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Sample records for copolymer modified cement

  1. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

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    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  2. Morphological studies on block copolymer modified PA 6 blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindl, M.; Bonten, C.

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies show that compounding polyamide 6 (PA 6) with a PA 6 polyether block copolymers made by reaction injection molding (RIM) or continuous anionic polymerization in a reactive extrusion process (REX) result in blends with high impact strength and high stiffness compared to conventional rubber blends. In this paper, different high impact PA 6 blends were prepared using a twin screw extruder. The different impact modifiers were an ethylene propylene copolymer, a PA PA 6 polyether block copolymer made by reaction injection molding and one made by reactive extrusion. To ensure good particle matrix bonding, the ethylene propylene copolymer was grafted with maleic anhydride (EPR-g-MA). Due to the molecular structure of the two block copolymers, a coupling agent was not necessary. The block copolymers are semi-crystalline and partially cross-linked in contrast to commonly used amorphous rubbers which are usually uncured. The combination of different analysis methods like atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) gave a detailed view in the structure of the blends. Due to the partial cross-linking, the particles of the block copolymers in the blends are not spherical like the ones of ethylene propylene copolymer. The differences in molecular structure, miscibility and grafting of the impact modifiers result in different mechanical properties and different blend morphologies.

  3. A new method to analyze copolymer based superplasticizer traces in cement leachates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérandel, Cyril; Vernex-Loset, Lionel; Krier, Gabriel; De Lanève, Michel; Guillot, Xavier; Pierre, Christian; Muller, Jean François

    2011-03-15

    Enhancing the flowing properties of fresh concrete is a crucial step for cement based materials users. This is done by adding polymeric admixtures. Such additives have enabled to improve final mechanicals properties and the development of new materials like high performance or self compacting concrete. Like this, the superplasticizers are used in almost cement based materials, in particular for concrete structures that can have a potential interaction with drinking water. It is then essential to have suitable detection techniques to assess whether these organic compounds are dissolved in water after a leaching process or not. The main constituent of the last generation superplasticizer is a PolyCarboxylate-Ester copolymer (PCE), in addition this organic admixture contains polyethylene oxide (free PEO) which constitutes a synthesis residue. Numerous analytical methods are available to characterize superplasticizer content. Although these techniques work well, they do not bring suitable detection threshold to analyze superplasticizer traces in solution with high mineral content such as leachates of hardened cement based materials formulated with superplasticizers. Moreover those techniques do not enable to distinguish free PEO from PCE in the superplasticizer. Here we discuss two highly sensitive analytical methods based on mass spectrometry suitable to perform a rapid detection of superplasticizer compounds traces in CEM I cement paste leachates: MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, is used to determine the free PEO content in the leachate. However, industrial copolymers (such as PCE) are characterized by high molecular weight and polymolecular index. These two parameters lead to limitation concerning analysis of copolymers by MALDI-TOFMS. In this study, we demonstrate how pyrolysis and a Thermally assisted Hydrolysis/Methylation coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, provides good results for the detection of PCE copolymer traces in CEM I cement paste

  4. Porous surface modified bioactive bone cement for enhanced bone bonding.

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    Qiang He

    Full Text Available Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth.The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant-bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests.The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony defect.Our findings suggested a new bioactive

  5. Further investigations of the properties of polymer modified cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.I.

    1988-05-01

    This report concludes the work done on behalf of the Department of the Environment on polymer modified cement composites. Topics covered include: the influence of cure schedule on flexural properties, observation of the onset and cracking during flexural testing, measurement of water permeability and caesium diffusion rates, and the use of Back Scattered Electron Imaging to identify the polymer phase. The properties of epoxide resin modified cements in the previous report were disappointing. Air entrainment of the mixing stage was a likely cause of the poor performance of these products and procedures to overcome this problem were devised. The range of polymer additives investigated was broadened by the inclusion of modified acrylic latexes and a polymensable acrylate resin additive. Properties for OPC and 9 BFS: 1 OPC cements are compared and the modification of properties achieved by polymer additions to both cement systems is discussed. (author)

  6. Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. Because hydraulic cement requires a chemical hydration reaction for setting and hardening, it is subject to potential interactions between elements in the waste and binder that can retard or prevent solidification. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above its melting point, combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991

  7. Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these ''problem'' wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above it's melting point (120 degree C), combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Cytotoxicity of modified glass ionomer cement on odontoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Mestres, Gemma; Lan, Weihua; Xia, Wei; Engqvist, Håkan

    2016-07-01

    Recently a modified glass ionomer cement (GIC) with enhanced bioactivity due to the incorporation of wollastonite or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of the modified GIC on odontoblast-like cells. The cytotoxicity of a conventional GIC, wollastonite modified GIC (W-mGIC), MTA modified GIC (M-mGIC) and MTA cement has been evaluated using cement extracts, a culture media modified by the cement. Ion concentration and pH of each material in the culture media were measured and correlated to the results of the cytotoxicity study. Among the four groups, conventional GIC showed the most cytotoxicity effect, followed by W-mGIC and M-mGIC. MTA showed the least toxic effect. GIC showed the lowest pH (6.36) while MTA showed the highest (8.62). In terms of ion concentration, MTA showed the largest Ca(2+) concentration (467.3 mg/L) while GIC showed the highest concentration of Si(4+) (19.9 mg/L), Al(3+) (7.2 mg/L) and Sr(2+) (100.3 mg/L). Concentration of F(-) was under the detection limit (0.02 mg/L) for all samples. However the concentrations of these ions are considered too low to be toxic. Our study showed that the cytotoxicity of conventional GIC can be moderated by incorporating calcium silicate based ceramics. The modified GIC might be promising as novel dental restorative cements.

  9. Modified sulfur cement solidification of low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in modified sulfur cement. The work was performed as part of the Waste Form Evaluation Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Processing of waste and binder was accomplished by means of both a single-screw extruder and a dual-action mixing vessel. Waste types selected for this study included those resulting from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type and method of processing. Property evaluation testing was carried out on laboratory scale specimens in order to compare with waste form performance for other potential matrix materials. Waste form property testing included compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling and radionuclide leachability. Recommended waste loadings of 40 wt. % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt. % incinerator ash, which are based on processing and performance considerations, are reported. Solidification efficiencies for these waste types represent significant improvements over those of hydraulic cements. Due to poor waste form performance, incorporation of ion exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended

  10. Modified tricalcium silicate cement formulations with added zirconium oxide.

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    Li, Xin; Yoshihara, Kumiko; De Munck, Jan; Cokic, Stevan; Pongprueksa, Pong; Putzeys, Eveline; Pedano, Mariano; Chen, Zhi; Van Landuyt, Kirsten; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of modifying tricalcium silicate (TCS) cements on three key properties by adding ZrO 2 . TCS powders were prepared by adding ZrO 2 at six different concentrations. The powders were mixed with 1 M CaCl 2 solution at a 3:1 weight ratio. Biodentine (contains 5 wt.% ZrO 2 ) served as control. To evaluate the potential effect on mechanical properties, the mini-fracture toughness (mini-FT) was measured. Regarding bioactivity, Ca release was assessed using ICP-AES. The component distribution within the cement matrix was evaluated by Feg-SEM/EPMA. Cytotoxicity was assessed using an XTT assay. Adding ZrO 2 to TCS did not alter the mini-FT (p = 0.52), which remained in range of that of Biodentine (p = 0.31). Ca release from TSC cements was slightly lower than that from Biodentine at 1 day (p > 0.05). After 1 week, Ca release from TCS 30 and TCS 50 increased to a level that was significantly higher than that from Biodentine (p  0.05). EPMA revealed a more even distribution of ZrO 2 within the TCS cements. Particles with an un-reacted core were surrounded by a hydration zone. The 24-, 48-, and 72-h extracts of TCS 50 were the least cytotoxic. ZrO 2 can be added to TCS without affecting the mini-FT; Ca release was reduced initially, to reach a prolonged release thereafter; adding ZrO 2 made TCS cements more biocompatible. TCS 50 is a promising cement formulation to serve as a biocompatible hydraulic calcium silicate cement.

  11. Porosity and ion diffusivity of latex-modified cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Takashi; Kuriyama, Osamu; Matsuda, Masami; Chino, Koichi; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1990-01-01

    Latex-modified portland cement, which would be expected to have low permeability and ion diffusivity, was studied for possible application as a solidification agent for radioactive wastes generated from nuclear power plants. In order to predict the leaching ratio of radionuclides from the cementitious waste forms, the effect of water and latex content in the fresh cement paste on total porosity and ion diffusivity of hardened paste was quantitatively estimated. Total porosity of hardened cement paste decreased with the reduction of water content in the fresh paste and it was also reduced by latex addition. This latter effect could be attributed to the latex emulsion forming a water-proof film and filling the capillary pores. Also Cs ions diffusivity, which is the ratio of the diffusion coefficient in pore water to that in bulk water, showed an exponential correlation with total porosity for both cement materials. An empirical equation, expressing ion diffusivity as a function of total porosity, was derived from the consideration that the water constrictivity in this porous medium could cause an increase of the apparent viscosity of pore water. These results suggested a possibility that the transport behavior of radionuclides through the cementitious matrix could be estimated from the mixing parameters of the original cement pastes

  12. Preparation of iron-modified portland cement adsorbent and the investigation of its decolorization performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Wang, Huifeng; Li, Yang; Li, Zhen

    2018-02-01

    The ordinary portland cement was modified by ferric salt impregnation method. Through the technologies of x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy, the physicochemical properties of modified cement were detected and analyzed. It was found that after the modification, the main constituents of raw cement, tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate had been depleted, and the new crystal mineral of antarcticite replaced them. The iron precipitates and cement hydration products calcium silicate hydrate gel mainly existed in the form of amorphous on modified cement. The results of BET specific surface determination showed that the modified cement particles had mesoporous distribution. The results of adsorption experiment revealed modified cement exhibited excellent adsorption performance on reactive brilliant blue KNR. The combination mechanism between modified cement and adsorbate was mainly electrostatic interaction. The adsorption process satisfied with the pseudo-second order kinetics model, and the adsorption reaction was a spontaneous endothermic process.

  13. Push-out strength of modified Portland cements and resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacono, Francesco; Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Huffman, Bradford; Sword, Jeremy; Agee, Kelli; Siboni, Francesco; Tay, Franklin; Prati, Carlo; Pashley, David

    2010-02-01

    Modified calcium-silicate cements derived from white Portland cement (PC) were formulated to test their push-out strength from radicular dentin after immersion for 1 month. Slabs obtained from 42 single-rooted extracted teeth were prepared with 0.6 mm diameter holes, then enlarged with rotary instruments. After immersion in EDTA and NaOC1, the holes were filled with modified PCs or ProRoot MTA, Vitrebond and Clearfil SE. Different concentrations of phyllosilicate (montmorillonite-MMT) were added to experimental cements. ProRoot MTA was also included as reference material. Vitrebond and Clearfil SE were included as controls. Each group was tested after 1 month of immersion in water or PBS. A thin-slice push-out test on a universal testing machine served to test the push-out strength of materials. Results were statistically analyzed using the least squares means (LSM) method. The modified PCs had push-out strengths of 3-9.5 MPa after 1 month of immersion in water, while ProRoot MTA had 4.8 MPa. The push-out strength of PC fell after incubation in PBS for 1 month, while the push-out strength of ProRoot MTA increased. There were no significant changes in Clearfil SE Bond or Vitrebond after water or PBS storage.

  14. POTENTIAL ANTISTATIC PROPERTIES OF A CEMENT COMPOSITION MODIFIED BY CHITOSAN

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    Darchiya Valentina Ivanovna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Environmental compatibility of construction materials and their impact onto the human organism and the environment are the essential factors to be taken account of in the course of construction. Therefore, natural renewable biological polymers arouse interest. Polysaccharide chitin takes a special position among them. It represents one of the most widely spread biological polymers; it is extracted from 100% renewable materials. It is part of the external skeleton of crustaceans and insects, and it also part of cell walls of mushrooms and algae. Any research of potential materials to be generated from chitin and its derivative chitosan may involve a practical implementation. The research of the antistatic properties followed the introduction of 1% of chitosan into the cement composition. Electrostatic field intensity was measured by Electrostatic Field Intensity Meter ST-01. The electrostatic property of the sample modified by chitosan turned out to be lower than the one of the benchmark sample by 5.6 times. The presence of chitosan in the cement composition makes no impact on strength-related properties of the construction material. The cement composition modified by chitosan may be used in the manufacturing of antistatic self-leveling floors.

  15. The immobilization of anion exchange resins in polymer modified cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, A.; Morgan, P.D.

    1991-09-01

    Organic anion exchange resins, loaded with 99-Tc as the pertechnate ion, were incorporated into polymer modified cements (Flexocrete Ltd, Preston). BFS/OPC (9:1 mix) also was modified by three polymers from the same source (styrene acrylic (2) styrene butadiene) and loaded with anion exchanger containing the pertechnate. Composites were tested for initial compressive strengths, under water and radiation stability and leach rate. IAEA standard leach testing was with simulated sea and ground waters. Ground water leaching also was carried out on composites subjected to 1.10 9 rads (γ). Leach testing correlated well with compressive strength. Modified composites performed better than the BFS/OPC mix under all conditions studied and were able to encapsulate higher resin loadings. (author)

  16. Characterization of polymer-modified cement as a solidification agent for the radwaste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Kwak, Kyung-Kil; Hong, Dae-Seok; Ryu, Woo-Seog

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Polymer-modified cement (PMC) by modification with water-based resins. ► Determination of the optimized polymer content. ► Evaluation of the improved chemical resistance of the PMC. ► Decrease of the amount of ions released into the demineralized water. ► Highly improved property for the nuclide diffusivity at the Co-60. - Abstract: Polymer-modified cement can be produced by partially replacing cement hydrate binders in ordinary Portland cement with polymeric compounds. It is known that the addition of the polymer to the cement paste leads to improved quality, which would be expected to have a high chemical resistance. In order to investigate the application as a solidification agent for the radwaste, polymer-modified cement specimens, by modification with water-based resins, were prepared according to the polymer content from 0% to 30%. The optimized polymer content in the cement pastes was then determined through the compressive strength and the porosity test. Finally, the improved chemical resistance of the polymer-modified cement with the optimized polymer content was evaluated by the thermal cycling, the immersion, and the leaching tests. From the test results, the amount of ions released into the water showed lower values of about 20% at the polymer-modified cement. Especially, a highly improved nuclide diffusivity of Co-60 was observed in the polymer-modified cement.

  17. Effect of Copolymer Latexes on Physicomechanical Properties of Mortar Containing High Volume Fly Ash as a Replacement Material of Cement

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    El-Sayed Negim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the physicomechanical properties of mortar containing high volume of fly ash (FA as partial replacement of cement in presence of copolymer latexes. Portland cement (PC was partially replaced with 0, 10, 20, 30 50, and 60% FA. Copolymer latexes were used based on 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (2-HEA and 2-hydroxymethylacrylate (2-HEMA. Testing included workability, setting time, absorption, chemically combined water content, compressive strength, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The addition of FA to mortar as replacement of PC affected the physicomechanical properties of mortar. As the content of FA in the concrete increased, the setting times (initial and final were elongated. The results obtained at 28 days of curing indicate that the maximum properties of mortar occur at around 30% FA. Beyond 30% FA the properties of mortar reduce and at 60% FA the properties of mortar are lower than those of the reference mortar without FA. However, the addition of polymer latexes into mortar containing FA improved most of the physicomechanical properties of mortar at all curing times. Compressive strength, combined water, and workability of mortar containing FA premixed with latexes are higher than those of mortar containing FA without latexes.

  18. Modified femoral pressuriser generates a longer lasting high pressure during cement pressurisation

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    Kjellson Fred

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The strength of the cement-bone interface in hip arthroplasty is strongly related to cement penetration into the bone. A modified femoral pressuriser has been investigated, designed for closer fitting into the femoral opening to generate higher and more constant cement pressure compared to a commercial (conventional design. Methods Femoral cementation was performed in 10 Sawbones® models, five using the modified pressuriser and five using a current commercial pressuriser as a control. Pressure during the cementation was recorded at the proximal and distal regions of the femoral implant. The peak pressure and the pressure-time curves were analysed by student's t-test and Two way ANOVA. Results The modified pressuriser showed significantly and substantially longer durations at higher cementation pressures and slightly, although not statistically, higher peak pressures compared to the conventional pressuriser. The modified pressuriser also produced more controlled cement leakage. Conclusion The modified pressuriser generates longer higher pressure durations in the femoral model. This design modification may enhance cement penetration into cancellous bone and could improve femoral cementation.

  19. Post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, A.U.J.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin using a digital microhardness tester. Change in hardness of these materials over a period of 6 months was compared to that of conventional glass ionomer cements and a composite resin. With the exception of the composite resin, all materials showed a significant increase in hardness over 24 h after their initial set. Dual-cure resin-modified glass ionomer cements showed decreased hardness with increased storage time in saline at 37 o C. Results suggest that the addition of resins to glass ionomer cements does not improve initial hardness and does not negate the acid-base reaction of conventional cements. Resin addition may, however, lead to increased water sorption and decreased hardness. (author)

  20. Comparison of the Amount of Fluoride Release from Nanofilled Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Conventional and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements

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    Sumitha Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate and compare the amount of fluoride release of conventional, resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cements.Materials and Methods: Tablets of glass-ionomer cements were immersed in deionized water and incubated at 37◦C. After 1, 2, 7, 15 and 30 days, fluoride ion was measured under normal atmospheric conditions by fluoride ion selective electrode. Buffer (TISAB II was used to decomplex the fluoride ion and to provide a constant background ionic strength and to maintain the pH of water between 5.0 and 5.5 as the fluoride electrode is sensitive to changes in pH. Statistical evaluation was carried out by one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance using SPSS 11.0. The significance level was set at p< 0.05.Results: The release of fluoride was highest on day 1 and there was a sudden fall on day 2 in all three groups. Initially fluoride release from conven-tional glass-ionomer cement was highest compared to the other two glass-ionomer cements, but the amount drastically reduced over the period. Although the amount of fluoride release was less than both the resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass-ionomer cement, the release was sustained consistently for 30 daysConclusion: The cumulative fluoride release of nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement was very less compared to the conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements and Nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement released less but steady fluoride as compared to other resin modified glass ionomer cements.

  1. Properties and self-healing behavior of oil absorbent microspheres modified cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunyu; Bu, Yuhuan; Zhao, Letian

    2017-09-01

    This paper concerns the properties and self-healing behavior of cement composites modified by oil absorbent microspheres with fumed silica shell. These microspheres, prepared by Pickering polymerization, possessed excellent properties, such as uniform particle size, good hydrophilicity and fine thermal stability. Furthermore, the effect of these microspheres on the properties of cement slurry was studied. The results showed that these microspheres had good compatibility with cement slurry, except for a slight effect on the consistency of cement slurry and the compressive strength of cement stone. At last, we derived the mathematical formulation of valid sealing for microcracks in self-healing cement, and measured sealing pressure under different filling conditions. The self-healing cement would guarantee the health, safety and high efficiency in the process of oil and gas production.

  2. modified water-cement ratio law for compressive strength of rice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    solid agricultural waste (rice husk) and also produce more sustainable cheaper concrete products. To this end, studies on the development of modified water- cement ratio law for concrete incorporating RHA is timely and justifiable. The relationship between the compressive strength and the cement-water ratio is ...

  3. The effect of modified hydrotalcites on mechanical properties and chloride penetration resistance in cement mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Z.; Fischer, H.; Polder, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, two types of modified hydrotalcites (MHT) were incorporated into cement mortars with two dosage levels (replacing 5% and 10% cement by mass). Designated testing programme including strength test, porosity test, and rapid chloride migration and diffusion test were employed to

  4. Penetrating waterproofing coatings based on slag -containing cements, modified by natural zeolites

    OpenAIRE

    Пушкарева, Екатерина Константиновна; Суханевич, Марина Владимировна; Бондарь, Екатерина Владимировна

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with obtaining penetrating waterproofing coatings for concrete surfaces based on the slag-cement systems, modified by natural zeolite additives. The composition was investigated and physico-mechanical properties of slag-containing cements with natural zeolite, which were subsequently modified by the salt-electrolyte complex to create penetrating coating, were optimized. Studying the properties of the developed coating has confirmed its competitiveness in the market of similar ...

  5. Effect of modified cementation technique on marginal fit and apical spread of excess cement for implant restorations: An in vitro study

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    Brijesh Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate and compare the vertical marginal discrepancy and spread of excess cement after cementation with modified cementation technique and conventional technique. Materials and Methods: Ten implant analogs with prefabricated standard abutments of similar dimensions were mounted individually in self-cure acrylic blocks subcrestally. Forty ideal metal coping specimens were prepared by conventional lost wax technique. Measurement of the marginal discrepancy at the implant-crown interface was done using a stereomicroscope before cementation. Abutment replicas (ARs were prepared for twenty specimens using cast copings and pattern resin. All forty copings were cemented according to the following cementation techniques and cement types, with ten specimens in each group. (1 Group 1: Half filling (HF cementation technique using provisional cement. (2 Group 2: HF cementation technique using permanent cement. (3 Group 3: AR technique using provisional cement. (4 Group 4: AR technique using permanent cement. Specimens were subjected to measurement of marginal discrepancy and spread of excess cement using stereomicroscope after cementation procedure. Data were analyzed using paired t-test and unpaired t-test. Results: AR technique showed significantly less marginal discrepancy (P = 0.000 and apical spread of excess cement (P = 0.002 than conventional HF technique. Provisional cement showed significantly more marginal discrepancy (HF-P = 0.000 and AR-P = 0.001 and less apical spread of excess cement (HF-P = 0.023 and AR-P = 0.002 and among both technique. Statistical Analysis: Unpaired t-test. Conclusion: An alternative technique of using AR is effective technique to prevent peri-implant diseases.

  6. Properties of cement based composites modified using diatomaceous earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Záleská, Martina; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2017-07-01

    Diatomite belongs among natural materials rich on amorphous silica (a-SiO2). When finely milled, it can potentially substitute part of cement binder and positively support formation of more dense composite structure. In this connection, two types of diatomaceous earth applied as a partial substitution of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mass% of Portland cement in the composition of cement paste were studied. In the tested mixtures with cement blends, the amount of batch water remained same, with water/binder ratio 0.5. For fresh paste mixtures, initial and final setting times were measured. First, hardened pastes cured 28 days in water were characterized by their physical properties such as bulk density, matrix density and open porosity. Then, their mechanical and thermophysical parameters were assessed. Obtained results gave clear evidence of setting time shortening for pastes with diatomite what brought negative effect with respect to the impaired workability of fresh mixtures. On the other hand, there was observed strength improvement for mixtures containing diatomite with higher amount of SiO2. Here, the increase in mechanical resistivity was distinct up to 15 mass% of cement replacement. Higher cement substitution by diatomite resulted in an increase in porosity and thus improvement of thermal insulation properties.

  7. Polystyrene-block-Poly(ionic liquid) Copolymers as Work Function Modifiers in Inverted Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Baek; Isik, Mehmet; Park, Hea Jung; Jung, In Hwan; Mecerreyes, David; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2018-02-07

    Interfacial layers play a critical role in building up the Ohmic contact between electrodes and functional layers in organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells. These layers are based on either inorganic oxides (ZnO and TiO 2 ) or water-soluble organic polymers such as poly[(9,9-dioctyl-2,7-fluorene)-alt-(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)] and polyethylenimine ethoxylated (PEIE). In this work, we have developed a series of novel poly(ionic liquid) nonconjugated block copolymers for improving the performance of inverted OPV cells by using them as work function modifiers of the indium tin oxide (ITO) cathode. Four nonconjugated polyelectrolytes (n-CPEs) based on polystyrene and imidazolium poly(ionic liquid) (PSImCl) were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The ratio of hydrophobic/hydrophilic block copolymers was varied depending on the ratio of polystyrene to the PSImCl block. The ionic density, which controls the work function of the electrode by forming an interfacial dipole between the electrode and the block copolymers, was easily tuned by simply changing the PSImCl molar ratio. The inverted OPV device with the ITO/PS 29 -b-PSImCl 60 cathode achieved the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.55% among the synthesized block copolymers, exhibiting an even higher PCE than that of the reference OPV device with PEIE (7.30%). Furthermore, the surface properties of the block copolymers films were investigated by contact angle measurements to explore the influence of the controlled hydrophobic/hydrophilic characters on the device performances.

  8. Evaluation of tri-steps modified styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymer membrane for wound dressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jen Ming; Huang, Huei Tsz

    2012-01-01

    Tri-steps modified styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymer (SBS) membrane was prepared with epoxidation, ring opening reaction with maleated ionomer and layer-by-layer assembled polyelectrolyte technique. The tri-steps modified SBS membrane was characterized by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS). The structures of the modified SBS membranes were identified with methylene blue and azocarmine G. The content of amino group on the surface of the modified membrane was calculated from uptake of an acid dye. The values of the contact angle, water absorption, water vapor transmission rate and the adsorption of fibronectin on the membranes were determined. To evaluate the biocompatibility of the tri-steps modified SBS membrane, the cytotoxicity, antibacterial and growth profile of the cell culture of 3T3 fibroblasts on the membrane were evaluated. The bactericidal activity was found on the modified SBS. From the cell culture of 3T3 fibroblasts on the membrane, it revealed that the cells not only remained viable but also proliferated on the surface of the tri-steps modified SBS membranes. As the membranes are sterile semipermeable with bactericidal activity and transparent allowing wound checks, they can be considered for shallow wound with low exudates. - Highlights: ► Styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymer (SBS) was modified with tri-steps. ► The tri-steps are epoxidation, ring opening reaction and layer-by-layer assembly. ► Modified SBS membrane for wound dressing is evaluated. ► Membranes are sterile semipermeable with bactericidal activity and transparent. ► Membranes can be considered for shallow wound with low exudates.

  9. Magnetic silica hybrids modified with guanidine containing co-polymers for drug delivery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timin, Alexander S., E-mail: a_timin@mail.ru [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Ivanovo State University of Chemistry and Technology (ISUCT), 7, Sheremetevsky prosp., 153000 Ivanovo (Russian Federation); RASA Center in Tomsk, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Avenue, 634500 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Khashirova, Svetlana Yu. [Kabardino-Balkar State University, ul. Chernyshevskogo 173, Nal' chik, 360004 Kabardino-Balkaria (Russian Federation); Rumyantsev, Evgeniy V.; Goncharenko, Alexander A. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Ivanovo State University of Chemistry and Technology (ISUCT), 7, Sheremetevsky prosp., 153000 Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    Guanidine containing co-polymers grafted onto silica nanoparticles to form core-shell structure were prepared by sol-gel method in the presence of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. The morphological features for uncoated and coated silica particles have been characterized with scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the polymer coated silicas exhibit spherical morphology with rough polymeric surface covered by γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. The grafting amount of guanidine containing co-polymers evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis was in the range from 17 to 30%. Then, the drug loading properties and cumulative release of silica hybrids modified with guanidine containing co-polymers were evaluated using molsidomine as a model drug. It was shown that after polymer grafting the loading content of molsidomine could reach up to 3.42 ± 0.21 and 2.34 ± 0.14 mg/g respectively. The maximum drug release of molsidomine is achieved at pH 1.6 (approximately 71–75% release at 37 °C), whereas at pH 7.4 drug release is lower (50.4–59.6% release at 37 °C). These results have an important implication that our magneto-controlled silica hybrids modified with guanidine containing co-polymers are promising as drug carriers with controlled behaviour under influence of magnetic field. - Highlights: • Polymer coated silica hybrids containing γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared via sol–gel method. • Polymer grafting influences pH-response and surface properties of final products. • Molsidomine as a model drug was effectively loaded into polymer coated silicas. • The drug loading depends on the nature of grafted polymer and its content.

  10. Influence of Aggregate Coated with Modified Sulfur on the Properties of Cement Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swoo-Heon Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the mixing design of concrete having modified sulfur-coated aggregate (MSCA to enhance the durability of Portland cement concrete. The mechanical properties and durability of the proposed MSCA concrete were evaluated experimentally. Melting-modified sulfur was mixed with aggregate in order to coat the aggregate surface at a speed of 20 rpm for 120 s. The MSCA with modified sulfur corresponding to 5% of the cement weight did not significantly affect the flexural strength in a prism concrete beam specimen, regardless of the water-cement ratio (W/C. However, a dosage of more than 7.5% decreased the flexural strength. On the other hand, the MSCA considerably improved the resistance to the sulfuric acid and the freezing-thawing, regardless of the sulfur dosage in the MSCA. The coating modified sulfur of 5% dosage consequently led to good results for the mechanical properties and durability of MSCA concrete.

  11. Gentamicin release from modified acrylic bone cements with lactose and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virto, M R; Frutos, P; Torrado, Susana; Frutos, G

    2003-01-01

    Modified polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cements formulations were prepared by including different proportions of gentamicin and release modulators such as lactose or hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC). Surface aspect, gentamicin release and porosity of these modified formulations were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a specially designed system for the dissolution studies of the bone cements, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Lactose modified cements presented an irregular surface with numerous hollows and voids due to the lactose dissolution. HPMC cements presented a characteristic laminated and flaky surface. The drug release of lactose formulations was up to four-fold greater (13%) than the commercial bone cement CMW1 Gentamicin one (3%). The amount of gentamicin eluted at the first withdrawn sample ranged from 30% to 60% of total gentamicin released over the assay. Gentamicin release from lactose formulations increased as lactose percentage was increased which agree with the porosity results. Nevertheless, the use of release modulator HPMC increased porosity, but did not produce an increase in the gentamicin release. HPMC dissolution creates a surrounding sticky and viscous medium similar to a gel that makes the gentamicin release from the cement matrix difficult. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. Effect of modified cementation technique on marginal fit and apical spread of excess cement for implant restorations: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Brijesh Patel; Vilas Patel; T R Ramesh; Aishwarya Soundharya

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate and compare the vertical marginal discrepancy and spread of excess cement after cementation with modified cementation technique and conventional technique. Materials and Methods: Ten implant analogs with prefabricated standard abutments of similar dimensions were mounted individually in self-cure acrylic blocks subcrestally. Forty ideal metal coping specimens were prepared by conventional lost wax technique. Measurement of the marginal discrepancy at the implant-crown inte...

  13. Characterization of modified calcium-silicate cements exposed to acidic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, Josette, E-mail: josette.camilleri@um.edu.mt

    2011-01-15

    Portland cement which is used as a binder in concrete in the construction industry has been developed into a biomaterial. It is marketed as mineral trioxide aggregate and is used in dentistry. This material has been reported to be very biocompatible and thus its use has diversified. The extended use of this material has led to developments of newer versions with improved physical properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acidic environments found in the oral cavity on fast setting calcium silicate cements with improved physical properties using a combination of techniques. Two fast setting calcium silicate cements (CSA and CFA) and two cement composites (CSAG and CFAG) were assessed by subjecting the materials to lactic acid/sodium lactate buffer gel for a period of 28 days. At weekly intervals the materials were viewed under the tandem scanning confocal microscope (TSM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The two prototype cements exhibited changes in their internal chemistry with no changes in surface characteristics. Since the changes observed were mostly sub-surface evaluation of surface characteristics of cement may not be sufficient in the determination of chemical changes occurring. - Research Highlights: {yields} An acidic environment affects modified fast setting calcium silicate-based cements. {yields} No surface changes are observed in acidic environment. {yields} An acidic environment causes sub-surface changes in the material chemistry which are only visible in fractured specimens. {yields} A combination of techniques is necessary in order to evaluate the chemical changes occurring.

  14. PERFORMANCE OF CEMENT COMPOSITES REINFORCED WITH SURFACE-MODIFIED POLYPROPYLENE MICRO- AND MACRO-FIBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Antoš

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the mechanical properties investigation of cement pastes reinforced with surface treated polymer fibers. The cement matrix was composed of Portland cement (CEM I 42.5 R, w/c ratio equal to 0.4. Two polypropylene fiber types (micro- and macro-fibers were used as randomly distributed and oriented reinforcement in volume amount of 2 %. The fibers were modified in the low-pressure inductively coupled cold oxygen plasma in order to enhance their surface interaction with the cement matrix. The investigated composite mechanical properties (load bearing capacity and response during loading were examined indirectly by means of four-point bending mechanical destructive tests. A response of loaded samples containing treated fibers were compared to samples with reference fibers. Moreover, cracking behavior development was monitored using digital image correlation (DIC. This method enabled to record the micro-cracks system evaluation of both fiber reinforced samples.

  15. Low-modulus PMMA bone cement modified with castor oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alejandro; Hoess, Andreas; Thersleff, Thomas; Ott, Marjam; Engqvist, Håkan; Persson, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    Some of the current clinical and biomechanical data suggest that vertebroplasty causes the development of adjacent vertebral fractures shortly after augmentation. These findings have been attributed to high injection volumes as well as high Young's moduli of PMMA bone cements compared to that of the osteoporotic cancellous bone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of castor oil as a plasticizer for PMMA bone cements. The Young's modulus, yield strength, maximum polymerization temperature, doughing time, setting time and the complex viscosity curves during curing, were determined. The cytotoxicity of the materials extracts was assessed on cells of an osteoblast-like cell line. The addition of up to 12 wt% castor oil decreased yield strength from 88 to 15 MPa, Young's modulus from 1500 to 446 MPa and maximum polymerization temperature from 41.3 to 25.6°C, without affecting the setting time. However, castor oil seemed to interfere with the polymerization reaction, giving a negative effect on cell viability in a worst-case scenario.

  16. Compound soil-tyre chips modified by cement as a road construction material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panu Promputthangkoon

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This research attempts to overcome the two problems of low-quality soil and a growing number of discarded tyres bymixing low-CBR soil with recycled tyre chips. The compound soil-tyre chips was then stabilised by Portland cement with theaim of using them as a new material in road construction in order to reduce the occurrence of shrinkage cracks. To achievethe purposes of this research three standard geotechnical testing programmes were employed: (1 modified compaction tests,(2 California Bearing Ratio tests (CBR, and (3 unconfined compression tests. The modified compaction test results provedthat for the mixtures having very low tyre chips and cement content, the behaviour is very complex. It was also observed thatthe greater the percentage of rubber added the lower the global density. However, this is predictable as the specific gravityof the rubber is much lower than that of the soil. For the relationship between the optimum moisture content (OMC and thecement content, it was observed that there is no clear pattern.For the specimens having no cement added, the CBR for unsoaked specimens was observed to be greater than that forsoaked specimens. However, when the cement was introduced the CBR test showed that the resistance to penetration for thesoaked specimens was significantly greater, indicating the effects of cement added on the strength. In addition, it was foundthat the CBR values for both soaked and unsoaked specimens gradually increased with the increase of cement content.Lastly, the unconfined compressive strength progressively increased with the increased percentage of cement.

  17. Modified sulphur cement: A low porosity encapsulation material for low, medium and alpha waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalen, A. van; Rijpkema, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Modified sulphur cement, available under the trade name Chement 2000, is a thermoplastic candidate material for the matrix of low, intermediate and alpha radioactive waste. The main source of sulphur is the desulphurization of fossil fuels. In view of the future increase of this product a modified compound of sulphur has been developed at the US Bureau of Mines. Modified sulphur cement as matrix material has properties in common with Portland or blast furnace cement and bitumen. The mechanical strength is comparable to hydraulic cement products. The process to incorporate waste materials is identical to bitumization. The leachability and the resistance to attack by chemicals is nearly the same as for bituminized products. This study showed also that the radiation resistance is high without radiolytic gas production and without change in dimensions (swelling). The rigidity of the matrix is a disadvantage when internal pressures are built up. The thermal conductivity and the heat of combustion of sulphur is low resulting in slow damage to the waste form under fire conditions, even when the temperature of self ignition in air is 220 0 C. The low leachability, the very slow effective diffusion of H 2 O and HTO, and the low permeability is due to the small pore diameters in the modified sulphur matrix. The loading capacity of modified sulphur cement depends on grain size and distribution and is for ungraded ashes, precipitates, dried sludges, etc., in the order of 40-50% of weight. The price of Chement 2000 per tonne is equal to those of blown bitumen

  18. Encapsulation of mixed radioactive and hazardous waste contaminated incinerator ash in modified sulfur cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the process waste streams incinerated at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities contain traces of both low-level radioactive (LLW) and hazardous constituents, thus yielding ash residues that are classified as mixed waste. Work is currently being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop new and innovative materials for encapsulation of DOE mixed wastes including incinerator ash. One such material under investigation is modified sulfur cement, a thermoplastic developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Monolithic waste forms containing as much as 55 wt % incinerator fly ash from Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been formulated with modified sulfur cement, whereas maximum waste loading for this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %. Compressive strength of these waste forms exceeded 27.6 MPa. Wet chemical and solid phase waste characterization analyses performed on this fly ash revealed high concentrations of soluble metal salts including Pb and Cd, identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as toxic metals. Leach testing of the ash according to the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) resulted in concentrations of Pb and Cd above allowable limits. Encapsulation of INEL fly ash in modified sulfur cement with a small quantity of sodium sulfide added to enhance retention of soluble metal salts reduced TCLP leachate concentrations of Pb and Cd well below EPA concentration criteria for delisting as a toxic hazardous waste. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  19. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-methyl acrylate copolymers identified in this section may be safely used as components of articles... copolymers in the form of particles of a size that will pass through a U.S. standard sieve No. 6 and that will be held on a U.S. standard sieve No. 10: (i) Extracted copolymer not to exceed 2.0 parts per...

  20. Fabrication of endothelial progenitor cell capture surface via DNA aptamer modifying dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xin; Deng, Jinchuan; Yuan, Shuheng; Wang, Juan; Luo, Rifang; Chen, Si [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wang, Jin, E-mail: jinxxwang@263.net [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Huang, Nan [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The dopamine/PEI film with controlled amine density was successfully prepared. • The DNA aptamer was assembled onto the film via electrostatic incorporation. • The A@DPfilmscanspecificallyandeffectivelycaptureEPCs. • The A@DP film can support the survival of ECs, control the hyperplasia of SMCs. • The dynamic/co-culture models are useful for studying cells competitive adhesion. - Abstract: Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are mainly located in bone marrow and circulate, and play a crucial role in repairmen of injury endothelium. One of the most promising strategies of stents designs were considered to make in-situ endothelialization in vivo via EPC-capture biomolecules on a vascular graft to capture EPCs directly from circulatory blood. In this work, an EPC specific aptamer with a 34 bases single strand DNA sequence was conjugated onto the stent surface via dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film as a platform and linker. The assembled density of DNA aptamer could be regulated by controlling dopamine percentage in this copolymer film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle (WCA) and fluorescence test confirmed the successful immobilization of DNA aptamer. To confirm its biofunctionality and cytocompatibility, the capturing cells ability of the aptamer modified surface and the effects on the growth behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were investigated. The aptamer functionalized sample revealed a good EPC-capture ability, and had a cellular friendly feature for both EPC and EC growth, while not stimulated the hyperplasia of SMCs. And, the co-culture experiment of three types of cells confirmed the specificity capturing of EPCs to aptamer modified surface, rather than ECs and SMCs. These data suggested that this aptamer functionalized surface may have a large potentiality for the application of vascular grafts with targeted endothelialization.

  1. Fabrication of endothelial progenitor cell capture surface via DNA aptamer modifying dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xin; Deng, Jinchuan; Yuan, Shuheng; Wang, Juan; Luo, Rifang; Chen, Si; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The dopamine/PEI film with controlled amine density was successfully prepared. • The DNA aptamer was assembled onto the film via electrostatic incorporation. • The A@DPfilmscanspecificallyandeffectivelycaptureEPCs. • The A@DP film can support the survival of ECs, control the hyperplasia of SMCs. • The dynamic/co-culture models are useful for studying cells competitive adhesion. - Abstract: Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are mainly located in bone marrow and circulate, and play a crucial role in repairmen of injury endothelium. One of the most promising strategies of stents designs were considered to make in-situ endothelialization in vivo via EPC-capture biomolecules on a vascular graft to capture EPCs directly from circulatory blood. In this work, an EPC specific aptamer with a 34 bases single strand DNA sequence was conjugated onto the stent surface via dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film as a platform and linker. The assembled density of DNA aptamer could be regulated by controlling dopamine percentage in this copolymer film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle (WCA) and fluorescence test confirmed the successful immobilization of DNA aptamer. To confirm its biofunctionality and cytocompatibility, the capturing cells ability of the aptamer modified surface and the effects on the growth behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were investigated. The aptamer functionalized sample revealed a good EPC-capture ability, and had a cellular friendly feature for both EPC and EC growth, while not stimulated the hyperplasia of SMCs. And, the co-culture experiment of three types of cells confirmed the specificity capturing of EPCs to aptamer modified surface, rather than ECs and SMCs. These data suggested that this aptamer functionalized surface may have a large potentiality for the application of vascular grafts with targeted endothelialization.

  2. Nanodiamond modified copolymer scaffolds affects tumour progression of early neoplastic oral keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliman, Salwa; Mustafa, Kamal; Krueger, Anke; Steinmüller-Nethl, Doris; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Osdal, Tereza; Hamza, Amani O; Sun, Yang; Parajuli, Himalaya; Waag, Thilo; Nickel, Joachim; Johannessen, Anne Christine; McCormack, Emmet; Costea, Daniela Elena

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the tumorigenic potential of functionalising poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds. The copolymer scaffolds were functionalised with nanodiamonds (nDP) or with nDP and physisorbed BMP-2 (nDP-PHY) to enhance osteoinductivity. Culturing early neoplastic dysplastic keratinocytes (DOK(Luc)) on nDP modified scaffolds reduced significantly their subsequent sphere formation ability and decreased significantly the cells' proliferation in the supra-basal layers of in vitro 3D oral neoplastic mucosa (3D-OT) when compared to DOK(Luc) previously cultured on nDP-PHY scaffolds. Using an in vivo non-invasive environmentally-induced oral carcinogenesis model, nDP scaffolds were observed to reduce bioluminescence intensity of tumours formed by DOK(Luc) + carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAF). nDP modification was also found to promote differentiation of DOK(Luc) both in vitro in 3D-OT and in vivo in xenografts formed by DOK(Luc) alone. The nDP-PHY scaffold had the highest number of invasive tumours formed by DOK(Luc) + CAF outside the scaffold area compared to the nDP and control scaffolds. In conclusion, in vitro and in vivo results presented here demonstrate that nDP modified copolymer scaffolds are able to decrease the tumorigenic potential of DOK(Luc), while confirming concerns for the therapeutic use of BMP-2 for reconstruction of bone defects in oral cancer patients due to its tumour promoting capabilities. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Preparation and Performance of Amphiphilic Random Copolymer Noncovalently Modified MWCNTs/Epoxy Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An amphiphilic random copolymer of polyglycidyl methacrylate-co-N-vinyl carbazole P(GMA-co-NVC was synthesized by free radical polymerization and was used to noncovalently modify multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. The obtained P(GMA-co-NVC/MWCNTs was mixed with epoxy resin and used to reinforce epoxy resin. Polymer modified carbon nanotubes/epoxy resin composites were prepared by a casting molding method. Tensile test, electrical resistivity test and differential scanning calorimeter(DSC analysis were used to study the effect of polymer modified carbon nanotubes on the mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of epoxy resin. The results show that the epoxy composite reinforced with P(GMA-co-NVC/MWCNTs shows a remarkable enhancement in both tensile strength and elongation at break compared to either the pure epoxy or the pristine MWCNTs/epoxy composites. In addition, the electrical conductivity of epoxy is significantly improved and the volume resistivity decreases from 1014Ω·m to 106Ω·m with 0.25% mass fraction loading of P(GMA-co-NVC/MWCNTs. Moreover, glass transition temperature of the epoxy composite also increases from 144℃ to 149℃.

  4. Waste form development/test: polyethylene and modified sulfur cement solidification of LLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1984-01-01

    Low-density polyethylene and a modified sulfur cement have been selected for further study as new potential solidification agents for LLW streams including dry evaporator concentrates, incinerator ash and ion exchange resins. These binder materials are thermoplastic and are processed by use of a screw-type extruder or an air-powered dual action mixer. The studies have utilized ''bench scale'' systems with sufficient capacity to enable reliable determination of the effects of processing parameters such as temperature requirements, feed rates, mixing methods, waste pretreatment and solidification kinetics. Maximum waste loadings have been obtained for polyethylene by use of the screw extruder under controlled conditions. The modified sulfur cement system is processed more effectively by the dual action mixer due to its very low melt viscosity. Simulated waste forms produced using acceptable formulations, are being tested to develop a data base of relevant waste form properties. Several tests underway include immersion, leaching, compressive strength and thermal stability

  5. Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals from Cement Pastes Using a Modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minrui; Feng, Huajun; Shen, Dongsheng; Li, Na; Chen, Yingqiang; Shentu, Jiali

    2016-03-01

    As the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) can not exhaust the acid neutralizing capacity of the cement rotary kiln co-processing solid wastes products which is particularly important for the assessment of the leaching concentrations of heavy metals. A modified TCLP was proposed. The extent of leaching of heavy metals is low using the TCLP and the leaching performance of the different metals can not be differentiated. Using the modified TCLP, however, Zn leaching was negligible during the first 180 h and then sharply increased (2.86 ± 0.18 to 3.54 ± 0.26 mg/L) as the acidity increased (pH cement rotary kiln co-processing products.

  6. Unfolding of cytochrome C upon interaction with azobenzene-modified copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Ruchmann, Juliette; Pallier, A; Jullien, L; Desmadril, M; Tribet, Christophe

    2012-11-12

    Hydrophilic or amphiphilic macromolecules are common organic matrices used to encapsulate and protect fragile drugs such as proteins. Polymer cargoes are in addition designed for remote control of protein delivery, upon imparting the macromolecules with stimuli-responsive properties, such as light-triggered polarity switches. The effect of interaction between polymers and proteins on the stability of the proteins is, however, rarely investigated. Here we studied the unfolding/folding equilibrium of cytochrome c (cyt c) under its oxidized or reduced forms, in the presence of various amphiphilic copolymers (by circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence measurements). As models of stimuli-responsive amphiphilic chains, we considered poly(acrylic acid) derivatives, modified to contain hydrophobic, light-responsive azobenzene moieties. These copolymers are, thus, capable to develop both ionic (under their sodium forms at pH > 8) and hydrophobic associations with the basic protein cyt c (isoelectric point of 10.0). In aqueous buffer upon increasing urea concentrations, cyt c underwent unfolding, at [urea] of 9-10 M, which was analyzed under the framework of the equilibrium between two states (native-unfolded). In the presence of polymers, the native folding of cyt c was preserved at low concentrations of urea (typically azobenzene moieties in the copolymers and the disappearance of destabilization at ionic strength higher than 150 mM. In addition, stability was similar to that of an isolated cyt c, in the presence of a neutral chain bearing acryloyl(oligoethyleneoxide) units instead of the ionized sodium acrylate moieties. DSC measurements showed that in the presence of polymers, cyt c is thermally unfolded in aqueous buffer at temperatures lowered by >20 °C as compared to thermal unfolding in the absence of polymers. Upon exposure to UV light, properties of the polymers chains were perturbed in situ, upon cis/trans isomerization of the azobenzene groups. In polymers

  7. Effects of adding silica particles on certain properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement

    OpenAIRE

    Felemban, Nayef H.; Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of incorporation of silica particles with different concentrations on some properties of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC): Microleakage, compressive strength, tensile strength, water sorption, and solubility. Materials and Methods: Silica particle was incorporated into RMGIC powder to study its effects, one type of RMGIC (Type II visible light-cured) and three concentrations of silica particles (0.06, 0.08, and 0.1% weight)...

  8. The physical properties and ion release of CPP-ACP-modified calcium silicate-based cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, A E; Manton, D J; Parashos, P; Wong, Rhk; Palamara, Jea; Stanton, D P; Reynolds, E C

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the physical properties and ion release of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP)-modified calcium silicate-based cements (CSCs) and compared the properties of a trial mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with two commercially available CSCs, Biodentine(™) and Angelus(®) MTA. The setting time, solubility, compressive strength and Vickers surface microhardness of the three CSCs incorporated with 0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0% and 3.0% (w/w) CPP-ACP were investigated. Release of calcium (Ca(2+) ), phosphate ions (Pi ) and pH of the test cements were measured after 24, 72, 168 and 336 h of storage. The addition of up to 1.0% CPP-ACP into Biodentine(™) and 0.5% into the other cements did not adversely affect their physical properties except for the setting time. The addition of 0.5% CPP-ACP increased Ca(2+) released from Biodentine(™) (after 168 and 336 h), Angelus(®) MTA (after 168 h) and the trial MTA (after 72 h). The addition of 1.0-3.0% CPP-ACP increased Ca(2+) and Pi released from all the cements. Biodentine(™) released more Ca(2+) particularly in the early stages and showed shorter setting time and higher mechanical properties than the other cements. The mechanical properties of Angelus(®) MTA and the trial MTA were similar. All the cements produced highly alkaline storage solutions. Up to 1.0% CPP-ACP in Biodentine(™) improves Ca(2+) and Pi release and 0.5% CPP-ACP in Angelus(®) MTA and the trial MTA improves Ca(2+) release without altering the mechanical properties and solubility. The addition of CPP-ACP into CSCs prolonged the setting time. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Biocompatibility assessment of modified Portland cement in comparison with MTA® : In vivo and in vitro studies

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    I Khalil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of our study is to elaborate a new cement based on Portland cement (PC, Modified Portland Cement (MPC with modified chemical and physical properties that allow easier clinical manipulation and faster setting time than MTA® and then to evaluate its cytotoxicity in vitro and its biocompatibility in vivo in comparison with MTA® . Materials and Methods: Elaboration of MPC: Portland cement powder slenderly grinded to homogenize the particles, mixed with a radiopaque element and a setting time accelerator. A comparative in vitro study (MTS test of the toxic effect of MTA® and MPC with culture isolated from the calvaria of 18-day-old fetal Swiss OF1 mice are done. A comparative in vivo study of the biocompatibility of MTA® and MPC: Under general anaesthesia, three holes (2.5 mm were made in both the left and right femurs of six White New Zealand rabbits. In the first hole MPC is placed, in the second MTA® and the third one is left empty (negative control group. Three weeks after implantation, two rabbits are sacrificed, then two other rabbits over six weeks and the last two after twelve weeks. The neck of the femur is trimmed and prepared for undecalcified histological studies. Mann-Whitney test was used to analyze the results. Results: The cell viability test according to the morphological observations suggested the biocompatibility of the two biomaterials tested. The in vivo test showed similar biocompatibility between MTA® and MPC. Bone healing and minimal inflammatory response adjacent to MTA® and MPC implants were observed at all experimental periods (3, 6 and 12 weeks, suggesting that both materials are well tolerated. Conclusion: This pilot comparative study of MTA® and MPC showed no or very limited toxic effects of both cements in vitro and similar biocompatibility in vivo. However, additional in vivo and clinical studies should be done on MPC before it can be introduced in our clinical practice.

  10. Antibacterial effect and physical properties of chitosan and chlorhexidine-cetrimide-modified glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Apurva; Pandey, Ramesh Kumar; Manickam, Natesan

    2017-01-01

    To compare antibacterial effect and physical properties of chitosan (CH) modified glass ionomer cement (GIC) (10% v/v), chlorhexidine-cetrimide (CHX-CT) modified GIC (2.5/2.5% w/w) and conventional GIC. A total of fifty healthy children of age 7-12 years were selected and randomly assigned to class A and B for in vivo analysis. Slabs of CH modified GIC (Group II) along with slabs of conventional GIC (Group I, control) were cemented on buccal surfaces of maxillary molars (split-mouth technique) for class A children. Similarly, slabs of CHX-CT modified GIC (Group III) were cemented against control (Group I, control) in class B children. Slabs were assessed after 48 h for microbial load of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus (LB) on mitis salivarius-bacitracin and Man Rogosa Sharpe agar media, respectively. Agar diffusion test was done to access the antibacterial effect of each group against Streptococcus muatns and LB. Slabs and cylinders of GICs were made for in vitro evaluation of compressive and flexure strength in each group. Comparison was done by nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis analysis followed by Dunn's multiple comparison test. Categorical groups were compared by Chi-square test. The increase in antibacterial activity (Group II > III > I) (P I > III) were observed. In the view of findings, it is concluded that CH modified GIC would be effective in inhibiting the bacteria associated with dental caries along with improved physical properties when compared with CHX-CT modified GIC and conventional GIC.

  11. Antibacterial effect and physical properties of chitosan and chlorhexidine-cetrimide-modified glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurva Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To compare antibacterial effect and physical properties of chitosan (CH modified glass ionomer cement (GIC (10% v/v, chlorhexidine-cetrimide (CHX-CT modified GIC (2.5/2.5% w/w and conventional GIC. Materials and Methods: A total of fifty healthy children of age 7–12 years were selected and randomly assigned to class A and B for in vivo analysis. Slabs of CH modified GIC (Group II along with slabs of conventional GIC (Group I, control were cemented on buccal surfaces of maxillary molars (split-mouth technique for class A children. Similarly, slabs of CHX-CT modified GIC (Group III were cemented against control (Group I, control in class B children. Slabs were assessed after 48 h for microbial load of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus (LB on mitis salivarius-bacitracin and Man Rogosa Sharpe agar media, respectively. Agar diffusion test was done to access the antibacterial effect of each group against Streptococcus muatns and LB. Slabs and cylinders of GICs were made for in vitro evaluation of compressive and flexure strength in each group. Results: Comparison was done by nonparametric Kruskal–Wallis analysis followed by Dunn's multiple comparison test. Categorical groups were compared by Chi-square test. The increase in antibacterial activity (Group II > III > I (P I > III were observed. Conclusions: In the view of findings, it is concluded that CH modified GIC would be effective in inhibiting the bacteria associated with dental caries along with improved physical properties when compared with CHX-CT modified GIC and conventional GIC.

  12. The physics of water sorption by resin-modified glass-ionomer dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, J W

    1997-11-01

    The water-sorption characteristics of two commercial resin-modified glass-ionomer dental cements (Baseline VLC, ex. Detrey Dentsply, and Vitremer lining cement, ex. 3M Dental Products) have been studied in more detail than previously. Water sorption in both cements proved to be rapid, reaching equilibrium at approximately 48 h for Baseline VLC and at approximately 10 d for Vitremer. Over the first 8 h or so, absorption was shown to follow Fick's law, with a diffusion coefficient of 1.56x10(-7) cm2 s(-1) for Baseline VLC (cured for 20 s) and 5.09x10(-7) cm2 s(-1) for Vitremer (also cured for 20 s). As expected, sorption of water was found to be faster in specimens cured for shorter cure times and slower for those cured for longer times. In the presence of sodium chloride, both at 0.9% and at 1 M, diffusion coefficients were significantly greater than in pure water, but did not vary significantly with sodium chloride concentration, being approximately 3.3x10(-7) cm2 s(-)1 for Baseline VLC and 8.0x10(-7) cm2 s(-1) for Vitremer. This is attributed to conformational changes in hydrophilic segments of the polymer on absorption of aqueous sodium chloride in which the molecules form more compact coils than in the presence of pure water. They thus create a microstructure that is more permeable to water. Sorption in salt solutions became non-Fickian much sooner than in pure water, i.e. at 3-4 h for both cements. This is probably due to concentration changes of salt within the cement, suggesting that these materials possess a degree of permselectivity. Finally, equilibrium water uptakes varied with salt concentration, being least in 1 M NaCl, which reflects the different chemical potentials of water in the various storage media.

  13. Effect of Modified Rubber Particles Mixing Amount on Properties of Cement Mortar

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    Gang Xue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The crumb rubber cement mortar is prepared by the crumb rubber aggregates in 60 mesh which are modified by 1% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA solution. Some mechanical properties of cement mortar with different crumb rubber aggregate amounts are researched including compressive strength, flexural strength, the ratio of compressive strength to flexural strength, impact resistance, and dry contraction percentage. In our tests, we consider six kinds of the rubber contents, 0%, 7.5%, 15%, 19%, 22.5%, and 30%, respectively. The optimal mixing amount of crumb rubber is determined by measuring three indices, the ratio of compressive strength to flexural strength, impact resistance, and dry contraction percentage. It is shown by test that the ratio of compressive strength to flexural strength is the smallest when the mixing amount of rubber is 19%; meanwhile high impact resistance and rational drying shrinkage are observed. The optimal mixing amount of the rubber particles is 19% determined by this test.

  14. Modified Glass Ionomer Cement with “Remove on Demand” Properties: An In Vitro Study

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    Shaza Bishti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the influence of different temperatures on the compressive strength of glass ionomer cement (GIC modified by the addition of silica-coated wax capsules; Material and Methods: Commercially-available GIC was modified by adding 10% silica-coated wax capsules. Test blocks were fabricated from pure cement (control and modified cement (test, and stored in distilled water (37 °C/23 h. The compressive strength was determined using a universal testing machine under different temperatures (37 °C, 50 °C, and 60 °C. The maximum load to failure was recorded for each group. Fractured surfaces of selected test blocks were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM; Results: For the control group, the average compressive strength was 96.8 ± 11.8, 94.3 ± 5.7 and 72.5 ± 5.7 MPa for the temperatures 37 °C, 50 °C and 60 °C respectively. The test group reported compressive strength of 64.8 ± 5.4, 47.1 ± 5.4 and 33.4 ± 3.6 MPa at 37 °C, 50 °C and 60 °C, respectively. This represented a decrease of 28% in compressive strength with the increase in temperature from 37 °C to 50 °C and 45% from the 37 °C to the 60 °C group; Conclusion: GIC modified with 10% silica-coated wax capsules and temperature application show a distinct effect on the compressive strength of GIC. Considerable compressive strength reduction was detected if the temperature was above the melting temperature of the wax core.

  15. The Use of Micro and Nano Particulate Fillers to Modify the Mechanical and Material Properties of Acrylic Bone Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slane, Joshua A.

    Acrylic bone cement (polymethyl methacrylate) is widely used in total joint replacements to provide long-term fixation of implants. In essence, bone cement acts as a grout by filling in the voids left between the implant and the patient's bone, forming a mechanical interlock. While bone cement is considered the `gold standard' for implant fixation, issues such as mechanical failure of the cement mantle (aseptic loosening) and the development of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) still plague joint replacement procedures and often necessitate revision arthroplasty. In an effort to address these failures, various modifications are commonly made to bone cement such as mechanical reinforcement with particles/fibers and the addition of antibiotics to mitigate PJI. Despite these attempts, issues such as poor particle interfacial adhesion, inadequate drug release, and the development of multidrug resistant bacteria limit the effectiveness of bone cement modifications. Therefore, the overall goal of this work was to use micro and nanoparticles to enhance the properties of acrylic bone cement, with particular emphasis placed on improving the mechanical properties, cumulative antibiotic release, and antimicrobial properties. An acrylic bone cement (Palacos R) was modified with three types of particles in various loading ratios: mesoporous silica nanoparticles (for mechanical reinforcement), xylitol microparticles (for increased antibiotic release), and silver nanoparticles (as an antimicrobial agent). These particles were used as sole modifications, not in tandem with one another. The resulting cement composites were characterized using a variety of mechanical (macro to nano, fatigue, fracture, and dynamic), imaging, chemical, thermal, biological, and antimicrobial testing techniques. The primary outcomes of this dissertation demonstrate that: (1) mesoporous silica, as used in this work, is a poor reinforcement phase for acrylic bone cement, (2) xylitol can significantly

  16. Rice husk ash (RHA) as a partial cement replacement in modifying peat soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Nik Norsyahariati Nik; Daud, Mohd Nazrin Mohd; Muhammed, Abubakar Sadiq

    2018-02-01

    This paper describes the effect of rice husk ash (RHA) and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) as a potential binder for modifying the properties of peat soil. The amounts RHA and OPC added to the peat soil sample, as percentage of the dry soil mass were in the range of 10-15% and 15%, respectively. Observations were made for the changes in the properties of the soil such as maximum dry density (MDD), optimum moisture content (OMC) and shear strength. Scanning Electron Micrograph-Energy Dispersive X-Ray (SEM-EDX) test were also conducted to observe the microstructure of treated and untreated peat soil. The results show that the modified soil of MDD and OMC values are increased due to the increment amount of binder material. Shear strength values of modified peat showing a good result by assuming that it is relative to the formation of major reaction products such as calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H). The presence of C-S-H formation is indicated by the results produced from microstructural analysis of peat before and after modification process. This depicts the potential usage of RHA as a partial cement replacement in peat soil which is also improving its engineering properties.

  17. Effect of Resin-modified Glass Ionomer Cement Dispensing/Mixing Methods on Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, T A; Abdulmajeed, A A; Altitinchi, A; Ahmed, S N; Donovan, T E

    2018-03-23

    Resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGIs) are often used for luting indirect restorations. Hand-mixing traditional cements demands significant time and may be technique sensitive. Efforts have been made by manufacturers to introduce the same cement using different dispensing/mixing methods. It is not known what effects these changes may have on the mechanical properties of the dental cement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties (diametral tensile strength [DTS], compressive strength [CS], and fracture toughness [FT]) of RMGIs with different dispensing/mixing systems. The RMGI specimens (n=14)-RelyX Luting (hand mix), RelyX Luting Plus (clicker-hand mix), RelyX Luting Plus (automix) (3M ESPE), GC Fuji PLUS (capsule-automix), and GC FujiCEM 2 (automix) (GC)-were prepared for each mechanical test and examined after thermocycling (n=7/subgroup) for 20,000 cycles to the following: DTS, CS (ISO 9917-1) and FT (ISO standard 6872; Single-edge V-notched beam method). Specimens were mounted and loaded with a universal testing machine until failure occurred. Two-/one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey honestly significantly different post hoc test was used to analyze data for statistical significance ( p<0.05). The interaction effect of both dispensing/mixing method and thermocycling was significant only for the CS test of the GC group ( p<0.05). The different dispensing/mixing methods had no effect on the DTS of the tested cements. The CS of GC Fuji PLUS was significantly higher than that of the automix version ( p<0.05). The FT decreased significantly when switching from RelyX (hand mix) to RelyX Luting Plus (clicker-hand mix) and to RelyX Luting Plus (automix) ( p<0.05). Except in the case of the DTS of the GC group and the CS of GC Fuji PLUS, thermocycling had a significant effect reducing the mechanical properties of the RMGI cements ( p<0.05). Introducing alternative dispensing/mixing methods for mixing RMGIs to reduce time and

  18. Characterization of antibacterial and adhesion properties of chitosan-modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Marrwa A; Neo, Jennifer; Esguerra, Roxanna J; Fawzy, Amr S

    2015-10-01

    The aim is to investigate the effect of modifying the liquid phase of a conventional glass ionomer restorative material with different chitosan volume contents on the antibacterial properties and adhesion to dentin. The liquids of commercially available restorative glass ionomer cements (GIC) were modified with chitosan (CH) solutions at different volume contents (5%, 10%, 25%, and 50%). The GIC powders were mixed with the unmodified and the CH-modified liquids at the desired powder/liquid (P/L) ratio. For the characterization of the antibacterial properties, Streptococcus mutans biofilms were formed on GIC discs and characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), confocal microscopy, colony forming unit (CFU) count, and cell viability assay (MTS). The unmodified and CH-modified GICs were bonded to dentin surfaces and the micro-tensile bond strength (µTBs) was evaluated and the interface was investigated by SEM. Modification with CH solutions enhanced the antibacterial properties against S. mutans in terms of resistance to biofilm formation, CFU count, and MTS assay. Generally, significant improvement in the antibacterial properties was found with the increase in the CH volume content. Modification with 25% and 50% CH adversely affected the µTBs with predominant cohesive failure in the GIC. However, no difference was found between the control and the 5% and 10% CH-modified specimens. Incorporation of acidic solutions of chitosan in the polyacrylic acid liquid of GIC at v/v ratios of 5-10% improved the antibacterial properties of conventional glass ionomer cement against S. mutans without adversely affecting its bonding to dentin surface. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Surface pH of resin-modified glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, M J; Chadwick, R G

    1992-12-01

    The recently developed group of materials known as light-activated, or resin-modified, glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cements have been produced in response to clinical demands for a command set cavity base material. This study monitored the surface pH of three commercially available resin-modified glass ionomer cements over a 60-min period following either mixing alone or mixing followed by a 30-s exposure to a curing lamp. The results indicate that each material behaves in a unique manner. For all materials and conditions the pH reached after a 60-min period was significantly (P pH of two of the materials (Baseline VLC and Vitrebond) as compared to the same materials in the uncured state. In the case of XR-Ionomer, however, no significant (P > 0.05) effect of light curing upon the surface pH was apparent. The precise clinical consequences of a low surface pH are unclear but may be an aetiological factor in postoperative pulpal sensitivity. It is therefore recommended that a sublining of a proprietary calcium hydroxide lining material should be placed routinely beneath these materials and every effort made to ensure effective light curing.

  20. COMPOSITE MATERIALS BASED ON CEMENT BINDERS MODIFIED WITH SiO2 NANOADDITIVES

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    B. M. Khroustalev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of nanotechnologies allows to solve a number of problems of construction materials science: increase in strength, durability, abrasion and corrosion resistance that determines operational reliability of building constructions. Generally it is achieved due to nanoparticles that modify the structure and properties of the existing materials or products and are entered into their volume or on a surface layer. It’s theoretically and experimentally proved that the modified water has the bigger activity owing to the change of the ionic composition influencing the рН size and other parameters. As nanoparticles have a high level of surface energy, they show the increased tendency to agglomeration, meanwhile the size of agglomerates can reach several micrometers. In this regard an urgent task is to equally distribute and disaggregate the nanoparticles in the volume of tempering water. The experiments on studying of influence of the nanoparticles of silica distributed in volume of liquid by means of ultrasonic processing on characteristics of cement and sand solution and heavy concrete have been conducted. Nanoadditive influence on density, speed of strength development, final strength under compression of materials on the basis of cement depending on nanoadditive mass percent has been established.

  1. Retentive Strength of Orthodontic Bands Cemented with Amorphous Calcium Phosphate-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement: An In-Vitro Study

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    Farzin Heravi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the retentive strength of orthodontic bands cemented with amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP-containing and conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs. Materials and Methods: One-hundred-and-twenty mandibular third molars were embedded in acrylic resin blocks with the buccal surface of crowns perpendicular to the base of the mold. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups containing 30 teeth each. Groups 1 and 3 were cemented using conventional GIC and groups 2 and 4 were cemented using ACP-containing orthodontic cement. Groups 1 and 2 without thermocycling, and groups 3 and 4 after thermocycling (5000 cycles, 5° to 55°C were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine (crosshead speed of 1mm/minute. Two-way ANOVA was performed to compare the retentive strength of the groups.Results: The highest retentive strength belonged to group 1, and it was significantly higher than that of group 2 (P<0.001 and group 3 (P=0.02. The mean strength for group 2 was significantly lower than that of group 1 (P<0.001 and group 4 (P=0.04. Conclusions: Although retentive strength decreased when ACP was added to GIC, the retentive strength of the samples cemented by ACP-containing GIC was remarkably high after thermocycling. It seems that in the oral cavity, ACP-containing GIC provides sufficient strength to endure forces applied on posterior teeth.Keywords: Glass Ionomer Cements; Amorphous Calcium Phosphate; Retention

  2. Mechanical and chemical properties of polyvinyl alcohol modified cement mortar with silica fume used as matrix including radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dakroury, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discussed the mechanical and chemical properties of polyvinyl alcohol - modified cement mortar with silica fume to assess the safety for disposal of radioactive waste. The modified cement mortars containing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) in the presence of 10 % silica fume (SF) .The chemical reaction between polymer and cement - hydrated product were investigated by the Infrared Spectral Technology, Differential Thermal Analysis and X-ray diffraction. The leaching of 137Cs from a waste composite into a surrounding fluid has been studied .The results shown that PVA increases the strength and decreases the porosity. The increase in strength duo to the interaction of PVA with cement , may be forming some new compound that fill the pores or improve the bond between the cement . The pozzolanic reaction of the SF increases the calcium silicate hydrates in the hardening matrix composites. There is distinct change in the refinement of the pore structure in cement composites giving fewer capillary pores and more of the finer gel pores

  3. Evolution of pH in a radwaste repository: leaching of modified cements and reactions with groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, A.; Guppy, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Cementitious materials in radioactive waste repositories establish high pH which brings many benefits. The pH will change with time as the chemical constituents responsible for it are leached away. This has been simulated in the laboratory for a Sulphate Resisting Portland Cement (SRPC), a slag-modified cement composed of 90% Blast Furnace Slag (BFS) and 10% Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and an ash-modified cement containing 90% Pulverized Fuel Ash (PFA) and 10% OPC. They have been leached in demineralised water and a synthetic groundwater typical of a clay environment. Leachate analyses for a variety of elements showed that the leachate was not usually in equilibrium with any of the solid phases. Nevertheless the experimental evolution of pH was not too different from that predicted by assuming equilibrium and the predictions offer a means of estimating a lower bound for pH as it evolves in a real repository. The experiments with synthetic groundwater showed that the dominant effect influencing pH was precipitation of CaCO 3 from bicarbonates in the groundwater resulting in a reduction in both pH and buffer capacity. The ash-modified cement has particularly poor pH-buffering performance which is exacerbated in the groundwater. (author)

  4. A novel and easy-to-prepare strontium(II) modified calcium phosphate bone cement with enhanced mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, M; Henß, A; Rohnke, M; Gelinsky, M

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two different approaches to obtaining strontium-modified calcium phosphate bone cements (SrCPCs) without elaborate synthesis of Sr-containing calcium phosphate species as cement precursors that could release biologically effective doses of Sr(2+) and thus could improve the healing of osteoporotic bone defects. Using strontium carbonate as a strontium(II) source, it was introduced into a hydroxyapatite-forming cement either by the addition of SrCO3 to an α-tricalcium phosphate-based cement precursor mixture (A-type) or by substitution of CaCO3 by SrCO3 during precursor composition (S-type). The cements, obtained after setting in a water-saturated atmosphere, contained up to 2.2at.% strontium in different distribution patterns as determined by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The setting time of CPC and A-type cements was in the range of 6.5-7.5min and increased for substitution-type cements (12.5-13.0min). Set cements had an open porosity between 26 and 42%. Compressive strength was found to increase from 29MPa up to 90% in substituted S-type cements (58MPa). SrCPC samples released between 0.45 and 1.53mgg(-1) Sr(2+) within 21days and showed increased radiopacity. Based on these findings, the SrCPC developed in this study could be beneficial for the treatment of defects of systemically impaired (e.g. osteoporotic) bone. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation in vivo of biocompatibility of differents resin-modified cements for bonding orthodontic bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JANAINA A. MESQUITA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The focus of this study was to test the hypothesis that there would be no difference between the biocompatibility of resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Sixty male Wistar rats were selected and divided into four groups: Control Group; Crosslink Group; RMO Group and Transbond Group. The materials were inserted into rat subcutaneous tissue. After time intervals of 7, 15 and 30 days morphological analyses were performed. The histological parameters assessed were: inflammatory infiltrate intensity; reaction of multinucleated giant cells; edema; necrosis; granulation reaction; young fibroblasts and collagenization. The results obtained were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn test (P<0.05. After 7 days, Groups RMO and Transbond showed intense inflammatory infiltrate (P=0.004, only Group RMO presented greater expression of multinucleated giant cell reaction (P=0.003 compared with the control group. After the time intervals of 15 and 30 days, there was evidence of light/moderate inflammatory infiltrate, lower level of multinucleated giant cell reaction and thicker areas of young fibroblasts in all the groups. The hypothesis was rejected. The Crosslink cement provided good tissue response, since it demonstrated a lower level of inflammatory infiltrate and higher degree of collagenization, while RMO demonstrated the lowest level of biocompatibility.

  6. The Influence of Modified Sodium Montmorillonite as Filler on the Performance of Glass Polyalkenoate Cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Izzah Md Nasir; Norhazlin Zainuddin; Wan Md Zin Wan Yunus; Khamirul Amin Matori

    2014-01-01

    Modification of sodium montmorillonite (Na-MMT) to aluminium montmorillonite (Al-MMT) and octadecylamine montmorillonite (ODA-MMT) was done by ion exchange process. These MMTs were added as filler to glass polyalkenoate cement (GPC) formulation. The compressive strength and setting reaction of the GPCs were studied. Aluminosilicate glass powder with polyacrylic acid, water and MMT were mixed together with weight ratio of 5:1:1:(1.5 wt % powder). The setting reaction was studied from FTIR by monitoring the conversion of COOH in polyacrylic acid to crosslink with metal ions from the glass to form COO - M + at different aging time. The addition of Al-MMT slightly sped up the setting reaction of GPCs as early as 3 minutes and recorded significant increment in compressive strength at early aging time. While GPC+ODA-MMT only showed increment in compressive strength at early aging time. However, GPC+Na-MMT had shown the slowest performance in GPCs setting reaction and lowest value of the compressive strength. Although the compressive strength for these GPCs was different at early aging time, all cements recorded almost similar compressive strength at day 28. The study highlighted the potential of modified Na-MMT as filler to enhance the performance of GPCs as posterior filling material. (author)

  7. Functionalized surfaces of polylactide modified by Langmuir-Blodgett films of amphiphilic block copolymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubies, Dana; Machová, Luďka; Brynda, Eduard; Lukáš, Jaromír; Rypáček, František

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 2 (2003), s. 143-149 ISSN 0957-4530 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/99/0576 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : polylactide * Langmuir - Blodgett films * amphiphilic block copolymers Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.930, year: 2003

  8. A preliminary assessment of polymer-modified cements for use in immobilisation of intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnay, S.G.; Dyson, J.R.

    1982-11-01

    A range of polymer-modified cements has been examined as candidate materials for the immobilisation of intermediate level radioactive waste. The waste streams studied were inactive simulates of real wastes and included ion-exchange resins, Magnox debris and dilute sludges. Preliminary experiments on the compatibility of the polymer-cement-waste combinations have been carried out and measurements of flexural strength before and after #betta#-irradiation to 10 9 rad and water immersion have been made. Soxhlet leach tests have been used to compare the leach rates of the different materials. From the results of these preliminary experiments, a limited number of polymer-modified cements have been suggested as suitable for more detailed study. (author)

  9. The effects of shelf life on the compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajong, K. H.; Damiyanti, M.; Irawan, B.

    2017-08-01

    Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) is a restoration material composed of powder and liquid whose stability is affected by its shelf life. This is an issue that has not been taken into consideration by customers or sellers. To observe the effects of shelf life on the compressive strength of RMGIC, 30 cylindrical (d = 4mm and t = 6mm) specimens of RMGIC (Fuji II LC, GC, Tokyo, Japan) were divided into three groups with different storage times and their compressive strength was tested with a universal testing machine. Results were statistically analyzed with the one-way ANOVA test. There were significant differences (p<0.05) between the three groups of RMGIC. There is a decrease in the compressive strength value along with the duration of storage time.

  10. Histological assessment of pulpal responses to resin modified glass ionomer cements in human teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eskandarizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The biocompatibility of resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGIs as a lining material is still under question. The present study evaluated the response of the pulp-dentin complex following application of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, calcium hydroxide and conventional glass-ionomer in deep cavities prepared in human teeth. Materials and Methods: In this controlled clinical trial, 30 deep class V buccal cavities (3 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm were prepared in human premolars treatment planned to be extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into 3 groups. Groups were lined by a RMGI (Vivaglass, conventional glass Ionomer (Ionocid and calcium hydroxide respectively. The cavities were subsequently filled with amalgam. Each group was then divided into two sub-groups according to time intervals 5 and 30 days. The patients were referred to Kerman Dental School and in accordance with orthodontic treatment plan; premolars were extracted and then prepared for histological assessment. The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid Schiff techniques. All of the samples were examined using a number of criteria including odontoblastic changes, inflammatory cells response, reactionary dentin formation and presence of microorganisms. The data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. P 0.05. Conclusion: Ionocid and Vivaglass resin-modified glass ionomers can be used as lining materials in human teeth.

  11. Comparison of Elastic Modulus and Compressive Strength of Ariadent and Harvard Polycarboxylate Cement and Vitremer Resin Modified Glass Ionomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadian Khoshemehr Leila

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Luting agents are used to attach indirect restoration into or on the tooth. Poor mechanical properties of cement may be a cause of fracture of this layer and lead to caries and restoration removal. The purpose of this study was to compare the elastic modulus and compressive strength of Ariadent (A Poly and Harvard polycarboxylate (H Poly cements and Vitremer resin modified glass ionomer (RGl.Materials & Methods: In this experimental study 15 specimens were prepared form each experimental cement in Laboratory of Tehran Oil Refining Company. The cylindrical specimens were compressed in Instron machine after 24 hours. Elastic modulus and compressive strength were calculated from stress/strain curve of each specimen. One way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis and P values<0.05 were considered to be statistically significant.Results: The mean elastic modulus and mean compressive strength were 2.2 GPa and 87.8MPa in H poly, 2.4 GPa and 56.5 MPa in A Poly, and 0.8GPa and 105.6 MPa in RGI, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that compressive strength and elastic modulus of both polycarboxylate cements were significantly different from hybrid ionomer (P<0.05, but the difference between elastic modulus of two types of polycarboxilate cements was not statistically significant. Compressive strength of two polycarboxilate cements were significantly different (P<0.05. Conclusion: An ideal lutting agent must have the best mechanical properties. Between the tested luttins RGl cement had the lowest elastic modulus and the highest compressive strength, but the A poly cement had the highest elastic modulus and the lowest compressive strength. Therefore none of them was the best.

  12. The sorption and mechanical properties of the modified cement matrix used for conditioning of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogaru, Daniela; Nuculae, Ortenzia; Jinescu, Gheorghita; Duliu, Octavian; Dogaru, Gheorghe

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radioactive contaminant sorption onto concrete represents one of the most important retardation mechanisms in engineered barriers such as the conditioning matrix itself, concrete walls and concrete floors. During the life of a disposal facility for radioactive waste, the sorption properties as well as the mechanical properties of the cement are affected by both external and internal processes. The most important sorbing material present in concrete is the hydrated cement. The sorption data obtained for specific cement or cement mixes in general may be used to characterize a given cement type. In order to improve the mechanical and sorption properties of the cement matrix, different additives were used in the laboratory tests. The used additives are known to have good sorption properties. The paper describes the influence of the concentration of additives on the mechanical and sorption properties of the cement matrix. As radioactive contaminants 134 Cs, 60 Co, 3 H, 241 Am were used. (authors)

  13. Clinical evaluation of a new art material: Nanoparticulated resin-modified glass ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konde, S.; Raj, S.; Jaiswal, D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The success of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) technique depends on the restorative material; hence, clinical studies with various materials are necessary. Aim: The aim of the present study was to clinically evaluate and compare the nanoionomer and high-viscosity glass ionomer using United States Public Health Services (USPHS) Modified Cvar/Ryge Criteria with ART approach. Materials and Methods: Two primary molars in 50 healthy children aged between 5 and 8 years were selected for the study. The teeth were treated with ART and divided into two groups. The group 1 teeth were restored with nanoionomer (Ketac Nano 100 3M ESPE) and group 2 with high-viscosity glass ionomer cement (HVGIC), (Fuji IX GC). Each restoration was evaluated using the USPHS Modified Cvar/Ryge Criteria at baseline and 6 months’ and 12 months’ time interval. Statistical analysis used: Chi-squared (χ2) test. Results: Nanoionomer was significantly better than HVGIC with respect to color match at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months (P0.05), but at 12 months, nanoionomer was statistically better than HVGIC (P0.05). Conclusion: The results indicate that nanoionomer can be a successful alternative restorative material for use with ART technique. PMID:24478966

  14. Influence of Crumb-Rubber in the Mechanical Response of Modified Portland Cement Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Retama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of crumb-rubber on the mechanical properties of Portland cement concrete (PCC is studied by experimental tests and numerical simulations. The main hypothesis of the study is that replacing part of the stone aggregate with crumb-rubber in the mix modifies the energy dissipation during the cracking process and affects the concrete behaviour under monotonically increasing loads. The experimental research program characterizes the mechanical properties of PCC for three different types of concrete with a variable content of crumb-rubber. The experimental results showed that fracture energy and other properties are directly related to the rubber fineness used in the mixture. The material properties derived for these laboratory tests are used to study, by numerical models, its response through its damage evolution. The numerical model used to simulate the damage evolution of the concrete is the Embedded Discontinuity Method (EDM. One characteristic of the EDM is that it does not need to modify the mesh topology to propagate the damage through the continuum solid. For this study, the Disk-Shaped Compact Tension specimen geometry, normed by the D7313-13 of the ASTM, is used. Results showed that the numerical methods provide good approximation of the experimental curve in the elastic and softening branches.

  15. Effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tatiana Bahia Junqueira; Jansen, Wellington Corrêa; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Souki, Bernardo Quiroga; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). One hundred premolars, extracted for orthodontic reasons, were divided into five groups (n = 20). Group 1 (control): enamel was etched with 35 per cent phosphoric acid, a thin layer of adhesive was applied, and the brackets were bonded with Transbond XT. Group 2: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC). Group 3: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with conventional GIC. Group 4: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. Group 5: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 hours before they were submitted to shear testing. The results demonstrated that bond strength values of group 1 (17.08 ± 6.39 MPa) were significantly higher in comparison with the other groups. Groups 2 (3.43 ± 1.94 MPa) and 3 (3.92 ± 1.57 MPa) presented values below the average recommended in the literature. With regard to adhesive remnant index, the groups in which the enamel was treated with NaOCl showed a behaviour similar to that of the resin composite. It is conclude with enamel treatment with NaOCl increased bonding strength of brackets bonded with GIC and RMGIC, but increased bond strength was not statistically significant when compared to the untreated groups.

  16. XRD study of intercalation in statically annealed composites of ethylene copolymers and organically modified montmorillonites. 2. One-tailed organoclays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Filippi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene copolymers with different polar comonomers, such as vinyl acetate, methyl acrylate, glycidyl methacrylate, and maleic anhydride, were used for the preparation of polymer/clay nanocomposites by statically annealing their mechanical mixtures with different commercial or home-made organically modified montmorillonites containing only one long alkyl tail. The nanostructure of the products was monitored by X-ray diffraction, and the dispersion of the silicate particles within the polymer matrix was qualitatively evaluated through microscopic analyses. The effect of the preparation conditions on the structure and the morphology of the composites was also addressed through the characterization of selected samples with similar composition prepared by melt compounding. In agreement with the findings reported in a previous paper for the composites filled with two-tailed organoclays, intercalation of the copolymer chains within the tighter galleries of the one-tailed clays occurs easily, independent of the application of a mechanical stress. However, the shear-driven break-up of the intercalated clay particles into smaller platelets (exfoliation seems more hindered. A collapse of the organoclay interlayer spacing was only observed clearly for a commercial one-tailed organoclay – Cloisite® 30B – whereas the same effect was almost negligible for a home-made organoclay with similar structure.

  17. Self-consistent-field analysis of the micellization of carboxy-modified poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) triblock copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauw, Y.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    The micellization properties of carboxy-modified Pluronics P85 (poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) triblock copolymers) are investigated by means of a molecularly realistic self-consistent-field theory. We consider the, so-called, carboxylic acid

  18. The Long-Term Study of Some mechanical and Chemical Properties of Polymer Modified Cement Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatta, H.A.; Eskander, S.B.

    2002-01-01

    The present work is a new experimental trend to study the long-term durability of polymer/cement/borate waste forms in storage and disposal sites during the long period of time. The data obtained indicate that all the samples of polymer modified cement waste forms immersed in both distilled and ground water (for more than 2700 days) show a slight increase in the compressive strength values. The chemical stability of the immobilized borate waste forms in distilled and ground water was studied. The cumulative leach fraction in percentage, of Cs-137 isotope from the final solidified waste forms in case of using ground water was lower than that in distilled water for all samples used and the presence of polymer lowered the percent release of radioactive Cs-137 isotope in all samples studied . The leach coefficients (Lc) and the leach indices (Li) of radioactive cesium-137 isotope for cement borate and polymer modified cement waste forms were also calculated. It was found that the leach indices values greater than 6

  19. Effect of light curing unit on resin-modified glass-ionomer cements: a microhardness assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefaly, Daniela Francisca Gigo; de Mello, Liliam Lucia Carrara Paes; Wang, Linda; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the microhardness of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGICs) photoactivated with a blue light-emitting diode (LED) curing light. Thirty specimens were distributed in 3 groups: Fuji II LC Improved/GC (RM1), Vitremer/3M ESPE (RM2) and Filtek Z250/3M ESPE (RM3). Two commercial light-curing units were used to polymerize the materials: LED/Ultrablue IS and a halogen light/XL3000 (QTH). After 24 h, Knoop microhardness test was performed. Data were submitted to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. At the top surface, no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) in the microhardness was seen when the LED and QTH lights were used for all materials. At the bottom surface, microhardness mean value of RM2 was significantly higher when the QTH light was used (plight was used. No statistically significant difference (p>0.05) was seen at the bottom surface for RM3, irrespective of the light used. Top-to-bottom surface comparison showed no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) for both RMGICs, regardless of the light used. For RM3, microhardness mean value at the top was significantly higher (pcuring units were used. The microhardness values seen when a LED light was used varied depending on the restorative material tested.

  20. Effect of light curing unit on resin-modified glass-ionomer cements: a microhardness assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Francisca Gigo Cefaly

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the microhardness of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGICs photoactivated with a blue light-emitting diode (LED curing light. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty specimens were distributed in 3 groups: Fuji II LC Improved/GC (RM1, Vitremer/3M ESPE (RM2 and Filtek Z250/ 3M ESPE (RM3. Two commercial light-curing units were used to polymerize the materials: LED/Ultrablue IS and a halogen light/XL3000 (QTH. After 24 h, Knoop microhardness test was performed. Data were submitted to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. RESULTS: At the top surface, no statistically significant difference (p>0.05 in the microhardness was seen when the LED and QTH lights were used for all materials. At the bottom surface, microhardness mean value of RM2 was significantly higher when the QTH light was used (p0.05 was seen at the bottom surface for RM3, irrespective of the light used. Top-to-bottom surface comparison showed no statistically significant difference (p>0.05 for both RMGICs, regardless of the light used. For RM3, microhardness mean value at the top was significantly higher (p<0.05 than bottom microhardness when both curing units were used. CONCLUSION: The microhardness values seen when a LED light was used varied depending on the restorative material tested.

  1. Modified water-cement ratio law for compressive strength of rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work examines the modification of age long water – cement ratio law of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) concrete to cater for concrete with Rice Husk Ash (RHA). Chemical analysis of RHA produced under controlled temperature of 600°C was carried out. A total of one hundred and fifty (150) RHA concrete cubes at ...

  2. Physical Properties, Film Thickness, and Bond Strengths of Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements According to Their Delivery Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Taiseer A; Abdulmajeed, Awab A; Altitinchi, Ali; Ahmed, Sumitha N; Donovan, Terence E

    2018-03-05

    To determine the effect of changing the dispensing or mixing method of resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cements on their water sorption, solubility, film thickness, and shear bond strength. Disc-shaped specimens of RMGI cements (RelyX: Luting [handmix], Luting Plus [clicker-handmix], Luting Plus [automix], GC: Fuji PLUS [capsule-automix], FujiCEM 2 [automix], [n = 10]) were prepared according to ISO standard 4049 for water sorption and solubility tests. Furthermore, the percentage of mass change, percentage of solubility, and percentage of water absorbed was also determined. Film thickness was measured according to ISO standard 9917-2; the mean of 5 measurements for each cement was calculated. Shear bond strength for each cement was determined according to ISO standard 29022 before and after thermocycling at 20,000 cycles, temperatures 5 to 55°C with a 15-second dwell time (n = 10/subgroup). Two- and one-way ANOVA were used to analyze data for statistical significance (p 0.05). RelyX Luting Plus (clicker-handmix) displayed lower solubility than its handmix and automix counterparts (p < 0.05). Film thickness of RelyX cements was significantly different (p < 0.05). RelyX Luting Plus (automix) had the lowest film thickness (19 μm) compared to its handmix (48 μm) and clicker-handmix (117 μm) counterparts (p < 0.05). GC Fuji PLUS (capsule-automix, 22 μm) was significantly lower than the automix version (GC FujiCEM 2, 127 μm) (p < 0.05). Shear bond strength of RelyX Luting Plus (automix) was significantly lower than its handmix and clicker-handmix versions (p < 0.05). GC Fuji PLUS (capsule-automix) was significantly higher than GC FujiCEM 2 (automix) (p < 0.05). The binary interaction of the two independent variables (dispensing/mixing method and thermocycling) was significant for the shear bond strengths of the GC cements only (p < 0.05). Change in the dispensing/mixing method of RMGI cement from the same brand may have an effect on its physical properties

  3. Microleakage of conventional, resin-modified, and nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement as primary teeth filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dita Madyarani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glass ionomer cements are one of many dental materials that widely used in pediatric dentistry due to their advantage of fluoride release and chemical bond to tooth structure. Adherence of the filling material to the cavity walls is one of the most important characteristic that need to be examined its effect on microleakage. Purpose: This study was conducted to examine the microleakage of nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement compared with the conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Methods: Standard class V cavities sized 3 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm were made on a total of 21 extracted maxillary primary canine teeth and restored with the conventional, resin-modified, dan nano-ionomer glass ionomer cements. All the teeth were immersed in a 2% methylene blue dye for 4 hours. The depth of dye penetration was assessed using digital microscope after sectioning the teeth labio-palatally. The results were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: All type of glass ionomer material showed microleakage. Conventional glass ionomer cement demonstrated the least microleakage with mean score 1.29. the resin-modified glass ionomer cements (mean score 1.57 and nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement (mean score 2.57. Conclusion: The conventional glassionomer, resin modified glassionomer, and nano-ionomer glassionomer showed micro leakage as filling material in primary teeth cavity. The micro leakage among three types was not significant difference. All three material were comparable in performance and can be used for filling material but still needs a coating material to fill the microleakage.Latar belakang: Semen ionomer kaca adalah salah satu dari banyak bahan gigi yang banyak digunakan dalam praktek kedokteran gigi anak karena bahan tersebut merilis fluoride dan berikatan kimia dengan struktur gigi. Perlekatan bahan tumpatan pada dinding kavitas adalah salah satu karakteristik paling penting yang perlu diteliti efeknya terhadap

  4. The biocompatibility of modified experimental Portland cements with potential for use in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the biocompatibility of a group of new potential dental materials and their eluants by assessing cell viability. Calcium sulpho-aluminate cement (CSA), calcium fluoro-aluminate cement (CFA) and glass-ionomer cement (GIC; Ketac Molar), used as the control, were tested for biocompatibility. Using a direct test method cell viability was measured quantitatively using alamarBluetrade mark dye, and an indirect test method where cells were grown on material elutions and cell viability was assessed using methyltetrazolium (MTT) assay as recommended by ISO 10 993-Part 5 for in vitro testing. Statistical analysis was performed by analysis of variance and Tukey multi-comparison test method. Elution collected from the prototype cements and the GIC cured for 1 and 7 days allowed high cell activity after 24 h cell exposure, which reduced after 48 h when compared to the nontoxic glass-ionomer control, but increased significantly after 72 h cell contact. Elutions collected after 28 days revealed reduced cell activity at all cell exposure times. Cells placed in direct contact with the prototype materials showed reduced cell activity when compared with the control. Cell growth was poor when seeded in direct contact with the prototype cements. GIC encouraged cell growth after 1 day of contact. The eluted species for all the cements tested exhibited adequate cell viability in the early ages with reduced cell activity at 28 days. Changes in the production of calcium hydroxide as a by-product of cement hydration affect the material biocompatibility adversely.

  5. Biocompatibility of a restorative resin-modified glass ionomer cement applied in very deep cavities prepared in human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Scheffel, Débora Lopes Sales; Giro, Elisa Maria Aparecida; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated whether a restorative resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Vitremer (VM), would be biocompatible with pulp tissue when used as a liner in very deep cavities prepared in young human permanent teeth. Two dental cements in current use as liner materials, Vitrebond (VB) and Dycal (DY), were compared to VM. Class V cavities were prepared in 36 sound premolars that were scheduled for extraction, and the cavity floor was lined with the restorative cement (VM) or a liner/base control cement (VB or DY). For VM specimens, the cavity floor was pretreated with a primer (polyacrylic acid plus 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate). Teeth were extracted after 7 or 30 days and processed for microscopic evaluation. In the VM group, inward diffusion of dental material components through dentinal tubules, associated with disruption of the odontoblastic layer, moderate to intense inflammatory response, and resorption of inner dentin, was observed in 2 teeth at 7 days. These histologic features were observed in 1 tooth at 30 days. In the VB group, mild inflammatory reactions and tissue disorganization observed at 7 days were resolved at 30 days. No pulpal damage occurred in the DY specimens. Of the materials tested, only Vitremer was not considered biocompatible, because it caused persistent pulpal damage when applied in very deep cavities (remaining dentin thickness less than 0.3 mm).

  6. Shear Resistance Properties of Modified Nano-SiO2/AA/AM Copolymer Oil Displacement Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanjun Lai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To address the problem regarding poor shear resistance of commonly employed polymers for oil displacement, modified nano-SiO2/AA/AM copolymer (HPMNS oil displacement agents were synthesized using acrylic acid (AA, acrylamide (AM, and modified nano-SiO2 of different modification degrees as raw materials. HPMNS was characterized by means of infrared spectroscopy (IR, nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, dynamic/static light scattering, and scanning electron microscope. A comparative study of the shear resistance properties for partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM and HPMNS was conducted. Compared to HPAM, the introduced hyperbranched structure endowed HPMNS with good shear resistance, which was quantified from the viscosity retention ratio of the polymer solutions. From the perspective of rheological property, HPMNS also showed great shear stability after shearing by a Mixing Speed Governor and porous media shear model. Furthermore, with a higher degree of modification, HPMNS-2 had better shear stability in terms of viscosity and rheological property than HPMNS-1. The phenomena were due to its lower hydrodynamic radius, weight-average molecular weight, and better flexibility of its molecular chains. In addition, upon the indoor displacement test, the resistance factor and residual resistance factor values of HPMNS-2 were higher than those of HPAM. This behavior is beneficial for increasing oil recovery.

  7. Effect of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation on the mechanical properties of resin modified glass-ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roza Haghgoo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Metallic nano-particles show exclusive biological, chemical and physical characteristic. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effect of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation (0 (as control, 20, 40, 80, 120, 200 ppm on the mechanical Properties ( compressive and flexural strength of resin modified Glass ionomer Cement.   Materials and Methods: Based on ISO 4049 and ISO 9971 for polyalkenoid cements, 90 cases in each group were prepared for the flexural and compressive strength. Specimens in 6 groups with different amounts of nanosilver (20, 40, 80, 120 and 200 ppm and control (Fuji II LC improved, stored in distilled water at 37 ° C for 1 day and 30 days. Flexural strength, using a three-point bending method, Modulus of elasticity and the compressive strength were measured by universal testing machine (Zwick with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey post HOC test.   Results: The flexural strength and modulus of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation of resin modified glass-ionomer cement were not significantly different (P>0.05. The compressive strength of incorporating of20 ppm compared with control (P=0.01, 40 ppm (P=0.02 and 80 ppm compared with control (P<0.001 were increased. The flexural strength and compressive strength of Fuji II LC, containing nanosilver particles were increased after 1 day and 1 month significantly (P<0.001.   Conclusion: Incorporation of 20 to 80 ppm nanosilver into Fuji II LC had increased mechanical properties compared to the original cement.

  8. Study of radon diffusion from RHA-modified ordinary Portland cement using SSNTD technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narula, A.K.; Goyal, S.K.; Chauhan, R.P.; Chakarvarti, S.K.

    2013-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of radon is a very important factor in estimating the rate of indoor radon inflow. The aim of this work is to develop and assess the potential of radon resistant construction materials in residential buildings. Of late, rice husk ash (RHA) has been used as a component in cement. The X-ray diffraction of RHA indicates that the RHA contains mainly amorphous materials while the X-ray fluorescence analysis shows that the major percentage of it is composed of silica. The amorphous silica present in the RHA is responsible for the pozzolonic activity of the ash. The results of the present study indicate that the RHA when mixed with cement initially reduces radon diffusion coefficient, followed by enhancement when the percentage of RHA is increased above 30% by weight. - Highlights: ► Radon diffusion coefficient has been measured in Portland cement with different percentage of rice husk ash (RHA). ► The mixing of RHA to cement changes the radon diffusion coefficient. ► The mixture of cement and RHA can be used to make building materials more resistant to radon entry through diffusion

  9. Well-defined copolymers synthesized by RAFT polymerization as effective modifiers to enhance the photocatalytic performance of TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilaki, E., E-mail: euavasilakh@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, 710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Applied Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, 710 04 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Kaliva, M. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research & Technology-Hellas, P.O. Box 1385, Vassilika Vouton, 711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete, 710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Katsarakis, N. [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Applied Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, 710 04 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research & Technology-Hellas, P.O. Box 1385, Vassilika Vouton, 711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Vamvakaki, M. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research & Technology-Hellas, P.O. Box 1385, Vassilika Vouton, 711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete, 710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Well-defined, random functional copolymers were synthesized by RAFT polymerization. • Novel TiO{sub 2} particles in-situ modified with copolymers were synthesized. • The hybrid catalysts exhibited reduced aggregation and particle size. • The photocatalytic removal of methylene blue was higher for the hybrid catalysts. - Αbstract: The enhancement of the photocatalytic performance of anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles is demonstrated by a facile route, involving their in-situ surface modification with preformed polymer chains. Random copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate-co-methacrylic acid (PEGA-co-MAA) or poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate-co-dopamine methacrylamide (PEGA-co-DMA) were synthesized by reversible addition−fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization and were bound onto the surface of anatase titania nanoparticles via the “grafting to” method. The hybrid nanocatalysts were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, zeta-potential measurements, X-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Their photocatalytic performance was evaluated by the decoloration of methylene blue (MB) dye in aqueous media under UV–vis light irradiation. The enhanced photoactivity and reusability of the polymer modified photocatalysts compared to that of bare TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was attributed to their improved dispersability and colloidal stability, the smaller particle size that leads to a larger surface area and the increased adsorption capacity of the dye onto the polymer modified nanoparticles.

  10. Autogenous Deformation and Change of the Relative Humidity in Silica Fume-Modified Cement Paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    1996-01-01

    Even during sealed curing and at a constant temperature a hardening cement paste will deform and the relative humidity within its pores will lower. This autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change may be so significant that the cement paste cracks if the deformation is restrained....... This article focuses on the influence of silica fume addition on autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change. Continuous measurement of autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change for more than 1 year and 1« years, respectively, was performed. The investigations show...... thatsilica fume addition markedly increases the autogenous shrinkage as well as the autogenous relative humidity change....

  11. Durability Of Cellulose-cement Composites Modified By Polymer [durabilidade De Compósito Biomassa Vegetal-cimento Modificado Por Polímero

    OpenAIRE

    Pimentel L.L.; Beraldo A.L.; Savastano Jr. H.

    2006-01-01

    The durability of the cellulose-cement composites is a decisive factor to introduce such material in the market. Polymers have been used in concrete and mortar production to increase its durability. The goal of this work was the physical and mechanical characterization of cellulose-cement composites modified by a polymer and the subsequent durability evaluation. The work also evaluated the dispersion of acrylic polymer in composites made of Pinus caribaea residues. The physical properties obs...

  12. Modifying Cement Hydration with NS@PCE Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that fine particles could accelerate cement hydration process, or, more specifically, this accelerating effect can be attributed to additional surface area introduced by fine particles. In addition to this view, the surface state of fine particles is also an important factor, especially for nanoparticles. In the previous study, a series of nano-SiO2-polycarboxylate superplasticizer core-shell nanoparticles (NS@PCE were synthesized, which have a similar particle size distribution but different surface properties. In this study, the impact of NS@PCE on cement hydration was investigated by heat flow calorimetry, mechanical property measurement, XRD, and SEM. Results show that, among a series of NS@PCE, NS@PCE-2 with a moderate shell-core ratio appeared to be more effective in accelerating cement hydration. As dosage increases, the efficiency of NS@PCE-2 would reach a plateau which is quantified by various characteristic values. Compressive strength results indicate that strength has a linear correlation with cumulative heat release. A hypothesis was proposed to explain the modification effect of NS@PCE, which highlights a balance between initial dispersion and pozzolanic reactivity. This paper provides a new understanding for the surface modification of supplementary cementitious materials and their application and also sheds a new light on nano-SiO2 for optimizing cement-based materials.

  13. Nano-modified cement composites and its applicability as concrete repair material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzur, Tanvir

    Nanotechnology or Nano-science, considered the forth industrial revolution, has received considerable attention in the past decade. The physical properties of a nano-scaled material are entirely different than that of bulk materials. With the emerging nanotechnology, one can build material block atom by atom. Therefore, through nanotechnology it is possible to enhance and control the physical properties of materials to a great extent. Composites such as concrete materials have very high strength and Young's modulus but relatively low toughness and ductility due to their covalent bonding between atoms and lacking of slip systems in the crystal structures. However, the strength and life of concrete structures are determined by the microstructure and mass transfer at nano scale. Cementitious composites are amenable to manipulation through nanotechnology due to the physical behavior and size of hydration products. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are nearly ideal reinforcing agent due to extremely high aspect ratios and ultra high strengths. So there is a great potential to utilize CNT in producing new cement based composite materials. It is evident from the review of past literature that mechanical properties of nanotubes reinforced cementitious composites have been highly variable. Some researches yielded improvement in performance of CNT-cement composites as compared to plain cement samples, while other resulted in inconsequential changes in mechanical properties. Even in some cases considerable less strengths and modulus were obtained. Another major difficulty of producing CNT reinforced cementitious composites is the attainment of homogeneous dispersion of nanotubes into cement but no standard procedures to mix CNT within the cement is available. CNT attract more water to adhere to their surface due to their high aspect ratio which eventually results in less workability of the cement mix. Therefore, it is extremely important to develop a suitable mixing technique and an

  14. Adsorption of cefixime from aqueous solutions using modified hardened paste of Portland cement by perlite; optimization by Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulifard, Mohammad Hossein; Khanmohammadi, Soghra; Heidari, Azam

    In the present study, we have used a simple and cost-effective removal technique by a commercially available Fe-Al-SiO2 containing complex material (hardened paste of Portland cement (HPPC)). The adsorbing performance of HPPC and modified HPPC with perlite for removal of cefixime from aqueous solutions was investigated comparatively by using batch adsorption studies. HPPC has been selected because of the main advantages such as high efficiency, simple separation of sludge, low-cost and abundant availability. A Taguchi orthogonal array experimental design with an OA16 (4(5)) matrix was employed to optimize the affecting factors of adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dosage, type of adsorbent, contact time and pH. On the basis of equilibrium adsorption data, Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption isotherm models were also confirmed. The results showed that HPPC and modified HPPC were both efficient adsorbents for cefixime removal.

  15. Properties and osteoblast cytocompatibility of self-curing acrylic cements modified by glass fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, P; Garcia, M P; Fernandes, M H; Fernandes, M H V

    2013-11-01

    Materials filled with a silicate glass (MSi) and a borate glass (MB) were developed and compared in terms of their in vitro behavior. The effect of filler composition and concentration (0, 30, 40 and 50 wt%) on the curing parameters, residual monomer, water uptake, weight loss, bioactivity, mechanical properties (bending and compression) and osteoblast cytocompatibility was evaluated. The addition of bioactive glass filler significantly improved the cements curing parameters and the mechanical properties. The most relevant results were obtained for the lower filler concentration (30 t%) a maximum flexural strength of 40.4 Pa for MB3 and a maximum compressive strength of 95.7 MPa for MSi3. In vitro bioactivity in acellular media was enhanced by the higher glass contents in the cements. Regarding the biological assessment, the incorporation of the silicate glass significantly improved osteoblast cytocompatibility, whereas the presence of the borate glass resulted in a poor cell response. Nevertheless it was shown that the surviving cells on the MB surface were in a more differentiated stage compared to those growing over non-filled poly(methyl methacrylate). Results suggest that the developed formulations offer a high range of properties that might be interesting for their use as self-curing cements.

  16. Fracture frequency and longevity of fractured resin composite, polyacid-modified resin composite, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement class IV restorations: an up to 14 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture frequency and longevity of fractured class IV resin composite (RC), polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer; PMRC), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) restorations in a longitudinal long-term follow-up. Eighty-five class IV RC (43...

  17. The Feasibility of Modified Magnesia-Phosphate Cement as a Heat Resistant Adhesive for Strengthening Concrete with Carbon Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailian Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available External bonding of carbon fiber sheets has become a popular technique for strengthening concrete structures all over the world. Epoxy adhesive, which is used to bond the carbon fiber sheets and concrete, deteriorates rapidly when being exposed to high temperatures. This paper presents a high-temperature-resistant modified magnesia-phosphate cement (MPC with the compressive strength that does not decrease at the temperature of 600 °C. The bond properties of both the modified MPC and the epoxy adhesive between externally bonded carbon fiber sheets and concrete were evaluated by using a double-shear test method after exposure to elevating temperatures from 105 °C to 500 °C. The results showed that the bond strength of the modified MPC at room temperature (RT is much higher than that of the epoxy resin. Full carbonation with almost 0 MPa was detected for the epoxy sample after the exposure to 300 °C, while only 40% reduction of bond strength was tested for the modified MPC sample. Although the modified MPC specimens failed through interlaminar slip of fiber strips instead of complete debonding, the MPC specimens performed higher bond strength than epoxy resin at ambient temperature, and retained much higher bond strength at elevated temperatures. It could be concluded that it is feasible to strengthen concrete structural members with externally bonded carbon fiber sheets using the modified MPC instead of epoxy adhesive. Furthermore, the use of the modified MPC as the binder between carbon fiber sheets and concrete can be less expensive and an ecologically friendly alternative.

  18. Encapsulation, solid-phases identification and leaching of toxic metals in cement systems modified by natural biodegradable polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasheras-Zubiate, M; Navarro-Blasco, I; Fernández, J M; Alvarez, J I

    2012-09-30

    Cement mortars loaded with Cr, Pb and Zn were modified by polymeric admixtures [chitosans with low (LMWCH), medium (MMWCH) and high (HMWCH) molecular weight and hydroxypropylchitosan (HPCH)]. The influence of the simultaneous presence of the heavy metal and the polymeric additive on the fresh properties (consistency, water retention and setting time) and on the compressive strength of the mortars was assessed. Leaching patterns as well as properties of the cement mortars were related to the heavy metals-bearing solid phases. Chitosan admixtures lessened the effect of the addition of Cr and Pb on the setting time. In all instances, chitosans improved the compressive strength of the Zn-bearing mortars yielding values as high as 15 N mm(-2). A newly reported Zn phase, dietrichite (ZnAl(2)(SO(4))(4)·22H(2)O) was identified under the presence of LMWCH: it was responsible for an improvement by 24% in Zn retention. Lead-bearing silicates, such as plumalsite (Pb(4)Al(2)(SiO(3))(7)), were also identified by XRD confirming that Pb was mainly retained as a part of the silicate network after Ca ion exchange. Also, the presence of polymer induced the appearance and stabilization of some Pb(IV) species. Finally, diverse chromate species were identified and related to the larger leaching values of Cr(VI). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hardness depth profile of lattice strained cemented carbide modified by high-energy boron ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Y.; Matsumura, A.; Higeta, K.; Inoue, T.; Shimizu, S.; Motonami, Y.; Sato, M.; Sadahiro, T.; Fujii, K.

    1991-07-01

    The hardness depth profiles of cemented carbides which were implanted with high-energy B + ions have been estimated using a dynamic microhardness tester. The B + implantations into (16% Co)-cemented WC alloys were carried out under conditions where the implantation energies were 1-3 MeV and the fluences 1 × 10 17-1 × 10 18ions/cm 2. The profiles show that the implanted layer becomes harder as fluences are chosen at higher values and there is a peak at a certain depth which depends on the implantation energy. In X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of the implanted surface the broadened refraction peaks of only WC and Co are detected and the increments of lattice strain and of residual stress in the near-surface region are observed. It is supposed that the hardening effect should be induced by an increase in residual stress produced by lattice strain. The hardness depth profile in successive implantation of ions with different energies agrees with the compounded profile of each one of the implantations. It is concluded that the hardness depth profile can be controlled under adequate conditions of implantation.

  20. Characterization of Chitosan/TiO2Nano-Powder Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement for Restorative Dental Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Marrwa A; Meera Priyadarshini, Balasankar; Neo, Jennifer; Fawzy, Amr S

    2017-04-01

    We are introducing novel glass-ionomer cement (GIC) dually-modified with chitosan (CH) in the liquid phase and titanium-dioxide nano-powder (TiO 2 /NP) in the powder phase. The aim was to investigate the effect of this dual-modification on the antibacterial properties against S. mutans biofilms and on the bulk and surface mechanical properties. Commercially available powder/liquid restorative GIC was used in this study. The GIC specimens were modified with 3% (w/w) TiO 2 /NP, 10% (v/v) CH solution, or dually-modified with TiO 2 /CH. The non-modified GIC was used as a control. The biofilms formations were characterized by SEM, live/dead assay using confocal-microscopy, colony-forming unit counts, and MTS assay. The bulk and surface mechanical properties were characterized in terms of flexural and compressive strengths and surface hardness, respectively. With the dual-modification, a significant improvement in the antibacterial properties was found both qualitatively and quantitatively. The synergetic effect of the dual-modification was also reflected on the enhancement of the flexural and compressive strengths. However, no difference was found in surface hardness. The modification of GIC powder with TiO 2 /NP showed to be more effective in enhancing the mechanical properties. However, the enhancement in the antibacterial properties was more evident with CH incorporation in GIC liquid. This study introduced novel glass ionomer cement dually-modified with TiO2 NP and chitosan with superior mechanical and antibacterial properties for potential applications in restorative and preventive dentistry. The modification of GIC powder with TiO2 NP showed to be more effective in enhancing the mechanical properties. However, the enhancement in the antibacterial properties was more evident with CH incorporation in GIC liquid. Although of the promising synergetic effect of the dual-modification of GIC with TiO2 NP/CH, further clinically-related studies are recommended. (J Esthet

  1. Mechanical Behavior of Concrete Modified by Replacement of Cement by Rice Husk Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Saravanan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Construction industry is in need of lump sum quantities of materials which has increased both their demand and price. The use of large quantities of cement leads to increasing CO2 emission and as a consequence, the greenhouse effect. Consumption of wastes and byproducts from various sources in the manufacture of concrete has gained a great deal of importance in present days. Various researches are currently being conducted concerning the use of such products in concrete. RHA is a carbon neutral green product. Lots of ways are being thought of for disposing them by making commercial use of this. Rice husk ash is a good super-pozzolan which can be used to make special concrete mixes. The rice husk ash has been taken for this present study due to its easy availability and effective pozzolonic properties that are expected to improve the mechanical strength properties of concrete. Concrete specimens were made for evaluation of Compressive, Split Tensile, Flexural strength and Stress-Strain Behavior of concrete. The tests were conducted at the age of 7 and 28 days. Generally all mixes containing RHA achieved better properties than the conventional mix without RHA. By the experimental investigation the recommendation is given for using optimum percentage of RHA in concrete.

  2. Studies on physico-chemical and mechanical properties of the irradiated latex modified mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassene, A.A.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis contains three chapter; chapter(I): Introduction and literature review on:- Introduction to polymer. - Mechanism of polymer-cement co-matrix formation.-Sulphate attack. - Solidification /stabilization of heavy metal in cement mortar. chapter(II): Materials and experimental techniques that include: 1- Preparation of latex polymer films from different polymer latices of styrene butadine rubber latex (SBR), poly (styrene-acrylic ester) latex (SAE) and vinylacetate /versatic -ester copolymer latex (C2A). The effect of γ-irradiation dose on the physico - chemical and mechanical properties of different latex polymer films was studied.2- Preparation of latex polymer-modified cement mortar with different ratios of cement: latex polymer and different curing method.3- Solidification /stabilization (S/S) of electroplating heavy metal precipitate in latex polymer- modified mortar with different cement /electroplating heavy metal sludge ratio. chapter(III) results and discussion

  3. On the crystallization behavior of syndiotactic-b-atactic polystyrene stereodiblock copolymers, atactic/syndiotactic polystyrene blends, and aPS/sPS blends modified with sPS-b-aPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annunziata, Liana, E-mail: liana.annunziatta@univ-rennes1.fr [Organométalliques et Catalyse, UMR 6226 Sciences Chimiques CNRS, Université de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Monasse, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.monasse@mines-paristech.fr [Mines-ParisTech, CEMEF, Centre de Mise en Forme des Matériaux, UMR CNRS 7635, Sophia Antipolis (France); Rizzo, Paola; Guerra, Gaetano [Dipartimento di Chimica e Biologia, Università degli studi di Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy); Duc, Michel [Total Petrochemicals Research Feluy, Zone Industrielle Feluy C, B-7181 Seneffe (Belgium); Carpentier, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.carpentier@univ-rennes1.fr [Organométalliques et Catalyse, UMR 6226 Sciences Chimiques CNRS, Université de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2013-09-16

    Crystallization and morphological features of syndiotactic-b-atactic polystyrene stereodiblock copolymers (sPS-b-aPS), atactic/syndiotactic polystyrene blends (aPS/sPS), and aPS/sPS blends modified with sPS-b-aPS, with different compositions in aPS and sPS, have been investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarized light optical microscopy (POM) and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXRD) techniques. For comparative purposes, the properties of parent pristine sPS samples were also studied. WAXRD analyses revealed for all the samples, independently from their composition (aPS/sPS ratio) and structure (blends, block copolymers, blends modified with block copolymers), the same polymorphic β form of sPS. The molecular weight of aPS and sPS showed opposite effects on the crystallization of 50:50 aPS/sPS blends: the lower the molecular weight of aPS, the slower the crystallization while the lower the molecular weight of sPS, the faster the crystallization. DSC studies performed under both isothermal and non-isothermal conditions, independently confirmed by POM studies, led to a clear trend for the crystallization rate at a given sPS/aPS ratio (ca. 50:50 and 20:80): sPS homopolymers > sPS-b-aPS block copolymers ∼sPS/aPS blends modified with sPS-b-aPS copolymers > sPS/aPS blends. Interestingly, sPS-b-aPS block copolymers not only crystallized faster than blends, but also affected positively the crystallization behavior of blends. At 50:50 sPS/aPS ratio, blends (Blend-2), block copolymers (Cop-1) and blends modified with block copolymers (Blend-2-mod) crystallized via spherulitic crystalline growth controlled by an interfacial process. In all cases, an instantaneous nucleation was observed. The density of nuclei in block copolymers (160,000−190,000 nuclei mm{sup −3}) was always higher than that in blends and modified blends (30,000−60,000 nuclei mm{sup −3}), even for quite different sPS/aPS ratio. At 20:80 sPS/aPS ratio, the block copolymers

  4. Addition of a Fluoride-containing Radiopacifier Improves Micromechanical and Biological Characteristics of Modified Calcium Silicate Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonijevic, Djordje; Jeschke, Anke; Colovic, Bozana; Milovanovic, Petar; Jevremovic, Danimir; Kisic, Danilo; vom Scheidt, Annika; Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael; Jokanovic, Vukoman; Busse, Björn; Djuric, Marija

    2015-12-01

    Calcium silicate cements (CSCs) with the addition of nanohydroxyapatite and calcium carbonate play a critical role in dental applications. To further improve their properties, particularly radiopacity and biointeractivity, the fluoride-containing radiopacifier ytterbium trifluoride (YbF3) was added to their composition, and biological and mechanical characteristics were evaluated. YbF3 was added to 3 different CSCs: cement I (CSC + calcium carbonate), cement II (CSC + nanohydroxyapatite), and Portland cement. Material characterization encompassed measurements of pH, calcium, ytterbium, and fluoride ion release; radiopacity; setting time; porosity; microindentation properties; wettability; and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopic analyses. Osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells were grown on the materials' surface to evaluate their adherence. The addition of calcium carbonate, nanohydroxyapatite, and 30 wt% of YbF3 improved radiopacity and the setting time of experimental cements. The pH values did not differ among the groups. The greatest ytterbium and fluoride releases occurred in the Portland cement + YbF3 group. Combined x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis showed the presence of calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrates. In addition, the presence of calcium ytterbium fluoride and ytterbium oxide proved that YbF3 reacted with cement compounds. Wettability of cement I + YbF3 was superior to other formulations, but its porosity and microindentation properties were weaker than in the Portland cement + YbF3 mixture. Cement II + YbF3 presented micromechanical indentation and porosity characteristics similar to the Portland-based cement formulation. Osteoclast- and osteoblast-like cells adhered to the cements' surfaces without alteration of the cell structural integrity. YbF3-containing CSCs with nanostructured hydroxyapatite and calcium carbonate are well suited for

  5. Impact of non-functionalized and ionic liquid modified carbon nanotubes on mechanical and thermal properties of ethylene- octene copolymer nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, T; Meri, R Merijs; Zicans, J; Grigalovica, A; Roja, Zh; Reinholds, I

    2016-01-01

    In this article the development and characterization of composites made from metallocene based ethylene-octene copolymer (EOC) with 38% octene content, non-modified or modified multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), covalently functionalised with long chain hexadecyl moiety imidazolium ionic liquid (IL-f-MWCNTs), is presented. The procedure of MWCNTs functionalization is discussed. In order to obtain a good dispersion of the filler, composites with MWCNTs and IL-f-MWCNTs in the concentration range of 0.5-12 wt.% were made by ultrasonication / thermoplastic mixing method. The results indicated improvement in mechanical properties with increase of the filler content. The methodology of the development of EOC matrix nanocomposites with IL-f-MWCNTs showed advantages of the conductive material creation with high mechanical stiffness compared to direct melt mixing of EOC with non-modified MWCNTs. A notable enhancement of thermal stability was observed in case of both pristine MWCNTs and IL-f-MWCNTs containing EOC nanocomposites, which was attributed to scavenging action of the nanofiller. Modification of EOC with IL-f-MWCNTs showed somewhat increased efficiency in enhancing overall thermal stability of the composites because of better dispersion of the nanofiller due to compatibilizing effect of IL modifier. (paper)

  6. Consequences of enamel preparation with sodium hypochlorite, polyacrylic and phosphoric acids for the bonding of brackets with resin-modified glass ionomer cements

    OpenAIRE

    Trindade, Alessandra Marques; Pereira, Tatiana Bahia Junqueira; Smith Neto, Perrin; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Akaki, Emílio; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of deproteinization with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) prior to enamel conditioning with 10% polyacrylic acid (PAA) and 35% phosphoric acid (PA) on the bond strength (BS) of brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). One hundred human premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons were divided into 5 groups (n = 20 in each group): G1 (control), enamel conditioning with PA, application of adhesive and bonding of brackets...

  7. Biological and mechanical properties of an experimental glass-ionomer cement modified by partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong-Ae, KIM; Hany, ABO-MOSALLAM; Hye-Young, LEE; Jung-Hwan, LEE; Hae-Won, KIM; Hae-Hyoung, LEE

    2015-01-01

    Some weaknesses of conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) as dental materials, for instance the lack of bioactive potential and poor mechanical properties, remain unsolved. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO on the mechanical and biological properties of the experimental glass ionomer cements. Material and Methods Calcium fluoro-alumino-silicate glass was prepared for an experimental glass ionomer cement by melt quenching technique. The glass composition was modified by partial replacement (10 mol%) of CaO with MgO or ZnO. Net setting time, compressive and flexural properties, and in vitro rat dental pulp stem cells (rDPSCs) viability were examined for the prepared GICs and compared to a commercial GIC. Results The experimental GICs set more slowly than the commercial product, but their extended setting times are still within the maximum limit (8 min) specified in ISO 9917-1. Compressive strength of the experimental GIC was not increased by the partial substitution of CaO with either MgO or ZnO, but was comparable to the commercial control. For flexural properties, although there was no significance between the base and the modified glass, all prepared GICs marked a statistically higher flexural strength (p<0.05) and comparable modulus to control. The modified cements showed increased cell viability for rDPSCs. Conclusions The experimental GICs modified with MgO or ZnO can be considered bioactive dental materials. PMID:26398508

  8. Biological and mechanical properties of an experimental glass-ionomer cement modified by partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ae KIM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSome weaknesses of conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC as dental materials, for instance the lack of bioactive potential and poor mechanical properties, remain unsolved.Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO on the mechanical and biological properties of the experimental glass ionomer cements.Material and Methods Calcium fluoro-alumino-silicate glass was prepared for an experimental glass ionomer cement by melt quenching technique. The glass composition was modified by partial replacement (10 mol% of CaO with MgO or ZnO. Net setting time, compressive and flexural properties, and in vitrorat dental pulp stem cells (rDPSCs viability were examined for the prepared GICs and compared to a commercial GIC.Results The experimental GICs set more slowly than the commercial product, but their extended setting times are still within the maximum limit (8 min specified in ISO 9917-1. Compressive strength of the experimental GIC was not increased by the partial substitution of CaO with either MgO or ZnO, but was comparable to the commercial control. For flexural properties, although there was no significance between the base and the modified glass, all prepared GICs marked a statistically higher flexural strength (p<0.05 and comparable modulus to control. The modified cements showed increased cell viability for rDPSCs.Conclusions The experimental GICs modified with MgO or ZnO can be considered bioactive dental materials.

  9. Development of carbon nanotube modified cement paste with microencapsulated phase-change material for structural-functional integrated application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongzhi; Yang, Shuqing; Memon, Shazim Ali

    2015-04-10

    Microencapsulated phase-change materials (MPCM) can be used to develop a structural-functional integrated cement paste having high heat storage efficiency and suitable mechanical strength. However, the incorporation of MPCM has been found to degrade the mechanical properties of cement based composites. Therefore, in this research, the effect of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the properties of MPCM cement paste was evaluated. Test results showed that the incorporation of CNTs in MPCM cement paste accelerated the cement hydration reaction. SEM micrograph showed that CNTs were tightly attached to the cement hydration products. At the age of 28 days, the percentage increase in flexural and compressive strength with different dosage of CNTs was found to be up to 41% and 5% respectively. The optimum dosage of CNTs incorporated in MPCM cement paste was found to be 0.5 wt %. From the thermal performance test, it was found that the cement paste panels incorporated with different percentages of MPCM reduced the temperature measured at the center of the room by up to 4.6 °C. Inverse relationship was found between maximum temperature measured at the center of the room and the dosage of MPCM.

  10. Development of Carbon Nanotube Modified Cement Paste with Microencapsulated Phase-Change Material for Structural–Functional Integrated Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Cui

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Microencapsulated phase-change materials (MPCM can be used to develop a structural–functional integrated cement paste having high heat storage efficiency and suitable mechanical strength. However, the incorporation of MPCM has been found to degrade the mechanical properties of cement based composites. Therefore, in this research, the effect of carbon nanotubes (CNTs on the properties of MPCM cement paste was evaluated. Test results showed that the incorporation of CNTs in MPCM cement paste accelerated the cement hydration reaction. SEM micrograph showed that CNTs were tightly attached to the cement hydration products. At the age of 28 days, the percentage increase in flexural and compressive strength with different dosage of CNTs was found to be up to 41% and 5% respectively. The optimum dosage of CNTs incorporated in MPCM cement paste was found to be 0.5 wt %. From the thermal performance test, it was found that the cement paste panels incorporated with different percentages of MPCM reduced the temperature measured at the center of the room by up to 4.6 °C. Inverse relationship was found between maximum temperature measured at the center of the room and the dosage of MPCM.

  11. Rheological and mechanical properties and interfacial stress development of composite cements modified with thio-urethane oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Ataís; Pfeifer, Carmem S

    2016-08-01

    Thio-urethane oligomers have been shown to reduce stress and increase toughness in highly filled composite materials. This study evaluated the influence of thio-urethane backbone structure on rheological and mechanical properties of resin cements modified with a fixed concentration of the oligomers. Thio-urethane oligomers (TU) were synthesized by combining thiols - pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP) or trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP) - with isocyanates - 1,6-hexanediol-diissocyante (HDDI) (aliphatic) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (BDI) (aromatic) or dicyclohexylmethane 4,4'-diisocyanate (HMDI) (cyclic), at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol, leaving pendant thiols. 20wt% TU were added to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2). 60wt% silanated inorganic fillers were added. Near-IR was used to follow methacrylate conversion and rate of polymerization ( [Formula: see text] ). Mechanical properties were evaluated in three-point bending (ISO 4049) for flexural strength/modulus (FS/FM, and toughness), and notched specimens (ASTM Standard E399-90) for fracture toughness (KIC). PS was measured on the Bioman. Viscosity (V) and gel-points (defined as the crossover between storage and loss shear moduli (G'/G″)) were obtained with rheometry. Glass transition temperature (Tg), cross-link density and homogeneity of the network were obtained with dynamic mechanical analysis. Film-thickness was evaluated according to ISO 4049. DC and mechanical properties increased and [Formula: see text] and PS decreased with the addition of TUs. Gelation (G'/G″) was delayed and DC at G'/G″ increased in TU groups. Tg and cross-link density dropped in TU groups, while oligomers let to more homogenous networks. An increase in V was observed, with no effect on film-thickness. Significant reductions in PS were achieved at the same time conversion and mechanical properties increased. The addition of thio-urethane oligomers proved successful in improving several key properties

  12. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Ricardo PEREIRA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs and resinmodified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05. The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148. The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. CONCLUSIONS: Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values.

  13. Dimethyl diallyl ammonium chloride and diallylamin Co-polymer modified bio-film derived from palm dates for the adsorption of dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabli, Mahjoub; Saleh, Tawfik A; Sebeia, Nouha; Tka, Najeh; Khiari, Ramzi

    2017-10-31

    For the first time, co-polymer of dimethyl diallyl ammonium chloride and diallylamin (PDDACD) was used to modify the films derived from the waste of palm date fruits, which were then investigated by the purification of colored aqueous solutions. The physico-chemical characteristics were identified using data color, FT-IR spectroscopy, and SEM features. The modified films were evaluated as adsorbents of Methylene Blue (MB), Direct Yellow 50 (DY50), Reactive Blue 198 (RB198) and Naphtol Blue Black (NBB). High retention capacities were achieved in the following order: The equilibrium da DY50 (14 mg g -1 ) adsorption data follows the pseudo second order model. It was fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Redushkevich equations, and the data best fit the Freundlich model indicating that the adsorption might occur in the heterogeneous adsorption sites. These results reveal that PDDACD modified films are valuable materials for the treatment of industrial wastewater. Moreover, the as-prepared adsorbent is economically viable and easily controllable for pollutant adsorption.

  14. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC TM (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine TM (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into th...

  15. Characterization of the Mineral Trioxide Aggregate–Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement Interface in Different Setting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Ashraf A.; Komabayashi, Takashi; Watanabe, Etsuko; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been used successfully for perforation repair, vital pulpotomies, and direct pulp capping. However, little is known about the interactions between MTA and glass ionomer cement (GIC) in final restorations. In this study, 2 null hypotheses were tested: (1) GIC placement time does not affect the MTA-GIC structural interface and hardness and (2) moisture does not affect the MTA-GIC structural interface and hardness. Methods Fifty cylinders were half filled with MTA and divided into 5 groups. The other half was filled with resin-modified GIC either immediately after MTA placement or after 1 or 7 days of temporization in the presence or absence of a wet cotton pellet. The specimens were then sectioned, carbon coated, and examined using a scanning electron microscope and an electron probe micro-analyzer (SEM-EPMA) for interfacial adaptation, gap formation, and elemental analysis. The Vickers hardness numbers of the interfacial MTA were recorded 24 hours after GIC placement and 8 days after MTA placement and analyzed using the analysis of variance test. Results Hardness testing 24 hours after GIC placement revealed a significant increase in hardness with an increase of temporization time but not with a change of moisture conditions (P MTA placement indicated no significant differences among groups. SEM-EPMA showed interfacial adaptation to improve with temporization time and moisture. Observed changes were limited to the outermost layer of MTA. The 2 null hypotheses were not rejected. Conclusions GIC can be applied over freshly mixed MTA with minimal effects on the MTA, which seemed to decrease with time. PMID:22794220

  16. Bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement to primary dentin after cutting with different bur types and dentin conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Di Nicoló

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12. In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer - 3M/ESPE prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5% and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence.

  17. Detection of chloroform in water using an azo dye-modified β-cyclodextrin - Epichlorohydrin copolymer as a fluorescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncube, Phendukani; Krause, Rui W. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    Chlorination disinfection by-products (DBPs) in water pose a health threat to humans and the aquatic environment. Their detection in water sources is therefore vital. Herein we present the detection of chloroform, a DBP, using a molecular fluorescent probe. The detection was based on the quenching of fluorescence of the probe by chloroform due to host-guest complex formation between β-cyclodextrin in the probe and the chloroform molecule. The stability constant for the host-guest complex was high at 3.825 × 104 M-1. Chloroform quenched the fluorescence of the copolymer the most compared to the other small chlorinated compounds studied, suggesting that the probe was more sensitive to chloroform, with a sensing factor of 0.35 compared to as low as 0.0073 for dichloromethane. There was no interference from other chloroalkanes on the quenching efficiency of chloroform. The probe was used to detect chloroform in dam water as well as in bottled water. Detection of chloroform in both water samples using the probe was possible without chemically treating the water samples which may introduce other pollutants.

  18. Heat shrink ability of electron-beam-modified thermoplastic elastomeric films from blends of ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer and polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Chaki, T.K.; Bhowmick, Anil K.

    2000-01-01

    The heat shrink ability of electron-beam-irradiated thermoplastic elastomeric films from blends of ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer (EVA) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) has been investigated in this paper. The effects of temperature, time and extent of stretching and shrinkage temperature and time have been reported. Based on the above data, the optimized conditions in terms of high heat shrinkage and low amnesia rating have been evaluated. Influence of radiation doses (0-500 kGy), multifunctional sensitizer levels (ditri methylol propane tetraacrylate, DTMPTA), and blend proportions on heat shrink ability has been explained with the help of gel fraction and X-ray data. With the increase in radiation dose, gel fraction increases, which in turn gives rise to low values of heat shrinkage and amnesia rating. At a constant radiation dose and blend ratio, percent heat shrinkage is found to decrease with increase in DTMPTA level. Gel content increases with the increase in EVA content of the blend at a constant radiation dose and monomer level, giving rise to decrease in heat shrink ability. Heat shrinkage increases with the increase in percent crystallinity, although the amnesia rating follows the reverse trend.

  19. Heat shrink ability of electron-beam-modified thermoplastic elastomeric films from blends of ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer and polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Chaki, T.K.; Bhowmick, Anil K. E-mail: anilkb@rtc.iitkgp.ernet.in

    2000-11-01

    The heat shrink ability of electron-beam-irradiated thermoplastic elastomeric films from blends of ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer (EVA) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) has been investigated in this paper. The effects of temperature, time and extent of stretching and shrinkage temperature and time have been reported. Based on the above data, the optimized conditions in terms of high heat shrinkage and low amnesia rating have been evaluated. Influence of radiation doses (0-500 kGy), multifunctional sensitizer levels (ditri methylol propane tetraacrylate, DTMPTA), and blend proportions on heat shrink ability has been explained with the help of gel fraction and X-ray data. With the increase in radiation dose, gel fraction increases, which in turn gives rise to low values of heat shrinkage and amnesia rating. At a constant radiation dose and blend ratio, percent heat shrinkage is found to decrease with increase in DTMPTA level. Gel content increases with the increase in EVA content of the blend at a constant radiation dose and monomer level, giving rise to decrease in heat shrink ability. Heat shrinkage increases with the increase in percent crystallinity, although the amnesia rating follows the reverse trend.

  20. Transmission of composite polymerization contraction force through a flowable composite and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Castañeda-Espinosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual contraction force during polymerization of a composite resin (Z-250, a flowable composite (Filtek Flow, FF and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond, VB, and the transmission of Z-250 composite resin polymerization contraction force through different thicknesses of FF and VB. The experiment setup consisted of two identical parallel steel plates connected to a universal testing machine. One was fixed to a transversal base and the other to the equipment's cross head. The evaluated materials were inserted into a 1-mm space between the steel plates or between the inferior steel plate and a previously polymerized layer of an intermediate material (either FF or VB adhered to the upper steel plate. The composite resin was light-cured with a halogen lamp with light intensity of 500 mW/cm² for 60 s. A force/time graph was obtained for each sample for up to 120 s. Seven groups of 10 specimens each were evaluated: G1: Z-250; G2: FF; G3: VB; G4: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm layer of FF; G5: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of FF; G6: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm of VB; G7: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of VB. They were averaged and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test at a = 0.05. The obtained contraction forces were: G1: 6.3N + 0.2N; G2: 9.8 + 0.2N; G3: 1.8 + 0.2N; G4: 6.8N + 0.2N; G5: 6.9N + 0.3N; G6: 4.0N + 0.4N and G7: 2.8N + 0.4N. The use of VB as an intermediate layer promoted a significant decrease in polymerization contraction force values of the restorative system, regardless of material thickness. The use of FF as an intermediate layer promoted an increase in polymerization contraction force values with both material thicknesses.

  1. TRANSMISSION OF COMPOSITE POLYMERIZATION CONTRACTION FORCE THROUGH A FLOWABLE COMPOSITE AND A RESIN-MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Pereira, Rosana Aparecida; Cavalcanti, Ana Paula; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual contraction force during polymerization of a composite resin (Z-250), a flowable composite (Filtek Flow, FF) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond, VB), and the transmission of Z-250 composite resin polymerization contraction force through different thicknesses of FF and VB. The experiment setup consisted of two identical parallel steel plates connected to a universal testing machine. One was fixed to a transversal base and the other to the equipment's cross head. The evaluated materials were inserted into a 1-mm space between the steel plates or between the inferior steel plate and a previously polymerized layer of an intermediate material (either FF or VB) adhered to the upper steel plate. The composite resin was light-cured with a halogen lamp with light intensity of 500 mW/cm2 for 60 s. A force/time graph was obtained for each sample for up to 120 s. Seven groups of 10 specimens each were evaluated: G1: Z-250; G2: FF; G3: VB; G4: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm layer of FF; G5: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of FF; G6: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm of VB; G7: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of VB. They were averaged and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test at a = 0.05. The obtained contraction forces were: G1: 6.3N ± 0.2N; G2: 9.8 ± 0.2N; G3: 1.8 ± 0.2N; G4: 6.8N ± 0.2N; G5: 6.9N ± 0.3N; G6: 4.0N ± 0.4N and G7: 2.8N ± 0.4N. The use of VB as an intermediate layer promoted a significant decrease in polymerization contraction force values of the restorative system, regardless of material thickness. The use of FF as an intermediate layer promoted an increase in polymerization contraction force values with both material thicknesses. PMID:19089187

  2. Aggregate structure and effect of phthalic anhydride modified soy protein on the mechanical properties of styrene-butadiene copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aggregate structure of phthalic anhydride (PA) modified soy protein isolate (SPI) was investigated by estimating its fractal dimension from the equilibrated dynamic strain sweep experiments. The estimated fractal dimensions of the filler aggregates were less than 2, indicating that these partic...

  3. A Target-Directed Chemo-Photothermal System Based on Transferrin and Copolymer-Modified MoS2Nanoplates with pH-Activated Drug Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aitang; Li, Aihua; Tian, Wenxue; Li, Zichao; Wei, Chen; Sun, Yong; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Mengli; Liu, Jingquan

    2017-08-22

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) nanosheets have attracted significant attention due to their photothermal properties, but the poor solubility and colloidal stability limited their further application in biomedical field. Here, we report a targeted photothermal controllable nanocarrier consisting of MoS 2 nanosheets modified with block copolymer P(OEG-A)-b-P(VBA-co-KH570) and targeting ligand transferrin. P(OEG-A)-b-P(VBA-co-KH570) is synthesized by RAFT polymerization and utilized not only to improve the solubility of MoS 2 nanosheets but also efficiently load the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) through an acid-cleavable Schiff base linker. Thiol-functionalized transferrin (Tf-SH) is anchored onto the surface of MoS 2 nanosheets by the formation of disulfide bonds, which could further enhance the cellular uptake of DOX and MoS 2 to HepG2 cells for high-efficiency synergetic therapy. The drug release experiments exhibited the minimal release of DOX at room temperature and neutral pH, and the maximal drug release of 53 % at acidic tumor pH and hyperthermia condition after 48 h. In addition, the DOX-loaded, Tf-SH and P(OEG-A)-b-P(VBA-co-KH570) modified MoS 2 (DOX-POVK-MoS 2 -Tf) showed better a therapeutic effect than DOX-POVK-MoS 2 and POVK-MoS 2 , probably owing to the combined effects of target-directed uptake, acid-triggered drug release, and NIR induced localized heating, which suggest the designed MoS 2 nanocarriers are promising for applications in multi-modal cancer therapy. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Modified hydrogenated PBLH copolymer synthesis with styrene for proton exchange membranes fuel cell application; Derivados de PBLH hidrogenado na sintese de copolimeros com estireno, para a producao de membranas cationicas para celulas a combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraz, Fernando A.; Oliveira, Angelo R.S.; Rodrigues, Maraiza F.; Groetzner, Mariana B.; Cesar-Oliveira, Maria Aparecida F. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica. Lab. de Polimeros Sinteticos (LABPOL)]. E-mails: ferraz@quimica.ufpr.br; angelorsoliveira@ig.com.br; maraiza@quimica.ufpr.br; marianabitt@brasilh2.com.br; mafco@quimica.ufpr.br; Cantao, Mauricio P. [Instituto de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento (LACTEC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: cantao@lactec.org.br

    2005-07-01

    Polymers used as electrolyte in fuel cells are expected to have functional groups in their structure which are responsible for proton conductivity. Since the use of hydroxylated liquid polybutadiene (PBLH) has not been mentioned in the literature as an ion exchange membrane for fuel cell application (PEMFC), and its structure can be modified for a later sulfonation, it has been studied. In this work, PBLH was modified through a hydrogenation reaction. Furthermore, hydrogenated polymeric esters were obtained by esterification and transesterification reactions (PBLH- estearate and PBLH- methacrylate). Reacting the PBLH methacrylate with styrene, it was generated a copolymer with appropriated structure for sulfonation, justifying researches for fuel cell. (author)

  5. Morphology, Microstructure and Physico-Mechanical Properties of Pasargad Bitumen, Modified by Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate Copolymer (EVA and Nanoclay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Ghaempour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the characteristics such as flexibility, adhesion, hydrophobicity and low price, bitumen is used in different construction and insulation industries. The major problem with the bitumen material is its restricted physico-mechanical properties, mainly high temperature rutting and low temperature cracking. The aim of this work was to modify bitumen, produced in Tabriz Pasargad Oil Company, and evaluation of its different properties to make it suitable for the weather conditions of North West of Iran. The physico-mechanical, morphological and rheological characteristics of EVA/Cloisite 15A modified bitumen were studied.Two different feeding instructions were used in the mixing of bitumen with modifiers.In the first method, EVA and Cloisite 15A nanoclay were simultaneously added into the molten bitumen and in the second method, EVA and Cloisite 15A were premixed in an internal mixer before adding the polymer/nanoclay nanocomposite into the molten bitumen. The results showed that addition of nanoclay and polymer into the bitumen, led increased softening point and a decrease in the penetration of base bitumen, in which the extent of changes, was higher for the samples prepared by masterbatch method. The rheological properties of the pre-mixed samples exhibited more improvement and these samples showed more elastic behavior. The results of optical microscopy showed that the pre-mixing of polymer and nanoclay led to a more uniform distribution of the swollen polymer phase at the base bitumen. These samples also showed higher morphology stability than those samples prepared in single step. These effects were related to the probable localization of nanoclay at the interface of the two phases.

  6. Physicochemical and mechanical properties of zirconium oxide and niobium oxide modified Portland cement-based experimental endodontic sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viapiana, R; Flumignan, D L; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, J M; Camilleri, J; Tanomaru-Filho, M

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the physicochemical and mechanical properties of Portland cement-based experimental sealers (ES) with different radiopacifying agents (zirconium oxide and niobium oxide micro- and nanoparticles) in comparison with the following conventional sealers: AH Plus, MTA Fillapex and Sealapex. The materials were tested for setting time, compressive strength, flow, film thickness, radiopacity, solubility, dimensional stability and formaldehyde release. Data were subjected to anova and Tukey tests (P 0.05) and lower solubility when compared with MTA Fillapex and Sealapex (P Portland cement-based experimental endodontic sealers presented physicochemical properties according to the specifications no 57 ANSI/ADA (ADA Professional Product Review, 2008) and ISO 6876 (Dentistry - Root Canal Sealing Materials, 2012, British Standards Institution, London, UK). The sealers had setting times and flow ability that was adequate for clinical use, satisfactory compressive strength and low solubility. Additional studies should be carried out with the purpose of decreasing the film thickness and to determine the ideal ratio of radiopacifying agents in Portland cement-based root canal sealers. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Enhanced Antifungal Activity by Ab-Modified Amphotericin B-Loaded Nanoparticles Using a pH-Responsive Block Copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaolong; Dai, Jingjing; Xie, Jun; Zhu, Yongqiang; Zhu, Ming; Wang, Zhi; Xie, Chunmei; Yao, Aixia; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Li; Jiang, Qinglin; Wang, Shulei; Liang, Yong; Xu, Congjing

    2015-06-01

    Fungal infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Amphotericin B (AMB), with broad-spectrum antifungal activity, has long been recognized as a powerful fungicidal drug, but its clinical toxicities mainly nephrotoxicity and poor solubility limit its wide application in clinical practice. The fungal metabolism along with the host immune response usually generates acidity at sites of infection, resulting in loss of AMB activity in a pH-dependent manner. Herein, we developed pH-responsive AMB-loaded and surface charge-switching poly( d, l-lactic- co-glycolic acid)- b-poly( l-histidine)- b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PLH-PEG) nanoparticles for resolving the localized acidity problem and enhance the antifungal efficacy of AMB. Moreover, we modified AMB-encapsulated PLGA-PLH-PEG nanoparticles with anti- Candida albicans antibody (CDA) (CDA-AMB-NPs) to increase the targetability. Then, CDA-AMB-NPs were characterized in terms of physical characteristics, in vitro drug release, stability, drug encapsulation efficiency, and toxicity. Finally, the targetability and antifungal activity of CDA-AMB-NPs were investigated in vitro /in vivo. The result demonstrated that CDA-AMB-NPs significantly improve the targetability and bioavailability of AMB and thus improve its antifungal activity and reduce its toxicity. These NPs may become a good drug carrier for antifungal treatment.

  8. A Retrospective Study of the 3-Year Survival Rate of Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement Class II Restorations in Primary Molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webman, Mark; Mulki, Ezat; Roldan, Rosie; Arevalo, Oscar; Roberts, John F; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

    2016-01-01

    To determine the three-year survival rate of Class II resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC), Vitremer, restorations in primary molars and to compare these results with measurements of survival of Class II restorations of standard restorative materials. Data on Class II restorations placed in primary molars during a six-year period were collected through a chart review and radiographic evaluation in the office of a board-certified pediatric dentist. A radiograph showing that the restoration was intact was required at least 3 years after placement to qualify as successful. If no radiograph existed, the restoration was excluded. If the restoration was not found to be intact radiographically or was charted as having been replaced before three years it was recorded as a failure. The results of this study were then compared to other standard restorative materials using normalized annual failure rates. Of the 1,231 Class II resinmodified glass-ionomer cement restorations placed over six years 427 met the inclusion criteria. There was a 97.42% survival rate for a 3-year period equivalent to an annual failure rate of 0.86%. A novel approach comparing materials showed that in this study Vitremer compared very favorably to previously published success rates of other standard restorative materials (amalgam, composite, stainless steel crown, compomer) and other RMGIC studies.

  9. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  10. The effect of salivary pH on diametral tensile strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement coated with coating agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismayanti, D.; Triaminingsih, S.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of artificial saliva with different acidities on the diametral tensile strength of Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) coated with varnish and nanofilled coating agent. The specimens coated with coating agents were immersed in artificial saliva with pH of 4.5, 5.5, and 7 for 24 hours in an incubatorat 37°C. The diametral tensile strength of the specimens was tested with Universal Testing Machine. There were no significant differences on the diametral tensile strength of all specimens that were put into groups based on the acidity of the saliva and the type of coating agent (p>0.05). Both varnish and nanofilled coating agent stayed on the RMGIC in the acidic condition that simulated the true condition of oral cavity in people with high caries risk for the 24 hours of maturation.

  11. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  12. Cementing of low pressure formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brownlie, D. [Trican Well Service Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Coupland, M. [Baytex Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    This paper proposed a solution to the notorious problem of squeeze cementing low pressure formations. It is a well known fact within the petroleum industry that it is difficult to squeeze cement low pressure formations in certain areas. Short of fracturing, most geological formations will not allow cement to penetrate the actual rock. In standard cement squeezing, cement slurries are placed across perforations and then pressure is applied to force the cement into perforation tunnels against the formation causing partial dehydration of the slurry. The cement left in the perforation tunnels makes a seal between the formation and the wellbore that has high compressive strength and low permeability. However, experience has shown that some wells are not capable of holding the hydrostatic pressure of a water column. This paper presented case studies that examined formations with modified geology, a highly unconsolidated sandstone where large volumes of sand were extracted during the production process. In particular, the paper refers to a low pressure field in Western Canada, the remedial cementing in Lloydminster. Within a 3 year period 18 zones were cement squeezed and drilled out. Nine of the zones were cement squeezed using a retainer with thixotropic cement followed by a 0:1:0 Class G cement. Only 11 per cent of the 9 zones was successful on the first attempt. The other 9 zones were cement squeezed using the bullhead technique in which a fluid is shot into the well casing before the downhole equipment. This latter technique proved to be more successful on the first attempt. 2 refs.

  13. Residual HEMA and TEGDMA Release and Cytotoxicity Evaluation of Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement and Compomers Cured with Different Light Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Selim Botsali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was first to evaluate the elution of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA monomers from resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC and compomers cured with halogen and light-emitting diode (LED light-curing units (LCUs. The effect of cured materials on the viability of L929 fibroblast cells was also evaluated. One RMGIC (Ketac N100 and two compomers (Dyract Extra and Twinkystar were tested. Materials were prepared in teflon disks and light-cured with LED or halogen LCUs. The residual monomers of resin materials in solution were identified using high-performance liquid chromatography. The fibroblast cells’ viability was analyzed using MTT assay. The type of LCU did not have a significant effect on the elution of HEMA and TEGDMA. A greater amount of HEMA than TEGMDA was eluted. The amount of TEGDMA eluted from Twinkystar was greater than Dyract Extra (P0.05. Curing with the LED LCU decreased the cells’ viability more than curing with the halogen LCU for compomers. For Ketac N100, the halogen LCU decreased the cells’ viability more than the LED LCU.

  14. Comparing the reinforcing effects of a resin modified glassionomer cement, Flowable compomer, and Flowable composite in the restoration of calcium hydroxide-treated immature roots in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Prathibha Rani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and sixty human permanent central incisors were enlarged to a 120 file size after crown removal procedure to simulate immature teeth. The root canals were filled with calcium hydroxide and stored for 15 days (phase I, 30 days (phase II, 90 days (phase III, and 180 days (Phase IV. At the end of these selected time periods, calcium hydroxide was cleaned off the root canals of forty teeth that were randomly selected and obturated with gutta-percha points in the apical 2 mm of the root canals with a sealer. The specimens were further equally divided into four groups. Unrestored Group I served as control and the root canals of teeth in the other three group specimens were reinforced with resin modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC (Group II, Flowable Compomer (Group III, and Flowable Composite (Group IV, respectively, using a translucent curing post. All specimens were subjected to compressive force using an Instron Testing machine, until fracture occurred. All the materials evaluated substantially reinforced the root specimens compared to the control. At the end of 180 days, Flowable composites showed maximum reinforcement compared to the other groups; however, no significant differences were found between the reinforcement capabilities of Flowable Compomer and RMGIC.

  15. A polyethylenimine-modified carboxyl-poly(styrene/acrylamide copolymer nanosphere for co-delivering of CpG and TGF-β receptor I inhibitor with remarkable additive tumor regression effect against liver cancer in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang SY

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Shuyan Liang,* Jun Hu,* Yuanyuan Xie, Qing Zhou, Yanhong Zhu, Xiangliang Yang National Engineering Research Center for Nanomedicine, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cancer immunotherapy based on nanodelivery systems has shown potential for treatment of various malignancies, owing to the benefits of tumor targeting of nanoparticles. However, induction of a potent T-cell immune response against tumors still remains a challenge. In this study, polyethylenimine-modified carboxyl-styrene/acrylamide (PS copolymer nanospheres were developed as a delivery system of unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β receptor I inhibitors for cancer immunotherapy. TGF-β receptor I inhibitors (LY2157299, LY were encapsulated to the PS via hydrophobic interaction, while CpG oligodeoxynucleotides were loaded onto the PS through electrostatic interaction. Compared to the control group, tumor inhibition in the PS-LY/CpG group was up to 99.7% without noticeable toxicity. The tumor regression may be attributed to T-cell activation and amplification in mouse models. The results highlight the additive effect of CpG and TGF-β receptor I inhibitors co-delivered in cancer immunotherapy. Keywords: CpG, TGF-β receptor I inhibitor, Pst-AAm copolymer nanosphere, immunotherapy

  16. Adhesion of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements may affect the integrity of tooth structure in the open sandwich technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Beata; Kruszelnicki, Anna; Kao, Anthony; Strykowska, Marta; Nicholson, John W

    2014-12-01

    To study the interfaces between model cavities prepared in teeth and four glass ionomer cements (two conventional and two resin-modified). Ten non-cavitated molars and premolars were used and, in each, two 3mm deep slot preparations were created on opposing sides of the tooth. The teeth were conditioned as appropriate, then restored using the open sandwich technique, using a conventional glass ionomer (Fuji IX, Ketac Molar) or resin modified glass ionomer (Fuji II LC or N100), followed by completion with composite resin. The teeth were then embedded in a transparent acrylic resin and cut parallel to the long axis through both restorations, using a low speed diamond wheel saw. Samples were evaluated using a metallographic light microscope (100×). Three areas were assessed: the axial wall, the axial gingival line angle and the cavo-surface line angle. Bonding was categorized as inadequate or adequate based on the appearance and inadequate bonding was further studied and classified. Data were analysed statistically using the McNamara analysis. The majority of materials failed to make adequate contact with the axial wall, and there were also flaws at the axial/gingival line angle in several samples. By contrast, the cavo-surface line angle was generally soundly filled and the materials showed intimate contact with the tooth surface in this region. The most serious inadequacy, though, was not lack of intimate contact and/or adhesive bond, but the presence of perpendicular cracks in 30% of the Fuji II LC samples which extended into the underlying dentin. The problems of placement and dentin cracking experienced with these materials demonstrate that adhesive bond strength alone cannot be used as the criterion of success for restorative materials. In fact good adhesion can, in certain cases, promote cracking of the dentin due to stresses within the material, an outcome which is undesirable. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  17. Durabilidade de compósito biomassa vegetal-cimento modificado por polímero Durability of cellulose-cement composites modified by polymer

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    Lia L. Pimentel

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A durabilidade de compósito biomassa vegetal-cimento é um dos fatores mais importantes para a colocação desse material no mercado consumidor. A utilização de polímeros em concreto e argamassa, com o objetivo de melhorar sua durabilidade, é cada vez mais freqüente. Este estudo visou à caracterização de propriedades físicas e mecânicas de compósito biomassa vegetal-cimento modificado com polímeros e a análise da durabilidade desse compósito. Foi testado um polímero de base acrílica em compósitos produzidos com resíduo de Pinus caribaea. Foram realizados ensaios de envelhecimento acelerado, por meio de ciclos de molhamento e secagem, por imersão em água quente e ensaio de envelhecimento natural. As propriedades físicas do compósito avaliadas foram a massa específica aparente e a absorção total de água por imersão. As propriedades mecânicas foram determinadas por meio de ensaios de resistência à tração na flexão, analisando-se a tensão e a energia de ruptura. Os corpos-de-prova foram extraídos de placas executadas por simples prensagem. Ensaios de microscopia eletrônica de varredura foram utilizados para observar o estado da fibra e da matriz após os processos de envelhecimento. O uso de polímero melhorou o desempenho mecânico do compósito nas primeiras idades e também promoveu significativa redução da capacidade de absorção de água, demonstrando que o uso desse material pode vir a melhorar a durabilidade desses compósitos, uma vez que reduziu sensivelmente sua capacidade de absorção.The durability of the cellulose-cement composites is a decisive factor to introduce such material in the market. Polymers have been used in concrete and mortar production to increase its durability. The goal of this work was the physical and mechanical characterization of cellulose-cement composites modified by a polymer and the subsequent durability evaluation. The work also evaluated the dispersion of acrylic

  18. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Padmaja; Valiathan, Ashima; Arora, Ankit; Agarwal, Sachin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs), due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL) on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel) and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min) of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1) Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2) Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3) Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4) Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC. PMID:24014999

  19. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

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    Behnam Khosravanifard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on compositeto-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods. Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI. Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25. All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC. The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min. The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was scored under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05. Results. The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test. SBS of both control (P=0.014 and experimental (P=0.000 groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion. Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments, which deserves further studies.

  20. Effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement lining and composite layering technique on the adhesive interface of lateral wall

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    Larissa Marinho AZEVEDO

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interface integrity can be maintained by setting the composite in a layering technique and using liners. Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to verify the effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC lining and composite layering technique on the bond strength of the dentin/resin adhesive interface of lateral walls of occlusal restorations. Material and Methods Occlusal cavities were prepared in 52 extracted sound human molars, randomly assigned into 4 groups: Group 2H (control – no lining + two horizontal layers; Group 4O: no lining + four oblique layers; Group V-2H: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond + two horizontal layers; and Group V-4O: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond + four oblique layers. Resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE was placed after application of an adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE dyed with a fluorescent reagent (Rhodamine B to allow confocal microscopy analysis. The teeth were stored in deionized water at 37oC for 24 hours before being sectioned into 0.8 mm slices. One slice of each tooth was randomly selected for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM analysis. The other slices were sectioned into 0.8 mm x 0.8 mm sticks to microtensile bond strength test (MPa. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Fisher's test. Results There was no statistical difference on bond strength among groups (p>0.05. CLSM analysis showed no significant statistical difference regarding the presence of gap at the interface dentin/resin among groups. Conclusions RMGIC lining and composite layering techniques showed no effect on the microtensile bond strength and gap formation at the adhesive interface of lateral walls of high C-factor occlusal restorations.

  1. The Effect of Temporary Cement Cleaning Methods on the Retention of Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mi-Young; An, Hongseok; Park, Eun-Jin

    2017-06-09

    To evaluate the effect of temporary cement cleaning methods on the retention of cemented crowns using zinc phosphate cement and resin-modified glass ionomer cement. Forty titanium specimens were fabricated to simulate prepared molars with minimally retentive taper. The Ni-Cr cast crowns were fabricated, temporarily cemented, and separated. The specimens were divided into four groups according to the temporary cement cleaning method (n = 10) as follows: control group (no temporary cementation), orange solvent group, ultrasonic cleaning group, and air-abrasion group. After the cleaning procedures, the specimens were cemented with definitive cements (zinc phosphate cement and resin-modified glass ionomer, RMGI, cement) and subjected to thermocycling (5000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time, 10 seconds). The tensile bond strength of each specimen was measured using a universal testing machine, and the results were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test (α = 0.05). When cemented with zinc phosphate cement, the statistical analysis showed that the value of the air-abrasion group was significantly higher than those of the other groups (p crowns when zinc phosphate cement was used for permanent cementation. Airborne-particle abrasion after provisional cementation improved retention of crowns cemented with zinc phosphate cement; however, the use of temporary cement significantly decreased retention of permanently cemented crowns when RMGI cement was used regardless of the temporary cement cleaning method. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cements versus resin-based materials as fissure sealants: a meta-analysis of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengopal, V; Mickenautsch, S

    2010-02-01

    To appraise quantitatively current evidence regarding the caries-preventing effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RM-GIC) fissure sealants in comparison to that of resin-based fissure sealants. Systematic review with meta-analysis. 8 Anglophone databases and 2 Lusophone databases were searched until 15 April 2009, using a pre-determined search strategy. Clinical trials were considered for inclusion if their titles/abstracts were relevant to the topic, published in English, Portuguese or Spanish and had a two-arm longitudinal study design. The outcome measure of the caries-preventive effect was caries absence on sealed teeth. Two reviewers independently extracted data from the accepted articles in order to complete a 2x2 table for meta-analysis. The unit of interest was the tooth, and the number of caries-free teeth (n) at the end of each time interval (6, 12 and 24 months) was compared against the total number of evaluated teeth (N). Datasets were assessed for their clinical and methodological heterogeneity, following Cochrane guidelines, and only homogeneous datasets were combined for meta-analysis, using a random effects model (RevMan 4.2). Differences in the caries-preventive effect were computed on the basis of the combined Relative Risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Of the 212 articles identified, only 6 trials were included. From these, 19 separate datasets were extracted. For the pooled data, equivalent caries-preventive effects were observed at 6 months (RR= 0.98, 95% CI 0.95- 1.00; p = 0.08); 12 months (RR=1.00, 95% CI 0.96-1.04, p = 0.99) and 24 months (RR=1.01, 95% CI 0.84-1.21, p = 0.91). The 36-month data (not pooled) favoured resin-based sealants (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.88-0.97, p = 0.002). This meta-analysis found no conclusive evidence that either material was superior to the other in preventing dental caries.

  3. Olefin–Styrene Copolymers

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    Nunzia Galdi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review are reported some of the most relevant achievements in the chemistry of the ethylene–styrene copolymerization and in the characterization of the copolymer materials. Focus is put on the relationship between the structure of the catalyst and that of the obtained copolymer. On the other hand, the wide variety of copolymer architecture is related to the properties of the material and to the potential utility.

  4. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  5. A study on provisional cements, cementation techniques, and their effects on bonding of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod Kumar, G; Soorya Poduval, T; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P

    2014-03-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restoration. Determine the presence of cement debris on prepared tooth surface subsequent to the removal of provisional restoration. Determine the cement with the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Determine the effect of smear layer on the amount of residual luting cement. Eighty-four extracted natural anterior teeth were prepared for porcelain laminate veneers. For half of the teeth, the smear layer was removed before luting provisional restorations. Veneer provisional restorations were fabricated and luted to teeth with six bonding methods: varnish combined with glass ionomer cement (GIC), varnish combined with resin modified GIC, varnish, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement, adhesive combined with GIC, adhesive combined with resin modified GIC, and adhesive, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement. After removal of provisional restorations 1 week later, the tooth surface was examined for residual luting material with SEM. Traces of cement debris were found on all the prepared teeth surfaces for all six groups which were cemented with different methods. Cement debris was seen on teeth subsequent to the removal of provisional's. Dual-cure cement had the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Presence of smear layer had no statistical significance in comparison with cement residue. With the use of adhesive the cement debris was always found to be more than with the use of varnish. GIC showed maximum residual cement followed by dual-cure.

  6. Silicon containing copolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Amiri, Sahar; Amiri, Sanam

    2014-01-01

    Silicones have unique properties including thermal oxidative stability, low temperature flow, high compressibility, low surface tension, hydrophobicity and electric properties. These special properties have encouraged the exploration of alternative synthetic routes of well defined controlled microstructures of silicone copolymers, the subject of this Springer Brief. The authors explore the synthesis and characterization of notable block copolymers. Recent advances in controlled radical polymerization techniques leading to the facile synthesis of well-defined silicon based thermo reversible block copolymers?are described along with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), a technique utilized to develop well-defined functional thermo reversible block copolymers. The brief also focuses on Polyrotaxanes and their great potential as stimulus-responsive materials which produce poly (dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) based thermo reversible block copolymers.

  7. Effect of light-emitting diode and halogen light curing on the micro-hardness of dental composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, M; Patel, D; Shashikiran, N D; Mallikarjuna, R M; Nalawade, T M; Reddy, H K

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate and compare the micro-hardness of composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using light-emitting diode (LED) and halogen curing and also to inter-compare the effect of LED and halogen curing. The study sample comprised of 4 stainless steel plates with a thickness of 2 mm. For these stainless steel plates, holes were made to a diameter of 3 mm. The samples were divided into 4 groups of 8 each and labeled as group I, group II, group III, group IV, thus making provision for the two different modes of light exposure. In each group, the hole was restored with its respective restorative material and cured with light-curing unit according to manufacturer instructions. The results were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney test. It was concluded that the curing efficacy of the LED lamp was comparable to that of conventional halogen lamp, even with a 50% reduction in cure time, and resin composite (Filtek Z-250) presented the highest hardness values, whereas complete hardening of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) (Vitremer) was observed because of its self-curing system even after the removal of light source.

  8. Effect of light-emitting diode and halogen light curing on the micro-hardness of dental composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bhalla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate and compare the micro-hardness of composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using light-emitting diode (LED and halogen curing and also to inter-compare the effect of LED and halogen curing. Materials and Methods : The study sample comprised of 4 stainless steel plates with a thickness of 2 mm. For these stainless steel plates, holes were made to a diameter of 3 mm. The samples were divided into 4 groups of 8 each and labeled as group I, group II, group III, group IV, thus making provision for the two different modes of light exposure. In each group, the hole was restored with its respective restorative material and cured with light-curing unit according to manufacturer instructions. The results were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney test. Results and conclusion: It was concluded that the curing efficacy of the LED lamp was comparable to that of conventional halogen lamp, even with a 50% reduction in cure time, and resin composite (Filtek Z-250 presented the highest hardness values, whereas complete hardening of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC (Vitremer was observed because of its self-curing system even after the removal of light source.

  9. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC™ (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine™ (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC), Group B (BD), and Group C (RMGIC). Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS) analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573) while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000). The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD) while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of New ‎Copolymers as Asphalt Additives

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    Firyal M. ‎ A

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheological properties of asphalt S50  were improved by adding different prepared copolymers as additives with high homogeneity of asphalts  samples.  Three types of copolymers were prepared  Poly  (Indene –Co- maleic anhydride(A1 Poly (Acrylonitrile –Co- Maleic anhydride (A2 and Poly (Dipentine –Co-Maleic anhydride (A3, the cross linking of (A3 to (A3d. by using sulfur.              These copolymers  were designed by inserting Maleic anhydride as  rings  containing through backbone of polymer chains to be high potentially to react with water to protect the crack of pavement .And moisture with inhibit bonding of crack of pavement, Many factors should be considered when prepared the additives to enhanced performance to be convenience cost, beneficial thermal safety ,   extended life of the asphalt, preparing conditions which gave high thermal resistance with more stabilities, all these prepared copolymer have been characterized by FTIR and H-NMR spectroscopies .Intrinsic viscosities were calculated. softening point and penetration were observed for all asphalts blends which were  compared with the  asphalt samples, which gave high thermal resistance with more stabilities.                                          The results  showed high properties of these blends when  compared with the original asphalt. The physical properties of a specific polymers are determined by the sequence and chemical structure , When polymers are added to asphalt , the properties of the modified asphalt cement depend on polymer characteristic of asphalt and compatibility of polymer with asphalt. All these prepared copolymers were tested by softening points and penetration for all  asphalt blends which were compared with the asphalt sample. All the Improvements made by adding polymers to asphalt included the Increasing the viscosity of the binder service, the thermal susceptibility of the binder

  11. Preparation, characterization and investigation of in vitro and in vivo biological properties of strontium-modified calcium phosphate cement for bone defect repair

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    Reza Masaeli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the invitro and invivo performance of a 3 wt% of strontium additive hydroxyapatite calcium phosphate cements (CPC. Materials and Methods: The prepared calcium phosphate cement was characterized with XRD, FTIR, setting time, STA and in vitro and in vivo biological analyses. The MTT assay ALP activities as in vitro study and radiological and histological examinations as in vivo study between the three groups of 3 wt% Sr-HA/CPC, CPC and control were performed and compared. Data were analyzed using T-test and One-way ANOVA. Results: XRD analysis demonstrated that by increasing the ratio of Powder/Liquid (P/L, the crystallinity of the prepared cement increased. The substitution of strontium instead of calcium in CPC could also alter the crystal structure, including some structural disorder. However, in the CPC with no strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA, no significant increase in the crystallinity was observed. SEM observations revealed CPC with increasing P/L ratio, the formation of hydroxyapatite crystals arising from the interaction of solid and liquid phase of cement was decreased. Also, the addition of Sr within Ca site culminated in a dramatic increase in crystallinity of hydroxyapatite. In vitro biological properties ascertained that addition of 3 wt. % Sr-HA into CPC enhanced MTT assay and ALP activity, which could be due to the presence of strontium ions. The histological study showed that greater remodeling was seen at 4 weeks after implantation when the 3 wt% Sr-HA/CPC was used. Conclusion: The obtained results cleared that CPC can be a potential candidate as a carrier with strontium additives for bone remodeling and regeneration.

  12. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

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    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  13. Effects on Setting, Strength, Moisture Resistance and Linear Changes of Sorel’s Cement on Mixing Portland Cement as an Additive

    OpenAIRE

    Mathur, Ritu; Chandrawat, M. P. S.; Sharma, Sanjay K.

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium oxysulphate cement (MOC, Magnesia / Sorel’s Cement), discovered by Sorel S.T. in 1867 and has versatile cementing characteristics. It is prepared by the reaction of magnesium sulphate with magnesia in aqueous solution. Dolomite is used as inert filler to absorb the heat evolved during the exothermic formations of oxysulphate cement. Additives play an important role to modify the properties of Sorel’s cement by nullifying the harmful effects of the impurities present in the matrix...

  14. Optoelectronics using block copolymers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botiz, I.; Darling, S. B.; Center for Nanoscale Materials

    2010-05-01

    Block copolymers, either as semiconductors themselves or as structure directors, are emerging as a promising class of materials for understanding and controlling processes associated with both photovoltaic energy conversion and light emitting devices.

  15. Bismaleimide Copolymer Matrix Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, John A.; Heimbuch, Alvin H.; Hsu, Ming-Ta S.; Chen, Timothy S.

    1987-01-01

    Graphite composites, prepared from 1:1 copolymer of two new bismaleimides based on N,N'-m-phenylene-bis(m-amino-benzamide) structure have mechanical properties superior to those prepared from other bismaleimide-type resins. New heat-resistant composites replace metal in some structural applications. Monomers used to form copolymers with superior mechanical properties prepared by reaction of MMAB with maleic or citraconic anhydride.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of POSS-(PAA)8 star copolymers and GICs for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelmer, Christina; Wang, David K; Keen, Imelda; Hill, David J T; Symons, Anne L; Walsh, Laurence J; Rasoul, Firas

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the application of a new type of multiarm polymer resins in the formulation of Glass Ionic Cements. A series of star copolymers of t-butyl acrylate has been prepared by ATRP using a multiarm POSS-Br8 initiator. The resulting POSS-co-t-butyl acrylate star copolymers with eight arms were subsequently hydrolysed by trifluoroacetic acid to produce the corresponding POSS-co-acrylic acid star copolymers. All of the copolymers have been characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR and FTIR spectroscopies and TGA/DSC. The as-prepared star copolymers were mixed with the glass powder from Fuji IX GP to produce the GIC samples for compression testing. The new type of multiarm polymer resins have been shown to have narrow molecular weight distributions and thermal properties of the acrylic acid copolymers are similar to that of poly(acrylic acid), with a two stage degradation profile involving transitions at ≈140°C and 250°C, corresponding to anhydride formation and loss of carbon dioxide, respectively. In aqueous solution the POSS-co-acrylic acid copolymers form aggregates with ≈33nm dimensions. When aqueous solutions of POSS-(PAA)8 are mixed with a glass powder, a rigid glass ionomer cement, GIC, is formed with a maximum compressive stress significantly greater than that for a linear PAA GIC of a comparable polymer molecular weight. Therefore, these POSS-(PAA)8 copolymers demonstrate the potential for the application of well characterized star copolymers in the future development of new GICs as dental materials. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    speciation of silicon at pH 10 has a significant impact upon the solubility of montmorillonite and would thus constitute a logical choice of pH limit for cement-derived pore fluids, but it is unlikely that cement-based grouts could be developed to meet this limit. Control of mass transport by diffusion processes serves as a significant constraint over the amount of bentonite that can be degraded. Computer simulations indicate that porosity reduction is likely at the interface between cement and bentonite. However, it is not clear how the transport properties of bentonite may be modified due to mineral alteration processes. There are considerable uncertainties concerning the precise mechanism of the rate of montmorillonite dissolution at elevated pH. The rate of dissolution may be inhibited by the presence of dissolved Si (and perhaps Al), but this mechanism has yet to be confirmed at high pH. The type of secondary minerals assumed to form from cement-bentonite interaction will also have a significant impact upon the rate of montmorillonite dissolution. Low-pH cement systems have received little attention thus far regarding the development of models for the chemical evolution of pore fluids. Low Ca/Si CSH gels show preferential leaching of Si, which is in marked contrast with gels of greater Ca/Si ratio. Models apparently capable of predicting pore fluid composition coexisting with low Ca/Si CSH gels are a modified Berner model and a solid-solution model proposed by Sugiyama and Fujita. The solubility of silica in pore fluids coexisting with low Ca/Si gels may exceed that of amorphous silica, and may pose problems regarding the stability of montmorillonite in relation to framework silicates such as feldspars. However, the potential rate of conversion of montmorillonite to feldspar under repository conditions is uncertain. It is necessary to use additives such as super plasticiser to improve the workability of low-pH cements. These organic additives have the potential to

  18. Low pH Cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven

    2007-05-01

    speciation of silicon at pH 10 has a significant impact upon the solubility of montmorillonite and would thus constitute a logical choice of pH limit for cement-derived pore fluids, but it is unlikely that cement-based grouts could be developed to meet this limit. Control of mass transport by diffusion processes serves as a significant constraint over the amount of bentonite that can be degraded. Computer simulations indicate that porosity reduction is likely at the interface between cement and bentonite. However, it is not clear how the transport properties of bentonite may be modified due to mineral alteration processes. There are considerable uncertainties concerning the precise mechanism of the rate of montmorillonite dissolution at elevated pH. The rate of dissolution may be inhibited by the presence of dissolved Si (and perhaps Al), but this mechanism has yet to be confirmed at high pH. The type of secondary minerals assumed to form from cement-bentonite interaction will also have a significant impact upon the rate of montmorillonite dissolution. Low-pH cement systems have received little attention thus far regarding the development of models for the chemical evolution of pore fluids. Low Ca/Si CSH gels show preferential leaching of Si, which is in marked contrast with gels of greater Ca/Si ratio. Models apparently capable of predicting pore fluid composition coexisting with low Ca/Si CSH gels are a modified Berner model and a solid-solution model proposed by Sugiyama and Fujita. The solubility of silica in pore fluids coexisting with low Ca/Si gels may exceed that of amorphous silica, and may pose problems regarding the stability of montmorillonite in relation to framework silicates such as feldspars. However, the potential rate of conversion of montmorillonite to feldspar under repository conditions is uncertain. It is necessary to use additives such as super plasticiser to improve the workability of low-pH cements. These organic additives have the potential to

  19. Retention of oral microorganisms on conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements Retenção de microrganismos bucais em cimentos de ionômero de vidro convencionais e modificados por resina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise PEDRINI

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary caries are a worldwide public and socioeconomic problem. The placement of restorations can lead to the development of environmental conditions favorable to microbial colonization, especially on the tooth/restoration interface, which is a predisposing factor for secondary caries. The aim of this study was to evaluate microbial retention on conventional (Chelon-Fil and Vidrion R and resin-modified (Vitremer and Fuji II LC glass-ionomer cements, in situ, using a hybrid composite resin (Z100 as a control. Twelve volunteers wore Hawley appliances with specimens made of all tested filling materials for 7 days. The specimens were then removed from the appliances and transferred to tubes containing 2.0 ml of Ringer-PRAS. Microorganisms from the samples were inoculated onto blood agar and Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar and incubated under anaerobiosis (90% N2, 10% CO2, at 37°C, for 10 and 2 days, respectively. The resin-modified glass-ionomer cements and the composite resin retained the same levels of microorganisms on their surfaces. The resin-modified glass-ionomers retained less mutans streptococci than the composite resin and conventional glass-ionomer cements. The conventional glass-ionomer cements retained less mutans streptococci than the composite resin, but that difference was not statistically significant.A cárie secundária representa problema de saúde pública e socioeconômico no mundo. A restauração de dentes acometidos por cárie pode criar condições favoráveis à proliferação microbiana na superfície do material restaurador ou na interface dente/restauração, criando ambiente propício para o estabelecimento de cárie secundária. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a capacidade de retenção de placa bacteriana em cimentos de ionômero de vidro convencionais (Chelon-Fil e Vidrion R e modificados por resina (Vitremer e Fuji II LC e de resina composta híbrida (Z100, utilizada como controle. Nos testes de reten

  20. Study of methane hydrate inhibition using AA/AMPS copolymers; Etude du mecanisme d'action d'une famille de copolymeres inhibiteurs cinetiques susceptibles de modifier la cristallisation des hydrates de methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cingotti, B.

    1999-12-02

    Gas hydrates are inclusion compounds that form when water and natural gas come into contact at high pressure and low temperature. In hydrocarbon production, these conditions can be reached in cold areas (artic zones) or in subsea pipelines where hydrates formation can block production facilities. For a few years, a lot of work has been done to develop a new class of low dosage additives called kinetic inhibitors. These hydrosoluble additives are crystallization inhibitors: they delay nucleation and/or slow down crystal growth and/or agglomeration. In this work, we have studied methane hydrate inhibition using AA/AMPS copolymers. To study methane hydrate crystallization, we use a semibatch reactor equipped with a turbidimetric sensor allowing to measure the turbidity spectrum in the reactor. From turbidity measurements, it is possible to calculate the particles size distribution. This set up allows us to obtain macroscopic results (induction time, gas consumption rate) and microscopic results (hydrate particles granulometry). With this set up, we have studied methane hydrate crystallization without additive at macroscopic and microscopic scale and at different pressures and stirring rates. Copolymers have then been tested in the same experimental conditions. Influence of copolymer composition, copolymer molecular mass and additive concentration has been studied. These copolymers have an inhibiting effect on crystals formation kinetics. Optimal performances are obtained for an AMPS molar ratio or 50 %. Furthermore, minimum additive concentration and minimum mean molecular mass are needed to obtain a kinetic effect on crystals. The higher the pressure (driving force) and the higher the stirring rate (gas transfer), the higher these minimum values. To understand results with and without additives, we have used a model. Relating gas consumption rate to crystal growth, it seems that the copolymer inhibits crystal growth by means of a dead zone. Then, using a model based

  1. The mechanical study of acrylic bone cement reinforced with carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nien, Yu-Hsun; Huang, Chiao-li

    2010-01-01

    Bone cement is used as filler between prosthesis and bone for fixation and force distribution. The major composition of bone cement is polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Some disadvantages of PMMA bone cement are found such as significant poor mechanical properties which may cause failure of the cement. In this paper, we exploited carbon nanotube to enhance the mechanical properties of bone cement. The mechanical properties of the bone cement were characterized using tensile and compressive analysis as well as dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The result shows that carbon nanotube is able to enhance the mechanical properties of the modified bone cement.

  2. The mechanical study of acrylic bone cement reinforced with carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nien, Yu-Hsun, E-mail: nienyh@yuntech.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chiao-li [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-25

    Bone cement is used as filler between prosthesis and bone for fixation and force distribution. The major composition of bone cement is polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Some disadvantages of PMMA bone cement are found such as significant poor mechanical properties which may cause failure of the cement. In this paper, we exploited carbon nanotube to enhance the mechanical properties of bone cement. The mechanical properties of the bone cement were characterized using tensile and compressive analysis as well as dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The result shows that carbon nanotube is able to enhance the mechanical properties of the modified bone cement.

  3. Streptococcus mutans counts in plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement or resin-based composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Machado Mota

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU (colony forming units in the saliva and plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with a glass ionomer cement - GIC (Fuji Ortho or a resin-based composite - RC (Concise. Twenty male and female patients, aged 12 to 20 years, participated in the study. Saliva was collected before and after placement of appliances. Plaque was collected from areas adjacent to brackets and saliva was again collected on the 15th, 30th, and 45th day after placement. On the 30th day, 0.4% stannous fluoride gel was applied for 4 minutes. No significant modification in the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU in saliva was observed after placement of the fixed orthodontic appliances. On the 15th day, the percentage of Streptococcus mutans CFU in plaque was statistically lower in sites adjacent to GIC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.365 than in those adjacent to RC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.935. No evidence was found of a contribution of GIC to the reduction of CFU in plaque after the 15th day. Topical application of stannous fluoride gel on the 30th day reduced the number of CFU in saliva, but not in plaque. This study suggests that the antimicrobial activity of GIC occurs only in the initial phase and is not responsible for a long-term anticariogenic property.

  4. INFILTRAÇÃO MARGINAL DE CIMENTOS IONOMÉRICOS MODIFICADOS POR RESINA MICROLEAKAGE OF RESIN-MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo CARRARA

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparou-se a infiltração marginal de dois cimentos restauradores que liberam flúor, o Vitremer/3M e o Variglass/Caulk Dentsply. Cavidades classe II foram confeccionadas nas faces mesiais e distais de pré-molares extraídos. Cada dente recebeu uma restauração de cada material. Procedeu-se, então, a termociclagem em solução de fucsina básica a 0,5%. Nenhum material foi capaz de evitar a infiltração marginal, porém, esta foi menor nas restaurações de Vitremer/3M (pThe microleakage behavior of two hybrid glass ionomer cements used as restorative materials (Variglass/Caulk Dentsply and Vitremer/3M was compared. Separate class II cavities were prepared on the mesial and distal aspects of thirteen extracted premolars. One restoration of each material was placed on every tooth. The cervical margins of the restorations were left one millimeter below the cementoenamel junction. Thermocycling was conduced in a 0.5% basic fuchsin solution. The teeth were washed and sectioned for microleakage analysis under a dissecting microscope. None of the materials tested were able to inhibit dye penetration at the cervical margin. Vitremer/3M was more effective than Variglass/Caulk Dentsply in reducing microleakage.

  5. The effects of crown venting or pre-cementing of CAD/CAM-constructed all-ceramic crowns luted on YTZ implants on marginal cement excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Lucia K; Zehnder, Isabella; Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens; Zitzmann, Nicola U

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the cement excess produced when cementing CAD/CAM-fabricated lithium disilicate (L) or zirconium dioxide (Z) crowns using adhesive cement (A) or resin-modified glass ionomer cement (B). Three different cementation techniques were applied: palatal venting (PV), pre-cementation with custom analogs (CA), and conventional standard procedure (SP). Seventy-two crowns (36 each material) were assigned to 12 experimental groups depending on the restoration material (L, Z), type of cement (A, B), and cementation technique (PV, CA, SP). Weight measurements were taken during cementation, and the amounts of excess cement, cement retained in crown, and relative excess cement were calculated and statistically analyzed. A significant direct relation between the amounts of cement applied and excess cement was observed in groups CA and SP. Vented crowns showed least amounts of marginal excess cement (0.8 ± 0.3 μl) followed by CA (4.2 ± 1.1 μl) and SP (8.8 ± 2.5 μl; p cement (95%CI: 28.4, 35.7) was produced than in the SP group (p cement (A) than of glass ionomer cement (B) were retained in crowns. Using crown venting was the most effective measure to reduce the amount of marginal excess cement, followed using a pre-cementation device. To keep the marginal excess cement of one-piece zirconia implants to a minimum, both techniques should be considered for clinical application. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Block coordination copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G.; Matzger, Adam J.; Benin, Annabelle I.; Willis, Richard R.

    2012-12-04

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  7. Block coordination copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R

    2014-11-11

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  8. Block coordination copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R

    2012-11-13

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  9. Modification of Wood Fiber for Use in Cement Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, F. Q.; Tan, X.; Zhao, F. Q.

    2017-12-01

    When ordinary Portland cement is used for wood fiber cement (WFC) board, the setting time is too long, even hard to solidify. Three methods can be used for wood fiber modification, i.e., soaking in water, treated with alkali solution and coated with some substances on the fiber surface. The results show that the proper water-cement ratio of WFC paste is 1:1.3 in the case of wood cement ratio being 1:1. The WFC board from modified wood fiber and cement is better than the control samples, in which the combined treatment, i.e. soaking in hot water and then coating with alkali-BFS-EVA slurry, behaves best. It is proved that ordinary Portland cement can be used to produce WFC board, with the modified wood fiber, which can greatly reduce production costs.

  10. Retention of metal-ceramic crowns with contemporary dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Zhang, Hai; Wataha, John C

    2009-09-01

    New types of crown and bridge cement are in use by practitioners, and independent studies are needed to assess their effectiveness. The authors conducted a study in three parts (study A, study B, and study C) and to determine how well these new cements retain metal-ceramic crowns. The authors prepared teeth with a 20-degree taper and a 4-millimeter length. They cast high-noble metal-ceramic copings, then fitted and cemented them with a force of 196 newtons. The types of cements they used were zinc phosphate, resin-modified glass ionomer, conventional resin and self-adhesive modified resin. They thermally cycled the cemented copings, then removed them. They recorded the removal force and calculated the stress of dislodgment by using the surface area of each preparation. They used a single-factor analysis of variance to analyze the data (alpha = .05). The mean stresses necessary to remove crowns, in megapascals, were 8.0 for RelyX Luting (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.), 7.3 for RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE), 5.7 for Panavia F (Kuraray America, New York) and 4.0 for Fuji Plus (GC America, Alsip, Ill.) in study A; 8.1 for RelyX Luting, 2.6 for RelyX Luting Plus (3M ESPE) and 2.8 for Fuji CEM (GC America) in study B; and 4.9 for Maxcem (Kerr, Orange, Calif.), 4.0 for BisCem (Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill.), 3.7 for RelyX Unicem Clicker (3M ESPE), 2.9 for iCEM (Heraeus Kulzer, Armonk, N.Y.) and 2.3 for Fleck's Zinc Cement (Keystone Industries, Cherry Hill, N.J.) in study C. Powder-liquid versions of new cements were significantly more retentive than were paste-paste versions of the same cements. The mean value of crown removal stress for the new self-adhesive modified-resin cements varied appreciably among the four cements tested. All cements retained castings as well as or better than did zinc phosphate cement. Powder-liquid versions of cements, although less convenient to mix, may be a better clinical choice when crown retention is an issue. All cements tested will retain castings

  11. Expansive cements for the manufacture of the concrete protective bandages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymechko, Yaroslav; Voloshynets, Vladyslav

    2017-12-01

    One of the promising directions of the use of expansive cements is making the protective bandages for the maintenance of pipelines. Bandages expansive application of the compositions of the pipeline reinforce the damaged area and reduce stress due to compressive stress in the cylindrical area. Such requirements are best suited for expansive compositions obtained from portland cement and modified quicklime. The article presents the results of expansive cements based on quick lime in order to implement protective bandages pipelines.

  12. Spatial Position Control of CdS Nanoclusters using a Self-Assembled Diblock Copolymer Template

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yeh, Siao-Wei; Wu, Tsung-Lun; Wei, Kung-Hwa

    2004-01-01

    ...s. For controlling the spatial position of nanoparticles with block copolymers, it was found that the mercapto-ethanol modified CdS nanoparticles have a preferential binding to the poly(ethylene oxide...

  13. Retention of Implant Supported Metal Crowns Cemented with Different Luting Agents: A Comparative Invitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Roohi; Singh, Kavipal; Kaur, Simrat; Arora, Aman

    2016-04-01

    To overcome limitations of screw-retained prostheses, cement-retained prostheses have become the restoration of choice now a days. Selection of the cement hence becomes very critical to maintain retrievability of the prostheses. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the retention of base metal crowns cemented to implant abutments with five different luting cements. Ten implant analogs were secured in five epoxy resin casts perpendicular to the plane of cast in right first molar and left first molar region and implant abutments were screwed. Total of 100 metal copings were fabricated and cemented. The cements used were zinc phosphate, resin modified glass ionomer cement, resin cement, non-eugenol acrylic based temporary implant cement & non-eugenol temporary resin cement implant cement. Samples were subjected to a pull-out test using an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min. The load required to de-cement each coping was recorded and mean values for each group calculated and put to statistical analysis. The results showed that resin cement has the highest retention value 581.075N followed by zinc phosphate luting cement 529.48N, resin modified glass ionomer cement 338.095 N, non-eugenol acrylic based temporary implant cement 249.045 N and non-eugenol temporary resin implant cement 140.49N. Within the limitations of study, it was concluded that non-eugenol acrylic based temporary implant cement and non-eugenol temporary resin implant cement allow for easy retrievability of the prosthesis in case of any failure in future. These are suitable for cement retained implant restorations. The results provide a possible preliminary ranking of luting agents based on their ability to retain an implant-supported prosthesis and facilitate easy retrieval.

  14. Retention of Implant Supported Metal Crowns Cemented with Different Luting Agents: A Comparative Invitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kavipal; Kaur, Simrat; Arora, Aman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To overcome limitations of screw-retained prostheses, cement-retained prostheses have become the restoration of choice now a days. Selection of the cement hence becomes very critical to maintain retrievability of the prostheses. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the retention of base metal crowns cemented to implant abutments with five different luting cements. Materials and Methods Ten implant analogs were secured in five epoxy resin casts perpendicular to the plane of cast in right first molar and left first molar region and implant abutments were screwed. Total of 100 metal copings were fabricated and cemented. The cements used were zinc phosphate, resin modified glass ionomer cement, resin cement, non-eugenol acrylic based temporary implant cement & non-eugenol temporary resin cement implant cement. Samples were subjected to a pull-out test using an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min. The load required to de-cement each coping was recorded and mean values for each group calculated and put to statistical analysis. Results The results showed that resin cement has the highest retention value 581.075N followed by zinc phosphate luting cement 529.48N, resin modified glass ionomer cement 338.095 N, non-eugenol acrylic based temporary implant cement 249.045 N and non-eugenol temporary resin implant cement 140.49N. Conclusion Within the limitations of study, it was concluded that non-eugenol acrylic based temporary implant cement and non-eugenol temporary resin implant cement allow for easy retrievability of the prosthesis in case of any failure in future. These are suitable for cement retained implant restorations. The results provide a possible preliminary ranking of luting agents based on their ability to retain an implant-supported prosthesis and facilitate easy retrieval. PMID:27190954

  15. Cements research progress. 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This book reviews a survey of the literature on the science of cements published during 1988. The book focuses on an aspect of cement utilization of increasing importance, the immobilization of nuclear wastes

  16. Development of an Improved Cement for Geothermal Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabits, George [Trabits Group, LLC, Wasilla, AK (United States)

    2015-04-20

    After an oil, gas, or geothermal production well has been drilled, the well must be stabilized with a casing (sections of steel pipe that are joined together) in order to prevent the walls of the well from collapsing. The gap between the casing and the walls of the well is filled with cement, which locks the casing into place. The casing and cementing of geothermal wells is complicated by the harsh conditions of high temperature, high pressure, and a chemical environment (brines with high concentrations of carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid) that degrades conventional Portland cement. During the 1990s and early 2000s, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provided support for the development of fly-ash-modified calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) cement, which offers improved resistance to degradation compared with conventional cement. However, the use of CaP cements involves some operational constraints that can increase the cost and complexity of well cementing. In some cases, CaP cements are incompatible with chemical additives that are commonly used to adjust cement setting time. Care must also be taken to ensure that CaP cements do not become contaminated with leftover conventional cement in pumping equipment used in conventional well cementing. With assistance from GTO, Trabits Group, LLC has developed a zeolite-containing cement that performs well in harsh geothermal conditions (thermal stability at temperatures of up to 300°C and resistance to carbonation) and is easy to use (can be easily adjusted with additives and eliminates the need to “sterilize” pumping equipment as with CaP cements). This combination of properties reduces the complexity/cost of well cementing, which will help enable the widespread development of geothermal energy in the United States.

  17. Studies on the Microstructure of Epoxy-Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukowski P.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of polymers into the cement composites improves same of the properties of concretes and mortars. Therefore, the polymer-cement composites are successfully used in construction. The model of microstructure formation in cement composites modified with thermoplastic polymer (pre-mix modifiers has already been developed and successfully implemented. However, the formation of microstructure in the case of epoxy-cement composites ( containing post-mix modifier demonstrates same peculiarities which should be taken into account when modelling the process. The microstructure of epoxy-cement composites and its formation is discussed in the paper. The model is offered, formulated on the basis of the microscopic observations and results of testing.

  18. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  19. Effects of Reinforcing Fiber and Microsilica on the Mechanical and Chloride Ion Penetration Properties of Latex-Modified Fiber-Reinforced Rapid-Set Cement Concrete for Pavement Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woong Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of reinforcement fiber type and microsilica content on the performance of latex-modified fiber-reinforced roller-compacted rapid-hardening cement concrete (LMFRCRSC for a concrete pavement emergency repair. Experimental variables were the microsilica substitution ratio (1, 2, 3, and 4%, and the reinforcement fiber (jute versus macrosynthetic fiber. In the tests, compressive, flexural, and splitting tensile strength; chloride ion penetration resistance; and abrasion resistance were assessed. From the compressive and flexural strength tests with microsilica substitution, the 4-hour curing strength decreased as the microsilica substitution ratio increased. From the chloride ion penetration test, as the microsilica substitution ratio increased, chloride ion penetration decreased. The abrasion resistances increased with the substitution ratio of microsilica increase. Based on these test results, microsilica at a substitution ratio of 3% or less and macrosynthetic fiber as the reinforcement improved the performance of LMFRCRSC for a concrete pavement emergency repair and satisfied all of the target strength requirements.

  20. Cement matrix composite construction features for production of waterproofing coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Суханевич, Марина Володимирівна

    2014-01-01

    It is investigated the properties of the matrix based on Portland cement, slag-contain and fly-ash- slag-contain cements modified with the addition of natural zeolite and complex additives consisting of carbon nanotubes in C-3 solution plasticizer as the main component of composite waterproofing material that is applied to wet concrete in the form of thin-layer coatings.

  1. impact of cement dust pollution on respiratory systems of lafarge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this investigation, the impact of cement dust pollution on respiratory systems of Lafarge cement workers was evaluated. A total of 120 respondents; 60 from the factory workers and 60 (controls) from Ifo, a nearby village 22 km. NE of the factory were interviewed in 2014 using a modified respiratory symptom score ...

  2. Impact of cement dust pollution on respiratory systems of Lafarge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this investigation, the impact of cement dust pollution on respiratory systems of Lafarge cement workers was evaluated. A total of 120 respondents; 60 from the factory workers and 60 (controls) from Ifo, a nearby village 22 km NE of the factory were interviewed in 2014 using a modified respiratory symptom score ...

  3. The polymer cement of sulfur as an alternative for the recycling of phosphogypsum. Corrosion testing of cements enriched with phosphogypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Lopez, F. A.; Navarro, N.; Sanchez, M.; Sanz, B.; Ballesteros, O.; Higueras, E.; Roman, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of the use of cement for the recycling of materials is seen today as sustainable solution of the fertilizer industry for production of matches (NORM). In this paper presents some results of corrosion tests performed on these cements modified using buffer solutions of different pH. The analytical determinations in these matrices are new challenges. (Author)

  4. CHH Cement Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwirzen, A.; Habermehl-Cwirzen, K.; Nasibulina, L. I.; Shandakov, S. D.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Kauppinen, E. I.; Mudimela, P. R.; Penttala, V.

    The compressive strength and electrical resistivity for hardened pastes produced from nanomodified Portland SR cement (CHH- Carbon Hedge Hog cement) were studied. The nanomodification included growing of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the cement particles. Pastes having water to binder ratio of 0.5 were produced. The obtained hardened material was characterized by increased compressive strength in comparison with the reference specimens made from pristine SR cement, which was attributed to reinforcing action of the CNTs and CNFs. The electrical resistivity of CHH composite was lower by one order of magnitude in comparison with reference Portland cement paste.

  5. Block copolymer investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yufa, Nataliya A.

    The research presented in this thesis deals with various aspects of block copolymers on the nanoscale: their behavior at a range of temperatures, their use as scaffolds, or for creation of chemically striped surfaces, as well as the behavior of metals on block copolymers under the influence of UV light, and the healing behavior of copolymers. Invented around the time of World War II, copolymers have been used for decades due to their macroscopic properties, such as their ability to be molded without vulcanization, and the fact that, unlike rubber, they can be recycled. In recent years, block copolymers (BCPs) have been used for lithography, as scaffolds for nano-objects, to create a magnetic hard drive, as well as in photonic and other applications. In this work we used primarily atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), described in Chapter II, to conduct our studies. In Chapter III we demonstrate a new and general method for positioning nanoparticles within nanoscale grooves. This technique is suitable for nanodots, nanocrystals, as well as DNA. We use AFM and TEM to demonstrate selective decoration. In Chapters IV and V we use AFM and TEM to study the structure of polymer surfaces coated with metals and self-assembled monolayers. We describe how the surfaces were created, exhibit their structure on the nanoscale, and prove that their macroscopic wetting properties have been altered compared to the original polymer structures. Finally, Chapters VI and VII report out in-situ AFM studies of BCP at high temperatures, made possible only recently with the invention of air-tight high-temperature AFM imaging cells. We locate the transition between disordered films and cylinders during initial ordering. Fluctuations of existing domains leading to domain coarsening are also described, and are shown to be consistent with reptation and curvature minimization. Chapter VII deals with the healing of PS-b-PMMA following AFM-tip lithography or

  6. Recent and future of cement and concrete industries- a root of our development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ts Erdenebat

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers that cement and concrete industry is contributing to our country development positively, and cement and concrete industry also can be reduced environmental pressure by;- Continuously reducing the CO2 emission from cement production by increased use of biofuels and alternative raw materials as well as introducing modified low energy clinker types and cement with reduced clinker content or geopolymer cement and a new type concrete.- Exploiting the potential of waste bricks, cement and concrete recycling to decrease the emission of CO2.- Exploiting the thermal mass of concrete to create energy optimized solutions for heating and cooling residential and office buildings.

  7. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.

  8. In-situ Mechanical Manipulation of Wellbore Cements as a Solution to Leaky Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupresan, D.; Radonjic, M.; Heathman, J.

    2013-12-01

    Wellbore cement provides casing support, zonal isolation, and casing protection from corrosive fluids, which are essential for wellbore integrity. Cements can undergo one or more forms of failure such as debonding at cement/formation and cement/casing interface, fracturing and defects within cement matrix. Failures and defects within cement will ultimately lead to fluids migration, resulting in inter-zonal fluid migration and premature well abandonment. There are over 27,000 abandoned oil and gas wells only in The Gulf of Mexico (some of them dating from the late 1940s) with no gas leakage monitoring. Cement degradation linked with carbon sequestration can potentially lead to contamination of fresh water aquifers with CO2. Gas leaks can particularly be observed in deviated wells used for hydraulic fracking (60% leakage rate as they age) as high pressure fracturing increases the potential for migration pathways. Experimental method utilized in this study enables formation of impermeable seals at interfaces present in a wellbore by mechanically manipulating wellbore cement. Preliminary measurements obtained in bench scale experiments demonstrate that an impermeable cement/formation and cement/casing interface can be obtained. In post-modified cement, nitrogen gas flow-through experiments showed complete zonal isolation and no permeability in samples with pre-engineered microannulus. Material characterization experiments of modified cement revealed altered microstructural properties of cement as well as changes in mineralogical composition. Calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), the dominant mineral in hydrated cement which provides low permeability of cement, was modified as a result of cement pore water displacement, resulting in more dense structures. Calcium hydroxide (CH), which is associated with low resistance of cement to acidic fluids and therefore detrimental in most wellbore cements, was almost completely displaced and/or integrated in CSH as a result of

  9. Effect of Rebonding on the Bond Strength of Orthodontic Tubes: A Comparison of Light Cure Adhesive and Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Aleksiejunaite

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of different enamel preparation procedures and compare light cure composite (LCC and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI on the bond strength of orthodontic metal tubes rebonded to the enamel. Twenty human molars were divided into two groups (n=10. Tubes were bonded using LCC (Transbond XT in group 1 and RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC in group 2. The tubes in each group were bonded following manufacturers’ instructions (experiment I and then debonded using testing machine. Then, the same brackets were sandblasted and rebonded twice. Before the first rebonding, the enamel was cleaned using carbide bur (experiment II and before second rebonding, it was cleaned using carbide bur and soda blasted (experiment III. Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed no significant difference between RMGI and LCC bond strengths in case of normal bonding and rebonding, when enamel was cleaned using carbide bur before rebonding. Enamel soda blasting before rebonding significantly increased RMGI tensile bond strength value compared to LLC (p<0.05. LCC and RMGI (especially RMGI provide sufficient bond strengths for rebonding of molar tubes, when residual adhesive from previous bonding is removed and enamel soda blasted.

  10. Styrene-Based Copolymer for Polymer Membrane Modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Harsha Srivastava; Harshad Lade; Diby Paul; G. Arthanareeswaran; Ji Hyang Kweon

    2016-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) was modified with a styrene-based copolymer. The crystalline behavior, phase, thermal stability, and surface morphology of the modified membranes were analyzed. The membrane surface roughness showed a strong dependence on the styrene-acrylonitrile content and was reduced to 34% for a PVDF/styrene-acrylonitrile blend membrane with a 40/60 ratio. The thermal and crystalline behavior confirmed the blend miscibility of both polymers. It was observed in X-ray diffr...

  11. Modification of Portland cement mortars with cactus gum

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez-Zaragoza, Juan-Bosco; Caballero-Badillo, Carlos-Eduardo; Rosas-Juarez, Arnulfo; Lopez-Lara, Teresa; Hinojosa-Torres, Jaime; Castano, Victor-Manuel

    2007-01-01

    ????????, ?? ?????????? ??????? ?? ?????? ????????-???????, ??? ???????????????? ? ????????? ???????????, ???????????? ?????????? ?????????? ??????, ????????? ? ????????? ?????????????? ???????. ???????? ?????????? ???????? ??? ????????? ???????? ??? ????????? ?? 65 %, ????????? ?? ???????????? ?????????. Portland cement-based mortars of the standard type used for modern constructions, were modified by adding liophilized cactus gum, extracted froman indigenous Mexican cactus. The results show...

  12. On the Use of Self-Assembling Block Copolymers to Toughen A Model Epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yilin

    Block copolymers have been receiving considerable attention in toughening epoxy due to their ability to form a wide variety of nanostructures. This study focuses on using both triblock and diblock copolymers to improve the fracture toughness of an aromatic-amine cured epoxy system. The curing system consisted of 1,3- phenylenediamine (mPDA) as curing agent and aniline as a chain extender. Three triblock copolymers and three diblock copolymers were incorporated in the same lightly crosslinked model epoxy system, which was chosen to mimic an underfill material in flip-chip packaging for the microelectronics industry. In this research, rubber particles were formed in situ using self-assembling block copolymers. Mechanical, thermal and microscopic studies were conducted with the main goal to study the relationship between the block parameters and the final morphologies and their effects on static and dynamic mechanical properties of the toughened resin, especially fracture toughness. In these block-copolymer-modified epoxies, spherical micelles and wormlike micelles were obtained by varying block lengths, molecular weight, polarities and compositions. It was found that miscibility of the epoxy-miscible block played a crucial role in the formation of different types of morphologies. At a low loading level, diblock copolymers were able to toughen the model epoxy as effectively as triblock copolymers. The fracture toughness was improved to almost three times with respect to that of the neat resin with addition of 10 phr AM*-27. At the same time, other mechanical properties, such as yield strength and modulus, were well retained. Incorporation of block copolymers did not have a significant effect on glass transition temperature but caused an increase in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the modified epoxy. Particle cavitation and matrix void growth were proved to be the toughening mechanisms for SBM-Modified epoxies. However, these typical toughening mechanisms for

  13. Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    performance of three locally manufactured cement samples and imported class G cement sample for oil and gas well ... cement. 2 Materials and Methods. 2.1 Materials. Three brands of cement available on the Ghanaian market and commonly used by Ghanaians for construction ..... Cement Slurry using Factorial Design”,.

  14. Resin-modified and conventional glass ionomer restorations in primary teeth: 8-year results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, V.; Manscher, E.; Teglers, P.T.

    2004-01-01

    clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer......clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer...

  15. Experimental Study on Artificial Cemented Sand Prepared with Ordinary Portland Cement with Different Contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongliang; Liu, Xinrong; Liu, Xianshan

    2015-07-02

    Artificial cemented sand test samples were prepared by using ordinary Portland cement (OPC) as the cementing agent. Through uniaxial compression tests and consolidated drained triaxial compression tests, the stress-strain curves of the artificial cemented sand with different cementing agent contents (0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.08) under various confining pressures (0.00 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 1.00 MPa) were obtained. Based on the test results, the effect of the cementing agent content ( C v ) on the physical and mechanical properties of the artificial cemented sand were analyzed and the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory was modified by using C v . The research reveals that when C v is high (e.g., C v = 0.03, 0.05 or 0.08), the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate a strain softening behavior; under the same confining pressure, as C v increases, both the peak strength and residual strength of the samples show a significant increase. When C v is low (e.g., C v = 0.01), the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate strain hardening behavior. From the test data, a function of C v (the cementing agent content) with c ' (the cohesion force of the sample) and Δϕ' (the increment of the angle of shearing resistance) is obtained. Furthermore, through modification of the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory, the effect of cementing agent content on the strength of the cemented sand is demonstrated.

  16. Experimental Study on Artificial Cemented Sand Prepared with Ordinary Portland Cement with Different Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongliang Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Artificial cemented sand test samples were prepared by using ordinary Portland cement (OPC as the cementing agent. Through uniaxial compression tests and consolidated drained triaxial compression tests, the stress-strain curves of the artificial cemented sand with different cementing agent contents (0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.08 under various confining pressures (0.00 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 1.00 MPa were obtained. Based on the test results, the effect of the cementing agent content (Cv on the physical and mechanical properties of the artificial cemented sand were analyzed and the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory was modified by using Cv. The research reveals that when Cv is high (e.g., Cv = 0.03, 0.05 or 0.08, the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate a strain softening behavior; under the same confining pressure, as Cv increases, both the peak strength and residual strength of the samples show a significant increase. When Cv is low (e.g., Cv = 0.01, the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate strain hardening behavior. From the test data, a function of Cv (the cementing agent content with c′ (the cohesion force of the sample and Δϕ′ (the increment of the angle of shearing resistance is obtained. Furthermore, through modification of the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory, the effect of cementing agent content on the strength of the cemented sand is demonstrated.

  17. Modification of ethylene-norbornene copolymer by Gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kačarević-Popović Zorica M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of modifying polyethylene and many other polymers with high energy radiation has led to many useful applications. Due to their new combination of properties and the shortage of experimental data, the radiolysis of a new class of materials, cyclo-olefin copolymers (COC, polymerised from norbornene and ethylene using metallocene catalysts, is of great interest to the study of radiation chemistry and the physics of polymeric systems. Ethylenenorbornene copolymer, pristine and containing an antioxidant were subjected to gamma irradiation in the presence of air and in water. The irradiated copolymer was studied using IR and UV-vis spectrophotometric analysis. The radiation-induced changes in the molecular structure were correlated to changes in the glass transition temperature measured by the DSC method.

  18. Quantitative characterization of the microstructure of fresh cement paste via random packing of polydispersed Platonic cement particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W X; Chen, H S

    2012-01-01

    On a microscopic scale, fresh cement paste is composed of random packing of irregular cement particles, and their initial packing behavior plays an important role in microstructural evolution. The preponderance of previous works has focused on the microstructure model by random packing of three-dimensional spheroidal particles, and little is known about non-spheroidal particles. In this paper, a modified cement particle size distribution function is used to facilitate the particle size distribution of convex polyhedral cement particles. Based on an overlapping detection algorithm, the microstructure model of fresh cement paste is simulated by the random sequential packing of Platonic cement particles of various sizes. Applying stereological tools and the serial sectioning analysis technique, the modeling microstructure composed of polydispersed Platonic cement particles is characterized and compared with that of ellipsoidal cement particles with various aspect ratios. The statistical results are investigated to evaluate the influence of cement particle shape on the microstructure of fresh cement paste. Finally, with the derived experimental and numerical results of microstructural parameters, the reliability of the statistical results is verified. (paper)

  19. Biocompatibility of calcium phosphate bone cement with optimised mechanical properties: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Iwan; Nelson, John; Schatton, Wolfgang; Dunne, Nicholas J; Buchanan, Fraser; Clarke, Susan A

    2016-12-01

    This work establishes the in vivo performance of modified calcium phosphate bone cements for vertebroplasty of spinal fractures using a lapine model. A non-modified calcium phosphate bone cement and collagen-calcium phosphate bone cements composites with enhanced mechanical properties, utilising either bovine collagen or collagen from a marine sponge, were compared to a commercial poly(methyl methacrylate) cement. Conical cement samples (8 mm height × 4 mm base diameter) were press-fit into distal femoral condyle defects in New Zealand White rabbits and assessed after 5 and 10 weeks. Bone apposition and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity around cements were assessed. All implants were well tolerated, but bone apposition was higher on calcium phosphate bone cements than on poly(methyl methacrylate) cement. Incorporation of collagen showed no evidence of inflammatory or immune reactions. Presence of positive tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining within cracks formed in calcium phosphate bone cements suggested active osteoclasts were present within the implants and were actively remodelling within the cements. Bone growth was also observed within these cracks. These findings confirm the biological advantages of calcium phosphate bone cements over poly(methyl methacrylate) and, coupled with previous work on enhancement of mechanical properties through collagen incorporation, suggest collagen-calcium phosphate bone cement composite may offer an alternative to calcium phosphate bone cements in applications where low setting times and higher mechanical stability are important.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Facilitated Transport Membranes Composed of Chitosan-Styrene and Chitosan-Acrylonitrile Copolymers Modified by Methylimidazolium Based Ionic Liquids for CO2 Separation from CH4 and N2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenia V. Otvagina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available CO2 separation was found to be facilitated by transport membranes based on novel chitosan (CS–poly(styrene (PS and chitosan (CS–poly(acrylonitrile (PAN copolymer matrices doped with methylimidazolium based ionic liquids: [bmim][BF4], [bmim][PF6], and [bmim][Tf2N] (IL. CS plays the role of biodegradable film former and selectivity promoter. Copolymers were prepared implementing the latest achievements in radical copolymerization with chosen monomers, which enabled the achievement of outstanding mechanical strength values for the CS-based membranes (75–104 MPa for CS-PAN and 69–75 MPa for CS-PS. Ionic liquid (IL doping affected the surface and mechanical properties of the membranes as well as the gas separation properties. The highest CO2 permeability 400 Barrers belongs to CS-b-PS/[bmim][BF4]. The highest selectivity α (CO2/N2 = 15.5 was achieved for CS-b-PAN/[bmim][BF4]. The operational temperature of the membranes is under 220 °C.

  1. Styrene-Based Copolymer for Polymer Membrane Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha Srivastava

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Poly(vinylidene fluoride (PVDF was modified with a styrene-based copolymer. The crystalline behavior, phase, thermal stability, and surface morphology of the modified membranes were analyzed. The membrane surface roughness showed a strong dependence on the styrene-acrylonitrile content and was reduced to 34% for a PVDF/styrene-acrylonitrile blend membrane with a 40/60 ratio. The thermal and crystalline behavior confirmed the blend miscibility of both polymers. It was observed in X-ray diffraction (XRD experiments that the modified PVDF membranes show a drastic reduction in their crystallinity. The neat PVDF membrane has the highest degradation rate, which decreased with the addition of the styrene-based copolymer.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of acrylamide-N-isopropyl acrylamide copolymer grafts on silicone rubber substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenoyama, Satoshi; Hoffman, Allan S.

    Radiation grafting has been used to modify the surface composition of a polymeric biomaterial without changing its mechanical properties. The graft copolymer surface modifications may result in significant changes in protein and cell adhesion to the surface, and thus in the overall biological response to the foreign material. In this paper we present a study of the radiation grafting of an unusual monomer, N-isopropyl acrylamide, and its copolymers with acrylamide, onto silicone rubber. This graft system may be able to influence protein adsorption and cell interactions in a unique fashion due to the special hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance and the unusual hydration character of the grafted copolymer.

  3. Corrosion-resistant Foamed Cements for Carbon Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Gill, S.; Pyatina, T., Muraca, A.; Keese, R.; Khan, A.; Bour, D.

    2012-12-01

    The cementitious material consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate designed as an alternative thermal-shock resistant cement for the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells was treated with cocamidopropyl dimethylamine oxide-based compound as foaming agent (FA) to prepare numerous air bubble-dispersed low density cement slurries of and #61603;1.3 g/cm3. Then, the foamed slurry was modified with acrylic emulsion (AE) as corrosion inhibitor. We detailed the positive effects of the acrylic polymer (AP) in this emulsion on the five different properties of the foamed cement: 1) The hydrothermal stability of the AP in 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cements; 2) the hydrolysis-hydration reactions of the slurry at 85 and #61616;C; 3) the composition of crystalline phases assembled and the microstructure developed in autoclaved cements; 4) the mechanical behaviors of the autoclaved cements; and, 5) the corrosion mitigation of carbon steel (CS) by the polymer. For the first property, the hydrothermal-catalyzed acid-base interactions between the AP and cement resulted in Ca-or Na-complexed carboxylate derivatives, which led to the improvement of thermal stability of the AP. This interaction also stimulated the cement hydration reactions, enhancing the total heat evolved during cement’s curing. Addition of AP did not alter any of the crystalline phase compositions responsible for the strength of the cement. Furthermore, the AP-modified cement developed the porous microstructure with numerous defect-free cavities of disconnected voids. These effects together contributed to the improvement of compressive-strength and –toughness of the cured cement. AP modification of the cement also offered an improved protection of CS against brine-caused corrosion. There were three major factors governing the corrosion protection: 1) Reducing the extents of infiltration and transportation of corrosive electrolytes through the cement layer deposited on the underlying CS

  4. Physical characteristics, antimicrobial and odontogenesis potentials of calcium silicate cement containing hinokitiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ming-Hsien [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shen, Yu-Fang; Hsu, Tuan-Ti [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-01

    Hinokitiol is a natural material and it has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the material characterization, cell viability, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities of the hinokitiol-modified calcium silicate (CS) cement as a root end filling material. The setting times, diametral tensile strength (DTS) values and XRD patterns of CS cements with 0–10 mM hinokitiol were examined. Then, the antibacterial effect and the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) of the hinokitiol-modified CS cements were evaluated. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility, the expression levels of the markers of odontoblastic differentiation, mineralized nodule formation and calcium deposition of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on hinokitiol-modified CS cements were determined. The hinokitiol-modified CS cements had better antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities and cytocompatibility than non-modified CS cements. Otherwise, the hinokitiol-modified CS cements had suitable setting times and better odontoblastic potential of hDPCs. Previous report pointed out that the root-end filling materials may induce inflammatory cytokines reaction. In our study, hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility, antimicrobial properties and active ability of odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Therefore, the hinokitiol-modified CS cement may be a potential root end filling material for clinic. - Highlights: • The hinokitiol-modified CS up-regulation of odontogenic of hDPCs. • Promoted proliferation of hDPCs on hinokitiol-modified CS. • The hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility. • The hinokitiol-modified CS up-regulation of odontogenic of hPDLs.

  5. Physical characteristics, antimicrobial and odontogenesis potentials of calcium silicate cement containing hinokitiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ming-Hsien; Shen, Yu-Fang; Hsu, Tuan-Ti; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Shie, Ming-You

    2016-01-01

    Hinokitiol is a natural material and it has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the material characterization, cell viability, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities of the hinokitiol-modified calcium silicate (CS) cement as a root end filling material. The setting times, diametral tensile strength (DTS) values and XRD patterns of CS cements with 0–10 mM hinokitiol were examined. Then, the antibacterial effect and the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) of the hinokitiol-modified CS cements were evaluated. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility, the expression levels of the markers of odontoblastic differentiation, mineralized nodule formation and calcium deposition of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on hinokitiol-modified CS cements were determined. The hinokitiol-modified CS cements had better antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities and cytocompatibility than non-modified CS cements. Otherwise, the hinokitiol-modified CS cements had suitable setting times and better odontoblastic potential of hDPCs. Previous report pointed out that the root-end filling materials may induce inflammatory cytokines reaction. In our study, hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility, antimicrobial properties and active ability of odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Therefore, the hinokitiol-modified CS cement may be a potential root end filling material for clinic. - Highlights: • The hinokitiol-modified CS up-regulation of odontogenic of hDPCs. • Promoted proliferation of hDPCs on hinokitiol-modified CS. • The hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility. • The hinokitiol-modified CS up-regulation of odontogenic of hPDLs.

  6. Diblock Copolymer/Layered Silicate Nanocomposite Thin Film Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limary, Ratchana; Green, Peter

    2000-03-01

    The stability of thin film symmetric diblock copolymers blended with layered silicate nanocomposites were examined using a combination of optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Two cases were examined PS-b-PMMA (polystyrene-b-polymethylacrylate) blended with montmorillonite stoichiometrically loaded with alkyl ammonium ions, OLS(S), and PS-b-PMMA blended with montmorillonite loaded with excess alkyl ammonium ions, OLS(E). XRD spectra show an increase in the gallery spacing of the OLSs, indicating that the copolymer chains have intercalated the layered silicates. AFM images reveal a distinct difference between the two nanocomposite thin films: regions in the vicinity of OLS(S) aggregates were depleted of material, while in the vicinity of OLS(E) aggregates, dewetting of the substrate occurred. We show that the stability of the copolymer/OLS nanocomposite films is determined by the enthalpic driving force associated with intercalation of the copolymer chains into the galleries of the modified OLS layers and by the substrate/organic modifier interactions.

  7. A review on seashells ash as partial cement replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Wan Ahmad Soffian Bin Wan; Hazurina Othman, Nor; Ibrahim, Mohd Haziman Wan; Rahim, Masazurah A.; Shahidan, Shahiron; Rahman, Raha Abd

    2017-11-01

    This review paper emphasis on various sea shells ash such as cockle, clam, oyster, mollusc, periwinkle, snail, and green mussel shell ash as partial cement replacement and its objective is to create sustainable environment and reduce problems of global warming. Cement production give huge impact to environment in every stage of its production. These include air pollution in form of dust and, gases, sound and vibration during quarry crushing and milling. One of the solutions to solve this problem is by using modified cement. The modified cement is a cementitious material that meets or exceeds the Portland cement performance by combining and optimizes the recycle and wasted materials. This will indirectly reduce the use of raw materials and then, become a sustain construction materials. Therefore, the replacement of cement in concrete by various sea shell ash may create tremendous saving of energy and also leads to important environmental benefits. This study includes previous investigation done on the properties of chemical and mechanical such as specific gravity, chemical composition, compressive strength, tensile strength and flexural strength of concrete produced using partial replacement of cement by seashells ash. Results show that the optimum percentage of seashells as cement replacement is between 4 - 5%.

  8. Retention of crowns cemented on implant abutments with temporary cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Yuko; Hibino, Yasushi; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    This study was to examine the retentive force of crowns to implant abutments with commercial temporary cements. Six different temporary cements were investigated. Cast crowns were cemented to the abutments using each cement and their retentive forces to abutments were determined 7 or 28 days after cementing (n=10). The retentive force of the cements to abutments varied widely among the products [27-109 N (7-day), 18-80 N (28-days)]. The retentive force of all the cements was not reduced as the time elapsed, except for two products tested. The polycarboxylate cements and paste-mixing type eugenol-free cements revealed comparable retentive force after 28 days of storage. The powder-liquid type cements showed a positive correlation (pcement between the retentive force and compressive strength. Mechanical strength of temporary cements could not be a prominent predicting factor for retention of the crowns on the abutments.

  9. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Liang; Tseng, Dyi-Hwa; Wu, Yue-Ze

    2012-07-01

    Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the control cement mortar, respectively. GBS had the highest strength activity index value and could produce large amounts of CaO to enhance the pozzolanic activity of SSA/FA and form calcium silicate hydrate gels to fill the capillary pores of the cement mortar. Consequently, the Sc development of cement mortar with GBS replacement was better than that without GBS, and the total pore volume of blended cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement was less than that with FA/SSA replacement. In the cement mortar with modified SSA and GBS at 70% of total cement replacement, the Sc at 56 days was 92.4% of the control mortar. Modifying the content of calcium in SSA also increased its pozzolanic reaction. CaCl(2) accelerated the pozzolanic activity of SSA better than lime did. Moreover, blending cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement could generate more monosulfoaluminate to fill capillary pores.

  10. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    are available all over the world. The cement is affected by excessive exposure to moisture, particularly at high temperatures. Use of various additives has been suggested to enhance the durability of this cement. (Bludnov et al 1974; Paul 1975; Mingfen and Wei 1989;. Misra and Mathur 1993; Chandrawat and Yadav 2000).

  11. Advanced cementation concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this programme of work was to investigate whether improvements could be made to existing formulations for cement suitable for the immobilization of intermediate level radioactive waste. Two additives were selected, microsilica and limestone flour. Improvements to the cement were only slight. (author)

  12. A new cement slurry modified with chitosan/alginate interpenetrating networks and hydroxyapatite: structural characteristics after long-term contact with hyper-saline produced water from oil well operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Ivory Marcos Gomes dos; Santos, Danilo Oliveira; Cestari, Antonio Reinaldo

    2017-01-01

    Oil is an important source of energy, mainly in developing countries. Important research has been conducted to find cementing procedures that guarantee safe and cost-effective oil exploration below pre-salt layers. This work aimed to make a new cement paste with cement, seawater, silica, biopolymers (chitosan and sodium alginate) and hydroxyapatite (HA), found in nature. For comparison purposes, slurry without additives was prepared and characterized. The HA used was extracted from fish scales (Cynoscion acoupa) in optimized condition NaOH concentration, temperature and reaction time. Both slurry were prepared with ratios water/cement (w/c) and silica/cement (s/c) equal to 0.50 and 0.35, respectively. The new cement slurry was obtained with proportions of 5% of each biopolymer and HA with respect to the total weight of the cement. In the immersion tests, specimens were immersed in samples of hyper production of saline water by 35°C for 15 days. Thereafter, they were washed, dried and its surface layers were scraped. Before, the resulting materials were characterized. The values of the ratios Ca/Si of new cement slurry (3.38 ± 0.06) were superior compared to standard (2.58 ± 0.05). The new slurry had high thermal stability and low amounts of small crystallite-type portlandite (35.70 nm). Conversely, a slurry standard formed larger crystals of about 50.3 nm. Significantly, after continuous long-term contact of both slurries with hyper-saline produced water from oil well fields operations, in comparison with standard slurry structural characteristics, the new slurry has practically maintained its pristine chemical structure, as well as has shown crystallite-type particles of NaCl and Friedel’s/Kuzel’s salts with lower proportion. The presence of the biopolymers and HA has driven the improved the self-healing properties observed in the new cement slurry. In this first study, the new slurry has shown adequate characteristics to contribute to cost effective and

  13. A new cement slurry modified with chitosan/alginate interpenetrating networks and hydroxyapatite: structural characteristics after long-term contact with hyper-saline produced water from oil well operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Ivory Marcos Gomes dos; Santos, Danilo Oliveira; Cestari, Antonio Reinaldo, E-mail: ivorymarcos@hotmail.com, E-mail: danilo.quimico@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: rcestari@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencia dos Materiais; Ribeiro, Joenesson Filip Santos, E-mail: joenesson.joe@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Lab, Materiais e Calorimetria; Alves, Jose do Patrocinio Hora; Ferreira, Angelica Baganha, E-mail: jphalves@uol.com.br, E-mail: angelica.bferreira@itps.se.gov.br [Instituto Tecnologico e de Pesquisas do Estado de Sergipe (ITPS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    Oil is an important source of energy, mainly in developing countries. Important research has been conducted to find cementing procedures that guarantee safe and cost-effective oil exploration below pre-salt layers. This work aimed to make a new cement paste with cement, seawater, silica, biopolymers (chitosan and sodium alginate) and hydroxyapatite (HA), found in nature. For comparison purposes, slurry without additives was prepared and characterized. The HA used was extracted from fish scales (Cynoscion acoupa) in optimized condition NaOH concentration, temperature and reaction time. Both slurry were prepared with ratios water/cement (w/c) and silica/cement (s/c) equal to 0.50 and 0.35, respectively. The new cement slurry was obtained with proportions of 5% of each biopolymer and HA with respect to the total weight of the cement. In the immersion tests, specimens were immersed in samples of hyper production of saline water by 35°C for 15 days. Thereafter, they were washed, dried and its surface layers were scraped. Before, the resulting materials were characterized. The values of the ratios Ca/Si of new cement slurry (3.38 ± 0.06) were superior compared to standard (2.58 ± 0.05). The new slurry had high thermal stability and low amounts of small crystallite-type portlandite (35.70 nm). Conversely, a slurry standard formed larger crystals of about 50.3 nm. Significantly, after continuous long-term contact of both slurries with hyper-saline produced water from oil well fields operations, in comparison with standard slurry structural characteristics, the new slurry has practically maintained its pristine chemical structure, as well as has shown crystallite-type particles of NaCl and Friedel’s/Kuzel’s salts with lower proportion. The presence of the biopolymers and HA has driven the improved the self-healing properties observed in the new cement slurry. In this first study, the new slurry has shown adequate characteristics to contribute to cost effective and

  14. Ionization of amphiphilic acidic block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombani, Olivier; Lejeune, Elise; Charbonneau, Céline; Chassenieux, Christophe; Nicolai, Taco

    2012-06-28

    The ionization behavior of an amphiphilic diblock copolymer poly(n-butyl acrylate(50%)-stat-acrylic acid(50%))(100)-block-poly(acrylic acid)(100) (P(nBA(50%)-stat-AA(50%))(100)-b-PAA(100), DH50) and of its equivalent triblock copolymer P(nBA(50%)-stat-AA(50%))(100)-b-PAA(200)-b-P(nBA(50%)-stat-AA(50%))(100) (TH50) were studied by potentiometric titration either in pure water or in 0.5 M NaCl. These polymers consist of a hydrophilic acidic block (PAA) connected to a hydrophobic block, P(nBA(50%)-stat-AA(50%))(100), whose hydrophobic character has been mitigated by copolymerization with hydrophilic units. We show that all AA units, even those in the hydrophobic block could be ionized. However, the AA units within the hydrophobic block were less acidic than those in the hydrophilic block, resulting in the preferential ionization of the latter block. The preferential ionization of PAA over that of P(nBA(50%)-stat-AA(50%))(100) was stronger at higher ionic strength. Remarkably, the covalent bonds between the PAA and P(nBA(50%)-stat-AA(50%))(100) blocks in the diblock or the triblock did not affect the ionization of each block, although the self-association of the block copolymers into spherical aggregates modified the environment of the PAA blocks compared to when PAA was molecularly dispersed.

  15. Crowns cemented on crown preparations lacking geometric resistance form. Part II: effect of cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussaefs, Periklis

    2004-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different cements on resistance to dislodgment of crowns cemented on preparations lacking geometric resistance form. A preparation that offered no geometric resistance form, with 20 degrees total occlusal convergence (TOC), 0.9 mm wide shoulder finish line, and a 2.5 mm axial wall height was created on an ivorine tooth using a milling machine. Ten metal test specimen die replicas and 10 standardized metal crowns with recipient sites for the application of external forces through a universal testing machine were fabricated. The crowns were cemented on the dies under 5 and 10 kg external loads, the marginal openings measured, loaded to dislodgment, and cleaned of cement. The process was repeated using zinc oxide and eugenol (ZOE), zinc phosphate (ZPh), resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI), and composite resin (CR) cements. Marginal openings under 5 kg cementation loads were 74.63 (+/-15.04) for ZOE, 75.98 (+/-18.20) microm for ZPh, 98.58 (+/-22.62) microm for RMGI, and 105.82 (+/-20.07) microm for CR cements respectively; under 10 kg cementation loads they were 57.62 (+/-15.86) microm, 59.55 (+/-15.41) microm, 95.00 (+/-19.52) microm, 101.30 (+/-12.52) microm respectively. Oblique dislodgment forces, measured with a Universal testing machine, were 40.18 (+/- 6.76) N for ZOE, 215.65 (+/-45.79) N for ZPh, 165.43 (+/-19.53) N for RMGI, and 181.54 (+/-30.75) N for CR respectively when crowns were cemented under 5 kg loads. The corresponding values for 10 kg loads were 38.62 (+/-4.19), 274.86 (+/-54.22), 139.70 (+/-21.71), and 160.40 (+/-21.21) respectively. Only zinc phosphate cement produced statistically enhanced resistance when crowns were cemented under 10 kg force (p value = 0.035). Under the conditions of the present study only crowns cemented with zinc phosphate displayed increased resistance to dislodgment on preparations lacking resistance form.

  16. Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone intended for efficient paving materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishina, A.

    2017-10-01

    Due to the growth of load on automotive roads, modern transportation engineering is in need of efficient paving materials. Runways and most advanced highways require Portland cement concretes. This makes important the studies directed to improvement of binders for such concretes. In the present work some peculiarities of the process of Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone with barium hydrosilicate sol were examined. It was found that the admixture of said sol leads to a shift in the induction period to later times without significant change in its duration. The admixture of a modifier with nanoscale barium hydrosilicates increases the degree of hydration of the cement clinker minerals and changes the phase composition of the hydration products; in particular, the content of portlandite and tricalcium silicate decreases, while the amount of ettringite increases. Changes in the hydration processes of Portland cement and early setting of cement stone that are caused by the nanoscale barium hydrosilicates, allow to forecast positive technological effects both at the stage of manufacturing and at the stage of operation. In particular, the formwork age can be reduced, turnover of molds can be increased, formation of secondary ettringite and corrosion of the first type can be eliminated.

  17. Analysis by X-Ray images of EVA waste incorporated in Portland Cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, M.A.; Antunes, M.L.P.; Montagnoli, R.M.; Mancini, S.D.

    2012-01-01

    The EVA is a copolymer used by Brazilian shoes industries. This material is cut for the manufacture of insoles. This operation generates about 18% of waste. The EVA waste can be reused in incorporation in Portland cement to construction without structural purposes. The aim of this work is to show X-rays images to assessment the space distribution of the wastes in the cement and to evaluate the use of this methodology. Cylindrical specimens were produced according to ABNT - NBR 5738 standards. The volume relation of sand and cement was 3:1, 10% and 30% of waste was incorporated in cement specimens. X-Rays images were obtained of cylindrical specimens in front projection. The images showed that the distribution of the waste is homogeneous, consistent with what was intended in this type of incorporation, which can provide uniformity in test results of compressive strength. (author)

  18. A comparative evaluation of compressive strength of Portland cement with zinc oxide eugenol and Polymer-reinforced cement: an in vitro analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakasam, S; Bharadwaj, Prakasam; Loganathan, S C; Prasanth, B Krishna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ultimate compressive strength of 50% and 25% Portland cement mixed with Polymer-reinforced zinc oxide eugenol and zinc oxide eugenol cement after 1 hour, 24 hours, and 7 days. One hundred and eighty samples were selected. The samples were made cylindrical of size 6 × 8 mm and were divided into six groups as follows with each group consisting of 10 samples. Group 1: Polymer-reinforced zinc oxide eugenol with 50% Portland cement (PMZNPC 50%) Group 2: Polymer-reinforced zinc oxide eugenol with 25% Portland cement (PMZNPC 25%) Group 3: Polymer-reinforced zinc oxide eugenol with 0% Portland cement (PMZNPC 0%) Group 4: Zinc oxide eugenol with 50% Portland cement (ZNPC 50%) Group 5: Zinc oxide eugenol with 25% Portland cement (ZNPC 25%) Group 6: Zinc oxide eugenol with 0% Portland cement (ZNPC 0%) These samples were further subdivided based on time interval and were tested at 1 hour, 24 hours and at 7 th day. After each period of time all the specimens were tested by vertical CVR loaded frame with capacity of 5 tones/0473-10kan National Physical laboratory, New Delhi and the results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Scheffe test. Polymer-reinforced cement with 50% Portland cement, Zinc oxide with 50% Portland cement, Polymer-reinforced cement with 25% Portland cement and Zinc oxide with 25% Portland cement exhibited higher compressive strength when compared to Zinc oxide with 0% Portland cement and Polymer-reinforced cement with 0% Portland cement, at different periods of time. The difference between these two groups were statistically significant (P Portland cement in Zinc oxide eugenol and Polymer-modified zinc oxide cement can be used as core build up material and permanent filling material. It is concluded that 50% and 25% Portland cement in zinc oxide eugenol and polymer-modified zinc oxide eugenol results in higher compressive strength and hence can be used as permanent filling material and core built

  19. Cement composite delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convery, F R; Devine, S D; Hollis, J M; Woo, S L

    1986-09-01

    Several new and innovative techniques have recently been introduced that purport to increase the strength of polymethyl methacrylate bone cement. One of these concepts is the use of carbon and polymer fibers to form a cement composite. Bone cement composites usually 1% fiber, are very difficult to use clinically. The composite is very sticky and viscous, which precludes effective hand packing or the use of conventional delivery systems. A new delivery system for very viscous materials is presented and examples of in vitro application are shown.

  20. Lignin poly(lactic acid) copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Johan Vilhelm; Chung, Yi-Lin; Li, Russell Jingxian; Waymouth, Robert; Sattely, Elizabeth; Billington, Sarah; Frank, Curtis W.

    2017-02-14

    Provided herein are graft co-polymers of lignin and poly(lactic acid) (lignin-g-PLA copolymer), thermoset and thermoplastic polymers including them, methods of preparing these polymers, and articles of manufacture including such polymers.

  1. Effect of cement types on the tensile strength of metallic crowns submitted to thermocycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consani Simonides

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between metallic cast crowns and tensile strength according to cement types submitted to thermocycling was studied. Seventy-two metallic crowns were cast with Verabond II Ni-Cr alloy and cemented in standardized preparations with 10º tapering. Three types of finishing line (45-degree chamfered, 20-degree bevel shoulder and right shoulder were made with diamond burs on bovine teeth. Twenty-four metallic crowns in each group were randomly subdivided into three subgroups of 8 samples each according to the cement used: SS White zinc phosphate cement, Vitremer resin-modified glass ionomer cement, and Rely X resin cement and were submitted to thermocycling. Retention was evaluated according to tensile load required to displace the metallic cast crowns from tooth preparations with an Instron testing machine. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed a statistically significant difference among luting materials, with greater results for Rely X resin cement (24.9 kgf followed by SS White zinc phosphate cement (13.3 kgf and Vitremer resin-modified glass ionomer cement (10.1 kgf. The finishing line types did not influence the tensile resistance of the crowns fixed with the three cements. Increased tensile resistance of metallic crowns fixed on bovine teeth was obtained with resin cement, independent of the finishing line types.

  2. Caesium diffusion through cement paste cured at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, V.K.; Ray, A.

    1999-01-01

    Cs + diffusivity through ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples was investigated using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Secondary Ion Mass-Spectrometry (SIMS). Intrinsic diffusivities were calculated using modified diffusion equations. The intrinsic diffusivities of Cs + through OPC and cemented clinoptilolite samples cured at 25 deg C, 60 deg C and 150 deg C were compared. As expected, Cs + diffusivity was found to increase with increasing cure temperature of OPC. Cs + diffusivity through cemented clinoptilolite also varied with cure temperature. The addition of clinoptilolite to OPC reduced Cs + diffusivity through the sample, and this effect was more pronounced at greater cure temperatures

  3. Thermal and Electrical Characterization of the Carbon Nanofibers Based Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka ŚLOSARCZYK

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the influence of chemical modification of vapor grown carbon nanofibers (VGCnFs on the thermal and electrical properties of the cement composites. The surface modification of nanofibers was performed by means of ozone and nitric acid treatments. It was shown that the oxidized carbon nanofibers surface plays an important role in shaping the mechanical and especially electrical properties of cement composite. For cement matrix modified with carbon nanofibers subjected to oxidized treatment, the slightly increase of cement paste resistivity was observed. It confirms the better adhesion of carbon nanofibers to cement paste. However, independently of carbon nanofibers modification, the occurrence of VGCnFs in cement paste increased the electrical conductivity of the composite in comparison to the cement paste without fibers. The obtained values of electrical resistivity were comparable with values of cement composites modified with 4 mm long carbon fibers. Moreover, it was shown that the chemical modification of carbon nanofibers surface does not influence on the thermal properties of cement composites. In case of cement paste with unmodified and modified carbon nanofibers, the Seebeck voltage was proportional to the temperature difference and was independent of the oxidation degree of carbon nanofibers.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.2.14993

  4. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brajkovic, Denis; Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar; Kisic, Danilo; Zelic, Ksenija; Djuric, Marija; Rakocevic, Zlatko

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation

  5. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brajkovic, Denis [Clinic for Dentistry, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Svetozara Markovica 69, 34000 Kragujevac (Serbia); Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Kisic, Danilo [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Zelic, Ksenija; Djuric, Marija [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Rakocevic, Zlatko, E-mail: zlatkora@vinca.rs [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation

  6. Effect of glass and polyacid preparations on the strength of glass ionomer cements for dental applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruporn Monmaturapoj

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GICs, widely used as restorative materials in dentistry, are principally composed of fluoroaluminosilicateglass powder combined with a water-soluble polyacid. The investigation of new glass compositions and polyacid components are very important to improve the mechanical properties of these cements. The objective of this work was to prepare glass ionomers and polyacids for the use as GICs. The effects of spherical bodies, Al2O3:SiO2 ratios, replacing CaO by SrO, and ZrO2 adding in glass powder in combination with the variation of acidic copolymer concentration on the compressive strength were investigated and discussed.

  7. The Influence of Abutment Surface Treatment and the Type of Luting Cement on Shear Bond Strength between Titanium/Cement/Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Śmielak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the shear bond strength of zirconia cylinders on a modified titanium surface using different luting cement types. Material and Methods. Eighty titanium disks were divided into two groups (n=40, which were treated with either grinding or a combination of sandblasting and grinding. Then, each group was subdivided into 4 groups (n=10 and the disks were bonded to disks of sintered zirconia using one of four cement types (permanent: composite cement; temporary: polycarboxylate cement, zinc-oxide-eugenol cement, and resin cement. Shear bond strength (SBS was measured in a universal testing machine. Fracture pattern and site characteristic were recorded. A fractographic analysis was performed with SEM. The chemical analysis of the composition of the fractures was performed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The results of the experiment were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test. Results. The highest mean values of SBS were achieved when grinding was combined with sandblasting and when composite cement was used (18.18 MPa. In the temporary cement group, the highest mean values of SBS were for polycarboxylate cement after grinding (3.57 MPa. Conclusion. The choice of cement has a crucial influence on the titanium-cement-zirconia interface quality.

  8. Micellization and Dynamics of a Block Copolymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Triblock copolymers of the type EPE, where E and P denote ethylene oxide and propylene oxide blocks, respectively, are industrially important copolymers often called Pluronics or Poloxamers. EPE copolymers form micelles with a core of P blocks and different micellar shapes depending on block leng...

  9. Addition of poly (propylene glycol) to multiblock copolymer to optimize siRNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhi; Arévalo, Maria T; Li, Junwei; Zeng, Mingtao

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have examined different strategies for siRNA delivery with varying degrees of success. These include use of viral vectors, cationic liposomes, and polymers. Several copolymers were designed and synthesized based on blocks of poly(ethylene glycol) PEG, poly(propylene glycol) PPG, and poly(l-lysine). These were designated as P1, P2, and P3. We studied the copolymer self-assembly, siRNA binding, particle size, surface potential, architecture of the complexes, and siRNA delivery. Silencing of GFP using copolymer P3 to deliver GFP-specific siRNA to Neuro-2a cells expressing GFP was almost as effective as using Lipofectamine 2000, with minimal cytotoxicity. Thus, we have provided a new copolymer platform for siRNA delivery that we can continue to modify for improved delivery of siRNA in vitro and eventually in vivo.

  10. Water sorption of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements photoactivated with LED Sorção de água de cimentos de ionômero de vidro modificados por resina fotoativados com LED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Francisca Gigo Cefaly

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The Light Emitting Diodes (LED technology has been used to photoactivate composite resins and there is a great number of published studies in this area. However, there are no studies regarding resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGIC, which also need photoactivation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate water sorption of two RMGIC photoactivated with LED and to compare this property to that obtained with a halogen light curing unit. A resin composite was used as control. Five specimens of 15.0 mm in diameter x 1.0 mm in height were prepared for each combination of material (Fuji II LC Improved, Vitremer, and Filtek Z250 and curing unit (Radii and Optilight Plus and transferred to desiccators until a constant mass was obtained. Then the specimens were immersed into deionized water for 7 days, weighed and reconditioned to a constant mass in desiccators. Water sorption was calculated based on weight and volume of specimens. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p A tecnologia baseada em Diodos emissores de luz (LED tem sido utilizada para a fotoativação de resinas compostas e existe um grande número de estudos publicados a este respeito. Entretanto, não existem estudos envolvendo cimentos de ionômero de vidro modificados por resina (CIVMR, que também necessitam fotoativação. Assim, o objetivo deste estudo foi o de avaliar a sorção de água de dois CIVMR fotoativados com LED e comparar essa propriedade com aquela obtida com unidade com lâmpada halógena. Uma resina composta foi utilizada como controle. Cinco espécimes com 15,0 mm diâmetro x 1,0 mm de altura foram preparados para cada combinação de material (Fuji II LC Improved, Vitremer e Filtek Z250 e fonte de luz (Radii e Optilight Plus e transferidos a dessecadores até a obtenção de massa constante. Em seguida, os espécimes foram imersos em água deionizada por 7 dias, pesados e recondicionados a uma massa constante em dessecadores. A sor

  11. Polyethylene-Based Tadpole Copolymers

    KAUST Repository

    Alkayal, Nazeeha

    2017-02-15

    Novel well-defined polyethylene-based tadpole copolymers ((c-PE)-b-PS, PE: polyethylene, PS: polystyrene) with ring PE head and linear PS tail are synthesized by combining polyhomologation, atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), and Glaser coupling reaction. The -OH groups of the 3-miktoarm star copolymers (PE-OH)-b-PS, synthesized by polyhomologation and ATRP, are transformed to alkyne groups by esterification with propiolic acid, followed by Glaser cyclization and removal of the unreacted linear with Merrifield\\'s resin-azide. The characterization results of intermediates and final products by high-temperature size exclusion chromatography, H NMR spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry confirm the tadpole topology.

  12. Retentive strength of luting cements for stainless steel crowns: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Priya; Kondae, Sapna; Gupta, Kamal Kishore

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated and compared the retentive strength of three luting cements. A total of forty five freshly extracted human primary molars were used in this study. The teeth were prepared to receive stainless steel crowns. They were then randomly divided into three groups, of fifteen teeth each, so as to receive the three different luting cements: conventional glass ionomer resin modified glass ionomer and adhesive resin. The teeth were then stored in artificial saliva for twenty four hours. The retentive strength of the crowns was determined by using a specially designed Instron Universal Testing Machine (Model 1011). The data was statistically analyzed using ANOVA to evaluate retentive strength for each cement and Tukey test for pair wise comparison. It was concluded that retentive strength of adhesive resin cement and resin modified glass ionomer cement was significantly higher than that of the conventional glass ionomer cement.

  13. Main-chain supramolecular block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Si Kyung; Ambade, Ashootosh V; Weck, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Block copolymers are key building blocks for a variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to drug delivery. The material properties of block copolymers can be tuned and potentially improved by introducing noncovalent interactions in place of covalent linkages between polymeric blocks resulting in the formation of supramolecular block copolymers. Such materials combine the microphase separation behavior inherent to block copolymers with the responsiveness of supramolecular materials thereby affording dynamic and reversible materials. This tutorial review covers recent advances in main-chain supramolecular block copolymers and describes the design principles, synthetic approaches, advantages, and potential applications.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of the polystyrene - asphaltene graft copolymer BY FT-IR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leo, Adan Yovani; Salazar Ramiro

    2008-01-01

    The creation of new polymer compounds to be added to asphalt has drawn considerable attention because these substances have succeeded in modifying the asphalt rheological characteristics and physical properties for the enhancement of its behavior during the time of use. This work explains the synthesis of a new graft copolymer based on an asphalt fraction called asphaltene, modified with maleic anhydride. Polystyrene functionalization is conducted in a parallel fashion in order to obtain polybenzylamine resin with an amine - NH2 free group that reacts with the anhydride graft groups in the asphaltene, thus obtaining the new Polystyrene/Asphaltene graft copolymer

  15. Cytotoxicity of resin-based luting cements to pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Elaine Cristina Voltolini; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Hebling, Josimeri; Costa, Carlos Alberto De Souza

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of components released from different types of luting cements to two cell lines obtained from pulp tissue. Three types of luting cements were evaluated, distributed into the following groups: G1--negative control (no treatment); G2--resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (Rely X Luting 2); G3--self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X U200); and G4--conventional resin cement (Rely X ARC). Standardized cylindrical specimens (14 mm diameter and 1 mm thick) prepared with the dental materials were immersed in culture medium (DMEM) for 24 hours to obtain the extracts (DMEM + components released from the cements). Then, the extracts were applied to cultured odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells or human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). Finally, cell viability (MTT assay), cell death (Annexin/PI) (Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney; α = 5%) and cell morphology (SEM) were assessed. Cements' components in contact with cells (SEM/EDS) and pH of the extracts were also evaluated. The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (G2) caused the most intense toxic effect to the two cell lines; the cell viability reduction was around 95.8% and 89.4% for MDPC-23 cells and HDPCs, respectively, which was statistically significantly different compared with that of the negative control group (G1). Also, a high quantity of particles leached from this ionomeric cement was found on the cells, which showed intense morphological alterations. In the G2 group, 100% necrosis was observed for both cell lines, and an acidic pH was detected on the extract. Conversely, Rely X U200 (G3) and Rely X ARC (G4), which presented low solubility and no alteration in pH, caused only slight cytotoxicity to the cultured cells.

  16. New photoresponsive (meth)acrylate (co)polymers containing azobenzene pendant sidegroups with carboxylic and dimethylamino substituents .2. Synthesis and characterization of polymers and copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haitjema, HJ; Buruma, R; VanEkenstein, GORA; Tan, YY; Challa, G

    1996-01-01

    The title (co)polymers, used for our investigations on their photoresponsive behaviour were obtained by free radical (co)polymerization. The monomer was either an acrylate or a methacrylate to which an azobenzene group, modified with a para-placed dimethylamino or a carboxylic pendant group, was

  17. Microleakage and marginal gap of adhesive cements for noble alloy full cast crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, T; Mohajerfar, M; Keshvad, A; Motahhary, P

    2011-01-01

    Very limited comparative information about the microleakage in noble alloy full cast crowns luted with different types of adhesive resin cements is available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microleakage and marginal gap of two self-adhesive resin cements with that of other types of adhesive luting cements for noble alloy full cast crowns. Fifty noncarious human premolars and molars were prepared in a standardized manner for full cast crown restorations. Crowns were made from a noble alloy using a standardized technique and randomly cemented with five cementing agents as follows: 1) GC Fuji Plus resin-modified glass ionomer cement, 2) Panavia F 2.0 resin cement, 3) Multilink Sprint self-adhesive resin cement, 4), Rely X Unicem self-adhesive resin cement with pretreatment, and 5) Rely X Unicem with no pretreatment. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for two weeks and then subjected to thermocycling. They were then placed in a silver nitrate solution, vertically cut in a mesiodistal direction and evaluated for microleakage and marginal gap using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn multiple range test at a pcement and cement-crown interfaces. The greatest amount of microleakage was found for Panavia F 2.0 resin cement followed by GC Fuji Plus at both interfaces. No statistically significant difference in the marginal gap values was found between the cementing agents evaluated (p>0.05). The self-adhesive resin cements provided a much better marginal seal for the noble alloy full cast crowns compared with the resin-modified glass ionomer or dual-cured resin-based cements.

  18. Synthesis of copolymers with cyclodextrin as pendants and its end group effect as superplasticizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinwen; Guo, Huilong; Zhang, Yunfei; Zheng, Jian; Li, Zhaoxia; Yang, Chenghua; Lu, Mangeng

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, the efficient approach for the synthesis of β-cyclodextrin (CD) based functional monomers was described. Based on the monovinyl β-CD monomer (GMA-EDA-CD), a new type poly(AA-co-GMA-EDA-CD) (PCDs) copolymer bearing pendent CD groups was synthesized and used as superplasticizer. Their chemical compositions were characterized by FT-IR, NMR, MALDI-TOF and GPC. The effects of PCDs on dispersion and adsorption in cement mortars were detailed discussed. The results indicated that PCD copolymers behaved excellent dispersion ability and strong retarding effect. PCD2 with molar ratio (%) for monomer (AA:GMA-EDA-CD=80:20) had the best dispersion and dispersion maintaining abilities, which were mainly attributed to the synergistic effects of steric hindrance and electrostatic repulsive force, and the retarding effect of PCD copolymers resulted from steric hindrance repulsion of CD pendants and the large number of hydroxyl groups, which affected the hydration reaction of cement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Investigation of Properties of Insulating Refractory Concrete with Portland Cement Binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudžma, A.; Antonovič, V.; Stonys, R.; Škamat, J.

    2015-11-01

    The present work contains the results of experimental study on properties of insulating refractory concrete created on the basis of Portland cement (PC) binder and modified with microsilica (MS). The experimental compositions were made using Portland cement, lightweight aggregates (expanded clay and vermiculite) and microsilica additives. It was established that MS additives enable significant improvement of mechanical properties and thermal shock resistance of PC-based insulating concrete with values comparable to insulating refractory concrete based on calcium aluminate cement.

  20. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  1. High early strength latex modified concrete overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the condition of the first high early strength latex modified concrete (LMC-HE) overlay to be constructed for the Virginia Department of Transportation. The overlay was prepared with type III cement and with more cement and less...

  2. Microleakage of adhesive and nonadhesive luting cements for stainless steel crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Mesbahi, Maryam; Rezvani, Gita; Rahimi, Mehran

    2011-01-01

    This study's purpose was to compare the ability of 5 luting cements to reduce microleakage at stainless steel crown (SSC) margins on primary molar teeth. Standard preparations were performed on 100 extracted primary molar teeth for SSC restoration. After fitting SSCs, samples were randomly divided into 5 groups of 20 teeth each, which were cemented with nonadhesive cement consisting of polycarboxylate (PC) or zinc phosphate (ZP), or with adhesive cement consisting of glass ionomer (GIC), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), or RMGIC with a bonding agent (RMGIC+DBA). After aging and thermocycling, the specimens were placed in 1% methylene blue, sectioned, and evaluated under a digital microscope. The data were compared between groups with the t test, analysis of variance, and the least significant difference test. Microleakage with adhesive cements was significantly lower than with nonadhesive cements (Pcements were statistically significant at Pcement showed the greatest microleakage. Adhesive cements were more effective in reducing microleakage in stainless steel crowns than nonadhesive cements. Use of a bonding agent with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement yielded better results than using the latter alone.

  3. (MAA:EA) copolymer films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-08-16

    Aug 16, 2017 ... C are the regions of major weight loss, which are due to the extensive degradation of the polymer backbone. According to Zain et al [14], the decomposition at 210. ◦. C is attributed to the elimination of evaporated molecules in the side groups of MAA:EA copolymer and the decomposition above 400.

  4. Thermo-responsive block copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocan Cetintas, Merve

    2017-01-01

    Block copolymers (BCPs) are remarkable materials because of their self-assembly behavior into nano-sized regular structures and high tunable properties. BCPs are in used various applications such as surfactants, nanolithography, biomedicine and nanoporous membranes. In these thesis, we aimed to

  5. Copolymer coatings consisting of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine and 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane via ATRP to improve cellulose biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Chen, Qiang; Ding, Wen-Quan; Liu, Ping-Sheng; Wu, Shi-Shan; Lin, Si-Cong; Shen, Jian; Gai, Yue

    2012-08-01

    AB diblock copolymers comprised of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) and poly(3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane) (PMTSi) segments, which are used for biocompatible coatings, were investigated. Block copolymers with various compositions were synthesized by atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The obtained copolymers were dissolved in an ethanol solution, and dynamic light scattering showed that all block copolymers were capable of existing as micelles. After a convenient "one-step" reaction, the cellulose membranes could be covalently modified by these copolymers with stable chemical bonds (C-O-Si and Si-O-Si). Block copolymers with different PMPC chain length were applied to surface modification to find the most suitable copolymer. The functional MPC density can be controlled by adjusting the ratio of the two monomers (MPC and MTSi), which also affect surface properties, including the surface contact angle, surface morphology, and number of functional PC groups. The low-fouling properties were measured by protein adsorption, platelet adhesion and activation, and cell adhesion. Protein adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), fibrinogen, and human plasma were also tested and a moderate monomer composite was attained. The protein adsorption behavior on the novel interfaces depends both on MPC density and PMPC chain length. Platelet adhesion and activation were reduced on all the modified surfaces. The adhesion of Human Embryonic Kidney 293 (293T) cells on the coated surfaces also decreased.

  6. Thermosensitive Self-Assembling Block Copolymers as Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Filippo Palmieri

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembling block copolymers (poloxamers, PEG/PLA and PEG/PLGA diblock and triblock copolymers, PEG/polycaprolactone, polyether modified poly(Acrylic Acid with large solubility difference between hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties have the property of forming temperature dependent micellar aggregates and, after a further temperature increase, of gellifying due to micelle aggregation or packing. This property enables drugs to be mixed in the sol state at room temperature then the solution can be injected into a target tissue, forming a gel depot in-situ at body temperature with the goal of providing drug release control. The presence of micellar structures that give rise to thermoreversible gels, characterized by low toxicity and mucomimetic properties, makes this delivery system capable of solubilizing water-insoluble or poorly soluble drugs and of protecting labile molecules such as proteins and peptide drugs.

  7. Gas migration through cement slurries analysis: A comparative laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arian Velayati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cementing is an essential part of every drilling operation. Protection of the wellbore from formation fluid invasion is one of the primary tasks of a cement job. Failure in this task results in catastrophic events, such as blow outs. Hence, in order to save the well and avoid risky and operationally difficult remedial cementing, slurry must be optimized to be resistant against gas migration phenomenon. In this paper, performances of the conventional slurries facing gas invasion were reviewed and compared with modified slurry containing special gas migration additive by using fluid migration analyzer device. The results of this study reveal the importance of proper additive utilization in slurry formulations. The rate of gas flow through the slurry in neat cement is very high; by using different types of additives, we observe obvious changes in the performance of the cement system. The rate of gas flow in neat class H cement was reported as 36000 ml/hr while the optimized cement formulation with anti-gas migration and thixotropic agents showed a gas flow rate of 13.8 ml/hr.

  8. PURIFIED WASTE FCC CATALYST AS A CEMENT REPLACEMENT MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danute Vaiciukyniene

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zeolites are commonly used in the fluid catalytic cracking process. Zeolite polluted with oil products and became waste after some time used. The quantity of this waste inevitably rises by expanding rapidly oil industry. The composition of these catalysts depends on the manufacturer and on the process that is going to be used. The main factors retarding hydration process of cement systems and modifying them strength are organic compounds impurities in the waste FCC catalyst. The present paper shows the results of using purified waste FCC catalyst (pFCC from Lithuania oil refinery, as Portland cement replacement material. For this purpose, the purification of waste FCC catalyst (FCC samples was treated with hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is one of the most powerful oxidizers known. By acting of waste with H2O2 it can eliminate the aforementioned waste deficiency, and the obtained product becomes one of the most promising ingredients, in new advanced building materials. Hardened cement paste samples with FCC or pFCC were formed. It was observed that the pFCC blended cements developed higher strength, after 28 days, compared to the samples with FCC or reference samples. Typical content of Portland cement substituting does not exceed 30 % of mass of Portland cement in samples. Reducing the consumption of Portland cement with utilizing waste materials is preferred for reasons of environmental protection.

  9. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  10. Cementation of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenkov, V.

    2004-01-01

    The cementation methods for immobilisation of radioactive wastes are discussed in terms of methodology, chemistry and properties of the different types of cements as well as the worldwide experience in this field. Two facilities for cementation - DEWA and MOWA - are described in details

  11. Center for Cement Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-31

    DSP cement pastes were prepared using white Portland cement (PC), amorphous silica fume, and a superplasticizer . The fume/cement ratios varied from... superplasticized PC pastes without silica fume. This is due to a reduction in the amount and size of porosity formed in DSP. Specific: surface areas measured

  12. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  13. Carboxylic Terminated Thermo-Responsive Copolymer Hydrogel and Improvement in Peptide Release Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Kun Rao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To improve the release profile of peptide drugs, thermos-responsive triblock copolymer poly (ε-caprolactone-co-p-dioxanone-b-poly (ethylene glycol-b-poly (ε-caprolactone-co-p-dioxanone (PECP was prepared and end capped by succinic anhydride to give its carboxylic terminated derivative. Both PCEP block copolymer and its end group modified derivative showed temperature-dependent reversible sol-gel transition in water. The carboxylic end group could significantly decrease the sol-gel transition temperature by nearly 10 °C and strengthen the gel due to enhanced intermolecular force among triblock copolymer chains. Furthermore, compared with the original PECP triblock copolymer, HOOC–PECP–COOH copolymer displayed a retarded and sustained release profile for leuprorelin acetate over one month while effectively avoiding the initial burst. The controlled release was believed to be related to the formation of conjugated copolymer-peptide pair by ionic interaction and enhanced solubility of drug molecules into the hydrophobic domains of the hydrogel. Therefore, carboxyl terminated HOOC–PECP–COOH hydrogel was a promising and well-exhibited sustained release carrier for peptide drugs with the advantage of being able to develop injectable formulation by simple mixing.

  14. Preparation and biocompatibility of grafted functional β-cyclodextrin copolymers from the surface of PET films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yan, E-mail: yan_jiang_72@126.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China); Liang, Yuan; Zhang, Hongwen [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Weiwei [College of Life Science, Agriculture and Forestry, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006, Heilongjiang (China); Tu, Shanshan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China)

    2014-08-01

    The hydrophobic inert surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film has limited its practical bioapplications, in which case, better biocompatibility should be achieved by surface modification. In this work, the copolymer of functional β-cyclodextrin derivatives and styrene grafted surfaces was prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) on initiator-immobilized PET. The structures, composition, properties, and surface morphology of the modified PET films were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurement, and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The results show that the surface of PET films was covered by a thick targeted copolymer layer, and the hydrophobic surface of PET was changed into an amphiphilic surface. The copolymer-grafted surfaces were also shown good biocompatibility on which SGC-7901 A549 and A549/DDP cells readily attached and proliferated, demonstrating that the functional copolymer-grafted PET films could be a promising alternative to biomaterials especially for tissue engineering. - Highlights: • The PET film was grafted by functional β-CD copolymers, which owns amphiphilicity. • The surface of grafted PET film by copolymers enhanced the cell adhesion and growth. • The biocompatible PET film may be used in tissue engineering and cell cultivation.

  15. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  16. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  17. Some geotechnical properties of a cement-stabilized granite-gneiss ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This was with a view to determining the influence of cement on some engineering properties of the soil. ... the maximum Dry Density and the percentage cement of the samples compacted at the West African and Modified American Association of State Highways and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) levels respectively.

  18. Biphasic products of dicalcium phosphate-rich cement with injectability and nondispersibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Chia-Ling; Chen, Jian-Chih; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Jen-Chyan; Tien, Yin-Chun; Chen, Wen-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a calcium phosphate cement was developed using tetracalcium phosphate and surface-modified dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA). This developed injectable bone graft substitute can be molded to the shape of the bone cavity and set in situ through the piping system that has an adequate mechanical strength, non-dispersibility, and biocompatibility. The materials were based on the modified DCPA compositions of calcium phosphate cement (CPC), where the phase ratio of the surface-modified DCPA is higher than that of the conventional CPC for forming dicalcium phosphate (DCP)-rich cement. The composition and morphology of several calcium phosphate cement specimens during setting were analyzed via X-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectroscopy system. The compressive strength of DCP-rich CPCs was greater than 30 MPa after 24 h of immersion in vitro. The reaction of the CPCs produced steady final biphasic products of DCPs with apatite. The composites of calcium phosphate cements derived from tetracalcium phosphate mixed with surface-modified DCPA exhibited excellent mechanical properties, injectability, and interlocking forces between particles, and they also featured nondispersive behavior when immersed in a physiological solution. - Highlights: • Bone cement precursor with nanocrystals is characterized. • DCP-rich CPCs with nanocrystals exhibited biphasic product phases. • Nanocrystals in cement significantly affected the interlocking ability. • Nanocrystals in cement exhibited higher strength and anti-dispersion. • DCP-rich CPCs increase the potential of bioresorption after reaction

  19. Biphasic products of dicalcium phosphate-rich cement with injectability and nondispersibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Chia-Ling [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, Taichung, 407, Taiwan (China); Dental Medical Devices and Materials Research Center, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jian-Chih [Department of Orthopaedics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopaedics, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Jen-Chyan [Dental Medical Devices and Materials Research Center, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Tien, Yin-Chun [Department of Orthopaedics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopaedics, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Cheng, E-mail: wencchen@fcu.edu.tw [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, Taichung, 407, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a calcium phosphate cement was developed using tetracalcium phosphate and surface-modified dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA). This developed injectable bone graft substitute can be molded to the shape of the bone cavity and set in situ through the piping system that has an adequate mechanical strength, non-dispersibility, and biocompatibility. The materials were based on the modified DCPA compositions of calcium phosphate cement (CPC), where the phase ratio of the surface-modified DCPA is higher than that of the conventional CPC for forming dicalcium phosphate (DCP)-rich cement. The composition and morphology of several calcium phosphate cement specimens during setting were analyzed via X-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectroscopy system. The compressive strength of DCP-rich CPCs was greater than 30 MPa after 24 h of immersion in vitro. The reaction of the CPCs produced steady final biphasic products of DCPs with apatite. The composites of calcium phosphate cements derived from tetracalcium phosphate mixed with surface-modified DCPA exhibited excellent mechanical properties, injectability, and interlocking forces between particles, and they also featured nondispersive behavior when immersed in a physiological solution. - Highlights: • Bone cement precursor with nanocrystals is characterized. • DCP-rich CPCs with nanocrystals exhibited biphasic product phases. • Nanocrystals in cement significantly affected the interlocking ability. • Nanocrystals in cement exhibited higher strength and anti-dispersion. • DCP-rich CPCs increase the potential of bioresorption after reaction.

  20. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  1. Hydration process for calcium-aluminate cement within EVA emulsion by SPring-8 synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotera, Masaru; Matsuda, Ikuyo; Miyashita, Keiko; Adachi, Nobuyuki; Tamura, Hisayuki

    2005-01-01

    Polymer-modified mortars which consist of a polymer emulsion and cement materials have been widely developed in the construction materials fields. Forming process of the polymer-modified cement membrane simultaneously involves evaporation of water within the polymer emulsion and hydration of cement. It is important for the polymer-modified cement paste that the hydrate crystal of cement is generating by the hydration during the setting process under existence of the polymer emulsion. In this study, hydration process for calcium-aluminate cement under existence of poly (ethylene-vinyl acetate) (EVA) emulsion (polymer-cement ratio=100%) was investigated by X-ray diffraction method using synchrotron radiation (SPring-8). The diffraction peaks of calcium aluminate (CA) disappeared after the hardening, on the other hand, the peaks of hydrate crystals of calcium-aluminate cement (C 2 AH 8 and C 3 AH 6 ) could be observed. This polymer-modified cement paste hydrated using the water within the polymer emulsion. The hydration of C 2 AH 8 from CA started at around 300 min, and then C 3 AH 6 hydrate crystal increased after 700 min at ambient temperature. This implies that the conversion from C 2 AH 8 to C 3 AH 6 occurred to be more stable phase. The setting temperature affected the reaction rate. In case of hydration at 35degC, the start time of the hydration for calcium-aluminate cement was quicker than that in the ambient temperature four or more times. (author)

  2. Retention, marginal leakage, and cement solubility of provisional crowns cemented with temporary cement containing stannous fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, Israel; Fuhrer, Nitzan; Gelfand, Katerina; Cardash, Harold; Pilo, Raphael

    2003-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the (1) retention and microleakage of provisional crowns cemented with temporary cements to which stannous fluoride (SnF2) was added, and (2) solubility of these cements. Provisional crowns were constructed of acrylic resin with shoulder preparations for 12 molars. The crowns were luted with Tempbond, Tempbond NE, and Freegenol temporary cements, and also with SnF2 added to these cements. Specimens were thermocycled 100 times, stored for 6 days, and immersed in 0.5% basic fuschin. Seven days after cementation, crown removal (retention) tests were conducted. Marginal leakage was assessed using a five-level scale to score dye penetration. Solubility in water of the cements with and without SnF2 was assessed using cement disks. Freegenol was more retentive than the other cements. The incorporation of SnF2 significantly increased the retention capacity of Freegenol and Tempbond NE but had no effect on Tempbond. Tempbond showed significantly higher dye penetration than Freegenol. The addition of SnF2 did not alter the dye penetration of the cements. There were no significant differences in the solubility of the cements. However, the incorporation of SnF2 increased the solubility of Freegenol and Tempbond NE (P crowns cemented with Tempbond NE and Freegenol but did not affect the retention of those cemented with Tempbond. The marginal leakage of crowns cemented with the tested temporary cements with and without the incorporation of SnF2 was similar. However, the addition of SnF2 increased the solubility of the cements.

  3. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations' setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05).

  4. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations’ setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05). PMID:26787304

  5. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    ting. It is used in industrial floorings, ship decks, railway passenger coach floorings, hospital floors, ammunition factory floors, missile silos and underground armament factories and bunkers. Recently, concrete of high compres- sive and tensile strength prepared with magnesium oxy- chloride cement and recycled rubber ...

  6. DESIGN OF CEMENT COMPOSITES WITH INCREASED IMPERMEABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedyuk Roman Sergeevich

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the development of composite binders for producing concrete with improved characteristics of gas, water and vapor permeability. The authors investigate the processes of composite materials formation in order of decreasing scale levels from macro to nanostructures. The criteria for optimization of the volume of dispersed additives in concrete are offered. The authors theoretically studied the technological features of the formation of hydrated cement stone structure. A positive effect of nanodispersed additives on the structure and physico-mechanical properties of cement composite materials are predicted. Thanks to its improved features, such as good ratio of strength and body density, high density and lifetime, the modified concrete may be used when solving various practical tasks of the construction branch.

  7. physico-chemical studies on polymer impregnated blending cement mortar composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rahman, H.A.

    2001-01-01

    as the increasing of the demand on a specific performance characteristics in concrete such as improved strength, low heat, sulfate resistance, improved impermeability and certain other applications. some of the industrial waste materials such as the blast-furnace slag, silica fume and fly ash were mixed with the cement clinker to produce blended cement . the use of these materials modifies the strength, pore structure and permeability of hardened cement mortar or concrete. the incorporation of blast furnace slag and silica fume in the hardened blended cement mortar or concrete is a common practice recently due to technological, economical and environmental benefits

  8. Surface Modification for Controlling the Orientation of Block Copolymers in thin film and in Cylindrical Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xin-Guan; Lin, Feng-Cheng; Tung, Shih-Huang

    2012-02-01

    A series of benzocyclobutene-functionalized random copolymers of styrene and 4-vinylpyridine were synthesized by nitroxide-mediated controlled radical polymerization with BPO and TEMPO. Our research was to use these random copolymers of P(S-r-BCB-r-4VP) to control the orientation of microdomains in block copolymers(BCPs) of poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine)(PS-b-P4VP) thin films and in cylindrical nanopores of anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. On P(S-r-BCB-r-4VP)-modified substrate,we found that in some particular compositions of random copolymer ,the parallel orientation of the microdomains is switched to be perpendicular in PS-b-P4VP thin film. We also introduced P(S-r-BCB-r-4VP) solution into the nanopores of the AAO and nanotubes formed after solvent evaporation and pyrolysis. And then BCPs of PS-b-P4VP were drawn into the P(S-r-BCB-r-4VP)-modified nanopores in the melt via capillary action to form P(S-r-BCB-r-4VP) coated nanorods of PS-b-P4VP.Similarly,in some particular compositions of random copolymer, we observed that the interactions of the blocks with the walls are not strong or if the interactions are balanced, then the orientation of the microdomains will change from being parallel to being perpendicular to the confining walls.

  9. Blends of Styrene-Butadiene-Styrene Triblock Copolymer with Random Styrene-Maleic Anhydride Copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piccini, Maria Teresa; Ruggeri, Giacomo; Passaglia, Elisa; Picchioni, Francesco; Aglietto, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    Blends of styrene-butadiene-styrene triblock copolymer (SBS) with random styrene-maleic anhydride copolymers (PS-co-MA), having different MA content, were prepared in a Brabender Plastigraph mixer. The presence of polystyrene (PS) blocks in the SBS copolymer and the high styrene content (93 and 86

  10. Thermogravimetric analysis of phase transitions in cement compositions mixed by sodium silicate solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedosov Sergey Viktorovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the capability to modify cement by mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. Admixtures or blends of binding agents were employed for modifying concrete properties. The liquid glass is applied to protect from chemically or physically unfavorable environmental impacts, such as acidic medium and high temperature. The sodium silicate is a high-capacity setting accelerator. The increasing of the liquid glass proportion in the mix leads to the degradation of the cement paste plasticity and for this reason it is necessary to reduce the amount of liquid glass in the cement paste. The activation of dilute water solution of sodium silicate into rotary pulsating apparatus directly before tempering of the cement paste is an effective way to decrease mass fraction of liquid glass in the cement paste. The results of the combined influence of liquid glass and mechanical activation on physicochemical processes taking place in cement stone are represented in this research. Thermogravimetric analysis was used in order to study cement blends. Thermogravimetric analysis of modified cement stone assays was performed by thermo analyzer SETARAM TGA 92-24. The results of the analysis of phase transition taking place under high-temperature heating of cement stone modified by the mechanical activation of the water solution of the sodium silicate were introduced. Thermograms of cement stone assays were obtained at different hardening age. The comparison of these thermograms allows us to come to a conclusion on the formation and the retention during long time of a more dense structure of the composite matrix mixed by the mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. The relation between the concrete composition and its strength properties was stated. Perhaps, the capability of modified concrete to keep calcium ions in sparingly soluble hydrosilicates leads to the increase in its durability and corrosion resistance.

  11. Functionalized and graft copolymers of chitosan and its pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavsar, Chintan; Momin, Munira; Gharat, Sankalp; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2017-10-01

    Chitosan is the second most abundant natural polysaccharide. It belongs a family of polycationic polymers comprised of repetitive units of glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine. Its biodegradability, nontoxicity, non-immunogenicity and biocompatibility along with properties like mucoadhesion, fungistatic and bacteriogenic have made chitosan an appreciated polymer with numerous applications in the pharmaceutical, comestics and food industry. However, the limited solubility of chitosan at alkaline and neutral pH limits its widespread commercial use. This can be circumvented by fabrication of chitosan by graft copolymerization with acyl, alkyl, monomeric and polymeric moieties. Areas covered: Modifications like quarterization, thiolation, acylation and grafting result in copolymers with higher mucoadhesion strength, increased hydrophobic interactions (advantageous in hydrophobic drug entrapment), and increased solubility in alkaline pH, the ability for adsorption of metal ions, protein and peptide delivery and nutrient delivery. Insights on methods of polymerization, including atomic transfer radical polymerization and click chemistry are discussed. Applications of such modified chitosan copolymers in medical and surgical, and drug delivery, including nasal, oral and buccal delivery have also been covered. Expert opinion: Despite a number of successful investigations, commercialization of chitosan copolymers still remains a challenge. Further advancements in polymerization techniques may address the unmet needs of the healthcare industry.

  12. Hydration study of limestone blended cement in the presence of hazardous wastes containing Cr(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trezza, M.A.; Ferraiuelo, M.F.

    2003-01-01

    Considering the increasing use of limestone cement manufacture, the present paper tends to characterize limestone behavior in the presence of Cr(VI). The research reported herein provides information regarding the effect of Cr(VI) from industrial wastes in the limestone cement hydration. The cementitious materials were ordinary Portland cement, as reference, and limestone blended cement. The hydration and physicomechanical properties of cementitious materials and the influence of chromium at an early age were studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), conductimetric and mechanical tests. Portland cement pastes with the addition of Cr(VI) were examined and leaching behavior with respect to water and acid solution were investigated. This study indicates that Cr(VI) modifies the rate and the components obtained during the cement hydration

  13. Nonaqueous Dispersion Formed by an Emulsion Solvent Evaporation Method Using Block-Random Copolymer Surfactant Synthesized by RAFT Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezaki, Naofumi; Watanabe, Yoshifumi; Mori, Hideharu

    2015-10-27

    As surfactants for preparation of nonaqueous microcapsule dispersions by the emulsion solvent evaporation method, three copolymers composed of stearyl methacrylate (SMA) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) with different monomer sequences (i.e., random, block, and block-random) were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Despite having the same comonomer composition, the copolymers exhibited different functionality as surfactants for creating emulsions with respective dispersed and continuous phases consisting of methanol and isoparaffin solvent. The optimal monomer sequence for the surfactant was determined based on the droplet sizes and the stabilities of the emulsions created using these copolymers. The block-random copolymer led to an emulsion with better stability than obtained using the random copolymer and a smaller droplet size than achieved with the block copolymer. Modification of the epoxy group of the GMA unit by diethanolamine (DEA) further decreased the droplet size, leading to higher stability of the emulsion. The DEA-modified block-random copolymer gave rise to nonaqueous microcapsule dispersions after evaporation of methanol from the emulsions containing colored dyes in their dispersed phases. These dispersions exhibited high stability, and the particle sizes were small enough for application to the inkjet printing process.

  14. Effect of a micro-copolymer addition on the thermal conductivity of fly ash mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Herrera, A; Campos-Dimas, J K; Valdez-Tamez, P L; Bentz, D P

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a copolymer composed of hollow spherical particles with an average particle size of 90 µm was evaluated as a lightweight aggregate in Portland cement-fly ash mortars to improve the thermal conductivity ( k ) of the composite. Mortars were produced for three different water/binder ratios by mass ( w/b ), 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6. Optimized proportions were obtained for a minimum target compressive strength of 35 kg f /cm 2 (3.4 MPa) according to the requirements of Mexican standards for non-structural masonry units. Thermal conductivity was determined for dry and saturated samples through the transient plane technique with average results of 0.16 W/(m·K) and 0.31 W/(m·K), respectively. These values represent an increment of 23 % and a reduction of 33 %, respectively, in comparison to an efficient Portland cement-based commercially available thermal insulator.

  15. TiO2 functionalization for efficient NOx removal in photoactive cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapati, S.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Todorova, N.; Boukos, N.; Antiohos, S.; Papageorgiou, D.; Chaniotakis, E.; Dimotikali, D.; Trapalis, C.

    2014-11-01

    Commercial titania nanoparticles (P25 Evonic-Degussa) were modified with organic compounds oleic acid (OA), oleylamine (OM) and equimolar concentrations of both modifiers (OAOM) through a biphase toluene/water emulsion processing in order to be endowed with hydrophobic properties. Specific molar ratio 3 between modifier and titania powder was used. The modified and the initial P25 photocatalysts were embedded in cement matrix in low percentage loading (2.5, 1, 0.5%). The grafting of the modifier to the titania nanoparticles was verified by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Light absorption measurements revealed that the energy band gap of the photocatalysts was lowered after the modification. The average size (nm) and polydisperse index of the initial and modified P25 were determined via dynamic light scattering (DLS). The photocatalytic activity of the photocatalysts alone and the composite cement specimens was evaluated via ISO standard NOx oxidation procedure. The photocatalytic cements containing modified P25 exhibited 2-5 times better NOx removal than those with non-modified P25 even for the lowest photocatalyst loading. The results were attributed to the hydrophobic properties of the modified titania and its behavior during the incorporation in the cement matrix. This conclusion was confirmed by the SEM/EDX analysis which demonstrated a gradual increase of hydrophobic photocatalyst from the bottom to the surface of the cement specimens.

  16. Surface roughness of orthodontic band cements with different compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Hélène van de Sande

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The present study evaluated comparatively the surface roughness of four orthodontic band cements after storage in various solutions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eight standardized cylinders were made from 4 materials: zinc phosphate cement (ZP, compomer (C, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC and resin cement (RC. Specimens were stored for 24 h in deionized water and immersed in saline (pH 7.0 or 0.1 M lactic acid solution (pH 4.0 for 15 days. Surface roughness readings were taken with a profilometer (Surfcorder SE1200 before and after the storage period. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (comparison among cements and storage solutions or paired t-test (comparison before and after the storage period at 5% significance level. RESULTS: The values for average surface roughness were statistically different (pRMGIC>C>R (p0.05. Compared to the current threshold (0.2 µm related to biofilm accumulation, both RC and C remained below the threshold, even after acidic challenge by immersion in lactic acid solution. CONCLUSIONS: Storage time and immersion in lactic acid solution increased the surface roughness of the majority of the tested cements. RC presented the smoothest surface and it was not influenced by storage conditions.

  17. INORGANIC CEMENT CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Clay Rios Silva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a Geopolymeric Cement Concrete (GCC was developed through adequate portions of geopolymer components. Its characteristics were compared with Portland Cement Concrete (PCC, through of the establishment of some parameters of design, as consumption of binders, water/aggregates ratio and mortar content. The concrete mechanical performance was evaluated with emphasis to the fatigue behavior. Were tested the effects of different tensile strength maximum (increasing and decreasing. The results of fatigue tests had shown that GCC presents a better performance when compared to PCC. Its fatigue strength was 15% higher than that of PCC, when 70% of rupture tension of the concrete in static bending (SR, was applied. Tensions of about 80% SR resulted in 96% of increase, when compared to GCC. The SEM microstructural analysis showed that the GCC has a matrix/aggregate bonding very strong, when compared to PCC, probably due to the massive nature of the geopolymeric matrix.

  18. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  19. Rheology of acrylic bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracane, J L; Greener, E H

    1981-01-01

    The rheological properties of setting acrylic bone cements were examined with a rotational cone and plate viscometer. The cements were tested over two orders of magnitude of shear rate to determine the nature of any non-Newtonian flow behavior. All three cements behaved with moderate pseudoplasticity (i.e., shear thinning) during setting, suggesting the use of higher pressures during administration for better flow and penetration. The low viscosity brand was found to be nearly one-half as viscous as the conventional cements during the working time (i.e., 2-5 minutes). A series of sieving experiments were performed to determine the particle size distributions of the powder components. Statistical analysis (chi square) showed the cements to have different distributions, with the low viscosity brand containing a larger proportion of smaller polymer particles. This difference is thought to contribute to the lower viscosity of this cement.

  20. High-order multiblock copolymers via iterative Cu(0)-mediated radical polymerizations (SET-LRP): toward biological precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeriyadi, Alexander H; Boyer, Cyrille; Nyström, Fredrik; Zetterlund, Per B; Whittaker, Michael R

    2011-07-27

    We report a new approach for the facile synthesis of high-order multiblock copolymers comprising very short blocks. The approach entails sequential addition of different monomers via an iterative single electron transfer-living radical polymerization technique, allowing nearly perfect control of the copolymer microstructure. It is possible to synthesize high-order multiblock copolymers with unprecedented control, i.e., A-B-C-D-E-etc., without any need for purification between iterative 24 h block formation steps. To illustrate this concept, we report the synthesis of model P(MA-b-MA...) homopolymer and P(MA-b-nBuA-b-EA-b-2EHA-b-EA-b-nBuA) copolymer in extremely high yield. Finally, the halide end-group can be modified via "click chemistry", including thiol-bromide click chemistry, sodium methanethiosulfonate nucleophilic substitution, and atom transfer radical nitroxide coupling reaction, to yield functional, structurally complex macromolecules.

  1. Preparation of amphiphilic block copolymer containing triazene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    −7. M). Experiments of fluorescence quenching with various metal cations (UO2+. 2 , Fe2+, Fe3+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Co2+, Pb2+ and Hg2+) suggested that such a block copolymer could ..... from the intersection of straight-line segments, drawn through the points on ... copolymer displays a strong emission around 400 nm, which is ...

  2. Copolymers at the solid - liquid interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijmans, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    Copolymers consisting of both adsorbing and nonadsorbing segments can show an adsorption behaviour which is very different from that of homopolymers. We have mainly investigated the adsorption of AB diblock copolymers, which have one adsorbing block (anchor) and one nonadsorbing block

  3. Amphiphilic copolymers for fouling-release coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noguer, Albert Camós; Olsen, Stefan Møller; Hvilsted, Søren

    of the coatings [9,10,11]. This work shows the effect of an amphiphilic copolymer that induces hydrophilicity on the surface of the silicone-based fouling release coatings. The behaviour of these copolymers within the coating upon immersion and the interaction of these surface-active additives with other...

  4. PEO-related block copolymer surfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, K.

    2001-01-01

    Non-ionic block copolymer systems based on hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) and more hydrophobic co-polymer blocks are used intensively in a variety of industrial and personal applications. A brief description on the applications is presented. The physical properties of more simple model systems ...

  5. 21 CFR 177.2470 - Polyoxymethylene copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2470 Polyoxymethylene copolymer. Polyoxymethylene copolymer identified in this section may be safely used as an article or component of articles intended for.... Standard Sieve No. 6 and that are retained on a U.S.A. Standard Sieve No. 10, shall yield total extractives...

  6. Micellization and Characterization of Block Copolymer Detergents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Søren

    Triblock copolymers of the type EPE, where E and P denote ethylene oxide and propylene oxide blocks, respectively, are used widely in industry as emulsifiers, anti-foaming agents, and in delayed drug release. EPE copolymers form micelles with a core of P blocks and different micellar shapes depen...

  7. Cementos óseos acrílicos modificados con hidroxiapatita/acetato de vinilo: caracterización mecánica, termoanálitica y bioactividad in vitro Acrylic bone cement modified whit hydroxiapatyte/vinyl acetate: mechanical, thermoanalytical characterization and in vitro bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayrim B. Guerra

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Los cementos óseos se han convertido en los últimos años en biomateriales de gran utilidad en la fijación de prótesis y en la reconstrucción del hueso. El objetivo de este trabajo es evaluar las propiedades termoanalíticas tales como temperatura máxima de polimerización y tiempo de fraguado en cementos óseos acrílicos modificados con hidroxiapatita/acetato de vinilo, determinar la resistencia a la compresión axial y realizar ensayos de bioactividad in vitro. Diferentes contenidos de acetato de vinilo fueron incorporados en cementos óseos acrílicos cargados todos con un 30 % de hidroxiapatita CORALINA® HAP-200. Las propiedades mecánicas y los parámetros de curado fueron evaluados cumpliendo lo establecido en la Norma ISO 5833 descrita para cementos óseos acrílicos. Se determinaron los parámetros termoanalíticos, obteniéndose tiempos de fraguados entre 3 y 6 minutos y los valores de temperaturas máximas de polimerización oscilan entre 66 y 88 °C. Se obtuvo formulaciones con valores de resistencia a la compresión superiores a lo establecido en la Norma ISO 5833. Se demostró la bioactividad de las formulaciones mediante la inmersión de las muestras en fluido biológico simulado, observándose en la superficie de las mismas la nucleación y el crecimiento de cristales con morfología similar a las apatitas biológicas.Bone cements have become biomaterials of great utility in the prosthesis fixation and as substitutes to the bone. The objective of this study is to evaluate the thermo analytical properties such as setting time and peak temperature of polymerization of acrylic bone cement modified with hydroxyapatite/vinyl acetate, to determine the compression strengths and perform in vitro bioactivity tests. Amounts of vinyl acetate component were incorporated in different percentages in acrylic bone cements, all loaded with 30 % of hydroxyapatite CORALINA® HAP-200. Curing parameters and mechanical properties were

  8. Hemocompatibility of styrenic block copolymers for use in prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubert, Jacob; Krajewski, Stefanie; Wendel, Hans Peter; Nair, Sukumaran; Stasiak, Joanna; Moggridge, Geoff D

    2016-02-01

    Certain styrenic thermoplastic block copolymer elastomers can be processed to exhibit anisotropic mechanical properties which may be desirable for imitating biological tissues. The ex-vivo hemocompatibility of four triblock (hard-soft-hard) copolymers with polystyrene hard blocks and polyethylene, polypropylene, polyisoprene, polybutadiene or polyisobutylene soft blocks are tested using the modified Chandler loop method using fresh human blood and direct contact cell proliferation of fibroblasts upon the materials. The hemocompatibility and durability performance of a heparin coating is also evaluated. Measures of platelet and coagulation cascade activation indicate that the test materials are superior to polyester but inferior to expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and bovine pericardium reference materials. Against inflammatory measures the test materials are superior to polyester and bovine pericardium. The addition of a heparin coating results in reduced protein adsorption and ex-vivo hemocompatibility performance superior to all reference materials, in all measures. The tested styrenic thermoplastic block copolymers demonstrate adequate performance for blood contacting applications.

  9. Amphiphilic block copolymer/poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) blends and nanocomposites for improved fouling-release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Elisa; Suffredini, Marianna; Galli, Giancarlo; Glisenti, Antonella; Pettitt, Michala E; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Williams, David; Lyall, Graeme

    2011-05-01

    Amphiphilic diblock copolymers, Sz6 and Sz12, consisting of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) block (average degree of polymerisation = 132) and a PEGylated-fluoroalkyl modified polystyrene block (Sz, average degree of polymerisation = 6, 12) were prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Coatings were obtained from blends of either block copolymer (1-10 wt%) with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) matrix. The coating surface presented a simultaneous hydrophobic and lipophobic character, owing to the strong surface segregation of the lowest surface energy fluoroalkyl chains of the block copolymer. Surface chemical composition and wettability of the films were affected by exposure to water. Block copolymer Sz6 was also blended with PDMS and a 0.1 wt% amount of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT). The excellent fouling-release (FR) properties of these new coatings against the macroalga Ulva linza essentially resulted from the inclusion of the amphiphilic block copolymer, while the addition of CNT did not appear to improve the FR properties.

  10. Inhibition of multispecies biofilms by a fluoride-releasing dental prosthesis copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Sufian A; German, Matthew J; Rolland, Sarah L; Rickard, Alexander H; Jakubovics, Nicholas S

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to develop a new mixed-species acidogenic biofilm model and use it to assess the antimicrobial properties of a novel fluoride-releasing copolymer. Stubs composed of a copolymer of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) were produced by chemically-activated free radical polymerization. A fluoride-releasing copolymer was developed by incorporating sodium fluoride in place of a portion of the PMMA. Samples were mounted in polysulfone Modified Robbins Devices (MRDs) and were optimized for single- and mixed-species biofilm formation by Candida albicans, Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans. Fluoride release was sustained for at least 48h in flowing conditions. Fluoride did not affect the colonization and biofilm growth of any of the microorganisms in monocultures. However, in mixed-species biofilms, cell densities of all three species were reduced approximately ten-fold (pbiofilms are sensitive to fluoride, and that the inclusion of fluoride in a denture lining copolymer reduces the formation of polymicrobial biofilms. The growth of acidogenic microorganisms on denture materials is associated with denture stomatitis and dental caries on surrounding teeth. A fluoride-releasing copolymer that inhibits acidogenic mixed-species biofilms, such as the material described in this study, has the potential to control these diseases by limiting biofilm growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nylon-3 copolymers that generate cell-adhesive surfaces identified by library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Ryul; Stahl, Shannon S; Gellman, Samuel H; Masters, Kristyn S

    2009-11-25

    Polymers in the nylon-3 family contain subunits derived from beta-amino acids, which are linked to one another via amide bonds. Thus, the nylon-3 backbone is homologous to the alpha-amino acid-based backbone of proteins. This molecular-level homology suggests that nylon-3 materials might be intrinsically protein-mimetic. The experiments described here explore this prospect in the context of cell adhesion, with tissue engineering as a long-range goal. We have evaluated a small library of sequence-random nylon-3 copolymers for the ability to render surfaces attractive to NIH 3T3 fibroblast adhesion and spreading. Library screening was accomplished in a high-throughput, parallel mode via attachment of the copolymers in a two-dimensional array to a modified glass surface. Significant variations in fibroblast adhesion and spreading were observed as a function of nylon-3 subunit identity and proportion. Several of the nylon-3 copolymers supported cell adhesion and morphology that was comparable, or even superior, to that achieved on positive control substrates such as tissue culture polystyrene and collagen-coated glass. Moreover, studies conducted under serum-free conditions demonstrated that specific nylon-3 derivatives supported cell adhesion independently of serum protein adsorption. Although cell adhesion was diminished in the absence of serum, particular copolymers demonstrated an ability to support substantially greater cell adhesion than any of the other conditions, including the positive controls. The nylon-3 copolymers that were most effective at promoting adhesion to a modified glass surface proved also to be effective at promoting adhesion when attached to a PEG-based hydrogel, demonstrating the potential for these copolymers to be used in tissue engineering applications.

  12. Nylon-3 Co-Polymers that Generate Cell-Adhesive Surfaces Identified by Library Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Ryul; Stahl, Shannon S.; Gellman, Samuel H.; Masters, Kristyn S.

    2010-01-01

    Polymers in the nylon-3 family contain subunits derived from β-amino acids, which are linked to one another via amide bonds. Thus, the nylon-3 backbone is homologous to the α-amino acid-based backbone of proteins. This molecular-level homology suggests that nylon-3 materials might be intrinsically protein-mimetic. The experiments described here explore this prospect in the context of cell adhesion, with tissue engineering as a long-range goal. We have evaluated a small library of sequence-random nylon-3 copolymers for the ability to render surfaces attractive to NIH 3T3 fibroblast adhesion and spreading. Library screening was accomplished in a high-throughput, parallel mode via attachment of the copolymers in a two-dimensional array to a modified glass surface. Significant variations in fibroblast adhesion and spreading were observed as a function of nylon-3 subunit identity and proportion. Several of the nylon-3 copolymers supported cell adhesion and morphology that was comparable, or even superior, to that achieved on positive control substrates such as tissue culture polystyrene and collagen-coated glass. Moreover, studies conducted under serum-free conditions demonstrated that specific nylon-3 derivatives supported cell adhesion independently of serum protein adsorption. Although cell adhesion was diminished in the absence of serum, particular copolymers demonstrated an ability to support substantially greater cell adhesion than any of the other conditions, including the positive controls. The nylon-3 copolymers that were most effective at promoting adhesion to a modified glass surface proved also to be effective at promoting adhesion when attached to a PEG-based hydrogel, demonstrating the potential for these copolymers to be used in tissue engineering applications. PMID:19886604

  13. Rapid self-assembly of block copolymers to photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yan; Sveinbjornsson, Benjamin R; Grubbs, Robert H; Weitekamp, Raymond; Miyake, Garret M; Atwater, Harry A; Piunova, Victoria; Daeffler, Christopher Scot; Hong, Sung Woo; Gu, Weiyin; Russell, Thomas P.

    2016-07-05

    The invention provides a class of copolymers having useful properties, including brush block copolymers, wedge-type block copolymers and hybrid wedge and polymer block copolymers. In an embodiment, for example, block copolymers of the invention incorporate chemically different blocks comprising polymer size chain groups and/or wedge groups that significantly inhibit chain entanglement, thereby enhancing molecular self-assembly processes for generating a range of supramolecular structures, such as periodic nanostructures and microstructures. The present invention also provides useful methods of making and using copolymers, including block copolymers.

  14. [A comparative study of marginal microleakage using different cements in porcelain-fused-to-metal crown].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ming-Xin; Huang, Ke-Qiang; Li, Zhi-Gang; Gao, Xiu-Qiu; Li, Chun-Shan

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the marginal microleakage of porcelain-fused-to-metal crown using four different cements. Sixteen porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns were built and randomly divided into 4 group, luted onto standard prepared human forward molars using four different cements (glass ionomer cement, resin-modified glass ionomer cement, PanaviaF, Super-Bond C&B adhesive luting system). After temperature cycling test, all the crowns were then submerged in 2% fuchsin for 24 h. The marginal microleakage at tooth cement interfaces was observed using light stereomicroscopy and evaluated in classification index. The marginal microleakage grade of 4 groups were analyzed by SPSS 13.0. The PanaviaF demonstrated the least marginal microleakage, Super-Bond C&B adhesive luting system, resin-modified glass ionomer cement showed an intermediate level of marginal microleakage, glass ionomer cement was associated with severe marginal microleakage (total, Chi2 = 157.60, P cement and is good at porcelain-fused-to-metal crown.

  15. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  16. Influence of type of cement on the color and translucency of monolithic zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkondu, Ozlem; Tinastepe, Neslihan; Kazazoglu, Ender

    2016-12-01

    With the development of translucent zirconia, questions regarding the influence of cements on the final color of monolithic zirconia restorations have arisen. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate color changes in terms of the perceptibility and acceptability of monolithic zirconia-and-cement combinations with 2 monolithic zirconia thicknesses and 3 types of cement. The translucency parameters of these combinations were also compared. Sixty monolithic zirconia ceramic disks were milled with 2 different thicknesses (0.6 mm and 1 mm). A conventional glass ionomer cement, a resin-modified glass ionomer cement, and a resin cement from the same manufacturer were applied to the ceramic surfaces of both thickness disks (n=10). Translucencies and color changes of the monolithic zirconia specimens after cement application were examined by using a spectrophotometer, and translucency parameters (TPs) and color changes (ΔEs) were calculated and statistically analyzed. Colors and TPs of the zirconia disks changed significantly after being cemented to 0.6- and 1-mm-thick disks (Pzirconia-resin modified glass ionomer combination, whereas the highest ΔE values (5.64 for the 0.6-mm and 5.06 for the 1-mm thick disks) were observed for the zirconia-resin cement combination. The glass ionomer cement most strongly affected the TP values of both of the thicknesses. Cement types and zirconia thickness affected the colors and translucencies of the monolithic zirconia specimens. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of implant abutment modification on the extrusion of excess cement at the crown-abutment margin for cement-retained implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwani, Chandur; Piñeyro, Alfonso; Hess, Timothy; Zhang, Hai; Chung, Kwok-Hung

    2011-01-01

    To compare the effect of implant abutment modification on the amount of cement extruded at the crown-abutment margin and to evaluate the vertical discrepancy after cementation. Access openings of titanium abutments were modified with an opening (open) and placement of two vent holes 3 mm from the occlusal edge and 180 degrees apart (internal vent). Access openings were filled with resin material (closed) and used as controls. Each abutment was secured to an implant analog. Eugenol-free zinc oxide cement (TempBond NE) was selected to cement the cast crowns (n = 9) onto test abutments. The amount of cement extruded out of the margin was calculated, and vertical seating discrepancies were determined with a linear transducer device before and after cementation. Differences among groups were analyzed statistically. The mean amount of extruded cement ranged from 36% to 90% of the total cement placed within the crowns. The order, from least to greatest amount of excess cement extrusion at the margins, was internal vent, open, and closed; significant differences were observed between test groups. The net vertical discrepancies of tested specimens ranged from -7 μm to +6 μm (mean, 0 μm). No statistically significant differences in vertical discrepancy were found between the groups. Venting the hollow abutment resulted in the least amount of cement extrusion when compared to closing off the screw access channel or leaving it open. Within the limitations of this study, it may be concluded that the use of two, 0.75-mm radius vent holes placed 3 mm apical to the occlusal area of the abutment and 180 degrees apart will limit the amount of cement extruded into the gingival sulcus of implant-retained crowns.

  18. Testing and evaluation of polyethylene and sulfur cement waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, E.M.; Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of recent studies related to the use of polyethylene and modified sulfur cement as new binder materials for the improved solidification of low-level wastes. Waste streams selected for this study include those which result from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those that remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion-exchange resins). Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type. Recommended waste loadings of 70 wt % sodium sulfate, 50 wt % boric acid, 40 wt % incinerator ash and 30 wt % ion exchange resins, which are based on process control and waste form performance considerations are reported for polyethylene. For sulfur cement the recommended waste loadings of 40 wt % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt % incinerator ash are reported. However, incorporation of ion-exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended due to poor waste form performance. The work presented in this paper will, in part, present data that can be used to assess the acceptability of polyethylene and modified sulfur cement waste forms to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61. 8 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Microelectrode Arrays and the Use of PEG-Functionalized Diblock Copolymer Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakshi Uppal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available PEG-modified diblock copolymer surfaces have been examined for their compatibility with microelectrode array based analytical methods. The use of PEG-modified polymer surfaces on the arrays was initially problematic because the redox couples used in the experiments were adsorbed by the polymer. This led the current measured by cyclic voltammetry for the redox couple to be unstable and increase with time. However, two key findings allow the experiments to be successful. First, after multiple cyclic voltammograms the current associated with the redox couple does stabilize so that a good baseline current can be established. Second, the rate at which the current stabilizes is consistent every time a particular coated array is used. Hence, multiple analytical experiments can be conducted on an array coated with a PEG-modified diblock copolymer and the data obtained is comparable as long as the data for each experiment is collected at a consistent time point.

  20. Resistance against bacterial leakage of four luting agents used for cementation of complete cast crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmener, Osvaldo; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Hernández, Sandra

    2014-02-01

    To assess the sealing properties of four luting materials used for cementation of full cast crowns. 40 human premolars were prepared with a chamfer finish line. Stone dies were fabricated and copings were waxed, invested and cast in gold. Ten samples (n = 10) were randomly assigned to four groups. In two groups, resin modified glass-ionomer cements were used, ACTIVA BioACTIVE-CEMENT/BASE/LINER and FujiCem2; the third group received the self-adhesive resin cement Embrace WetBond, while the fourth group served as control with a zinc phosphate cement. After cementation, excess cement was removed followed by bench-set for 10 minutes. All samples were stored in water at 37 degrees C and subjected to thermal cycling (x2000 between 5 and 55 degrees C). Subsequently the occlusal surface was reduced exposing the dentin. After sterilization the specimens were subjected to bacterial microleakage with E. faecalis in a dual chamber apparatus for a period of 60 days. Bacterial leakage was checked daily. Data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meyer survival test. Significant pairwise differences were analyzed using the Log Rank test and the Fishers' exact test at P CEMENT/BASE/LINER, FujiCem2 and Embrace WetBond showed the lowest microleakage scores and differed statistically significantly (P cement.

  1. Comparison of the fixation effects of heavy metals by cement rotary kiln co-processing and cement based solidification/stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junli; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Cheng; Jin, Yiying; Nie, Yongfeng; Li, Jinhui

    2009-06-15

    Cement rotary kiln co-processing of hazardous wastes and cement based solidification/stabilization could both immobilize heavy metals. The different retention mechanisms of the two technologies lead to different fixation effects of heavy metals. The same amount of heavy metal compounds were treated by the two types of fixation technologies. Long-term leaching test (160 days), the maximum availability leaching test (NEN 7341) and a modified three-step sequential extraction procedure, proposed by the Commission of the European Communities Bureau of Reference (BCR) were employed to compare the fixation effects of the two fixation technologies. The leaching concentrations in NEN 7341 and long-term leaching tests were compared with identification standard for hazardous wastes (GB5085.3-1996) and drinking water standard (GB5749-2005). The results indicate that the leaching concentrations of the long-term leaching test and NEN 7341 test were lower than the regulatory limits and the leached ratios were small. Both cement based solidification/stabilization and cement rotary kiln co-processing could effectively fix heavy metals. Calcination in a cement rotary kiln and the following hydration that follows during cement application could fix As, Cd, Pb and Zn more effectively and decrease the release to the environment. Cement solidification/stabilization technology has better effect in immobilizing Cr and Ni. Cr wastes are more fitful to be treated by cement solidification/stabilization.

  2. NANO-GLASS-IONOMER CEMENTS IN MODERN RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya G. Lyapina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of nanoparticles into glass powder of glass ionomers led to wider particle size distribution, which resulted in higher mechanical values. Consequently they can occupy the empty spaces between the Glass ionomer particles and act as reinforcing material in the composition of the glass ionomer cements. The nanofiller components of nano ionomers also enhance some physical properties of the hardened restorative. Its bonding mechanism should be attributed to micro-mechanical interlocking provided by the surface roughness, most likely combined with chemical interaction through its acrylic/itaconic acid copolymers. The paper reviews their secondary caries prevention – fluoride release properties, mechanical and physical propreties, biocompatibility aspects, and antimicrobial activity.

  3. Block copolymer membranes for aqueous solution applications

    KAUST Repository

    Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2016-03-22

    Block copolymers are known for their intricate morphology. We review the state of the art of block copolymer membranes and discuss perspectives in this field. The main focus is on pore morphology tuning with a short introduction on non-porous membranes. The two main strategies for pore formation in block copolymer membranes are (i) film casting and selective block sacrifice and (ii) self-assembly and non-solvent induced phase separation (SNIPS). Different fundamental aspects involved in the manufacture of block copolymer membranes are considered, including factors affecting the equilibrium morphology in solid films, self-assembly of copolymer in solutions and macrophase separation by solvent-non-solvent exchange. Different mechanisms are proposed for different depths of the SNIPS membrane. Block copolymer membranes can be prepared with much narrower pore size distribution than homopolymer membranes. Open questions and indications of what we consider the next development steps are finally discussed. They include the synthesis and application of new copolymers and specific functionalization, adding characteristics to respond to stimuli and chemical environment, polymerization-induced phase separation, and the manufacture of organic-inorganic hybrids.

  4. Health hazards of cement dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, Sultan A.

    2004-01-01

    ven in the 21st century, millions of people are working daily in a dusty environment. They are exposed to different types of health hazards such as fume, gases and dust, which are risk factors in developing occupational disease. Cement industry is involved in the development of structure of this advanced and modern world but generates dust during its production. Cement dust causes lung function impairment, chronic obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, pneumoconiosis and carcinoma of the lungs, stomach and colon. Other studies have shown that cement dust may enter into the systemic circulation and thereby reach the essentially all the organs of body and affects the different tissues including heart, liver, spleen, bone, muscles and hairs and ultimately affecting their micro-structure and physiological performance. Most of the studies have been previously attempted to evaluate the effects of cement dust exposure on the basis of spirometry or radiology, or both. However, collective effort describing the general effects of cement dust on different organ and systems in humans or animals, or both has not been published. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the potential toxic effects of cement dust and to minimize the health risks in cement mill workers by providing them with information regarding the hazards of cement dust. (author)

  5. The polymer cement of sulfur as an alternative for the recycling of phosphogypsum. Corrosion testing of cements enriched with phosphogypsum; El cemento polimerico de azufre como alternative para el reciclado de fosfoyesos. Pruebas de corrosion de cementos enriquecidos con fosfoyesos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco, C.; Lopez, F. A.; Navarro, N.; Sanchez, M.; Sanz, B.; Ballesteros, O.; Higueras, E.; Roman, C. P.

    2011-07-01

    The possibility of the use of cement for the recycling of materials is seen today as sustainable solution of the fertilizer industry for production of matches (NORM). In this paper presents some results of corrosion tests performed on these cements modified using buffer solutions of different pH. The analytical determinations in these matrices are new challenges. (Author)

  6. A Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Resin based Sealers on Retention of Crown Cemented with Three Types of Cement – An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumeet; Patel, J.R.; Sethuraman, Rajesh; Singh, Sarbjeet; Wazir, Nikhil Dev; Singh, Harvinder

    2014-01-01

    Aim: In an effort to control postoperative sensitivity, dentin sealers are being applied following crown preparations, with little knowledge of how crown retention might be affected. A previous study demonstrated no adverse effect when using a gluteraldehyde-based sealer, and existing studies have shown conflicting results for resin-based products. This study determined the retention of the casting cemented with three types of cement, with and without use of resin sealers and it determined the mode of failure. Materials and Methods: Extracted human molars (n=60) were prepared with a flat occlusal, 20-degree taper, and 4-mm axial length. The axial surface area of each preparation was determined and specimens were distributed equally among groups (n=10). A single-bottle adhesive system (one step single bottle adhesive system) was used to seal dentin, following tooth preparation. Sealers were not used on the control specimens. The test castings were prepared by using Ni-Cr alloy for each specimen and they were cemented with a seating force of 20 Kg by using either Zinc Phosphate (Harvard Cement), Glass Ionomer (GC luting and lining cement,GC America Inc.) and modified-resin cement (RelyXTMLuting2). Specimens were thermocycled for one month and were then removed along the path of insertion by using a Universal Testing Machine at 0.5 mm/min. A single-factor ANOVA was used with a p value of .05. The nature of failure was recorded and the data was analyzed by using Chi-square test. Results: Mean dislodgement stress for Zinc phosphate (Group A) was 24.55±1.0 KgF and that for zinc phosphate with sealer (Group D) was 14.65±0.8 KgF. For glass ionomer (Group B) without sealer, the mean value was 32.0±1.0 KgF and mean value for glass ionomer with sealer (Group E) was 37.90±1.0 KgF. The mean value for modified resin cement (Group C) was 44.3±1.0KgF and that for modified resins with sealer (Group F) was 57.2±1.2 KgF. The tooth failed before casting dislodgement in 8 to 10

  7. A Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Resin based Sealers on Retention of Crown Cemented with Three Types of Cement - An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumeet; Patel, J R; Sethuraman, Rajesh; Singh, Sarbjeet; Wazir, Nikhil Dev; Singh, Harvinder

    2014-03-01

    In an effort to control postoperative sensitivity, dentin sealers are being applied following crown preparations, with little knowledge of how crown retention might be affected. A previous study demonstrated no adverse effect when using a gluteraldehyde-based sealer, and existing studies have shown conflicting results for resin-based products. This study determined the retention of the casting cemented with three types of cement, with and without use of resin sealers and it determined the mode of failure. Extracted human molars (n=60) were prepared with a flat occlusal, 20-degree taper, and 4-mm axial length. The axial surface area of each preparation was determined and specimens were distributed equally among groups (n=10). A single-bottle adhesive system (one step single bottle adhesive system) was used to seal dentin, following tooth preparation. Sealers were not used on the control specimens. The test castings were prepared by using Ni-Cr alloy for each specimen and they were cemented with a seating force of 20 Kg by using either Zinc Phosphate (Harvard Cement), Glass Ionomer (GC luting and lining cement,GC America Inc.) and modified-resin cement (RelyXTMLuting2). Specimens were thermocycled for one month and were then removed along the path of insertion by using a Universal Testing Machine at 0.5 mm/min. A single-factor ANOVA was used with a p value of .05. The nature of failure was recorded and the data was analyzed by using Chi-square test. Mean dislodgement stress for Zinc phosphate (Group A) was 24.55±1.0 KgF and that for zinc phosphate with sealer (Group D) was 14.65±0.8 KgF. For glass ionomer (Group B) without sealer, the mean value was 32.0±1.0 KgF and mean value for glass ionomer with sealer (Group E) was 37.90±1.0 KgF. The mean value for modified resin cement (Group C) was 44.3±1.0KgF and that for modified resins with sealer (Group F) was 57.2±1.2 KgF. The tooth failed before casting dislodgement in 8 to 10 specimens cemented with modified

  8. Injectible bodily prosthetics employing methacrylic copolymer gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Anderson, Brian C.

    2007-02-27

    The present invention provides novel block copolymers as structural supplements for injectible bodily prosthetics employed in medical or cosmetic procedures. The invention also includes the use of such block copolymers as nucleus pulposus replacement materials for the treatment of degenerative disc disorders and spinal injuries. The copolymers are constructed by polymerization of a tertiary amine methacrylate with either a (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymer, such as the commercially available Pluronic.RTM. polymers, or a poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether polymer.

  9. Amphiphilic block copolymer micelles with hydrophobically modified shells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, K.; Uhlík, F.; Limpouchová, Z.; Matějíček, P.; Humpolíčková, J.; Procházka, K.; Tuzar, Zdeněk; Špírková, Milena; Hof, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 29, 10-11 (2003), s. 655-660 ISSN 0892-7022 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : micelles * conformation * NRET Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.721, year: 2003

  10. Thermal aggregation properties of nanoparticles modified with temperature sensitive copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamner, Kristen L; Maye, Mathew M

    2013-12-10

    In this paper, we describe the use of a temperature responsive polymer to reversibly assemble gold nanoparticles of various sizes. Temperature responsive, low critical solution temperature (LCST) pNIPAAm-co-pAAm polymers, with transition temperatures (T(C)) of 51 and 65 °C, were synthesized with a thiol modification, and grafted to the surface of 11 and 51 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The thermal-responsive behavior of the polymer allowed for the reversible aggregation of the nanoparticles, where at T polymers were hydrophilic and extended between particles. In contrast, at T > T(C), the polymer shell undergoes a hydrophilic to hydrophobic phase transition and collapses, decreasing interparticle distances between particles, allowing aggregation to occur. The AuNP morphology and polymer conjugation were probed by TEM, FTIR, and (1)H NMR. The thermal response was probed by UV-vis and DLS. The structure of the assembled aggregates at T > T(C) was studied via in situ small-angle X-ray scattering, which revealed interparticle distances defined by polymer conformation.

  11. Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L.; Morris, C.E.

    1995-12-01

    A set of ''templates'' was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ''affinity effect'' cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity

  12. Gyroid Membranes made from Nanoporous Blck Copolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szewczykowski, Piotr Plzemystaw; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Ndoni, Sokol

    2007-01-01

    Nanoporous materials are interesting and exciting materials in view of their many potential applications, especially as ultrafiltration membranes. One way of preparing nanoporous polymeric materials is to use block copolymers. Block copolymers have the great advantage that they organize them......-selves into different morphologies on the nano scale. Block copolymer synthesis controls the molecular weight and volume fraction of blocks, which determine the resulting nano-structures. From a membrane application point of view one very suitable morphology is the bicontinuous gyroid. Mechanical stability...... of the membrane and its nanoporosity is e.g. obtained by cross-linking the majority blocks and selectively etching the minority blocks. Here we report on ultrafiltration membranes prepared from a 1,2-polybutadiene-b-polydimethylsiloxane diblock copolymer with gyroid structure. Different experimental methods...

  13. Block copolymer structures in nano-pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Marco; Guo, Xiaohu; Zvelindovsky, Andrei

    2010-03-01

    We present results of coarse-grained computer modelling of block copolymer systems in cylindrical and spherical nanopores on Cell Dynamics Simulation. We study both cylindrical and spherical pores and systematically investigate structures formed by lamellar, cylinders and spherical block copolymer systems for various pore radii and affinity of block copolymer blocks to the pore walls. The obtained structures include: standing lamellae and cylinders, ``onions,'' cylinder ``knitting balls,'' ``golf-ball,'' layered spherical, ``virus''-like and mixed morphologies with T-junctions and U-type defects [1]. Kinetics of the structure formation and the differences with planar films are discussed. Our simulations suggest that novel porous nano-containers can be formed by confining block copolymers in pores of different geometries [1,2]. [4pt] [1] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, Polymer 49, 2797 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 214902 (2009).

  14. Electrostatic control of block copolymer morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, Charles E.; Zwanikken, Jos W.; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2014-07-01

    Energy storage is at present one of the foremost issues society faces. However, material challenges now serve as bottlenecks in technological progress. Lithium-ion batteries are the current gold standard to meet energy storage needs; however, they are limited owing to the inherent instability of liquid electrolytes. Block copolymers can self-assemble into nanostructures that simultaneously facilitate ion transport and provide mechanical stability. The ions themselves have a profound, yet previously unpredictable, effect on how these nanostructures assemble and thus the efficiency of ion transport. Here we demonstrate that varying the charge of a block copolymer is a powerful mechanism to predictably tune nanostructures. In particular, we demonstrate that highly asymmetric charge cohesion effects can induce the formation of nanostructures that are inaccessible to conventional uncharged block copolymers, including percolated phases desired for ion transport. This vastly expands the design space for block copolymer materials and is informative for the versatile design of battery electrolyte materials.

  15. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027) into...

  16. Block Copolymers: Synthesis and Applications in Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qin

    This study is focused on the synthesis and study of (block) copolymers using reversible deactivation radical polymerizations (RDRPs), including atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. In particular, two primary areas of study are undertaken: (1) a proof-of-concept application of lithographic block copolymers, and (2) the mechanistic study of the deposition of titania into block copolymer templates for the production of well-ordered titania nanostructures. Block copolymers have the ability to undergo microphase separation, with an average size of each microphase ranging from tens to hundreds of nanometers. As such, block copolymers have been widely considered for nanotechnological applications over the past two decades. The development of materials for various nanotechnologies has become an increasingly studied area as improvements in many applications, such as those found in the semiconductor and photovoltaic industries are constantly being sought. Significant growth in developments of new synthetic methods ( i.e. RDRPs) has allowed the production of block copolymers with molecular (and sometimes atomic) definition. In turn, this has greatly expanded the use of block copolymers in nanotechnology. Herein, we describe the synthesis of statistical and block copolymers of 193 nm photolithography methacrylate and acrylate resist monomers with norbornyl and adamantyl moieties using RAFT polymerization.. For these resist (block) copolymers, the phase separation behaviors were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). End groups were removed from the polymers to avoid complications during the photolithography since RAFT end groups absorb visible light. Poly(glycidyl methacrylate-block-polystyrene) (PGMA-b-PS) was synthesize by ATRP and demonstrated that this block copolymer acts as both a lithographic UV (365 nm) photoresist and a self-assembly material. The PGMA segments can undergo cationic

  17. Reactivity Ratios for Organotin Copolymer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H. El-Newehy

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Di(tri-n-butyltin itaconate (DTBTI and monoethyl tributyltin fumarate (METBTF were synthesized as organotin monomers. The organotin monomers were copolymerized with styrene (ST and methyl methacrylate (MMA via a free radical polymerization technique. The overall conversion was kept low (£15% wt/wt for all studied samples and the copolymer composition was determined from tin analysis. The synthesized monomers and copolymers were characterized by elemental analysis, 1H- and 13C-NMR, and FTIR spectroscopy.

  18. Responsive Copolymers for Enhanced Petroleum Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, C.; Hester, R.

    2001-02-27

    The objectives of this work was to: synthesize responsive copolymer systems; characterize molecular structure and solution behavior; measure rheological properties of aqueous fluids in fixed geometry flow profiles; and to tailor final polymer compositions for in situ rheology control under simulated conditions. This report focuses on the synthesis and characterization of novel stimuli responsive copolymers, the investigation of dilute polymer solutions in extensional flow and the design of a rheometer capable of measuring very dilute aqueous polymer solutions at low torque.

  19. Crown and bridge cements: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunek, Sabiha S; Powers, John M

    2012-12-01

    Cement selection can be confusing because factors such as substrate, the type of restoration, and patient needs must be considered. Some substrates require additional treatment before cementation. This article describes the most commonly used traditional crown and bridge cements (GI and RMGI) used for metal and metal-ceramic restorations, and resin cements used for all-ceramic restorations. Advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications of cements have been reviewed. Recommended uses of cements for metal, ceramic, and laboratory composite restorations have been presented. General guidelines for surface treatment ot silica- and zirconia-based restorations when using resin cements have been discussed.

  20. Textural properties of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) : acid-modified bentonite nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zunic, M.; Milutinovic-Nikolic, A.; Nastasovic, A.; Vukovic, Z.; Loncarevic, D.; Vukovic, I.; Loos, K.; ten Brinke, G.; Jovanovic, D.; Sharma, Bhaskar; Ubaghs, Luc; Keul, Helmut; Höcker, Hartwig; Loontjens, Ton; Benthem, Rolf van; Žunić, M.; Milutinović-Nikolić, A.; Nastasović, A.; Vuković, Z.; Lončarević, D.; Vuković, I.; Jovanović, D.

    The aim of this study was to obtain enhanced textural properties of macroporous crosslinked copolymer poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) by synthesizing nanocomposites with acid-modified bentonite. Nanocomposites were obtained by introducing various amounts of

  1. Cement/slag chemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Macphee, D.; Atkins, M.; Beckley, N.; Carson, S.O.; Wilding, C.R.; McHugh, G.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of cement-based matrices intended for radwaste immobilization is assessed. The long-term performance of the matrix is characterized by thermodynamic evaluation of experimental data. The results are presented in a general form, amenable to a range of specific formulations. The interaction of specific radwaste components with cements has been studied, using Iodine as an example. It occurs as both I - and IO 3 - species, but these differ sharply in sorption characteristics. The effect of ionizing radiation of the pH and E h of cement matrices is reported. (author)

  2. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of cement and concrete to immobilise radioactive waste is complicated by the wide- ranging nature of inorganic cementing agents available as well as the range of service environments in which cement is used and the different functions expected of cement. For example, Portland cement based concretes are widely used as structural materials for construction of vaults and tunnels. These constructions may experience a long pre-closure performance lifetime during which they are required to protect against collapse and ingress of water: strength and impermeability are key desirable characteristics. On the other hand, cement and concrete may be used to form backfills, ranging in permeability. Permeable formulations allow gas readily to escape, while impermeable barriers retard radionuclide transport and reduce access of ground water to the waste. A key feature of cements is that, while fresh, they pass through a fluid phase and can be formed into any shape desired or used to infiltrate other materials thereby enclosing them into a sealed matrix. Thereafter, setting and hardening is automatic and irreversible. Where concrete is used to form structural elements, it is also natural to use cement in other applications as it minimises potential for materials incompatibility. Thus cement- mainly Portland cement- has been widely used as an encapsulant for storage, transport and as a radiation shield for active wastes. Also, to form and stabilise structures such as vaults and silos. Relative to other potential matrices, cement also has a chemical immobilisation potential, reacting with and binding with many radionuclides. The chemical potential of cements is essentially sacrificial, thus limiting their performance lifetime. However performance may also be required in the civil engineering sense, where strength is important, so many factors, including a geochemical description of service conditions, may require to be assessed in order to predict performance lifetime. The

  3. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-06-15

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T{sub 1} increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T{sub 1} in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T{sub 1} in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T 1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T 1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  5. Traditional Portland cement and MgO-based cement: a promising combination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Monica; Martini, Francesca; Calucci, Lucia; Geppi, Marco; Borsacchi, Silvia; Ridi, Francesca

    2017-06-01

    MgO/SiO2 cements are materials potentially very useful for radioactive waste disposal, but knowledge about their physico-chemical properties is still lacking. In this paper we investigated the hydration kinetics of cementitious formulations prepared by mixing MgO/SiO2 and Portland cement in different proportions and the structural properties of the hydrated phases formed in the first month of hydration. In particular, the hydration kinetics was investigated by measuring the free water index on pastes by means of differential scanning calorimetry, while the structural characterization was carried out by combining thermal (DTA), diffractometric (XRD), and spectroscopic (FTIR, 29Si solid state NMR) techniques. It was found that calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) and magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gels mainly form as separate phases, their relative amount and structural characteristics depending on the composition of the hydrated mixture. Moreover, the composition of the mixtures strongly affects the kinetics of hydration and the pH of the aqueous phase in contact with the cementitious materials. The results here reported show that suitable mixtures of Portland cement and MgO/SiO2 could be used to modify the properties of hydrated phases with potential application in the storage of nuclear waste in clayey disposal.

  6. Early hydration cement Effect of admixtures superplasticizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puertas, F.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Early hydration of portland cement with superplasticizer admixtures of different nature has been studied. These admixtures were: one based on melamine synthetic, other based on vinyl copolymer and other based on polyacrylate copolymers. The dosage of the formers were constant (1% weigth of cement and for the third, the influence of admixture dosage was also evaluated, giving dosage values among 1-0.3%. The pastes obtained were studied by conduction calorimetry, XRD and FTIR. Also the apparent fluidity was determined by "Minislump" test. The main results obtained were: a superplasticizers admixtures used, regardless of their nature and for the polycarboxilate one the dosage, retard the silicate hydration (specially, alite phase, b The ettringite formation is affected by the nature of the admixture. cA relationship between the dosage of admixture based on polycarboxilates and the time at the acceleration has been established. A lineal relation (y = 11.03 + 16.05x was obtained. From these results is possible to know, in function of dosage admixture, the time when the masive hydration products and the setting times are produced. Also the total heat releases in these reactions is independent of the nature and dosage of admixture, saying that in all cases the reactions are the same.

    En el presente trabajo se ha estudiado la hidratación inicial de un cemento portland aditivado con superplastificantes de diferente naturaleza. Dichos aditivos fueron: uno basado en melaminas sintéticas, otro en copolímeros vinilicos y otro en policarboxilatos. La dosificación de los dos primeros se fijó constante en 1% en peso con relación al cemento, mientras que para el tercero se evaluó, también, la influencia de la dosificación, tomando proporciones desde el 1% hasta el 0,3%. Las pastas obtenidas se estudiaron por: calorimetría de conducción, DRX y FTIR. También se determinó la fluidez de la pasta a través del ensayo del "Minislump ". Los

  7. [Bonding interfaces of three kinds of cements and root canal dentin: a scanning electron microscope observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Lei, Hui-yun; Xu, Guo-fu; Liang, Xiao-peng; Li, Ji-jia

    2010-04-01

    To compare the bonding properties of three kinds of cements by observing the bonding inteffaces of cements and root canal dentin. 15 extracted mandibular premolars were divided into 3 groups, and were cemented by Rely X luting, Panavia F and Paracore 5 mL, respectively. Each tooth was sectioned into two parts and the dentin-cement interfaces at the coronal, middle and apical parts of the fiber post were oberved by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The length of hybrid layer was also recorded. Hybrid layer was not clearly found in group one, which could be seen on the dentin-cement interfaces of group two and three. Resin tags and lateral adhesives were also observed in group three. From the apical to the coronal part, microgaps seemed gradually smaller in group one, while the hybrid layer became thicker in both group two and three. The total-etch resin cement bounds tightly with dentin, and owns a more superior bonding property than self-etch resin cement and resin modified glass ionomer cement.

  8. Research on the nanolevel influence of surfactants on structure formation of the hydrated Portland cement compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guryanov Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The research of the structure formation process on a nanolevel of the samples of hydrated Portland cement compositions containing the modifying additives has been conducted with the help of small angle neutron scattering method. Carbonate and aluminum alkaline slimes as well as the complex additives containing surfactants were used as additives. The influence of slimes and surfactants on structural parameters change of Portland cement compositions of the average size of the disseminating objects, fractal dimension samples is considered. These Portland cement compositions are shown to be fractal clusters.

  9. Ash cements stabilized by supercritical CO2 carbonation for tailings pond overlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, J. B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Paviet-Hartmann, P.; Hartmann, T.

    2000-01-01

    The article describes the general features of supercritical fluids, as well as the application of these fluids to the production of unmodified portland and portland cement modified by incorporation of industrial waste solids, such as oil shale ash. Suitably treated, pre-fabricated cement, incorporating spent oil shale ash, as well as some of the tailings pond waste, could be used as an overlayer for the Sillamaee tailings pond

  10. Sliding wear of cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engqvist, H.; Ederyd, S.; Uhrenius, B.; Hogmark, S.

    2001-01-01

    Cemented carbides are known to be very hard and wear resistant and are therefor often used in applications involving surface damage and wear. The wear rate of cemented carbides is often measured in abrasion. In such tests it has been shown that the wear rate is inversely dependent on the material hardness. The sliding wear is even more of a surface phenomenon than a abrasion, making it difficult to predict friction and wear from bulk properties. This paper concentrates on the sliding wear of cemented carbides and elucidates some wear mechanisms. It is especially shown that a fragmenting wear mechanism of WC is very important for the description of wear of cemented carbides. (author)

  11. Alternative Fuels in Cement Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Boberg

    The substitution of alternative for fossil fuels in cement production has increased significantly in the last decade. Of these new alternative fuels, solid state fuels presently account for the largest part, and in particular, meat and bone meal, plastics and tyre derived fuels (TDF) accounted...... for the most significant alternative fuel energy contributors in the German cement industry. Solid alternative fuels are typically high in volatile content and they may differ significantly in physical and chemical properties compared to traditional solid fossil fuels. From the process point of view......, considering a modern kiln system for cement production, the use of alternative fuels mainly influences 1) kiln process stability (may accelerate build up of blockages preventing gas and/or solids flow), 2) cement clinker quality, 3) emissions, and 4) decreased production capacity. Kiln process stability...

  12. A comparative analysis of modified binders : original asphalts and materials extracted from existing pavements : technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The initial objective of this research was to develop procedures and standards for applying GPC as an analytical tool to define the percentage amounts of polymer modifiers in polymer modified asphalt cements soluble in eluting GPC solvents. Quantific...

  13. Rheological measurements on cement grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, M.J.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes the techniques which have been developed at Winfrith for assessing the rheological properties of cement grouts. A discussion of the theory of rheology and its application to cement is given and the methodology for calibrating a special paddle measuring system for a commercial viscometer is described. The use of the system for determining flow curves, equilibrium viscosity, viscosity as a function of shearing time and structure changes is also discussed. (author)

  14. Very-early-strength latex-modified concrete overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    This paper describes the installation and condition of the first two very-early-strength latex modified concrete (LMC-VE) overlays constructed for the Virginia Department of Transportation. The overlays were prepared with a special blended cement rat...

  15. Methacrylate-Based Copolymers for Polymer Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Zaremba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Waveguides made of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA play a major role in the homogeneous distribution of display backlights as a matrix for solid-state dye lasers and polymer optical fibers (POFs. PMMA is favored because of its transparency in the visible spectrum, low price, and well-controlled processability. Nevertheless, technical drawbacks, such as its limited temperature stability, call for new materials. In this work, the copolymerization technique is used to modify the properties of the corresponding homopolymers. The analytical investigation of fourteen copolymers made of methyl-methacrylate (MMA or ethyl-methacrylate (EMA as the basis monomer is summarized. Their polymerization behaviors are examined by NMR spectroscopy with subsequent copolymerization parameter evaluation according to Fineman-Ross and Kelen-Tüdös. Therefore, some r-parameter sets are shown to be capable of copolymerizations with very high conversions. The first applications as high-temperature resistant (HT materials for HT-POFs are presented. Copolymers containing isobornyl-methacrylate (IBMA as the comonomer are well-suited for this demanding application.

  16. In Vitro Evaluation of Cell Compatibility of Dental Cements Used with Titanium Implant Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, Jason C; Gallegos, Silvia I; Parsaei, Shaida; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2018-03-09

    To evaluate the biocompatibility of five dental cement compositions after directly exposing human gingival fibroblast (HGF) and MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells to cement alone and cement applied on commercially pure titanium (cpTi) specimens. Nanostructurally integrated bioceramic (NIB), resin (R), resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC), zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), and zinc phosphate (ZP) compositions were prepared according to the respective manufacturer's instructions. Samples were prepared in cylindrical Teflon molds or applied over the entire surface of polished cpTi discs. All samples were cured for 0.5, 1, 12, or 24 hours post-mixing. Direct contact testing was conducted according to ISO 10993 by seeding 6-well plates at 350,000 cells/well. Plates were incubated at 37°C in a humidified atmosphere with 5% CO 2 for 24 hours before individually plating samples and cpTi control discs. Plates were then incubated for an additional 24 hours. Microtetrazolium (MTT) cell viability assays were used to measure sample cytotoxicity. For samples that cured for 24 hours prior to direct contact exposure, only NIB and ZP cements when cemented on cpTi demonstrated cell viability percentages above the minimum biocompatibility requirement (≥70%) for both the investigative cell lines. R, RMGIC, and ZOE cements exhibited moderate to severe cytotoxic effects on both cell lines in direct contact and when cemented on cpTi specimens. For HGF cells, ZOE cemented-cpTi specimens exhibited significantly decreased cytotoxicity, whereas RMGIC cemented-cpTi specimens exhibited significantly increased cytotoxicity. Despite previous studies that showed enhanced cpTi corrosion activity for fluoride-containing compositions (NIB and ZP), there was no significant difference in cytotoxicity between cement alone and cemented-cpTi. In general, the MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells were more sensitive than HGF cells to cement composition. Ultimately, cement composition played a significant role in maintaining

  17. A facile novel fluorocarbon copolymer solution coating process for improving platelet compatibility of titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sophia Chao-Wei; Cheng, Chi-Hui; Chiu, Yun; Lin, Yi-Ching; Lin, Jui-Che

    2017-11-01

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys possess mechanical properties that are desirable in many biomedical applications compared to other metals. Furthermore, the native metal oxide layer that prevents further oxidation is also known to be biocompatible. However, clinical findings have shown that titanium and its alloys are prone to adverse bioreactions such as platelet adhesion and activation which could lead to thrombogenic complications. It has been found that surfaces modified with fluorocarbons could reduce the degree of both platelet adhesion and activation. Nevertheless, direct fluorocarbon deposition onto titanium substrates would require significant technical efforts. Instead, this research utilized a facile coating process with novel copolymers containing 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate (TFEMA) and vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) to modify the titanium surface, giving the surface lower surface energy and higher hydrophobicity, significantly reducing the thrombus formation while exhibiting good cytocompatibility. The anchorage group, phosphonic acid provided by VPA, can be covalently bound to the oxide surface of titanium metal. Via free radical polymerization, VPA and TFEMA formed copolymers with different hydrophobicity were then used to modify titanium substrates, on which a series of surface characterization, in vitro platelet adhesion tests, and cytotoxicity assays were performed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the synthesis of the copolymers and the modification of Ti substrates. The platelet adhesion tests showed significantly reduced amount of adherent platelets on certain copolymer-modified Ti substrates with low degrees of activation. The in vitro cytotoxicity assays further highlighted that the modifications conducted on Ti does not induce cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of copolymer architectures on adhesion and compatibilization of polymers at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lantao

    Adhesion and compatibilization of immiscible homopolymers by a variety of copolymer architectures were studied. The work is arranged into 5 chapters: In Chapter 1, an introduction to recent studies on improvement of adhesion and compatibilization of polymer blends using copolymers was made including the advantages and shortcomings of interfacial reinforcement by a diblock copolymer architecture. Emphasis is on the novel ways to improve adhesion at polymer interfaces by a variety of copolymer architectures, including physical entanglement and chemical modification and chemical bonding. In Chapter 2, a series of Polystyrene-Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-PMMA) graft copolymers were introduced to modify the PS and PMMA homopolymer interface and was found to increase the interfacial fracture toughness to a large extent, depending on the detailed architectural variables such as the graft number per chain, the lengths of the backbone and the grafts, and the total molecular weights of the graft copolymers. It was also found that there was an optimal number of grafts per chain which can be interpreted based on the graft length and inter-branch length of the backbone of the copolymer. Effect of in-situ grafting via a chemical reaction between Polystyrene-Poly(vinyl phenol) (PS-PSOH) and oxazoline containing Styrene-Acrylonitril (SAN) was also discussed compared with the physical grafting of a graft copolymer of different structural parameters. In Chapter 3, hydrogen bonding was utilized to toughen the interface between PS and PAA poly(acrylic acid)) or PMMA using a random copolymer architecture of Polystyrene-Poly(vinyl pyridine) (PS-PVP). It was shown that random copolymer architecture is not only economically feasible due to its low cost of producing but also very effective on adhesion because it not only overcomes the issue of micelle formation which is an unavoidable situation in the diblock and graft cases but the enhancement of adhesion is much higher utilizing a H

  19. Rheology of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Cement-Based Mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banfill, Phillip F. G.; Starrs, Gerry; McCarter, W. John

    2008-01-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced cement based materials (CFRCs) offer the possibility of fabricating 'smart' electrically conductive materials. Rheology of the fresh mix is crucial to satisfactory moulding and fresh CFRC conforms to the Bingham model with slight structural breakdown. Both yield stress and plastic viscosity increase with increasing fibre length and volume concentration. Using a modified Viskomat NT, the concentration dependence of CFRC rheology up to 1.5% fibre volume is reported

  20. Polyamide copolymers having 2,5-furan dicarboxamide units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Bret Ja; Samanta, Satyabrata

    2017-09-19

    Polyamide copolymers, and methods of making and using polyamide copolymers, having 2,5-furan dicarboxamide units are disclosed herein. Such polymers can be useful for engineering thermoplastics having advantageous physical and/or chemical properties.

  1. Radioactive wastes dispersed in stabilized ash cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, J.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Carey, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    One of the most widely-used methods for the solidification/stabilization of low-level radwaste is by incorporation into Type-I/II ordinary portland cement (OPC). Treating of OPC with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO 2 ) has been shown to significantly increase the density, while simultaneously decreasing porosity. In addition, the process significantly reduces the hydrogenous content, reducing the likelihood of radiolytic decomposition reactions. This, in turn, permits increased actinide loadings with a concomitant reduction in disposable waste volume. In this article, the authors discuss the combined use of fly-ash-modified OPC and its treatment with SCCO 2 to further enhance immobilization properties. They begin with a brief summary of current cement immobilization technology in order to delineate the areas of concern. Next, supercritical fluids are described, as they relate to these areas of concern. In the subsequent section, they present an outline of results on the application of SCCO 2 to OPC, and its effectiveness in addressing these problem areas. Lastly, in the final section, they proffer their thoughts on why they believe, based on the OPC results, that the incorporation of fly ash into OPC, followed by supercritical fluid treatment, can produce highly efficient wasteforms

  2. Radioactive wastes dispersed in stabilized ash cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, J.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Carey, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    One of the most widely-used methods for the solidification/stabilization of low-level radwaste is by incorporation into Type-I/II ordinary portland cement (OPC). Treating of OPC with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) has been shown to significantly increase the density, while simultaneously decreasing porosity. In addition, the process significantly reduces the hydrogenous content, reducing the likelihood of radiolytic decomposition reactions. This, in turn, permits increased actinide loadings with a concomitant reduction in disposable waste volume. In this article, the authors discuss the combined use of fly-ash-modified OPC and its treatment with SCCO{sub 2} to further enhance immobilization properties. They begin with a brief summary of current cement immobilization technology in order to delineate the areas of concern. Next, supercritical fluids are described, as they relate to these areas of concern. In the subsequent section, they present an outline of results on the application of SCCO{sub 2} to OPC, and its effectiveness in addressing these problem areas. Lastly, in the final section, they proffer their thoughts on why they believe, based on the OPC results, that the incorporation of fly ash into OPC, followed by supercritical fluid treatment, can produce highly efficient wasteforms.

  3. Development of Mix Design Method in Efforts to Increase Concrete Performance Using Portland Pozzolana Cement (PPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisnamurti; Soehardjono, A.; Zacoeb, A.; Wibowo, A.

    2018-01-01

    Earthquake disaster can cause infrastructure damage. Prevention of human casualties from disasters should do. Prevention efforts can do through improving the mechanical performance of building materials. To achieve high-performance concrete (HPC), usually used Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). However, the most widely circulating cement types today are Portland Pozzolana Cement (PPC) or Portland Composite Cement (PCC). Therefore, the proportion of materials used in the HPC mix design needs to adjust to achieve the expected performance. This study aims to develop a concrete mix design method using PPC to fulfil the criteria of HPC. The study refers to the code/regulation of concrete mixtures that use OPC based on the results of laboratory testing. This research uses PPC material, gravel from Malang area, Lumajang sand, water, silica fume and superplasticizer of a polycarboxylate copolymer. The analyzed information includes the investigation results of aggregate properties, concrete mixed composition, water-binder ratio variation, specimen dimension, compressive strength and elasticity modulus of the specimen. The test results show that the concrete compressive strength achieves value between 25 MPa to 55 MPa. The mix design method that has developed can simplify the process of concrete mix design using PPC to achieve the certain desired performance of concrete.

  4. Photoconductivity enhancement and charge transport properties in ruthenium-containing block copolymer/carbon nanotube hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Kin Cheung; Hau, King In; Chan, Wai Kin

    2018-04-05

    Functional polymer/carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid materials can serve as a good model for light harvesting systems based on CNTs. This paper presents the synthesis of block copolymer/CNT hybrids and the characterization of their photocurrent responses by both experimental and computational approaches. A series of functional diblock copolymers was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerizations for the dispersion and functionalization of CNTs. The block copolymers contain photosensitizing ruthenium complexes and modified pyrene-based anchoring units. The photocurrent responses of the polymer/CNT hybrids were measured by photoconductive atomic force microscopy (PCAFM), from which the experimental data were analyzed by vigorous statistical models. The difference in photocurrent response among different hybrids was correlated to the conformations of the hybrids, which were elucidated by molecular dynamics simulations, and the electronic properties of polymers. The photoresponse of the block copolymer/CNT hybrids can be enhanced by introducing an electron-accepting block between the photosensitizing block and the CNT. We have demonstrated that the application of a rigorous statistical methodology can unravel the charge transport properties of these hybrid materials and provide general guidelines for the design of molecular light harvesting systems.

  5. Biodegradation of polystyrene-graft-starch copolymers in three different types of soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Vladimir; Velickovic, Sava; Popovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Materials based on polystyrene and starch copolymers are used in food packaging, water pollution treatment, and textile industry, and their biodegradability is a desired characteristic. In order to examine the degradation patterns of modified, biodegradable derivates of polystyrene, which may keep its excellent technical features but be more environmentally friendly at the same time, polystyrene-graft-starch biomaterials obtained by emulsion polymerization in the presence of new type of initiator/activator pair (potassium persulfate/different amines) were subjected to 6-month biodegradation by burial method in three different types of commercially available soils: soil rich in humus and soil for cactus and orchid growing. Biodegradation was monitored by mass decrease, and the highest degradation rate was achieved in soil for cactus growing (81.30%). Statistical analysis proved that microorganisms in different soil samples have different ability of biodegradation, and there is a significant negative correlation between the share of polystyrene in copolymer and degree of biodegradation. Grafting of polystyrene on starch on one hand prevents complete degradation of starch that is present (with maximal percentage of degraded starch ranging from 55 to 93%), while on the other hand there is an upper limit of share of polystyrene in the copolymer (ranging from 37 to 77%) that is preventing biodegradation of degradable part of copolymers.

  6. Oil recovery with vinyl sulfonic acid-acrylamide copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, C.J.; Falk, D.O.

    1973-12-18

    An aqueous polymer flood containing sulfomethylated alkali metal vinyl sulfonate-acrylamide copolymers was proposed for use in secondary or tertiary enhanced oil recovery. The sulfonate groups on the copolymers sustain the viscosity of the flood in the presence of brine and lime. Injection of the copolymer solution into a waterflooded Berea core, produced 30.5 percent of the residual oil. It is preferred that the copolymers are partially hydrolyzed.

  7. Charge Transport in Conjugated Block Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brandon; Le, Thinh; Lee, Youngmin; Gomez, Enrique

    Interest in conjugated block copolymers for high performance organic photovoltaic applications has increased considerably in recent years. Polymer/fullerene mixtures for conventional bulk heterojunction devices, such as P3HT:PCBM, are severely limited in control over interfaces and domain length scales. In contrast, microphase separated block copolymers self-assemble to form lamellar morphologies with alternating electron donor and acceptor domains, thereby maximizing electronic coupling and local order at interfaces. Efficiencies as high as 3% have been reported in solar cells for one block copolymer, P3HT-PFTBT, but the details concerning charge transport within copolymers have not been explored. To fill this gap, we probed the transport characteristics with thin-film transistors. Excellent charge mobility values for electron transport have been observed on aluminum source and drain contacts in a bottom gate, bottom contact transistor configuration. Evidence of high mobility in ordered PFTBT phases has also been obtained following thermal annealing. The insights gleaned from our investigation serve as useful guideposts, revealing the significance of the interplay between charge mobility, interfacial order, and optimal domain size in organic block copolymer semiconductors.

  8. Polymer-cement interactions towards improved wellbore cement fracture sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckingham, B. S.; Iloejesi, C.; Minkler, M. J.; Schindler, A. K.; Beckingham, L. E.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) in deep geologic formations is a promising means of reducing point source emissions of CO2. In these systems, CO2 is captured at the source and then injected to be utilized (eg. in enhanced oil recovery or as a working fluid in enhanced geothermal energy plants) or stored in geologic formations such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs or saline aquifers. While CCUS in subsurface systems could aid in reducing atmospheric CO2 emissions, the potential for CO2 leakage from these systems to overlying formations remains a major limitation and poses a significant risk to the security of injected CO2. Thus, improved materials for both initial wellbore isolation and repairing leakage pathways that develop over time are sought. One approach for the repair of cement fractures in wellbore (and other) systems is the injection of polymer materials into the fracture with a subsequent environmentally dependent (temperature, pressure, pH, etc.) densification or solidification. Here, we aim to investigate novel polymer materials for use to repair leaking wellbores in the context of CCUS. We synthesize and fully characterize a series of novel polymer materials and utilize a suite of analysis techniques to examine polymer-cement interactions at a range of conditions (namely temperature, pressure and pH). Initial findings will be leveraged to design novel polymer materials for further evaluation in polymer-cement composite cores, cement fracture healing, and the aging behavior of healed cements.

  9. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylate ester copolymer coating. 175.210 Section... COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.210 Acrylate ester copolymer coating. Acrylate ester copolymer coating may safely be used as a food-contact surface of articles intended for packaging...

  10. Cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of Zirconia (Y-TZP posts with various dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeongsoon Shin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Endodontically treated teeth with insufficient tooth structure are often restored with esthetic restorations. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity and biological effects of yttria partially stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP blocks in combination with several dental cements. Materials and Methods Pairs of zirconia cylinders with medium alone or cemented with three types of dental cement including RelyX U200 (3M ESPE, FujiCEM 2 (GC, and Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray were incubated in medium for 14 days. The cytotoxicity of each supernatant was determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays on L929 fibroblasts and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 mRNA were evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and IL-6 protein was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The MTT assays showed that MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were more susceptible to dental cements than L929 fibroblasts. The resin based dental cements increased IL-6 expression in L929 cells, but reduced IL-6 expression in MC3T3-E1 cells. Conclusions Zirconia alone or blocks cemented with dental cement showed acceptable biocompatibilities. The results showed resin-modified glass-ionomer based cement less produced inflammatory cytokines than other self-adhesive resin-based cements. Furthermore, osteoblasts were more susceptible than fibroblasts to the biological effects of dental cement.

  11. Microleakage of Four Dental Cements in Metal Ceramic Restorations With Open Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Farzaneh, Babak; Azarsina, Mohadese; Aghdashi, Farzad; Dehghani, Nima; Afshari, Aisooda; Mahshid, Minu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fixed prosthodontics is a routine dental treatment and microleakage is a major cause of its failure. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the marginal microleakage of four cements in metal ceramic restorations with adapted and open margins. Materials and Methods: Sixty sound human premolars were selected for this experimental study performed in Tehran, Iran and prepared for full-crown restorations. Wax patterns were formed leaving a 300 µm gap on one of the proximal margins. The crowns were cast and the samples were randomly divided into four groups based on the cement used. Copings were cemented using zinc phosphate cement (Fleck), Fuji Plus resin-modified glass ionomer, Panavia F2.0 resin cement, or G-Cem resin cement, according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue solution. After 24 hours, dye penetration was assessed under a stereomicroscope and analyzed using the respective software. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, paired t-tests, and Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The least microleakage occurred in the Panavia F2.0 group (closed margin, 0.18 mm; open margin, 0.64 mm) and the maximum was observed in the Fleck group (closed margin, 1.92 mm; open margin, 3.32 mm). The Fleck group displayed significantly more microleakage compared to the Fuji Plus and Panavia F2.0 groups (P cement exhibited better sealing ability in closed and open margins compared to G-Cem and Fleck cements. When using G-Cem and Fleck cements for full metal ceramic restorations, clinicians should try to minimize marginal gaps in order to reduce restoration failure. In situations where there are doubts about perfect marginal adaptation, the use of Fuji Plus cement may be helpful. PMID:26730349

  12. Phase Structure and Properties of a Biodegradable Block Copolymer Coalesced from It's Crystalline Inclusion Compound Formed with alpha-Cyclodextrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Xintao; Wei, Min; Probeni, Francis; Bullions, Todd A.; Shin, I. Daniel; Tonelli, Alan E.

    2002-03-01

    A well-defined biodegradable block copolymer of poly(epsilon caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was synthesized and characterized and then included as a guest in an inclusion compound (IC) formed with the host alpha-cyclodextrin (CD). The PCL-b-PLLA block copolymer was subsequently coalesced from it's CD-IC crystals by either treatment with hot water (50 C) or an aqueous amylase solution at 25 C. The coalesced PCL-b-PLLA was examined by FTIR, DSC, TGA, and WAXD and was found to be much more homogeneosly organized, with much less segregation and crystallinity of the PCL and PLLA microphases. The morpholgy, crystallization kinetics, thermal behavior, and biodegradability of the coalesced PCL-b-PLLA block copolymer was studied by comparison to similar observations made on as-synthesized PCL-b-PLLA, PCL and PLLA homopolymers, and their solution-cast blend. The PCL and PLLA blocks are found to be more intimately mixed, with less phase segregation, in the coalesced diblock copolymer, and this leads to homogeneous bulk crystallization, which is not observed for the as-synthesized diblock copolymer. The coalesced PCL-b-PLLA was also found to be more quickly biodegraded (lipase from Rhizopus arrhizus)than the as-synthesized PCL-b-PLLA or the physical blend of PCL and PLLA homopolymers. Overall, the coalescence of the inherently phase segregated diblock copolymer PCL-b-PLLA results in a small amount of compact, chain-extended PCL and PLLA crystals embedded in an amorphous phase, largely consisting of well-mixed PCL and PLLA blocks. Thus, we have demonstrated that it is possible to control the morpholgy of a biodegradable diblock copolymer, thereby significantly modifying it's properties, by coalescence from it's CD-IC crystals.

  13. Grafting of 4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid onto commercially available poly(VDF-co-HFP) copolymers for the preparation of membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguet, A.; Ameduri, B.; Boutevin, B. [Laboratory of Macromolecular Chemistry, UMR 5076 (CNRS), Ecole Nat. Sup. de Chimie de Montpellier, 8 rue de L' Ecole Normale, F-34296 Montpellier Cedex 1 (France)

    2006-10-15

    The grafting of a phenate bearing sulfonate group in solution onto commercially available poly(VDF-co-HFP) copolymers, where VDF and HFP stand for vinylidene fluoride and hexafluoropropene, respectively, is presented. This reaction leads to novel fluoropolymers, bearing aryl sulfonic acid side functions, which are fuel cell membrane precursors. A mechanism similar to the grafting of bisphenol onto VDF-containing copolymers is discussed. First, the sulfonate phenate is modified to give the didecyldimethylammonium bromide sulfonate phenate salt, in order to promote the substitution onto a fluorine atom in VDF unit adjacent to one HFP unit onto a fluorine atom in the copolymer. The substitution of this salt onto the fluorinated copolymer yields low molar percentages of grafted phenate, ranging from 1.8 to 5.1 mol-%, whereas it reaches values up to 13 mol-% grafting when the NH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-S-CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-SO{sub 3}Na amine is used as the grafting agent. NMR characterization is used to monitor the grafting process. The electrochemical properties of the resulting phenate grafted-poly(VDF-co-HFP) copolymer are studied. The theoretical ion exchange capacities are half that of Nafion registered. The proton conductivities are also lower than that of Nafion registered, although one conductivity measurement reached a value of 5.1 mS cm{sup -1}, showing a non-negligible conductivity. The water uptake is lower than these noted for a sulfonated amine-grafted copolymer, and is of the same order as that for Nafion registered. Finally, it is shown that these novel materials start to decompose above 200 C, showing a similar thermostability as that of an amino-containing aryl sulfonate-grafted poly(VDF-co-HFP) copolymer. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Synthesis of amphiphilic diblock copolymer for surface modification of Ethylene-Norbornene copolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Simon; Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Horsewell, Andy

    2014-01-01

    -norbornene copolymer TOPAS. Through matching of the radius of gyration for the model polymer and TOPAS the miscibility was achieved. The poly(ethylene-1-butene) polymer was synthesized from a hydrogenated anionic polymerized polybutadiene polymer. As hydrophilic block poly(ethylene oxide) was subsequently added also...... consisting of a bulk material compatible block and a hydrophilic block. To utilize the possibility of incorporating diblock copolymers into ethylenenorbornene copolymers, we have in this work developed a model poly(ethylene-1-butene) polymer compatible with the commercial available ethylene...

  15. Fabrication of gold nanoparticle arrays by block copolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiao Ling

    2011-02-01

    Gold nanoparticle is one of the widely research objects in various fields including catalysis and biotechnology. Precise control of gold nanoparticles placement and their integration is essential to take full advantage of these unique properties for applications. An approach to self-assembling of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from reconstructed block copolymer was introduced. Highly ordered polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine)(PS-b-P2VP) micellar arrays were obtained by solvent annealing. Subsequent immersion of the films in a preferential solvent for P2VP caused a reorganization of the film to generate a porous structure upon drying. PEG-coated AuNPs were spin-coated onto this reconstruction PS-b-P2VP template. When such films were exposed to toluene vapor-which is non-selective solvent for PEO and P2VP, AuNPs were drawn into those porous to form ordered arrays. Gold nanospheres with size 12±1.8 nm were synthesized by reducing HAuCl 4 via sodium citrate. Gold nanorods (aspect ratio about 6) were prepared from seed-mediated surfactant capping wet chemical method and the aspect ratio is tunable by changing surfactant amount. PEG ligand is used to modify gold nanoparticle surface by removing the original surfactant (sodium citrate -gold nanospheres: CTAB-gold nanorods), which have affinity with certain block copolymer component. Once gold nanoparticle is modified with PEG thiol, they were spin coated onto PS-b-P2VP template, which was prepared by solvent annealing and surface reconstruction process. So gold nanoparticle array was fabricated by this self-assembling process. The same idea can be applied on other nanoparticles

  16. Degradable borate glass polyalkenoate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, L; Coughlan, A; Towler, M; Hall, M

    2014-04-01

    Glass polyalkenoate cements (GPCs) containing aluminum-free borate glasses having the general composition Ag2O-Na2O-CaO-SrO-ZnO-TiO2-B2O3 were evaluated in this work. An initial screening study of sixteen compositions was used to identify regions of glass formation and cement compositions with promising rheological properties. The results of the screening study were used to develop four model borate glass compositions for further study. A second round of rheological experiments was used to identify a preferred GPC formulation for each model glass composition. The model borate glasses containing higher levels of TiO2 (7.5 mol %) tended to have longer working times and shorter setting times. Dissolution behavior of the four model GPC formulations was evaluated by measuring ion release profiles as a function of time. All four GPC formulations showed evidence of incongruent dissolution behavior when considering the relative release profiles of sodium and boron, although the exact dissolution profile of the glass was presumably obscured by the polymeric cement matrix. Compression testing was undertaken to evaluate cement strength over time during immersion in water. The cements containing the borate glass with 7.5 mol % TiO2 had the highest initial compressive strength, ranging between 20 and 30 MPa. No beneficial aging effect was observed-instead, the strength of all four model GPC formulations was found to degrade with time.

  17. Morphologies of poly(cyclohexadiene) diblock copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajeev [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Sides, Scott [ORNL; Goswami, Monojoy [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos [University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Russell, Thomas P [ORNL; Gido, Samuel [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Tsoukatos, Thodoris [University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Beyer, Fredrick [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD

    2012-01-01

    Concerted experimental and theoretical investigations have been carried out to understand the micro-phase separation in diblock copolymer melts containing poly (1,3-cyclohexadiene), PCHD, as one of the constituents. In particular, we have studied diblock copolymer melts containing polystyrene (PS), polybutadiene (PB), and polyisoprene (PI) as the second block. We have systematically varied the ratio of 1,2- /1,4-microstructures of poly (1,3-cyclohexadiene) to tune the conformational asymmetry between the two blocks and characterized the effects of these changes on the morphologies using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our experimental investigations reveal that the melts of PCHD-b-PB, PCHD-b-PS and PCHD-b-PI containing nearly equal fractions of each component and high percentage of 1,4-microstructures in the PCHD block form cylindrical rather than lamellar morphologies as expected in symmetric diblock copolymers. In contrast, the morphologies of PCHD-b-PB, PCHD-b-PS and PCHD-b-PI containing PCHD block with higher 1,2-microstructure are found to be disordered at 110 C. The change in the morphological behavior is in good agreement with our numerical calculations using the random phase approximation and self-consistent field theory for conformationally asymmetric diblock copolymer melts. Also, the effects of composition fluctuations are studied by extending the Brazovskii-Leibler-Fredrickson-Helfand (J. Chem. Phys. 87, 697 (1987)) theory to conformationally asymmetric diblock copolymer melts. These results allow the understanding of the underlying self-assembly process that highlights the importance of the conformational asymmetry in tuning the morphologies in block copolymers.

  18. Radwaste solidification system (cement)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-04-01

    The radwaste solidification system described herein is designed to package and solidify radioactive waste material produced at nuclear power plants using cement solidification agents, and is referred to as RSS(C). This integrated system consists of all the equipment necessary to store and transfer solidification agents and additives, collect and transfer process waste in the form of solids, liquids, slurries, and sludges, and continuously mix these materials under controlled conditions prior to letdown into a disposable container. As an integrated system, the RSS(C) also includes the process instrumentation necessary to monitor all process conditions throughout the radwaste packaging cycle and provides the operator with the controls necessary to operate the system in a variety of packaging modes. A single process train which is considered adequate for PWR's is described. A dual process train with crossover capability and two separate filling stations is recommended for most BWR applications. A general description of the solidification process by system configuration and subsystem and detailed equipment descriptions including process equipment data sheets are presented. Equipment listings are also presented. A narrative discussion of the operating procedures for processing a variety of radwaste types normally produced in BWR's and PWR's is presented. A safety analysis is presented, and a detailed discussion of system maintenance requirements and the estimated radiation exposure incident to maintenance is presented. The results of laboratory and prototype testing conducted by Hitman Nuclear and Development Corp. (HNDC) to establish the process parameters required to achieve a satisfactory solidified product are given. A summary of the engineering and quality verification requirements implemented through the HNDC Quality Assurance Program is presented

  19. Performance of Polymer Modified Mortar with Different Dosage of Polymeric Modifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesan Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer modified mortar system is defined as hydraulic cement combined at the time of mixing with organic polymers that are dispersed or re-dispersed in water, with or without aggregates. The compressive strength and flexural strength of polymer modified mortar obtained at early age are low and it required prolong curing period for the strength enhancement. In order to enhance the mechanical properties of cementitious mixture as well as its durability, hybridization of polymeric modifiers are applied into cementitious mixture specimens. Thus, this study is intended to examine the mechanical properties of hybrid polymer modified mortar system at various levels of polymeric modifier dosage; styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR latex and epoxy resin. Laboratory tests for density, compressive strength and flexural strength were carried out to determine the strength of hybrid polymer modified mortar. In this study, the hybrid polymer of SBR latex with epoxy resin gives discontented results compared to unmodified cement system. The results of density, compressive strength and flexural strength of hybrid polymer modified cement system had shown negative outcomes and did not make any improvement to cement system.

  20. Co-polymer Films for Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Homer, Margie L. (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Pin S. (Inventor); Kisor, Adam (Inventor); Jewell, April D. (Inventor); Shevade, Abhijit V. (Inventor); Manatt, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Taylor, Charles (Inventor); Blanco, Mario (Inventor); Goddard, William A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Embodiments include a sensor comprising a co-polymer, the co-polymer comprising a first monomer and a second monomer. For some embodiments, the first monomer is poly-4-vinyl pyridine, and the second monomer is poly-4-vinyl pyridinium propylamine chloride. For some embodiments, the first monomer is polystyrene and the second monomer is poly-2-vinyl pyridinium propylamine chloride. For some embodiments, the first monomer is poly-4-vinyl pyridine, and the second monomer is poly-4-vinyl pyridinium benzylamine chloride. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  1. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Pilo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC. Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa. The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns.

  2. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilo, Raphael; Harel, Noga; Nissan, Joseph; Levartovsky, Shifra

    2016-03-25

    The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC)). Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa) were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa). The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns.

  3. Dynamics of Block Copolymer Nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochrie, Simon G. J.

    2014-09-09

    A detailed study of the dynamics of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles suspended in polystyrene homopolymer matrices was carried out using X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy for temperatures between 120 and 180 °C. For low molecular weight polystyrene homopolymers, the observed dynamics show a crossover from diffusive to hyper-diffusive behavior with decreasing temperatures. For higher molecular weight polystyrene, the nanoparticle dynamics appear hyper-diffusive at all temperatures studied. The relaxation time and characteristic velocity determined from the measured hyper-diffusive dynamics reveal that the activation energy and underlying forces determined are on the order of 2.14 × 10-19 J and 87 pN, respectively. We also carried out a detailed X-ray scattering study of the static and dynamic behavior of a styrene– isoprene diblock copolymer melt with a styrene volume fraction of 0.3468. At 115 and 120 °C, we observe splitting of the principal Bragg peak, which we attribute to phase coexistence of hexagonal cylindrical and cubic double- gyroid structure. In the disordered phase, above 130 °C, we have characterized the dynamics of composition fluctuations via X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Near the peak of the static structure factor, these fluctuations show stretched-exponential relaxations, characterized by a stretching exponent of about 0.36 for a range of temperatures immediately above the MST. The corresponding characteristic relaxation times vary exponentially with temperature, changing by a factor of 2 for each 2 °C change in temperature. At low wavevectors, the measured relaxations are diffusive with relaxation times that change by a factor of 2 for each 8 °C change in temperature.

  4. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-461 (Third Review)] Gray Portland Cement... duty order on gray Portland cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to... the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4281 (December 2011), entitled Gray Portland Cement...

  5. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  6. Composite materials based on modified epoxy resin and carbon fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalez, Viviane; Barcia, Fabio L.; Soares, Bluma G.

    2006-01-01

    Epoxy resin networks have been modified with block copolymer of polybutadiene and bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (DGEBA)-based on epoxy resin. The epoxy resin modified with carboxyl-terminated polybutadiene presented improved impact resistance and outstanding mechanical performance in terms of flexural and tensile properties because of the presence of rubber particles homogeneously dispersed inside the epoxy matrix. This modified system also resulted in an improvement of mechanical properties o...

  7. Microwave based synthesis and spectral characterization of thermo-sensitive poly(N,N-diethylacrylamide) grafted pectin copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işıklan, Nuran; Tokmak, Şeyma

    2018-07-01

    The functionalization of polysaccharides with synthetic polymers has attracted great attention owing to its application in many industrial fields. The aim of this work was to study the impact of pectin functionalization with N,N-diethylacrylamide (DEAAm). Pectin was modified via microwave-induced graft copolymerization of DEAAm using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED). FTIR, 13 C NMR, DSC/TGA, XRD, and SEM techniques were used to verify the structure of graft copolymers. Various reaction conditions such as microwave irradiation time, temperature, microwave power, monomer, initiator, and TEMED concentrations were investigated to get a maximum grafting yield of 192%. Lower critical solution temperatures (LCST) of graft copolymers were determined by UV spectroscopy. Graft copolymers were found to be thermo-sensitive, with LCST of 31°C and high thermal resistance. Biocompatibility test of copolymers showed that copolymers were not cytotoxic to L929 fibroblasts cells and can be used as a biomaterial. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Graphene Nanoplatelet-Cement Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baomin; Jiang, Ruishuang; Wu, Zhenlin

    2016-11-04

    In this work, graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were dispersed uniformly in aqueous solution using methylcellulose (MC) as a dispersing agent via ultrasonic processing. Homogenous GNP suspensions were incorporated into the cement matrix to investigate the effect of GNPs on the mechanical behavior of cement paste. The optimum concentration ratio of GNPs to MC was confirmed as 1:7 by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), and the optical microscope and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images displayed remarkable dispersing performance. The GNP-cement composite exhibited better mechanical properties with the help of surface-modified GNPs. The flexural strength of cement paste increased up to 15%-24% with 0.05 wt % GNPs (by weight of cement). Meanwhile, the compressive strength of the GNP-cement composite increased up to 3%-8%. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal analysis (TG/DTG) demonstrated that the GNPs could accelerate the degree of hydration and increase the amount of hydration products, especially at an early age. Meanwhile, the lower porosity and finer pore size distribution of GNP-cement composite were detected by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). In addition, scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis showed the introduction of GNPs could impede the development of cracks and preserve the completeness of the matrix through the plicate morphology and tortuous behavior of GNPs.

  9. Investigation of the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Graphene Nanoplatelet-Cement Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baomin Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs were dispersed uniformly in aqueous solution using methylcellulose (MC as a dispersing agent via ultrasonic processing. Homogenous GNP suspensions were incorporated into the cement matrix to investigate the effect of GNPs on the mechanical behavior of cement paste. The optimum concentration ratio of GNPs to MC was confirmed as 1:7 by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis, and the optical microscope and transmission electron microscopy (TEM images displayed remarkable dispersing performance. The GNP–cement composite exhibited better mechanical properties with the help of surface-modified GNPs. The flexural strength of cement paste increased up to 15%–24% with 0.05 wt % GNPs (by weight of cement. Meanwhile, the compressive strength of the GNP–cement composite increased up to 3%–8%. The X-ray diffraction (XRD and thermal analysis (TG/DTG demonstrated that the GNPs could accelerate the degree of hydration and increase the amount of hydration products, especially at an early age. Meanwhile, the lower porosity and finer pore size distribution of GNP–cement composite were detected by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP. In addition, scanning electron microscope (SEM analysis showed the introduction of GNPs could impede the development of cracks and preserve the completeness of the matrix through the plicate morphology and tortuous behavior of GNPs.

  10. A mild alkali treated jute fibre controlling the hydration behaviour of greener cement paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Byung-Wan; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2015-01-16

    To reduce the antagonistic effect of jute fibre on the setting and hydration of jute reinforced cement, modified jute fibre reinforcement would be a unique approach. The present investigation deals with the effectiveness of mild alkali treated (0.5%) jute fibre on the setting and hydration behaviour of cement. Setting time measurement, hydration test and analytical characterizations of the hardened samples (viz., FTIR, XRD, DSC, TGA, and free lime estimation) were used to evaluate the effect of alkali treated jute fibre. From the hydration test, the time (t) required to reach maximum temperature for the hydration of control cement sample is estimated to be 860 min, whilst the time (t) is measured to be 1040 min for the hydration of a raw jute reinforced cement sample. However, the time (t) is estimated to be 1020 min for the hydration of an alkali treated jute reinforced cement sample. Additionally, from the analytical characterizations, it is determined that fibre-cement compatibility is increased and hydration delaying effect is minimized by using alkali treated jute fibre as fibre reinforcement. Based on the analyses, a model has been proposed to explain the setting and hydration behaviour of alkali treated jute fibre reinforced cement composite.

  11. Traction test of temporary dental cements

    OpenAIRE

    Román Rodríguez, Juan Luis; Millan Martínez, Diego; Fons Font, Antonio; Agustín Panadero, Rubén; Fernández Estevan, Lucía

    2017-01-01

    Background Classic self-curing temporary cements obstruct the translucence of provisional restorations. New dual-cure esthetic temporary cements need investigation and comparison with classic cements to ensure that they are equally retentive and provide adequate translucence. The objective is to analyze by means of traction testing in a in vitro study the retention of five temporary cements. Material and Methods Ten molars were prepared and ten provisional resin restorations were fabricated u...

  12. Synthesis and characterization of cement slurries additives with epoxy resins - kinetics, thermodynamic and calorimetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, A.M.G.; Andrade Junior, M.A.S.; Cestari, A.R.; Vieira, E.F.S.

    2010-01-01

    Cement has been used in the world, presenting a wide versatility. However, due to its chemical nature, it is subject to several types of chemical damages, especially for agents of acidic nature. With the purpose of increase its life-time, new cement slurries have been modified with the addition of specific additives. The objective of this work is to modify cement slurries with epoxy resins, which promote higher resistance of those materials in relation to acid attacks. Three cement slurries were synthesized with epoxy resins and a standard slurries, which was composed by cement and water. After 30 days of hydration, the samples were characterized by XDR, FTIR and thermal analysis (TG and DSC). The hydration processes of the cement slurries were studied by heat-conduction microcalorimetry. A kinetic study of HCl interaction with the new slurries were performed by the batch methodology at 25, 35, 45 e 55 deg C. It was verified that the addition of the polymers delayed the processes of hydration of the slurries, decreasing the flow of heat released as a function of the amount of added resin and, increased the resistance of those slurries to the acid attack. (author)

  13. Molecular Interaction Control in Diblock Copolymer Blends and Multiblock Copolymers with Opposite Phase Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junhan

    2014-03-01

    Here we show how to control molecular interactions via mixing AB and AC diblock copolymers, where one copolymer exhibits upper order-disorder transition and the other does lower disorder-order transition. Linear ABC triblock copolymers possessing both barotropic and baroplastic pairs are also taken into account. A recently developed random-phase approximation (RPA) theory and the self-consistent field theory (SCFT) for general compressible mixtures are used to analyze stability criteria and morphologies for the given systems. It is demonstrated that the copolymer systems can yield a variety of phase behaviors in their temperature and pressure dependence upon proper mixing conditions and compositions, which is caused by the delicate force fields generated in the systems. We acknowledge the financial support from National Research Foundation of Korea and Center for Photofunctional Energy Materials.

  14. A technique for the management of screw access opening in cement-retained implant restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kermanshah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abutment screw loosening has been considered as a common complication of implant-supported dental prostheses. This problem is more important in cement-retained implant restorations due to their invisible position of the screw access opening. Case Report: This report describes a modified retrievability method for cement-retained implant restorations in the event of abutment screw loosening. The screw access opening was marked with ceramic stain and its porcelain surface was treated using hydrofluoric acid (HF, silane, and adhesive to bond to composite resin. Discussion: The present modified technique facilitates screw access opening and improves the bond between the porcelain and composite resin.

  15. Cementation unit for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellamano, Jose Claudio; Vicente, Roberto; Lima, Jose Rodrigues de

    2001-01-01

    This communication describes the waste cementation process and facility developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN. The process is based on 200 litres batch operation, in drum mixing, with continuous cement feeding. The equipment is a single recoverable helicoidal mixer and a turning table that allows the drum to rotate during the mixing operation, simulating a planetary mixer. The facility was designed to treat contact handled liquids and wet solid wastes, but can be adapted for shielded equipment and remote operation. (author)

  16. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well

  17. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  18. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  19. Poly(carboxylate ether)-based superplasticizer achieves workability retention in calcium aluminate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Omid; Menceloglu, Yusuf Ziya; Akbulut, Ozge

    2017-01-01

    Calcium aluminate cement (CAC) suffers from loss of workability in less than an hour (~15 minutes) after first touch of water. Current superplasticizers that are utilized to modify the viscosity of cement admixtures are designed to target ordinary Portland cement (OPC). The high affinity between these superplasticizers and cement particles were found to be detrimental in CAC systems. Utilization of a monomer that, instead, facilitates gradual adsorption of a superplasticizer provides workability retention. For the first time in literature, we report a superplasticizer that caters to the properties of CAC such as high rate of surface development and surface charge. While neat CAC was almost unworkable after 1 hour, with the addition of only 0.4% of the optimized superplasticizer, 90% fluidity retention was achieved.

  20. Waste Mineral Powders as a Components of Polymer-Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworska B.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of the sustainable development elements in the construction industry leads to finding new ways of using waste minerals that are difficult in storage and recycling. Coal combustion products have been already introduced into building materials as a part of cement or concrete but they have been thought insufficiently compatible with the polymer-cement binders [7]. The paper presents results of the mechanical properties of polymer-cement composites containing two types of mineral additives: waste perlite powder that is generated during the perlite expanding process, and calcium fly ash which is the byproduct of burning coal in conventional furnaces. Mechanical tests of polymer-cement composites modified with wastes were carried out after 28 and 90 days of curing. As a part of preliminary study specific surface area and particle size distribution of mineral wastes were determined.

  1. Effect of Graphene Oxide (GO on the Morphology and Microstructure of Cement Hydration Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguo Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of graphene oxide (GO on the microstructure of cement mortars were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetric (TG, and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques. Cement mortar samples with different proportions of GO (0.02, 0.04, 0.06, and 0.08 wt % based on the weight of cement were prepared. The test results showed that GO affected the crystallization of cement hydration products, C–S–H (calcium silicate hydrate is the main hydrate product and CH (calcium hydroxide. The morphology of hydration products changed with the increase of GO content. Furthermore, the results of XRD analyses showed that the diffraction peak intensity and the crystal grain size of CH (001, (100, (101, and (102 for GO samples increased considerably compared with the control sample. Based on the results, it can be understood that GO can modify the crystal surface of CH, leading to the formation of larger crystals.

  2. Rice Husk Ash Cement – An alternative pozzolana cement for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The engineering properties of the cement resulting from a mixture of OPC plus RHA and lime plus RHA were satisfactory with addition of up to 50% RHA. The RHA improved greatly the compressive strength of lime. The cost of producing RHA was considered in pricing the resulting binder and it showed that the use of RHA ...

  3. Lateral structuring and stability phenomena induced by block copolymers and core-shell nanogel particles at immiscible polymer/polymer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozen, Arif Omer

    changing boundary conditions as spherical holes develop. These studies reveal that in-plane interfacial nanostructures produced by block copolymers may not always provide stabilization of the bilayer; this behavior has been attributed to the interplay between copolymer micellization and copolymer segregation at the immiscible polymer interface. Lastly, we have investigated the dewetting behavior of PS/PMMA assemblies containing compositionally varied mixtures of mirrored copolymers, such as PS50-b-PMMA10/PS10- b-PMMA50 and PS50-b-PMMA 20/PS20-b-PMMA50. The dewetting rates of systems composed of copolymer mixtures lie between those of systems modified with the neat copolymers. This observation suggests that the dewetting behavior of the double layer with a copolymer mixture may be approximated satisfactorily by a linear rule of mixtures.

  4. Preparation of amphiphilic block copolymer containing triazene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The lower rate constant in film state (film = 1.3 × 10−3 s-1), shows that the higher mobility of polymeric chains in solution allow a more rapid orientation, favourable to the triazene bond cleavage. The capability of block copolymer to form micelles in aqueous environment and implicitly, its critical micelle concentration (CMC) ...

  5. Substrate tolerant direct block copolymer nanolithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Tao; Wang, Zhongli; Schulte, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Block copolymer (BC) self-assembly constitutes a powerful platform for nanolithography. However, there is a need for a general approach to BC lithography that critically considers all the steps from substrate preparation to the final pattern transfer. We present a procedure that significantly...... plasma treatment enables formation of the oxidized PDMS hard mask, PS block removal and polymer or graphene substrate patterning....

  6. CONJUGATED BLOCK-COPOLYMERS FOR ELECTROLUMINESCENT DIODES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilberer, A; Gill, R.E; Herrema, J.K; Malliaras, G.G; Wildeman, J.; Hadziioannou, G

    In this article we review results obtained in our laboratory on the design and study of new light-emitting polymers. We are interested in the synthesis and characterisation of block copolymers with regularly alternating conjugated and non conjugated sequences. The blocks giving rise to luminescence

  7. Chiral Block Copolymer Structures for Metamaterial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-27

    elt @rice.edu Institution : Rice University Mailing Address : Department of...information from the molecular level to the micro and macrodomain levels. This joint work3 was published in the Journal of the American Chemical...Chirality from Molecule to Phase in Self‐Assembled Chiral Block Copolymers,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, 134 (26), 10974 – 10986, (2012).

  8. Periodic titania nanostructures using block copolymer templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthamanipeta, Pavan S; Lou, Qin; Shipp, Devon A

    2011-01-25

    The deposition of periodic titania nanostructures, templated by a polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) block copolymer, is reported. When cast as a thin film (30-50 nm thick), the PS-b-P4VP forms a morphology that consists of P4VP cylinders that are orientated perpendicular to the substrate. The P4VP phase was lightly cross-linked by exposing the film to diiodobutane. When the block copolymer film was exposed to the sol-gel titania precursor, titanium(IV) bis(ammonium lactate) dihydroxide (TALH), titania was formed in the P4VP phase. The resulting titania structures were identical in size to the P4VP cylinders and only formed (under the deposition conditions used in this study) when the block copolymer film was present on the substrate, thus providing evidence that the block copolymer indeed acts as a template. The process works for both silicon and indium tin oxide substrates.

  9. 21 CFR 173.65 - Divinylbenzene copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Divinylbenzene copolymer. 173.65 Section 173.65 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... with food only of Types I, II, and VI-B (excluding carbonated beverages) described in table 1 of...

  10. Cyclic olefin copolymer-silica nanocomposites foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pegoretti, A.; Dorigato, A.; Biani, A.; Šlouf, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 8 (2016), s. 3907-3916 ISSN 0022-2461 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : cyclic olefin copolymer * nanocomposites * silica Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.599, year: 2016

  11. Silica reinforced triblock copolymer gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theunissen, E.; Overbergh, N.; Reynaers, H.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of silica and polymer coated silica particles as reinforcing agents on the structural and mechanical properties of polystyrene-poly(ethylene/butylene)-polystyrene (PS-PEB-PS) triblock gel has been investigated. Different types of chemically modified silica have been compared in order...

  12. Amphiphilic block copolymers as efficiency boosters in microemulsions a SANS investigation of the role of polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, H; Mihailescu, M; Monkenbusch, M; Gompper, G; Richter, D; Jakobs, B; Sottmann, T; Strey, R

    2002-01-01

    The effect of amphiphilic block copolymers on ternary microemulsions (water, oil and non-ionic surfactant) is investigated. Small amounts of PEP-PEO block copolymer lead to a dramatic expansion of the one-phase region where water and oil can be solubilized by the mediation of surfactant molecules. Small-angle neutron-scattering experiments employing a high-precision two-dimensional contrast-variation technique demonstrate that the polymer is distributed uniformly on the surfactant membrane, where it modifies the membrane curvature elasticity. Furthermore, a new approach to determine the bending rigidity of an amphiphilic membrane is proposed, which is precise enough to measure the logarithmic scale dependence of the bending rigidity and its universal prefactor in bicontinuous microemulsions. (orig.)

  13. Role of Synthetic and Dimensional Synthetic Organic Chemistry in Block Copolymer Micelle Nanosensor Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Pramod Kumar

    or comicellisation strategy. In this approach, the amphiphilic triblock copolymers synthesized by ATRP were further modified, and conjugated with targeting ligands and fluorophores. The co-micellisation of this functionalized amphiphilic triblock copolymers resulted in functionalized mixed micelle nanosensors. Post......-shellcorona micelle based ratiometric fluorescence pH nanosensor fabrications. Two synthetic strategies such as post micelle modification and mixed micellisation (co-micellisation) were employed for pH nanosensor synthesis. In the post micelle modification strategy, dimensional synthetic modifications on polymer...... synthesized with sensitivity ranges that were appropriate for pH measurements in living cells. The sensitivity ranges of the nanosensors were simply altered by changing the fluorophores conjugated to the shell region. Nanosensors having targeting capabilities were synthesized by mixed micellisation...

  14. Self-assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles and di-block copolymers: Magnetic micelles and vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecommandoux, S.; Sandre, O.; Checot, F.; Rodriguez-Hernandez, J.; Perzynski, R.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic nanocomposites are obtained by the self-assembly in water of polypeptide-based di-block copolymers polybutadiene-b-poly(glutamic acid) combined with hydrophobic γ-Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles. These hybrid supramolecular objects are either-(3D) spherical micelles filled with a hydrophobic ferrofluid at a concentration as high as 45 vol% or-hollow vesicles with a (2D) magnetic membrane. In this last case, the organic amphiphile copolymers are able to confine the hydrophobic nanoparticles within the thin layer of polybutadiene blocks. We probe these objects by atomic force microscopy, by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and by light scattering. Furthermore, anisotropic SANS data bring the experimental evidence of the capability to modify the shape of the mineralized membranes in response to a magnetic field intensity as low as 290 G

  15. Block copolymer self-assembly fundamentals and applications in formulation of nano-structured fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Biswajit

    Dispersions of nanoparticles in polymer matrices form hybrid materials that can exhibit superior structural and functional properties and find applications in e.g. thermo-plastics, electronics, polymer electrolytes, catalysis, paint formulations, and drug delivery. Control over the particle location and orientation in the polymeric matrices are essential in order to realize the enhanced mechanical, electrical, and optical properties of the nanohybrids. Block copolymers, composed of two or more different monomers, are promising for controlling particle location and orientation because of their ability to organize into ordered nanostructures. Fundamental questions pertaining to nanoparticle-polymer interfacial interactions remain open and formulate the objectives of our investigation. Particle-polymer enthalpic and entropic interactions control the nanoparticle dispersion in polymer matrices. Synthetic chemical methods for modifying the particle surface in order to control polymer-particle interactions are involved and large scale production is not possible. In the current approach, a physical method is employed to control polymer-particle interactions. The use of commercially available solvents is found to be effective in modifying particle-polymer interfacial interactions. The approach is applicable to a wide range of particle-polymer systems and can thereby enable large scale processing of polymer nanohybrids. The systems of silica nanoparticles dispersed in long-range or short-range self-assembled structures of aqueous poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymers (Pluronics) is considered here. The effect of various parameters such as the presence of organic solvents, pH, and particle size on the block copolymer organization and the ensuing particle-polymer interactions are investigated. Favorable surface interactions between the deprotonated silica nanoparticle and PEO-rich domain facilitate particle

  16. Crumb waste tire rubber surface modification by plasma polymerization of ethanol and its application on oil-well cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaowei, Cheng; Sheng, Huang; Xiaoyang, Guo; Wenhui, Duan

    2017-07-01

    Crumb waste tire rubber (WTR) was pretreated by oxygen low temperature plasma (LTP) and modified by LTP polymerization process of ethanol monomer to improve the adhesion property with oil-well cement matrix and the mechanical properties of cement. The surface properties of modified crumb WTR and the mechanical properties and structures of modified oil-well cement were investigated by means of contact angle measurement, dispersion test, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), mechanics performance tests, permeability test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was demonstrated that LTP treatment changed both the surface composition and roughness. The contact angle of pretreated crumb WTR dramatically fell from 122° to 34°, and sample with ethanol LPT polymer film decreased even further to 11°. The ATR-FTIR and XPS analysis results demonstrated that hydrophilic groups, such as -COOH, C-OH, and -CHO, were introduced on the WTR surface. The oxygen atomic percent increased from 8.11% to 14.50% and 24.83%. The mechanical properties, porosity and permeability of raw cement were compared to samples modified by untreated crumb WTR, pretreated crumb WTR and ethanol LTP polymerization treated crumb WTR. It was found that after 28 days, the compressive strength of the samples with the untreated crumb WTR decreased to 80% with respect to raw cement. The tensile strength and flexural strength also had a slight reduction compared with the raw cement. On the contrary, after 28 days, the tensile strength of cement modified by LTP polymerization treated WTR increased 11.03% and 13.36%, and the flexural strength increased 9.65% and 7.31%, respectively. A decrease in the compressive strength also occurred but was inconspicuous. A tight interface bonding for ethanol LTP polymerization treated WTR with cement matrix was observed via an SEM image.

  17. False set in aireated cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez, T.

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of aireation on the appearance or elimination of the false setting in industrial portland cements is studied by means of infrared spectroscopy.

    Se estudia por medio de la espectroscopia infrarroja la influencia de la aireación sobre la aparición o eliminación del fraguado, en cemento portland industriales.

  18. Polymer reinforcement of cement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, R.N.

    1979-01-01

    In the last couple of decades several cement- and concrete-based composites have come into prominence. Of these, cement-polymer composites, like cement-fibre composites, have been recognised as very promising, and considerable research and development on their properties, fabrication methods and application are in progress. Of the three types of concrete materials which incorporate polymers to form composites, polymer impregnated concrete forms a major development in which hardened concrete is impregnated with a liquid monomer which is subsequently polymerized to form a rigid polymer network in the pores of the parent material. In this first part of the extensive review of the polymer reinforcement of cement systems, the process technology of the various monomer impregnation techniques and the properties of the impregnated composite are assessed critically. It is shown that the high durability and superior performance of polymer impregnated concrete can provide an economic and competitive alternative in in situ strengthening, and in other areas where conventional concrete can only at best provide adequate performance. The review includes a section on radiation-induced polymerization. (author)

  19. Electrically conductive Portland cement concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    There is a need for an effective, simple-to-install secondary anode system for use in the cathodic protection of reinforced concrete bridge decks. In pursuit of such a system, carbon fibers and carbon black were incorporated in portland cement concre...

  20. Utilization of Network-Forming Block Copolymers and Ionomers in the Development of Novel Nanostructures and Responsive Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineart, Kenneth

    Network forming block copolymers, i.e. thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs), are one of the highest commodity forms of block copolymers due to their competitive elasticity and extendability as well as their ability to be melt and solution processed. TPEs owe many of their advantages to a combination of hard and soft blocks. The soft blocks, which must be covalently bound at both ends to hard blocks, connect adjacent hard domains resulting in physically cross-linked systems. Herein, simulations and theory are used to provide a molecular-level depiction of the evolution from diblock copolymers, which do not contain the ability to form physical cross-links, to network forming triblock copolymers. In addition, systems with high interblock incompatibility that are within the diblock-to-triblock transition (i.e. having high molecular asymmetry) are identified to form three component (ABC triblock copolymer) phases from copolymer containing only two chemically distinct blocks. Following this work, which emphasizes the fundamental principle of TPEs, the dissertation shifts focus to physically- and chemically-modified triblock and pentablock copolymer TPEs. Recent progress has sought to broaden TPEs to include properties that are above and beyond their inherent mechanical benefits, including responsiveness to external stimuli. The first examples presented here consist of TPEs prepared in combination with amorphous hydrocarbon additives to yield TPE gels (TPEGs). The resulting TPEGs, which maintain the beneficial processing properties of TPEs, are subsequently molded into 1- and 2-D arrays of microchannels that are filled with liquid metal. The final devices exhibit strain-sensitive electrical conductivity to at least 600% strain, have tunable compliance (ease of stretching), and are fully recyclable. The substitution of the amorphous hydrocarbon component for crystalline analogues with melting points combination of lamellar and hexagonally-pack cylinder nanostructures. These

  1. Copolymers based on N-acryloyl-L-leucine and urea methacrylate with pyridine moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buruiana Emil C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By using free radical polymerization of (N-methacryloyloxyethyl-N′-4-picolyl-urea (MAcPU and N-acryloyl-L-leucine (AcLeu, an optically active copolymer, poly[(N-methacryloyloxyethyl-N′-4-picolyl-urea-co-N-acryloyl-L-leucine], MAcPU-co-AcLeu (1.86:1 molar ratio was prepared and subsequently functionalized at the pyridine-N with (1R/S-(−/+-10-camphorsulfonic acid (R/S-CSA and at carboxyl group with (R-(+-α-ethylbenzylamine (R-EBA or trans-4-stilbene methanol (t-StM. The structures, chemical composition and chiroptical activity of the monomers and the copolymers were characterized by spectral analysis (FTIR, 1H (13C-NMR, 1H,1H-COSY, UV/vis, thermal methods (TGA, DSC, fluorescence spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography and specific rotation measurements. Influence of the optical activity of monomer and modifier on modified copolymers suggested a good correlation between the experimental data obtained (23[α]589=+12.5° for AcLeu and MAcPU-co-AcLeu, 23[α]589=0°+27.5° for (MAcPU-co-AcLeu-R/S-CSA, 23[α]589=+25° for (MAcPU-co-AcLeu-R-EBA, and 23[α]589 = 0° for (MAcPU-co-AcLeu-St. In addition, the photobehavior of the stilbene copolymer (MAcPU-co-AcLeu-St in film was investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy. The fluorescence quenching of the stilbene species in the presence of aliphatic/aromatic amine in DMF solution was evaluated, more efficiently being 4,4′−dipyridyl (detection limit: 7.2 x 10-6 mol/L.

  2. Cycloolefin effect in cycloolefin-(meth)acryl copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun Soon; Seo, Dong Chul; Lee, Chang Soo; Park, Sang Wok; Kim, Sang Jin; Shin, Dae Hyeon; Shin, Jin Bong; Park, Joo Hyun

    2008-11-01

    One of the most important factors in ArF resist development is a resin platform, which dominates a lot of parts of resist characteristics. It has been much changed in order to improve their physical properties such as resolution, pattern profile, etch resistance and line edge roughness. Through the low etch resistance in ArF initial (meth)acryl type copolymer and low transmittance in COMA type copolymer most researchers were interested in developing of (meth)acryl type copolymer again for ArF photoresist. On the other hand, we have studied various polymer platforms suitable ArF photoresist except for meth(acryl) type copolymer. As a result of this study we had developed ROMA type polymers and cycloolefin-(meth)acryl type copolymers. Among the polymers cycloolefin-(meth)acryl type copolymer has many attractions such as etch roughness, resist reflow which needs low glass transition temperature and solvent solubility. In this study, we intend to find out cycloolefin-(meth)acryl copolymer characteristics compared with (meth)acryl copolymer. And, we have tried to find out any differences between acrylate type copolymer and cycloolefin-(meth)acrylate type copolymer with various evaluation results. As a result of this study we are going to talk about the reason that the resist using acrylate type copolymer and cycloolefin-(meth)acryl type copolymer show good pattern profile while acrylate type copolymer show poor pattern profile. We also intend to explain the role of cycloolefin as a function of molecular weight variation and substitution ratio variation of cycloolefin in cycloolefin-(meth)acrylate resin.One of the most important factors in ArF resist development is a resin platform, which dominates a lot of parts of resist characteristics. It has been much changed in order to improve their physical properties such as resolution, pattern profile, etch resistance and line edge roughness. Through the low etch resistance in ArF initial (meth)acryl type copolymer and low

  3. The effect of temperature on compressive and tensile strengths of commonly used luting cements: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Suneel G; Sajjan, Mc Suresh; Patil, Rekha

    2015-02-01

    The luting cements must withstand masticatory and parafunctional stresses in the warm and wet oral environment. Mouth temperature and the temperature of the ingested foods may induce thermal variation and plastic deformation within the cements and might affect the strength properties. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of temperature on the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of two polycarboxylate, a conventional glass ionomer and a resin modified glass ionomer luting cements and, to compare the compressive strength and the diametral tensile strength of the selected luting cements at varying temperatures. In this study, standardized specimens were prepared. The temperature of the specimens was regulated prior to testing them using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Six specimens each were tested at 23°C, 37°C and 50°C for both the compressive and diametral tensile strengths, for all the luting cements. All the luting cements showed a marginal reduction in their compressive and diametral tensile strengths at raised temperatures. Fuji Plus was strongest in compression, followed by Fuji I > Poly F > Liv Carbo. Fuji Plus had the highest diametral tensile strength values, followed by Poly F = Fuji I = Liv Carbo, at all temperatures. An increase in the temperature caused no significant reduction in the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of the cements evaluated. The compressive strength of the luting cements differed significantly from one another at all temperatures. The diametral tensile strength of resin modified glass ionomers differed considerably from the other cements, whereas there was no significant difference between the other cements, at all the temperatures.

  4. Comparison of effect of desensitizing agents on the retention of crowns cemented with luting agents: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalandar, Sonune Shital; Pandharinath, Dange Shankar; Arun, Khalikar; Smita, Vaidya

    2012-08-01

    Many dentists use desensitizing agents to prevent hypersensitivity. This study compared and evaluated the effect of two desensitizing agents on the retention of cast crowns when cemented with various luting agents. Ninety freshly extracted human molars were prepared with flat occlusal surface, 6 degree taper and approximately 4 mm axial length. The prepared specimens were divided into 3 groups and each group is further divided into 3 subgroups. Desensitizing agents used were GC Tooth Mousse and GLUMA® desensitizer. Cementing agents used were zinc phosphate, glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cement. Individual crowns with loop were made from base metal alloy. Desensitizing agents were applied before cementation of crowns except for control group. Under tensional force the crowns were removed using an automated universal testing machine. Statistical analysis included one-way ANOVA followed by Turkey-Kramer post hoc test at a preset alpha of 0.05. Resin modified glass ionomer cement exhibited the highest retentive strength and all dentin treatments resulted in significantly different retentive values (In Kg.): GLUMA (49.02 ± 3.32) > Control (48.61 ± 3.54) > Tooth mousse (48.34 ± 2.94). Retentive strength for glass ionomer cement were GLUMA (41.14 ± 2.42) > Tooth mousse (40.32 ± 3.89) > Control (39.09 ± 2.80). For zinc phosphate cement the retentive strength were lowest GLUMA (27.92 ± 3.20) > Control (27.69 ± 3.39) > Tooth mousse (25.27 ± 4.60). The use of GLUMA® desensitizer has no effect on crown retention. GC Tooth Mousse does not affect the retentive ability of glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cement, but it decreases the retentive ability of zinc phosphate cement.

  5. INVESTIGATION OF RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF MODIFIED BITUMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erofeev Vladimir Trofimovich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available At the present time the most widely used type of road pavement is asphalt-concrete pavement produced on the basis of oil bitumen. One of the efficient ways to increase the quality and durability of asphalt-concrete pavement is modification of bitumen. Though Russian specialists still don’t have the global view of the ideal and real asphalt cement, the requirements to its quality and durability indicators in the composition of road structure haven’t yet formed. The authors present the investigation results of the properties of oil asphalt cement containing 0.5-2.0% of modifier “Olazol”. The physical, mechanical and rheological properties of the modified bitumen are determined. The dependences of the dynamic viscosity of the modified bitumen from the quantity of introduced modifier, shear rate and reheat temperature are analyzed.

  6. Optimization of compositions of multicomponent fine-grained fiber concretes modified at different scale levels.

    OpenAIRE

    NIZINA Tatyana Anatolevna,; SELYAEV Vladimir Pavlovich,; BALYKOV Artemy Sergeevich,; VOLODIN Vladimir Vladimirovich,; KOROVKIN Dmitry Igorevich,

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with perspectives of modification of cement composites at different scale levels (nano-, micro-, macro-). Main types of micro- and nanomodifiers used in modern concrete technology are presented. Advantages of fullerene particles applied in nanomodification of cement concretes have been shown. Use of complex modifiers based on dispersed fibers, mineral additives and nanoparticles is proposed. These are the basic components of the fiber fine-grained concretes: cement of class...

  7. Durability of cellulose-cement composites modified by polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Pimentel, Lia L.; Beraldo, Antonio L.; Savastano Júnior, Holmer

    2006-01-01

    A durabilidade de compósito biomassa vegetal-cimento é um dos fatores mais importantes para a colocação desse material no mercado consumidor. A utilização de polímeros em concreto e argamassa, com o objetivo de melhorar sua durabilidade, é cada vez mais freqüente. Este estudo visou à caracterização de propriedades físicas e mecânicas de compósito biomassa vegetal-cimento modificado com polímeros e a análise da durabilidade desse compósito. Foi testado um polímero de base acrílica em compósito...

  8. Synthesis of Portland cement and calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement for sustainable development and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Irvin Allen

    Portland cement concrete, the most widely used manufactured material in the world, is made primarily from water, mineral aggregates, and portland cement. The production of portland cement is energy intensive, accounting for 2% of primary energy consumption and 5% of industrial energy consumption globally. Moreover, portland cement manufacturing contributes significantly to greenhouse gases and accounts for 5% of the global CO2 emissions resulting from human activity. The primary objective of this research was to explore methods of reducing the environmental impact of cement production while maintaining or improving current performance standards. Two approaches were taken, (1) incorporation of waste materials in portland cement synthesis, and (2) optimization of an alternative environmental friendly binder, calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement. These approaches can lead to less energy consumption, less emission of CO2, and more reuse of industrial waste materials for cement manufacturing. In the portland cement part of the research, portland cement clinkers conforming to the compositional specifications in ASTM C 150 for Type I cement were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals with 0% to 40% fly ash and 0% to 60% slag incorporation (with 10% intervals), 72.5% limestone with 27.5% fly ash, and 65% limestone with 35% slag. The synthesized portland cements had similar early-age hydration behavior to commercial portland cement. However, waste materials significantly affected cement phase formation. The C3S--C2S ratio decreased with increasing amounts of waste materials incorporated. These differences could have implications on proportioning of raw materials for cement production when using waste materials. In the calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement part of the research, three calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement clinkers with a range of phase compositions were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals. The synthesized calcium sulfoaluminate

  9. The influence of silanized nano-SiO{sub 2} on the hydration of cement paste: NMR investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bede, A., E-mail: Andrea.Bede@phys.utcluj.ro; Pop, A.; Ardelean, I. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Physics and Chemistry, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Moldovan, M. [“Babes-Bolyai” University, “Raluca Ripan” Chemistry Research Institute, Department of Polymer Composites, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    It is known that by adding a small amount of nanoparticles to the cement-based materials a strong influence on the workability, strength and durability is obtained. These characteristics of the material are fundamentally determined by the hydration process taking place after mixing the cement grains with water. In the present study the influence introduced by the addition of nano-silica with silanized surfaces on the hydration process was investigated using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The cement samples were prepared using gray cement at a water-to-cement ratio of 0.4 and a 5% addition of nanosilica. The surface of the nanoparticles was modified using a coating of Silane A174. The cement pastes were monitored during their standard curing time of 28 days. It was established that, by using unmodified nanosilica particles, an acceleration of the hydration process takes place as compared with the pure cement paste. On the other side, by adding silanized nanoparticles, the dormancy stage significantly extends and the hydration process is slower. This slowing down process could enhance the mechanical strength of cement based materials as a result of a better compaction of the hydrated samples.

  10. Physico-Chemical Studies Involving Incorporation of Radioactive and Industrial Waste In Cement-Epoxy Resin Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayed, M.S.; Hafez, N.

    1999-01-01

    Cement and epoxy resin as chemical additives are proposed to incorporate different types of wastes. The study was extended to prepare different mixtures of cement and epoxy resin in presence of some toxic ions. The studied ions were Cd II, Ni II, Cu II, Fe III, Ce IV, 154+152 Eu, phenol and toluene. The physical, mechanical and leaching properties of the mixtures were studied. The thermal analysis and infrared spectra were also investigated. It was observed that all the studied properties of the epoxy modified cement as a disposal matrix was improved

  11. Crumb waste tire rubber surface modification by plasma polymerization of ethanol and its application on oil-well cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaowei, Cheng [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu (China); Sheng, Huang [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu (China); School of Oil and Natural Gas Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu (China); Xiaoyang, Guo, E-mail: guoxiaoyangswpi@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu (China); School of Oil and Natural Gas Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu (China); Wenhui, Duan, E-mail: wenhui.duan@monash.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Melbourne 3800 (Australia)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • The crumb waste tire rubber (WTR) was modified by plasma polymerization of ethanol. • Hydrophilic groups were introduced onto WTR surface and improved its hydrophilia. • The functionalized crumb WTR was applied in oil-well cement. • The mechanical properties of modified oil-well cement were intensively enhanced. - Abstract: Crumb waste tire rubber (WTR) was pretreated by oxygen low temperature plasma (LTP) and modified by LTP polymerization process of ethanol monomer to improve the adhesion property with oil-well cement matrix and the mechanical properties of cement. The surface properties of modified crumb WTR and the mechanical properties and structures of modified oil-well cement were investigated by means of contact angle measurement, dispersion test, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), mechanics performance tests, permeability test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was demonstrated that LTP treatment changed both the surface composition and roughness. The contact angle of pretreated crumb WTR dramatically fell from 122° to 34°, and sample with ethanol LPT polymer film decreased even further to 11°. The ATR-FTIR and XPS analysis results demonstrated that hydrophilic groups, such as –COOH, C–OH, and –CHO, were introduced on the WTR surface. The oxygen atomic percent increased from 8.11% to 14.50% and 24.83%. The mechanical properties, porosity and permeability of raw cement were compared to samples modified by untreated crumb WTR, pretreated crumb WTR and ethanol LTP polymerization treated crumb WTR. It was found that after 28 days, the compressive strength of the samples with the untreated crumb WTR decreased to 80% with respect to raw cement. The tensile strength and flexural strength also had a slight reduction compared with the raw cement. On the contrary, after 28 days, the tensile strength of cement modified by LTP polymerization

  12. Research of magnesium phosphosilicate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhu

    Magnesium phosphosilicate cement (MPSC) is a novel phosphate bonded cement, which consists mainly of magnesia, phosphate and silicate minerals. The traditional magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) usually composed by ammonium phosphate, and gaseous ammonia will emit during mixing and in service. There is no noxious ammonia released from MPSC, furthermore, it can recycle a large volume of the non-hazardous waste. The goal of this research is to investigate the composition, reaction products, reaction mechanism, microstructure, properties, durability and applications of the MPSC. MPSC sets rapidly and has high early strength. It reacts better with solid industrial waste when compared to Portland cement. Many solid industrial wastes, such as fly ash, steel slag, coal gangue, red coal gangue, red mud, barium-bearing slag, copper slag, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag, have been used as the main component (40% by weight) in MPSC. The research has found that these aluminosilicate (or ironsilicate, or calciumsilicate) minerals with an amorphous or glass structure can enhance the performance of MPSC. The disorganized internal structure of amorphous materials may make it possess higher reactivity compared to the crystalline phases. Chemical reaction between phosphate and these minerals may form an amorphous gel, which is favorable to the cementing. Borax, boric acid and sodium tripolyphosphate have been used as retardants in the MPSC system. It is found that boric acid has a higher retarding effect on the setting of cement, than borax does. However, sodium polyphosphate accelerates the reaction of MPSC. The hydration of MPSC is exothermic reaction. The heat evolution may prompt hydrates formation, and shorten the setting process. Modern materials characterization techniques, XRD, DSC, TG-DTA FTIR, XPS, MAS-NMR, SEM, TEM, MIP, etc. were used to analyze the phase composition, micro morphology, and microstructure of hardened MPSC. The main hydration product

  13. Modifications induced by adding natural zeolitic pozzolans to cement paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco-Varela, M. T.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic pozzolans owe their pozzolanic activity chiefly to the presence of vitreous or zeolitic material rich in SiO2, and Al20y compounds that react with the portlandite produced during cement hydration to generate amorphous gels with cementitious properties. The present study analyzes the modifications taking place in the composition, structure and micro structure of the hydra ted cement paste when 20% of the cement by weight is replaced by two finely ground zeolitic rocks from Cuban deposits. Hydrated cement pastes were prepared with a CEM I35 cement, as well as with mixes of the cement and two Cuban zeolitic rocks (20% by weight. After eight months of hydration, the pastes were characterized -mineralogically, chemically and microstructurally- with XRD, FTIR, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR, DTA/TG, back scattered electron microscopy and mercury porosimetry techniques. The replacement of 20% by weight of the cement with two finely ground zeolitic rocks significantly modified the composition, structure, quantity and microstructure of the hydrated cement paste reaction product. The C-S-H gel formed in these pastes differed in quantity, which was larger, and composition from the original cement gel. Moreover, the gel formed in addition-free cement had a higher Ca and a lower Al content and shorter silicate chains than the C-S-H product formed in the pastes made with zeolitic rocks. Finally, the pastes with pozzolan additions had fewer and smaller pores.

    La actividad de las puzolanas de origen volcánico procede fundamentalmente de la presencia de material vitreo o zeolítico rico en SiO2 y Al2Oy que son los que reaccionan con la portlandita producida en la hidratación del cemento generando geles amorfos con propiedades cementantes. El objetivo del presente trabajo es estudiar las modificaciones que produce la sustitución del 20% en peso de cemento por dos

  14. The comparison of properties and cost of material use of natural rubber and sand in manufacturing cement mortar for construction sub-base layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, R.; Nemmang, M. S.; Hazurina, Nor; Shahidan, S.; Khairul Tajuddin Jemain, Raden; Abdullah, M. E.; Hassan, M. F.

    2017-11-01

    The main issue related to this research was to examine the feasibility of natural rubber SMR 20 in the manufacturing of cement mortar for sub-base layer construction. Subbase layers have certain functions that need to be fulfilled in order to assure strong and adequate permeability of pavement performance. In a pavement structure, sub-base is below the base and serves as the foundation for the overall pavement structure, transmitting traffic loads to the sub-grade and providing drainage. Based on this research, the natural rubber, SMR 20 was with the percentages of 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% to mix with sand in the manufacture of the cement mortar. This research describes some of the properties and cost of the materials for the natural rubber and sand in cement mortar manufacturing by laboratory testing. Effects of the natural rubber replacement on mechanical properties of mortar were investigated by laboratory testing such as compressive strength test and density. This study obtained the 5% of natural rubber replaced in sand can achieved the strength of normal mortar after 7 days and 28 days. The strength of cement mortar depends on the density of cement mortar. According to the cost of both materials, sand shows the lower cost in material for the cement mortar manufacturing than the uses of natural rubber. Thus, the convectional cement mortar which used sand need lower cost than the modified rubber cement mortar and the most economical to apply in industrial. As conclusion, the percentage of 5% natural rubber in the cement mortar would have the same with normal cement mortar in terms of the strength. However, in terms of the cost of the construction, it will increase higher than cost of normal cement mortar production. So that, this modified cement mortar is not economical for the road sub-base construction.

  15. Predictors of excess cement and tissue response to fixed implant-supported dentures after cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsch, Michael; Robra, Bernt-Peter; Walther, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    The cementation of fixed implant-supported restorations involves the risk of excess cement remaining in the peri-implant tissue that may cause a peri-implant tissue response with attachment loss. The aim was to study the peri-implant tissue response after cementation and to detect potential predictors of excess cement. Clinical complications after cementation in several index cases led to a recall of all patients treated with a special methacrylate cement (one hundred five patients with one hundred eighty-eight implants) and systematic reevaluation of 71 patients (68%) with one hundred twenty-six implants (67%). In all cases, suprastructures including abutments were removed, and findings were documented. Implant diameter was significantly associated with the frequency of excess cement. Implant location or system had no significant effect. Excess cement in turn was associated with bleeding on probing, suppuration, and peri-implant attachment loss. In the absence of excess cement 58.8% of implants had no peri-implant attachment loss versus 37.3% when excess cement was present. With increasing retention time of the methacrylate cement, more peri-implant attachment loss was detected. However, the latter association was not significant. Larger diameters are significantly associated with excess cement in peri-implant tissue. Consequences of excess cement may be increased bleeding on probing, suppuration, and possibly peri-implant attachment loss. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Retention of gold alloy crowns cemented with traditional and resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, Lilliam M; Frey, Gary N; Winkler, Mark M; Tate, William H; Burgess, John O; Powers, John M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure in vitro retention of cast gold crowns cemented with traditional and resin cements. Forty-eight human molars were prepared on a lathe to produce complete crown preparations with a consistent taper and split into six groups, eight crowns in each group. Crowns were cast in a high-gold alloy and then cemented. After 24 hours, the retention force (N) was recorded and mean values were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the Fisher post-hoc least significant difference (PLSD) multiple comparisons test (a = .05). Failure sites were examined under 3100 magnification and recorded. Mean values (SD) for each group in increasing order of retention force were: Harvard Cement: 43 N (27), TempoCem: 59 N (16), PermaCem Dual: 130 N (42), RelyX Luting Cement: 279 N (26), Contax and PermaCem Dual: 286 N (38), and TempoCem with Contax and PermaCem Dual: 340 N (14). The Fisher PLSD interval (P = .05) for comparing cements was 29 N. Zinc-phosphate cement and provisional resin cements had the lowest retention forces. Resin cement with a bonding agent and the hybrid-ionomer cement had similar retention forces. Resin cement with a bonding agent applied after use of a provisional resin cement had a significantly higher retention force than the other cements tested.

  17. Retention of provisional crowns cemented with eight temporary cements: comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, Mariana Ribeiro de Moraes; Santiago, Luiz Carlos

    2004-09-01

    Many temporary cements are commercially available; therefore, it is necessary to indicate them for each clinical requirement with regard to the tensile strength of prosthetic retainers. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the retention of provisional crowns cemented with eight temporary cements, over full crown preparations with standardized mechanical principles as height, taper, and length. For that purpose, eighty human first premolars received full crown preparation with standardized height and taper. Provisional crowns were fabricated and luted with eight brands of temporary cements. Twenty four hours after cementation, the restorations were submitted to tensile strength test in a universal testing machine and the data submitted to ANOVA and Bonferroni tests. Mean tensile strength values ranged from 20.1N for Nogenol cement to 67.5N for Hydro C cement. Statistically significant difference (pcrowns cemented with Hydro C cement were more retentive that than those cemented with the other cements, except for Rely X Temp and Temp Bond. The less retentive crowns were those cemented with Nogenol and Freegenol temporary cements.

  18. Synthesis and photooxidation of styrene copolymer bearing camphorquinone pendant groups

    OpenAIRE

    Branislav Husár; Norbert Moszner; Ivan Lukáč

    2012-01-01

    (±)-10-Methacryloyloxycamphorquinone (MCQ) was synthesized from (±)-10-camphorsulfonic acid either by a known seven-step synthetic route or by a novel, shorter five-step synthetic route. MCQ was copolymerized with styrene (S) and the photochemical behavior of the copolymer MCQ/S was compared with that of a formerly studied copolymer of styrene with monomers containing the benzil (BZ) moiety (another 1,2-dicarbonyl). Irradiation (λ > 380 nm) of aerated films of styrene copolymer...

  19. Evaluation of the Performance of Local Cements with Imported Class

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Portland cement is the most commonly used cement in the oil and gas industry and it accounts for about 99% of all primary cementing operations throughout the world. For Portland cement to qualify as oil well cement, the chemical and physical properties must meet the required standards of the American Petroleum Institute ...

  20. Hybrid, Nanoscale Phospholipid/Block Copolymer Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liedberg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles, in which the polymeric membrane is blended with phospholipids, display interesting self-assembly behavior, incorporating the robustness and chemical versatility of polymersomes with the softness and biocompatibility of liposomes. Such structures can be conveniently characterized by preparing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs via electroformation. Here, we are interested in exploring the self-assembly and properties of the analogous nanoscale hybrid vesicles (ca. 100 nm in diameter of the same composition prepared by film-hydration and extrusion. We show that the self-assembly and content-release behavior of nanoscale polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide (PB-PEO/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles can be tuned by the mixing ratio of the amphiphiles. In brief, these hybrids may provide alternative tools for drug delivery purposes and molecular imaging/sensing applications and clearly open up new avenues for further investigation.

  1. Rapid ordering of block copolymer thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Pawel W; Yager, Kevin G

    2016-10-12

    Block-copolymers self-assemble into diverse morphologies, where nanoscale order can be finely tuned via block architecture and processing conditions. However, the ultimate usage of these materials in real-world applications may be hampered by the extremely long thermal annealing times-hours or days-required to achieve good order. Here, we provide an overview of the fundamentals of block-copolymer self-assembly kinetics, and review the techniques that have been demonstrated to influence, and enhance, these ordering kinetics. We discuss the inherent tradeoffs between oven annealing, solvent annealing, microwave annealing, zone annealing, and other directed self-assembly methods; including an assessment of spatial and temporal characteristics. We also review both real-space and reciprocal-space analysis techniques for quantifying order in these systems.

  2. Nanostructured Polysulfone-Based Block Copolymer Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Yihui

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work is to fabricate nanostructured membranes from polysulfone-based block copolymers through self-assembly and non-solvent induced phase separation. Block copolymers containing polysulfone are novel materials for this purpose providing better mechanical and thermal stability to membranes than polystyrene-based copolymers, which have been exclusively used now. Firstly, we synthesized a triblock copolymer, poly(tert-butyl acrylate)-b-polsulfone-b-poly(tert-butyl acrylate) through polycondensation and reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. The obtained membrane has a highly porous interconnected skin layer composed of elongated micelles with a flower-like arrangement, on top of the graded finger-like macrovoids. Membrane surface hydrolysis was carried out in a combination with metal complexation to obtain metal-chelated membranes. The copper-containing membrane showed improved antibacterial capability. Secondly, a poly(acrylic acid)-b-polysulfone-b-poly(acrylic acid) triblock copolymer obtained by hydrolyzing poly(tert-butyl acrylate)-b-polsulfone-b-poly(tert-butyl acrylate) formed a thin film with cylindrical poly(acrylic acid) microdomains in polysulfone matrix through thermal annealing. A phase inversion membrane was prepared from the same polymer via self-assembly and chelation-assisted non-solvent induced phase separation. The spherical micelles pre-formed in a selective solvent mixture packed into an ordered lattice in aid of metal-poly(acrylic acid) complexation. The space between micelles was filled with poly(acrylic acid)-metal complexes acting as potential water channels. The silver0 nanoparticle-decorated membrane was obtained by surface reduction, having three distinct layers with different particle sizes. Other amphiphilic copolymers containing polysulfone and water-soluble segments such as poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) were also synthesized through coupling reaction and copper0-mediated

  3. Phase-Segregated Dendrigraft Copolymer Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena-Eugenia Sanchez Cadena

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendrigraft polymers have a multi-level branched architecture resulting from the covalent assembly of macromolecular building blocks. Most of these materials are obtained in divergent (core-first synthetic procedures whereby the molecule grows outwards in successive grafting reactions or generations. Two main types of dendrigraft polymers can be identified depending on the distribution of reactive sites over the grafting substrate: Arborescent polymers have a large and variable number of more or less uniformly distributed sites, while dendrimer-like star polymers have a lower but well-defined number of grafting sites strictly located at the ends of the substrate chains. An overview of the synthesis and the characterization of dendrigraft copolymers with phase-segregated morphologies is provided in this review for both dendrigraft polymer families. The tethering of side-chains with a different composition onto branched substrates confers unusual physical properties to these copolymers, which are highlighted through selected examples.

  4. Ethylene copolymers analysis by fractionation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escher, Fernanda F.N.; Silva, Luciana P.; Galland, Griselda B.

    2000-01-01

    Samples of ethylene 1-butene copolymer,produced in laboratory by different processes using Ziegler-Natta catalysts, ethylene-1-hexene and metallocenes catalysts were fractionated according to molecular size by direct extraction by different solvents and at different temperatures. These samples were also fractionated by differences on crystallinity using a DSC calorimeter. The obtained fractions were characterized by 13 C-NMR, FTIR, GPC and DSC. The polyethylene copolymers produced by Ziegler-Natta catalyst were found more heterogeneous when compared with the one produced by metallocenes catalysts. The commercial resin produced by UCC process with Ziegler-Natta catalysts showed a more homogeneous incorporation of comonomer compared with the one obtained by the Spherilene process. The supported metallocenes catalyst gave a more homogeneous product than the homogeneous metallocene one. (author)

  5. A Cationic Smart Copolymer for DNA Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Ribeiro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A new block copolymer with a temperature-responsive block and a cationic block was prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization, with good control of its size and composition. The first block is composed by di(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (DEGMA and oligo(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA, with the ratio DEGMA/OEGMA being used to choose the volume phase transition temperature of the polymer in water, tunable from ca. 25 to above 90 °C. The second block, of trimethyl-2-methacroyloxyethylammonium chloride (TMEC, is positively charged at physiological pH values and is used for DNA binding. The coacervate complexes between the block copolymer and a model single strand DNA are characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. The new materials offer good prospects for biomedical application, for example in controlled gene delivery.

  6. Use sulfoferritic cements in construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samchenko, Svetlana V.; Zorin, Dmitriy A.

    2018-03-01

    Currently, high-rise construction has received increasing attention around the world. In the big cities under construction is less space and one solution is the high-rise construction. However, high-rise buildings use special requirements, such as strength, thermal insulation, wind load and others. When concrete is exposed to continuous loads by wind or to mechanical loads, it undergoes abrasion. Resistance to this process depends on the characteristics of materials that the concrete and finishing seams are made of. Research on increasing impact and abrasion resistance of calcium sulfoferrite-based cement stone from the perspective of formation of cement stone structure will be instrumental in developing durable materials for application in high-rise construction.

  7. [Preparation of leucine-methyl glutamate-glutamic acid copolymers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, S; Shi, F; Huang, L; Zhou, Q; Lin, Z; Yi, W

    1997-06-01

    The method for preparing leucine-methyl glutamate-glutamic acid copolymer was studied. In the first place benzyl glutamate and methyl glutamate were synthesized respectively. Then N-carboxy anhydrides (NCA) of leucine, benzyl glutamate or methyl glutamate were prepared in a closed container by phosgene-toluene solution method. After copolymerization the copolymers were debenzylated and demethylated by anhydrous hydrogen bromide. The free carboxyl group mole content in side chains of the copolymer was controlled by various standing periods following bubbling HBr. Analysis of infrared spectrogram and ultraviolet asorbance of copolymers indicated that this procedure resulted in the loss of almost all benzyl groups and some methyl groups.

  8. ROTARY SCREW SYSTEMS IN CEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Taratuta V. D.; Belokur K. A.; Serga G. V.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results of research of rotary-screw systems in relation to the creation of rotary kilns for the annealing of-cuttings in the preparation of cement clinker. Using the proposed design, in comparison with known designs of similar purpose, it significantly improves performance, reduces size and power consumption through the use of rotary screw systems in the form of screw rotors and drums made hollow with sidewalls assembled from separate strips or plates of different geometr...

  9. Initial acidity of dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, D; Evje, D M

    1984-04-01

    The acidity in aqueous solutions following release of acid components from glass ionomer, silicate, zinc phosphate and zinc polycarboxylate cements has been registered by pH measurements. One brand of each type was studied. Initial setting was accomplished at two different temperatures; 23 degrees C and in the interval from 23 degrees C to about 60 degrees C. In the latter case external heat was transferred to the samples by infrared radiation for a period of 2 min. The highest acidity was associated with the silicate specimen, while the lowest acidity was recorded for the zinc polycarboxylate specimen. Exposure to infrared radiation resulted in a reduced acidity for all types of cements. The effect of infrared exposure was most pronounced for the silicate specimens, resulting in a reduction of acid release by a factor of about 10 compared to the nontreated samples. The resistance to acid release was found to be improved by a factor of about 5 for the glass ionomer and about 3 for the zinc phosphate cement treated in a similar way. Clinically, it seems possible considerably to reduce the risk of pulpal injuries associated with the insertion of silicate restorations by using a moderate infrared radiation treatment. Furthermore, the susceptibility of glass ionomer cements to a high initial erosion should be reduced by the use of such a technique. After exposure of the glass ionomer and silicate specimens to infrared radiation at the temperature interval applied, the samples had a more glossy, tooth-like appearance compared to the nonexposed samples, improving the aesthetic properties.

  10. Morphology of diblock copolymers in porous media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maniadis, Panagiotis; Tsimpanogiannis, I. N.; Kober, E.M.; Lookman, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 17 (2014), s. 2297-2309 ISSN 0026-8976 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0214 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : confinement * diblock copolymers * porous media * self-assembly * self-consistent field theory Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.720, year: 2014

  11. SANS study of coated block copolymer micelles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pleštil, Josef; Kříž, Jaroslav; Koňák, Čestmír; Pospíšil, Herman; Kadlec, Petr; Sedláková, Zdeňka; Grillo, I.; Cubitt, R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 206, č. 12 (2005), s. 1206-1215 ISSN 1022-1352 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/0600; GA AV ČR IAA1050201; GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : block copolymer micelles * core-shell polymers * nanoparticles Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.111, year: 2005

  12. Linear optical absorption response of poly(vinylidene fluoride - trifluoroethylene) copolymers to high gamma dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Adriana S.

    2009-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) [PVDF] is a semicrystalline linear homopolymer composed by the repetition of CH 2 - CF 2 monomers. The Poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] is a copolymer which is obtained with the random introduction of fluorinated CHF-CF 2 monomers in the PVDF main chain. PVDF, and also its copolymers with TrFE contents ranging from 18 to 63 wt. %, have long been studied for their striking ferroelectric properties and their applications in actuators, transducers and ferroelectric memory. Recent research work around the world have demonstrated that, for TrFE contents ranging from with 30 to 50 wt. %, the copolymer can have its ferroelectric properties modified by high doses of ionizing radiation, with the appearing of radio-induced relaxor ferroelectric features. These studies have lead us to investigate the possible use of these copolymers as high dose dosemeters, once the reported amount of induced C=C conjugated bonds after X-ray, UV and gamma irradiation seems to be a function of the delivered radiation dose. In a first investigation for doses ranging from 0.1 to 100 kGy we found out a linear relation between the gamma radiation dose and the absorption peak intensities in the UV region of the spectrum, i.e., at 223 and 274 nm. The absorption peak at 223 nm is the most sensitive to gamma rays and can be used for detecting gamma doses ranging from 0.3 to 75 kGy. Simultaneously, the absorption peak at 274 nm can be used for doses ranging from 1 to 100 kGy. Now, in the present work, we extended the investigation to gamma doses up to 3 MGy. Particularly, this study is focused in the optical absorption peak at 274 nm, corresponding to the radio-induction of triplets of conjugated C=C double bonds. The investigation revealed a linear correlation between the gamma dose and peak intensity at 274 nm for gamma doses ranging from 0.1 to more than 750 KGy, with a huge extension of the original usable dose range. Calorimetric data revealed a

  13. Merging Bottom-Up with Top-Down: Continuous Lamellar Networks and Block Copolymer Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ian Patrick

    Block copolymer lithography is an emerging nanopatterning technology with capabilities that may complement and eventually replace those provided by existing optical lithography techniques. This bottom-up process relies on the parallel self-assembly of macromolecules composed of covalently linked, chemically distinct blocks to generate periodic nanostructures. Among the myriad potential morphologies, lamellar structures formed by diblock copolymers with symmetric volume fractions have attracted the most interest as a patterning tool. When confined to thin films and directed to assemble with interfaces perpendicular to the substrate, two-dimensional domains are formed between the free surface and the substrate, and selective removal of a single block creates a nanostructured polymeric template. The substrate exposed between the polymeric features can subsequently be modified through standard top-down microfabrication processes to generate novel nanostructured materials. Despite tremendous progress in our understanding of block copolymer self-assembly, continuous two-dimensional materials have not yet been fabricated via this robust technique, which may enable nanostructured material combinations that cannot be fabricated through bottom-up methods. This thesis aims to study the effects of block copolymer composition and processing on the lamellar network morphology of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) and utilize this knowledge to fabricate continuous two-dimensional materials through top-down methods. First, block copolymer composition was varied through homopolymer blending to explore the physical phenomena surrounding lamellar network continuity. After establishing a framework for tuning the continuity, the effects of various processing parameters were explored to engineer the network connectivity via defect annihilation processes. Precisely controlling the connectivity and continuity of lamellar networks through defect engineering and

  14. Rheological Design of Sustainable Block Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Alexander M.

    Block copolymers are extremely versatile materials that microphase separate to give rise to a rich array of complex behavior, making them the ideal platform for the development of rheologically sophisticated soft matter. In line with growing environmental concerns of conventional plastics from petroleum feedstocks, this work focuses on the rheological design of sustainable block copolymers--those derived from renewable sources and are degradable--based on poly(lactide). Although commercially viable, poly(lactide) has a number of inherent deficiencies that result in a host of challenges that require both creative and practical solutions that are cost-effective and amenable to large-scale production. Specifically, this dissertation looks at applications in which both shear and extensional rheology dictate performance attributes, namely chewing gum, pressure-sensitive adhesives, and polymers for blown film extrusion. Structure-property relationships in the context of block polymer architecture, polymer composition, morphology, and branching are explored in depth. The basic principles and fundamental findings presented in this thesis are applicable to a broader range of substances that incorporate block copolymers for which rheology plays a pivotal role.

  15. Natural cement as the precursor of Portland cement: Methodology for its identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varas, M.J.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2005-01-01

    When cements appeared in the 19th century, they took the place of traditional binding materials (lime, gypsum, and hydraulic lime) which had been used until that time. Early cements can be divided into two groups, natural and artificial (Portland) cements. Natural cements were introduced first, but their widespread usage was short-lived as they were quickly replaced by artificial cements (Portland), still the most important and predominant today. The main differences between natural and artificial cements arise during the manufacturing process. The final properties of the cements are greatly influenced by differences in the raw materials and burning temperatures employed. The aim of this paper is to assess the efficiency of traditional analytical techniques (petrographic microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)) used to differentiate natural and artificial cements

  16. Use of Incineration Solid Waste Bottom Ash as Cement Mixture in Cement Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, N. H.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Jin, T. S.; Kadir, A. A.; Tugui, C. A.; Sandu, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    Incineration solid waste bottom ash was use to examine the suitability as a substitution in cement production. This study enveloped an innovative technology option for designing new equivalent cement that contains incineration solid waste bottom ash. The compressive strength of the samples was determined at 7, 14, 28 and 90 days. The result was compared to control cement with cement mixture containing incineration waste bottom ash where the result proved that bottom ash cement mixture able achieve its equivalent performance compared to control cement which meeting the requirement of the standards according to EN 196-1. The pozzolanic activity index of bottom ash cement mixture reached 0.92 at 28 days and 0.95 at 90 and this values can be concluded as a pozzolanic material with positive pozzolanic activity. Calcium hydroxide in Portland cement decreasing with the increasing replacement of bottom ash where the reaction occur between Ca(OH)2 and active SiO2.

  17. Mesoporous Silica Formation by Block Copolymers and Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide as Structure Control Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ali Semsarzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Block copolymers and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide were used as templates in nano silica structure formation like MCM-41Mobil Composition of Matter, SBA16 Santa Barbara Amorphous and a new compound namely SPB  silicone mesoporous particles, prepared by sol-gel method using PPG-PEG-PPG block copolymer to compare the porosity and regularity of the products together. In this work tetraethylorthosilicate  TEOS, as silica source and alcohol as surface modifying agent were used because of having the main advantage, compared to an ionic template such as etyltrimethylammonium bromide, in producing larger pores  and thicker walls for holding larger catalytic molecules in their pores or increasing  their resistance towards fragmentation. In order to study the copolymer as a template,  SPB structure was prepared and compared with SBA16 which was found to have  broader  pore-size  distribution  and  smaller  specifc  surface  area.  Using  alcohol  in particle production resulted in higher formation rate of micelles with improved  morphology. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction and electron scanning  microscopy confrmed the mesoporous structure and regularity of these synthesized  materials. Finally a mechanism is proposed for the formation of these structures.

  18. Block copolymer micelles with near infrared metal phthalocyanine dyes for laser induced writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Himadri; Yoon, Bokyung; Park, Youn Jung; Bae, Insung; Park, Cheolmin

    2010-06-16

    A route has been developed to disperse metal-containing phthalocyanine dyes in a non-polar medium based on amphiphilic block copolymer micelles of poly[styrene-block-(4-vinylpyridine)] (PS-b-P4VP) and poly[styrene-block-(acrylic acid)] (PS-b-PAA) copolymers. Polar P4VP and PAA efficiently encapsulate cobalt(II), manganese(II), and nickel(II) phthalocyanine dyes by axial coordination of nitrogen and µ-oxo bridged dimerization with the transition metals, respectively. Good dispersion of the dyes is confirmed by the linear enhancement of Q-bands in UV-vis absorption spectra with dye concentration. A thin monolayered PS-b-P4VP micelle film that contained a nickel(II) phthalocyanine dye which efficiently adsorbs a laser beam on a localized area to generate a local heat higher than the glass transition temperatures of both blocks. One-dimensional laser writing on the dye-containing film allows the fabrication of a few submicrometer wide line patterns in which the self-assembled nanostructure of the block copolymer is modified by the directional heat arising from laser scanning. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Star-Shaped Block Copolymer sPCL-b-PEG-GA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared to linear polymers with the same molecular weight, star-shaped polymers have the superiority of drug loading and delivery. The glycyrrhetinic acid (GA from licorice is remarkably characteristic of liver distribution and liver cells targetability. In this paper, four-armed star-shaped polycaprolactone was synthesized and amino polyethylene glycol was modified by glycyrrhetinic acid (NH2-PEG-GA. Then the condensation reaction between the two above polymers finally produced four-armed star-shaped poly(ethylene glycol-b-poly(ε-caprolactone block copolymer (sPCL-b-PEG-GA. The structures of the intermediates and product were characterized by 1H NMR. The results indicated that the structure and molecular weight of sPCL-b-PEG-GA can be controlled by the varied ratios of pentaerythritol (PTOL to ε-caprolactone (ε-CL in the presence of stannous octoate (Sn(Oct2, and the amphiphilic copolymer sPCL-b-PEG-GA consists of PTOL as core, PCL as inner hydrophobic segments, PEG as external hydrophilic segments, and terminal glycyrrhetic acid as targeting ligand. The work explored a new synthesis route of star poly(ethylene glycol-b-poly(ε-caprolactone copolymer with liver targetability. The star-shaped polymer is expected to be an efficient drug carrier.

  20. Cement replacement materials. Properties, durability, sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramezanianpour, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the latest findings in the properties and application of Supplementary Cementing Materials and blended cements currently used in the world in concrete. Sustainability is an important issue all over the world. Carbon dioxide emission has been a serious problem in the world due to the greenhouse effect. Today many countries agreed to reduce the emission of CO2. Many phases of cement and concrete technology can affect sustainability. Cement and concrete industry is responsible for the production of 7% carbon dioxide of the total world CO2 emission. The use of supplementary cementing materials (SCM), design of concrete mixtures with optimum content of cement and enhancement of concrete durability are the main issues towards sustainability in concrete industry.

  1. Modelling porewater chemistry in hydrated Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, U.R.

    1987-01-01

    Extensive employment of concrete is foreseen in radioactive waste repositories. A prerequisite for modelling the interactions between concrete and formation waters is characterization of the concrete system. Available experimental data from high pressure squeezing of cement pore-water indicate that, besides the high pH due to alkali hydroxide dissolution, cement composition itself influences the solubility determining solid phases. A model which simulates the hydration of Portland cement assuming complete hydration of the main clinker minerals is presented. The model also includes parameters describing the reactions between the cement and blending agents. Comparison with measured pore-water data generally gives a consistent picture and, as expected, the model gives correct predictions for pure Portland cements. For blended cements, the required additional parameters can, to some extent, be derived from pore-water analysis. 14 references, 1 figure, 4 tables

  2. 76 FR 50252 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-461 (Third Review)] Gray Portland Cement... Duty Order on Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United States International... Act) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on gray portland cement and cement...

  3. A multiphysics-viscoplastic cap model for simulating blast response of cemented tailings backfill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongda Lu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although a large number of previous researches have significantly contributed to the understanding of the quasi-static mechanical behavior of cemented tailings backfill, an evolutive porous medium used in underground mine cavities, very few efforts have been made to improve the knowledge on its response under sudden dynamic loading during the curing process. In fact, there is a great need for such information given that cemented backfill structures are often subjected to blast loadings due to mine exploitations. In this study, a coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC-viscoplastic cap model is developed to describe the behavior of cementing mine backfill material under blast loading. A THMC model for cemented backfill is adopted to evaluate its behavior and evolution of its properties in curing processes with coupled thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical factors. Then, the model is coupled to a Perzyna type of viscoplastic model with a modified smooth surface cap envelope and a variable bulk modulus, in order to reasonably capture the nonlinear and rate-dependent behaviors of the cemented tailings backfill under blast loading. All of the parameters required for the variable-modulus viscoplastic cap model were obtained by applying the THMC model to reproducing evolution of cemented paste backfill (CPB properties in the curing process. Thus, the behavior of hydrating cemented backfill under high-rate impacts can be evaluated under any curing time of concern. The validation results of the proposed model indicate a good agreement between the experimental and the simulated results. The authors believe that the proposed model will contribute to a better understanding of the performance of hydrating cemented backfill under blasting, and also to practical risk management of backfill structures associated with such a dynamic condition.

  4. The influence of ultrasound on removal of prefabricated metal post cemented with different resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiyeh Feiz

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasonic energy did not decrease the retention of posts cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Furthermore, it seems that there is no significant difference between removal force of self-etch (Panavia and the self-etch self-adhesive (Maxcem Elite resin cements.

  5. Evaluation of cement thixotropy for the cement of oil wells in areas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... economical for cementing job operations in wells with loss zones. The results also show that the effect of LHF is positive, since in addition to his contribution to long term performances, especially the durability of hardened concrete, it improves the thixotropy of cement made of plaster. Keywords: cementing; lost circulation; ...

  6. Properties of paving units incorporating slag cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan A. El Nouhy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effect and possibility of using Portland slag cement in the production of interlocking paving units. Paving units consist of two layers. Four mixes were cast. The first mix was the control mix, in which Portland cement was used in the two layers. In the second mix, Portland slag cement was used in the upper layer, Portland cement was used in the backing layer. In the third mix, Portland cement was placed in the upper layer, while Portland slag cement was used in the backing layer. Finally, in the fourth mix, Portland cement was fully replaced by Portland slag cement in both layers. Tests were carried out in order to investigate the properties of the manufactured specimens at ages 28 and 180 days, respectively. Compressive strength and abrasion resistance were conducted according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM C 140 and ASTM C418. Water absorption, split tensile strength, abrasion resistance, as well as, skid resistance were performed according to both Egyptian Standard Specifications (ESS 4382 and European Standard (EN 1338. The Egyptian standard is identical with the European standard. The results indicate that it is feasible to use Portland slag cement in the manufacture of paving blocks as the conditions of the conducted tests were satisfied at age180 days except for the minimum splitting tensile strength test.

  7. Integer programming of cement distribution by train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indarsih

    2018-01-01

    Cement industry in Central Java distributes cement by train to meet daily demand in Yogyakarta and Central Java area. There are five destination stations. For each destination station, there is a warehouse to load cements. Decision maker of cement industry have a plan to redesign the infrastructure and transportation system. The aim is to determine how many locomotives, train wagons, and containers and how to arrange train schedules with subject to the delivery time. For this purposes, we consider an integer programming to minimize the total of operational cost. Further, we will discuss a case study and the solution the problem can be calculated by LINGO software.

  8. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  9. Immobilisation of radwaste in cement based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Macphee, D.; Atkins, M.; Pointer, C.; Cowie, J.; Wilding, C.R.; Mattingley, N.J.; Evans, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The solubilities and influence on cement pH are reported for calcium aluminate and aluminosulphate hydrates. The solubility of Ca(OH) 2 is reported to 700 bars. Polymerization of C-S-H is investigated by NMR. Specific interactions of U 6+ and iodine (I - , IO 3 - ) with cement components are described. The impact of radiation on cements and the influence of higher temperature are documented. The role of dissolved Ca and CO 2 in groundwaters as dissolution media for cements are reported. (author)

  10. Hydration kinetics of cements by Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Application to Portland-cement-derived endodontic pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortolotti, Villiam; Fantazzini, Paola; Mongiorgi, Romano; Sauro, Salvatore; Zanna, Silvano

    2012-01-01

    Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (TD-NMR) of 1 H nuclei is used to monitor the maturation up to 30 days of three different endodontic cement pastes. The “Solid–liquid” separation of the NMR signals and quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times allow one to follow the formation of chemical compounds and the build-up of the nano- and subnano-structured C–S–H gel. 1 H populations, distinguished by their different mobilities, can be identified and assigned to water confined within the pores of the C–S–H gel, to crystallization water and Portlandite, and to hydroxyl groups. Changes of the TD-NMR parameters during hydration are in agreement with the expected effects of the different additives, which, as it is known, can substantially modify the rate of reactions and the properties of cementitious pastes. Endodontic cements are suitable systems to check the ability of this non-destructive technique to give insight into the complex hydration process of real cement pastes.

  11. Effect of Grafting Density of Random Copolymer Brushes on Perpendicular Alignment in PS-b-PMMA Thin Films

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Wooseop

    2017-07-18

    We modulated the grafting density (σ) of a random copolymer brush of poly(styrene-r-methyl methacrylate) on substrates to probe its effect on the formation of perpendicularly aligned lamellae of polystyrene-b-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA). Supported by coarse-grained simulation results, we hypothesized that an increase in σ will allow us to systematically tune the block copolymer interfacial interactions with the substrates from being preferential to one of the blocks to being neutral toward both blocks and will thereby facilitate enhanced regimes of perpendicularly aligned lamellae. We verified such a hypothesis by using a simple grafting-to approach to modify the substrates and characterized the thickness window for perpendicular lamellae as a function of brush thickness (or σ) on the grafted substrates using scanning force microscopy (SFM) images and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. The experimental results validated our hypothesis and suggested that the σ of random copolymer brushes can be used as an additional versatile parameter to modulate the interfacial interactions and the resulting alignment of block copolymer films.

  12. A theoretical and simulation study of the self-assembly of a binary blend of diblock copolymers

    KAUST Repository

    Padmanabhan, Poornima

    2012-01-01

    Pure diblock copolymer melts exhibit a narrow range of conditions at which bicontinuous and cocontinuous phases are stable; such conditions and the morphology of such phases can be tuned by the use of additives. In this work, we have studied a bidisperse system of diblock copolymers using theory and simulation. In particular, we elucidated how a short, lamellar-forming diblock copolymer modifies the phase behavior of a longer, cylinder-forming diblock copolymer. In a narrow range of intermediate compositions, self-consistent field theory predicts the formation of a gyroid phase although particle-based simulations show that three phases compete: the gyroid phase, a disordered cocontinuous phase, and the cylinder phase, all having free energies within error bars of each other. Former experimental studies of a similar system have yielded an unidentified, partially irregular bicontinuous phase, and our simulations suggest that at such conditions the formation of a partially transformed network phase is indeed plausible. Close examination of the spatial distribution of chains reveals that packing frustration (manifested by chain stretching and low density spots) occurs in the majority-block domains of the three competing phases simulated. In all cases, a double interface around the minority-block domains is also detected with the outer one formed by the short chains, and the inner one formed by the longer chains. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Manipulating Interfaces through Surface Confinement of Poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-block-poly(vinyldimethylazlactone), a Dually Reactive Block Copolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokitz, Bradley S.; Wei, Jifeng; Hinestrosa Salazar, Juan P.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Browning, James B.; Ankner, John Francis; Kilbey, S. Michael II; Messman, Jamie M.

    2012-01-01

    The assembly of dually reactive, well-defined diblock copolymers incorporating the chemoselective/functional monomer, 4,4-dimethyl-2-vinylazlactone (VDMA) and the surface-reactive monomer glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) is examined to understand how competition between surface attachment and microphase segregation influences interfacial structure. Reaction of the PGMA block with surface hydroxyl groups not only anchors the copolymer to the surface, but limits chain mobility, creating brush-like structures comprising PVDMA blocks, which contain reactive azlactone groups. The block copolymers are spin coated at various solution concentrations and annealed at elevated temperature to optimize film deposition to achieve a molecularly uniform layer. The thickness and structure of the polymer thin films are investigated by ellipsometry, infrared spectroscopy, and neutron reflectometry. The results show that deposition of PGMA-b-PVDMA provides a useful route to control film thickness while preserving azlactone groups that can be further modified with biotin-poly(ethylene glycol)amine to generate designer surfaces. The method described herein offers guidance for creating highly functional surfaces, films, or coatings through the use of dually reactive block copolymers and postpolymerization modification.

  14. Rietveld analysis, powder diffraction and cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Phase quantification of cement is essential in its industrial use, however many methods are inaccurate and/or time consuming. Powder diffraction is one of the more accurate techniques used for quantitative phase analysis of cement. There has been an increase in the use of Rietveld refinement and powder diffraction for the analysis and phase quantification of cement and its components in recent years. The complex nature of cement components, existence of solid solutions, polymorphic variation of phases and overlapping phase peaks in diffraction patterns makes phase quantification of cements by powder diffraction difficult. The main phase in cement is alite, a solid solution of tricalcium silicate. Tricalcium silicate has been found to exist in seven modifications in three crystal systems, including triclinic, monoclinic, and rhombohedral structures. Hence, phase quantification of cements using Rietveld methods usually involves the simultaneous modelling of several tricalcium silicate structures to fit the complex alite phase. An industry ordinary Portland cement, industry and standard clinker, and a synthetic tricalcium silicate were characterised using neutron, laboratory x-ray and synchrotron powder diffraction. Diffraction patterns were analysed using full-profile Rietveld refinement. This enabled comparison of x-ray, neutron and synchrotron data for phase quantification of the cement and examination of the tricalcium silicate. Excellent Rietveld fits were achieved, however the results showed that the quantitative phase analysis results differed for some phases in the same clinker sample between various data sources. This presentation will give a short introduction about cement components including polymorphism, followed by the presentation of some problems in phase quantification of cements and the role of Rietveld refinement in solving these problems. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  15. Antibacterial activity of selected glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Łuczaj-Cepowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the paper was to determine the antibacterial activity of four glass ionomer cements against bacteria of the genera Streptococcus and Lactobacillus. Material and methods: Four capsulated glass ionomer cements were applied in the study: Fuji Triage (GC, Fuji IX (GC, Ketac Molar (3M Espe and Ketac Silver (3M Espe. Four standard bacterial strains were used to assess the antibacterial activity of the studied cements: Streptococcus mutans, S. sanguis, S. salivarius and Lactobacillus casei. The antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. The bacterial suspension was spread with a cotton swab on TSA plates. For each material six wells (7 mm diameter, 5 mm deep were made with a cork borer. Each well was then filled with freshly prepared cements. The results were obtained by measuring the bacterial growth inhibition zone after 1, 2, 3 and 7 days. Results: Fuji Triage cement inhibited the growth of all bacterial strains. Fuji IX cement demonstrated the most potent antibacterial activity against S. sanguis. Ketac Molar showed antibacterial activity against S. sanguis and S. salivarius, whereas Ketac Silver was efficient against S. mutans as well. Neither of the Ketac cements inhibited growth of the standard L. casei strain. Discussion: Antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements has attracted the interest of scientists in recent years. Most authors, including us, carried out experiments using the agar diffusion method and demonstrated antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements. Different antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements, observed in our study and studies of other authors, depended on the evaluated cement, bacterial strain and period of evaluation.

  16. Antibacterial activity of selected glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Łuczaj-Cepowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the paper was to determine the antibacterial activity of four glass ionomer cements against bacteria of the genera Streptococcus and Lactobacillus.Material and methods: Four capsulated glass ionomer cements were applied in the study: Fuji Triage (GC, Fuji IX (GC, Ketac Molar (3M Espe and Ketac Silver (3M Espe. Four standard bacterial strains were used to assess the antibacterial activity of the studied cements: Streptococcus mutans, S. sanguis, S. salivarius and Lactobacillus casei. The antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. The bacterial suspension was spread with a cotton swab on TSA plates. For each material six wells (7 mm diameter, 5 mm deep were made with a cork borer. Each well was then filled with freshly prepared cements. The results were obtained by measuring the bacterial growth inhibition zone after 1, 2, 3 and 7 days. Results: Fuji Triage cement inhibited the growth of all bacterial strains. Fuji IX cement demonstrated the most potent antibacterial activity against S. sanguis. Ketac Molar showed antibacterial activity against S. sanguis and S. salivarius, whereas Ketac Silver was efficient against S. mutans as well. Neither of the Ketac cements inhibited growth of the standard L. casei strain. Discussion: Antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements has attracted the interest of scientists in recent years. Most authors, including us, carried out experiments using the agar diffusion method and demonstrated antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements. Different antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements, observed in our study and studies of other authors, depended on the evaluated cement, bacterial strain and period of evaluation.

  17. Polyether based segmented copolymers with uniform aramid units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesten, M.C.E.J.

    2000-01-01

    Segmented copolymers with short, glassy or crystalline hard segments and long, amorphous soft segments (multi-block copolymers) are thermoplastic elastomers (TPE’s). The hard segments form physical crosslinks for the amorphous (rubbery) soft segments. As a result, this type of materials combines

  18. Blends of Syndiotactic Polystyrene with SBS Triblock Copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciardelli, Francesco; Ruggeri, Giacomo; Passaglia, Elisa; Picchioni, Francesco

    2001-01-01

    Blending of polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS) triblock copolymers with syndiotactic polystyrene (PSsyn) has been performed in a Brabender mixer above the glass transition temperature of the triblock copolymer but below the melting point of PSsyn. The presence of a large excess

  19. Radiation crosslinked block copolymer blends with improved impact resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, F.L.; Pelletier, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    Polymer blends having high impact resistance after mechanical working are produced by blending together a non-elastomeric monovinylidene aromatic polymer such as polystyrene with an elastomeric copolymer, such as a block copolymer of styrene and butadiene, in the form of crosslinked, colloidal size particles

  20. Antimicrobial activity of poly(acrylic acid) block copolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratzl, Günther; Paulik, Christian; Hild, Sabine; Guggenbichler, Josef P.; Lackner, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains has developed into a major health problem. In particular, biofilms are the main reason for hospital-acquired infections and diseases. Once formed, biofilms are difficult to remove as they have specific defense mechanisms against antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial surfaces must therefore kill or repel bacteria before they can settle to form a biofilm. In this study, we describe that poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) containing diblock copolymers can kill bacteria and prevent from biofilm formation. The PAA diblock copolymers with poly(styrene) and poly(methyl methacrylate) were synthesized via anionic polymerization of tert-butyl acrylate with styrene or methyl methacrylate and subsequent acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of the tert-butyl ester. The copolymers were characterized via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis, and acid–base titrations. Copolymer films with a variety of acrylic acid contents were produced by solvent casting, characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and tested for their antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antimicrobial activity of the acidic diblock copolymers increased with increasing acrylic acid content, independent of the copolymer-partner, the chain length and the nanostructure. - Highlights: • Acrylic acid diblock copolymers are antimicrobially active. • The antimicrobial activity depends on the acrylic acid content in the copolymer. • No salts, metals or other antimicrobial agents are needed

  1. Tensile properties of segmented block copolymers with monodisperse hard segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, G.J.E.; Feijen, Jan; Gaymans, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    The tensile properties of segmented block copolymers with mono-disperse hard segments were studied with respect to the hard segment content (16–44 wt.%) and the temperature (20–110 °C). The copolymers were comprised of poly(tetramethylene oxide) segments with the molecular weights of 650–2,900 Da

  2. Convenient synthetic method of starch/lactic acid graft copolymer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Copolymer of starch grafted with lactic acid (LA) could be directly prepared by reaction of cornstarch with lactic acid and with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) as the catalyst. The structure of starch/LA copolymer was characterized by IR, XRD, SEM and 1H-NMR. The effects of NaOH concentration, ratios of starch and LA, reaction ...

  3. Micellar structure of amphiphilic poly(2-oxazoline) diblock copolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadakis, C.M.; Ivanova, R.; Lüdtke, K.

    2007-01-01

    Amphiphilic diblock copolymers from poly(2-oxazoline)s in aqueous solution can form micelles. By means of small-angle neutron scattering, we have found that poly[(n-nonyl-2-oxazoline)-b-(methyl-2-oxazoline)] {P[(NOx)-b-(MOx)]} diblock copolymers in aqueous solution form micelles of core-shell typ...

  4. Alternation and tunable composition in hydrogen bonded supramolecular copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Thorsten; de Greef, Tom F A; Nieuwenhuizen, Marko M L; Sijbesma, Rint P

    2014-03-07

    Sequence control in supramolecular copolymers is limited by the selectivity of the associating monomer end groups. Here we introduce the use of monomers with aminopyrimidinone and aminohydroxynaphthyridine quadruple hydrogen bonding end groups, which both homodimerize, but form even stronger heterodimers. These features allow the formation of supramolecular copolymers with a tunable composition and a preference for alternating sequences.

  5. Functional Block Copolymers via Anionic Polymerization for Electroactive Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, Alison

    2013-01-01

           Ion-containing block copolymers blend ionic liquid properties with well-defined polymer architectures. This provides conductive materials with robust mechanical stability, efficient processability, and tunable macromolecular design. Conventional free radical polymerization and anion exchange achieved copolymers containing n-butyl acrylate and phosphonium ionic liquids. These compositions incorporated vinylbenzyl triphenyl phosphonium and vinylbenzyl tricyclohexyl phosphonium cations be...

  6. Influence of copolymer composition on the transport properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Influence of copolymer composition on the transport properties of conducting copolymers: poly(aniline-co-o-anisidine). S S UMARE*, A D BORKAR† and M C GUPTA†. Department of Chemistry, Visvesvaraya Regional College of Engineering, Nagpur 440 011, India. †Department of Chemistry, Nagpur University, Nagpur ...

  7. Rheological Behavior of Entangled Polystyrene-Polyhedral Oligosilsesquioxane (POSS) Copolymer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Jian; Mather, Patrick T; Haddad, Timothy S; Kim, Gyeong-Man

    2006-01-01

    ...: random copolymers of polystyrene (PS) and styryl-based polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (POSS), R7(Si8O12)(C6H4CH=CH2), with R = isobutyl (iBu). A series of styrene-styryl POSS random copolymers with 0, 6, 15, 30, 50 wt...

  8. Antimicrobial activity of poly(acrylic acid) block copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratzl, Günther, E-mail: guenther.gratzl@jku.at [Johannes Kepler University Linz, Institute for Chemical Technology of Organic Materials, Altenberger Str. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Paulik, Christian [Johannes Kepler University Linz, Institute for Chemical Technology of Organic Materials, Altenberger Str. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Hild, Sabine [Johannes Kepler University Linz, Institute of Polymer Science, Altenberger Str. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Guggenbichler, Josef P.; Lackner, Maximilian [AMiSTec GmbH and Co. KG, Leitweg 13, 6345 Kössen, Tirol (Austria)

    2014-05-01

    The increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains has developed into a major health problem. In particular, biofilms are the main reason for hospital-acquired infections and diseases. Once formed, biofilms are difficult to remove as they have specific defense mechanisms against antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial surfaces must therefore kill or repel bacteria before they can settle to form a biofilm. In this study, we describe that poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) containing diblock copolymers can kill bacteria and prevent from biofilm formation. The PAA diblock copolymers with poly(styrene) and poly(methyl methacrylate) were synthesized via anionic polymerization of tert-butyl acrylate with styrene or methyl methacrylate and subsequent acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of the tert-butyl ester. The copolymers were characterized via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis, and acid–base titrations. Copolymer films with a variety of acrylic acid contents were produced by solvent casting, characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and tested for their antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antimicrobial activity of the acidic diblock copolymers increased with increasing acrylic acid content, independent of the copolymer-partner, the chain length and the nanostructure. - Highlights: • Acrylic acid diblock copolymers are antimicrobially active. • The antimicrobial activity depends on the acrylic acid content in the copolymer. • No salts, metals or other antimicrobial agents are needed.

  9. Impact of zeolite-based nanomodified additive on the structure and strength of the cement stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, A. D.; Filippova, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Portland cement is the main binder in the building materials industry; its properties strongly influence properties of mortars and concretes. Some regions experience difficulties with delivery and storage of Portland cement, raising the need to develop an effective additive from the available raw materials. Such materials for the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) are zeolite-containing rocks. Studies have shown that introducing of dibutylphthalate to the composition of modified additive during mechanochemical activation leads to achievement of up to 11% of total amount particles with the size of 3-30 nm. After introducing 0.5% of the obtained additives, the compressive strength of cement-sand slurry samples increases up to 28%. Positive effect of additives introduction is also observed at high flow rate of water (W / C = 0.7). Gaining strength reaches 23%, allowing the efficient use of additive for movable mixtures with enhanced strength properties. In general, the proposed supplement allows reducing the water flow in the solution without decreasing its mobility, and increasing strength properties, which makes it possible to obtain a whole class of solutions of modified cement binder. The market value of the developed additives is 18 rubles per 1 kg, making sound competition in the market of modifying additives.

  10. Latex-modified fiber-reinforced concrete bridge deck overlay : construction/interim report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Latex-modified concrete (LMC) is Portland cement concrete (PCC) with an admixture of latex. LMC is considered to be nearly impermeable to chlorides and is extensively used to construct bridge deck overlays. Unfortunately, some of these overlays have ...

  11. Investigation of the use of recycled polymer-modified asphalt in asphaltic concrete pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-30

    This report presents issues associated with recycling polymer modified asphalt cements (PMACs), particularly blending aged PMAC with new PMAC. A styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) PMAC was selected and graded using the Superpave Performance Grading (PG)...

  12. Analysis of Chemical Composition of Portland Cement in Ghana: A Key to Understand the Behavior of Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Bediako, Mark; Amankwah, Eric Opoku

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Portland cement in concrete or mortar formation is very well influenced by chemical compositions among other factors. Many engineers usually have little information on the chemical compositions of cement in making decisions for the choice of commercially available Portland cement in Ghana. This work analyzed five different brands of Portland cement in Ghana, namely, Ghacem ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and Portland limestone cement (PLC), CSIR-BRRI Pozzomix, Dangote OPC, a...

  13. Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty Using the Cement-in-Cement Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanatullah, Derek F; Pallante, Graham D; Floccari, Lorena V; Vasileiadis, George I; Trousdale, Robert T

    2017-03-01

    The cement-in-cement technique is useful in the setting of revision total hip arthroplasty (THA), especially to gain acetabular exposure, change a damaged or loose femoral component, or change the version, offset, or length of a fixed femoral component. The goal of this retrospective study was to assess the clinical and radiographic characteristics of revision THA using the cement-in- cement technique. Between 1971 and 2013, a total of 63 revision THAs used an Omnifit (Osteonics, Mahwah, New Jersey) or Exeter (Howmedica, Mahwah, New Jersey) stem and the cement-in-cement technique at the senior author's institution. Aseptic loosening (74%) was the predominant preoperative diagnosis followed by periprosthetic fracture (14%), instability (8%), and implant fracture (6%). Mean clinical follow-up was 5.5±3.8 years. The Harris Hip Score had a statistically significant increase of 18.5 points (Prevision THA using the cement-in-cement technique. There were 13 returns to the operating room, resulting in an overall failure rate of 21%. Eleven (18%) cases required revision THA, but only 1 (2%) revision THA was for aseptic removal of the femoral component. All other femoral implants had no evidence of component migration, cement mantel fracture, or circumferential lucent lines at final follow-up. The patients who underwent cement-in-cement revision THA at the senior author's institution had good restoration of function but a high complication rate. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e348-e351.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Sulfomethylated graft copolymers of xanthan gum and polyacrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, I.W.; Empey, R.A.; Racciato, J.S.

    1978-08-08

    A water-soluble anionic graft copolymer of xanthan gum and polyacrylamide is described in which at least part of the amide function of the acrylamide portion of the copolymer is sulfomethylated and the xanthan gum portion of the copolymer is unreacted with formaldehyde. The copolymer is sulfomethylated by reaction with formaldehyde and sodium metabisulfite. The formaldehyde does not cause any appreciable cross-linking between hydroxyl groups of the xanthan moieties. The sulfomethylation of the acrylamido group takes place at temperatures from 35 to 70 C. The pH is 10 or higher, typically from 12 to 13. The degree of anionic character may be varied by adjusting the molar ratio of formaldehyde and sodium metabisulfite with respect to the copolymer. 10 claims.

  15. An interpretation of cell separation mechanism on polyamine graft copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Y; Muramatsu, N; Kataoka, K; Ohshima, H; Kondo, T

    1992-01-01

    Interaction between polyamide microcapsules having different balances of negative and positive charges on their surface, that is, different isoelectric points and copolymers with different numbers of polyamine macromer of a definite chain length grafted on poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) backbone was studied by measuring the amount adhered of the microcapsules onto the surface of copolymer-coated glass beads at different pH values. Maximum microcapsule adhesion was observed for a proper combination of microcapsule and copolymer to suggest that separation of a specified cell population from others on the surface of copolymer-coated glass beads can be explained in terms of preferential adhesion through electrostatic interaction of the specified cells with the copolymer.

  16. Block Copolymer Metastability: Scientific Nightmare or Engineering Dream?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Frank S.

    1997-03-01

    Most experimental studies and almost all theories that deal with block copolymers, or mixtures of block copolymers and homopolymers, have been designed from an equilibrium perspective. Yet a myriad of factors conspire to retard approach to equilibrium in these systems, including: subtle features in the free energy surface that are controlled by ordered state symmetry; a coupling between microphase separation and entanglement dynamics; complex molecular architectures such as multiblock, starblock, and miktoarm. Even unentangled low molecular weight diblock copolymers, the simplest and dynamically least encumbered materials, exhibit long-lived metastable states that confound attempts to validate equilibrium theories. However, this apparent dilemma can be exploited through clever processing strategies. This lecture will address two opposing consequences of block copolymer metastability. The first is a potential nightmare: Can we ever establish universal block copolymer phase diagrams? The second is the stuff of dreams: Self-assembled thermoset nanocomposites.

  17. Feasibility of producing nano cement in a traditional cement factory in Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sada Abdalkhaliq Hasan Alyasri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the economic feasibility of producing nano cement through the establishment of a production line within an existing cement factory. Creating a nano cement production line within the Alkufa Cement factory in Iraq is selected as a case study. Evaluation measures including internal rate of return (IRR, net present value (NPV and breakeven point (BEP are used to evaluate the possible gain that can be achieved from this option. The results demonstrated a positive NPV. The IRR is found to be 26.8% and BEP is reached within 3 years after the establishment of the line. This indicates that producing nano cement in the existing cement factory is economically feasible and can be more advantageous than the ordinary cement.

  18. Cements in radioactive waste management. Characterization requirements of cement products for acceptance and quality assurance purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.A.; Glasser, F.P.

    1987-01-01

    Cementitious materials are used as immobilizing matrices for low (LLW) and medium-level wastes (MLW) and are also components of the construction materials in the secondary barriers and the repositories. This report has concerned itself with a critical assessment of the quality assurance aspects of the immobilization and disposal of MLW and LLW cemented wastes. This report has collated the existing knowledge of the use and potential of cementitious materials in radioactive waste immobilization and highlighted the physico-chemical parameters. Subject areas include an assessment of immobilization objectives and cement as a durable material, waste stream and matrix characterization, quality assurance concepts, nature of cement-based systems, chemistry and modelling of cement hydration, role and effect of blending agents, radwaste-cement interaction, assessment of durability, degradative and radiolytic processes in cements and the behaviour of cement-based matrices and their near-field interactions with the environment and the repository conditions

  19. Effects of Two Redispersible Polymer Powders on Efflorescence of Portland Cement-based Decorative Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimei ZHU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of redispersible polymer powders of ethylene/Vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA and ethylene/vinyl laurate/vinyl chloride terpolymer (E/VL/VC on the efflorescence of Portland cement-based decorative mortar (PCBDM were studied. The results showed that EVA slightly prolongs the efflorescence duration of fresh PCBDM; and exacerbates efflorescence of hardened PCBDM, because it increases the content of soluble salts such as Ca2+, K+, Na+ ions in hardened PCBDM and promotes their migration. E/VL/VC exacerbates efflorescence of fresh PCBDM due to it easily dissolves in the surface water; but reduces efflorescence of hardened PCBDM, which is attributed to that it decreases the soluble salts content in hardened PCBDM and prohibits salts migration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4053

  20. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Coats, Alison M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature), The measurements...

  1. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE CEMENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WESSON, CARL E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY IS TO PRESENT A PRELIMINARY PICTURE OF OCCUPATIONAL CHANGES BROUGHT ABOUT IN THE MANUFACTURE OF CEMENT AS A RESULT OF INTRODUCING AUTOMATED EQUIPMENT. ONE AUTOMATED AND SEVERAL CONVENTIONAL TYPE CEMENT PLANTS WERE STUDIED. ANALYSIS OF DATA OBTAINED THROUGH RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTED DURING THE STUDY REVEALED THAT…

  2. Cemented or cementless total knee arthroplasty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prudhon Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since 1996 we have been using cementless fixation with hydroxyapatite (HA coating. The purpose of this paper is to compare survivorship of a series of 100 cemented Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA to a similar series of 100 cementless with a follow up of 11–16 years. Material methods: Both TKA are mobile bearing total knee postero-stabilized. They can be used with cement or without cement. Among 1030 New Wave TKATM implanted from 2002 to 2015 we have identified 100 cemented TKAs and 100 cementless TKAs. All these cases were primary replacement. Differences in survival probability were determined using log-rank test. Results: Survival probabilities at 11 years of follow-up were: Cemented group: 90.2% CI95% [81.9–94.8]; Cementless group: 95.4% CI95% [88.1–98.2]. Comparison between both group showed significant difference, p = 0.32. Discussion: The advantages of cementless TKA are bone stock preservation, cement debris protection and the potential to achieve biologic fixation. Cementless implants rely on a porous or roughened surface to facilitate bone formation. HA has been shown to accelerate bone integration and to decrease micro motion of the components and to increase fixation. With a survival probability of 90.2% (cemented version and 95.4% (cementless version, this total knee prosthesis performs as intended in primary total knee arthroplasty. No statistical differences could be found between cemented and cementless implants.

  3. Pre-portland cements and geopolymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíček, Tomáš; Perná, Ivana; Ertl, Z.; Miller, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2012), s. 57-62 ISSN 1214-9705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : caementum * cement itious * calcareous cement Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2011 http://www.irsm.cas.cz/materialy/acta_content/2012_01/5_Hanzlicek.pdf

  4. Elaborating the History of Our Cementing Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Zhi; Shen, Lei; Løvik, Amund N.

    2017-01-01

    development of cement in-use stocks in residential, nonresidential, and civil engineering sectors of all world countries. We found that global cement production spreads unevenly among 184 countries, with China dominating the global production and consumption after the 1990s. Nearly all countries have shown...

  5. Dangote cement : an African success story?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akinyoade, A.; Uche, C.U.

    2016-01-01

    This paper critiques the rise of Dangote Cement plc to become the dominant player in the Nigerian cement industry. Although the close relationship between the company's founder, Aliko Dangote, and subsequent Nigerian governments has been an important factor in this success story, we argue that it is

  6. Effect of fluoride-containing desensitizing agents on the bond strength of resin-based cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Saraç

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents containing different amounts of fluoride on the shear bond strength of a dual polymerized resin cement and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to dentin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred human molars were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and prepared until the dentin surface was exposed. The specimens were treated with one of four desensitizing agents: Bifluorid 12, Fluoridin, Thermoline and PrepEze. The remaining 20 specimens served as untreated controls. All groups were further divided into 2 subgroups in which a dual polymerized resin cement (Bifix QM or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (AVANTO was used. The shear bond strength (MPa was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed statistically with a 2-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD test and regression analysis (α=0.05. The effect of the desensitizing agents on the dentin surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: The fluoride-containing desensitizing agents affected the bond strength of the resin-based cements to dentin (p<0.001. PrepEze showed the highest bond strength values in all groups (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Regression analysis showed a reverse relation between bond strength values of resin cements to dentin and the amount of fluoride in the desensitizing agent (p<0.05.

  7. Comparison of complex coacervate core micelles from two diblock copolymers or a single diblock copolymer with a polyelectrolyte.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofs, P.S.; Voets, I.K.; Keizer, de A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    With light scattering titrations, we show that complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) form from a diblock copolymer with a polyelectrolyte block and either an oppositely charged polyelectrolyte, a diblock copolymer with an oppositely charged polyelectrolyte or a mixture of the two. The effect of

  8. Design, synthesis, morphology and properties of semiconducting block copolymers for photonic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Boer, B.

    2001-09-24

    morphology can be obtained. Morphological observations of the solid films can provide information on the local order of polymers and the influence of order on the device performance. Ultimately, this should lead to the establishment of relationships between thin-film structure/ordering and opto-electronic properties. Chapter 2 describes the design and synthesis of a series of novel diblock copolymers, in which one block is PPV and the other is a C60-functionalized polystyrene. During casting of soluble, semiconducting polymers, both the temperature and the quality of the solvent are strongly affected due to rapid evaporation of the solvent and the increasing concentration of the semiconducting polymer. The influence of the solvent temperature and the solvent quality on the chain conformation and the aggregation of semiconducting block copolymers is described in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4 the thermotropic properties and the solid-state morphology of PPV-based block copolymers are studied. As demonstrated in Chapter 5, the covalent incorporation of C60 in the PPV-based block copolymer results in a strong quenching of the photoluminescence from the PPV block, which is indicative of an efficient electron transfer at the donor-acceptor interface. Furthermore, photovoltaic devices based on thin films of donor and acceptor moieties, either a blend of donor and acceptor homopolymers or a donor-acceptor block copolymer, were prepared. In Chapter 6, the formation of highly ordered honeycomb structures upon dropcasting a solution of PPV-b-PS in CS{sub 2} is described. Chapter 7 describes a novel method to modify the surface properties of inorganic substrates by chemically grafting an initiator for Iiving free radical photopolymerizations. The design, synthesis, characterization and properties of regioregular, amphiphilic polythiophenes is described in Chapter 8. refs.

  9. Amphiphilic block copolymers for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Monica L; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Kwon, Glen S

    2003-07-01

    Amphiphilic block copolymers (ABCs) have been used extensively in pharmaceutical applications ranging from sustained-release technologies to gene delivery. The utility of ABCs for delivery of therapeutic agents results from their unique chemical composition, which is characterized by a hydrophilic block that is chemically tethered to a hydrophobic block. In aqueous solution, polymeric micelles are formed via the association of ABCs into nanoscopic core/shell structures at or above the critical micelle concentration. Upon micellization, the hydrophobic core regions serve as reservoirs for hydrophobic drugs, which may be loaded by chemical, physical, or electrostatic means, depending on the specific functionalities of the core-forming block and the solubilizate. Although the Pluronics, composed of poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(propylene oxide)-block-poly(ethylene oxide), are the most widely studied ABC system, copolymers containing poly(L-amino acid) and poly(ester) hydrophobic blocks have also shown great promise in delivery applications. Because each ABC has unique advantages with respect to drug delivery, it may be possible to choose appropriate block copolymers for specific purposes, such as prolonging circulation time, introduction of targeting moieties, and modification of the drug-release profile. ABCs have been used for numerous pharmaceutical applications including drug solubilization/stabilization, alteration of the pharmacokinetic profile of encapsulated substances, and suppression of multidrug resistance. The purpose of this minireview is to provide a concise, yet detailed, introduction to the use of ABCs and polymeric micelles as delivery agents as well as to highlight current and past work in this area. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  10. Thermal Conductivity of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate Copolymer/Nanofiller Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, S.; Watson, K. A.; Working, D. C.; Connell, J. W.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Lin, Y.; Sun, Y. P.

    2007-01-01

    To reduce weight and increase the mobility, comfort, and performance of future spacesuits, flexible, thermally conductive fabrics and plastic tubes are needed for the Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment. Such improvements would allow astronauts to operate more efficiently and safely for extended extravehicular activities. As an approach to raise the thermal conductivity (TC) of an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (Elvax 260), it was compounded with three types of carbon based nanofillers: multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), vapor grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and expanded graphite (EG). In addition, other nanofillers including metallized CNFs, nickel nanostrands, boron nitride, and powdered aluminum were also compounded with Elvax 260 in the melt at various loading levels. In an attempt to improve compatibility between Elvax 260 and the nanofillers, MWCNTs and EG were modified by surface coating and through noncovalent and covalent attachment of organic molecules containing alkyl groups. Ribbons of the nanocomposites were extruded to form samples in which the nanofillers were aligned in the direction of flow. Samples were also fabricated by compression molding to yield nanocomposites in which the nanofillers were randomly oriented. Mechanical properties of the aligned samples were determined by tensile testing while the degree of dispersion and alignment of nanoparticles were investigated using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. TC measurements were performed using a laser flash (Nanoflash ) technique. TC of the samples was measured in the direction of, and perpendicular to, the alignment direction. Additionally, tubing was also extruded from select nanocomposite compositions and the TC and mechanical flexibility measured.

  11. Printable and Rewritable Full Block Copolymer Structural Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Han Sol; Lee, Jinseong; Cho, Suk Man; Park, Tae Hyun; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Chanho; Lee, Seung Won; Kim, Kang Lib; Ryu, Du Yeol; Huh, June; Thomas, Edwin L; Park, Cheolmin

    2017-08-01

    Structural colors (SCs) of photonic crystals (PCs) arise from selective constructive interference of incident light. Here, an ink-jet printable and rewritable block copolymer (BCP) SC display is demonstrated, which can be quickly written and erased over 50 times with resolution nearly equivalent to that obtained with a commercial office ink-jet printer. Moreover, the writing process employs an easily modified printer for position- and concentration-controlled deposition of a single, colorless, water-based ink containing a reversible crosslinking agent, ammonium persulfate. Deposition of the ink onto a self-assembled BCP PC film comprising a 1D stack of alternating layers enables differential swelling of the written BCP film and produces a full-colored SC display of characters and images. Furthermore, the information can be readily erased and the system can be reset by application of hydrogen bromide. Subsequently, new information can be rewritten, resulting in a chemically rewritable BCP SC display. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A Urea Potentiometric Biosensor Based on a Thiophene Copolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuan (Kevin Lai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A potentiometric enzyme biosensor is a convenient detector for quantification of urea concentrations in industrial processes, or for monitoring patients with diabetes, kidney damage or liver malfunction. In this work, poly(3-hexylthiophene-co-3-thiopheneacetic acid (P(3HT-co-3TAA was chemically synthesized, characterized and spin-coated onto conductive indium tin oxide (ITO glass electrodes. Urease (Urs was covalently attached to the smooth surface of this copolymer via carbodiimide coupling. The electrochemical behavior and stability of the modified Urs/P(3HT-co-3TAA/ITO glass electrode were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, and the bound enzyme activity was confirmed by spectrophotometry. Potentiometric response studies indicated that this electrode could determine the concentration of urea in aqueous solutions, with a quasi-Nernstian response up to about 5 mM. No attempt was made to optimize the response speed; full equilibration occurred after 10 min, but the half-time for response was typically <1 min.

  13. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone....... The CO2 capture capacity of limestone in the raw meal is lower than for pure limestone. The difference in the CO2 capture capacity decreases with an increase in cycle number. The calcination conditions and composition are major factors that influence the CO2 capture capacity of limestone. At 850 °C in N2...

  14. THE GLASS IONOMER CEMENT IN DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Matos Vieira

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The glass ionomer cement was developed in the past century 70s, after continuous researches about silicate cement. Over the years, glass ionomers have been playing an important role on restorative dentistry. Initially, the material was used for restoration of small cavities, however, its usage has been increased. The main indications at present are: as core buildup restorative, luting cement, liner and base and as a sealant. Recently, glass ionomer cement has been used for ART restorations and in some medicine fields because of the positive biointeraction with bone cells. Although glass ionomer cements exhibit an initial critical solubility and poor aesthetics, great biological properties like fluoride release to oral environment, chemical bonding to tooth tissues and biocompatibility leads this material elective for many purposes. Finally, their inherent antimicrobial properties contributes to the treatment of many situations in dentistry.

  15. Cement analysis using d + D neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Womble, Phillip C.; Paschal, Jon; Moore, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    In the cement industry, the primary concern is quality control. The earlier the cement industry can institute quality control upon their product, the more significant their savings in labor, energy and material. We are developing a prototype cement analyzer using pulsed neutrons from a d-D electronic neutron generator with the goal of ensuring quality control of cement in an on-line manner. By utilizing a low intensity d-D neutron source and a specially-designed moderator assembly, we are able to produce one of the safest neutron-based systems in the market. Also, this design includes some exciting new methods of data acquisition which may substantially reduce the final installation costs. In our proof-of-principle measurements, we were able to measure the primary components of cement (Al, Si, Ca and Fe) to limits required for the raw materials, the derived mixes and the clinkers utilizing this neutron generator

  16. An ongoing investigation on modeling the strength properties of water-entrained cement-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    -based materials. Beyond the discussion of whether or not the introduction of superabsorbent polymers leads to a strength reduction, this paper uses both experimental and theoretical background to separate the effect of SAP in both pore structure and internal relative humidity and the effect from the active......Water-entrained cement based materials by superabsorbent polymers is a concept that was introduced in the research agenda about a decade ago. However, a recent application in the production of high performance concrete revealed potential weaknesses when the proportioning of this intelligent...... material is not well performed, raising doubts among both academic and industrial society about the usability of superabsorbent polymers in cement-based materials. This work constitutes the baseline tentatively to be used on modeling the compressive strength of SF-modified water-entrained cement...

  17. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  18. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-14

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  19. Characterisation of Cements From Dominantly Volcanic Raw Materials of the Carpathian Bend Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halmagy Timea

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations regarding the production of cements from local raw materials, such as limestone from Varghis, gypsum from Nucsoara, basaltic scoria from Racosul de Jos, volcanic tuff from Racosul de Sus, diatomite from Filia, and red mud from Oradea. The raw mixtures, based on modified Bogue calculations, contain limestone, gypsum, and one or two of the above-mentioned materials. The cements resulted from clinker grinding in a laboratory gas furnace at 1260-1300 °C, with one hour at the peak temperatures, and were characterised for Blaine specific surface area, specific density, and mineral phases. Physico-mechanical properties, such as water content for normal consistency, setting time, soundness, and compressive strength were also determined. Results show that these cements contain belite, ferrite, calcium sulphoaluminate, anhydrite, and some minor compounds.

  20. Effect of the sterilization process on physical and mechanical properties of the bonacryl bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morejon, L.; Delgado, J.A.; Aguero, L.; Rapado, M.; Ginebra, M.P.; Gil, F.J.; Mendizabal, E.

    2008-01-01

    The use of bone cements of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to fix artificial prosthesis to the human body is a habitual method in orthopedic surgery. The hip and the knee joints have a very complex biomechanics and support high loads, for these reasons, acrylic bone cements have to comply with international standards in order to secure the biofuncionality and durability of the implant. In this work we report the effect of sterilization by ethylene oxide or gamma radiation on the BONACRYL Cuban cement. We determined how sterilization methods affect the molecular weight of the polymer as well as its quasi-static mechanical properties. The results demonstrated that the gamma radiation modifies the molecular weight of the PMMA although the compression and bending strength were not affected by the sterilization process applied. (authors)