreuth (Germany). Dept. of Ceramic Materials Engineering

    2013-04-15

    The main objective of the present work is to process porous silicon - silicon carbide (Si - SiC) ceramic by the oxidation of carboncarbon silicon carbide (C/C - SiC) composites. Phase studies are performed on the oxidized porous composite to examine the changes due to the high temperature oxidation. Further, various characterization techniques are performed on Si- SiC ceramics in order to study the material's microstructure. The effects of various parameters such as fiber alignment (twill weave and short/chopped fiber) and phenolic resin type (resol and novolak) are characterized.

  5. Epitaxial and bulk growth of cubic silicon carbide on off-oriented 4H-silicon carbide substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Norén, Olof

    2015-01-01

    The growth of bulk cubic silicon carbide has for a long time seemed to be something for the future. However, in this thesis the initial steps towards bulk cubic silicon carbide have been taken. The achievement of producing bulk cubic silicon carbide will have a great impact in various fields of science and industry such as for example the fields of semiconductor technology within electronic- and optoelectronic devices and bio-medical applications. The process that has been used to grow the bu...

  6. Direct Electrochemical Preparation of Cobalt, Tungsten, and Tungsten Carbide from Cemented Carbide Scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangjun; Xi, Xiaoli; Nie, Zuoren; Zhang, Liwen; Ma, Liwen

    2017-02-01

    A novel process of preparing cobalt, tungsten, and tungsten carbide powders from cemented carbide scrap by molten salt electrolysis has been investigated in this paper. In this experiment, WC-6Co and NaCl-KCl salt were used as sacrificial anode and electrolyte, respectively. The dissolution potential of cobalt and WC was determined by linear sweep voltammetry to be 0 and 0.6 V ( vs Ag/AgCl), respectively. Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior of cobalt and tungsten ions was investigated by a variety of electrochemical techniques. Results of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square-wave voltammetry show that the cobalt and tungsten ions existed as Co2+ and W2+ on melts, respectively. The effect of applied voltage, electrolysis current, and electrolysis times on the composition of the product was studied. Results showed that pure cobalt powder can be obtained when the electrolysis potential is lower than 0.6 V or during low current and short times. Double-cathode and two-stage electrolysis was utilized for the preparation of cobalt, tungsten carbide, and tungsten powders. Additionally, X-ray diffraction results confirm that the product collected at cathodes 1 and 2 is pure Co and WC, respectively. Pure tungsten powder was obtained after electrolysis of the second part. Scanning electron microscope results show that the diameters of tungsten, tungsten carbide, and cobalt powder are smaller than 100, 200, and 200 nm, respectively.

  7. Direct Electrochemical Preparation of Cobalt, Tungsten, and Tungsten Carbide from Cemented Carbide Scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangjun; Xi, Xiaoli; Nie, Zuoren; Zhang, Liwen; Ma, Liwen

    2016-10-01

    A novel process of preparing cobalt, tungsten, and tungsten carbide powders from cemented carbide scrap by molten salt electrolysis has been investigated in this paper. In this experiment, WC-6Co and NaCl-KCl salt were used as sacrificial anode and electrolyte, respectively. The dissolution potential of cobalt and WC was determined by linear sweep voltammetry to be 0 and 0.6 V (vs Ag/AgCl), respectively. Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior of cobalt and tungsten ions was investigated by a variety of electrochemical techniques. Results of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square-wave voltammetry show that the cobalt and tungsten ions existed as Co2+ and W2+ on melts, respectively. The effect of applied voltage, electrolysis current, and electrolysis times on the composition of the product was studied. Results showed that pure cobalt powder can be obtained when the electrolysis potential is lower than 0.6 V or during low current and short times. Double-cathode and two-stage electrolysis was utilized for the preparation of cobalt, tungsten carbide, and tungsten powders. Additionally, X-ray diffraction results confirm that the product collected at cathodes 1 and 2 is pure Co and WC, respectively. Pure tungsten powder was obtained after electrolysis of the second part. Scanning electron microscope results show that the diameters of tungsten, tungsten carbide, and cobalt powder are smaller than 100, 200, and 200 nm, respectively.

  8. Characterization of Nanometric-Sized Carbides Formed During Tempering of Carbide-Steel Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matus K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article of this paper is to present issues related to characterization of nanometric-sized carbides, nitrides and/or carbonitrides formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. Closer examination of those materials is important because of hardness growth of carbide-steel cermet after tempering. The results obtained during research show that the upswing of hardness is significantly higher than for high-speed steels. Another interesting fact is the displacement of secondary hardness effect observed for this material to a higher tempering temperature range. Determined influence of the atmosphere in the sintering process on precipitations formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. So far examination of carbidesteel cermet produced by powder injection moulding was carried out mainly in the scanning electron microscope. A proper description of nanosized particles is both important and difficult as achievements of nanoscience and nanotechnology confirm the significant influence of nanocrystalline particles on material properties even if its mass fraction is undetectable by standard methods. The following research studies have been carried out using transmission electron microscopy, mainly selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The obtained results and computer simulations comparison were made.

  9. Stress in tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon (WC-DLC) multilayer coatings have been prepared by sputter deposition from a tungsten-carbide target and periodic switching on and off of the reactive acetylene gas flow. The stress in the resulting WC-DLC multilayers has been studied by substrate curvature. Peri

  10. Carbide Transformations in Tempering of Complexly Alloyed White Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, K. N.; Gorlenko, D. A.; Zavalishchin, A. N.

    2015-07-01

    Variation of the chemical composition of all phases and structural components (metallic matrix, eutectic and secondary carbides) in complexly alloyed cast iron is studied after crystallization and different variants of tempering. It is shown that several groups of secondary carbides may be distinguished according to their morphology and chemical composition.

  11. Preparation and Electrocatalytic Activity of Tungsten Carbide Nanorod Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    High density tungsten carbide nanorod arrays have been prepared by magnetron sputtering (MS) using the aluminum lattice membrane (ALM) as template. Electrocatalytic properties of nitromethane electroreduction on the tungsten carbide nanorod arrays electrode were investigated by electrochemical method, and their electrocatalytic activity is approached to that of the Pt foil electrode.

  12. Interface Defeat of Long Rods Impacting Oblique Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Test data for gold rods impacting unconfined silicon carbide targets are reported. This work focuses on the dwell phenomenon exhibited by silicon ... carbide for targets at obliquity. Experiments are presented for obliquities of 30 deg, 45 deg and 60 deg, with and without cover plates. Results are compared to normal impact.

  13. Silicon Carbide Tiles for Sidewall Lining in Aluminium Electrolysis Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUANBo; ZHAOJunguo; 等

    1999-01-01

    The paper introduces the nitride bonded silicon carbide used for sidewall lining in aluminium eletrolysis cells ,including technical process,main properties and application results.Comparison tests on various physical properties of silicon carbide products made by LIRR and other producers worldwide have also been conducted in an independent laboratory.

  14. Titanium Carbide-Nickel Cermets: Processing and Joing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-03-01

    Titanium carbide -nickel cermets can be sintered to have transverse rupture strengths over 250,000 pounds per square inch. To do so, four principal...enough to allow thorough degassing. Joining titanium - carbide cermets to high-temperature alloys has been accomplished by vacuum diffusion, and gives

  15. TITANIUM CARBIDE CONTENT EFFECT ON EROSION IN CERMET ROCKET NOZZLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    class investigated consisted of an AISI Type 316 stainless steel matrix incorporating a hard phase of titanium carbide ranging in content from 20% to...55% by volume. The results of the study indicated that under the test conditions, increases in the titanium carbide constituents did increase the

  16. Development and characterization of solid solution tri-carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2001-02-01

    Solid-solution, binary uranium/refractory metal carbide fuels have been shown to be capable of performing at high temperatures for nuclear thermal propulsion applications. More recently, tri-carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C1+x with less than 10% metal mole fraction uranium have been studied for their application in ultra-high temperature, high performance space nuclear power systems. These tri-carbide fuels require high processing temperatures greater than 2600 K owing to their high melting points in excess of 3600 K. This paper presents the results of recent studies involving hypostoichiometric, single-phase tri-carbide fuels. Processing techniques of cold uniaxial pressing and sintering were investigated to optimize the processing parameters necessary to produce high density (low porosity), single phase, solid solution mixed carbide nuclear fuels for testing. Scanning electron microscopy and xray diffraction were used to analyze samples. Liquid phase sintering with UC1+x at temperatures near 2700 K was shown to be instrumental in achieving good densification in hyper- and near-stoichiometric mixed carbides. Hypostoichiometric carbides require even higher processing temperatures greater than 2800 K in order to achieve liquid phase sintering with a UC liquid phase and good densification of the final solid solution, tri-carbide fuel. .

  17. Rapid cost-effective silicon carbide optical component manufacturing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casstevens, John M.; Plummer, Ronald; Jarocki, Jim

    1999-10-01

    Silicon carbide may well be the best known material for the manufacture of high performance optical components. A combination of extremely high specific stiffness (r/E), high thermal conductivity and outstanding dimensional stability make silicon carbide superior overall to beryllium and low- expansion glass ceramics. A major impediment to wide use of silicon carbide in optical systems has been the costs of preliminary pressing, casting, shaping and final finishing of silicon carbide. Diamond grinding of silicon carbide is a slow and expensive process even on machines specially designed for the task. The process described here begins by machining the component from a special type of graphite. This graphite is easily machined with multi-axis CNC machine tools to any level of complexity and lightweighting required. The graphite is then converted completely to silicon carbide with very small and very predictable dimensional change. After conversion to silicon carbide the optical surface is coated with very fine grain silicon carbide which is easily polished to extreme smoothness using conventional optical polishing techniques. The fabrication process and a 6 inch diameter development mirror is described.

  18. Novel Polymer Nanocomposite With Silicon Carbide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyona I. Wozniak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyimides are ranked among the most heat-resistant polymers and are widely used in high temperature plastics, adhesives, dielectrics, photoresistors, nonlinear optical materials, membrane materials for gasseparation, and Langmuir–Blodgett (LB films, among others. While there is a variety of high temperature stable polyimides, there is a growing demand for utilizing these materials at higher temperatures in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Therefore, we sought to use oxidation-resistant materials to enhance properties of the polyimide composition maintaining polyimide weights and processing advantages. In this paper we introduced results of utilizing inorganic nanostructured silicon carbide particles to produce an inorganic particle filled polyimide materials.

  19. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Mandal; A Seal; S K Dalui; A K Dey; S Ghatak; A K Mukhopadhyay

    2001-04-01

    The present work deals with the sintering of SiC with a low melting additive by microwave technique. The mechanical characteristics of the products were compared with that of conventionally sintered products. The failure stress of the microwave sintered products, in biaxial flexure, was superior to that of the products made by conventional sintering route in ambient condition. In firing of products by conventionally sintered process, SiC grain gets oxidized producing SiO2 (∼ 32 wt%) and deteriorates the quality of the product substantially. Partially sintered silicon carbide by such a method is a useful material for a varieties of applications ranging from kiln furniture to membrane material.

  20. Niobium carbide precipitation in microalloyed steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinkenberg, C.; Hulka, K. [Niobium Products Co. GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany); Bleck, W. [Inst. for Ferrous Metallurgy, RWTH Aachen Univ., Aachen (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    The precipitation of niobium carbo-nitrides in the austenite phase, interphase and ferrite phase of microalloyed steel was assessed by a critical literature review and a round table discussion. This work analyses the contribution of niobium carbide precipitates formed in ferrite in the precipitation hardening of commercially hot rolled strip. Thermodynamics and kinetics of niobium carbo-nitride precipitation as well as the effect of deformation and temperature on the precipitation kinetics are discussed in various examples to determine the amount of niobium in solid solution that will be available for precipitation hardening after thermomechanical rolling in the austenite phase and successive phase transformation. (orig.)

  1. Titanium carbide coatings for aerospace ball bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boving, Hans J.; Haenni, Werner; Hintermann, HANS-E.

    1988-01-01

    In conventional ball bearings, steel to steel contacts between the balls and the raceways are at the origin of microwelds which lead to material transfer, surface roughening, lubricant breakdown, and finally to a loss in the bearing performances. To minimize the microwelding tendencies of the contacting partners it is necessary to modify their surface materials; the solid to solid collisions themselves are difficult to avoid. The use of titanium carbide coated steel balls can bring spectacular improvements in the performances and lifetimes of both oil-grease lubricated and oil-grease free bearings in a series of severe applications.

  2. Supported molybdenum carbide for higher alcohol synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Chiarello, Gian Luca

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum carbide supported on active carbon, carbon nanotubes, and titanium dioxide, and promoted by K2CO3, has been prepared and tested for methanol and higher alcohol synthesis from syngas. At optimal conditions, the activity and selectivity to alcohols (methanol and higher alcohols) over...... supported molybdenum carbide are significantly higher compared to the bulk carbide. The CO conversion reaches a maximum, when about 20wt% Mo2C is loaded on active carbon. The selectivity to higher alcohols increases with increasing Mo2C loading on active carbon and reaches a maximum over bulk molybdenum...... carbide, while the selectivity to methanol follows the opposite trend. The effect of Mo2C loading on the alcohol selectivity at a fixed K/Mo molar ratio of 0.14 could be related to the amount of K2CO3 actually on the active Mo2C phase and the size, structure and composition of the supported carbide...

  3. Synthesis and photoluminescence property of boron carbide nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Li-Hong; Li Chen; Tian Yuan; Tian Ji-Fa; Hui Chao; Wang Xing-Jun; Shen Cheng-Min; Gao Hong-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Large scale, high density boron carbide nanowires have been synthesized by using an improved carbothermal reduction method with B/B2O3/C powder precursors under an argon flow at 1100~C. The boron carbide nanowires are 5-10 μm in length and 80-100 nm in diameter. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) characterizations show that the boron carbide nanowire has a B4C rhombohedral structure with good crystallization. The Raman spectrum of the as-grown boron carbide nanowires is consistent with that of a B4C structure consisting of B11C icosahedra and C-B-C chains. The room temperature photoluminescence spectrum of the boron carbide nanowires exhibits a visible range of emission centred at 638 nm.

  4. Electrocatalysis using transition metal carbide and oxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Yagya N.

    Carbides are one of the several families of transition metal compounds that are considered economic alternatives to catalysts based on noble metals and their compounds. Phase pure transition metal carbides of group 4-6 metals, in the first three periods, were synthesized using a common eutectic salt flux synthesis method, and their electrocatalytic activities compared under uniform electrochemical conditions. Mo2C showed highest hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities among the nine metal carbides investigated, but all other metal carbides also showed substantial activities. All the metal carbides showed remarkable enhancement in catalytic activities as supports, when compared to traditional graphitic carbon as platinum support. Mo2C, the most active transition metal carbide electrocatalyst, was prepared using four different synthesis routes, and the synthesis route dependent activities compared. Bifunctional Mo 2C that is HER as well as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) active, was achieved when the carbide was templated on a multiwalled carbon nanotube using carbothermic reduction method. Bimetallic carbides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo or W were prepared using a common carbothermic reduction method. Two different stoichiometries of bimetallic carbides were obtained for each system within a 60 °C temperature window. While the bimetallic carbides showed relatively lower electrocatalytic activities towards HER and ORR in comparison to Mo2C and WC, they revealed remarkably higher OER activities than IrO2 and RuO2, the state-of-the-art OER catalysts. Bimetallic oxides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo and W were also prepared using a hydrothermal synthesis method and they also revealed OER activities that are much higher than RuO2 and IrO2. Additionally, the OER activities were dependent on the degree and nature of hydration in the bimetallic oxide crystal lattice, with the completely hydrated, as synthesized, cobalt molybdate and nickel

  5. Modification of σ-Donor Properties of Terminal Carbide Ligands Investigated Through Carbide-Iodine Adduct Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt, Anders; Vosch, Tom; Bendix, Jesper

    2016-09-26

    The terminal carbide ligands in [(Cy3 P)2 X2 Ru≡C] complexes (X=halide or pseudohalide) coordinate molecular iodine, affording charge-transfer complexes rather than oxidation products. Crystallographic and vibrational spectroscopic data show the perturbations of iodine to vary with the auxiliary ligand sphere on ruthenium, demonstrating the σ-donor properties of carbide complexes to be tunable.

  6. [Copper pathology (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, B; Romette, J; Di Costanzo, J D

    1982-01-30

    Copper is an essential dietary component, being the coenzyme of many enzymes with oxidase activity, e.g. ceruloplasmin, superoxide dismutase, monoamine oxidase, etc. The metabolism of copper is complex and imperfectly known. Active transport of copper through the intestinal epithelial cells involves metallothionein, a protein rich in sulfhydryl groups which also binds the copper in excess and probably prevents absorption in toxic amounts. In hepatocytes a metallothionein facilitates absorption by a similar mechanism and regulates copper distribution in the liver: incorporation in an apoceruloplasmin, storage and synthesis of copper-dependent enzymes. Metallothioneins and ceruloplasmin are essential to adequate copper homeostasis. Apart from genetic disorders, diseases involving copper usually result from hypercupraemia of varied origin. Wilson's disease and Menkes' disease, although clinically and pathogenetically different, are both marked by low ceruloplasmin and copper serum levels. The excessive liver retention of copper in Wilson's disease might be due to increased avidity of hepatic metallothioneins for copper and decreased biliary excretion through lysosomal dysfunction. Menkes' disease might be due to low avidity of intestinal and hepatic metallothioneins for copper. The basic biochemical defect responsible for these two hereditary conditions has not yet been fully elucidated.

  7. [Copper IUDs (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, M

    1983-10-01

    Following initial development of the Grafenberg ring in the 1920's, IUDs fell into disuse until the late 1950s, when plastic devices inserted using new technology began to gain worldwide acceptance. Further research indicated that copper had a significant antifertility effect which increased with increasing surface area, and several copper IUDs were developed and adapted, including the Copper T 200, the Copper T 220C, and the Copper T 380 A, probably the most effective yet. The Gravigard and Multiload are 2 other copper devices developed according to somewhat different principles. Copper devices are widely used not so much because of their great effectiveness as because of their suitability for nulliparous patients and their ease of insertion, which minimizes risk of uterine perforation. Records of 2584 women using Copper IUDs for 7190 women-years and 956 women using devices without copper for 6059 women-years suggest that the copper devices were associated with greater effectiveness and fewer removals for complications. Research suggests that the advantages of copper IUDs become more significant with increased duration of use. Contraindications to copper devices include allergy to copper and hepatolenticular degeneration. No carcinogenic or teratogenic effect of copper devices has been found, but further studies are needed to rule out other undesirable effects. Significant modifications of copper devices in recent years have been developed to increase their effectiveness, prolong their duration of usefulness, facilitate insertion and permit insertion during abortion or delivery. The upper limit of the surface area of copper associated with increased effectiveness appears to be between 200-300 sq mm, and at some point increases in copper exposure may provoke expulsion of the IUD. The duration of fertility inhibition of copper IUDs is usually estimated at 2-3 years, but recent research indicates that it may be 6-8 years, and some devices may retain copper surface

  8. Sol–gel processing of carbidic glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L M Manocha; E Yasuda; Y Tanabe; S Manocha; D Vashistha

    2000-02-01

    Carbon incorporation into the silicate network results in the formation of rigid carbidic glasses with improved physical, mechanical and thermal properties. This generated great interest in the development of these heteroatom structured materials through different processing routes. In the present studies, sol–gel processing has been used to prepare silicon based glasses, especially oxycarbides through organic–inorganic hybrid gels by hydrolysis–condensation reactions in silicon alkoxides, 1,4-butanediol and furfuryl alcohol with an aim to introduce Si–C linkages in the precursors at sol level. The incorporation of these linkages has been studied using IR and NMR spectroscopy. These bonds, so introduced, are maintained throughout the processing, especially during pyrolysis to high temperatures. In FFA–TEOS system, copolymerization with optimized mol ratio of the two results in resinous mass. This precursor on pyrolysis to 1000°C results in Si–O–C type amorphous solid black mass. XRD studies on the materials heated to 1400°C exhibit presence of crystalline Si–C and cristobalites in amorphous Si–O–C mass. In organic–inorganic gel system, the pyrolysed mass exhibits phase stability up to much higher temperatures. The carbidic materials so produced have been found to exhibit good resistance against oxidation at 1000°C.

  9. Ultrasmall Carbide Nanospheres - Formation and Electronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Petra; Monazami, Ehsan; McClimon, John

    2015-03-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are highly coveted but are subject to rapid Ostwald ripening even at moderate temperatures limiting study of their properties. Ultrasmall transition metal carbide ``nanospheres'' are synthesized by a solid-state reaction between fullerene as carbon scaffold, and a W surface. This produces nanospheres with a narrow size distribution below 2.5 nm diameter. The nanosphere shape is defined by the scaffold and densely packed arrays can be achieved. The metal-fullerene reaction is temperature driven and progresses through an intermediate semiconducting phase until the fully metallic nanospheres are created at about 350 C. The reaction sequence is observed with STM, and STS maps yield the local density of states. The reaction presumably progresses by stepwise introduction of W-atoms in the carbon scaffold. The results of high resolution STM/STS in combination with DFT calculations are used to unravel the reaction mechanism. We will discuss the transfer of this specific reaction mechanism to other transition metal carbides. The nanospheres are an excellent testbed for the physics and chemistry of highly curved surfaces.

  10. Dynamic compaction of tungsten carbide powder.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluth, Jeffrey Weston; Hall, Clint Allen; Vogler, Tracy John; Grady, Dennis Edward

    2005-04-01

    The shock compaction behavior of a tungsten carbide powder was investigated using a new experimental design for gas-gun experiments. This design allows the Hugoniot properties to be measured with reasonably good accuracy despite the inherent difficulties involved with distended powders. The experiments also provide the first reshock state for the compacted powder. Experiments were conducted at impact velocities of 245, 500, and 711 m/s. A steady shock wave was observed for some of the sample thicknesses, but the remainder were attenuated due to release from the back of the impactor or the edge of the sample. The shock velocity for the powder was found to be quite low, and the propagating shock waves were seen to be very dispersive. The Hugoniot density for the 711 m/s experiment was close to ambient crystal density for tungsten carbide, indicating nearly complete compaction. When compared with quasi-static compaction results for the same material, the dynamic compaction data is seen to be significantly stiffer for the regime over which they overlap. Based on these initial results, recommendations are made for improving the experimental technique and for future work to improve our understanding of powder compaction.

  11. Precipitation behavior of carbides in high-carbon martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qin-tian; Li, Jing; Shi, Cheng-bin; Yu, Wen-tao; Shi, Chang-min [University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy; Li, Ji-hui [Yang Jiang Shi Ba Zi Group Co., Ltd, Guangdong (China)

    2017-01-15

    A fundamental study on the precipitation behavior of carbides was carried out. Thermo-calc software, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study the precipitation and transformation behaviors of carbides. Carbide precipitation was of a specific order. Primary carbides (M7C3) tended to be generated from liquid steel when the solid fraction reached 84 mol.%. Secondary carbides (M7C3) precipitated from austenite and can hardly transformed into M23C6 carbides with decreasing temperature in air. Primary carbides hardly changed once they were generated, whereas secondary carbides were sensitive to heat treatment and thermal deformation. Carbide precipitation had a certain effect on steel-matrix phase transitions. The segregation ability of carbon in liquid steel was 4.6 times greater that of chromium. A new method for controlling primary carbides is proposed.

  12. Quantitative evaluation of carbides in nickel-base superalloy MAR-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczotok, A.

    2011-05-01

    It has been established that carbides in superalloys serve three functions. Fine carbides precipitated in the matrix give strengthening results. Carbides also can tie up certain elements that would otherwise promote phase instability during service. Grain boundary carbides prevent or retard grain-boundary sliding and strengthen the grain boundary, which depends significantly on carbide shape, size and distribution. Various types of carbides are possible, depending on superalloy composition and processing. In the paper optical and scanning electron microscopy investigations of carbides occurring in specimens of the polycrystalline nickel-base superalloy MAR-M247 were carried out. Conditions of carbides revealing and microstructure images acquisition have been described. Taking into consideration distribution and morphology of the carbides in matrix a method of quantitative description of Chinese script-like and blocky primary carbides on the basis of image analysis was proposed.

  13. Salt flux synthesis of single and bimetallic carbide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Brian M.; Waetzig, Gregory R.; Clouser, Dale A.; Schmuecker, Samantha M.; Harris, Daniel P.; Stacy, John M.; Duffee, Kyle D.; Wan, Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Metal carbide compounds have a broad range of interesting properties and are some of the hardest and highest melting point compounds known. However, their high melting points force very high reaction temperatures and thus limit the formation of high surface area nanomaterials. To avoid the extreme synthesis temperatures commonly associated with these materials, a new salt flux technique has been employed to reduce reaction temperatures and form these materials in the nanometer regime. Additionally, the use of multiwall carbon nanotubes as a reactant further reduces the diffusion distance and provides a template for the final carbide materials. The metal carbide compounds produced through this low temperature salt flux technique maintain the nanowire morphology of the carbon nanotubes but increase in size to ˜15-20 nm diameter due to the incorporation of metal in the carbon lattice. These nano-carbides not only have nanowire like shape but also have much higher surface areas than traditionally prepared metal carbides. Finally, bimetallic carbides with composition control can be produced with this method by simply using two metal precursors in the reaction. This method provides the ability to produce nano sized metal carbide materials with size, morphology, and composition control and will allow for these compounds to be synthesized and studied in a whole new size and temperature regime.

  14. Effects of carbides on fatigue characteristics of austempered ductile iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, B.; Gao, N.; Reed, P. A. S.; Lee, K. K.

    2005-04-01

    Crack initiation and growth behavior of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) austenitized at 800 °C and austempered at 260 °C have been assessed under three-point bend fatigue conditions. Initiation sites have been identified as carbides remaining from the as-cast ductile iron due to insufficient austenization. The number of carbides cracking on loading to stresses greater than 275 MPa is critical in determining the failure mechanism. In general, high carbide area fractions promote coalescence-dominated fatigue crack failure, while low area fractions promote propagation-dominated fatigue crack failure. Individual carbides have been characterized using finite body tessellation (FBT) and adaptive numerical modeling (Support vector Parsimonious Analysis Of Variance (SUPANOVA)) techniques in an attempt to quantify the factors promoting carbide fracture. This indicated that large or long and thin carbides on the whole appear to be susceptible to fracture, and carbides that are locally clustered and aligned perpendicular to the tensile axis are particularly susceptible to fracture.

  15. Computational Studies of Physical Properties of Boron Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizhi Ouyang

    2011-09-30

    The overall goal is to provide valuable insight in to the mechanisms and processes that could lead to better engineering the widely used boron carbide which could play an important role in current plight towards greener energy. Carbon distribution in boron carbide, which has been difficult to retrieve from experimental methods, is critical to our understanding of its structure-properties relation. For modeling disorders in boron carbide, we implemented a first principles method based on supercell approach within our G(P,T) package. The supercell approach was applied to boron carbide to determine its carbon distribution. Our results reveal that carbon prefers to occupy the end sites of the 3-atom chain in boron carbide and further carbon atoms will distribute mainly on the equatorial sites with a small percentage on the 3-atom chains and the apex sites. Supercell approach was also applied to study mechanical properties of boron carbide under uniaxial load. We found that uniaxial load can lead to amorphization. Other physical properties of boron carbide were calculated using the G(P,T) package.

  16. High precision optical finishing of lightweight silicon carbide aspheric mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, John; Young, Kevin

    2010-10-01

    Critical to the deployment of large surveillance optics into the space environment is the generation of high quality optics. Traditionally, aluminum, glass and beryllium have been used; however, silicon carbide becomes of increasing interest and availability due to its high strength. With the hardness of silicon carbide being similar to diamond, traditional polishing methods suffer from slow material removal rates, difficulty in achieving the desired figure and inherent risk of causing catastrophic damage to the lightweight structure. Rather than increasing structural capacity and mass of the substrate, our proprietary sub-aperture aspheric surface forming technology offers higher material removal rates (comparable to that of Zerodur or Fused Silica), a deterministic approach to achieving the desired figure while minimizing contact area and the resulting load on the optical structure. The technology performed on computer-controlled machines with motion control software providing precise and quick convergence of surface figure, as demonstrated by optically finishing lightweight silicon carbide aspheres. At the same time, it also offers the advantage of ideal pitch finish of low surface micro-roughness and low mid-spatial frequency error. This method provides a solution applicable to all common silicon carbide substrate materials, including substrates with CVD silicon carbide cladding, offered by major silicon carbide material suppliers. This paper discusses a demonstration mirror we polished using this novel technology. The mirror is a lightweight silicon carbide substrate with CVD silicon carbide cladding. It is a convex hyperbolic secondary mirror with 104mm diameter and approximately 20 microns aspheric departure from best-fit sphere. The mirror has been finished with surface irregularity of better than 1/50 wave RMS @632.8 nm and surface micro-roughness of under 2 angstroms RMS. The technology has the potential to be scaled up for manufacturing capabilities of

  17. Growth kinetics of cubic carbide free layers in graded cemented carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liu-Yong; Liu, Yi-Min; Huang, Ji-Hua; Zhang, Shou-Quan; Zhao, Xing-Ke

    2012-01-01

    In order to reveal the formation mechanism of cubic carbide free layers (CCFL), graded cemented carbides with CCFL in the surface zone were fabricated by a one-step sintering procedure in vacuum, and the analysis on microstructure and element distribution were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA), respectively. A new physical model and kinetic equation were established based on experimental results. Being different from previous models, this model suggests that nitrogen diffusion outward is only considered as an induction factor, and the diffusion of titanium through liquid phase plays a dominative role. The driving force of diffusion is expressed as the differential value between nitrogen partial pressure and nitrogen equilibrium pressure essentially. Simulation results by the kinetic equation are in good agreement with experimental values, and the effect of process parameters on the growth kinetics of CCFL can also be explained reasonably by the current model.

  18. Microstructure and Properties of Plasma Spraying Boron Carbide Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Microstructure of plasma spray boron carbide coating was studied by SEM and TEM. Its physical,mechanical and electrical properties were measured. The results showed that high microhardness,modulus and Iow porosity of B4C coating were manufactured by plasma spray. It was lamellar packing and dense. The B4C coating examined here contained two principal structures and two impurity phase besides major phase. The relatively small value of Young′s modulus, comparing with that of the bulk materials, is explained by porosity. The Fe impurity phase could account for the relatively high electrical conductivity of boron carbide coating by comparing with the general boron carbide materials.

  19. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tin, Chin-Che, E-mail: cctin@physics.auburn.ed [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Mendis, Suwan [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Chew, Kerlit [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin [Physical Technical Institute, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700084 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Atabaev, Bakhtiyar [Institute of Electronics, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700125 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Adedeji, Victor [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, Elizabeth City State University, North Carolina 27909 (United States); Rusli [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2010-10-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  20. Plasma metallurgical production of nanocrystalline borides and carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Galevsky, S. G.; Efimova, K. A.

    2016-09-01

    he experience in production and study of properties of nanocrystalline borides and chromium carbides, titanium, silicon was summarized. The design and features of the vertical three-jet once-through reactor with power 150 kW, used in the plasma metallurgical production, was described. The technological, thermotechnical and resource characteristics of the reactor were identified. The parameters of borides and carbides synthesis, their main characteristics in the nanodispersed state and equipment-technological scheme of production were provided. Evaluation of engineering-and-economical performance of the laboratory and industrial levels of borides and carbides production and the state corresponding to the segment of the world market was carried out.

  1. Wear resistance of nodular cast iron with carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gumienny

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of abrasive and adhesive wear resistance of selected grades of nodular cast iron with carbides are presented. It was demonstrated, that the maximum wear resistance has got nodular cast iron with the microstructure of upper bainite, lower bainite and carbides. This cast iron with hardened steel and sulfonitrided steel is the most advantageous friction pair during adhesive wear testing. It was found, that the least advantageous friction pair is pearlitic nodular cast iron with carbides and normalized steel.

  2. Analysis of carbides and inclusions in high speed tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, K.T.; Dahl, K.V.

    2002-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of fatigued specimens were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The aim was to quantify the distribution of cracked carbides and non-metallic inclusions on the fracturesurfaces as well as on polished cross......-metallic inclusions and the crack initiation. Surprisingly, no differences were found between the carbide size distributions of the micro-clean and conventional grades.Also, the distribution of the fractured carbides was found to be the same regardless of steel type, manufacturing method or location on the specimen....

  3. First-principles study of structural and bonding properties of vanadium carbide and niobium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, K. B.; Paliwal, U.

    2009-11-01

    An ab initio linear combination of atomic orbitals method founded on density functional theory is applied to study the structural and bonding properties of vanadium carbide and niobium carbide. We present structural properties, namely, first-principles total energies, equilibrium lattice constants, bulk moduli and their pressure derivatives, together with the x-ray structure factors. Two generalized correction schemes—P86 and PW92—are applied to treat correlation. P86 gives a favourable ground state compared with the PW92. The computed equilibrium lattice constants and bulk moduli of the two compounds are compared with available experimental data. The x-ray structure factors for a few reflection planes are also reported. Comparison with experiment could be done only for niobium carbide. More refined measurements on x-ray structure factors for both compounds are required. We also present the autocorrelation functions derived from the ground-state momentum density. The electronic behaviour and bonding properties are discussed in terms of absolute and anisotropies in the directional autocorrelation functions. Our findings on structural and bonding parameters are well in accordance with the experimental data.

  4. First-principles study of structural and bonding properties of vanadium carbide and niobium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, K B; Paliwal, U [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M L Sukhadia University, Udaipur - 313001 (India)], E-mail: k_joshi@yahoo.com

    2009-11-15

    An ab initio linear combination of atomic orbitals method founded on density functional theory is applied to study the structural and bonding properties of vanadium carbide and niobium carbide. We present structural properties, namely, first-principles total energies, equilibrium lattice constants, bulk moduli and their pressure derivatives, together with the x-ray structure factors. Two generalized correction schemes-P86 and PW92-are applied to treat correlation. P86 gives a favourable ground state compared with the PW92. The computed equilibrium lattice constants and bulk moduli of the two compounds are compared with available experimental data. The x-ray structure factors for a few reflection planes are also reported. Comparison with experiment could be done only for niobium carbide. More refined measurements on x-ray structure factors for both compounds are required. We also present the autocorrelation functions derived from the ground-state momentum density. The electronic behaviour and bonding properties are discussed in terms of absolute and anisotropies in the directional autocorrelation functions. Our findings on structural and bonding parameters are well in accordance with the experimental data.

  5. Stored energy in irradiated silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This report presents a short review of the phenomenon of Wigner stored energy release from irradiated graphite and discusses it in relation to neutron irradiation of silicon carbide. A single published work in the area of stored energy release in SiC is reviewed and the results are discussed. It appears from this previous work that because the combination of the comparatively high specific heat of SiC and distribution in activation energies for recombining defects, the stored energy release of SiC should only be a problem at temperatures lower than those considered for fusion devices. The conclusion of this preliminary review is that the stored energy release in SiC will not be sufficient to cause catastrophic heating in fusion reactor components, though further study would be desirable.

  6. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Oxidation at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Nadia; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNTs) have high mechanical strength and also have many potential functional applications. In this study, SiCNTs were investigated for use in strengthening high temperature silicate and oxide materials for high performance ceramic nanocomposites and environmental barrier coating bond coats. The high · temperature oxidation behavior of the nanotubes was of particular interest. The SiCNTs were synthesized by a direct reactive conversion process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and silicon at high temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation kinetics of SiCNTs at temperatures ranging from 800degC to1300degC. The specific oxidation mechanisms were also investigated.

  7. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold.

  8. Stable field emission from nanoporous silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myung-Gyu; Lezec, Henri J; Sharifi, Fred

    2013-02-15

    We report on a new type of stable field emitter capable of electron emission at levels comparable to thermal sources. Such an emitter potentially enables significant advances in several important technologies which currently use thermal electron sources. These include communications through microwave electronics, and more notably imaging for medicine and security where new modalities of detection may arise due to variable-geometry x-ray sources. Stable emission of 6 A cm(-2) is demonstrated in a macroscopic array, and lifetime measurements indicate these new emitters are sufficiently robust to be considered for realistic implementation. The emitter is a monolithic structure, and is made in a room-temperature process. It is fabricated from a silicon carbide wafer, which is formed into a highly porous structure resembling an aerogel, and further patterned into an array. The emission properties may be tuned both through control of the nanoscale morphology and the macroscopic shape of the emitter array.

  9. Preparation of Silicon Carbide with High Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to prepare silicon carbide with high properties, three kinds of SiC powders A, B, and C with different composition and two kinds of additives, which were Y2O3-Al2O3 system and Y2O3-La2O3 system, were used in this experiment. The properties of hot-pressed SiC ceramics were measured. With the same additives, different SiC powder resulted in different properties. On the other hand, with the same SiC powder, increasing the amount of the additive Y2O3-Al2O3 improved properties of SiC ceramics at room temperature, and increasing the amount of the additive Y2O3-La2O3 improved property SiC ceramics at elevated temperature. In addition, the microstructure of SiC ceramics was studied by scanning electron microscopy.

  10. Thermal Oxidation of Silicon Carbide Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiufang Chen; Li'na Ning; Yingmin Wang; Juan Li; Xiangang Xu; Xiaobo Hu; Minhua Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Thermal oxidation was used to remove the subsurface damage of silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces. The anisotrow of oxidation and the composition of oxide layers on Si and C faces were analyzed. Regular pits were observed on the surface after the removal of the oxide layers, which were detrimental to the growth of high quality epitaxial layers. The thickness and composition of the oxide layers were characterized by Rutherford backscat-tering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Epitaxial growth was performed in a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The substrate surface morphol-ogy after removing the oxide layer and gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer surface were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the GaN epilayer grown on the oxidized substrates was superior to that on the unoxidized substrates.

  11. Development of a silicon carbide sewing thread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawko, Paul M.; Vasudev, Anand

    1989-01-01

    A silicon carbide (SiC) sewing thread has been designed which consists of a two-ply yarn in a 122 turns-per-meter-twist construction. Two processing aids in thread construction were evaluated. Prototype blankets were sewn using an SiC thread prepared either with polytetrafluoroethylene sizing or with an overwrap of rayon/dacron service yarn. The rayon/dacron-wrapped SiC thread was stronger, as shown by higher break-strength retention and less damage to the outer-mold-line fabric. This thread enables thermal protection system articles to be sewn or joined, or have perimeter close-out of assembled parts when using SiC fabric for high-temperature applications.

  12. Production of titanium carbide from ilmenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutham Niyomwas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of titanium carbide (TiC powders from ilmenite ore (FeTiO3 powder by means of carbothermal reduction synthesis coupled with hydrochloric acid (HCl leaching process was investigated. A mixture of FeTiO3 and carbon powders was reacted at 1500oC for 1 hr under flowing argon gas. Subsequently, synthesized product of Fe-TiC powders were leached by 10% HCl solutions for 24 hrs to get final product of TiC powders. The powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The product particles were agglomerated in the stage after the leaching process, and the size of this agglomerate was 12.8 μm with a crystallite size of 28.8 nm..

  13. Reaction Kinetics of Nanostructured Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Kendra; Zerda, T. W.

    2006-10-01

    Nanostructured silicon carbide (SiC) is of interest particularly for use in nanocomposites that demonstrate high hardness as well as for use in semiconductor applications. Reaction kinetics studies of solid-solid reactions are relatively recent and present a method of determining the reaction mechanism and activation energy by measuring reaction rates. We have used induction heating to heat quickly, thus reducing the error in reaction time measurements. Data will be presented for reactions using silicon nanopowder (melting point of silicon. Using the well-known Avrami-Erofeev model, a two-parameter chi- square fit of the data provided a rate constant (k) and parameter (n), related to the reaction mechanism, for each temperature. From these data, an activation energy of 138 kJ/mol was calculated. In addition, the parameter n suggests the reaction mechanism, which will also be discussed. Experiments are continuing at higher temperatures to consider the liquid- solid reaction as well.

  14. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  15. Helium behaviour in implanted boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motte Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When boron carbide is used as a neutron absorber in nuclear power plants, large quantities of helium are produced. To simulate the gas behaviour, helium implantations were carried out in boron carbide. The samples were then annealed up to 1500 °C in order to observe the influence of temperature and duration of annealing. The determination of the helium diffusion coefficient was carried out using the 3He(d,p4He nuclear reaction (NRA method. From the evolution of the width of implanted 3He helium profiles (fluence 1 × 1015/cm2, 3 MeV corresponding to a maximum helium concentration of about 1020/cm3 as a function of annealing temperatures, an Arrhenius diagram was plotted and an apparent diffusion coefficient was deduced (Ea = 0.52 ± 0.11 eV/atom. The dynamic of helium clusters was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples implanted with 1.5 × 1016/cm2, 2.8 to 3 MeV 4He ions, leading to an implanted slab about 1 μm wide with a maximum helium concentration of about 1021/cm3. After annealing at 900 °C and 1100 °C, small (5–20 nm flat oriented bubbles appeared in the grain, then at the grain boundaries. At 1500 °C, due to long-range diffusion, intra-granular bubbles were no longer observed; helium segregates at the grain boundaries, either as bubbles or inducing grain boundaries opening.

  16. Handling of Copper and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles by Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcke, Felix; Dringen, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    Copper is an essential trace element for many important cellular functions. However, excess of copper can impair cellular functions by copper-induced oxidative stress. In brain, astrocytes are considered to play a prominent role in the copper homeostasis. In this short review we summarise the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms which are involved in the handling of copper by astrocytes. Cultured astrocytes efficiently take up copper ions predominantly by the copper transporter Ctr1 and the divalent metal transporter DMT1. In addition, copper oxide nanoparticles are rapidly accumulated by astrocytes via endocytosis. Cultured astrocytes tolerate moderate increases in intracellular copper contents very well. However, if a given threshold of cellular copper content is exceeded after exposure to copper, accelerated production of reactive oxygen species and compromised cell viability are observed. Upon exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of copper ions or copper oxide nanoparticles, astrocytes increase their copper storage capacity by upregulating the cellular contents of glutathione and metallothioneins. In addition, cultured astrocytes have the capacity to export copper ions which is likely to involve the copper ATPase 7A. The ability of astrocytes to efficiently accumulate, store and export copper ions suggests that astrocytes have a key role in the distribution of copper in brain. Impairment of this astrocytic function may be involved in diseases which are connected with disturbances in brain copper metabolism.

  17. Investigation on the Effects of Titanium Diboride Particle Size on Radiation Shielding Properties of Titanium Diboride Reinforced Boron Carbide-Silicon Carbide Composites

    OpenAIRE

    A.O. Addemir; A.C. Akarsu; A.B. Tugrul; B. Buyuk

    2012-01-01

    Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion power plants. Titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites which were produced from different titanium diboride particle sizes and ratios were studied for searching of the behaviour against the gamma ray. Cs-137 gamma radioisotope was used as gamma source in the expe...

  18. Structure and thermal expansion of NbC complex carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatsinskaya, I.M.; Chaporova, I.N.; Cheburaeva, R.F.; Samojlov, A.I.; Logunov, A.V.; Ignatova, I.A.; Dodonova, L.P.

    1983-11-01

    Alloying dependences of the crystal lattice parameters at indoor temperature and coefficient of thermal linear expansion within a 373-1273 K range are determined for complex NbC-base carbides by the method of mathematical experimental design. It is shown that temperature changes in the linear expansion coefficient of certain complex carbides as distinct from NbC have an anomaly (minimum) within 773-973 K caused by occurring reversible phase transformations. An increase in the coefficient of thermal linear expansion and a decrease in hardness of NbC-base tungsten-, molybdenum-, vanadium- and hafnium-alloyed carbides show a weakening of a total chemical bond in the complex carbides during alloying.

  19. Silicon carbide materials for high duty seal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berroth, K.E. (Schunk Ingenieurkeramik GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-12-01

    Properties, fabrication, and high-duty applications of silicon carbide grades are discussed. The two types of silicon carbide, i.e., reaction-bonded and sintered, are considered. The potential for adhesion and the lack of dry running abilities lead to a variety of microstructures. For reaction-bonded silicon carbide, the microstructure can be a tool for optimization of the tribological behavior. Besides the high corrosion resistance of the material, its thermal conductivity is excellent. Grain sizes of about 40-50 microns are used in high-duty applications. Reaction-bonded silicon carbide with residual content of carbon graphite has improved tribological/hydrodynamic characteristics and performs well in sealing hard faces.

  20. Ion implantation phenomena in 4H-silicon carbide

    CERN Document Server

    Phelps, Gordon James

    2003-01-01

    Silicon Carbide is a promising wide band gap semiconductor with many new properties yet to be established and investigated. Ion implantation is the dominant method of incorporating dopant materials into the Silicon Carbide crystalline structure for electronic device fabrication. The implantation process of dopants into Silicon Carbide, both theoretical and practical, is described in this Thesis. Additional fabrication process steps, such as annealing, and their implications are also described. To gain further insight into the process of ion implantation into Silicon Carbide, the detailed design of a special test die is discussed. The aim of the special test die was to obtain general information such as implanted dopant sheet resistivity and to test a novel bipolar transistor design. The fabrication steps involved for the special test die are discussed in detail. The results from the special test die take the form of specific electrical measurements, together with detailed visual observations provided by a sca...

  1. Radial furnace shows promise for growing straight boron carbide whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, E.

    1967-01-01

    Radial furnace, with a long graphite vaporization tube, maintains a uniform thermal gradient, favoring the growth of straight boron carbide whiskers. This concept seems to offer potential for both the quality and yield of whiskers.

  2. On surface Raman scattering and luminescence radiation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Filipov, V; Schwarz, U; Armbrüster, M; Leithe-Jasper, A; Tanaka, T; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-02-01

    The discrepancy between Raman spectra of boron carbide obtained by Fourier transform Raman and conventional Raman spectrometry is systematically investigated. While at photon energies below the exciton energy (1.560 eV), Raman scattering of bulk phonons of boron carbide occurs, photon energies exceeding the fundamental absorption edge (2.09 eV) evoke additional patterns, which may essentially be attributed to luminescence or to the excitation of Raman-active processes in the surface region. The reason for this is the very high fundamental absorption in boron carbide inducing a very small penetration depth of the exciting laser radiation. Raman excitations essentially restricted to the boron carbide surface region yield spectra which considerably differ from bulk phonon ones, thus indicating structural modifications.

  3. Novel Manufacturing Process for Unique Mixed Carbide Refractory Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR Phase I project will establish the feasibility of an innovative manufacturing process to fabricate a range of unique hafnium/silicon based carbide...

  4. Impact-resistant silicon-carbide-based ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevislov, S. N.; Bespalov, I. A.

    2017-08-01

    The bullet resistance is determined by an indirect method, by evaluation of time of delay of penetration by bullet of the silicon-carbide-based ceramics obtained by reactive sintering, liquid-phase sintering, and hot pressing.

  5. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  6. Silicon Carbide Threads For High-Temperature Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawko, Paul M.; Vasudev, Anand

    1991-01-01

    New thread material outperforms silica. Sewing threads containing silicon carbide (SiC) yarn withstand temperatures of more than 1,100 degrees C. Intended for use in stitching thermally insulating blankets.

  7. Status of advanced carbide fuels: Past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, Samim; Knight, Travis

    2002-01-01

    Solid solution, mixed uranium/refractory metal carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C, so called ternary carbide or tri-carbide fuels have great potential for applications in next generation advanced nuclear power reactors. Because of their high melting points, high thermal conductivity, improved resistance to hot hydrogen corrosion, and good fission product retention, these advanced nuclear fuels have great potential for high performance reactors with increased safety margins. Despite these many benefits, some concerns regarding carbide fuels include compatibility issues with coolant and/or cladding materials and their endurance under the extreme conditions associated with nuclear thermal propulsion. The status of these fuels is reviewed to characterize their performance for space nuclear power applications. Results of current investigations are presented and as well as future directions of study for these advanced nuclear fuels. .

  8. Process for preparing fine grain silicon carbide powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, G.C.

    Method of producing fine-grain silicon carbide powder comprises combining methyltrimethoxysilane with a solution of phenolic resin, acetone and water or sugar and water, gelling the resulting mixture, and then drying and heating the obtained gel.

  9. Canine models of copper toxicosis for understanding mammalian copper metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Fieten, Hille; Leegwater, Peter A. J.; Watson, Adrian L.; Rothuizen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary forms of copper toxicosis exist in man and dogs. In man, Wilson’s disease is the best studied disorder of copper overload, resulting from mutations in the gene coding for the copper transporter ATP7B. Forms of copper toxicosis for which no causal gene is known yet are recognized as well, often in young children. Although advances have been made in unraveling the genetic background of disorders of copper metabolism in man, many questions regarding disease mechanisms and copper homeo...

  10. Platinum group metal nitrides and carbides: synthesis, properties and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanovskii, Alexander L [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Urals Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2009-04-30

    Experimental and theoretical data on new compounds, nitrides and carbides of the platinum group 4d and 5d metals (ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium, platinum), published over the past five years are summarized. The extreme mechanical properties of platinoid nitrides and carbides, i.e., their high strength and low compressibility, are noted. The prospects of further studies and the scope of application of these compounds are discussed.

  11. Bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In these paper the possibility of upper and lower bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings are presented. Conditions, when in cast iron with carbides castings during continuous free air cooling austenite transformation to upper bainite or its mixture with lower bainte proceeds, have been given. A mechanism of this transformation has been given, Si, Ni, Mn and Mo distribution in the eutectic cell has been tested and hardness of tested castings has been determined.

  12. ADHERENCE AND PROPERTIES OF SILICON CARBIDE BASED FILMS ON STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Lelogeais, M.; Ducarroir, M.; Berjoan, R.

    1991-01-01

    Coatings of silicon carbide with various compositions have been obtained in a r.f plasma assisted process using tetramethylsilane and argon as input gases. Some properties against mechanical applications of such deposits on steel have been investigated. Residual stresses and hardness are reported and discussed in relation with plasma parameters and deposit composition. By scratch testing, it was shown that the silicon carbide films on steel denote a good adherence when compared with previous ...

  13. Dynamic compaction of boron carbide by a shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzyurkin, Andrey E.; Kraus, Eugeny I.; Lukyanov, Yaroslav L.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents experiments on explosive compaction of boron carbide powder and modeling of the stress state behind the shock front at shock loading. The aim of this study was to obtain a durable low-porosity compact sample. The explosive compaction technology is used in this problem because the boron carbide is an extremely hard and refractory material. Therefore, its compaction by traditional methods requires special equipment and considerable expenses.

  14. Stability of MC Carbide Particles Size in Creep Resisting Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodopivec, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical analysis of the dependence microstructure creep rate. Discussion on the effects of carbide particles size and their distribution on the base of accelerated creep tests on a steel X20CrMoV121 tempered at 800 °C. Analysis of the stability of carbide particles size in terms of free energy of formation of the compound. Explanation of the different effect of VC and NbC particles on accelerated creep rate.

  15. Implanted Bottom Gate for Epitaxial Graphene on Silicon Carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Waldmann, Daniel; Jobst, Johannes; Fromm, Felix; Speck, Florian; Seyller, Thomas; Krieger, Michael; Weber, Heiko B.

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique to tune the charge density of epitaxial graphene via an electrostatic gate that is buried in the silicon carbide substrate. The result is a device in which graphene remains accessible for further manipulation or investigation. Via nitrogen or phosphor implantation into a silicon carbide wafer and subsequent graphene growth, devices can routinely be fabricated using standard semiconductor technology. We have optimized samples for room temperature as well as for cryogenic...

  16. Single-Event Effects in Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ikpe, Stanley; Topper, Alyson D.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program Silicon Carbide Power Device Subtask efforts in FY15. Benefits of SiC are described and example NASA Programs and Projects desiring this technology are given. The current status of the radiation tolerance of silicon carbide power devices is given and paths forward in the effort to develop heavy-ion single-event effect hardened devices indicated.

  17. Process for preparing fine-grain metal carbide powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C.R.; Jeffers, F.P.

    Fine-grain metal carbide powder suitable for use in the fabrication of heat resistant products is prepared by coating bituminous pitch on SiO/sub 2/ or Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ particles, heating the coated particles to convert the bituminous pitch to coke, and then heating the particles to a higher temperature to convert the particles to a carbide by reaction of said coke therewith.

  18. Hair copper in intrauterine copper device users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, M; Heyndrickx, A; Uyttersprot, C

    1984-03-01

    The antifertility effect of copper-bearing IUDs is based on continuous release of copper, which is a result of the reaction between the metal and the uterine secretions. Released cupric ions collect in the endometrium and in the uterine fluid but significant accumulation has not been found in the bloodstream or elsewhere. Following Laker's suggestion that hair be used for monitoring essential trace elements, e.g., copper, we checked the copper content of the hair of women wearing copper-bearing IUDs. Samples of untreated pubic hair removed by clipping before diagnostic curettage were obtained from 10 young (24-34 years old), white caucasian females who until then had been wearing an MLCu250 IUD for more than 1 year. Pubes from 10 comparable (sex, age, race) subjects who had never used a Cu-containing device served as controls. The unwashed material was submitted to the toxicology laboratory, where the copper content was assessed by flameless atomic absorption, a technique whose lower limit of measurement lies at a concentration of 0.05 mcg Cu/ml fluid (50 ppb). Hair samples were washed to remove extraneous traces of metal according to the prescriptions of the International Atomic Energy Agency, weighed, and mineralized, after which a small volume (10 mcl) of the diluted fluid was fed into the graphite furnace. Each sample (75-150 mg) was analyzed 4 times, both before and after washing. Since the cleaning procedure reduces the weight of the sample (mainly by the removal of fat, dust, etc.) this explains why the percentage copper content of washed hair is higher than that of unwashed hair belonging to the same subject. The results indicate that there was no significant difference (Mann-Whitney U test) between the mean copper levels of both unwashed and washed pubes from women who were using or had never used an MLCu250 IUD. We therefore conclude that the use of this copper-containing device is not associated with significant accumulation of copper in (pubic) hair.

  19. China Copper Processing Industry Focus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>1. Market Consumption The ’China Factor’ and Copper Price Fluctuation We all know China is an enormous consumer of copper,but the exact levels of consumption and where the copper has gone remains a mystery.

  20. Biogenic nanoparticles: copper, copper oxides, copper sulphides, complex copper nanostructures and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubilar, Olga; Rai, Mahendra; Tortella, Gonzalo; Diez, Maria Cristina; Seabra, Amedea B; Durán, Nelson

    2013-09-01

    Copper nanoparticles have been the focus of intensive study due to their potential applications in diverse fields including biomedicine, electronics, and optics. Copper-based nanostructured materials have been used in conductive films, lubrification, nanofluids, catalysis, and also as potent antimicrobial agent. The biogenic synthesis of metallic nanostructured nanoparticles is considered to be a green and eco-friendly technology since neither harmful chemicals nor high temperatures are involved in the process. The present review discusses the synthesis of copper nanostructured nanoparticles by bacteria, fungi, and plant extracts, showing that biogenic synthesis is an economically feasible, simple and non-polluting process. Applications for biogenic copper nanoparticles are also discussed.

  1. Development and Evaluation of Mixed Uranium-Refractory Carbide/Refractory Carbide Cer-Cer Fuels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal a new carbide-based fuel is introduced with outstanding potential to eliminate the loss of uranium, minimizes the loss of uranium, and retains...

  2. Solid-state formation of titanium carbide and molybdenum carbide as contacts for carbon-containing semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, W. P.; Detavernier, C.; van Meirhaeghe, R. L.; Kellock, A. J.; Lavoie, C.

    2006-03-01

    Metal carbides are good candidates to contact carbon-based semiconductors (SiC, diamond, and carbon nanotubes). Here, we report on an in situ study of carbide formation during the solid-state reaction between thin Ti or Mo films and C substrates. Titanium carbide (TiC) was previously reported as a contact material to diamond and carbon nanotubes. However, the present study shows two disadvantages for the solid-state reaction of Ti and C. First, because Ti reacts readily with oxygen, a capping layer should be included to enable carbide formation. Second, the TiC phase can exist over a wide range of composition (about 10%, i.e., from Ti0.5C0.5 to Ti0.6C0.4), leading to significant variations in the properties of the material formed. The study of the Mo-C system suggests that molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) is a promising alternative, since the phase shows a lower resistivity (about 45% lower than for TiC), the carbide forms below 900 °C, and its formation is less sensitive to oxidation as compared with the Ti-C system. The measured resistivity for Mo2C is ρ=59 μΩ cm, and from kinetic studies an activation energy for Mo2C formation of Ea=3.15+/-0.15 eV was obtained.

  3. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Szlufarska, Izabela [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-10-11

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450{degree}C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC-based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800{degree}C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation

  4. Development and characterization of nickel based tungsten carbide laser cladded coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, Marleen; Persoons, Rosita; Geerinckx, Eric; Kemps, Raymond; Mertens, Myrjam; Hendrix, Willy; Chen, Hong

    Laser cladded coatings consisting of various types of tungsten carbides embedded in a NiCrBSiCFe matrix are characterized. At optimal process parameters crack-free coatings with a thickness of 0.85-1 mm, excellent bonding with the substrate, carbide concentrations up to 60 wt% and a hardness in the range of 40-55 HRC are obtained. During laser cladding the carbides have partly dissolved in the matrix as indicated by the presence of dispersed carbides in the matrix and by a carbide phase growing into the matrix along the edges of the particles. The wear coefficient during sliding contact decreases logarithmically with increasing carbide concentration.

  5. Crystal structural and diffusion property in titanium carbides: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yanan; Gao, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    Titanium carbides were studied via molecular dynamics simulation to characterize TiCx structures with respect to the carbon diffusion properties in this study. The effect of carbon concentration on atomic structures of titanium carbides was investigated through discussing the structure variation and the radial distribution functions of carbon atoms in titanium carbides. The carbon diffusion in titanium carbides was also analyzed, focusing on the dependence on carbon concentration and carbide structure. Carbon diffusivity with different carbon concentrations was determined by molecular dynamics (MD) calculations and compared with the available experimental data. The simulation results showed an atomic exchange mechanism for carbon diffusion in titanium carbide.

  6. Nanostructured carbide catalysts for the hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram Seshadri, Susannah Scott, Juergen Eckert

    2008-07-21

    The above quote, taken from the executive summary of the Report from the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences Workshop held August 6–8, 2007,[1] places in context the research carried out at the University of California, Santa Barbara, which is reported in this document. The enormous impact of heterogeneous catalysis is exemplified by the Haber process for the synthesis of ammonia, which consumes a few % of the world’s energy supply and natural gas, and feeds as many as a third of the world’s population. While there have been numerous advances in understanding the process,[2] culminating in the awarding of the Nobel Prize to Gerhard Ertl in 2007, it is interesting to note that the catalysts themselves have changed very little since they were discovered heuristically in the the early part of the 20th century. The thesis of this report is that modern materials chemistry, with all the empirical knowledge of solid state chemistry, combined with cutting edge structural tools, can help develop and better heterogeneous catalysis. The first part of this report describes research in the area of early transition metal carbides (notably of Mo and W), potentially useful catalysts for water gas shift (WGS) and related reactions of use to the hydrogen economy. Although these carbides have been known to be catalytically useful since the 1970s,[3] further use of these relatively inexpensive materials have been plagued by issues of low surface areas and ill-defined, and often unreactive surfaces, in conjunction with deactivation. We have employed for the first time, a combination of constant-wavelength and time-of-flight neutron scattering, including a total scattering analysis of the latter data, to better understand what happens in these materials, in a manner that for the first time, reveals surface graphitic carbon in these materials in a quantitative manner. Problems of preparation, surface stability, and irreversible reactivity have become manifest in this class of materials

  7. Copper and silver halates

    CERN Document Server

    Woolley, EM; Salomon, M

    2013-01-01

    Copper and Silver Halates is the third in a series of four volumes on inorganic metal halates. This volume presents critical evaluations and compilations for halate solubilities of the Group II metals. The solubility data included in this volume are those for the five compounds, copper chlorate and iodate, and silver chlorate, bromate and iodate.

  8. Coping with copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Ines; Jacquiod, Samuel; Brejnrod, Asker

    2016-01-01

    Copper has been intensively used in industry and agriculture since mid-18(th) century and is currently accumulating in soils. We investigated the diversity of potential active bacteria by 16S rRNA gene transcript amplicon sequencing in a temperate grassland soil subjected to century-long exposure......, suggesting a potential promising role as bioindicators of copper contamination in soils....

  9. Thermal Fatigue Behavior of Silicon-Carbide-Doped Silver Microflake Sinter Joints for Die Attachment in Silicon/Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Chen, Chuantong; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2017-02-01

    We studied the thermal fatigue behavior of submicron silicon carbide particle (SiCp)-doped silver (Ag) microflake sinter joints for die attachment in next-generation power devices. Si dummy chips and direct bonded copper substrates with various metallization schemes were bonded using SiCp-doped Ag microflakes under mild conditions (250°C, 30 min, 0.4 MPa). The SiCp was distributed homogeneously in the porous Ag network and inhibited morphological evolution during thermal cycling tests. The shear strength of as-sintered pure Ag and SiCp-added joints was ˜50 MPa and 35 MPa, respectively. Thermal cycling tests from -40°C to 250°C were conducted for up to 1000 cycles (hours) to characterize the thermostability of the bonded joints. After 1000 cycles, joints with and without SiCp experienced bonding degradation, with shear strength of ˜25 MPa and 20 MPa, respectively. Thus, after 1000 cycles, the shear strength of pure Ag and SiCp-doped joints decreased by 58% and 42%, respectively, compared with their maximum value. Coarsening of porous Ag occurred in pure Ag joints. SiCp addition inhibited morphological evolution of SiCp-doped joints during thermal cycling. However, vertical cracks generated by thermal stress were observed in joints both with and without SiCp, which may limit long-term reliability.

  10. Feasibility study of fluxless brazing cemented carbides to steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, W.; Sievers, N.

    2017-03-01

    One of the most important brazing processes is the joints between cemented carbides and steel for the tool industry such as in rotary drill hammers or saw blades. Even though this technique has already been used for several decades, defects in the joint can still occur and lead to quality loss. Mostly, the joining process is facilitated by induction heating and the use of a flux to enhance the wetting of the filler alloy on the surface of the steel and cemented carbide in an ambient atmosphere. However, although the use of flux enables successful joining, it also generates voids within the joint, which reduces the strength of the connection while the chemicals within the flux are toxic and polluting. In this feasibility study, a fluxless brazing process is used to examine the joint between cemented carbides and steel for the first time. For this, ultrasound is applied during induction heating to enable the wetting between the liquid filler metal and the surfaces of the cemented carbide and steel. The ultrasound generates cavitations within the liquid filler metal, which remove the oxides from the surface. Several filler metals such as a silver based alloy Ag449, pure Zn, and an AlSi-alloy were used to reduce the brazing temperature and to lower the thermal residual stresses within the joint. As a result, every filler metal successfully wetted both materials and led to a dense connection. The ultrasound has to be applied carefully to prevent a damage of the cemented carbide. In this regard, it was observed that single grains of the cemented carbide broke out and remained in the joint. This positive result of brazing cemented carbides to steel without a flux but using ultrasound, allows future studies to focus on the shear strength of these joints as well as the behavior of the thermally induced residual stresses.

  11. Structure and Properties of Cast Near-Congruent Copper-Manganese Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, Kevin; Trumble, Kevin P.

    2014-10-01

    Microstructure development in the casting of copper-manganese alloys based on the congruent point at 34.6 wt pct Mn and 1146 K (873 °C) has been studied. The alloys were prepared by induction melting of electrolytic Cu and Mn in clay-graphite crucibles in open air. Under conventional casting conditions, the alloys exhibit fine cellular (non-dendritic) solidification morphology with a distinct absence of solidification shrinkage microporosity, and they maintain these attributes over a composition range of approximately 3 wt pct Mn about the congruent point. The high Mn concentration in the alloy admits carbon into solution in the melt, resulting in formation of manganese carbide Mn7C3 particles having two different forms (globular and angular) in the cast microstructure. The Mn carbide was eliminated or controlled to low levels by melting in an alumina or a silicon carbide crucible, or in a clay-graphite crucible at lower temperatures. Microstructure development in casting the alloy was analyzed in terms of the available phase diagrams and thermochemical data. Hardness and tensile testing indicated a potent solid solution strengthening effect of Mn and high ductility in the as-cast condition, with additional hardness (strength) when the alloy contains the Mn carbide phase.

  12. Yarlongite:A New Metallic Carbide Mineral

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Nicheng; BAI Wenji; LI Guowu; XIONG Ming; FANG Qingsong; YANG Jingsui; MA Zhesheng; RONG He

    2009-01-01

    Yarlongite occurs in ophiolitic chromitite at the Luobusha mine(29°5'N 92°,5'E,about 200 km ESE of Lhasa),Qusum County,Shannan Prefecture,Tibet Autonomous Region,People'S Republic of China.Associated minerals are:diamond,moissanite,wiistite,iridium("osmiridium"), osmium("iridosmine"),periclase,chromite,native irun,native nickel,native chromium,forsterite. Cr-rich diopside,intermetallic compounds Ni-Fe-Cr,Ni-Cr,Cr-C,etc.Yariongite and its associated minerals were handpicked from a large heavy mineral sample of chromitite.The metallic carbides associated with yarlongite are cohenite,tongbaite,khamrabaevite and qusongite(IMA2007.034). Yarlongite occurs as irregular grains,with a size between 0.02 and 0.06 mm,steel-grey colour,H Mohs:5 1/2-6.Tenacity:brittle.Cleavage:{0 0 1}perfect.Fracture:conchoidal.Chemical formula: (Cr4Fe4Ni)∑9C4,or(Cr,Fe,Ni)∑9C4,Crystal system:Hexagonal,Space Group:P63/mc,a=18.839(2)A,C =4.4960(9)A,V=745.7(2)A3,Z=6,Density(calc.)=7.19 g/cm3(with simplified formula).Yarlongite has been approved as a new mineral by the CNMNC(IMA2007-035).Holotype material is deposited at the Geological Museum of China(No.M11650).

  13. Methods for producing silicon carbide architectural preforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A. (Inventor); Yun, Hee (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for producing architectural preforms and high-temperature composite structures containing high-strength ceramic fibers with reduced preforming stresses within each fiber, with an in-situ grown coating on each fiber surface, with reduced boron within the bulk of each fiber, and with improved tensile creep and rupture resistance properties for each fiber. The methods include the steps of preparing an original sample of a preform formed from a pre-selected high-strength silicon carbide ceramic fiber type, placing the original sample in a processing furnace under a pre-selected preforming stress state and thermally treating the sample in the processing furnace at a pre-selected processing temperature and hold time in a processing gas having a pre-selected composition, pressure, and flow rate. For the high-temperature composite structures, the method includes additional steps of depositing a thin interphase coating on the surface of each fiber and forming a ceramic or carbon-based matrix within the sample.

  14. Casimir forces from conductive silicon carbide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-05-01

    Samples of conductive silicon carbide (SiC), which is a promising material due to its excellent properties for devices operating in severe environments, were characterized with the atomic force microscope for roughness, and the optical properties were measured with ellipsometry in a wide range of frequencies. The samples show significant far-infrared absorption due to concentration of charge carriers and a sharp surface phonon-polariton peak. The Casimir interaction of SiC with different materials is calculated and discussed. As a result of the infrared structure and beyond to low frequencies, the Casimir force for SiC-SiC and SiC-Au approaches very slowly the limit of ideal metals, while it saturates significantly below this limit if interaction with insulators takes place (SiC-SiO2). At short separations (<10 nm) analysis of the van der Waals force yielded Hamaker constants for SiC-SiC interactions lower but comparable to those of metals, which is of significance to adhesion and surface assembly processes. Finally, bifurcation analysis of microelectromechanical system actuation indicated that SiC can enhance the regime of stable equilibria against stiction.

  15. Casimir force measurements from silicon carbide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-02-01

    Using an atomic force microscope we performed measurements of the Casimir force between a gold- coated (Au) microsphere and doped silicon carbide (SiC) samples. The last of these is a promising material for devices operating under severe environments. The roughness of the interacting surfaces was measured to obtain information for the minimum separation distance upon contact. Ellipsometry data for both systems were used to extract optical properties needed for the calculation of the Casimir force via the Lifshitz theory and for comparison to the experiment. Special attention is devoted to the separation of the electrostatic contribution to the measured total force. Our measurements demonstrate large contact potential V0(≈0.67 V ) , and a relatively small density of charges trapped in SiC. Knowledge of both Casimir and electrostatic forces between interacting materials is not only important from the fundamental point of view, but also for device applications involving actuating components at separations of less than 200 nm where surface forces play dominant role.

  16. In situ ion irradiation of zirconium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Christopher J.; Motta, Arthur T.; Kirk, Mark A.

    2015-11-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is a candidate material for use in one of the layers of TRISO coated fuel particles to be used in the Generation IV high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor, and thus it is necessary to study the effects of radiation damage on its structure. The microstructural evolution of ZrCx under irradiation was studied in situ using the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory. Samples of nominal stoichiometries ZrC0.8 and ZrC0.9 were irradiated in situ using 1 MeV Kr2+ ions at various irradiation temperatures (T = 20 K-1073 K). In situ experiments made it possible to continuously follow the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation using diffraction contrast imaging. Images and diffraction patterns were systematically recorded at selected dose points. After a threshold dose during irradiations conducted at room temperature and below, black-dot defects were observed which accumulated until saturation. Once created, the defect clusters did not move or get destroyed during irradiation so that at the final dose the low temperature microstructure consisted only of a saturation density of small defect clusters. No long-range migration of the visible defects or dynamic defect creation and elimination were observed during irradiation, but some coarsening of the microstructure with the formation of dislocation loops was observed at higher temperatures. The irradiated microstructure was found to be only weakly dependent on the stoichiometry.

  17. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  18. Predicting Two-Dimensional Silicon Carbide Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhiming; Zhang, Zhuhua; Kutana, Alex; Yakobson, Boris I

    2015-10-27

    Intrinsic semimetallicity of graphene and silicene largely limits their applications in functional devices. Mixing carbon and silicon atoms to form two-dimensional (2D) silicon carbide (SixC1-x) sheets is promising to overcome this issue. Using first-principles calculations combined with the cluster expansion method, we perform a comprehensive study on the thermodynamic stability and electronic properties of 2D SixC1-x monolayers with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Upon varying the silicon concentration, the 2D SixC1-x presents two distinct structural phases, a homogeneous phase with well dispersed Si (or C) atoms and an in-plane hybrid phase rich in SiC domains. While the in-plane hybrid structure shows uniform semiconducting properties with widely tunable band gap from 0 to 2.87 eV due to quantum confinement effect imposed by the SiC domains, the homogeneous structures can be semiconducting or remain semimetallic depending on a superlattice vector which dictates whether the sublattice symmetry is topologically broken. Moreover, we reveal a universal rule for describing the electronic properties of the homogeneous SixC1-x structures. These findings suggest that the 2D SixC1-x monolayers may present a new "family" of 2D materials, with a rich variety of properties for applications in electronics and optoelectronics.

  19. Kunpeng Copper:The largest Copper Smelting Company of Sichuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>On September 9,Liangshan Mining Company’s 100,000 tons/year cathode copper project kicked off.It is another key project of the company following the successful launch of the 100,000 tons/year anode copper project.Based on ISA copper smelting technology of the largest open-cast copper mine in southwest China,

  20. Posttranslational regulation of copper transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berghe, P.V.E.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal copper is an essential cofactor for many redox-active enzymes, but excessive copper can generate toxic reactive oxygen species. Copper homeostasis is maintained by highly conserved proteins, to balance copper uptake, distribution and export on the systemic and cellular level. Th

  1. Converting a carbon preform object to a silicon carbide object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A process for converting in depth a carbon or graphite preform object to a silicon carbide object, silicon carbide/silicon object, silicon carbide/carbon-core object, or a silicon carbide/silicon/carbon-core object, by contacting it with silicon liquid and vapor over various lengths of contact time in a reaction chamber. In the process, a stream comprised of a silicon-containing precursor material in gaseous phase below the decomposition temperature of said gas and a coreactant, carrier or diluent gas such as hydrogen is passed through a hole within a high emissivity, thin, insulating septum into the reaction chamber above the melting point of silicon. The thin septum has one face below the decomposition temperature of the gas and an opposite face exposed to the reaction chamber. Thus, the precursor gas is decomposed directly to silicon in the reaction chamber. Any stream of decomposition gas and any unreacted precursor gas from the reaction chamber is removed. A carbon or graphite preform object placed in the reaction chamber is contacted with the silicon. The carbon or graphite preform object is recovered from the reactor chamber after it has been converted to a desired silicon carbide, silicon and carbon composition.

  2. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  3. [Copper and the human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krízek, M; Senft, V; Motán, J

    1997-11-19

    Copper is one of the essential trace elements. It is part of a number of enzymes. Deficiency of the element is manifested by impaired haematopoesis, bone metabolism, disorders of the digestive, cardiovascular and nervous system. Deficiency occurs in particular in patients suffering from malnutrition, malabsorption, great copper losses during administration of penicillamine. Sporadically copper intoxications are described (suicidal intentions or accidental ingestion of beverages with a high copper content). Acute exposure to copper containing dust is manifested by metal fume fever. Copper salts can produce local inflammations. Wilson's disease is associated with inborn impaired copper metabolism. In dialyzed patients possible contaminations of the dialyzate with copper must be foreseen as well as the possible release of copper from some dialyzation membranes. With the increasing amount of copper in the environment it is essential to monitor the contamination of the environment.

  4. Active carbon supported molybdenum carbides for higher alcohols synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Chiarello, Gian Luca; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    This work provides an investigation of the high pressure CO hydrogenation to higher alcohols on K2CO3 promoted active carbon supported molybdenum carbide. Both activity and selectivity to alcohols over supported molybdenum carbides increased significantly compared to bulk carbides in literatures....... spectroscopy were applied for determining the carburization temperature and evaluating the composition of the carbide clusters of different samples through determinations of the Mo-C and Mo-Mo coordination numbers....

  5. Hydrogen evolution activity and electrochemical stability of selected transition metal carbides in concentrated phosphoric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás García, Antonio Luis; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative catalysts based on carbides of Group 5 (niobium and tantalum) and 6 (chromium, molybdenum and tungsten) metals were prepared as films on the metallic substrates. The electrochemical activities of these carbide electrodes towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in concentrated......, attributable to the different electronic structures. Tungsten carbide among the studied electrode samples exhibited the highest HER activity. Upon anodic potential scans in the presence of oxygen, chromium, tantalum and tungsten carbides displayed passivation due to the formation of stable surface layers...

  6. Investigation on the Effects of Titanium Diboride Particle Size on Radiation Shielding Properties of Titanium Diboride Reinforced Boron Carbide-Silicon Carbide Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Addemir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion power plants. Titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites which were produced from different titanium diboride particle sizes and ratios were studied for searching of the behaviour against the gamma ray. Cs-137 gamma radioisotope was used as gamma source in the experiments which has a single gamma-peak at 0.662 MeV. Gamma transmission technique was used for the measurements. The effects of titanium diboride particle size on radiation attenuation of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were evaluated in related with gamma transmission and the results of the experiments were interpreted and compared with each other. Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion power plants. Titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites which were produced from different titanium diboride particle sizes and ratios were studied for searching of the behaviour against the gamma ray. Cs-137 gamma radioisotope was used as gamma source in the experiments which has a single gamma-peak at 0.662 MeV. Gamma transmission technique was used for the measurements. The effects of titanium diboride particle size on radiation attenuation of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were evaluated in related with gamma transmission and the results of the experiments were interpreted and compared with each other. Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion

  7. Influence of Interfacial Carbide Layer Characteristics on Thermal Properties of Copper-Diamond Composites (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    wettability of diamond is not an issue. Moreover, the solid-state processing can, in principle , be carried out at relatively low temperatures even for non...capacity. q was mea- sured using Archimedes ’ method, and D was measured with laser flash technique per ASTM E1461. The speci- mens for D measurement...respectively. The CTE of composites was measured with a push -rod dilatometer DIL 402 C (Manufacturer: NET- ZSCH-Gerätebau GmbH, Selb, Germany) per ASTM E228

  8. On the melt infiltration of copper coated silicon carbide with an aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthana, R.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure-assisted infiltration of porous compacts of Cu coated and uncoated single crystals of platelet shaped alpha (hexagonal) SiC was used to study infiltration dynamics and particulate wettability with a 2014 Al alloy. The infiltration lengths were measured for a range of experimental variables which included infiltration pressure, infiltration time, and SiC size. A threshold pressure (P(th)) for flow initiation through compacts was identified from an analysis of infiltration data; P(th) decreased while penetration lengths increased with increasing SiC size (more fundamentally, due to changes in interparticle pore size) and with increasing infiltration times. Cu coated SiC led to lower P(th) and 60-80 percent larger penetration lengths compared to uncoated SiC under identical processing conditions.

  9. Targeting copper in cancer therapy: 'Copper That Cancer'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoyer, Delphine; Masaldan, Shashank; La Fontaine, Sharon; Cater, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient involved in fundamental life processes that are conserved throughout all forms of life. The ability of copper to catalyze oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, which can inadvertently lead to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), necessitates the tight homeostatic regulation of copper within the body. Many cancer types exhibit increased intratumoral copper and/or altered systemic copper distribution. The realization that copper serves as a limiting factor for multiple aspects of tumor progression, including growth, angiogenesis and metastasis, has prompted the development of copper-specific chelators as therapies to inhibit these processes. Another therapeutic approach utilizes specific ionophores that deliver copper to cells to increase intracellular copper levels. The therapeutic window between normal and cancerous cells when intracellular copper is forcibly increased, is the premise for the development of copper-ionophores endowed with anticancer properties. Also under investigation is the use of copper to replace platinum in coordination complexes currently used as mainstream chemotherapies. In comparison to platinum-based drugs, these promising copper coordination complexes may be more potent anticancer agents, with reduced toxicity toward normal cells and they may potentially circumvent the chemoresistance associated with recurrent platinum treatment. In addition, cancerous cells can adapt their copper homeostatic mechanisms to acquire resistance to conventional platinum-based drugs and certain copper coordination complexes can re-sensitize cancer cells to these drugs. This review will outline the biological importance of copper and copper homeostasis in mammalian cells, followed by a discussion of our current understanding of copper dysregulation in cancer, and the recent therapeutic advances using copper coordination complexes as anticancer agents.

  10. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, K. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: codl@sci.muni.cz; Stankova, A. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Haekkaenen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. BOX 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Otruba, V.; Kanicky, V. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2007-12-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r{sup 2} > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r{sup 2} = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  11. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, K.; Staňková, A.; Häkkänen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J.; Otruba, V.; Kanický, V.

    2007-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r2 > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r2 = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  12. Structure-Property Relationship in Metal Carbides and Bimetallic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguan [University of Delaware

    2014-03-04

    The primary objective of our DOE/BES sponsored research is to use carbide and bimetallic catalysts as model systems to demonstrate the feasibility of tuning the catalytic activity, selectivity and stability. Our efforts involve three parallel approaches, with the aim at studying single crystal model surfaces and bridging the “materials gap” and “pressure gap” between fundamental surface science studies and real world catalysis. The utilization of the three parallel approaches has led to the discovery of many intriguing catalytic properties of carbide and bimetallic surfaces and catalysts. During the past funding period we have utilized these combined research approaches to explore the possibility of predicting and verifying bimetallic and carbide combinations with enhanced catalytic activity, selectivity and stability.

  13. Ordering of carbon atoms in boron carbide structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponomarev, V. I., E-mail: i2212@yandex.ru; Kovalev, I. D.; Konovalikhin, S. V.; Vershinnikov, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Boron carbide crystals have been obtained in the entire compositional range according to the phase diagram by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS). Based on the results of X-ray diffraction investigations, the samples were characterized by the unit-cell metric and reflection half-width in the entire range of carbon concentrations. A significant spread in the boron carbide unit-cell parameters for the same carbon content is found in the data in the literature; this spread contradicts the structural concepts for covalent compounds. The SHS samples have not revealed any significant spread in the unit-cell parameters. Structural analysis suggests that the spread of parameters in the literary data is related to the unique process of ordering of carbon atoms in the boron carbide structure.

  14. Optimum Design of Lightweight Silicon Carbide Mirror Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yuanyuan; ZHANG Yumin; HAN Jiecai; ZHANG Jianhan; YAO Wang; ZHOU Yufeng

    2008-01-01

    According to the design requirement and on the basis of the principle that the thermal expansion coefficient of the support structure should match with that of the mirror, a lightweight silicon carbide primary mirror assembly was designed. Finite element analysis combined with the parameter-optimized method was used during the design. Lightweight cell and rigid rib structure were used for the mirror assembly. The static, dynamic and thermal properties of the primary mirror assembly were analyzed. It is shown that after optimization, the lightweight ratio of the silicon carbide mirror is 52.5%, and the rigidity of the silicon carbide structure is high enough to support the required mirror. When temperature changes, the deformation of the mirror surface is in proportion to the temperature difference.

  15. Palladium in cubic silicon carbide: Stability and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Guido

    2009-12-01

    Several technological applications of silicon carbide are concerned with the introduction of palladium impurities. Be it intentional or not, this may lead to the formation of silicides. Not only this process is not well understood, but the basic properties of palladium impurities in silicon carbide, such as solubility or diffusion mechanisms, are far from being known. Here the stability and kinetics of isolated Pd impurities in cubic silicon carbide are studied by first principles calculations in the framework of density functional theory. The preferential insertion sites, as well as the main migration mechanisms, are analyzed and presented here, together with the results for solution and migration energies. The early stages of nucleation are discussed based on the properties of isolated impurities and the smallest clusters.

  16. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses.

  17. Carbide Dissolution during Intercritical Austenitization in Bearing Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; MI Zhenli; ZHANG Xiaolei; TANG Di; WANG Yide

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the carbide dissolution mechanism of high carbon-chromium bearing steel during the intercritical austenitization, the database of TCFE7 of Thermo-calc and MOBFE of DICTRA software were used to calculate the elements diffusion kinetic and the evolution law of volume fraction of carbide. DIL805A dilatometer was used to simulate the intercritical heat treatment. The microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy(SEM), and the micro-hardness was tested. The experimental results indicate that the dissolution of carbide is composed of two stages:initial austenite growth governed by carbon diffusion which sharply moves up the micro-hardness of quenched martensite, and subsequent growth controlled by diffusion of Cr elements in M3C. The volume fraction of M3C decreases with the increasing holding time, and the metallographic analysis shows a great agreement with values calculated by software.

  18. Physical Properties of the NbC Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Gustavo Di Vernieri Cuppari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal carbides are interesting materials with a singular combination of properties, such as high melting points, high hardness, good transport properties and relatively low costs, which makes them excellent candidates for several technological applications. The possible applications of NbC carbide remained unexplored as it was in the past expensive and available in limited volumes. In order to guide investigations of the applicability of NbC, a deeper understanding of the physical properties of this carbide is fundamental. In this review paper, key physical properties of NbC are compiled with emphasis on its chemical bonding, a careful description of the C-Nb phase diagram, the phases formed and the crystal structures. Thermal properties are discussed and correlated with the intrinsic and extrinsic features of NbC. Finally, elastic properties are discussed.

  19. Wear resistant steels and casting alloys containing niobium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theisen, W.; Siebert, S.; Huth, S. [Lehrstuhl Werkstofftechnik, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Niobium, like titanium and vanadium, forms superhard MC carbides that remain relatively pure in technical alloys on account of their low solubility for other metallic alloying elements. However, because they have a greater hardness than the precipitated chromium carbides commonly used in wear-resistant alloys, they are suitable as alternative hard phases. This contribution deals with new wear-resistant steels and casting alloys containing niobium carbide. These include a secondary hardening hardfacing alloy, a composite casting alloy for wear applications at elevated temperatures, a white cast iron as well as two variants of a corrosion-resistant cold-work tool steel produced by melt metallurgy and by powder metallurgy. A heat-resistant casting alloy is also discussed. Based on equilibrium calculations the microstructures developing during production of the alloys are analysed, and the results are discussed with respect to important properties such as abrasive wear and corrosion resistance. (orig.)

  20. Implanted bottom gate for epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, D.; Jobst, J.; Fromm, F.; Speck, F.; Seyller, T.; Krieger, M.; Weber, H. B.

    2012-04-01

    We present a technique to tune the charge density of epitaxial graphene via an electrostatic gate that is buried in the silicon carbide substrate. The result is a device in which graphene remains accessible for further manipulation or investigation. Via nitrogen or phosphor implantation into a silicon carbide wafer and subsequent graphene growth, devices can routinely be fabricated using standard semiconductor technology. We have optimized samples for room temperature as well as for cryogenic temperature operation. Depending on implantation dose and temperature we operate in two gating regimes. In the first, the gating mechanism is similar to a MOSFET, the second is based on a tuned space charge region of the silicon carbide semiconductor. We present a detailed model that describes the two gating regimes and the transition in between.

  1. Carbide precipitation in austenitic stainless steel carburized at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7204 (United States)]. E-mail: frank.ernst@case.edu; Cao, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7204 (United States); Michal, G.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7204 (United States); Heuer, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7204 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Low-temperature gas-phase carburization can significantly improve the surface mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel by generating a single-phase 'case' with concentrations of interstitially dissolved carbon exceeding the equilibrium solubility limit by orders of magnitude. Upon prolonged treatment, however, carbides (mostly {chi}, M{sub 5}C{sub 2}) can precipitate and degrade the properties. High-resolution and spatially resolved analytical transmission electron microscopy revealed the precise carbide-austenite orientation relationship, a highly coherent interface, and that precipitation only occurs when (i) the carbon-induced lattice expansion of the austenite has reached a level that substantially reduces volume-misfit stress and (ii) diffusional transport of nickel, chromium, and iron - enhanced by structural defects - can locally reduce the nickel concentration to the solubility limit of nickel in {chi}-carbide.

  2. New process of silicon carbide purification intended for silicon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbouche, M.; Zaghouani, R. Benabderrahmane; Benammar, N. E.; Aglieri, V.; Mosca, M.; Macaluso, R.; Khirouni, K.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we report on a new, efficient and low cost process of silicon carbide (SiC) powder purification intended to be used in photovoltaic applications. This process consists on the preparation of porous silicon carbide layers followed by a photo-thermal annealing under oxygen atmosphere and chemical treatment. The effect of etching time on impurities removal efficiency was studied. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) results showed that the best result was achieved for an etching time of 10 min followed by gettering at 900 °C during 1 h. SiC purity is improved from 3N (99.9771%) to 4N (99.9946%). Silicon carbide thin films were deposited onto silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD) using purified SiC powder as target. Significant improvement of the minority carrier lifetime was obtained encouraging the use of SiC as a passivation layer for silicon.

  3. Studies on the equation of state of mixed carbide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, M.; Mathews, C. K.; Rao, P. Bhaskar

    1989-12-01

    The equation of state of reactor fuels is required up to very high temperatures in order to assess the energy release in hypothetical core disruptive accidents (HCM). Though the mixed carbide of uranium and plutonium is a candidate fuel material for fast breeder reactors, much information is not available on its equation of state. This paper reports the results of our studies to obtain the equilibrium vapour pressures of uranium carbide and uranium-plutonium mixed carbide of varying compositions in the temperature range of 1300-9000 K. An extrapolation method based on the principles of equilibrium thermodynamics has been used as also the principle of corresponding states. The agreement between the different results are discussed and their implications in HCDA calculations brought out.

  4. 40 CFR 415.30 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbide production subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calcium carbide production subcategory. 415.30 Section 415.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbide Production Subcategory § 415.30 Applicability; description of the calcium carbide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  5. 40 CFR 424.50 - Applicability; description of the other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calcium carbide furnaces subcategory. 424.50 Section 424.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Other Calcium Carbide Furnaces Subcategory § 424.50 Applicability; description of the other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  6. Evolution of carbides in cold-work tool steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hoyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, 2 Busandaehak-ro 63beon-gil, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jun-Yun, E-mail: firice@kims.re.kr [Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Dongmin [Seah Changwon Special Steel, 147 Jeokhyeon-ro, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-370 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae-Ho [Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Mox, E-mail: chokm@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, 2 Busandaehak-ro 63beon-gil, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    This study aimed to present the complete history of carbide evolution in a cold-work tool steel along its full processing route for fabrication and application. A sequence of processes from cast to final hardening heat treatment was conducted on an 8% Cr-steel to reproduce a typical commercial processing route in a small scale. The carbides found at each process step were then identified by electron diffraction with energy dispersive spectroscopy in a scanning or transmission electron microscope. After solidification, MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 2}C carbides were identified and the last one dissolved during hot compression at 1180 °C. In a subsequent annealing at 870 °C followed by slow cooling, M{sub 6}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} were added, while they were dissolved in the following austenitization at 1030 °C. After the final tempering at 520 °C, fine M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitated again, thus the final microstructure was the tempered martensite with MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide. The transient M{sub 2}C and M{sub 6}C originated from the segregation of Mo and finally disappeared due to attenuated segregation and the consequent thermodynamic instability. - Highlights: • The full processing route of a cold-work tool steel was simulated in a small scale. • The carbides in the tool steel were identified by chemical–crystallographic analyses. • MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, M{sub 2}C, M{sub 6}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides were found during the processing of the steel. • M{sub 2}C and M{sub 6}C finally disappeared due to thermodynamic instability.

  7. Nanofibre growth from cobalt carbide produced by mechanosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Barriga-Arceo, L [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Orozco, E [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Garibay-Febles, V [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Bucio-Galindo, L [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Mendoza Leon, H [FM-UPALM, IPN, Apartado Postal 75-395 CP 07300, DF (Mexico); Castillo-Ocampo, P [UAM-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-334 CP 09340, DF (Mexico); Montoya, A [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-06-09

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare cobalt carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy methods. In order to produce carbon nanotubes, the cobalt carbide was precipitated after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. Nanofibres of about 10-50 nm in diameter, 0.04-0.1 {mu}m in length and 20-200 nm in diameter and 0.6-1.2 {mu}m in length were obtained after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, by means of this process.

  8. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jonathan Y. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Lu, Xiyuan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Lin, Qiang, E-mail: qiang.lin@rochester.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 10{sup 4} with mode volume ∼0.60(λ/n){sup 3} at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ∼10{sup 4} is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  9. Shock-induced localized amorphization in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingwei; McCauley, James W; Hemker, Kevin J

    2003-03-01

    High-resolution electron microscope observations of shock-loaded boron carbide have revealed the formation of nanoscale intragranular amorphous bands that occur parallel to specific crystallographic planes and contiguously with apparent cleaved fracture surfaces. This damage mechanism explains the measured, but not previously understood, decrease in the ballistic performance of boron carbide at high impact rates and pressures. The formation of these amorphous bands is also an example of how shock loading can result in the synthesis of novel structures and materials with substantially altered properties.

  10. Catalytic carbide formation at aluminium-carbon interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, B.; Rabenberg, L.; Ohuchi, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations of the reaction of several monolayer-thick films of aluminum with glassy carbon substrates are presented. The influence of molecular oxygen and water vapor on the rate of reaction is examined. It is concluded that water vapor catalyzed the formation of aluminum carbide from aluminum and carbon by forming active sites which weakened carbon-carbon bonds at the glassy carbon surface, thus assisting their cleavage. The rate of carbide formation for undosed and molecular oxygen-dosed examples was less as neither metallic aluminum nor oxygen-formed alumina could bond to the carbon atom with sufficient strength to dissociate it quickly.

  11. Effects of laser ablation on cemented tungsten carbide surface quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, J.L.; Butler, D.L.; Sim, L.M.; Jarfors, A.E.W. [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, Singapore (Singapore)

    2010-11-15

    Although laser micromachining has been touted as being the most promising way to fabricate micro tools, there has been no proper evaluation of the effects of laser ablation on bulk material properties. The current work demonstrates the effects of laser ablation on the properties of a cemented tungsten carbide surface. Of particular interest is the resultant increase in compressive residual stresses in the ablated surface. From this study it is seen that there are no adverse effects from laser ablation of cemented tungsten carbide that would preclude its use for the fabrication of micro-tools but a finishing process may not be avoidable. (orig.)

  12. Effects of laser ablation on cemented tungsten carbide surface quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J. L.; Butler, D. L.; Sim, L. M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.

    2010-11-01

    Although laser micromachining has been touted as being the most promising way to fabricate micro tools, there has been no proper evaluation of the effects of laser ablation on bulk material properties. The current work demonstrates the effects of laser ablation on the properties of a cemented tungsten carbide surface. Of particular interest is the resultant increase in compressive residual stresses in the ablated surface. From this study it is seen that there are no adverse effects from laser ablation of cemented tungsten carbide that would preclude its use for the fabrication of micro-tools but a finishing process may not be avoidable.

  13. Ultrathin fiber poly-3-hydroxybutyrate, modified by silicon carbide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhov, A. A.; Krutikova, A. A.; Goldshtrakh, M. A.; Staroverova, O. V.; Iordanskii, A. L.; Ischenko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The article presents the results of studies the composite fibrous material based on poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and nano-size silicon carbide obtained by the electrospinning method. Size distribution of the silicon carbide nanoparticles in the fiber was estimated by X-ray diffraction technique. It is shown that immobilization of the SiC nanoparticles to the PHB fibers contributes to obtaining essentially smaller diameter of fibers, high physical-mechanical characteristics and increasing resistance to degradation in comparison with the fibers of PHB.

  14. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  15. Copper wire bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  16. The Kinetics of Formation and Decomposition of Austenite in Relation to Carbide Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Henrique Duarte; Van Steenberge, Nele; Sietsma, Jilt; Terryn, Herman

    2017-02-01

    The effect of the carbide morphology on the kinetics of austenite formation and its decomposition was investigated by a combination of measurements of austenite fraction by dilatometry and metallography. These measurements show that coarse carbide morphology is generated by fast cooling through the early stages of eutectoid transformation, enabling fast precipitation of pro-eutectoid ferrite, followed by slow cooling during the final stages of transformation, during the precipitation of carbides. Additionally, a strong influence of the morphology of carbides on the kinetics of austenite formation is observed. The presence of coarse carbides can determine the rate of austenite formation during intercritical annealing as a result of its slow dissolution kinetics.

  17. Standard Specification for Copper-Aluminum-Silicon-Cobalt Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon-Magnesium Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy, and Copper-Nickel-Tin Alloy Sheet and Strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Copper-Aluminum-Silicon-Cobalt Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon-Magnesium Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Silicon Alloy, Copper-Nickel-Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy, and Copper-Nickel-Tin Alloy Sheet and Strip

  18. Fabrication and study on tribological characteristics of cast copper-TiO{sub 2}-boric acid hybrid composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh, C.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, PESIT, Bangalore (India); Noor Ahmed, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anjuman Engineering College, Bhatkal (India); Mujeebu, M.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anjuman Engineering College, Bhatkal (India); School of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: mamujeeb5@yahoo.com; Abdullah, M.Z. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2009-05-15

    Copper based composites having hard reinforcements such as silicon carbide, alumina and cerium oxide do possess higher strength, better wear resistance and higher coefficient of friction when compared to copper. However, they pose several challenges in machining such as higher tool wear and inferior surface finish. On the other hand, copper based composites having soft reinforcements such as graphite, molybdenum disulphide and calcium fluoride do possess lower coefficient of friction and better machinability characteristics. Against this background, an attempt is made to develop a new class of copper composite materials by dispersing both the hard and soft reinforcements in appropriate proportions to ensure optimization of mechanical properties and machinability characteristics. In this paper the development and testing of copper-TiO{sub 2}-boric acid composites by liquid metallurgy method is presented. Metallographic study, micro hardness, tensile strength, friction and wear tests on these hybrid composites have been carried out. The results show that copper-TiO{sub 2}-boric acid composites possess higher hardness, higher tensile strength, higher coefficient of friction and better wear resistance when compared with pure copper00.

  19. Growth characteristics of primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Zhou, Yefei; Xing, Xiaolei; Wang, Jibo; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2016-09-01

    The microstructure of the hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is observed by optical microscopy (OM). The initial growth morphology, the crystallographic structure, the semi-molten morphology and the stacking faults of the primary M7C3 carbide are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in-suit growth process of the primary M7C3 carbide was observed by confocal laser microscope (CLM). It is found that the primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is irregular polygonal shape with several hollows in the center and gaps on the edge. Some primary M7C3 carbides are formed by layers of shell or/and consist of multiple parts. In the initial growth period, the primary M7C3 carbide forms protrusion parallel to {} crystal planes. The extending and revolving protrusion forms the carbide shell. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) maps show that the primary M7C3 carbide consists of multiple parts. The semi-molten M7C3 carbide contains unmelted shell and several small-scale carbides inside, which further proves that the primary M7C3 carbide is not an overall block. It is believed that the coalescence of the primary M7C3 carbides is ascribed to the growing condition of the protrusion and the gap filling process.

  20. SHORT COMMUNICATION: Metal carbide-carbon peritectic systems as high-temperature fixed points in thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Y.; Wang, Y.; Sasajima, N.

    2006-10-01

    WC-C, Cr3C2-C and Mn7C3-C peritectic systems were investigated for their potential of serving as high-temperature reference points in thermometry. Mixtures of high-purity graphite powder with W, Cr and Mn powder of 99.99%, 99.9% and 99.95% purity by mass, respectively, were placed in graphite blackbody crucibles and melting/freezing plateaus were observed by means of a radiation thermometer. The observed melting temperatures were 2749 °C (WC-C), 1826 °C (Cr3C2-C) and 1331 °C (Mn7C3-C), with a repeatability—in each case—of 0.02 K. The melting range for WC-C and Cr3C2-C peritectics was roughly 0.1 K. WC-C showed a flat freezing plateau that agreed with the melting plateau within the repeatability. The three fixed points are possible candidates, like the metal (carbide)-carbon eutectic fixed points, in the realization of an improved high-temperature scale above the copper point.

  1. Raman spectroscopic characterization of the core-rim structure in reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannotti, Phillip; Subhash, Ghatu, E-mail: subhash@ufl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Zheng, James Q.; Halls, Virginia [Program Executive Office—Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment, US Army, Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060 (United States); Karandikar, Prashant G.; Salamone, S.; Aghajanian, Michael K. [M-Cubed Technologies, Inc., Newark, Delaware 19711 (United States)

    2015-01-26

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics. Compositional and structural gradation in the silicon-doped boron carbide phase (rim), which develops around the parent boron carbide region (core) due to the reaction between silicon and boron carbide, was evaluated using changes in Raman peak position and intensity. Peak shifting and intensity variation from the core to the rim region was attributed to changes in the boron carbide crystal structure based on experimental Raman observations and ab initio calculations reported in literature. The results were consistent with compositional analysis determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Raman analysis revealed the substitution of silicon atoms first into the linear 3-atom chain, and then into icosahedral units of the boron carbide structure. Thus, micro-Raman spectroscopy provided a non-destructive means of identifying the preferential positions of Si atoms in the boron carbide lattice.

  2. Mullite Coating on Recrytallized Silicon Carbide and Its Cycling Oxidation Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Mullite coating on recrystallized silicon carbide was successfully prepared by the sol-gel route. The cycling oxidation of coated recrystallized silicon carbide was performed at 1500℃. For comparison, the oxidation of uncoated recrystallized silicon carbide was also carried out at the same condition. The results indicated that a layer of compact, adhesive and crack free mullite coating was found on the recrystallized silicon carbide. After oxidation, the new coatings exhibit adherence and crack resistance under thermal cycling between room temperature and 1500℃, therefore the oxidation resistance capability of silicon carbide was enhanced. With the increase of the dipping frequencies, namely, the increase of the thickness of mullite coating, the oxidation resistance of silicon carbide would be further improved. The formation mechanism of mullite coating was analyzed and discussed and the oxidation dynamics model of coatedmullite silicon carbide has been also proposed.

  3. Heat-Resistance of the Powder Cobalt Alloys Reinforced by Niobium or Titanium Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherepova, T.S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of heat-resistance of powder cobalt alloys at 1100 °C were investigated. These alloys were developed for the protection of workers banding shelves GTE blades from wear. The alloys were prepared by hot pressing powders of cobalt, chromium, aluminum, iron and niobium or titanium carbides. The values of heat resistance alloys containing carbides between 30 and 70% (vol. depend on the type made of carbide alloys: alloys with titanium carbide superior in heat-resistant alloy of niobium carbide. The most significant factor affecting on the heat-resistant alloys, is porosity: with its increase the parameters decline regardless of the type and content of carbide. The optimum composition of powder heat resisting alloys of titanium carbide with a melting point above 1300 °C were determined for use in the aircraft engine.

  4. Formation mechanism of spheroidal carbide in ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-guo Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of the spheroidal carbide in the ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron fabricated by the metal mold casting technique was systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that the spheroidal carbide belonged to eutectic carbide and crystallized in the isolated eutectic liquid phase area. The formation process of the spheroidal carbide was related to the contact and the intersection between the primary dendrite and the secondary dendrite of austenite. The oxides of magnesium, rare earths and other elements can act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the spheroidal carbide. It was also found that the amount of the spheroidal carbide would increase with an increase in carbon content. The cooling rate has an important influence on the spheroidal carbide under the same chemical composition condition.

  5. High-hardness ceramics based on boron carbide fullerite derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikov, D. A.; Popov, M. Yu.; Perfilov, S. A.; Prokhorov, V. M.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2017-02-01

    A new type of ceramics based on the phases of fullerite derivatives and boron carbide B4C is obtained. The material is synthesized at a temperature of 1500 K and a relatively low pressure of 4 GPa; it has a high hardness of 45 GPa and fracture toughness of 15 MPa m1/2.

  6. Dynamic strength of reaction-sintered boron carbide ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinykh, A. S.; Garkushin, G. V.; Razorenov, S. V.; Rumyantsev, V. I.

    2015-06-01

    The shock compression wave profiles in three modifications of boron carbide ceramic are studied in the compressive stress range 3-19 GPa. The Hugoniot elastic limit and the spall strength of the materials are determined. It is confirmed that the spall strength of high-hardness ceramic changes nonmonotonically with the compressive stress in a shock wave.

  7. Standard specification for nuclear-Grade boron carbide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This specification applies to boron carbide pellets for use as a control material in nuclear reactors. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only.

  8. PECVD silicon carbide surface micromachining technology and selected MEMS applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajaraman, V.; Pakula, L.S.; Yang, H.; French, P.J.; Sarro, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Attractive material properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon carbide (SiC) when combined with CMOS-compatible low thermal budget processing provides an ideal technology platform for developing various microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and merging them with

  9. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  10. Silicon carbide and other films and method of deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  11. Protective infrared antireflection coating based on sputtered germanium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Des; Waddell, Ewan; Placido, Frank

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes optical, durablility and environmental performance of a germanium carbide based durable antireflection coating. The coating has been demonstrated on germanium and zinc selenide infra-red material however is applicable to other materials such as zinc sulphide. The material is deposited using a novel reactive closed field magnetron sputtering technique, offering significant advantages over conventional evaporation processes for germanium carbide such as plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The sputtering process is "cold", making it suitable for use on a wide range of substrates. Moreover, the drum format provide more efficient loading for high throughput production. The use of the closed field and unbalanced magnetrons creates a magnetic confinement that extends the electron mean free path leading to high ion current densities. The combination of high current densities with ion energies in the range ~30eV creates optimum thin film growth conditions. As a result the films are dense, spectrally stable, supersmooth and low stress. Films incorporate low hydrogen content resulting in minimal C-H absorption bands within critical infra-red passbands such as 3 to 5um and 8 to 12um. Tuning of germanium carbide (Ge(1-x)Cx) film refractive index from pure germanium (refractive index 4) to pure germanium carbide (refractive index 1.8) will be demonstrated. Use of film grading to achieve single and dual band anti-reflection performance will be shown. Environmental and durability levels are shown to be suitable for use in harsh external environments.

  12. Design and Fabrication of Silicon Carbide Semiconductor Detectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG; Xin; LIU; Yang; HE; Gao-kui

    2015-01-01

    The potential of silicon carbide(SiC)for use in semiconductor nuclear radiation detectors has been recognized for years.SiC detectors have now been demonstrated for high-resolution alpha particle and X-ray energy spectrometry,beta ray,gamma-ray,thermal-and fast-neutron

  13. PECVD silicon carbide surface micromachining technology and selected MEMS applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajaraman, V.; Pakula, L.S.; Yang, H.; French, P.J.; Sarro, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Attractive material properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon carbide (SiC) when combined with CMOS-compatible low thermal budget processing provides an ideal technology platform for developing various microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and merging them with

  14. MICROSTRUCTURE AT THE INTERFACE OF TITANIUM CARBIDE AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Dian-hong; Wu Xing-fang; Lu Hua; N.Froumin; M.Polak

    2000-01-01

    Microstructure at the interface of titanium carbide and nickelaluminides in the samples obtained by infiltration of molten Ni3Al alloyhas studied by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an analyticaltransmission electron microscopy (ATEM) with an energy dispersivespectrometer (EDS). It is found that the morphology at the interfacesbetween hard phase skeleton of TiC{0.7 and metallic phases depends on theratio of Ti/C in carbide. Some periodic zigzag fringes are observed ata smooth interface between metallic phase and carbides in the sampleof Ni3Al/TiC0.7. The results of analysis using EDS show that Ti inTiC0.7 carbide is easier than that in TiC0.9 to dissolve into the moltenalloy during solid-liquid reaction. The formation of this periodic zigzagfringe,which may be a growth zone of a new Ti-Ni-Al phase,in the interfaceof TiC0.7/Ni3Al would occur during the initial stage of solidification.

  15. The synthesis of titanium carbide-reinforced carbon nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pinwen; Hong, Youliang; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian

    2009-06-24

    Tailoring hard materials into nanoscale building blocks can greatly extend the applications of hard materials and, at the same time, also represents a significant challenge in the field of nanoscale science. This work reports a novel process for the preparation of carbon-based one-dimensional hard nanomaterials. The titanium carbide-carbon composite nanofibers with an average diameter of 90 nm are prepared by an electrospinning technique and a high temperature pyrolysis process. A composite solution containing polyacrylonitrile and titanium sources is first electrospun into the composite nanofibers, which are subsequently pyrolyzed to produce the desired products. The x-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy results show that the main phase of the as-synthesized nanofibers is titanium carbide. The Raman analyses show that the composite nanofibers have low graphite clusters in comparison with the pure carbon nanofibers originating from the electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibers. The mechanical property tests demonstrate that the titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber membranes have four times higher tensile strength than the carbon nanofiber membranes, and the Young's modulus of the titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber membranes increases in direct proportion to the titanium quantity.

  16. Highly permeable and mechanically robust silicon carbide hollow fiber membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, Patrick; Kappert, Emiel; Lohaus, T.; Wessling, Matthias; Nijmeijer, Arian; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) membranes have shown large potential for applications in water treatment. Being able to make these membranes in a hollow fiber geometry allows for higher surface-to-volume ratios. In this study, we present a thermal treatment procedure that is tuned to produce porous silicon

  17. Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Arnoldbik, W.M.; Sloof, W.G.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings, sputter deposited in a reactive argon/acetylene plasma, has been studied as a function of the acetylene partial pressure. Stress and microstructure have been investigated by wafer curvature and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) whe

  18. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GEORGE PELIN; CRISTINA-ELISABETA PELIN; ADRIANA STEFAN; ION DINC\\u{A}; ANTON FICAI; ECATERINA ANDRONESCU; ROXANA TRUSC\\u{A}

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on obtaining and characterization of phenolic resin-based composites modified with nanometric silicon carbide. The nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating nanometric silicon carbide (nSiC) into phenolic resin at 0.5, 1 and 2 wt% contents using ultrasonication to ensure uniform dispersion of the nanopowder, followed by heat curing of the phenolic-based materials at controlled temperature profile up to 120$^{\\circ}$C. The obtained nanocomposites were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis and evaluated in terms of mechanical, tribological and thermal stability under load. The results highlight the positive effect of the nanometric silicon carbide addition in phenolic resin on mechanical, thermo-mechanical and tribological performance, improving their strength, stiffness and abrasive properties. The best results were obtained for 1 wt% nSiC, proving that this value is the optimum nanometric silicon carbide content. The results indicate that these materials could be effectively used to obtain ablative or carbon–carbon composites in future studies.

  19. Highly permeable and mechanically robust silicon carbide hollow fiber membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de P.; Kappert, Emiel J.; Lohaus, T.; Wessling, M.; Nijmeijer, A.; Benes, N.E.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) membranes have shown large potential for applications in water treatment. Being able to make these membranes in a hollow fiber geometry allows for higher surface-to-volume ratios. In this study, we present a thermal treatment procedure that is tuned to produce porous silicon ca

  20. An Exploration of Neutron Detection in Semiconducting Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Nina

    The 3He supply problem in the U.S. has necessitated the search for alternatives for neutron detection. The neutron detection efficiency is a function of density, atomic composition, neutron absorption cross section, and thickness of the neutron capture material. The isotope 10B is one of only a handful of isotopes with a high neutron absorption cross section---3840 barns for thermal neutrons. So a boron carbide semiconductor represents a viable alternative to 3He. This dissertation provides an evaluation of the performance of semiconducting boron carbide neutron detectors grown by plasma enhance chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) in order to determine the advantages and drawbacks of these devices for neutron detection. Improved handling of the PECVD system has resulted in an extremely stable plasma, enabling deposition of thick films of semiconducting boron carbide. A variety of material and semiconducting characterization tools have been used to investigate the structure and electronic properties of boron carbide thin films, including X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, infrared/Raman spectroscopy, current-voltage measurements and capacitance-voltage measurements. Elemental concentrations in the boron carbide films have been obtained from Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection analysis. Solid state neutron detection devices have been fabricated in the form of heterostructured p-n diodes, p-type boron carbide/n-type Si. Operating conditions, including applied bias voltage, and time constants, have been optimized for maximum detection efficiency and correlated to the semiconducting properties investigated in separate electronic measurements. Accurate measurements of the neutron detection efficiency and the response of the detector to a wide range of neutron wavelengths have been performed at a well calibrated, tightly collimated, "white" cold neutron beam source using time-of-flight neutron detection technique

  1. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Montes; Susana Rivera-Mancia; Araceli Diaz-Ruiz; Luis Tristan-Lopez; Camilo Rios

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased pr...

  2. Sputtering and codeposition of silicon carbide with deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, Rion A.

    2003-03-01

    Due to its excellent thermal properties, silicon carbide is being considered as a possible plasma-facing material for fusion devices. If used as a plasma-facing material, the energetic hydrogen isotope ions and charge-exchanged neutrals escaping from the plasma will sputter the silicon carbide. To assess the tritium inventory problems that will be generated by the use of this material, it is necessary that we know the codeposition properties of the redeposited silicon carbide. To determine the codeposition properties, the deuterium plasma experiment at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California has been used to directly compare the deuterium sputtering and codeposition of silicon carbide with that of graphite. A Penning discharge at a flux of 6×10 19 D/m 2 and an energy of ≈300 eV was used to sputter silicon and carbon from a pair of 0.05 m diameter silicon carbide disks. The removal rate of deuterium gas from the fixed volume of the system isolated from all other sources and sinks was used to measure the codeposition probability (probability that a hydrogen isotope atom will be removed through codeposition per ion striking the sample surface). A small catcher plate used to capture a fraction of the codeposited film was analyzed using Auger spectroscopy. This analysis showed the film to begin with a high carbon to silicon ratio due to preferential sputtering of the carbon. As the film became thicker, the ratio of the depositing material changed over to the (1:1) value that must eventually be attained.

  3. Jiangxi Copper Plans to Increase its Refined Copper Output

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>According to news published on March 30th, China’s largest copper producer--Jiangxi Copper alleged in its 2010 Financial Report Statement that it plans to improve its output of refined copper by 4.4% in 2011, to increase from 900,000 tonnes last year to 940,000 tons.

  4. Tungsten carbide encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon with iron/cobalt carbides electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jinwei; Jiang, Yiwu; Zhou, Feilong; Wang, Gang; Wang, Ruilin

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a type of hybrid catalyst prepared through an environmental and simple method, combining a pyrolysis of transition metal precursors, a nitrogen-containing material, and a tungsten source to achieve a one-pot synthesis of N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides (Fe/Co/WC@NC). The obtained Fe/Co/WC@NC consists of uniform Fe3C and Co3C nanoparticles encapsulated in graphitized carbon with surface nitrogen doping, closely wrapped around a plate-like tungsten carbide (WC) that functions as an efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The introduction of WC is found to promote the ORR activity of Fe/Co-based carbide electrocatalysts, which is attributed to the synergistic catalysts of WC, Fe3C, and Co3C. Results suggest that the composite exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability, and ability for methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C for ORR in alkaline electrolyte. These advantages make Fe/Co/WC@NC a promising ORR electrocatalyst and a cost-effective alternative to Pt/C for practical application as fuel cell.

  5. Effects of space exposure on ion-beam-deposited silicon-carbide and boron-carbide coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keski-Kuha, R A; Blumenstock, G M; Fleetwood, C M; Schmitt, D R

    1998-12-01

    Two recently developed optical coatings, ion-beam-deposited silicon carbide and ion-beam-deposited boron carbide, are very attractive as coatings on optical components for instruments for space astronomy and earth sciences operating in the extreme-UV spectral region because of their high reflectivity, significantly higher than any conventional coating below 105 nm. To take full advantage of these coatings in space applications, it is important to establish their ability to withstand exposure to the residual atomic oxygen and other environmental effects at low-earth-orbit altitudes. The first two flights of the Surface Effects Sample Monitor experiments flown on the ORFEUS-SPAS and the CRISTA-SPAS Shuttle missions provided the opportunity to study the effects of space exposure on these materials. The results indicate a need to protect ion-beam-deposited silicon-carbide-coated optical components from environmental effects in a low-earth orbit. The boron-carbide thin-film coating is a more robust coating able to withstand short-term exposure to atomic oxygen in a low-earth-orbit environment.

  6. [Copper metabolism and genetic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Norikazu

    2016-07-01

    Copper is one of essential trace elements. Copper deficiency lead to growth and developmental failure and/or neurological dysfunction. However, excess copper is also problems for human life. There are two disorders of inborn error of copper metabolism, Menkes disease and Wilson disease. Menkes disease is an X linked recessive disorder with copper deficiency and Wilson disease is an autosomal recessive disorder with copper accumulation. These both disorders result from the defective functioning of copper transport P-type ATPase, ATP7A of Menkes disease and ATP7B of Wilson disease. In this paper, the author describes about copper metabolism of human, and clinical feature, diagnosis and treatment of Menkes disease and Wilson disease.

  7. The Active Oxidation of Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2009-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation of silicon carbide occurs in two very different modes. Passive oxidation forms a protective oxide film which limits further attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + 3/2 O2(g) = SiO2(s) + CO(g) Active oxidation forms a volatile oxide and may lead to extensive attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + O2(g) = SiO(g) + CO(g) Generally passive oxidation occurs at higher oxidant pressures and active oxidation occurs at lower oxidant pressures and elevated temperatures. Active oxidation is a concern for reentry, where the flight trajectory involves the latter conditions. Thus the transition points and rates of active oxidation are a major concern. Passive/active transitions have been studied by a number of investigators. An examination of the literature indicates many questions remain regarding the effect of impurity, the hysteresis of the transition (i.e. the difference between active-to-passive and passive-toactive), and the effect of total pressure. In this study we systematically investigate each of these effects. Experiments were done in both an alumina furnace tube and a quartz furnace tube. It is known that alumina tubes release impurities such as sodium and increase the kinetics in the passive region [1]. We have observed that the active-to-passive transition occurs at a lower oxygen pressure when the experiment is conducted in alumina tubes and the resultant passive silica scale contains sodium. Thus the tests in this study are conducted in quartz tubes. The hysteresis of the transition has been discussed in the detail in the original theoretical treatise of this problem for pure silicon by Wagner [2], yet there is little mention of it in subsequent literature. Essentially Wagner points out that the active-to-passive transition is governed by the criterion for a stable Si/SiO2 equilibria and the passive-to-active transition is governed by the decomposition of the SiO2 film. A series of experiments were conducted for active-to-passive and passive

  8. Spark plasma sintering of tantalum carbide and graphene reinforced tantalum carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Ajith Kumar

    Tantalum carbide (TaC), an ultra-high temperature ceramic (UHTC), is well known for its exceptional properties such as high hardness (15-19 GPa), melting point (3950 °C), elastic modulus (537 GPa), chemical resistance, and thermal shock resistance. To make TaC to be the future material for hypersonic vehicles, it is required to improve its thermal conductivity, strength, and fracture toughness. Researchers have previously reinforced TaC ceramic with carbides of silicon and boron as well as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), however, these reinforcements either undergo chemical changes or induce defects in the matrix during processing. In addition, these reinforcements exhibit a very minimal improvement in the properties. In the present work, we attempted to improve TaC fracture toughness by reinforcing with graphene nano-platelets (GNPs) and processing through spark plasma sintering at high temperature of 2000 °C, pressure of 70 MPa, and soaking time of 10 min. In addition, we investigated the active densification mechanism during SPS of TaC powder and the effect of ball milling time on mechanical properties of sintered TaC. A relative density of >96% was achieved using SPS of monolithic TaC (<3 μm). Ball milling improved the sintering kinetics and improved the mechanical properties (microhardness, bi-axial flexural strength, and indentation fracture toughness). Activation energy (100 kJ/mol) and stress exponent (1.2) were obtained using the analytical model developed for power-law creep. Grain boundary sliding is proposed as active densification mechanism based on these calculations. Reinforcing GNPs (2-6 vol.% ) in the TaC matrix improved relative density (99.8% for TaC-6 vol.% GNP). Also ˜150% and ˜180% increase in flexural strength and fracture toughness, respectively, was observed for TaC-6 vol.% GNP composite. The significant improvement in these properties is attributed to improved densification and toughening mechanisms such as sheet pull-out and crack

  9. Chinese Copper Manufacturers Expand Overseas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>In 2012,China’s apparent copper consumption reached 8.84 million tons,accounting for 43%of the global total demand.Spurred by strong demand,China’s copper smelting capacity roars with annual average growth in domestic copper smelting capacity reaching approx-

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of Metallic Copper and Copper Oxide Nanoflowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *H. S. Virk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Copper nanoflowers have been fabricated using two different techniques; electro-deposition of copper in polymer and anodic alumina templates, and cytyltrimethal ammonium bromide (CTAB-assisted hydrothermal method. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM images record some interesting morphologies of metallic copper nanoflowers. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM has been used to determine morphology and composition of copper oxide nanoflowers. X-ray diffraction (XRD pattern reveals the monoclinic phase of CuO in the crystallographic structure of copper oxide nanoflowers. There is an element of random artistic design of nature, rather than science, in exotic patterns of nanoflowers fabricated in our laboratory.

  11. Electric Heating Property from Butyl Rubber-Loaded Boron Carbide Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Dechuan; WANG Ninghui; LI Guofeng

    2014-01-01

    We researched the electric heating property from butyl rubber-loaded boron carbide composite. The effects of boron carbide content on bulk resistivity, voltage-current characteristic, thermal conductivity and thermal stability of boron carbide/butyl rubber (IIR) polymer composite were introduced. The analysis results indicated that the bulk resistivity decreased greatly with increasing boron carbide content, and when boron carbide content reached to 60%, the bulk resistivity achieved the minimum. Accordingly, electric heating behavior of the composite is strongly dependent on boron carbide content as well as applied voltage. The content of boron carbide was found to be effective in achieving high thermal conductivity in composite systems. The thermal conductivity of the composite material with added boron carbide was improved nearly 20 times than that of the pure IIR. The thermal stability test showed that, compared with pure IIR, the thermal stable time of composites was markedly extended, which indicated that the boron carbide can significantly improve the thermal stability of boron carbide/IIR composite.

  12. Silicon carbide high performance optics: a cost-effective, flexible fabrication process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casstevens, John M.; Rashed, Abuagela; Plummer, Ronald; Bray, Don; Gates, Rob L.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Ferber, Matt K.; Kirkland, Tim

    2001-12-01

    Silicon carbide may well be the best known material for the manufacture of high performance optical components. This material offers many advantages over glasses and metals that have historically been used in high performance optical systems. A combination of extremely high specific stiffness (E/r), high thermal conductivity and outstanding dimensional stability make silicon carbide superior overall to beryllium and low-expansion glass ceramics. A major impediment to wide use of silicon carbide in optical systems has been the cost associated with preliminary shaping and final finishing of silicon carbide. Because silicon carbide is an extremely hard and strong material, precision machining can only be done with expensive diamond tooling on very stiff high quality machine tools. Near-net-shape slip casting of silicon carbide can greatly reduce the cost of silicon carbide mirror substrates but this process still requires significant diamond grinding of the cast components. The process described here begins by machining the component from all special type of graphite. This graphite can rapidly be machined with conventional multi-axis CNC machine tools to achieve any level of complexity and lightweighting required. The graphite is then directly converted completely to silicon carbide with very small and very predictable dimensional change. After conversion to silicon carbide the optical surface is coated with very fine grain CVD silicon carbide which is easily polished to extreme smoothness. Details of the fabrication process are described and photos and performance specifications of an eight-inch elliptical demonstration mirror are provided.

  13. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

    2014-09-01

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  14. Titanium Carbide and Silicon Carbide Thermal Conductivity under Heavy Ions Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrero, J.; Weisbecker, P.; Pailler, R. [LCTS, F-33600 Pessac (France); Cabrero, J.; Audubert, F. [CEA Cadarache, DEN 13108 Saint Paul Iez Durance (France); Kusiak, A. [TREFLE, Esplanade des Arts et Metiers 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    SiC(f)/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are considered as structural materials in next generation fission nuclear reactors. However, thermal conductivity of SiC is reduced on the one hand at the highest temperatures, but also under irradiation. Titanium carbide, because of its peculiar thermal properties is an attractive material to be used as a matrix in a CMC to enhance the thermal conductivity of CMC under irradiation and at high temperature. In this study, we performed irradiation experiments on TiC, TiC{sub x}SiC{sub 1-x} and SiC samples, with heavy ions at room temperature (74 MeV Kr, fluence from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}). This energy results in an irradiated layer of about 7 {mu}m for TiC. Thermal conductivity of the irradiated layer is measured using IR radiometry as a function of fluence and composition. The structural evolution of the irradiated samples was investigated by Raman micro spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. (authors)

  15. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Montes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson’s disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson’s disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson’s disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson’s disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology.

  16. Industrial experiment of copper electrolyte purification by copper arsenite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Ya-jie; XIAO Fa-xin; WANG Yong; LI Chun-hua; XU Wei; JIAN Hong-sheng; MA Yut-ian

    2008-01-01

    Copper electrolyte was purified by copper arsenite that was prepared with As2O3. And electrolysis experiments of purified electrolyte were carried out at 235 and 305 A/m2, respectively. The results show that the yield of copper arsenite is up to 98.64% when the molar ratio of Cu to As is 1.5 in the preparation of copper arsenite. The removal rates of Sb and Bi reach 74.11% and 65.60% respectively after copper arsenite is added in electrolyte. The concentrations of As, Sb and Bi in electrolyte nearly remain constant during electrolysis of 13 d. The appearances of cathode copper obtained at 235 and 305 A/m2 are slippery and even, and the qualification rate is 100% according to the Chinese standard of high-pure cathode copper(GB/T467-97).

  17. Novel fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics for nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These materials include refractory alloys based on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as SiC--SiCf; carbon--carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the fuel can lower the center-line temperature and, thereby, enhance power production capabilities and reduce the risk of premature fuel pellet failure. Crystalline silicon carbide has superior characteristics as a structural material from the viewpoint of its thermal and mechanical properties, thermal shock resistance, chemical stability, and low radioactivation. Therefore, there have been many efforts to develop SiC based composites in various forms for use in advanced energy systems. In recent years, with the development of high yield preceramic precursors, the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) method has aroused interest for the fabrication of ceramic based materials, for various applications ranging from disc brakes to nuclear reactor fuels. The pyrolysis of preceramic polymers allow new types of ceramic materials to be processed at relatively low temperatures. The raw materials are element-organic polymers whose composition and architecture can be tailored and varied. The primary focus of this study is to use a pyrolysis based process to fabricate a host of novel silicon carbide-metal carbide or oxide composites, and to synthesize new materials based on mixed-metal silicocarbides that cannot be processed using conventional techniques. Allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), which is an organometal polymer, was used as the precursor for silicon carbide. Inert gas pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous

  18. Development and Processing of Nickel Aluminide-Carbide Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newport, Timothy Scott

    1996-01-01

    With the upper temperature limit of the Ni-based superalloys attained, a new class of materials is required. Intermetallics appear as likely candidates because of their attractive physical properties. With a relatively low density, high thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance, high melting point, and simple crystal structure, nickel aluminide (NiAl) appears to be a potential candidate. However, NiAl is limited in structural applications due to its low room temperature fracture toughness and poor elevated temperature strength. One approach to improving these properties has been through the application of eutectic composites. Researchers have shown that containerless directional solidification of NiAl-based eutectic alloys can provide improvement in both the creep strength and fracture toughness. Although these systems have shown improvements in the mechanical properties, the presence of refractory metals increases the density significantly in some alloys. Lower density systems, such as the carbides, nitrides, and borides, may provide NiAl-based eutectic structure. With little or no information available on these systems, experimental investigation is required. The objective of this research was to locate and develop NiAl-carbide eutectic alloys. Exploratory arc-melts were performed in NiAl-refractory metal-C systems. Refractory metal systems investigated included Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, Mo, Nb, Ta, Ti, W, and Zr. Systems containing carbides with excellent stability (i.e.,HfC, NbC, TaC, TiC, and ZrC) produced large blocky cubic carbides in an NiAl matrix. The carbides appeared to have formed in the liquid state and were randomly distributed throughout the polycrystalline NiAl. The Co, Cr, Fe, Mo, and W systems contained NiAl dendrites with a two-phase interdendritic microconstituent present. Of these systems, the NiAl-Mo-C system had the most promising microstructure for in-situ composites. Three processing techniques were used to evaluate the NiAl-Mo-C system

  19. Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

    2014-11-04

    Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

  20. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR. DENNIS NAGLE; DR. DAJIE ZHANG

    2009-03-26

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm{sup -3} (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  1. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR. DENNIS NAGLE; DR. DAJIE ZHANG

    2009-03-26

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm{sup -3} (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  2. The Effect of Copper

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    higher (p<0.05) in the broodfish fed CSD0 and CSD1 diets than the other diets. Exposure of Clarias gariepinus fish to copper in water, at concentrations above 1.0mg CuSO4/g elicits adverse ... introduction of a toxicant to an aquatic system ..... Toxicity of four commonly used agrochemicals on. Oreochromis niloticus (L) fry.

  3. Presenilin promotes dietary copper uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Southon

    Full Text Available Dietary copper is essential for multicellular organisms. Copper is redox active and required as a cofactor for enzymes such as the antioxidant Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1. Copper dyshomeostasis has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in the presenilin genes encoding PS1 and PS2 are major causes of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease. PS1 and PS2 are required for efficient copper uptake in mammalian systems. Here we demonstrate a conserved role for presenilin in dietary copper uptake in the fly Drosophila melanogaster. Ubiquitous RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the single Drosophila presenilin (PSN gene is lethal. However, PSN knockdown in the midgut produces viable flies. These flies have reduced copper levels and are more tolerant to excess dietary copper. Expression of a copper-responsive EYFP construct was also lower in the midgut of these larvae, indicative of reduced dietary copper uptake. SOD activity was reduced by midgut PSN knockdown, and these flies were sensitive to the superoxide-inducing chemical paraquat. These data support presenilin being needed for dietary copper uptake in the gut and so impacting on SOD activity and tolerance to oxidative stress. These results are consistent with previous studies of mammalian presenilins, supporting a conserved role for these proteins in mediating copper uptake.

  4. Controlling the microstructure of binary carbide films with elemental substitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, K.; Haider, M.; Hodges, A.; Spreng, R.; Posbergh, E.; Woodward, H.; Lofland, S. E.; Hettinger, J. D.; Heon, M.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2011-03-01

    We report on experiments to control the microstructure of textured binary carbide thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputter deposition. Controlling the microstructure in these materials is important as the microstructure of these films provides a template for the resulting carbide-derived carbon (CDC) film and impacts their performance. Specifically, a combinatorial approach is used to add chromium to TiC films creating a compositional gradient as a function of position. We present a measurement of surface roughness as a function of material composition. The resulting materials, (Ti 1-x Cr x) C films, are significantly smoother than their pure TiC counterparts and the resulting CDC's have correlated defects which will improve the performance of the CDC in supercapacitor applications. This work was supported by Rowan University and NSF under contract DMR-0503711.

  5. Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiegs, Terry N.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

  6. PREPARATION OF TANTALUM CARBIDE FROM AN ORGANOMETALLIC PRECURSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. SOUZA

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta2O5.nH2O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, TaC, in the powder form at 1000oC. The natural sintering of TaC powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400°C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to densify the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value.

  7. Preparation of tantalum carbide from an organometallic precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, C.P. [Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Geoquimica. Lab. de Termodinamica e Reatores]. E-mail: carlson at ufrnet.ufrn.br; Favotto, C.; Satre, P.; L' Honore, A.; Roubin, M. [Universite du Toulon et de Var B.P. (France). Equipe der Materiaux a Finalite Specifique. Lab. de Physicochimie du Materiaux et du Milieu Marin]. E-mail: roubin at univ-tln.fr

    1999-03-01

    In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta{sub 2} O{sub 5} nH{sub 2}O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, Ta C, in the powder form at 1000 deg C. The natural sintering of Ta C powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400 deg C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to density the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value. (author)

  8. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.;

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...... melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded...... with boron-containing nanoparticles can hinder the growth of neighboring cells upon neutron irradiation. This could provide the first step toward a T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy....

  9. Determination of thorium in plutonium-thorium oxides and carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, L.F.; Temer, D.J.

    1979-10-01

    Thorium is determined in (PuTh)C and (PuTh)O/sub 2/ by complexometric titration with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) following separation on anion-exchange resin. Carbides are first oxidized by ignition in air at about 800/sup 0/C. Oxide or oxidized carbide samples are dissolved in acids by the sealed-reflux technique or by heating in beakers. The plutonium is selectively sorbed from the 12M hydrochloric acid solution of the fuel on a Bio-Rad AG1-X2 anion-exchange resin column, and the eluted thorium is titrated with EDTA using xylenol orange as the indicator. The average recovery of thorium in 20 samples is 99.98% with a relative standard deviation of 0.07%.

  10. Boron carbide (B4C) coating. Deposition and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizov, E.; Barsuk, V.; Begrambekov, L.; Buzhinsky, O.; Evsin, A.; Gordeev, A.; Grunin, A.; Klimov, N.; Kurnaev, V.; Mazul, I.; Otroshchenko, V.; Putric, A.; Sadovskiy, Ya.; Shigin, P.; Vergazov, S.; Zakharov, A.

    2015-08-01

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material of in-situ protecting coating for tungsten tiles of ITER divertor. To prove this concept the project including investigation of regimes of plasma deposition of B4C coating on tungsten and tests of boron carbide layer in ITER-like is started recently. The paper contends the first results of the project. The results of B4C coating irradiation by the plasma pulses of QSPU-T plasma accelerator are presented. The new device capable of B4C film deposition on tungsten and testing of the films and materials with ITER-like heat loads and ion- and electron irradiation is described. The results of B4C coating deposition and testing of both tungsten substrate and coating are shown and discussed.

  11. Atomic-Level Understanding of "Asymmetric Twins" in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kelvin Y.; An, Qi; Toksoy, M. Fatih; McCauley, James W.; Haber, Richard A.; Goddard, William A.; Hemker, Kevin J.

    2015-10-01

    Recent observations of planar defects in boron carbide have been shown to deviate from perfect mirror symmetry and are referred to as "asymmetric twins." Here, we demonstrate that these asymmetric twins are really phase boundaries that form in stoichiometric B4C (i.e., B12C3 ) but not in B13C2 . TEM observations and ab initio simulations have been coupled to show that these planar defects result from an interplay of stoichiometry, atomic positioning, icosahedral twinning, and structural hierarchy. The composition of icosahedra in B4C is B11C and translation of the carbon atom from a polar to equatorial site leads to a shift in bonding and a slight distortion of the lattice. No such distortion is observed in boron-rich B13C2 because the icosahedra do not contain carbon. Implications for tailoring boron carbide with stoichiometry and extrapolations to other hierarchical crystalline materials are discussed.

  12. Single crystalline boron carbide nanobelts:synthesis and characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Li-Hong; Li Chen; Tian Yuan; Tian Ji-Fa; Hui Chao; Wang Xing-Jun; Shen Cheng-Min; Gao Hong-Jun

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports that the large-scale single crystalline boron carbide nanobelts have been fabricated through a simple carbothermal reduction method with B/B203/C/Fe powder as precursors at ll00~C.Transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction characterizations show that the boron carbide nanobelt has a B4C rhomb-centred hexagonal structure with good crystallization.Electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis indicates that the nanobelt contains only B and C,and the atomic ratio of B to C is close to 4:1.High resolution transmission electron microscopy results show that the preferential growth direction of the nanobelt is [101].A possible growth mechanism is also discussed.

  13. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mukhopadhyay

    2001-04-01

    Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 m and 25 m, and a sintered silicon carbide (SSiC) are reported. The RIF experiments were conducted using a Vicker’s microhardness tester at various loads in the range 1–20 N. Subsequently, the gradual evolution of the damage was characterized using an optical microscope in conjunction with the image analysing technique. The materials were classified in the order of the decreasing resistance against repeated indentation fatigue at the highest applied load of 20 N. It was further shown that there was a strong influence of grain size on the development of resistance against repeated indentation fatigue on the same spot. Finally, the poor performance of the sintered silicon carbide was found out to be linked to its previous thermal history.

  14. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...... melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded...... with boron-containing nanoparticles can hinder the growth of neighboring cells upon neutron irradiation. This could provide the first step toward a T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy....

  15. PARAMETER OPTIMIZATION OF CARBIDIC AUSTEMPERED DUCTILE IRON USING TAGUCHI METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.DHANAPAL

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbidic austempered ductile iron [CADI] is the family of ductile iron containing wear resistance alloy carbides in the ausferrite matrix. This CADI is manufactured by selecting proper material composition through the melting route.In an effort to obtain the optimal production parameters, Taguchi method is applied. To analyse the effect of production parameters on the machanical properties, signal-to-noise (S/N ratio is calculated based on the design ofexperiments and the linear graph. The analysis of varience is calculated to find the amount of contribution of factors on individual mechanical properties and its significancy. The analytical results of taguchi method are compared with the experimental values, and it shows both are identical.

  16. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN; ChangZeng

    2007-01-01

    The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.……

  17. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.

  18. Preparation and electrocatalytic properties of tungsten carbide electrocatalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马淳安; 张文魁; 成旦红; 周邦新

    2002-01-01

    The tungsten carbide(WC) electrocatalysts with definite phase components and high specific surface area were prepared by gas-solid reduction method. The crystal structure, phase components and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared materials were characterized by XRD, BET(Brunauer Emmett and Teller Procedure) and electrochemical test techniques. It is shown that the tungsten carbide catalysts with definite phase components can be obtained by controlling the carburizing conditions including temperature, gas flowing rate and duration time. The electrocatalysts with the major phase of W2C show higher electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrocatalysts with the major phase of WC are suitable to be used as the anodic electrocatalyst for hydrogen anodic oxidation, which exhibit higher hydrogen anodic oxidation electrocatalytic properties in HCl solutions.

  19. Electronic transport properties of the armchair silicon carbide nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Jiuxu; Yang Yintang; Liu Hongxia [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Wide Band Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Guo Lixin [School of Science, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Zhang Zhiyong, E-mail: songjiuxu@126.com [Information Science and Technology Institution, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China)

    2010-11-15

    The electronic transport properties of the armchair silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) are investigated by using the combined nonequilibrium Green's function method with density functional theory. In the equilibrium transmission spectrum of the nanotube, a transmission valley of about 2.12 eV is discovered around Fermi energy, which means that the nanotube is a wide band gap semiconductor and consistent with results of first principle calculations. More important, negative differential resistance is found in its current voltage characteristic. This phenomenon originates from the variation of density of states caused by applied bias voltage. These investigations are meaningful to modeling and simulation in silicon carbide nanotube electronic devices.

  20. Electrical transport and thermoelectric properties of boron carbide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirihara, Kazuhiro; Mukaida, Masakazu; Shimizu, Yoshiki

    2017-04-01

    The electrical transport and thermoelectric property of boron carbide nanowires synthesized by a carbothermal method are reported. It is demonstrated that the nanowires achieve a higher Seebeck coefficient and power factor than those of the bulk samples. The conduction mechanism of the nanowires at low temperatures below 300 K is different from that of the sintered-polycrystalline and single-crystal bulk samples. In a temperature range of 200–450 K, there is a crossover between electrical conduction by variable-range hopping and phonon-assisted hopping. The inhomogeneous carbon concentration and planar defects, such as twins and stacking faults, in the nanowires are thought to modify the bonding nature and electronic structure of the boron carbide crystal substantially, causing differences in the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient. The effect of boundary scattering of phonon at nanostructured surface on the thermal conductivity reduction is discussed.

  1. Synthesis of titanium carbide by induction plasma reactive spray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xian-Liang(蒋显亮); M.Boulos

    2004-01-01

    A novel method capable of sufficient mixing of titanium powder and methane of carbon source was developed in the synthesis of titanium carbide by induction plasma reactive spray. X-ray diffraction analysis, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness test were used to characterize the spray-formed deposit.The experimental results show that both primary carburization of the titanium particles inside the plasma flame and secondary carburization of the growing deposit on high temperature substrate contribute to the forming of titanium carbide. The transitional phase of TiC1-x has the same crystal structure as TiC, but has a slightly low lattice constant. The deposit consists of fine grain structure and large grain structure. The fine grain structure, harder than large grain structure, shows grain boundary fracture.

  2. Room temperature quantum emission from cubic silicon carbide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelletto, Stefania; Johnson, Brett C; Zachreson, Cameron; Beke, David; Balogh, István; Ohshima, Takeshi; Aharonovich, Igor; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-26

    The photoluminescence (PL) arising from silicon carbide nanoparticles has so far been associated with the quantum confinement effect or to radiative transitions between electronically active surface states. In this work we show that cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles with diameters in the range 45-500 nm can host other point defects responsible for photoinduced intrabandgap PL. We demonstrate that these nanoparticles exhibit single photon emission at room temperature with record saturation count rates of 7 × 10(6) counts/s. The realization of nonclassical emission from SiC nanoparticles extends their potential use from fluorescence biomarker beads to optically active quantum elements for next generation quantum sensing and nanophotonics. The single photon emission is related to single isolated SiC defects that give rise to states within the bandgap.

  3. Scalable Quantum Photonics with Single Color Centers in Silicon Carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulaski, Marina; Widmann, Matthias; Niethammer, Matthias; Zhang, Jingyuan Linda; Lee, Sang-Yun; Rendler, Torsten; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G; Son, Nguyen Tien; Janzén, Erik; Ohshima, Takeshi; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Vučković, Jelena

    2017-02-24

    Silicon carbide is a promising platform for single photon sources, quantum bits (qubits), and nanoscale sensors based on individual color centers. Toward this goal, we develop a scalable array of nanopillars incorporating single silicon vacancy centers in 4H-SiC, readily available for efficient interfacing with free-space objective and lensed-fibers. A commercially obtained substrate is irradiated with 2 MeV electron beams to create vacancies. Subsequent lithographic process forms 800 nm tall nanopillars with 400-1400 nm diameters. We obtain high collection efficiency of up to 22 kcounts/s optical saturation rates from a single silicon vacancy center while preserving the single photon emission and the optically induced electron-spin polarization properties. Our study demonstrates silicon carbide as a readily available platform for scalable quantum photonics architecture relying on single photon sources and qubits.

  4. Laser-induced phase separation of silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Insung; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Hyeyoung; Kang, Gyeongwon; Byun, Myunghwan; Kim, Hyungjun; Chitu, Adrian M.; Im, James S.; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Choi, Sung-Yool; Lee, Keon Jae

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the phase separation mechanism of solid-state binary compounds induced by laser-material interaction is a challenge because of the complexity of the compound materials and short processing times. Here we present xenon chloride excimer laser-induced melt-mediated phase separation and surface reconstruction of single-crystal silicon carbide and study this process by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and a time-resolved reflectance method. A single-pulse laser irradiation triggers melting of the silicon carbide surface, resulting in a phase separation into a disordered carbon layer with partially graphitic domains (~2.5 nm) and polycrystalline silicon (~5 nm). Additional pulse irradiations cause sublimation of only the separated silicon element and subsequent transformation of the disordered carbon layer into multilayer graphene. The results demonstrate viability of synthesizing ultra-thin nanomaterials by the decomposition of a binary system.

  5. Preferential killing of cancer cells using silicon carbide quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mognetti, Barbara; Barberis, Alessandro; Marino, Silvia; Di Carlo, Francesco; Lysenko, Vladimir; Marty, Olivier; Géloën, Alain

    2010-12-01

    Silicon carbide quantum dots are highly luminescent biocompatible nanoparticles whose properties might be of particular interest for biomedical applications. In this study we investigated Silicon Carbide Quantum Dots (3C-SiC QDs) cellular localisation and influence on viability and proliferation on oral squamous carcinoma (AT-84 and HSC) and immortalized cell lines (S-G). They clearly localize into the nuclei, but the presence of 3C-SiC QDs in culture medium provoke morphological changes in cultured cells. We demonstrate that 3C-SiC QDs display dose- and time-dependent selective cytotoxicity on cancer versus immortalized cells in vitro. Since one of the limitations of classical antineoplastic drugs is their lack of selectivity, these results open a new way in the search for antiproliferative drugs.

  6. Laser melting of carbide tool surface: Model and experimental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S., E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa [ME Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1913, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Shuja, S.Z.; Khan, S.M.A.; Aleem, A. [ME Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1913, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-09-15

    Laser controlled melting is one of the methods to achieve structural integrity in the surface region of the carbide tools. In the present study, laser heating of carbide cutting tool and temperature distribution in the irradiated region are examined. The phase change process during the heating is modeled using the enthalpy-porosity method. The influence of laser pulse intensity distribution across the irradiated surface ({beta}) on temperature distribution and melt formation is investigated. An experiment is carried out and the microstructural changes due to laser consecutive pulse heating is examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is found that melt depth predicted agrees with the experimental results. The maximum depth of the melt layer moves away from the symmetry axis with increasing {beta}.

  7. Laser melting of carbide tool surface: Model and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Shuja, S. Z.; Khan, S. M. A.; Aleem, A.

    2009-09-01

    Laser controlled melting is one of the methods to achieve structural integrity in the surface region of the carbide tools. In the present study, laser heating of carbide cutting tool and temperature distribution in the irradiated region are examined. The phase change process during the heating is modeled using the enthalpy-porosity method. The influence of laser pulse intensity distribution across the irradiated surface ( β) on temperature distribution and melt formation is investigated. An experiment is carried out and the microstructural changes due to laser consecutive pulse heating is examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is found that melt depth predicted agrees with the experimental results. The maximum depth of the melt layer moves away from the symmetry axis with increasing β.

  8. Process for coating an object with silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A process for coating a carbon or graphite object with silicon carbide by contacting it with silicon liquid and vapor over various lengths of contact time. In the process, a stream of silicon-containing precursor material in gaseous phase below the decomposition temperature of said gas and a co-reactant, carrier or diluent gas such as hydrogen is passed through a hole within a high emissivity, thin, insulating septum into a reaction chamber above the melting point of silicon. The thin septum has one face below the decomposition temperature of the gas and an opposite face exposed to the reaction chamber. The precursor gas is decomposed directly to silicon in the reaction chamber. A stream of any decomposition gas and any unreacted precursor gas from said reaction chamber is removed. The object within the reaction chamber is then contacted with silicon, and recovered after it has been coated with silicon carbide.

  9. Atomic-Level Understanding of "Asymmetric Twins" in Boron Carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kelvin Y; An, Qi; Toksoy, M Fatih; McCauley, James W; Haber, Richard A; Goddard, William A; Hemker, Kevin J

    2015-10-23

    Recent observations of planar defects in boron carbide have been shown to deviate from perfect mirror symmetry and are referred to as "asymmetric twins." Here, we demonstrate that these asymmetric twins are really phase boundaries that form in stoichiometric B(4)C (i.e., B(12)C(3)) but not in B(13)C(2). TEM observations and ab initio simulations have been coupled to show that these planar defects result from an interplay of stoichiometry, atomic positioning, icosahedral twinning, and structural hierarchy. The composition of icosahedra in B(4)C is B(11)C and translation of the carbon atom from a polar to equatorial site leads to a shift in bonding and a slight distortion of the lattice. No such distortion is observed in boron-rich B(13)C(2) because the icosahedra do not contain carbon. Implications for tailoring boron carbide with stoichiometry and extrapolations to other hierarchical crystalline materials are discussed.

  10. CALCIUM CARBIDE: AN EFFICIENT ALTERNATIVE TO THE USE OF ALUMINUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilton Carlos Pinheiro Cardoso Filho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The steel demand for fine applications have increased considerably in the last years, and the criteria for its production are even stricter, mainly in relation to the residual elements content and cleanness required. In relation to the steel cleanness, the main problem faced is the control of the amount and morphology of alumina inclusions, generated in the steel deoxidation with aluminum. Besides harming the products quality, the presence of non metallic inclusions can originate nozzle clogging, and consequently interruptions in the process flux. Aiming to improve the steel cleanness and to minimize nozzle clogging, this study is developed to evaluate the partial substitution of aluminum by calcium carbide in the steel deoxidation. Along the operational procedures, the calcium carbide was applied to 397 heats, through what the improvement in steel cleanness is confirmed, with consequent reduction in the nozzle clogging occurrence.

  11. The local structure of transition metal doped semiconducting boron carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jing; Dowben, P A [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, Behlen Laboratory of Physics, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, PO Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); Luo Guangfu; Mei Waining [Department of Physics, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182-0266 (United States); Kizilkaya, Orhan [J. Bennett Johnston Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Hwy., Baton Rouge LA 70806 (United States); Shepherd, Eric D; Brand, J I [College of Engineering, and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, N209 Walter Scott Engineering Center, 17th and Vine Streets, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0511 (United States)

    2010-03-03

    Transition metal doped boron carbides produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of orthocarborane (closo-1,2-C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) and 3d metal metallocenes were investigated by performing K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements. The 3d transition metal atom occupies one of the icosahedral boron or carbon atomic sites within the icosahedral cage. Good agreement was obtained between experiment and models for Mn, Fe and Co doping, based on the model structures of two adjoined vertex sharing carborane cages, each containing a transition metal. The local spin configurations of all the 3d transition metal doped boron carbides, Ti through Cu, are compared using cluster and/or icosahedral chain calculations, where the latter have periodic boundary conditions.

  12. Effect of carbides on erosion resistance of 23-8-N steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aniruddha A Gadhikar; Ashok Sharma; D B Goel; C P Sharma

    2014-04-01

    Microstructure is one of the most important parameters influencing erosion behaviour of materials. The role of carbides in the matrix is very complicated in controlling the erosion rate of the materials. Conflicting results have been reported in the literature about the effect of carbides on erosion resistance. Carbides are of great importance especially as obstacles against the penetration of erosive particles into the material surface. However, they are susceptible to cracking and causing matrix decohesion which may increase the overall erosion rate. In 23-8-N nitronic steel, carbides present in the form of bands are observed to accelerate the erosion rate. Coarse carbides cause depletion of carbon in the austenite matrix which adversely affects the strain hardening tendency thus causing deterioration in erosion resistance of the bulk material. The dissolution of carbides in the austenitic matrix after solution annealing is observed to improve the erosion resistance of 23-8-N nitronic steel.

  13. Investigation on the Performance of Supported Molybdenum Carbide for the Partial Oxidation of Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanli Zhu; Jian Yang; Jiaxin Wang; Shengfu Ji; Hanqing Wang

    2003-01-01

    The performance of supported and unsupported molybdenum carbide for the partial oxida-tion of methane (POM) to syngas was investigated. An evaluation of the catalysts indicates that bulkmolybdenum carbide has a higher methane conversion during the initial stage but a lower selectivity toCO and H2/CO ratio in the products. The rapid deactivation of the catalyst is also a significant problem.However, the supported molybdenum carbide catalyst shows a much higher methane conversion, increasedselectivity and significantly improved catalytic stability. The characterization by XRD and BET specificarea measurements depict an improved dispersion of molybdenum carbide when using alumina as a carrier.The bulk or the supported molybdenum carbide exists in the β-Mo2C phase, while it is transformed intomolybdenum dioxide postcatalysis which is an important cause of molybdenum carbide deactivation.

  14. Influence of transformation temperature on carbide precipitation sequence during lower bainite formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero, F.G., E-mail: fgc@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Miller, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Materials Science and Technology Division, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6139 (United States); Garcia-Mateo, C. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    The nature of different carbides formed during the lower bainite reaction at different transformation temperatures was determined by atom probe tomography in three steels with different carbon and silicon contents. It is known that steel composition and temperature alter the carbide precipitation sequence during low-temperature bainite formation. However, present results confirm that dislocations in lower bainite that are more prominent at the lower the transformation temperature, trap a substantial amount of carbon and hence, can influence the carbide precipitation sequence and, in particular, can determine where ε-carbide forms before the growth of cementite. - Highlights: • Identification of carbides in lower bainite using atom probe tomography. • Determination of carbon trapping at dislocations in lower bainite. • Carbide precipitation sequence during lower bainite formation.

  15. Microstructural studies of carbides in MAR-M247 nickel-based superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczotok, A.; Rodak, K.

    2012-05-01

    Carbides play an important role in the strengthening of microstructures of nickel-based superalloys. Grain boundary carbides prevent or retard grain-boundary sliding and make the grain boundary stronger. Carbides can also tie up certain elements that would otherwise promote phase instability during service. Various types of carbides are possible in the microstructure of nickel-based superalloys, depending on the superalloy composition and processing. In this paper, scanning electron and scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of carbides occurring in the microstructure of polycrystalline MAR-M247 nickel-based superalloy were carried out. In the present work, MC and M23C6 carbides in the MAR-M247 microstructure were examined.

  16. Phonon spectrum, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Daroca, D., E-mail: pdaroca@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientı´ficas y Técnicas (Argentina); Jaroszewicz, S. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientı´ficas y Técnicas (Argentina); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA (Argentina)

    2013-06-15

    In this work, we study, by means of density functional perturbation theory and the pseudopotential method, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide. These properties are derived from the lattice dynamics in the quasi-harmonic approximation. The phonon spectrum of ThC presented in this article, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been studied, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. We compare mechanical properties, volume thermal expansion and molar specific capacities with previous results and find a very good agreement.

  17. Sintering of nano crystalline silicon carbide doping with aluminium nitride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Datta; A K Bandyopadhyay; B Chaudhuri

    2002-04-01

    Sinterable silicon carbide powders were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type -SiC. Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of aluminium nitride together with carbon. Nearly 99% sintered density was obtained. The mechanism of sintering was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. This study shows that the mechanism is a solid sintering process.

  18. Isotopic effects on the phonon modes in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Kuhlmann, U; Rotter, H W; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-10-01

    The effect of isotopes ((10)B-(11)B; (12)C-(13)C) on the infrared- and Raman-active phonons of boron carbide has been investigated. For B isotopes, the contributions of the virtual crystal approximation, polarization vector and isotopical disorder are separated. Boron and carbon isotope effects are largely opposite to one another and indicate the share of the particular atoms in the atomic assemblies vibrating in specific phonon modes. Some infrared-active phonons behave as expected for monatomic boron crystals.

  19. Photonic Crystal Cavities in Cubic Polytype Silicon Carbide Films

    CERN Document Server

    Radulaski, Marina; Buckley, Sonia; Rundquist, Armand; Provine, J; Alassaad, Kassem; Ferro, Gabriel; Vučković, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of high quality factor and small mode volume planar photonic crystal cavities from cubic (3C) thin films (thickness ~ 200 nm) of silicon carbide (SiC) grown epitaxially on a silicon substrate. We demonstrate cavity resonances across the telecommunications band, with wavelengths from 1250 - 1600 nm. Finally, we discuss possible applications in nonlinear optics, optical interconnects, and quantum information science.

  20. Comparative characteristics of copper, copper chloride, and copper bromide vapor lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazarian, M.A.; Petrash, G.G.; Trofimov, A.N.

    1980-03-01

    The paper reports the results of a comparative study of copper and copper halide vapor lasers emitting in a repetitively-pulsed regime. Copper chloride and copper bromide vapor lasers are found to have identical lasing characteristics under any excitation conditions. These characteristics are different from those of a copper vapor laser. An average lasing power of 13 W has been obtained for all lasers studied for an efficiency of 1%. It is shown that the choice of a laser will largely depend on the laser design suitability for a specific application.

  1. Parallel microwave chemistry in silicon carbide microtiter platforms: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappe, C Oliver; Damm, Markus

    2012-02-01

    In this review, applications of silicon carbide-based microtiter platforms designed for use in combination with dedicated multimode microwave reactors are described. These platforms are employed not only for the efficient parallel synthesis of compound libraries, but also in the context of high-throughput reaction screening/optimization and a number of other (bio)analytical and biomedical applications. Since the semiconducting plate material (silicon carbide) is strongly microwave absorbing and possesses high thermal conductivity, no temperature gradients across the microtiter plate exist. Therefore, many of the disadvantages experienced in attempting to perform microtiter plate chemistry under conventional microwave conditions can be eliminated. In general, the silicon carbide-based microtiter platforms allow sealed vessel processing (either directly in the well or in glass vials placed into the wells) of volumes ranging from 0.02-3.0 mL at a maximum temperature/pressure limit of 200°C/20 bar. Depending on the specific plate and rotor configuration, a maximum of 80-192 transformations can be carried out in parallel in a single microwave irradiation experiment under strict temperature control. A platform type utilizing HPLC/GC vials as reaction vessels allows analysis directly from the reaction vessel eliminating the need for a transfer step from the reaction to the analysis vial. The latter system is particularly useful for analytical applications as well as reaction optimization/screening.

  2. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure–high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C–B–C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  3. Predicted boron-carbide compounds: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De Yu; Yan, Qian; Wang, Bing; Wang, Yuan Xu; Yang, Jueming; Yang, Gui

    2014-06-14

    By using developed particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structural prediction, we have explored the possible crystal structures of B-C system. Their structures, stability, elastic properties, electronic structure, and chemical bonding have been investigated by first-principles calculations with density functional theory. The results show that all the predicted structures are mechanically and dynamically stable. An analysis of calculated enthalpy with pressure indicates that increasing of boron content will increase the stability of boron carbides under low pressure. Moreover, the boron carbides with rich carbon content become more stable under high pressure. The negative formation energy of predicted B5C indicates its high stability. The density of states of B5C show that it is p-type semiconducting. The calculated theoretical Vickers hardnesses of B-C exceed 40 GPa except B4C, BC, and BC4, indicating they are potential superhard materials. An analysis of Debye temperature and electronic localization function provides further understanding chemical and physical properties of boron carbide.

  4. Characterization of a boron carbide-based polymer neutron sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuting; James, Robinson; Dong, Bin; Driver, M. Sky; Kelber, Jeffry A.; Downing, Greg; Cao, Lei R.

    2015-12-01

    Boron is used widely in thin-film solid-state devices for neutron detection. The film thickness and boron concentration are important parameters that relate to a device's detection efficiency and capacitance. Neutron depth profiling was used to determine the film thicknesses and boron-concentration profiles of boron carbide-based polymers grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of ortho-carborane (1,2-B10C2H12), resulting in a pure boron carbide film, or of meta-carborane (1,7-B10C2H12) and pyridine (C5H5N), resulting in a pyridine composite film, or of pyrimidine (C4H4N2) resulting in a pure pyrimidine film. The pure boron carbide film had a uniform surface appearance and a constant thickness of 250 nm, whereas the thickness of the composite film was 250-350 nm, measured at three different locations. In the meta-carborane and pyridine composite film the boron concentration was found to increase with depth, which correlated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)-derived atomic ratios. A proton peak from 14N (n,p)14C reaction was observed in the pure pyrimidine film, indicating an additional neutron sensitivity to nonthermal neutrons from the N atoms in the pyrimidine.

  5. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube - Chromium Carbide Composite Through Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze; Gao, Yibo; Liang, Fei; Wu, Benxin; Gou, Jihua; Detrois, Martin; Tin, Sammy; Yin, Ming; Nash, Philip; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-03-01

    Ceramics often have high hardness and strength, and good wear and corrosion resistance, and hence have many important applications, which, however, are often limited by their poor fracture toughness. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may enhance ceramic fracture toughness, but hot pressing (which is one typical approach of fabricating CNT-ceramic composites) is difficult to apply for applications that require localized heat input, such as fabricating composites as surface coatings. Laser beam may realize localized material sintering with little thermal effect on the surrounding regions. However, for the typical ceramics for hard coating applications (as listed in Ref.[1]), previous work on laser sintering of CNT-ceramic composites with mechanical property characterizations has been very limited. In this paper, research work has been reported on the fabrication and characterization of CNT-ceramic composites through laser sintering of mixtures of CNTs and chromium carbide powders. Under the studied conditions, it has been found that laser-sintered composites have a much higher hardness than that for plasma-sprayed composites reported in the literature. It has also been found that the composites obtained by laser sintering of CNTs and chromium carbide powder mixtures have a fracture toughness that is ~23 % higher than the material obtained by laser sintering of chromium carbide powders without CNTs.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Niobium Carbide and Carbonitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak Soo; Bugli, Guy; Djéga-Mariadassou, Gérald

    1999-01-01

    Unsupported niobium carbide powders of NbC were prepared by carburization of commercial niobium pentoxide in flowing CH4-H2mixtures. Several routes of synthesis were investigated, leading to final carbides with specific surface areas ranging from 10 to 50 m2g-1. During direct carburization, after the first step of reduction of Nb2O5to NbO2, a long induction period which was succeeded by an acceleratory period, was observed for the reduction/carburization to NbC. In the presence of a catalyst of methane decomposition, this induction period was eliminated but the superficial carbon free contamination of the final carbide was increased. However, this contamination can be removed by a reducing treatment and CO chemisorption can be observed. The preparations through niobium oxynitride lead to face-centered cubic carbonitrides with specific surface areas ranging from 27 to 49 m2g-1. Chemical composition and cell parameter of these cabonitrides vary slightly with the synthesis conditions. After a reducing treatment, as for NbC, CO chemisorption was also observed.

  7. Comparative investigation on HVOF sprayed carbide-based coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingxiang; Zhang, Shihong; Li, Mingxi

    2013-05-01

    In this work, WC-17Co, WC-10Co-4Cr, WC-12Co and Cr3C2-25NiCr coatings were deposited on stainless steel using WOKAStar-640 HVOF spraying system. Three WC-based coatings were studied and compared with a chromium carbide-based coating. The microstructure, porosity, micro-hardness, indentation fracture toughness and adhesion strength of the coatings were investigated. The wear test was done by using silica grits as abrasive medium using a load of 20 N. The result shows that HVOF sprayed carbide-based coating possesses low porosity, high micro-hardness and high adhesion strength. Three WC-based coatings have higher micro-hardness and indentation fracture toughness compared to the Cr3C2-25NiCr coating. HVOF sprayed carbide coating has good wear resistance under 500 °C. The decarburization of WC-based coating has great effect on coating wear resistance. In addition, WC-17Co coating has best wear resistance.

  8. Barrier properties of nano silicon carbide designed chitosan nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Gopal C; Dash, Satyabrata; Swain, Sarat K

    2015-12-10

    Nano silicon carbide (SiC) designed chitosan nanocomposites were prepared by solution technique. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for studying structural interaction of nano silicon carbide (SiC) with chitosan. The morphology of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The thermal stability of chitosan was substantially increased due to incorporation of stable silicon carbide nanopowder. The oxygen permeability of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was reduced by three folds as compared to the virgin chitosan. The chemical resistance properties of chitosan were enhanced due to the incorporation of nano SiC. The biodegradability was investigated using sludge water. The tensile strength of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was increased with increasing percentage of SiC. The substantial reduction in oxygen barrier properties in combination with increased thermal stability, tensile strength and chemical resistance properties; the synthesized nanocomposite may be suitable for packaging applications.

  9. Calcium Carbide: A Unique Reagent for Organic Synthesis and Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodygin, Konstantin S; Werner, Georg; Kucherov, Fedor A; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2016-04-01

    Acetylene, HC≡CH, is one of the primary building blocks in synthetic organic and industrial chemistry. Several highly valuable processes have been developed based on this simplest alkyne and the development of acetylene chemistry has had a paramount impact on chemical science over the last few decades. However, in spite of numerous useful possible reactions, the application of gaseous acetylene in everyday research practice is rather limited. Moreover, the practical implementation of high-pressure acetylene chemistry can be very challenging, owing to the risk of explosion and the requirement for complex equipment; special safety precautions need to be taken to store and handle acetylene under high pressure, which limit its routine use in a standard laboratory setup. Amazingly, recent studies have revealed that calcium carbide, CaC2 , can be used as an easy-to-handle and efficient source of acetylene for in situ chemical transformations. Thus, calcium carbide is a stable and inexpensive acetylene precursor that is available on the ton scale and it can be handled with standard laboratory equipment. The application of calcium carbide in organic synthesis will bring a new dimension to the powerful acetylene chemistry.

  10. Silicon Carbide Mounts for Fabry-Perot Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Etalon mounts for tunable Fabry- Perot interferometers can now be fabricated from reaction-bonded silicon carbide structural components. These mounts are rigid, lightweight, and thermally stable. The fabrication of these mounts involves the exploitation of post-casting capabilities that (1) enable creation of monolithic structures having reduced (in comparison with prior such structures) degrees of material inhomogeneity and (2) reduce the need for fastening hardware and accommodations. Such silicon carbide mounts could be used to make lightweight Fabry-Perot interferometers or could be modified for use as general lightweight optical mounts. Heretofore, tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer structures, including mounting hardware, have been made from the low-thermal-expansion material Invar (a nickel/iron alloy) in order to obtain the thermal stability required for spectroscopic applications for which such interferometers are typically designed. However, the high mass density of Invar structures is disadvantageous in applications in which there are requirements to minimize mass. Silicon carbide etalon mounts have been incorporated into a tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer of a prior design that originally called for Invar structural components. The strength, thermal stability, and survivability of the interferometer as thus modified are similar to those of the interferometer as originally designed, but the mass of the modified interferometer is significantly less than the mass of the original version.

  11. Bonding and Integration Technologies for Silicon Carbide Based Injector Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Advanced ceramic bonding and integration technologies play a critical role in the fabrication and application of silicon carbide based components for a number of aerospace and ground based applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. Ceramic to ceramic diffusion bonding and ceramic to metal brazing technologies are being developed for this injector application. For the diffusion bonding, titanium interlayers (PVD and foils) were used to aid in the joining of silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. The influence of such variables as surface finish, interlayer thickness (10, 20, and 50 microns), processing time and temperature, and cooling rates were investigated. Microprobe analysis was used to identify the phases in the bonded region. For bonds that were not fully reacted an intermediate phase, Ti5Si3Cx, formed that is thermally incompatible in its thermal expansion and caused thermal stresses and cracking during the processing cool-down. Thinner titanium interlayers and/or longer processing times resulted in stable and compatible phases that did not contribute to microcracking and resulted in an optimized microstructure. Tensile tests on the joined materials resulted in strengths of 13-28 MPa depending on the SiC substrate material. Non-destructive evaluation using ultrasonic immersion showed well formed bonds. For the joining technology of brazing Kovar fuel tubes to silicon carbide, preliminary development of the joining approach has begun. Various technical issues and requirements for the injector application are addressed.

  12. Reactively sputtered titanium carbide thin films: Preparation and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizenberg, M.; Murarka, S. P.

    1983-06-01

    The low resistivity and refractory nature of titanium carbide makes it potentially useful as a diffusion barrier in thin film metallization schemes. In the present investigation, deposition and properties of thin titanium carbide films have been investigated. The films were deposited by reactive radio frequency sputtering in methane-argon mixtures on a variety of substrates. The effects of methane to argon ratio, total sputtering pressure, and power on the film deposition rate, composition and properties were determined. There were interactive effects of these parameters on the composition and properties of these films. Resistivity increased with carbon content; for Ti/C≥1 it was ˜200 μΩ cm. Stress that was compressive was maximum in the nearly stoichiometric TiC film. Grain size was small in all films, especially so in carbon rich films. All stoichiometric titanium carbide films were resistant to HF solutions. Films with TiC/≥1 dissolved easily in ethylene dinitrilo tetra acetric acid (EDTA) solution.

  13. Carbide-Derived Carbon Films for Integrated Electrochemical Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heon, Min

    Active RFID tags, which can communicate over tens or even hundreds of meters, MEMS devices of several microns in size, which are designed for the medical and pharmaceutical purposes, and sensors working in wireless monitoring systems, require microscale power sources that are able to provide enough energy and to satisfy the peak power demands in those applications. Supercapacitors have not been an attractive candidate for micro-scale energy storage, since most nanoporous carbon electrode materials are not compatible with micro-fabrication techniques and have failed to meet the requirements of high volumetric energy density and small form factor for power supplies for integrated circuits or microelectronic devices or sensors. However, supercapacitors can provide high power density, because of fast charging/discharging, which can enable self-sustaining micro-modules when combined with energy-harvesting devices, such as solar cell, piezoelectric or thermoelectric micro-generators. In this study, carbide-derived carbon (CDC) films were synthesized via vacuum decomposition of carbide substrates and gas etching of sputtered carbide thin films. This approach allowed manufacturing of porous carbon films on SiC and silicon substrates. CDC films were studied for micro-supercapacitor electrodes, and showed good double layer capacitance. Since the gas etching technique is compatible with conventional micro-device fabrication processes, it can be implemented to manufacture integrated on-chip supercapacitors on silicon wafers.

  14. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-18

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  15. Rapid accurate isotopic measurements on boron in boric acid and boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchateau, N L; Verbruggen, A; Hendrickx, F; De Bièvre, P

    1986-04-01

    A procedure is described whereby rapid and accurate isotopic measurements can be performed on boron in boric acid and boron carbide after fusion of these compounds with calcium carbonate. It allows the determination of the isotopic composition of boron in boric acid and boron carbide and the direct assay of boron or the (10)B isotope in boron carbide by isotope-dilution mass spectrometry.

  16. Review on Sintering Process of WC-Co Cemented Carbide in Metal Injection Molding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathabrao, M.; Amin, Sri Yulis M.; Ibrahim, M. H. I.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to give an overview on sintering process of WC-Co cemented carbides in metal injection molding technology. Metal injection molding is an advanced and promising technology in producing cemented nanostructured carbides. Cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) hard metal is known for its high hardness and wear resistance in various applications. Moreover, areas include fine grained materials, alternative binders, and alternative sintering techniques has been discussed in this paper.

  17. Evaluation of Bidirectional Silicon Carbide Solid-State Circuit Breaker v3.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Evaluation of Bidirectional Silicon Carbide Solid-State Circuit Breaker v3.2 by D. Urciuoli ARL-MR-0845 July 2013...Evaluation of Bidirectional Silicon Carbide Solid-State Circuit Breaker v3.2 D. Urciuoli Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...2012 to 20 March 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluation of Bidirectional Silicon Carbide Solid-State Circuit Breaker v3.2 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  18. Synthesis and Photoluminescence Property of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Via Carbothermic Reduction of Silica

    OpenAIRE

    Luo Xiaogang; Ma Wenhui; Zhou Yang; Liu Dachun; Yang Bin; Dai Yongnian

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized at 1400 °C by carbothermic reduction of silica with bamboo carbon under normal atmosphere pressure without metallic catalyst. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silicon carbide nanowires. The results show that the silicon carbide nanowires have a core–shell structure and gr...

  19. An Investigation of Unipolar Arcing Damage on Stainless Steel and Titanium Carbide Coated Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    STAINLESS STEEL AND TITANIUM CARBIDE COATED SURFACES by Michael Thomas Keville and Robert William Lautrup June 1980 Thesis Advisors: F. Schwirzke K.D...rd"ll SU108016) V " 111. ’Cato .: "? : :V lI . An Investigation of Unipolar Arcing Master’s esis Damage on Stainless Steel and Titanium , Carbide Coated...on Stainless Steel and Titanium Carbide Coated Surfaces by Michael Thomas Keville Lieutenant, United States Navy B.S., United States Naval Academy

  20. FORMATION MECHANISM OF TITANIUM CARBIDE CRYSTAL IN LASER SYNTHESIZED METAL-CERAMIC COMPOSITE COATING

    OpenAIRE

    BAOSHUAI DU; ZHONGWEN. ZHANG; XINHONG WANG; ZENGDA ZOU

    2011-01-01

    In situ titanium carbide reinforced iron-based composite coating was deposited on mild carbon steel using laser surface engineering (LSE) with ferrotitanium and graphite as precursor. The microstructure and phase constituents of the deposited coating were characterized. Formation mechanism of titanium carbide crystal in the composite coating was elucidated by correlating the morphology of titanium carbide and the thermal cycle experienced by the precursor during the laser treatment. It was de...

  1. Steam Reforming on Transition-metal Carbides from Density-functional Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2012-05-11

    A screening study of the steam reforming reaction on clean and oxygen covered early transition-metal carbides surfaces is performed by means of density-functional theory calculations. It is found that carbides provide a wide spectrum of reactivities, from too reactive via suitable to too inert. Several molybdenum-based systems are identified as possible steam reforming catalysts. The findings suggest that carbides provide a playground for reactivity tuning, comparable to the one for pure metals.

  2. Extreme-Environment Silicon-Carbide (SiC) Wireless Sensor Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop an integrated silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite capable of in situ measurements of critical characteristics of NTP engine; Compose silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite of: Extreme-environment sensors center, Dedicated high-temperature (450 deg C) silicon-carbide electronics that provide power and signal conditioning capabilities as well as radio frequency modulation and wireless data transmission capabilities center, An onboard energy harvesting system as a power source.

  3. A Study of Current Chopping Characteristics in Metal-Carbide Composite Contact Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kusano, Takashi; Okutomi, Tsutomu; Yokokura, Kunio; Homma, Mitsutaka

    To clarify the effect of carbides on current chopping characteristics chopping current was evaluated for various metalcarbide contact materials. As a result, it was found that the chopping current of metal-carbide contacts was related to the vapor pressure of metals and the work function of carbides. It was also found that the chopping current was reduced by the heat treatment when the melting point of contacts is lower than the temperature of heat teatment.

  4. Nanosized Borides and Carbides for Electroplating. Metal-Matrix Coatings: Specifications, Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Galevskiy, S. G.; Il'yashchenko, D. P.; Kartsev, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper summarizes experience of application of nano-sized carbides and borides of titanium and chromium, silicon carbide as components of electro-depositable coating compositions based on nickel, zinc, and chromium. Basic physical and mechanical properties of the coatings are determined. Technological and economic evaluation is completed; practicability of high-cost nano-diamonds substitution for nano-sized borides and carbides is justified.

  5. Nanosized Borides and Carbides for Electroplating. Metal-Matrix Coatings: Specifications, Performance Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Galevskiy, S. G.; Ilyashchenko, Dmitry Pavlovich; Karthev, Dmitry Sergeevich

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes experience of application of nano-sized carbides and borides of titanium and chromium, silicon carbide as components of electro-depositable coating compositions based on nickel, zinc, and chromium. Basic physical and mechanical properties of the coatings are determined. Technological and economic evaluation is completed; practicability of high-cost nano-diamonds substitution for nano-sized borides and carbides is justified.

  6. Trends in the chemical properties in early transition metal carbide surfaces: A density functional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitchin, J.R.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Barteau, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    are in excellent agreement with experimental values of lattice constants and bulk moduli. The adsorption of atomic hydrogen is used as a probe to compare the chemical properties of various carbide surfaces. Hydrogen adsorbs more strongly to the metal-terminated carbide surfaces than to the corresponding closest......-packed pure metal surfaces, due to the tensile strain induced in the carbide surfaces upon incorporation of carbon into the lattice. Hydrogen atoms were found to adsorb more weakly on carbide surfaces than on the corresponding closest-packed pure metal surfaces only when there were surface carbon atoms...

  7. Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy characterization of boron- and nitrogen-doped 6H silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Liu, Chuan

    2011-01-01

    Boron - and nitrogen-doped 6H silicon carbide epilayers grown on low off-axis 6H silicon carbide substrates have been characterized by photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Combined with secondary ion mass spectrometry results, preferable doping type and optimized concentration could be propo......Boron - and nitrogen-doped 6H silicon carbide epilayers grown on low off-axis 6H silicon carbide substrates have been characterized by photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Combined with secondary ion mass spectrometry results, preferable doping type and optimized concentration could...

  8. Kinetics of niobium carbide coating produced on AISI 1040 steel by thermo-reactive deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ugur

    2004-07-15

    There are a lot of technologically interesting characteristics of niobium carbide coating deposited by pack method which is the production of hard, wear-resistant, oxidation and corrosion resistant coating layer on the steel substrates. In the present study, the growth kinetics of niobium carbide layer deposited by thermo-reactive diffusion techniques in a solid medium on steel samples was reported. Niobium carbide coating treatment was performed on AISI 1040 steels in the powder mixture consisting of ferro-niobium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1073, 1173 and 1273 K for 1-4 h. The presence of NbC and Nb{sub 2}C phases formed on the surface of the steel substrates was confirmed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analyses. Niobium carbide layer thickness ranges from 3.42{+-}0.52 to 11.78{+-}2.29 {mu}m depending upon the treatment time and temperature. Layer growth kinetics was analyzed by measuring the depth of niobium carbide layer as a function of time and temperature. The kinetics of niobium carbide coating by pack method shows a parabolic relationship between carbide layer thickness and treatment time, and the activation energy for the process is estimated to be 91.257 kJ mol{sup -1}. Moreover, an attempt was made to investigate the possibility of predicting the contour diagram of niobium carbide layer variation and to establish some empirical relationships between process parameters and niobium carbide layer thickness.

  9. A New Approach for Refining Carbide Dimensions in M42 Super Hard High-speed Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-feng ZHOU; Wang-long ZHU; Hong-bing JIANG; Feng FANG; Yi-you TU; Jian-qing JIANG

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining small carbides is crucial but difficult for high-speed steels.A new approach for refining carbide dimensions in M42 super hard high-speed steel by increasing cooling rate and spheroidizing treatment was proposed. The morphologies and properties of eutectic carbides formed at different cooling rates were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM),energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS),X-ray diffraction (XRD),transmis-sion electron microscopy (TEM),electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD)and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC).The results show that eutectic carbides change from a lamellar shape into a curved-rod shape as cooling rate increases.Despite different morphologies,the two carbides are both of M2 C type with a hexagonal close-packed structure and display a single crystal orientation in one eutectic colony.The morphology of M2 C mainly depends on the growing process of eutectic carbides,which is strongly influenced by cooling rate.Compared with lamellar car-bides,M2 C carbides with curved-rod shapes are less stable,and decompose into M6 C and MC at lower temperatures. They are more inclined to spheroidize during heating,which ultimately and distinguishably refines the carbide dimen-sions.As small carbides are much easier to dissolve into matrices during austenization,the process described herein improves the supersaturation of alloying elements in martensite,which leads to an increment of hardness in M42 steel.

  10. Precipitation of the Carbides $M_{23}C_{6}$ under the Irradiation by High Energy Heavy Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, A; Semina, V K; Kochanski, T

    2000-01-01

    Carbide M_{23}C_{6} precipitation process in chromium-nickel steels 12H18N9ô and 00H17N14í2 irradiated with high energy heavy Ar^{+6} ions at 625^{o}ó has been studied. It was found that ion irradiation accelerates carbide M_{23}C_{6} precipitation in comparison to thermal annealing. It was shown that composition of carbides formed by irradiation in 00H17N14í2 steel formed under irradiation differs from composition of carbides precipitated during thermal ageing.

  11. Carbide Type Influence on Tribological Properties of Hard Faced Steel Layer - Part I - Theoretical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lazic

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a theoretical review of influence of the most important alloying elements on steel, and review of the most important carbide-forming elements and states the conditions which elements should fulfill in order to be considered as carbide-forming. It primarily involves alloying elements which in the iron-carbon system can form simple, complex or special carbides, i.e. phases of interstitial and substitutive type. It also gives a review of carbide types that are formed during either production or reparatory hard facing of steel parts with different types of filler materials.

  12. Production of ultrahigh purity copper using waste copper nitrate solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J Y; Kim, D S

    2003-04-25

    The production of ultrahigh purity copper (99.9999%) by electrolysis in the presence of a cementation barrier has been attempted employing a waste nitric copper etching solution as the electrolyte. The amount of copper deposited on the cathode increased almost linearly with electrolysis time and the purity of copper was observed to increase as the electrolyte concentration was increased. At some point, however, as the electrolyte concentration increased, the purity of copper decreased slightly. As the total surface area of cementation barrier increased, the purity of product increased. The electrolyte temperature should be maintained below 35 degrees C in the range of investigated electrolysis conditions to obtain the ultrahigh purity copper. Considering that several industrial waste solutions contain valuable metallic components the result of present study may support a claim that electrowinning is a very desirable process for their treatment and recovery.

  13. Characteristics of an optimized active metal cast joint between copper and C/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schedler, B [Technology Centre of PLANSEE SE, A-6600 Reutte (Austria); Huber, T [Technology Centre of PLANSEE SE, A-6600 Reutte (Austria); Friedrich, T [Technology Centre of PLANSEE SE, A-6600 Reutte (Austria); Eidenberger, E [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Kapp, M [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Erich-Schmid-Institute of Material Science, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Scheu, C [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Pippan, R [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Erich-Schmid-Institute of Material Science, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Clemens, H [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2007-03-15

    In this paper, an optimized active metal cast copper to carbon composite (C/C) joint is examined. Mechanical characterization by means of shear and tensile tests as well as fracture toughness measurements at ambient temperature are employed, which show that the obtained values are above those of the reference joint that has been used so far. The phases occurring at the interface region and the fracture surface of the optimized joint are investigated in detail to explain the improved mechanical behaviour. The composition and the morphology at the interface region are analysed by means of scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the crack path is analysed by stereomicroscopy. The improved properties can be explained by the circumstance that the fracture of the optimized joint is not restricted to the interface between the occurring carbide and the C/C but changes between C/C, the carbide to C/C interface and the copper, depending on the local structure in the C/C composite.

  14. Direct multielement trace analyses of silicon carbide powders by spark ablation simultaneous inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiera, Arne F.; Schmidt-Lehr, Sebastian; Song, Ming [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Bings, Nicolas H. [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: bings@chemie.uni-hamburg.de; Broekaert, Jose A.C. [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    A procedure for the direct analysis of silicon carbide powders (SiC) by simultaneous detection inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using a Spectro-CIROS{sup TM} spectrometer (CCD-ICP-OES) and a novel spark ablation system Spectro-SASSy (SA) as sample introduction technique is described. The sample preparation procedure for SA of non-conducting material is based on mixing the sample powders with a conducting matrix, in this case copper and briquetting pellets. Pressing time, pressure and mixing ratio are shown to be important parameters of the pelleting technique with respect to their mechanical stability for the reliability of the analysis results. A mixing ratio of 0.2 g +0.6 g for SiC and Cu, a pressure of 10 t cm{sup -2} and a pressing time of 8 min have been found optimum. It has also been shown that the spark parameters selected are crucial for uniform volatilization. Electron probe micrographs of the burning spots and the analytical signal magnitude showed that a rather hard spark at 100 Hz was optimum. The determination of trace elements in silicon carbide powders is demonstrated using a calibration based on the addition of standard solutions. For Al, Ti, V, Mn and Fe detection limits in the lower {mu}g g{sup -1} range can be achieved. Internal standardization with Y in combination with the addition of standard solutions allows relative standard deviations in the range of 4 to 24% for concentration levels of the order of 3 to 350 {mu}g g{sup -1}.

  15. Tongling:Copper Industry Giant Takes Shape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>Centering on the strategic goal of building "World Copper Capital", Tongling constantly extends its product lines and improves the copper industry chain. Now, the copper industry with a production value of RMB 100 billion has taken shape.As the largest copper wire rod manufacturer in Asia, Tongling Quanwei Copper Technologies Co., Ltd., upon its moving into the local market,

  16. Thermal Analysis of Tantalum Carbide-Hafnium Carbide Solid Solutions from Room Temperature to 1400 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The thermogravimetric analysis on TaC, HfC, and their solid solutions has been carried out in air up to 1400 °C. Three solid solution compositions have been chosen: 80TaC-20 vol % HfC (T80H20, 50TaC-50 vol % HfC (T50H50, and 20TaC-80 vol % HfC (T20H80, in addition to pure TaC and HfC. Solid solutions exhibit better oxidation resistance than the pure carbides. The onset of oxidation is delayed in solid solutions from 750 °C for pure TaC, to 940 °C for the T50H50 sample. Moreover, T50H50 samples display the highest resistance to oxidation with the retention of the initial carbides. The oxide scale formed on the T50H50 sample displays mechanical integrity to prevent the oxidation of the underlying carbide solid solution. The improved oxidation resistance of the solid solution is attributed to the reaction between Ta2O5 and HfC, which stabilizes the volume changes induced by the formation of Ta2O5 and diminishes the generation of gaseous products. Also, the formation of solid solutions disturbs the atomic arrangement inside the lattice, which delays the reaction between Ta and O. Both of these mechanisms lead to the improved oxidation resistances of TaC-HfC solid solutions.

  17. Study on fragmentation and dissolution behavior of carbide in a hot-rolled hypereutectic high chromium cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fei; Jiang, Yehua, E-mail: jiangyehua@kmust.edu.cn; Xiao, Han; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • The method to prepare Carbon steel/High chromium iron is totally new. • High chromium iron can achieve small plastic deformation during hot rolling process. • Carbides in high chromium irons are crushed, refined obviously and becoming isolated, which is benefit to improve the impact toughness. • The carbide fragmentation and dissolution behavior of the hot-rolled HCCI were analyzed. - Abstract: A sandwich-structured composite containing a hypereutectic high chromium cast iron (HCCI) and low carbon steel (LCS) claddings was newly fabricated by centrifugal casting, then the blank was hot-rolled into composite plate. The carbide fragmentation and dissolution behavior of the hot-rolled HCCI were analyzed. During hot rolling, significant refinement of carbides was discovered in hot-rolled HCCI specimens. The carbides were broken and partly dissolved into the austenite matrix. The results show that carbides are firstly dissolved under the action of stress. There are grooves appeared at the boundaries of the carbides. The grooves reduce the cross section of the carbide. When the cross section of the carbide reaches to the required minimum critical cross section, the carbide breaks through the tensile force. After break, carbides continue to dissolve since more interfaces between the matrix and carbides are generated. The secondary carbides precipitated due to the dissolution are index as fcc and stacking faults parallel to the {1 1 1} are observed.

  18. Direct Production of Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorovich, G. S.; Bell, M. C.; Diaz, C. M.; Bell, J. A. E.

    1987-09-01

    The use of commercially pure oxygen in flash smelting a typical chalcopyrite concentrate or a low grade comminuted matte directly to copper produces a large excess of heat. The heat balance is controlled by adjusting the calorific value of the solid feed. A portion of the sulfide material is roasted to produce a calcine which is blended with unroasted material, and the blend is then autogeneously smelted with oxygen and flux directly to copper. Either iron silicate or iron calcareous slags are produced, both being subject to a slag cleaning treatment. Practically all of the sulfur is contained in a continuous stream of SO2 gas, most of which is strong enough for liquefaction. A particularly attractive feature of these technologies is that no radically new metallurgical equipment needs to be developed. The oxygen smelting can be carried out not only in the Inco type flash furnace but in other suitable smelters such as cyclone furnaces. Another major advantage stems from abolishion of the ever-troublesome converter aisle, which is replaced with continuous roasting of a fraction of the copper sulfide feed.

  19. EFFECTS OF MODIFICATION OF THE CARBIDE CHARACTERISTICS THROUGH GRAIN BOUNDARY SERRATION ON CREEP-FATIGUE LIFE IN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.J.Kim; H.U.Hong; K.S.Min; S.W.Nam

    2004-01-01

    Modification of the carbide characteristics through the grain boundary serration is investigated, using an AISI 316 and 304 stainless steels. In both steels, triangular carbides were observed at straight grain boundaries while planar carbides vere observed at the serrated grain boundaries. The serrated grain boundary energy is observed to be much lower than that of the straight one. Therefore, the carbide morphology is found to be changed from triangular to planar along the serrated boundary to reduce the interfacial energy between the carbide and the matrix. The creep-fatigue properties of these steels at 873K have been investigated. The creep-fatigue life of the sample vith planar carbide at the serrated grain boundary was found to be much longer than that with triangular carbide at the straight one. These results imply that the planar carbides with lower interfacial energy have higher cavitation resistance, resulting in the retardation of cavity nucleation and growth to increase creep-fatigue life.

  20. Mechanochemical reactions on copper-based compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castricum, H.L.; Bakker, H.; Poels, E.K.

    1999-01-01

    Mechanochemical reactions of copper and copper oxides with oxygen and carbon dioxide are discussed, as well as decomposition and reduction of copper compounds by mechanical milling under high-vacuum conditions.

  1. Oxidation Mechanism of Copper Selenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskinen, Pekka; Patana, Sonja; Kobylin, Petri; Latostenmaa, Petri

    2014-09-01

    The oxidation mechanism of copper selenide was investigated at deselenization temperatures of copper refining anode slimes. The isothermal roasting of synthetic, massive copper selenide in flowing oxygen and oxygen - 20% sulfur dioxide mixtures at 450-550 °C indicate that in both atmospheres the mass of Cu2Se increases as a function of time, due to formation of copper selenite as an intermediate product. Copper selenide oxidises to copper oxides without formation of thick copper selenite scales, and a significant fraction of selenium is vaporized as SeO2(g). The oxidation product scales on Cu2Se are porous which allows transport of atmospheric oxygen to the reaction zone and selenium dioxide vapor to the surrounding gas. Predominance area diagrams of the copper-selenium system, constructed for selenium roasting conditions, indicate that the stable phase of copper in a selenium roaster gas with SO2 is the sulfate CuSO4. The cuprous oxide formed in decomposition of Cu2Se is further sulfated to CuSO4.

  2. Copper and copper-nickel-alloys - An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klassert, Anton; Tikana, Ladji [Deutsches Kupferinstitut e.V. Am Bonneshof 5, 40474 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    With the increasing level of industrialization the demand for and the number of copper alloys rose in an uninterrupted way. Today, the copper alloys take an important position amongst metallic materials due to the large variety of their technological properties and applications. Nowadays there exist over 3.000 standardized alloys. Copper takes the third place of all metals with a worldwide consumption of over 15 millions tons per year, following only to steel and aluminum. In a modern industrial society we meet copper in all ranges of the life (electro-technology, building and construction industry, mechanical engineering, automotive, chemistry, offshore, marine engineering, medical applications and others.). Copper is the first metal customized by humanity. Its name is attributed to the island Cyprus, which supplied in the antiquity copper to Greece, Rome and the other Mediterranean countries. The Romans called it 'ore from Cyprus' (aes cyprium), later cuprum. Copper deposited occasionally also dapper and could be processed in the recent stone age simply by hammering. Already in early historical time copper alloys with 20 to 50 percent tin was used for the production of mirrors because of their high reflecting power. Although the elementary nickel is an element discovered only recently from a historical perspective, its application in alloys - without any knowledge of the alloy composition - occurred at least throughout the last 2.000 years. The oldest copper-nickel coin originates from the time around 235 B.C.. Only around 1800 AD nickel was isolated as a metallic element. In particular in the sea and offshore technology copper nickel alloys found a broad field of applications in piping systems and for valves and armatures. The excellent combination of characteristics like corrosion resistance, erosion stability and bio-fouling resistance with excellent mechanical strength are at the basis of this success. An experience of many decades supports the use

  3. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blander, Milton; Sinha, Shome N.

    1990-01-01

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  4. Variations of serum copper values in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Vukelić Jelka; Kapamadžija Aleksandra; Petrović Đorđe; Grujić Zorica; Novakov-Mikić Aleksandra; Kopitović Vesna; Bjelica Artur

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Copper is essential micronutrient and has an important role in the human body. The serum copper increases during pregnancy and is doubled at full term. Lower levels of serum copper in pregnancy are connected with some pathological conditions. Objective. The aim of this study was to estimate the levels of serum copper in normal and pathological pregnancies, comparing them with values of serum copper in non-pregnant women, to determine if serum copper is lower in some pathol...

  5. Nickel, copper and cobalt coalescence in copper cliff converter slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to assess the effect of various additives on coalescence of nickel, copper and cobalt from slags generated during nickel extraction. The analyzed fluxes were silica and lime while examined reductants were pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon compound. Slag was settled at the different holding temperatures for various times in conditions that simulated the industrial environment. The newly formed matte and slag were characterized by their chemical composition and morphology. Silica flux generated higher partition coefficients for nickel and copper than the addition of lime. Additives used as reducing agents had higher valuable metal recovery rates and corresponding partition coefficients than fluxes. Microstructural studies showed that slag formed after adding reductants consisted of primarily fayalite, with some minute traces of magnetite as the secondary phase. Addition of 5 wt% of pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon alloys favored the formation of a metallized matte which increased Cu, Ni and Co recoveries. Addition of copper-silicon alloys with low silicon content was efficient in copper recovery but coalescence of the other metals was low. Slag treated with the ferrosilicon facilitated the highest cobalt recovery while copper-silicon alloys with silicon content above 10 wt% resulted in high coalescence of nickel and copper, 87 % and 72 % respectively.

  6. Study of Copper Substitute in High Copper Price Market Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>The high price of copper drives up industry cost,also it is difficult for terminal products to raise price to transfer the cost pressure brought by increase in copper price,as a result downstream consumption markets instead try to seek

  7. Zirconium carbide as an electrocatalyst for the chromous-chromic redox couple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahn, R. F.; Reid, M. A.; Yang, C. Y. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Zirconium carbide is used as a catalyst in a REDOX cell for the oxidation of chromous ions to chromic ions and for the reduction of chromic ions to chromous ions. The zirconium carbide is coated on an inert electronically conductive electrode which is present in the anode fluid of the cell.

  8. Ion-beam-deposited boron carbide coatings for the extreme ultraviolet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstock, G M; Keski-Kuha, R A

    1994-09-01

    The normal-incidence reflectance of ion-beam-deposited boron carbide thin films has been evaluated in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region. High-reflectance coatings have been produced with reflectances greater than 30% between 67 and 121.6 nm. This high reflectance makes ion-beam-deposited boron carbide an attractive coating for EUV applications.

  9. Study of the Process of the Formation of Niobium Carbide on Graphite Particles,

    Science.gov (United States)

    fluid bed. Details were worked out specifically for the deposition of niobium carbide . Curves showing deposit thickness as function of process time and...temperature indicate a diffusion process. X-ray structural analyses established that a uniform deposit of niobium carbide , of nearly stoichiometric composition, was formed about the entire particle surfaces. (Author)

  10. Development of a Robust Tri-Carbide Fueled Reactor for Multimegawatt Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samim Anghaie; Travis W. Knight; Johann Plancher; Reza Gouw

    2004-08-11

    An innovative reactor core design based on advanced, mixed carbide fuels was analyzed for nuclear space power applications. Solid solution, mixed carbide fuels such as (U,Zr,Nb)c and (U,Zr, Ta)C offer great promise as an advanced high temperature fuel for space power reactors.

  11. High temperature stability of Cr-carbides in an experimental Co-Re-based alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherji, Debashis; Klauke, Michael; Roesler, Joachim [Technische Universitaet Braunschweig (Germany). Institut fuer Werkstoffe; Strunz, Pavel [Nuclear Physics Institute and Research Center Rez (Czech Republic); Zizak, Ivo [Berliner Elektronenspeicherring-Gesellschaft fuer Synchrotronstrahlung, Berlin (Germany); Schumacher, Gerhard; Wiedenmann, Albrecht [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    The stability of the microstructure at high temperatures was studied in an experimental Co-Re-based alloy. The experimental alloy is mainly strengthened by Cr-carbides, particularly by those in the form of thin lamellar plates. Electron microscopic investigation on samples exposed for up to 1000 h to temperatures of 1000 and 1200 C showed that Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} type carbides present in the alloy in different morphologies are unstable at these temperatures. It was also observed that the alloy hardness dropped after exposing the samples to elevated temperatures and much of this loss occurred within the first 100 h. In-situ diffraction measurements with synchrotron radiation showed that carbide dissolution started as early as 3 h of holding at 1000 C. Moreover, in-situ small angle neutron scattering results indicated that the carbides at the grain boundaries and the blocky carbides dissolve first and then the thin lamellar carbides. Further, the enrichment of Cr in the Co-matrix phase, which took place due to the dissolution of Cr-carbides, stabilized a Cr-Re-rich {sigma} phase. Although the dissolution of lamellar carbides results in a significant loss of strength, the formation of {sigma} phase with extremely high hardness partly compensated the for loss. The {sigma} phase is stable even at 1200 C. (orig.)

  12. Monolayer Iron Carbide Films on Au(111) as a Fischer–Tropsch Model Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannie, Gilbère; Lammich, Lutz; Li, Yong-Wang;

    2014-01-01

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we characterize the atomic-scale details of ultrathin films of iron carbide (FexCy) on Au(111) synthesized as a potential model system for the active iron carbide phase in iron Fischer–Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts. The experiments show that room...

  13. Square lattice honeycomb tri-carbide fuels for 50 to 250 KN variable thrust NTP design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, Samim; Knight, Travis; Gouw, Reza; Furman, Eric

    2001-02-01

    Ultrahigh temperature solid solution of tri-carbide fuels are used to design an ultracompact nuclear thermal rocket generating 950 seconds of specific impulse with scalable thrust level in range of 50 to 250 kilo Newtons. Solid solutions of tri-carbide nuclear fuels such as uranium-zirconium-niobium carbide. UZrNbC, are processed to contain certain mixing ratio between uranium carbide and two stabilizing carbides. Zirconium or niobium in the tri-carbide could be replaced by tantalum or hafnium to provide higher chemical stability in hot hydrogen environment or to provide different nuclear design characteristics. Recent studies have demonstrated the chemical compatibility of tri-carbide fuels with hydrogen propellant for a few to tens of hours of operation at temperatures ranging from 2800 K to 3300 K, respectively. Fuel elements are fabricated from thin tri-carbide wafers that are grooved and locked into a square-lattice honeycomb (SLHC) shape. The hockey puck shaped SLHC fuel elements are stacked up in a grooved graphite tube to form a SLHC fuel assembly. A total of 18 fuel assemblies are arranged circumferentially to form two concentric rings of fuel assemblies with zirconium hydride filling the space between assemblies. For 50 to 250 kilo Newtons thrust operations, the reactor diameter and length including reflectors are 57 cm and 60 cm, respectively. Results of the nuclear design and thermal fluid analyses of the SLHC nuclear thermal propulsion system are presented. .

  14. Wide-Pulse Evaluation of 0.5 CM2 Silicon Carbide SGTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Silicon carbide Super-GTOs are being pursued by the Army as a replacement for current silicon-based, high-power pulse switches. In this study, 0.5...cm2 silicon carbide SGTOs were evaluated in an RLC pulse circuit which provided a half-sine shaped pulse at a width of 1 ms. The parameters assessed

  15. PREPARATION OF B-MODIFICATION SILICON CARBIDE ALLOYED WITH VARIOUS IMPURITIES,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The beta-modification of silicon carbide can be obtained by any of the following methods: (1) synthesis from silicon and carbon (graphite) at 1400...certain metals, a process based on the substantial temperature variation of the solubility of silicon carbide in fused metals; beta-SiC is obtained in

  16. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE NEW SILICON CARBIDE POLYMORPH 69R,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 69R polymorph is one of the 32 silicon carbide polymorphs recently discovered by us. The space group is R3m and the unit cell is hexagonal with...and in two industrial silicon carbide crystal plates. They all pair with the fundamental type 6H. The five ways of pairing are: 6H + 69R + 87R, 6H

  17. Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy characterization of boron- and nitrogen-doped 6H silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Liu, Chuan

    2011-01-01

    Boron - and nitrogen-doped 6H silicon carbide epilayers grown on low off-axis 6H silicon carbide substrates have been characterized by photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Combined with secondary ion mass spectrometry results, preferable doping type and optimized concentration could...

  18. Probing Structure and Composition of Nickel/Titanium Carbide Hybrid Interfaces at the Atomic Scale (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The transition in structure and composition across the titanium carbide /nickel hybrid interface has been determined at near atomic resolution by...coupling high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with three-dimensional atom probe tomography. The titanium carbide phase adopts a rocksalt-type

  19. Specific Nature of Application of Various Carbon Components for Mechanochemical Synthesis of Titanium Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, V. P.; Yagofarov, V. U.; Gulevskii, D. A.; Filatenkov, A. E.; Mansurov, Yu N.

    2016-08-01

    It has been established that structure of carbon modifications, obtained via pyrolysis of vegetable feed, and ash content of natural graphite are crucial factors during mechanochemical synthesis of titanium carbide under vibratory conditions. The possibility of synthesis of titanium carbide with minimal sulfur content has been shown.

  20. Molecular dynamics investigation of the interaction of dislocations with carbides in BCC Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, F.; Terentyev, D.; Nordlund, K.

    2015-06-01

    Different types of carbides are present in many steels used as structural materials. To safely use steel in demanding environments, like nuclear power plants, it is important to know how defects will affect the mechanical properties of the material. In this study, the effect of carbide precipitates on the edge dislocation movement is investigated. Three different types of carbides were investigated by means of molecular dynamics, with a Tersoff-like bond order interatomic potential by Henriksson et al. The obstacles were 4 nm in diameter and were of Fe3C- (cementite-), Fe23C6- and Cr23C6-type. The critical unpinning stress was calculated for each type at different temperatures, to get the temperature-dependent obstacle strength. The results showed a decreasing critical stress with increasing temperature, consistent with previous studies. The critical unpinning stress was seen to be dependent on the type of carbide, but the differences were small. A difference was also observed between the obstacles with the same structure, but with different composition. This study shows the relation between the existing Cr23C6 carbide and the experimentally non-existing Fe23C6 carbide, which needs to be used as a model system for investigations with interatomic potentials not able to describe the interaction of Cr in the Fe-C-system. We found the difference to be a between 7% and 10% higher critical unpinning stress for the chromium carbide, than for the iron carbide of the same type.

  1. Synthesis of nanoparticles of vanadium carbide in the ferrite of nodular cast iron

    CERN Document Server

    Fras, E; Guzik, E; Lopez, H

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis method of nanoparticles of vanadium carbide in nodular cast iron is presented. After introduction of this method, the nanoparticles with 10-70 nm of diameter was obtained in the ferrite. The diffraction investigations confirmed that these particles are vanadium carbides of type V/sub 3/C/sub 4/.

  2. Structure-performance relations of molybdenum- and tungsten carbide catalysts for deoxygenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stellwagen, D.R.; Bitter, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    This work demonstrates for the first time that carbide particle size is a critical factor for the activity and stability of carbon supported tungsten- and molybdenum carbide catalysts in (hydro-)deoxygenation reactions. The stability of the catalyst was shown to increase for larger particles due to

  3. Method of enhanced lithiation of doped silicon carbide via high temperature annealing in an inert atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersam, Mark C.; Lipson, Albert L.; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Karmel, Hunter J; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2014-05-27

    A method for enhancing the lithium-ion capacity of a doped silicon carbide is disclosed. The method utilizes heat treating the silicon carbide in an inert atmosphere. Also disclosed are anodes for lithium-ion batteries prepared by the method.

  4. Carbide induced reconstruction of monatomic steps on Ni(111) - A density functional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2007-01-01

    sites at the step-edge. It is furthermore possible to extend the carbide with the clock reconstructed geometry onto the upper terrace with a net energy gain compared to adsorption of carbon on unreconstructed close-packed steps or terrace sites on Ni(111). Our findings explain the fact that carbide...

  5. Microstructures and Wear Performance of PTAW Deposited Ni-Based Coatings with Spherical Tungsten Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewei Deng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ni-based coatings with different content of spherical tungsten carbide were deposited by plasma transfer arc welding (PTAW method on 304 austenitic stainless steel sheets in this study. The microstructure and wear property of spherical tungsten carbide particle reinforced composite coatings were investigated by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA and sliding wear test. It is shown that the fraction of spherical tungsten carbides has an important influence on microstructure of Ni-based overlay. The Ni40 overlay consists of γ-Ni dendrites with interdendritic Ni-based eutectics, borides and carbides improving the wear resistance. In the case of composite coatings with different content of tungsten carbide, many new phases are observed, such as Ni2W4C and NiW. In addition, there are a large number of irregular structures in composite coatings, such as acicular structure and irregular stripe organization. The results of sliding wear test indicate that the mass loss of coatings is influenced by the content of tungsten carbide. The mass loss decreases with the increase of tungsten carbide fraction. At high load, the abrasive resistance of composite coating with 60 wt. % tungsten carbide is improved about 50-fold compared to that of Ni40 overlay.

  6. Fixation Property of Copper Triazole Wood Preservatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    According to AWPA E11-2006 standard,copper fixation rates of several copper-based formulations,such as ammoniacal copper,amine copper,and ammoniacal-ethanolamine copper,as well as alkaline copper quaternary(ACQ),were tested and compared in this paper.And the fixation rates of tebuconazole(TEB) and propiconazole(PPZ) in several formulations,such as copper azole,emulsified type and solvent type,were also compared.The determination of copper content in the leachate was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrom...

  7. INTERACTION OF COPPER BASED PRESERVATIVES WITH WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Temiz

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Copper is highly toxic to fungi and the element is widely used in many preservative formulations over 50 years. The interactions of wood and copper-based preservatives impact both the performance and the environment aspects of treated wood. Copper might be present in treated wood as coppercellulose complex, copper-lignin complex, and crystalline or amorphous inorganic/organic copper compounds. In this review; it was aimed to investigate the interactions of wood and copper-based preservatives, Copper Adsorpsion factors and copper forms in treated wood

  8. Promotion of the Growth of Boron-Carbide Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranov, Yanko; Zhang, Daqing; McIlroy, David; Norton, Grant

    2000-03-01

    Boron carbide, is a wide bandgap semiconductor (2.1eV) with a high melting temperature in excess of 2400^circC. Initial studies indicate that nanowires of boron carbide approximately 25 ~30 μm in length and less than 100 nm in diameter can be grown by the technique of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition by a mode of the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism [1] at relatively low temperatures ( ~1150^circC). Through the use of boron based eutectics such as FeB, NiB and PtB nanowire growth at temperatures below 1150^circC. These metal borides have successively lower melting temperatures, respectively. In this paper we will discuss a simple technique for making submicron metal boride particles, as well as a simple means of depositing them onto a surface. In addition, the effect of droplet size on nanowire diameter and the stability of the size of the metal boride droplet during growth will be discussed. These studies demonstrate that the surface can be selectively seeded thereby controlling the location of the nanowires, i.e. select area deposition. Lastly, the techniques and materials used to grow boron carbide nanowires can easily be used to grow other types of nanowires, as well as carbon nanotubes. [1]. D. N. McIlroy, Daqing Zhang, Robert M. Cohen, J. Wharton, Yongjun Geng, M. Grant Norton, G. De Stasio, B.Gilbert, L.Perfetti, J.H.Streiff, B.Broocks and J.L. McHale, Phys. Rev. B 60 (1999) 4874

  9. The Effects of Carbide Characteristics on the Performance of Tungsten Carbide-Based Composite Overlays, Deposited by Plasma-Transferred Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, G.; Wolfe, T.; Meszaros, K.

    2013-06-01

    In Alberta, there are huge quantities of ore processed to remove bitumen from oil sands deposits. The scale of production generates very aggressive tribocorrosive conditions during the mining, extraction, and upgrading processes. It is common to apply tungsten carbide-based composite overlays to improve the reliability and extend service lives of equipment and components. The performance of the applied overlays is largely dependent on the selection of the carbide type and the wear environment. This paper will evaluate overlays containing macrocrystalline, angular eutectic, and spherical eutectic tungsten carbides and discuss the performance of the overlays with a focus on carbide properties and the interactions between the service conditions and the composite material. This discussion will demonstrate how effective selection of protective materials can improve the reliability of oil sands equipment.

  10. Electrocatalytic Activity of Tungsten Trioxide Micro-spheres, Tungsten Carbide Microspheres and Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube-tungsten Carbide Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hongzhi; YAN Taining

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide micropheres were prepared by spray pyrolysis, and tungsten carbidemicrospheres were produced by spray pyrolysis-low temperature reduction and carbonization technology.Multi-walled carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide composites were prepared by the continuous reductionand carbonization process using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and WO_3 precursor by mo-lecular level mixing and calcination. The morphology and structure of the samples were characterized byscanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. Furthermore, the crystal phase was identified by X-ray diffraction. The electrocatalytic activity of the sample was analyzed by means of me-thanol oxidation. Tungsten carbide microspheres were catalytic active for methanol oxidation reaction.Nevertheless tungsten trioxide microspheres and multi-walled carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide compos-ites were not catalytic active for methanol oxidation reaction. These results indicate that tungsten carbide micropheres are promising catalyst for methanol oxidation.

  11. 40 CFR 424.40 - Applicability; description of the covered calcium carbide furnaces with wet air pollution control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... covered calcium carbide furnaces with wet air pollution control devices subcategory. 424.40 Section 424.40... FERROALLOY MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Covered Calcium Carbide Furnaces With Wet Air Pollution Control Devices Subcategory § 424.40 Applicability; description of the covered calcium carbide...

  12. Electroleaching of Copper Waste with Recovery of Copper by Electrodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuñez P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A new process to leach and recover copper from solid waste using electric fields was designed. The leaching with electro migration is presented as an alternative to traditional leaching. Preliminary data indicate that the copper ion migration is facilitated by using the electrical potential difference; therefore applying a potential difference in the processes of leaching facilitates the removal of copper. This is especially useful when mineral concentrations are very low. Different phenomena associated with transport of copper in solution are studied to generate a model able predict the state of the copper ion concentration in time. A kinetic model for the process was developed and fitted very well the experimental data.

  13. Synthesis of copper/copper oxide nanoparticles by solution plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Genki; Hosokai, Sou; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of copper/copper oxide nanoparticles via a solution plasma, in which the effect of the electrolyte and electrolysis time on the morphology of the products was mainly examined. In the experiments, a copper wire as a cathode was immersed in an electrolysis solution of a K2CO3 with the concentration from 0.001 to 0.50 M or a citrate buffer (pH = 4.8), and was melted by the local-concentration of current. The results demonstrated that by using the K2CO3 solution, we obtained CuO nanoflowers with many sharp nanorods, the size of which decreased with decreasing the concentration of the solution. Spherical particles of copper with/without pores formed when the citrate buffer was used. The pores in the copper nanoparticles appeared when the applied voltage changed from 105 V to 130 V, due to the dissolution of Cu2O.

  14. Molybdenum isotopic composition of single silicon carbides from supernovae.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amari, S.; Clayton, R. N.; Davis, A. M.; Lewis, R. S.; Pellin, M. J.

    1999-02-03

    Presolar silicon carbide grains form in a variety of types of stars, including asymptotic giant branch red giant stars and supernovae. The dominant mechanisms of heavy element nucleosynthesis, the s-process and r-process, are thought to occur in AGB stars and supernovae, respectively. We have previously reported that mainstream SiC grains have strong enrichments in the s-process isotopes of Sr, Zr and Mo. We report here the first measurements of Mo isotopes in X-type SiC grains, which have previously been identified as having formed from supernova ejecta.

  15. Research on Diamond Enhanced Tungsten Carbide Composite Button

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    At the present, the cutters used in button bits and rock bits are mainly cobalt tungsten carbide in our country. Because of its low abrasive resistance, the bit service life and drilling efficiency was very low when the hard and extremely hard formations were being drilled. Owing to its high abrasive resistance, the diamond composite material is widely used in drilling operations. However, its toughness against impact is too low to be used in percussion drilling, only can it be used in rotary drilling. In ...

  16. Thermal Properties of Polyimide Composites with Nanostructured Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyona Igorevna Wozniak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of polyimide composites reinforced with different loadings of silicon carbide (SiC nanoparticles are prepared by in-situ polymerization technique. The polyimide (PI matrix resin is derived from 4,4’-oxydianiline (4,4’-ODA and pyromelliticdianhydride (PMDA. The dispersions of SiC nanoparticles are prepared via ultrasonic irradiation or mechanical homogenization. In this method, the SiC nanoparticles are dispersed in diamine solution followed by polymerization with dianhydride. The composites obtained under sonication were found to have lower thermal properties than composites prepared under homogenization.

  17. First-principles study of transition metal carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connétable, Damien

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the physical properties of transition metal carbides compounds associated with the Nb-C, Ti-C, Mo-C and W-C alloys systems using first-principles calculations. The ground-state properties (lattice parameters, cohesive energies and magnetism) were analyzed and compared to the experimental and theoretical literature. The simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental findings concerning atomic positions and structures. Elastic properties, computed using a finite-differences approach, are then discussed in detail. To complete the work, their lattice dynamics properties (phonon spectra) were investigated. These results serve to establish that some structures, which are mechanically stable, are dynamically unstable.

  18. Depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X Q; Tang, Z; Zhang, L; Guo, J J; Jin, C Q; Zhang, Y; Goto, T; McCauley, J W; Chen, M W

    2009-02-20

    We report depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide (B4C) investigated by in situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy. It was found that localized amorphization of B4C takes place during unloading from high pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses play a critical role in the high-pressure phase transition. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the depressurization amorphization results from pressure-induced irreversible bending of C-B-C atomic chains cross-linking 12 atom icosahedra at the rhombohedral vertices.

  19. PROPERTIES OF DEFECTS AND IMPLANTS IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Weilin; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2013-09-25

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor designs, silicon carbide (SiC) under high-energy neutron irradiation undergoes atomic displacement damage and transmutation reactions that create magnesium as one of the major metallic products. The presence of Mg and lattice disorder in SiC is expected to affect structural stability and degrade thermo-mechanical properties that could limit SiC lifetime for service. We have initiated a combined experimental and computational study that uses Mg+ ion implantation and multiscale modeling to investigate the structural and chemical effects in Mg implanted SiC and explore possible property degradation mechanisms.

  20. Crystal structure and electron density distribution in niobium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Will, G.; Platzbecker, R. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Mineralogie und Kristallographie

    2001-09-01

    In this paper the bonding properties, e. g. the charge distribution between the atoms and the deformation of niobium carbide densities have been studied. The crystal studied had the composition NbC{sub 0.98}. Careful and redundant data collection (74 unique reflections out of 2087 reflections measured) gave the basis for a detailed study. IAM models (independent atom model), high order and multipole refinements were made resulting in R values of R=0.4% and R=0.07%. In the corresponding deformation density maps electron accumulations between the niobium atoms were detected, but no bonding to the carbon atoms. (orig.)

  1. Size-Dependence of Infrared Spectra in Niobium Carbide Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubert, V. Alvin; Lewis, Steven P.

    2012-08-01

    Niobium carbide nanocrystals of 1:1 stoichiometry have recently been observed for particle sizes ranging from Nb4C4 to Nb50C50. Infrared (IR) spectroscopic measurements show that a new band of IR vibrational modes appears with increasing particle size at Nb9C9. Using density-functional theory, we show that the vibrational modes in the new band involve structural features present only in nanocrystals with three or more atomic layers in every direction. The Nb9C9 nanocrystal is right at this structural threshold.

  2. Structural Evolution of Silicon Carbide Nanopowders during the Sintering Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Volkova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Processes of sintering of silicon carbide nanopowder were investigated. Values of density (ρ=3.17 g/cm3 and strength (σ=450 MPa were obtained. Within the theory of dispersed systems, the temperature evolution of the materials structure was considered. The relationship between sintering temperature, characteristics of crystal structure and physical properties, in particular, density, and strength of aforementioned ceramics was established. It was concluded that it is necessary to suppress the anomalous diffusion at temperatures above 2080°C.

  3. Tungsten carbide laser alloying of a low alloyed steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Mihai; Taca, Mihaela

    1996-10-01

    Laser alloying is a way to change the composition of metal surfaces in order to improve their corrosion-resistance, high-temperature strength and hardness. The results of a structural and phase analysis of a tungsten carbide based surface layer prepared by laser alloying of a low carbon steel substrate are presented. Structure, phase composition and microhardness of surface alloyed layers have been investigated. The surface of the samples exhibited a thin layer with a different chemical and phase composition. An increase in alloyed surface hardness and wear-resistance was observed.

  4. Temperature Induced Voltage Offset Drifts in Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Nguyen, Vu; Savrun, Ender

    2012-01-01

    We report the reduction of transient drifts in the zero pressure offset voltage in silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors when operating at 600 C. The previously observed maximum drift of +/- 10 mV of the reference offset voltage at 600 C was reduced to within +/- 5 mV. The offset voltage drifts and bridge resistance changes over time at test temperature are explained in terms of the microstructure and phase changes occurring within the contact metallization, as analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results have helped to identify the upper temperature reliable operational limit of this particular metallization scheme to be 605 C.

  5. Formation of titanium carbide coating with micro-porous structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Ge, Shirong; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2010-03-01

    Micro-porous titanium carbide coating was successfully synthesized in a vacuum gas carburizing furnace by using a sequential diffusion technology. The composition and structure of the as-synthesized TiC were examined by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All of the XRD, XPS and GDMS analysis results indicate that carbon atoms effectively diffused into the titanium alloys and formed a uniform acicular TiC coating with micro-porous structure.

  6. Dynamic consolidation of aluminum-silicon carbide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabin, B.H.; Korth, G.E.; Williamson, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic consolidation was investigated as a potential method for producing P/M metal matrix composites. In this study, 2124 aluminum powders were mixed with silicon carbide particulate and consolidated using explosives. Numerical simulations were performed to provide insight into the consolidation process and to aid in the selection of experimental conditions. The microstructure of the as-consolidated product was dependent upon processing variables. Careful control of the shock parameters allowed full density, crack free composites to be achieved in cylindrical geometries. Although full density was obtained, low fracture strengths suggested a lack of interparticle bonding, probably resulting from the limited ability to redistribute surface oxides during consolidation. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Catalytic synthesis of silicon carbide preceramic polymers: Polycarbosilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, D.H.

    1991-11-01

    Polycarbosilanes are the most successful and widely studied class of polymer precursors for silicon carbide, but traditional methods for thier synthesis are inefficient and nonselective. This project is focused on developing transition metal catalysts for the synthesis of polycarbosilanes and other perceramic polymers. In recent work we have developed the first homogeneous transition metal catalysts for the dehydrogenative coupling of simple alkyl silanes to oligomeric and polymeric carbosilanes, H-(SiR{sub 2}CR{prime}{sub 2}){sub n}-SiR{sub 3}. Future work will help elucidate the mechanism of the catalytic process, explore the use of hydrogen acceptors as reaction accelerators, and develop new and more active catalysts.

  8. Synthesis of silicon carbide nanocrystals from waste polytetrafluoroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangbiao; Cheng, Qinglin; Qin, Hengfei; Li, Zhongchun; Lou, Zhengsong; Lu, Juanjuan; Zhang, Junhao; Zhou, Quanfa

    2017-02-28

    Resource utilization of waste plastic could solve the problem of environmental pollution and simultaneously relieve energy shortages, achieving sustainable development. In this study, the conversion of waste polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles has been described. The structures and morphologies of the obtained SiC were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the FTIR spectrum of the obtained SiC sample suggests that the waste PTFE was completely converted into SiC in our approach.

  9. Fundamental Studies and Device Development in Beta Silicon Carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-31

    Vol. 97, p.2 3 3 . 7. MB. Wessels, H. C. Gatos , and A. F. Witt, in Silicon Carbide-1973, edited by R. C. Marshall, J. W. Faust, Jr., and C. E. Ryan...G.F. Kholuyanov and V.E. Chelnokov, Sov. Phys. Semicond. 12, 1372 (1978). 8. E.V. Kalinina, A.V. Suvorov and G.F. Kholuyanov, Soy . Phys. Semicond...Campbell, Solid State Electronics 12L 683 (1974). 17. R. G. Verenchikova, V. 1. Sankin and E. 1. Radovanova, Soy . Phys. Semicond. 12 or 1123 (1983). 18

  10. Growth of Vanadium Carbide by Halide-Activated Pack Diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter;

    The present work investigates growth of vanadium carbide (VC) layers by the pack diffusion method on a Vanadis 6 tool steel. The VC layers were produced by pack diffusion at 1000°C for 1, 4 and 16 hours. The VC layers were characterized with optical and electron microscopy, Vickers hardness tests...... and X-ray diffraction. Homogeneous VC mono-phase layers with Vickers hardness of more than 2400 HV were obtained. Hardening and tempering of the vanadized Vanadis 6 steel did not affect the VC layers....

  11. Synthesis of functional acetylene derivatives from calcium carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhewang; Yu, Dingyi; Sum, Yin Ngai; Zhang, Yugen

    2012-04-01

    AHA Erlebnis: CaC(2), used to produce acetylene until several decades ago, is re-emerging as a cheap, sustainable resource synthesized from coal and lignocellulosic biomass. We report efficient catalytic protocols for the synthesis of functional acetylene derivatives from CaC(2) through aldehyde, alkyne, and amine (AAA) as well as alkyne, haloalkane, and amine (AHA) couplings, and in addition demonstrate its use in click and Sonogashira chemistry, showing that calcium carbide is a sustainable and cost-efficient carbon source.

  12. Band Anticrossing in Dilute Germanium Carbides Using Hybrid Functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Stephenson, Chad A; Qi, Meng; Penninger, Michael; Schneider, William; Wistey, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Dilute germanium carbides (Ge1-xCx) offer a direct bandgap for compact silicon photonics, but widely varying results have been reported. This work uses ab initio simulations with HSE06 hybrid functionals and spin-orbit coupling to study the band structure behavior in the absence of defects. Contrary to Vegard's law, the conduction band minimum at k=0 is consistently found to decrease with increasing C content, while L and X valleys remain nearly unchanged. A vanishing bandgap was observed for all alloys with x>0.017. Conduction bands deviate from a constant-potential band anticrossing model except near the center of the Brillouin zone.

  13. ROLE OF GRAIN BOUNDARY CARBIDES IN CRACKING BEHAVIOR OF Ni BASE ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEONG SIK HWANG

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC of Alloy 600 in a PWR has been reported in the control rod drive mechanism (CRDM, pressurizer instrumentation, and the pressurizer heater sleeves. Recently, two cases of boric acid precipitation that indicated leaking of the primary cooling water were reported on the bottom head surface of steam generators (SG in Korea. The PWSCC resistance of Ni base alloys which have intergranular carbides is higher than those which have intragranular carbides. Conversely, in oxidized acidic solutions like sodium sulfate or sodium tetrathionate solutions, the Ni base alloys with a lot of carbides at the grain boundaries and shows less stress corrosion cracking (SCC resistance. The role of grain boundary carbides in SCC behavior of Ni base alloys was evaluated and effect of intergranular carbides on the SCC susceptibility were reviewed from the literature.

  14. Sintering behavior of alumina-niobium carbide ceramics from polymer-filler mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acchar, W.; Wolff, D.M.B. [Programa de Doutorado em Engenharia e Ciencia dos Materiais-UFRN, Univ. Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); S. Dantas, A.C. da [Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica-UFRN, Univ. Federal do Rio Grande do Norte - Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Studies have been developed in the literature to obtain alternative ceramic cutting tools with better properties as tungsten carbide and silicon nitride. Results have showed that the addition of titanium carbide, tungsten carbide or niobium carbide has improved the wear resistance and hardness of alumina. This work presents a study about preparation and characterization of an alumina reinforced with niobium carbide. The composite material is produced using polymer-filler mixtures. Samples with 60 wt.% polysiloxane and a mixture of 40 wt.% of niobium and alumina powder were mixed, uniaxially pressed at 200 C and sintered in flowing argon at 1200 C, 1400 C and 1600 C. The composite materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), density measurements, fracture strength and microstructural analysis. The 60 wt% polymer+40 wt% Nb showed the presence of new crystalline phases such as NbC, Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and Nb{sub 3}Si. (orig.)

  15. Synthesis and Photoluminescence Property of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Via Carbothermic Reduction of Silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaogang; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Dachun; Yang, Bin; Dai, Yongnian

    2009-11-11

    Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized at 1400 degrees C by carbothermic reduction of silica with bamboo carbon under normal atmosphere pressure without metallic catalyst. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silicon carbide nanowires. The results show that the silicon carbide nanowires have a core-shell structure and grow along direction. The diameter of silicon carbide nanowires is about 50-200 nm and the length from tens to hundreds of micrometers. The vapor-solid mechanism is proposed to elucidate the growth process. The photoluminescence of the synthesized silicon carbide nanowires shows significant blueshifts, which is resulted from the existence of oxygen defects in amorphous layer and the special rough core-shell interface.

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties of WC-Ni-Al based cemented carbides developed for engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Edmilson O.; Santos, Julio N. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, Minas Gerais (Brazil). Inst. de Engenharia Mecanica; Klein, Aloisio N. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2011-11-15

    In this paper the influence of the Ni binder metal and Al as an additional alloying element on the microstructure and mechanical properties of WC-based cemented carbides processed by conventional powder metallurgy was studied. Microstructural examinations of the cemented carbides with 3 and 5 wt.% of Al in the binder metal indicated the presence of a very low and evenly distributed porosity as well as the presence of islands of metal binder in the microstructure. With the cemented carbide with 7 wt.% of Al in the metal binder, the presence of brittle needle-like regions was observed. The WC particles inside these regions were rounded and had a larger mean free path. Vickers hardness and flexural strength tests indicated that the cemented carbide WC-Ni - Al with addition of 5 wt.% of Al in the binder metal presented bulk hardness similar to the conventional WC-Co cemented carbides as well as superior flexure strength and fracture toughness. (orig.)

  17. Studies of copper transport in mammalian cells using copper radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camakaris, J.; Voskoboinik, I.; Brooks, H.; Greenough, M. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia). Department of Genetics; Smith, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Radiopharmaceuticals Division; Mercer, J. [Deakin University, Clayton, VIC (Australia). Centre of Cellular and Molecular Biology

    1998-12-31

    The trace element copper poses a major problem for all organisms. It is essential as a number of vital enzymes require it. Copper deficiency can lead to neurological disorders, osteoporosis and weakening of arteries. However Cu is also highly toxic and homeostatic mechanisms have evolved to maintain Cu at levels which satisfy requirements but do not cause toxicity. Toxicity is mediated by the oxidative capacity of Cu and its ability to generate toxic free radicals. There are several acquired and inherited diseases due to either Cu toxicity or Cu deficiency. The study of these diseases facilitates identification of genes and proteins involved in copper homeostasis, and this in turn will provide rational therapeutic approaches. Using the copper radioisotopes {sup 64}Cu (t1/2 = 12.8 hr) and {sup 67}Cu (t1/2 = 61 hr) we have developed a number of systems for studying copper transport in mammalian cells. These include investigation of copper uptake, copper efflux and ligand blot assays for Cu-binding proteins. Our studies have focused on Menkes disease which is an inherited and usually lethal copper deficiency disorder in humans. We have demonstrated that the Menkes protein is directly involved as a copper efflux pump in mammalian cells. Using cells overexpressing the Menkes protein we have provided the first biochemical evidence that this functions as a Cu translocating (across the membrane) P-type ATPase (Voskoboinik et al., FEBS Letters, in press). These studies were carried out using purified plasma membrane vesicles. We are now carrying out structure- function studies on this protein using targeted mutations and assaying using the radiocopper vesicle assay. Recently we have commenced studies on the role of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in copper transport and relationship of this to Alzheimers disease

  18. A Plasmodium falciparum copper-binding membrane protein with copper transport motifs

    OpenAIRE

    Choveaux David L; Przyborski Jude M; Goldring JP

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Copper is an essential catalytic co-factor for metabolically important cellular enzymes, such as cytochrome-c oxidase. Eukaryotic cells acquire copper through a copper transport protein and distribute intracellular copper using molecular chaperones. The copper chelator, neocuproine, inhibits Plasmodium falciparum ring-to-trophozoite transition in vitro, indicating a copper requirement for malaria parasite development. How the malaria parasite acquires or secretes copper st...

  19. Nanocrystalline copper based microcomposites

    OpenAIRE

    J.P. Stobrawa; Z.M. Rdzawski; W. Głuchowski; J. Domagała-Dubiel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to investigate microstructure, mechanical properties and deformation behavior of copper microcomposites: Cu- Y2O3, Cu- ZrO2 and Cu-WC produced by powder metallurgy techniques.Design/methodology/approach: Tests were made with Cu-Y2O3, Cu-ZrO2 and Cu-WC microcomposites containing up to 2% of a strengthening phase. The materials were fabricated by powder metallurgy techniques, including milling of powders, followed by their compacting and sintering. The main mec...

  20. The Bauschinger Effect in Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Bøcker; Brown, L .M.; Stobbs, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the Bauschinger effect in pure copper shows that by comparison with dispersion hardened copper the effect is very small and independent of temperature. This suggests that the obstacles to flow are deformable. A simple composite model based on this principle accounts for the data semi...

  1. Development of refractory armored silicon carbide by infrared transient liquid phase processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinoki, Tatsuya; Snead, Lance L.; Blue, Craig A.

    2005-12-01

    Tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) were coated on silicon carbide (SiC) for use as a refractory armor using a high power plasma arc lamp at powers up to 23.5 MW/m 2 in an argon flow environment. Both tungsten powder and molybdenum powder melted and formed coating layers on silicon carbide within a few seconds. The effect of substrate pre-treatment (vapor deposition of titanium (Ti) and tungsten, and annealing) and sample heating conditions on microstructure of the coating and coating/substrate interface were investigated. The microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The mechanical properties of the coated materials were evaluated by four-point flexural tests. A strong tungsten coating was successfully applied to the silicon carbide substrate. Tungsten vapor deposition and pre-heating at 5.2 MW/m 2 made for a refractory layer containing no cracks propagating into the silicon carbide substrate. The tungsten coating was formed without the thick reaction layer. For this study, small tungsten carbide grains were observed adjacent to the interface in all conditions. In addition, relatively large, widely scattered tungsten carbide grains and a eutectic structure of tungsten and silicon were observed through the thickness in the coatings formed at lower powers and longer heating times. The strength of the silicon carbide substrate was somewhat decreased as a result of the processing. Vapor deposition of tungsten prior to powder coating helped prevent this degradation. In contrast, molybdenum coating was more challenging than tungsten coating due to the larger coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch as compared to tungsten and silicon carbide. From this work it is concluded that refractory armoring of silicon carbide by Infrared Transient Liquid Phase Processing is possible. The tungsten armored silicon carbide samples proved uniform, strong, and capable of withstanding thermal fatigue testing.

  2. Effects of copper(II) and copper oxides on THMs formation in copper pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Qu, Jiuhui; Liu, Huijuan; Hu, Chengzhi

    2007-08-01

    Little is known about how the growth of trihalomethanes (THMs) in drinking water is affected in copper pipe. The formation of THMs and chlorine consumption in copper pipe under stagnant flow conditions were investigated. Experiments for the same water held in glass bottles were performed for comparison. Results showed that although THMs levels firstly increased in the presence of chlorine in copper pipe, faster decay of chlorine as compared to the glass bottle affected the rate of THMs formation. The analysis of water phase was supplemented by surface analysis of corrosion scales using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX). The results showed the scales on the pipe surface mainly consisted of Cu(2)O, CuO and Cu(OH)(2) or CuCO(3). Designed experiments confirmed that the fast depletion of chlorine in copper pipe was mainly due to effect of Cu(2)O, CuO in corrosion scales on copper pipe. Although copper(II) and copper oxides showed effect on THMs formation, the rapid consumption of chlorine due to copper oxide made THM levels lower than that in glass bottles after 4h. The transformations of CF, DCBM and CDBM to BF were accelerated in the presence of copper(II), cupric oxide and cuprous oxide. The effect of pH on THMs formation was influenced by effect of pH on corrosion of copper pipe. When pH was below 7, THMs levels in copper pipe was higher as compared to glass bottle, but lower when pH was above 7.

  3. Copper: From neurotransmission to neuroproteostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Opazo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Copper is critical for the Central Nervous System (CNS development and function. In particular, different studies have shown the effect of copper at brain synapses, where it inhibits Long Term Potentation (LTP and receptor pharmacology. Paradoxically, according to recent studies copper is required for a normal LTP response. Copper is released at the synaptic cleft, where it blocks glutamate receptors, which explain its blocking effects on excitatory neurotransmission. Our results indicate that copper also enhances neurotransmission through the accumulation of PSD95 protein, which increase the levels of AMPA receptors located at the plasma membrane of the post-synaptic density. Thus, our findings represent a novel mechanism for the action of copper, which may have implications for the neurophysiology and neuropathology of the CNS. These data indicate that synaptic configuration is sensitive to transient changes in transition metal homeostasis. Our results suggest that copper increases GluA1 subunit levels of the AMPA receptor through the anchorage of AMPA receptors to the plasma membrane as a result of PSD-95 accumulation. Here, we will review the role of copper on neurotransmission of CNS neurons. In addition, we will discuss the potential mechanisms by which copper could modulate neuronal proteostasis (neuroproteostasis in the CNS with focus in the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, which is particularly relevant to neurological disorders such Alzheimer’s disease (AD where copper and protein dyshomeostasis may contribute to neurodegeneration. An understanding of these mechanisms may ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to control metal and synaptic alterations observed in AD patients.

  4. Low-temperature synthesis of silicon carbide powder using shungite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubernat, A.; Pichor, W.; Lach, R.; Zientara, D.; Sitarz, M.; Springwald, M.

    2017-07-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation the novel and simple method of synthesis of silicon carbide. As raw material for synthesis was used shungite, natural mineral rich in carbon and silica. The synthesis of SiC is possible in relatively low temperature in range 1500–1600°C. It is worth emphasising that compared to the most popular method of SiC synthesis (Acheson method where the temperature of synthesis is about 2500°C) the proposed method is much more effective. The basic properties of products obtained from different form of shungite and in wide range of synthesis temperature were investigated. The process of silicon carbide formation was proposed and discussed. In the case of synthesis SiC from powder of raw materials the product is also in powder form and not requires any additional process (crushing, milling, etc.). Obtained products are pure and after grain classification may be used as abrasive and polishing powders. (Author)

  5. Low-temperature synthesis of silicon carbide powder using shungite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Gubernat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of investigation the novel and simple method of synthesis of silicon carbide. As raw material for synthesis was used shungite, natural mineral rich in carbon and silica. The synthesis of SiC is possible in relatively low temperature in range 1500–1600 °C. It is worth emphasising that compared to the most popular method of SiC synthesis (Acheson method where the temperature of synthesis is about 2500 °C the proposed method is much more effective. The basic properties of products obtained from different form of shungite and in wide range of synthesis temperature were investigated. The process of silicon carbide formation was proposed and discussed. In the case of synthesis SiC from powder of raw materials the product is also in powder form and not requires any additional process (crushing, milling, etc.. Obtained products are pure and after grain classification may be used as abrasive and polishing powders.

  6. Cavity-Enhanced Measurements of Defect Spins in Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calusine, Greg; Politi, Alberto; Awschalom, David D.

    2016-07-01

    The identification of new solid-state defect-qubit candidates in widely used semiconductors has the potential to enable the use of nanofabricated devices for enhanced qubit measurement and control operations. In particular, the recent discovery of optically active spin states in silicon carbide thin films offers a scalable route for incorporating defect qubits into on-chip photonic devices. Here, we demonstrate the use of 3C silicon carbide photonic crystal cavities for enhanced excitation of color-center defect spin ensembles in order to increase measured photoluminescence signal count rates, optically detected magnetic-resonance signal intensities, and optical spin initialization rates. We observe an up to a factor of 30 increase in the photoluminescence and optically detected magnetic-resonance signals from Ky5 color centers excited by cavity-resonant excitation and increase the rate of ground-state spin initialization by approximately a factor of 2. Furthermore, we show that the 705-fold reduction in excitation mode volume and enhanced excitation and collection efficiencies provided by the structures can be used to overcome inhomogenous broadening in order to facilitate the study of defect-qubit subensemble properties. These results highlight some of the benefits that nanofabricated devices offer for engineering the local photonic environment of color-center defect qubits to enable applications in quantum information and sensing.

  7. Frequency mixing in boron carbide laser ablation plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oujja, M.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Sanz, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Martín, M.; Nalda, R. de, E-mail: r.nalda@iqfr.csic.es; Castillejo, M.

    2015-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two-color frequency mixing has been studied in a laser ablation boron carbide plasma. • A space- and time-resolved study mapped the nonlinear optical species in the plasma. • The nonlinear process maximizes when charge recombination is expected to be completed. • Neutral atoms and small molecules are the main nonlinear species in this medium. • Evidence points to six-wave mixing as the most likely process. - Abstract: Nonlinear frequency mixing induced by a bichromatic field (1064 nm + 532 nm obtained from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser) in a boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) plasma generated through laser ablation under vacuum is explored. A UV beam at the frequency of the fourth harmonic of the fundamental frequency (266 nm) was generated. The dependence of the efficiency of the process as function of the intensities of the driving lasers differs from the expected behavior for four-wave mixing, and point toward a six-wave mixing process. The frequency mixing process was strongly favored for parallel polarizations of the two driving beams. Through spatiotemporal mapping, the conditions for maximum efficiency were found for a significant delay from the ablation event (200 ns), when the medium is expected to be a low-ionized plasma. No late components of the harmonic signal were detected, indicating a largely atomized medium.

  8. Stress envelope of silicon carbide composites at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozawa, Takashi, E-mail: nozawa.takashi67@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Kim, Sunghun [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ozawa, Kazumi; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    To identify a comprehensive stress envelope, i.e., strength anisotropy map, of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite (SiC/SiC composite) for practical component design, tensile and compressive tests were conducted using the small specimen test technique specifically tailored for high-temperature use. In-plane shear properties were, however, estimated using the off-axial tensile method and assuming that the mixed mode failure criterion, i.e., Tsai–Wu criterion, is valid for the composites. The preliminary test results indicate no significant degradation to either proportional limit stress (PLS) or fracture strength by tensile loading at temperatures below 1000 °C. A similarly good tolerance of compressive properties was identified at elevated temperatures, except for a slight degradation in PLS. With the high-temperature test data of tensile, compressive and in-plane shear properties, the stress envelopes at elevated temperatures were finally obtained. A slight reduction in the design limit was obvious at elevated temperatures when the compressive mode is dominant, whereas a negligibly small impact on the design is expected by considering the tensile loading case.

  9. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-01

    We report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. Using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor, we synthesized 70-250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. The material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250-1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  10. Development of the SOFIA silicon carbide secondary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit, Michel; Antoine, Pascal; Varin, Jean-Luc; Bittner, Hermann; Erdmann, Matthias

    2003-02-01

    The SOFIA telescope is ajoint NASA-DLR project for a 2.5 m airborne Stratospheric Observatory for IR Astronomy to be flown in a specially adapted Boeing 747 SP plane, Kayser-Threde being resopinsible for the development of the Telescope Optics. The φ 352 mm Secondary Mirror is mounted ona chopping mechanism to allow avoidance of background noise during IR observations. Stiffness associated to lightness is a major demand for such a mirror to achieve high frequency chopping. This leads to select SIlicon Carbide for the mirror blank. Its development has been run by the ASTRIUM/BOOSTEC joint venture SiCSPACE, taking full benefit of the instrinsic properties of the BOOSTEC SiC-100 sintered material, associated to qualified processes specifically developed for space borne mirrors by ASTRIUM. Achieved performances include a low mass of 1.97 kg, a very high stiffness with a first resonant frequency of 1865 Hz and a measured optical surface accuracy of 39 nm rms, using Ion Beam Figuring. It is proposed here to present the major design features of the SOFIA Secondary Mirror, highlighting the main advantages of using Silicon Carbide, the main steps of its development and the achieved optomechanical performances of the developed mirror.

  11. Genesis Silicon Carbide Concentrator Target 60003 Preliminary Ellipsometry Mapping Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, M. J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis concentrator was custom designed to focus solar wind ions primarily for terrestrial isotopic analysis of O-17/O-16 and O-18/O-16 to +/-1%, N-15/N-14 to +/-1%, and secondarily to conduct elemental and isotopic analysis of Li, Be, and B. The circular 6.2 cm diameter concentrator target holder was comprised of four quadrants of highly pure semiconductor materials that included one amorphous diamond-like carbon, one C-13 diamond, and two silicon carbide (SiC). The amorphous diamond-like carbon quadrant was fractured upon impact at Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR), but the remaining three quadrants survived fully intact and all four quadrants hold an important collection of solar wind. The quadrants were removed from the target holder at NASA Johnso n Space Center Genesis Curation Laboratory in April 2005, and have been housed in stainless steel containers under continual nitrogen purge since time of disintegration. In preparation for allocation of a silicon carbide target for oxygen isotope analyses at UCLA, the two SiC targets were photographed for preliminary inspection of macro particle contamination from the hard non-nominal landing as well as characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry to evaluate thin film contamination. This report is focused on Genesis SiC target sample number 60003.

  12. Cobalt exposure in a carbide tip grinding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, A I; Horstman, S W; Daniell, W E; Atallah, R

    1992-03-01

    Reports relating hard metal disease or nonspecific respiratory symptoms to tungsten or cobalt exposure have been published in the past 20 yr. This report discusses a work site investigation of a small company, employing approximately 50 workers, producing carbide tip saw blades for the woodworking industry. Cobalt exposure was characterized by ambient air monitoring (area and personnel), particle size determination, and biological monitoring. Area sampling for cadmium, cobalt, and tungsten indicated low ambient air levels in all manufacturing areas except the grinding department, which had cobalt air levels approaching the threshold limit value of 0.05 mg/m3. Area airborne cobalt exposure levels measured over six shifts in the grinding department ranged from 0.017 to 0.12 mg/m3 for the total collection method and 0.002 to 0.028 mg/m3 for the method collecting respirable particles. Cobalt content in the total and respirable fractions was similar. Urine monitoring indicated production workers have elevated cobalt levels, and the grinders' levels were higher than other production workers. The grinding coolant was found to have elevated cobalt concentrations. A survey of coolants from nine carbide grinding shops indicated the elevated cobalt concentrations may be common.

  13. Catalytic Conversion of Syngas into Higher Alcohols over Carbide Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2012-01-01

    of carbonaceous deposits on the catalyst. At the same general activity level Li, K, and Cs provide similar promotional effects for Mo2C, although K at a loading level of alkali metal/Mo = 0.164 mol/mol provides the better behavior at equal conditions. The effect of further additives on the K2CO3/Mo2C system......This work investigates the use of the bulk carbides Mo2C, WC, and NbC as catalysts for the conversion of syngas into higher alcohols. K2CO3/WC produces mainly CH3OH and CH4 with a low activity. NbC has a very low activity in CO hydrogenation. K2CO3/Mo2C produces mixed alcohols with a reasonable...... activity and selectivity. In a 94 h test the activity and the specific surface area of the K2CO3/Mo2C catalyst decreased significantly, but X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy did not indicate a strong sintering of the carbide. A likely cause for the deactivation is the formation...

  14. Microstructural Evolution of Chloride-Cleaned Silicon Carbide Aluminum Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeosun, S. O.; Akpan, E. I.; Gbenebor, O. P.; Balogun, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    This study examines the synergy between reinforcement surface modifications on the evolution of microstructures of AA6011-silicon carbide particle (SiCp) composites in multidirectional solidification. Silicon carbide particles (SiCp) were cleaned with ammonium chloride, tin(II) chloride, sodium chloride, and palladium(II) chloride and used as reinforcement to cast AA6011-SiCp composites by applying the stir casting method. A scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffractometer were used to investigate the morphology and phases present, respectively, in the composite material. Results show that wetting agents were effective as they inhibited the formation of Al4C3 in all modified composites. The modified SiCp was found to have varying effects on the morphology, dendrite arm size and direction, size and configuration of AlFeSi, and the amount of eutectic silicon depending on the concentration of the reagent and cleaning time. The highest effect was shown by the use of 40 g/L of tin(II) chloride. The composites had short dendritic arms, good interfacial interaction, and only a few crystals of AlFeSi.

  15. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources: a nominal 300 Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28 Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt (kW) discharge power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300 to 500 Volts (V) to the thruster. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall effect thruster. The performance of the unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97%. The unit was also tested with a 12.5kW Hall effect thruster to verify compatibility and output filter specifications. With space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power devices, this would provide a design solution to address the need for high power electric propulsion systems.

  16. Usability of calcium carbide gas pressure method in hydrological sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsoy, S.; Ozgur, M.; Keskin, E.; Yilmaz, C.

    2013-10-01

    Soil moisture is a key engineering variable with major influence on ecological and hydrological processes as well as in climate, weather, agricultural, civil and geotechnical applications. Methods for quantification of the soil moisture are classified into three main groups: (i) measurement with remote sensing, (ii) estimation via (soil water balance) simulation models, and (iii) measurement in the field (ground based). Remote sensing and simulation modeling require rapid ground truthing with one of the ground based methods. Calcium carbide gas pressure (CCGP) method is a rapid measurement procedure for obtaining soil moisture and relies on the chemical reaction of the calcium carbide reagent with the water in soil pores. However, the method is overlooked in hydrological science applications. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the usability of the CCGP method in comparison with standard oven-drying and dielectric methods in terms of accuracy, time efficiency, operational ease, cost effectiveness and safety for quantification of the soil moisture over a wide range of soil types. The research involved over 250 tests that were carried out on 15 different soil types. It was found that the accuracy of the method is mostly within ±1% of soil moisture deviation range in comparison to oven-drying, and that CCGP method has significant advantages over dielectric methods in terms of accuracy, cost, operational ease and time efficiency for the purpose of ground truthing.

  17. Carbide-based fuel system for undersea vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, A. Alan; Carreiro, Louis G.; Greene, Eric S. [Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport (NUWCDIVNPT), 1176 Howell Street, Building 1302/2, Newport, RI 02841 (United States)

    2008-01-21

    In underwater applications such as unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) propulsion, mass and volume constraints often dictate system energy density and specific energy, which are targeted to exceed 300 Wh L{sup -1} and 300 Wh kg{sup -1}, respectively, in order to compete with state-of-the-art battery technologies. To address this need, a novel carbide-based fuel system (CFS) intended for use with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is under development that is capable of achieving these energy metrics as well as sequestering carbon dioxide. The proposed CFS uses calcium carbide and calcium hydride that react with water to generate acetylene and hydrogen as the fuel and calcium hydroxide as a carbon dioxide scrubber. The acetylene is hydrogenated to ethane and then reformed to syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) before being utilized by the SOFC. Carbon dioxide effluent from the SOFC is reacted with the calcium hydroxide to produce a storable solid, calcium carbonate, thus eliminating gas evolution from the UUV. A system configuration is proposed and discussion follows concerning energy storage metrics, operational parameters and preliminary safety analysis. (author)

  18. Carbide-based fuel system for undersea vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, A. Alan; Carreiro, Louis G.; Greene, Eric S.

    In underwater applications such as unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) propulsion, mass and volume constraints often dictate system energy density and specific energy, which are targeted to exceed 300 Wh L -1 and 300 Wh kg -1, respectively, in order to compete with state-of-the-art battery technologies. To address this need, a novel carbide-based fuel system (CFS) intended for use with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is under development that is capable of achieving these energy metrics as well as sequestering carbon dioxide. The proposed CFS uses calcium carbide and calcium hydride that react with water to generate acetylene and hydrogen as the fuel and calcium hydroxide as a carbon dioxide scrubber. The acetylene is hydrogenated to ethane and then reformed to syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) before being utilized by the SOFC. Carbon dioxide effluent from the SOFC is reacted with the calcium hydroxide to produce a storable solid, calcium carbonate, thus eliminating gas evolution from the UUV. A system configuration is proposed and discussion follows concerning energy storage metrics, operational parameters and preliminary safety analysis.

  19. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-decorated silicon carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Sevak; Solanki, Ankit

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen storage for fuel cell is an active area of research and appropriate materials with excellent hydrogen adsorption properties are highly demanded. Nanotubes, having high surface to volume ratio, are promising storage materials for hydrogen. Recently, silicon carbide nanotubes have been predicted as potential materials for future hydrogen storage application, and studies in this area are ongoing. Here, we report a systematic study on hydrogen adsorption properties in metal (Pt, Ni and Al) decorated silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) using first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The hydrogen adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of adsorption energy, electronic band structure, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that hydrogen adsorptions on Pt, Ni and Al-decorated SiCNTs undergo spontaneous exothermic reactions with significant modulation of electronic structure of SiCNTs in all cases. Importantly, according to the Mulliken charge population analysis, dipole-dipole interaction causes chemisorptions of hydrogen in Pt, Ni and Al decorated SiCNTs with formation of chemical bonds. The study is a platform for the development of metal decorated SiCNTs for hydrogen adsorption or hydrogen storage application.

  20. Demonstration of Minimally Machined Honeycomb Silicon Carbide Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, William

    2012-01-01

    Honeycomb silicon carbide composite mirrors are made from a carbon fiber preform that is molded into a honeycomb shape using a rigid mold. The carbon fiber honeycomb is densified by using polymer infiltration pyrolysis, or through a reaction with liquid silicon. A chemical vapor deposit, or chemical vapor composite (CVC), process is used to deposit a polishable silicon or silicon carbide cladding on the honeycomb structure. Alternatively, the cladding may be replaced by a freestanding, replicated CVC SiC facesheet that is bonded to the honeycomb. The resulting carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide honeycomb structure is a ceramic matrix composite material with high stiffness and mechanical strength, high thermal conductivity, and low CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion). This innovation enables rapid, inexpensive manufacturing. The web thickness of the new material is less than 1 millimeter, and core geometries tailored. These parameters are based on precursor carbon-carbon honeycomb material made and patented by Ultracor. It is estimated at the time of this reporting that the HoneySiC(Trademark) will have a net production cost on the order of $38,000 per square meter. This includes an Ultracor raw material cost of about $97,000 per square meter, and a Trex silicon carbide deposition cost of $27,000 per square meter. Even at double this price, HoneySiC would beat NASA's goal of $100,000 per square meter. Cost savings are estimated to be 40 to 100 times that of current mirror technologies. The organic, rich prepreg material has a density of 56 kilograms per cubic meter. A charred carbon-carbon panel (volatile organics burnt off) has a density of 270 kilograms per cubic meter. Therefore, it is estimated that a HoneySiC panel would have a density of no more than 900 kilograms per cubic meter, which is about half that of beryllium and about onethird the density of bulk silicon carbide. It is also estimated that larger mirrors could be produced in a matter of weeks

  1. Fabrication and densification enhancement of SiC-particulate-reinforced copper matrix composites prepared via the sinter-forging process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammadmehdi Shabani; Mohammad Hossein Paydar; Mohammad Mohsen Moshksar

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication of copper (Cu) and copper matrix silicon carbide (Cu/SiCp) particulate composites via the sinter-forging process was investigated. Sintering and sinter-forging processes were performed under an inert Ar atmosphere. The influence of sinter-forging time, tempera-ture, and compressive stress on the relative density and hardness of the prepared samples was systematically investigated and subsequently com-pared with that of the samples prepared by the conventional sintering process. The relative density and hardness of the composites were enhanced when they were prepared by the sinter-forging process. The relative density values of all Cu/SiCp composite samples were observed to decrease with the increase in SiC content.

  2. Jiangxi Copper Corporation Builds 900,000-Ton Copper Production Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>The Eastward Refined Copper Expansion Pro- ject of Guixi Smelting Plant under Jiangxi Copper Corporation has output its first lot of Copper cathode,marking the company’s pos- session of a 900,000-ton copper production ca- pacity.Thus the company further strengthens its position as the top 3 of the copper world.

  3. Secondary Copper Industry Entered Rapid Growth Period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    In China’s copper output,secondary copper accounts for about 40%,for power cable industry,the usage percentage of secondary copper is about 50%.Under the favorable policy of the government to vigorously support recycling industry,secondary copper rod enterprises begin to expand,and are confident toward the industry’s potentials.

  4. Unravelling the Chemical Nature of Copper Cuprizone

    OpenAIRE

    Messori, L.; Casini, A.; C.Gabbiani; Sorace, L.; Muniz-Miranda, M.; Zatta, P

    2007-01-01

    During the last 50 years, formation of the highly chromogenic copper cuprizone complex has been exploited for spectrophotometric determinations of copper although the precise chemical nature of the resulting species has never been ascertained; we eventually show here, in contrast to current opinion, that copper cuprizone is a copper(III) complex.

  5. Studies of the composition and reactivity of carbon species generated through laser vaporization of graphite, tantalum carbide and tungsten carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortman, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    Vapor compositions above graphite, tantalum carbide, and tungsten carbide together with the chemical reactions of C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/ and C/sub 3/ were studied by the techniques of CW laser vaporization, matrix isolation, and FTIR spectroscopy. The carbon species were scavenged by cocondensing reactive gases (N/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, CO and H/sub 2/O) with the vapors of graphitic samples in argon or nitrogen matrices. Products were identified from their infrared spectra. Photolysis and annealing studies were also conducted to detect reaction intermediates, formation of carbon clusters, and metastable C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/, and C/sub 3/ adducts with the added reactants. From these experiments, CO was shown to be potentially the most useful scavenger molecule, since it reacted with both C/sub 1/ and C/sub 2/ to form C/sub 2/O and C/sub 3/O, respectively. CO also reacted with C/sub 3/ to form an adduct, which rearranges upon photolysis to form C/sub 4/O, a previously unknown molecule. Its identity was confirmed by isotopic studies and comparison of its vibrations to those of related molecules, C/sub 3/O, C/sub 2/O, and CO.

  6. Semiconducting boron carbides with better charge extraction through the addition of pyridine moieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Elena; Dong, Bin; Peterson, George; Silva, Joseph P.; Wilson, Ethiyal R.; Sky Driver, M.; Jun, Young-Si; Stucky, Galen D.; Knight, Sean; Hofmann, Tino; Han, Zhong-Kang; Shao, Nan; Gao, Yi; Mei, Wai-Ning; Nastasi, Michael; Dowben, Peter A.; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2016-09-01

    The plasma-enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) co-deposition of pyridine and 1,2 dicarbadodecaborane, 1,2-B10C2H12 (orthocarborane) results in semiconducting boron carbide composite films with a significantly better charge extraction than plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited semiconducting boron carbide synthesized from orthocarborane alone. The PECVD pyridine/orthocarborane based semiconducting boron carbide composites, with pyridine/orthocarborane ratios ~3:1 or 9:1 exhibit indirect band gaps of 1.8 eV or 1.6 eV, respectively. These energies are less than the corresponding exciton energies of 2.0 eV-2.1 eV. The capacitance/voltage and current/voltage measurements indicate the hole carrier lifetimes for PECVD pyridine/orthocarborane based semiconducting boron carbide composites (3:1) films of ~350 µs compared to values of  ⩽35 µs for the PECVD semiconducting boron carbide films fabricated without pyridine. The hole carrier lifetime values are significantly longer than the initial exciton decay times in the region of ~0.05 ns and 0.27 ns for PECVD semiconducting boron carbide films with and without pyridine, respectively, as suggested by the time-resolved photoluminescence. These data indicate enhanced electron-hole separation and charge carrier lifetimes in PECVD pyridine/orthocarborane based semiconducting boron carbide and are consistent with the results of zero bias neutron voltaic measurements indicating significantly enhanced charge collection efficiency.

  7. Secondary Copper Consumption and Location in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> China is short of copper resources and is alsothe second largest copper consuming country inthe world.The way to overcome the contradic-tion between the resource shortage and fastgrowth in consumption is to import copper rawmaterial in large quantities.Since the 1990’s,China’s import quantity of copper scrap hasincreased considerably.During the last twoyears,China has imported copper scrap worthof US$2.25 billion,1.32 times of the value ofimported copper concentrates in the same pe-riod.China is one of the biggest copper scrap

  8. On carbide dissolution in an as-cast ASTM F-75 alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudillo, M; Herrera-Trejo, M; Castro, M R; Ramírez, E; González, C R; Juárez, J I

    2002-02-01

    The solution treatment of an as-cast ASTM F-75 alloy was investigated. Microstructural evolution was followed during thermal processing, in particular with regard to the content and type of carbides formed. To evidence any probable carbide transformations occurring during the heating stage, as well as to clarify their effect on the carbide dissolution kinetics, three heating rates were studied. Image analysis and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used for microstructural characterization. For the identification of precipitates, these were electrolytically extracted from the matrix and then analyzed by X-ray diffraction. It was found that the precipitates in the as-cast alloy were constituted by both a M(23)C(6) carbide and a sigma intermetallic phase. The M(23)C(6) carbide was the only phase identified in solution-treated specimens, regardless of the heating rate employed, which indicated that this carbide dissolved directly into the matrix without being transformed first into an M(6)C carbide, as reported in the literature. It was found that the kinetics of dissolution for the M(23)C(6) carbide decreased progressively during the solution treatment, and that it was sensitive to the heating rate, decreasing whenever the latter was decreased. Because the M(23)C(6) carbide was not observed to suffer a phase transformation prior to its dissolution into the matrix, the effect of the heating rate was associated to the morphological change occurred as the specimens were heated. The occurrence of the observed phases was analyzed with the aid of phase diagrams computed for the system Co-Cr-Mo-C.

  9. SOLID SOLUTION CARBIDES ARE THE KEY FUELS FOR FUTURE NUCLEAR THERMAL PROPULSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Binayak; Hickman, Robert R.; Shah, Sandeep

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion uses nuclear energy to directly heat a propellant (such as liquid hydrogen) to generate thrust for space transportation. In the 1960 s, the early Rover/Nuclear Engine for Rocket Propulsion Application (NERVA) program showed very encouraging test results for space nuclear propulsion but, in recent years, fuel research has been dismal. With NASA s renewed interest in long-term space exploration, fuel researchers are now revisiting the RoverMERVA findings, which indicated several problems with such fuels (such as erosion, chemical reaction of the fuel with propellant, fuel cracking, and cladding issues) that must be addressed. It is also well known that the higher the temperature reached by a propellant, the larger the thrust generated from the same weight of propellant. Better use of fuel and propellant requires development of fuels capable of reaching very high temperatures. Carbides have the highest melting points of any known material. Efforts are underway to develop carbide mixtures and solid solutions that contain uranium carbide, in order to achieve very high fuel temperatures. Binary solid solution carbides (U, Zr)C have proven to be very effective in this regard. Ternary carbides such as (U, Zr, X) carbides (where X represents Nb, Ta, W, and Hf) also hold great promise as fuel material, since the carbide mixtures in solid solution generate a very hard and tough compact material. This paper highlights past experience with early fuel materials and bi-carbides, technical problems associated with consolidation of the ingredients, and current techniques being developed to consolidate ternary carbides as fuel materials.

  10. An Introduction to Copper Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    There are 11 genetic types of copper deposit in China, three of which (porphyry,contact metasomatic and VMS types) are the most important. The copper deposits distribute widely both temporally and spatially in China. The features of copper ores in China are mostly poor in copper tenor and complex in metal associated. The copper metallogeny in China predominantly occurs in three metallogenic megadomains, namely the circum-Pacific, the paleo-Asian and the Tethys-Himalayan.

  11. Characterization of silicon carbide and diamond detectors for neutron applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, M.; Lohstroh, A.; Sellin, P.; Thomas, D.

    2017-10-01

    The presence of carbon atoms in silicon carbide and diamond makes these materials ideal candidates for direct fast neutron detectors. Furthermore the low atomic number, strong covalent bonds, high displacement energies, wide bandgap and low intrinsic carrier concentrations make these semiconductor detectors potentially suitable for applications where rugged, high-temperature, low-gamma-sensitivity detectors are required, such as active interrogation, electronic personal neutron dosimetry and harsh environment detectors. A thorough direct performance comparison of the detection capabilities of semi-insulating silicon carbide (SiC–SI), single crystal diamond (D–SC), polycrystalline diamond (D–PC) and a self-biased epitaxial silicon carbide (SiC–EP) detector has been conducted and benchmarked against a commercial silicon PIN (Si–PIN) diode, in a wide range of alpha (Am-241), beta (Sr/Y-90), ionizing photon (65 keV to 1332 keV) and neutron radiation fields (including 1.2 MeV to 16.5 MeV mono-energetic neutrons, as well as neutrons from AmBe and Cf-252 sources). All detectors were shown to be able to directly detect and distinguish both the different radiation types and energies by using a simple energy threshold discrimination method. The SiC devices demonstrated the best neutron energy discrimination ratio (E\\max (n=5 MeV)/E\\max (n=1 MeV)  ≈5), whereas a superior neutron/photon cross-sensitivity ratio was observed in the D–PC detector (E\\max (AmBe)/E\\max (Co-60)  ≈16). Further work also demonstrated that the cross-sensitivity ratios can be improved through use of a simple proton-recoil conversion layer. Stability issues were also observed in the D–SC, D–PC and SiC–SI detectors while under irradiation, namely a change of energy peak position and/or count rate with time (often referred to as the polarization effect). This phenomenon within the detectors was non-debilitating over the time period tested (> 5 h) and, as such, stable

  12. Rapid Fabrication of Carbide Matrix/Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian E.; Bernander, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Composites of zirconium carbide matrix material reinforced with carbon fibers can be fabricated relatively rapidly in a process that includes a melt infiltration step. Heretofore, these and other ceramic matrix composites have been made in a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process that takes months. The finished products of the CVI process are highly porous and cannot withstand temperatures above 3,000 F (approx.1,600 C). In contrast, the melt-infiltration-based process takes only a few days, and the composite products are more nearly fully dense and have withstood temperatures as high as 4,350 F (approx.2,400 C) in a highly oxidizing thrust chamber environment. Moreover, because the melt- infiltration-based process takes much less time, the finished products are expected to cost much less. Fabrication begins with the preparation of a carbon fiber preform that, typically, is of the size and shape of a part to be fabricated. By use of low-temperature ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the carbon fibers in the preform are coated with one or more interfacial material(s), which could include oxides. The interfacial material helps to protect the fibers against chemical attack during the remainder of the fabrication process and against oxidation during subsequent use; it also enables slippage between the fibers and the matrix material, thereby helping to deflect cracks and distribute loads. Once the fibers have been coated with the interfacial material, the fiber preform is further infiltrated with a controlled amount of additional carbon, which serves as a reactant for the formation of the carbide matrix material. The next step is melt infiltration. The preform is exposed to molten zirconium, which wicks into the preform, drawn by capillary action. The molten metal fills most of the interstices of the preform and reacts with the added carbon to form the zirconium carbide matrix material. The zirconium does not react with the underlying fibers because they

  13. Electrochemical isolation of intermetallic and carbide phases from nickel-base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shul' ga, A.V.; Nikishanov, V.V.; Ofitserov, A.V.

    1988-01-01

    Parameters of carbide phases were examined to find the optimum conditions for isolating intermetallic and carbide phases from complex nickel-base alloys. Conditions for an electrochemical isolation of the phases are chosen on the basis of polarization curves for the matrix and phases to be isolated. Electrochemical studies were performed with a potentiostat and data from x-ray analyses of the phases are tabulated. Two electrolytes were developed, the first for isolating carbide phases from nickel matrix and from nickel-base superalloys and the second electrolyte isolates intermetallic phases.

  14. Effect of boron carbide on primary crystallization of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In the paper results of the influence of boron carbide (B4C as inoculant of abrasion-resisting chromium cast iron (about 2,8% carbon and 18% chromium on primary crystallization researches are presented. Boron carbide dispersion was introduced at the bottom of pouring ladle before tap of liquid cast iron. In this investigations were used three different quantities of inoculant in amounts 0,1%; 0,2% and 0,3% with relation to bath weight. It has been demonstrated that such small additions of boron carbide change primary crystallization parameters, particularly temperature characteristic of process, their time and kinetics.

  15. Priority compositions of boron carbide crystals obtained by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, V. I.; Konovalikhin, S. V.; Kovalev, I. D.; Vershinnikov, V. I.

    2015-09-01

    Splitting of reflections from boron carbide has been found for the first time by an X-ray diffraction study of polycrystalline mixture of boron carbide В15- х С х , (1.5 ≤ x ≤ 3) and its magnesium derivative C4B25Mg1.42. An analysis of reflection profiles shows that this splitting is due to the presence of boron carbide phases of different compositions in the sample, which are formed during crystal growth. The composition changes from В12.9С2.1 to В12.4С2.6.

  16. Diffusion and Creep in Niobium Carbide as a Function of Temperature and Carbon Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-05

    I AD-AOa 857 NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV RALEIGH DEPT OF ENGINEERIN- ETC F/6 7/2 I DIFFUSION AND CREEP IN NIOBIUM CARBIDE AS A FUN4CTION OF TEM4PERA...relationship is givet, by Q/TIM 36ca]/K where Tm is the absolute melting point of the metal. Using Tm = 3873K for niobium carbide , the Q is found to be...Davis, "Hot Isosttic Pressing of Niobium Carbide ," to be submitted J. Mat. Sc. and Eng. *Referred Publications IV. Particinatinq_ Scientific Personnel 1

  17. Effect of the Carbides and Matrix on the Wear Resistance of Nodular Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gumienny

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the abrasive wear resistance of selected types of nodular cast iron, including ADI, cooperating with quartz sand and 100 grit abrasive paper. It has been shown that carbides in nodular cast iron cause an increase in wear resistance of 6 to 12% depending on the surface fraction of the carbides and type of the matrix. For the same unit pressure the mass loss of the cast iron cooperating with quartz sand is many times larger than the cast iron cooperating with abrasive paper. For both abrasives the highest wear resistance showed nodular cast iron with upper and lower bainite and carbides.

  18. Methods of depositing an alpha-silicon-carbide-containing film at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habermehl, Scott D.

    2017-01-17

    Described methods are useful for depositing a silicon carbide film including Alpha-SiC at low temperatures (e.g., below about 1400.degree. C.), and resulting multi-layer structures and devices. A method includes introducing a chlorinated hydrocarbon gas and a chlorosilicon gas into a reaction chamber, and reacting the chlorinated hydrocarbon gas with the chlorosilicon gas at a temperature of less than about 1400.degree. C. to grow the silicon carbide film. The silicon carbide film so-formed includes Alpha-SiC.

  19. Handbook of refractory carbides and nitrides properties, characteristics, processing and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pierson, Hugh O

    1996-01-01

    Refractory carbides and nitrides are useful materials with numerous industrial applications and a promising future, in addition to being materials of great interest to the scientific community. Although most of their applications are recent, the refractory carbides and nitrides have been known for over one hundred years. The industrial importance of the refractory carbides and nitrides is growing rapidly, not only in the traditional and well-established applications based on the strength and refractory nature of these materials such as cutting tools and abrasives, but also in new and promising fields such as electronics and optoelectronics.

  20. Role of silicon dangling bonds in the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridene, Mohamed; Kha, Calvin S; Flipse, Cees F J

    2016-03-29

    In this paper, we study the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene (EG) on silicon carbide by means of ab initio calculations based on the local spin density approximation + U method taking into account the Coulomb interaction between Si localized electrons. We show that this interaction is not completely suppressed but is screened by carbon layers grown on-top of silicon carbide. This finding leads to a good qualitative understanding of the experimental results reported on EG on silicon carbide. Our results highlight the presence of the Si localized states and might explain the anomalous Hanle curve and the high values of spin relaxation time in EG.