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Sample records for copii coat component

  1. Structure of Coatomer Cage Proteins and the Relationship among COPI, COPII, and Clathrin Vesicle Coats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Changwook; Goldberg, Jonathan (MSKCC)

    2010-09-13

    COPI-coated vesicles form at the Golgi apparatus from two cytosolic components, ARF G protein and coatomer, a heptameric complex that can polymerize into a cage to deform the membrane into a bud. Although coatomer shares a common evolutionary origin with COPII and clathrin vesicle coat proteins, the architectural relationship among the three cages is unclear. Strikingly, the {alpha}{beta}-COP core of coatomer crystallizes as a triskelion in which three copies of a {beta}-COP {beta}-propeller domain converge through their axial ends. We infer that the trimer constitutes the vertex of the COPI cage. Our model proposes that the COPI cage is intermediate in design between COPII and clathrin: COPI shares with clathrin an arrangement of three curved {alpha}-solenoid legs radiating from a common center, and COPI shares with COPII highly similar vertex interactions involving the axial ends of {beta}-propeller domains.

  2. New insights into protein secretion: TANGO1 runs rings around the COPII coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Benjamin S

    2017-04-03

    In this issue, Liu et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201611088) and Raote et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201608080) use super-resolution microscopy to visualize large COPII-coated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) export carriers. Rings of TANGO1 surround COPII, implicating TANGO1 in organizing ER exit sites and in regulating COPII coat dynamics and geometry. © 2017 Glick.

  3. Sar1 localizes at the rims of COPII-coated membranes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Kazuo; Suda, Yasuyuki; Nakano, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    The Sar1 GTPase controls coat assembly on coat protein complex II (COPII)-coated vesicles, which mediate protein transport from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi. The GTP-bound form of Sar1, activated by the ER-localized guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Sec12, associates with the ER membrane. GTP hydrolysis by Sar1, stimulated by the COPII-vesicle-localized GTPase-activating protein (GAP) Sec23, in turn causes Sar1 to dissociate from the membrane. Thus, Sar1 is cycled between active and inactive states, and on and off vesicle membranes, but its precise spatiotemporal regulation remains unknown. Here, we examined Sar1 localization on COPII-coated membranes in living Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Two-dimensional (2D) observation demonstrated that Sar1 showed modest accumulation around the ER exit sites (ERES) in a manner that was dependent on Sec16 function. Detailed three-dimensional (3D) observation further demonstrated that Sar1 localized at the rims of the COPII-coated membranes, but was excluded from the rest of the COPII membranes. Additionally, a GTP-locked form of Sar1 induced abnormally enlarged COPII-coated structures and covered the entirety of these structures. These results suggested that the reversible membrane association of Sar1 GTPase leads to its localization being restricted to the rims of COPII-coated membranes in vivo. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Structural basis of cargo membrane protein discrimination by the human COPII coat machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancias, Joseph D.; Goldberg, Jonathan (MSKCC)

    2008-11-18

    Genomic analysis shows that the increased complexity of trafficking pathways in mammalian cells involves an expansion of the number of SNARE, Rab and COP proteins. Thus, the human genome encodes four forms of Sec24, the cargo selection subunit of the COPII vesicular coat, and this is proposed to increase the range of cargo accommodated by human COPII-coated vesicles. In this study, we combined X-ray crystallographic and biochemical analysis with functional assays of cargo packaging into COPII vesicles to establish molecular mechanisms for cargo discrimination by human Sec24 subunits. A conserved IxM packaging signal binds in a surface groove of Sec24c and Sec24d, but the groove is occluded in the Sec24a and Sec24b subunits. Conversely, LxxLE class transport signals and the DxE signal of VSV glycoprotein are selectively bound by Sec24a and Sec24b subunits. A comparative analysis of crystal structures of the four human Sec24 isoforms establishes the structural determinants for discrimination among these transport signals, and provides a framework to understand how an expansion of coat subunits extends the range of cargo proteins packaged into COPII-coated vesicles.

  5. Dynamic Glycosylation Governs the Vertebrate COPII Protein Trafficking Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nathan J; Unlu, Gokhan; Bisnett, Brittany J; Meister, Thomas R; Condon, Brett M; Luo, Peter M; Smith, Timothy J; Hanna, Michael; Chhetri, Abhishek; Soderblom, Erik J; Audhya, Anjon; Knapik, Ela W; Boyce, Michael

    2018-01-09

    The COPII coat complex, which mediates secretory cargo trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum, is a key control point for subcellular protein targeting. Because misdirected proteins cannot function, protein sorting by COPII is critical for establishing and maintaining normal cell and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, mutations in COPII genes cause a range of human pathologies, including cranio-lenticulo-sutural dysplasia (CLSD), which is characterized by collagen trafficking defects, craniofacial abnormalities, and skeletal dysmorphology. Detailed knowledge of the COPII pathway is required to understand its role in normal cell physiology and to devise new treatments for disorders in which it is disrupted. However, little is known about how vertebrates dynamically regulate COPII activity in response to developmental, metabolic, or pathological cues. Several COPII proteins are modified by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc), a dynamic form of intracellular protein glycosylation, but the biochemical and functional effects of these modifications remain unclear. Here, we use a combination of chemical, biochemical, cellular, and genetic approaches to demonstrate that site-specific O-GlcNAcylation of COPII proteins mediates their protein-protein interactions and modulates cargo secretion. In particular, we show that individual O-GlcNAcylation sites of SEC23A, an essential COPII component, are required for its function in human cells and vertebrate development, because mutation of these sites impairs SEC23A-dependent in vivo collagen trafficking and skeletogenesis in a zebrafish model of CLSD. Our results indicate that O-GlcNAc is a conserved and critical regulatory modification in the vertebrate COPII-dependent trafficking pathway.

  6. The coat protein complex II, COPII, protein Sec13 directly interacts with presenilin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Anders Lade, E-mail: aln@humgen.au.dk [Department of Human Genetics, The Bartholin Building, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2009-10-23

    Mutations in the human gene encoding presenilin-1, PS1, account for most cases of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease. PS1 has nine transmembrane domains and a large loop orientated towards the cytoplasm. PS1 locates to cellular compartments as endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi apparatus, vesicular structures, and plasma membrane, and is an integral member of {gamma}-secretase, a protein protease complex with specificity for intra-membranous cleavage of substrates such as {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. Here, an interaction between PS1 and the Sec13 protein is described. Sec13 takes part in coat protein complex II, COPII, vesicular trafficking, nuclear pore function, and ER directed protein sequestering and degradation control. The interaction maps to the N-terminal part of the large hydrophilic PS1 loop and the first of the six WD40-repeats present in Sec13. The identified Sec13 interaction to PS1 is a new candidate interaction for linking PS1 to secretory and protein degrading vesicular circuits.

  7. Vesicle coating and uncoating: controlling the formation of large COPII-coated carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Anna K

    2009-01-01

    The basic mechanisms underlying the formation of coated vesicles are now defined in considerable detail. This article highlights recent developments in our understanding of the problem of exporting large macromolecular cargo such as procollagen from the endoplasmic reticulum and discusses the implications that this has for cell and tissue organisation and human disease. PMID:20401317

  8. Erv41p and Erv46p: New components of COPII vesicles involved in transport between the ER and Golgi complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otte, S; Belden, W J; Heidtman, M

    2001-01-01

    Proteins contained on purified COPII vesicles were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry combined with database searching. We identified four known vesicle proteins (Erv14p, Bet1p, Emp24p, and Erv25p) and an additional nine species (Yip3p, Rer1p, Erp1p, Erp2p...

  9. Mea6 controls VLDL transport through the coordinated regulation of COPII assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaqing; Liu, Liang; Zhang, Hongsheng; Fan, Junwan; Zhang, Feng; Yu, Mei; Shi, Lei; Yang, Lin; Lam, Sin Man; Wang, Huimin; Chen, Xiaowei; Wang, Yingchun; Gao, Fei; Shui, Guanghou; Xu, Zhiheng

    2016-01-01

    Lipid accumulation, which may be caused by the disturbance in very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion in the liver, can lead to fatty liver disease. VLDL is synthesized in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transported to Golgi apparatus for secretion into plasma. However, the underlying molecular mechanism for VLDL transport is still poorly understood. Here we show that hepatocyte-specific deletion of meningioma-expressed antigen 6 (Mea6)/cutaneous T cell lymphoma-associated antigen 5C (cTAGE5C) leads to severe fatty liver and hypolipemia in mice. Quantitative lipidomic and proteomic analyses indicate that Mea6/cTAGE5 deletion impairs the secretion of different types of lipids and proteins, including VLDL, from the liver. Moreover, we demonstrate that Mea6/cTAGE5 interacts with components of the ER coat protein complex II (COPII) which, when depleted, also cause lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. Our findings not only reveal several novel factors that regulate lipid transport, but also provide evidence that Mea6 plays a critical role in lipid transportation through the coordinated regulation of the COPII machinery. PMID:27311593

  10. Trafficking through COPII stabilises cell polarity and drives secretion during Drosophila epidermal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Norum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The differentiation of an extracellular matrix (ECM at the apical side of epithelial cells implies massive polarised secretion and membrane trafficking. An epithelial cell is hence engaged in coordinating secretion and cell polarity for a correct and efficient ECM formation. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We are studying the molecular mechanisms that Drosophila tracheal and epidermal cells deploy to form their specific apical ECM during differentiation. In this work we demonstrate that the two genetically identified factors haunted and ghost are essential for polarity maintenance, membrane topology as well as for secretion of the tracheal luminal matrix and the cuticle. We show that they code for the Drosophila COPII vesicle-coating components Sec23 and Sec24, respectively, that organise vesicle transport from the ER to the Golgi apparatus. CONCLUSION: Taken together, epithelial differentiation during Drosophila embryogenesis is a concerted action of ECM formation, plasma membrane remodelling and maintenance of cell polarity that all three rely mainly, if not absolutely, on the canonical secretory pathway from the ER over the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane. Our results indicate that COPII vesicles constitute a central hub for these processes.

  11. Aesthetic coatings for steel bridge components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The effectiveness of aesthetic coating systems for steel bridges was studied. Twelve 2-coat, 3-coat, and duplex : coating systems were selected and subjected to a series of accelerated weathering and mechanical tests to : determine their performance....

  12. Aesthetic coatings for Wisconsin bridge components : [brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Over the past several years, the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) has : experienced performance-related issues with aesthetic and protective coatings used on : Wisconsin bridges. Public agencies make significant investments in coating ...

  13. Thermal barrier coatings for heat engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.; Hodge, P. E.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive NASA-Lewis program of coating development for aircraft gas turbine blades and vanes is presented. Improved ceramic layer compositions are investigated, along the MCrAlY bond films and the methods of uniform deposition of the coatings; the thermomechanical and fuel impurity tolerance limits of the coatings are being studied. Materials include the ZrO2-Y2O3/NiCrAlY system; the effects of the bond coat and zirconia composition on coating life and Mach 1 burner rig test results are discussed. It is concluded that Diesel engines can also utilize thermal barrier coatings; they have been used successfully on piston crowns and exhaust valves of shipboard engines to combat lower grade fuel combustion corrosion.

  14. The feelgood mutation in zebrafish dysregulates COPII-dependent secretion of select extracellular matrix proteins in skeletal morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Melville

    2011-11-01

    Craniofacial and skeletal dysmorphologies account for the majority of birth defects. A number of the disease phenotypes have been attributed to abnormal synthesis, maintenance and composition of extracellular matrix (ECM, yet the molecular and cellular mechanisms causing these ECM defects remain poorly understood. The zebrafish feelgood mutant manifests a severely malformed head skeleton and shortened body length due to defects in the maturation stage of chondrocyte development. In vivo analyses reveal a backlog of type II and type IV collagens in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER similar to those found in coat protein II complex (COPII-deficient cells. The feelgood mutation hinders collagen deposition in the ECM, but trafficking of small cargos and other large ECM proteins such as laminin to the extracellular space is unaffected. We demonstrate that the zebrafish feelgood mutation causes a single amino acid substitution within the DNA-binding domain of transcription factor Creb3l2. We show that Creb3l2 selectively regulates the expression of genes encoding distinct COPII proteins (sec23a, sec23b and sec24d but find no evidence for its regulation of sec24c expression. Moreover, we did not detect activation of ER stress response genes despite intracellular accumulation of collagen and prominent skeletal defects. Promoter trans-activation assays show that the Creb3l2 feelgood variant is a hypomorphic allele that retains approximately 50% of its transcriptional activity. Transgenic rescue experiments of the feelgood phenotype restore craniofacial development, illustrating that a precise level of Creb3l2 transcriptional activity is essential for skeletogenesis. Our results indicate that Creb3l2 modulates the availability of COPII machinery in a tissue- and cargo-specific manner. These findings could lead to a better understanding of the etiology of human craniofacial and skeletal birth defects as well as adult-onset diseases that are linked to dysregulated ECM deposition

  15. Increased Reliability of Gas Turbine Components by Robust Coatings Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A.; Dudykevych, T.; Sansom, D.; Subramanian, R.

    2017-08-01

    The expanding operational windows of the advanced gas turbine components demand increasing performance capability from protective coating systems. This demand has led to the development of novel multi-functional, multi-materials coating system architectures over the last years. In addition, the increasing dependency of components exposed to extreme environment on protective coatings results in more severe penalties, in case of a coating system failure. This emphasizes that reliability and consistency of protective coating systems are equally important to their superior performance. By means of examples, this paper describes the effects of scatter in the material properties resulting from manufacturing variations on coating life predictions. A strong foundation in process-property-performance correlations as well as regular monitoring and control of the coating process is essential for robust and well-controlled coating process. Proprietary and/or commercially available diagnostic tools can help in achieving these goals, but their usage in industrial setting is still limited. Various key contributors to process variability are briefly discussed along with the limitations of existing process and product control methods. Other aspects that are important for product reliability and consistency in serial manufacturing as well as advanced testing methodologies to simplify and enhance product inspection and improve objectivity are briefly described.

  16. DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

    2005-01-01

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this reporting period we coated coupons of selected alloy steels with diffusion coatings of Cr and Al, as well as with titanium and tantalum nitrides. The coated samples were analyzed for their surface composition. In several instances, the samples were also cut to determine the depth profile of the coating. Several of the early runs did not yield uniform or deep enough coatings and hence a significant portion of the effort in this period was devoted fixing the problems with our fluidized bed reactor. Before the end of the quarter we had prepared a number of samples, many of them in duplicates, and sent one set to Wabash River Energy Laboratory for them to install in their gasifier. The gasifier was undergoing a scheduled maintenance and thus presented an opportunity to place some of our coupons in the stream of an operating gasifier. The samples submitted included coated and uncoated pairs of different alloys.

  17. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  18. Chrome Free Coatings for Fasteners and Metal Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Chrome free coatings for fasteners and metal components Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...DX551810 Delphi DX45501804 Fiat 9.57513/ Tipo IV Ford S439 (WSS-M21P37-A1) Automotive Company Specification Number General Motors GM7114M General Motors

  19. Development of wear resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haselkorn, M.H. (Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States))

    1992-04-01

    Improved fuel economy and a reduction of emissions can be achieved by insulation of the combustion chamber components to reduce heat rejection. However, insulating the combustion chamber components will also increase the operating temperature of the piston ring/cylinder liner interface from approximately 150{degree}C to over 300{degree}C. Existing ring/liner materials can not withstand these higher operating temperatures and for this reason, new materials need to be developed for this critical tribological interface. The overall goal of this program is the development of piston ring/cylinder liner material pairs which would be able to provide the required friction and wear properties at these more severe operating conditions. More specifically, this program first selected, and then evaluated, potential d/wear resistant coatings which could be applied to either piston rings an or cylinder liners and provide, at 350{degree}C under lubricated conditions, coefficients of friction below 0.1 and wear rates of less than 25 {times} lO{sup {minus}6} mm/hour. The processes selected for applying the candidate wear resistant coatings to piston rings and/or cylinder liners were plasma spraying, chemical vapor, physical vapor and low temperature arc vapor deposition techniques as well as enameling techniques.

  20. Using sol-gel component as additive to foundry coatings to improve casting quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Poulsen, T.; Gravesen, B.

    2012-01-01

    The improvement of foundry coatings to enhance performance is important. This paper investigates the effect of using sol‐gel component as an additive to foundry coatings applied on chemically bonded sand cores. Three parameters at three levels each were investigated using Taguchi experimental...... was evaluated. The results show that the surface quality of castings obtained by adding the sol‐gel component to the coatings for cold box cores has no significant difference from castings produced with coatings without sol‐gel component. On the other hand, the addition of the sol‐gel component in coatings...

  1. Precision Cleaning and Protection of Coated Optical Components for NIF Small Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, Jim [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The purpose of this procedure shall be to define the precision cleaning of finished, coated, small optical components for NIF at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. The term “small optical components” includes coated optics that are set into simple mounts, as well as coated, un-mounted optics.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Multifunctional Two-Component Waterborne Polyurethane Coatings: Fluorescence, Thermostability and Flame Retardancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Yin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent and flame-retardant two-component waterborne polyurethane coatings were synthesized using 1,5-dihydroxy naphthalene, a halogen-free polyphosphate and a hydrophilic curing agent, and their properties were systematically characterized. The average particle sizes and zeta potential values were below 170 nm and −30 mV. Meanwhile, the multifunctional two-component waterborne polyurethane coatings had strong fluorescence intensities. When comparing with the coatings with 0.5 wt % 1,5-dihydroxy naphthalene, the coatings with 1.0 wt % 1,5-dihydroxy naphthalene had a stronger microphase separation. Interestingly, the thermostability of the multifunctional coatings was remarkably improved through 1.0 wt % 1,5-dihydroxy naphthalene, and besides it belonged to nonflammable materials. Additionally, all of the coating films passed the solvent resistance testing. These samples with different amounts of 1,5-dihydroxy naphthalene are environmental friendly, especially applications that require transparent and fluorescent coatings.

  3. THE USE OF COATINGS FOR HOT CORROSION AND EROSION PROTECTION IN TURBINE HOT SECTION COMPONENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayrettin AHLATCI

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available High pressure turbine components are subjected to a wide variety of thermal and mechanical loading during service. In addition, the components are exposed to a highly oxidizing atmosphere which may contain contaminants such as sulphates, chlorides and sulphuorous gases along with erosive media. So the variety of surface coatings and deposition processes available for the protection of blade and vane components in gas turbines are summarised in this study. Coating types range from simple diffusion aluminides to modified aluminides and a CoCrAlY overlayer. The recommendations for corrosion-resistant coatings (for low temperature and high temperature hot corrosion environments are as follows: silicon aluminide and platinumchromium aluminide for different gas turbine section superalloys substrates. Platinum metal additions are used to improve the properties of coatings on turbine components. Inorganic coatings based on ceramic films which contain aluminium or aluminium and silicon are very effective in engines and gas turbines. Diffusion, overlayer and thermal barrier coatings which are deposited on superalloys gas turbine components by pack cementation, plasma spraying processes and a number of chemical vapour deposition, physical vapour deposition processes (such as electron beam, sputtering, ion plating are described. The principles underlying the development of protective coatings serve as a useful guide in the choice of coatings for other high temperature applications.

  4. Quantitative thermoelastic measurement on a helicopter glass fibre component underneath a surface anti-fretting coating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA has been applied to measure the first stress invariant on a composite helicopter component under load. The component comprised inner mono-directional glass fiber layers with an outer central plate in glass fiber cloth, covered by an anti-fretting surface coating. In order to obtain quantitative results, a previous calibration of the thermoelastic constant obtained on a composite sample with a similar anti-fretting coating has been necessary.

  5. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF NONSTICK COATINGS TO REDUCE INK ADHESION TO PRINTING PRESS COMPONENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a project to identify surface coatings or preparations that might reduce and/or eliminate the need for solvent cleaning of ink-feed-system components of printing equipment. The study was designed to provide qualitative, but not quantitative, results. T...

  6. Tribological characterization of zirconia coatings deposited on Ti6Al4V components for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni, M; Lopomo, N; Marchiori, G; Gambardella, A; Boi, M; Bianchi, M; Visani, A; Pavan, P; Russo, A; Marcacci, M

    2016-05-01

    One of the most important issues leading to the failure of total joint arthroplasty is related to the wear of the plastic components, which are generally made of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Therefore, the reduction of joint wear represents one of the main challenges the research in orthopedics is called to address nowadays. Surface treatments and coatings have been recognized as innovative methods to improve tribological properties, also in the orthopedic field. This work investigated the possibility to realize hard ceramic coatings on the metal component of a prosthesis, by means of Pulsed Plasma Deposition, in order to reduce friction and wear in the standard coupling against UHMWPE. Ti6Al4V substrates were coated with a 2 μm thick yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) layer. The mechanical properties of the YSZ coatings were assessed by nanoindentation tests performed on flat Ti6Al4V substrates. Tribological performance was evaluated using a ball-on-disk tribometer in dry and lubricated (i.e. with fetal bovine serum) highly-stressing conditions, up to an overall distance of 10 km. Tribology was characterized in terms of coefficient of friction (CoF) and wear rate of the UHMWPE disk. After testing, specimens were analyzed through optical microscopy and SEM images, in order to check the wear degradation mechanisms. Progressive loading scratch tests were also performed in dry and wet conditions to determine the effects of the environment on the adhesion of the coating. Our results supported the beneficial effect of YSZ coating on metal components. In particular, the proposed solution significantly reduced UHMWPE wear rate and friction. At 10 km of sliding distance, a wear rate reduction of about 18% in dry configuration and of 4% in presence of serum, was obtained by the coated group compared to the uncoated group. As far as friction in dry condition is concerned, the coating allowed to maintain low CoF values until the end of the tests, with an

  7. Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Jordi Perez; Marc Hornbostel; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

    2007-05-31

    Advanced electric power generation systems use a coal gasifier to convert coal to a gas rich in fuels such as H{sub 2} and CO. The gas stream contains impurities such as H{sub 2}S and HCl, which attack metal components of the coal gas train, causing plant downtime and increasing the cost of power generation. Corrosion-resistant coatings would improve plant availability and decrease maintenance costs, thus allowing the environmentally superior integrated-gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) plants to be more competitive with standard power-generation technologies. Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in the IGCC system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high-temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy will improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. The Fe- and Ni-based high-temperature alloys are susceptible to sulfidation attack unless they are fortified with high levels of Cr, Al, and Si. To impart corrosion resistance, these elements need not be in the bulk of the alloy and need only be present at the surface layers. In this study, the use of corrosion-resistant coatings on low alloy steels was investigated for use as high-temperature components in IGCC systems. The coatings were deposited using SRI's fluidized-bed reactor chemical vapor deposition technique. Diffusion coatings of Cr and Al were deposited by this method on to dense and porous, low alloy stainless steel substrates. Bench-scale exposure tests at 900 C with a simulated coal gas stream containing 1.7% H{sub 2}S showed that the low alloy steels such SS405 and SS409 coated with

  8. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Hurst, Janet B.; Halbig, Michael Charles; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Costa, Gustavo; Mccue, Terry R.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation reviews the NASA advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) system development for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustors particularly under the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation, Fundamental Aeronautics and Transformative Aeronautics Concepts Programs. The emphases have been placed on the current design challenges of the 2700-3000F capable environmental barrier coatings for low NOX emission combustors for next generation turbine engines by using advanced plasma spray based processes, and the coating processing and integration with SiC-SiC CMCs and component systems. The developments also have included candidate coating composition system designs, degradation mechanisms, performance evaluation and down-selects; the processing optimizations using TriplexPro Air Plasma Spray Low Pressure Plasma Spray (LPPS), Plasma Spray Physical Vapor Deposition and demonstration of EBC-CMC systems. This presentation also highlights the EBC-CMC system temperature capability and durability improvements under the NASA development programs, as demonstrated in the simulated engine high heat flux, combustion environments, in conjunction with high heat flux, mechanical creep and fatigue loading testing conditions.

  9. Adhesion of thrombotic components to the surface of a clinically used oxygenator is not affected by Trillium coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Goor, J.M.; van Oeveren, W.; Rutten, P.M.; Tijssen, J.G.; Eijsman, L.

    2006-01-01

    The Trillium (R) coating is designed to minimize adsorption of protein and the attachment of cells and other particles. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of surface coating on the adhesion of thrombotic components (activated platelets, white blood cells and fibrin) to the

  10. Vesicular calcium regulates coat retention, fusogenicity, and size of pre-Golgi intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Marvin; Nycz, Deborah C; Joglekar, Ashwini; Fertschai, Ismene; Malli, Roland; Graier, Wolfgang F; Hay, Jesse C

    2010-03-15

    The significance and extent of Ca(2+) regulation of the biosynthetic secretory pathway have been difficult to establish, and our knowledge of regulatory relationships integrating Ca(2+) with vesicle coats and function is rudimentary. Here, we investigated potential roles and mechanisms of luminal Ca(2+) in the early secretory pathway. Specific depletion of luminal Ca(2+) in living normal rat kidney cells using cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) resulted in the extreme expansion of vesicular tubular cluster (VTC) elements. Consistent with this, a suppressive role for vesicle-associated Ca(2+) in COPII vesicle homotypic fusion was demonstrated in vitro using Ca(2+) chelators. The EF-hand-containing protein apoptosis-linked gene 2 (ALG-2), previously implicated in the stabilization of sec31 at endoplasmic reticulum exit sites, inhibited COPII vesicle fusion in a Ca(2+)-requiring manner, suggesting that ALG-2 may be a sensor for the effects of vesicular Ca(2+) on homotypic fusion. Immunoisolation established that Ca(2+) chelation inhibits and ALG-2 specifically favors residual retention of the COPII outer shell protein sec31 on pre-Golgi fusion intermediates. We conclude that vesicle-associated Ca(2+), acting through ALG-2, favors the retention of residual coat molecules that seem to suppress membrane fusion. We propose that in cells, these Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms temporally regulate COPII vesicle interactions, VTC biogenesis, cargo sorting, and VTC maturation.

  11. A Robot Trajectory Optimization Approach for Thermal Barrier Coatings Used for Free-Form Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhenhua; Qi, Beichun; Tao, Chongyuan; Luo, Jie; Chen, Yuepeng; Xie, Changjun

    2017-10-01

    This paper is concerned with a robot trajectory optimization approach for thermal barrier coatings. As the requirements of high reproducibility of complex workpieces increase, an optimal thermal spraying trajectory should not only guarantee an accurate control of spray parameters defined by users (e.g., scanning speed, spray distance, scanning step, etc.) to achieve coating thickness homogeneity but also help to homogenize the heat transfer distribution on the coating surface. A mesh-based trajectory generation approach is introduced in this work to generate path curves on a free-form component. Then, two types of meander trajectories are generated by performing a different connection method. Additionally, this paper presents a research approach for introducing the heat transfer analysis into the trajectory planning process. Combining heat transfer analysis with trajectory planning overcomes the defects of traditional trajectory planning methods (e.g., local over-heating), which helps form the uniform temperature field by optimizing the time sequence of path curves. The influence of two different robot trajectories on the process of heat transfer is estimated by coupled FEM models which demonstrates the effectiveness of the presented optimization approach.

  12. Tribological Performance Optimization of Electroless Ni-P-W Coating Using Weighted Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Roy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation is an experimental approach to deposit electroless Ni-P-W coating on mild steel substrate and find out the optimum combination of various tribological performances on the basis of minimum friction and wear, using weighted principal component analysis (WPCA. In this study three main tribological parameters are chosen viz. load (A, speed (B and time(C. The responses are coefficient of friction and wear depth. Here Weighted Principal Component Analysis (WPCA method is adopted to convert the multi-responses into single performance index called multiple performance index (MPI and Taguchi L27 orthogonal array is used to design the experiment and to find the optimum combination of tribological parameters for minimum coefficient of friction and wear depth. ANOVA is performed to find the significance of the each tribological process parameters and their interactions. The EDX analysis, SEM and XRD are performed to study the composition and structural aspects.

  13. Development of wear resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haselkorn, M.H. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Improved fuel economy and a reduction of emissions can be achieved by insulation of the combustion chamber components to reduce heat rejection. However, insulating the combustion chamber components will also increase the operating temperature of the piston ring/cylinder liner interface from approximately 150{degree}C to over 300{degree}C. Existing ring/liner materials can not withstand these higher operating temperatures and for this reason, new materials need to be developed for this critical tribological interface. The overall goal of this program is the development of piston ring/cylinder liner material pairs which would be able to provide the required friction and wear properties at these more severe operating conditions. More specifically, this program first selected, and then evaluated, potential d/wear resistant coatings which could be applied to either piston rings an or cylinder liners and provide, at 350{degree}C under lubricated conditions, coefficients of friction below 0.1 and wear rates of less than 25 {times} lO{sup {minus}6} mm/hour. The processes selected for applying the candidate wear resistant coatings to piston rings and/or cylinder liners were plasma spraying, chemical vapor, physical vapor and low temperature arc vapor deposition techniques as well as enameling techniques.

  14. Partitioning behavior of aromatic components in jet fuel into diverse membrane-coated fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Ronald E; Xia, Xin-Rui; Barlow, Beth M; Riviere, Jim E

    2007-11-01

    Jet fuel components are known to partition into skin and produce occupational irritant contact dermatitis (OICD) and potentially adverse systemic effects. The purpose of this study was to determine how jet fuel components partition (1) from solvent mixtures into diverse membrane-coated fibers (MCFs) and (2) from biological media into MCFs to predict tissue distribution. Three diverse MCFs, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, lipophilic), polyacrylate (PA, polarizable), and carbowax (CAR, polar), were selected to simulate the physicochemical properties of skin in vivo. Following an appropriate equilibrium time between the MCF and dosing solutions, the MCF was injected directly into a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC-MS) to quantify the amount that partitioned into the membrane. Three vehicles (water, 50% ethanol-water, and albumin-containing media solution) were studied for selected jet fuel components. The more hydrophobic the component, the greater was the partitioning into the membranes across all MCF types, especially from water. The presence of ethanol as a surrogate solvent resulted in significantly reduced partitioning into the MCFs with discernible differences across the three fibers based on their chemistries. The presence of a plasma substitute (media) also reduced partitioning into the MCF, with the CAR MCF system being better correlated to the predicted partitioning of aromatic components into skin. This study demonstrated that a single or multiple set of MCF fibers may be used as a surrogate for octanol/water systems and skin to assess partitioning behavior of nine aromatic components frequently formulated with jet fuels. These diverse inert fibers were able to assess solute partitioning from a blood substitute such as media into a membrane possessing physicochemical properties similar to human skin. This information may be incorporated into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to provide a more accurate assessment of tissue dosimetry of

  15. Plasma Response to Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.G. Bell, H.W. Kugel, R. Kaita, L.E. Zakharov, H. Schneider, B.P. LeBlanc, D. Mansfield, R.E. Bell, R. Maingi, S. Ding, S.M. Kaye, S.F. Paul, S.P. Gerhardt, J.M. Canik, J.C. Hosea, G. Taylor and the NSTX Research Team

    2009-08-20

    Experiments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have shown beneficial effects on the performance of divertor plasmas as a result of applying lithium coatings on the graphite and carbonfiber- composite plasma-facing components. These coatings have mostly been applied by a pair of lithium evaporators mounted at the top of the vacuum vessel which inject collimated streams of lithium vapor towards the lower divertor. In NBI-heated, deuterium H-mode plasmas run immediately after the application of lithium, performance modifications included decreases in the plasma density, particularly in the edge, and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron and ion temperatures and the energy confinement time. Reductions in the number and amplitude of ELMs were observed, including complete ELM suppression for periods up to 1.2 s, apparently as a result of altering the stability of the edge. However, in the plasmas where ELMs were suppressed, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities, although not of lithium itself which remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. The impurity buildup could be inhibited by repetitively triggering ELMs with the application of brief pulses of an n = 3 radial field perturbation. The reduction in the edge density by lithium also inhibited parasitic losses through the scrape-off layer of ICRF power coupled to the plasma, enabling the waves to heat electrons in the core of H-mode plasmas produced by NBI. Lithium has also been introduced by injecting a stream of chemically stabilized, fine lithium powder directly into the scrape-off layer of NBI-heated plasmas. The lithium was ionized in the SOL and appeared to flow along the magnetic field to the divertor plates. This method of coating produced similar effects to the evaporated lithium but at lower amounts.

  16. The effects of seed coating treatment on yield and yield components ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, coating fuzzy cotton seeds is proposed as an alternative to delintation. Coating makes fuzzy cotton seeds more suitable for the pneumatic spacing planter. Also, unlike delintation, sulphuric acid is not used for coating and this eliminates the problems associated with its usage such as seed loss, pollution and ...

  17. Vacuum Plasma Spraying W-coated Reduced Activation Structural Steels for Fusion Plasma Facing Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Tungsten (W) and its alloys are considered as candidate materials for plasma facing materials of the first wall and diverter components in fusion reactor systems because of high sputtering resistance and low tritium retention in a fusion environment. Therefore, it is considered that the joining between W and reduced activation structural steels, and its evaluation, are critical issues for the development of fusion reactors. However, the joining between these materials is a very challenging process because of significant differences in their physical properties, particularly the mismatch of coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE). For instance, the CTE of pure W is known to be about 4.3Χ10{sup -6}K{sup -1}; however, that of martensitic steels reaches over three times, about 12-14Χ10{sup -6}K{sup -1} at room temperature even up to 373K. Nevertheless, several joining techniques have been developed for joining between W and structural steels, such as a vapor deposition method, brazing and diffusion bonding. Meanwhile, vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) is supposed to be one of the prospective methods to fabricate a sufficient W layer on the steel substrates because of the coating of a large area with a relatively high fabricating rate. In this study, the VPS method of W powders on reduced activation steels was employed, and its microstructure and hardness distribution were investigated. ODS ferritic steels and F82H steel were coated by VPS-W, and the microstructure and hardness distribution were investigated. A microstructure analysis revealed that pure W was successfully coated on steel substrates by the VPS process without an intermediate layer, in spite of a mismatch of the CTE between dissimilar materials. After neutron irradiation, irradiation hardening significantly occurred in the VPSW. However, the hardening of VPS-W was lesser than that of bulk W irradiated HFIR at 773K. Substrate materials, ODS ferritic steels, and F82H steel, did not show irradiation hardening

  18. Effect of Graphene Coating on the Heat Transfer Performance of a Composite Anti-/Deicing Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity of a graphene coating for anti-/deicing is rarely studied. This paper presents an improved anti-/deicing efficiency method for composite material anti-/deicing by using the heat-transfer characteristic of a graphene coating. An anti-/deicing experiment was conducted using the centrifugal force generated by a helicopter rotor. Results showed that the graphene coating can accelerate the internal heat transfer of the composite material, thereby improving the anti-icing and deicing efficiency of the helicopter rotor. The spraying process parameters, such as coating thickness and spraying pressure, were also studied. Results showed that reducing coating thickness and increasing spraying pressure are beneficial in preparing a graphene coating with high thermal conductivity. This study provides an experimental reference for the application of a graphene coating in anti-/deicing.

  19. Development of a competitive lateral flow immunoassay for progesterone: influence of coating conjugates and buffer components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posthuma-Trumpie, Geertruida A; Korf, Jakob; van Amerongen, Aart

    2008-11-01

    Several aspects of the development of competitive lateral flow immunoassays (LFIAs) are described. The quantitation of progesterone is taken as an example. The LFIA format consisted of a nitrocellulose membrane spotted with various progesterone conjugates as the test line. A mixture of primary antibody and secondary antibody adsorbed to colloidal carbon was used for signal generation. A digital scanner and dedicated software were used to quantitate the response. A reappraisal of the checkerboard titration, often used in the optimisation of immunoassays, is discussed. Surprisingly, the highest sensitivity of the LFIA format (IC(50) of 0.6 microg L(-1) progesterone in buffer) was achieved by using a high coating concentration of the analyte-protein conjugate and a high dilution of the antibody solution. Immediate addition of all reagents in LFIA was superior to premixing the components and allowing prereaction. Of several blocking agents tested bovine serum albumin was superior in performance, whereas the combination of ovalbumin and progesterone substantially influenced test results.

  20. Protective Coatings for Space System Components Fabricated Using Ionic Self Assembled Monolayer Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miler, Mike

    1997-01-01

    Self-assembled multilayer thin film fabrication methods offer unique opportunities to incorporate multiple functionalities into coatings for space system materials and structures as well as consumer products...

  1. Tibial component fixation with a peri-apatite coating: evaluation by radiostereometric analysis in a canine total knee arthroplasty model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Matthew J; Leone, Kendall A; Dunbar, Michael J; Race, Amos; Rosenbaum, Paula F; Sacks, Jonathan M

    2012-06-01

    Cementless fixation for the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains problematic. Peri-Apatite (PA), a solution-deposited hydroxyapatite, is under investigation as an option for improving the fixation of cementless tibial components. In this study, radiostereometric analysis was used to document implant migration in 48 dogs that underwent TKA with cementless, PA-coated, or cemented tibial components. Migration at 12 weeks was similar in the 2 groups. At 12 months, there was greater migration in the PA-coated group, but the difference between the 2 groups was below the threshold considered clinically significant. In this canine TKA model, cementless fixation with PA performed less well than did cemented fixation, but not to a degree that would make a clinical difference in the short term. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effects of seed coating treatment on yield and yield components ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-13

    Sep 13, 2010 ... unlike delintation, sulphuric acid is not used for coating and this eliminates the problems associated with its usage such as seed loss, ... characteristics of cotton seed; coating may even improve the characteristics of the seeds. Also, no significant ..... The structure of the control and certification of seed and ...

  3. Electron transport in plasmas with lithium-coated plasma-facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Craig Michael

    The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak designed to study the lowrecycling regime through the use of lithium-coated shells conformal to the last closed flux surface (LCFS). A lowered recycling rate is expected to flatten core Te profiles, raise edge Te, strongly affect n e profiles, and enhance confinement. To study these unique plasmas, a Thomson scattering diagnostic uses a ≤ 20 J, 30 ns FWHM pulsed ruby laser to measure Te and ne at 11 radial points on the horizontal midplane, spaced from the magnetic axis to the outer edge at a single temporal point for each discharge. Scattered light is imaged through a spectrometer onto an intensified CCD. The diagnostic is absolutely calibrated using a precision light source and Raman scattering. Measurements of n e are compared with line integrated density measurements from a microwave interferometer. Adequate signal to noise is obtained with ne ≥ 2 x10 18 m--3. Thomson profiles of plasmas following evaporation of lithium onto room-temperature plasmafacing components (PFCs) are used in conjunction with magnetic equilibria as input for TRANSP modeling runs. Neoclassical calculations are used to determine Ti profiles, which have levels that agree with passive charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) measurements. TRANSP results for confinement times and stored energies agree with diamagnetic loop measurements. Results of chie result in values as low as 7 m2/s near the core, which rise to around 100 m2/s near the edge. These are the first measurements of chie in LTX, or its predecessor, the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), with lithium PFCs.

  4. Functionalization of PDMS modified and plasma activated two-component polyurethane coatings by surface attachment of enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Alexej; Richter, Katharina; Sell, Stephan; Fenske, Mandus; Tornow, Christian; Stenzel, Volkmar; Grunwald, Ingo

    2013-05-01

    This article describes a new strategy for coupling the enzyme horseradish peroxidase to a two-component polyurethane (2C-PUR) coating. A stable polymer conjugate was achieved by combining the enzyme and the 2C-PUR coating which was modified with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), located at the surface. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet system was used to convert alkyl groups from the PDMS into polar silanol functionalities. This conversion was proven by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the stability of the activated 2C-PUR surface containing silanol groups was determined by measuring the contact angle as a function of time. Compared to the non-modified 2C-PUR systems the one with PDMS displayed a higher stability over a time period over 28 h. In a silanization process the coating was treated with (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane and the enzyme was subsequently immobilized to the coating via the cross linker glutaraldehyde to receive new biomimetic catalytic/enzymatic functions. The chemical immobilization (chemisorption) of the enzyme to the surface showed statistically significant higher biological activity as compared to references samples without using a cross linker (physisorption). The presented technique offers the opportunity to design new and smart multifunctional surface coatings which employ biomimetic capabilities.

  5. Functionalization of PDMS modified and plasma activated two-component polyurethane coatings by surface attachment of enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreider, Alexej; Richter, Katharina; Sell, Stephan; Fenske, Mandus; Tornow, Christian; Stenzel, Volkmar [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials - IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Grunwald, Ingo, E-mail: ingo.grunwald@ifam.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials - IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    This article describes a new strategy for coupling the enzyme horseradish peroxidase to a two-component polyurethane (2C-PUR) coating. A stable polymer conjugate was achieved by combining the enzyme and the 2C-PUR coating which was modified with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), located at the surface. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet system was used to convert alkyl groups from the PDMS into polar silanol functionalities. This conversion was proven by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the stability of the activated 2C-PUR surface containing silanol groups was determined by measuring the contact angle as a function of time. Compared to the non-modified 2C-PUR systems the one with PDMS displayed a higher stability over a time period over 28 h. In a silanization process the coating was treated with (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane and the enzyme was subsequently immobilized to the coating via the cross linker glutaraldehyde to receive new biomimetic catalytic/enzymatic functions. The chemical immobilization (chemisorption) of the enzyme to the surface showed statistically significant higher biological activity as compared to references samples without using a cross linker (physisorption). The presented technique offers the opportunity to design new and smart multifunctional surface coatings which employ biomimetic capabilities.

  6. Synthesis and Physical Property of Multi-Functional Siloxane Protective Coating Materials Applicable for Electronic Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Hyun; Cho, Hyeon Mo; Lee, Myong Euy [Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Four multialkoxy-functionalized siloxane base-polymers were synthesized through either hydro-silylation or condensation reactions in order to prepare multi-networked siloxane polymers having appropriate physical properties for protective coating in fabrications of electronics. Formulations of 4 base-polymers gave coating materials and. Product A showed well-controlled flowing and leveling properties, and product A-2 was successfully applied to protective insulating coating for junction areas of connectors and chips in PDP controller. Tack free time, extrusion rate, dielectric breakdown voltage, hardness, thermal stability, water resistance and flame resistance of products and were examined.

  7. Significantly reduced adsorption and activation of blood components in a membrane oxygenator system coated with crosslinkable zwitterionic copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Bing; Shi, Ke-Hui; Jiang, Hong-Li; Gong, Yong-Kuan

    2016-08-01

    A crosslinkable zwitterionic copolymer PMBT was coated onto the surfaces of polypropylene hollow fiber membrane (PP-HFM) oxygenator and its connecting tubes. The PMBT copolymer coating on the oxygenator circuit formed a cell outer membrane mimetic surface with excellent stability. The hemocompatibility of the PMBT copolymer coated PP-HFM oxygenator circuit was evaluated by animal extracorporeal circulation. The concentrations of clotting components fibrinogen and platelet in the blood were almost unchanged during the circulation through the PMBT copolymer coated oxygenator circuits. By contrast, the concentrations of fibrinogen and platelet were significantly reduced to 52% and 56% respectively in the uncoated oxygenator group due to adsorption and thrombogenesis of the blood during 2h circulation. Moreover, concentration of activation marker beta-thromboglobulin for platelet in the blood was remarkably lower in the PMBT group than the uncoated control group (pblood components and eliminate heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, none of them have fabricated stable and densely assembled film, especially with crosslinkable amphiphilic random copolymer described in our manuscript. The novel features of our work include. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhanced Shielding Performance of HLW Storage Packages via Multi- Component Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfrey, Leigh [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2017-10-02

    The steel coatings developed here prevent water, dirt, and chemical contaminants from the atmosphere or soil from making contact with waste packages that would damage and weaken them during long-term storage. In addition, through this project we demonstrated that a range of coatings have this capability, will survive in the environment they will be used in, and can be deposited readily on large surfaces which is critical for their use in waste storage.

  9. Chemical vapour deposition of optical coatings onto small scale complex optical components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchman, M. L.; Gibson, D. R.; Manookian, W.; Waddell, E. M.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we describe how optical coatings can be deposited uniformly with a high precision and reproducibility on 3-dimensional substrates, such as spherical lenses, by CVD. We present results that will highlight some specific advantages of CVD over the traditionally used methods of e-beam evaporation and magnetron sputtering and we will show that CVD has tremendous potential for enhancing the quality of optical coatings and for making cost savings.

  10. Whole blood treated with riboflavin and ultraviolet light: quality assessment of all blood components produced by the buffy coat method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Peter; Culibrk, Brankica; Karwal, Simrath; Serrano, Katherine; Levin, Elena; Bu, Daniel; Bhakta, Varsha; Sheffield, William P; Goodrich, Raymond P; Devine, Dana V

    2015-04-01

    Pathogen inactivation (PI) technologies are currently licensed for use with platelet (PLT) and plasma components. Treatment of whole blood (WB) would be of benefit to the blood banking community by saving time and costs compared to individual component treatment. However, no paired, pool-and-split study directly assessing the impact of WB PI on the subsequently produced components has yet been reported. In a "pool-and-split" study, WB either was treated with riboflavin and ultraviolet (UV) light or was kept untreated as control. The buffy coat (BC) method produced plasma, PLT, and red blood cell (RBC) components. PLT units arising from the untreated WB study arm were treated with riboflavin and UV light on day of production and compared to PLT concentrates (PCs) produced from the treated WB units. A panel of common in vitro variables for the three types of components was used to monitor quality throughout their respective storage periods. PCs derived from the WB PI treatment were of significantly better quality than treated PLT components for most variables. RBCs produced from the WB treatment deteriorated earlier during storage than untreated units. Plasma components showed a 3% to 44% loss in activity for several clotting factors. Treatment of WB with riboflavin and UV before production of components by the BC method shows a negative impact on all three blood components. PLT units produced from PI-treated WB exhibited less damage compared to PLT component treatment. © 2014 AABB.

  11. Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings (TTBCs) for Low Emission, High Efficiency Diesel Engine Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Brad Beardsley, Caterpillar Inc.; Dr. Darrell Socie, University of Illinois; Dr. Ed Redja, University of Illinois; Dr. Christopher Berndt, State University of New York at Stony Brook

    2006-03-02

    The objective of this program was to advance the fundamental understanding of thick thermal barrier coating (TTBC) systems for application to low heat rejection diesel engine combustion chambers. Previous reviews of thermal barrier coating technology concluded that the current level of understanding of coating system behavior is inadequate and the lack of fundamental understanding may impede the application of thermal barrier coating to diesel engines.(1) Areas of TTBC technology examined in this program include powder characteristics and chemistry; bond coating composition, coating design, microstructure and thickness as they affect properties, durability, and reliability; and TTBC "aging" effects (microstructural and property changes) under diesel engine operating conditions. Fifteen TTBC ceramic powders were evaluated. These powders were selected to investigate the effects of different chemistries, different manufacturing methods, lot-to-lot variations, different suppliers and varying impurity levels. Each of the fifteen materials has been sprayed using 36 parameters selected by a design of experiments (DOE) to determine the effects of primary gas (Ar and N2), primary gas flow rate, voltage, arc current, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spraying distance. The deposition efficiency, density, and thermal conductivity of the resulting coatings were measured. A coating with a high deposition efficiency and low thermal conductivity is desired from an economic standpoint. An optimum combination of thermal conductivity and disposition efficiency was found for each lot of powder in follow-on experiments and disposition parameters were chosen for full characterization.(2) Strengths of the optimized coatings were determined using 4-point bending specimens. The tensile strength was determined using free-standing coatings made by spraying onto mild steel substrates which were subsequently removed by chemical etching. The compressive strengths of the coatings

  12. 'One-component' ultrathin multilayer films based on poly(vinyl alcohol) as stabilizing coating for phenytoin-loaded liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasada, Katarzyna; Łukasiewicz-Atanasov, Magdalena; Kłysik, Katarzyna; Lewandowska-Łańcucka, Joanna; Gzyl-Malcher, Barbara; Puciul-Malinowska, Agnieszka; Karewicz, Anna; Nowakowska, Maria

    2015-11-01

    Ultrathin "one-component" multilayer polymeric films for potential biomedical applications were designed based on polyvinyl alcohol,-a non-toxic, fully degradable synthetic polymer. Good uniformity of the obtained film and adequate adsorption properties of the polymeric layers were achieved by functional modification of the polymer, which involved synthesis of cationic and anionic derivatives. Synthesized polymers were characterized by FTIR, NMR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering measurements and elemental analysis. The layer by layer assembly technique was used to build up a multilayer film and this process was followed using UV-Vis spectroscopy and ellipsometry. The morphology and thickness of the obtained multilayered film material was evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Preliminary studies on the application of the obtained multilayer film for coating of liposomal nanocarriers containing phenytoin, an antiarrhythmic drug, were performed. The coating effectively stabilizes liposomes and the effect increases with an increasing number of deposited layers until the polymeric film reaches the optimal thickness. The obtained release profiles suggest that bilayer-coated liposomes release phenytoin less rapidly than uncoated ones. The cytotoxicity studies performed for all obtained nanocarriers confirmed that none of them has negative effect on cell viability. All of the performed experiments suggest that liposomes coated with ultrathin film obtained from PVA derivatives can be attractive drug nanocarriers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ammonia volatilization and yield components after application of polymer-coated urea to maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Zavaschi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A form of increasing the efficiency of N fertilizer is by coating urea with polymers to reduce ammonia volatilization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of polymer-coated urea on the control of ammonia volatilization, yield and nutritional characteristics of maize. The experiment was carried out during one maize growing cycle in 2009/10 on a Geric Ferralsol, inUberlândia, MG, Brazil. Nitrogen fertilizers were applied as topdressing on the soil surface in the following urea treatments: polymer-coated urea at rates of 45, 67.5 and 90 kg ha-1 N and one control treatment (no N, in randomized blocks with four replications. Nitrogen application had a favorable effect on N concentrations in leaves and grains, Soil Plant Analysis Development (SPAD chlorophyll meter readings and on grain yield, where as coated urea had no effect on the volatilization rates, SPAD readings and N leaf and grain concentration, nor on grain yield in comparison to conventional fertilization.

  14. Development of wear-resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naylor, M.G.S. (Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States))

    1992-06-01

    The tribological properties of a variety of advanced coating materials have been evaluated under conditions which simulate the piston ring -- cylinder liner environment near top ring reversal in a heavy duty diesel engine. Coated ring'' samples were tested against a conventional pearlitic grey cast iron liner material using a high temperature reciprocating wear test rig. Tests were run with a fresh CE/SF 15W40lubricant at 200 and 350{degrees}C, with a high-soot, engine-tested oil at 200{degrees}C and with no lubrication at 200{degrees}C. For lowest wear under boundary lubricated conditions, the most promising candidates to emerge from this study were high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3} C{sub 2} - 20% NiCr and WC - 12% Co cermets, low temperature arc vapor deposited (LTAVD) CrN and plasma sprayed chromium oxides. Also,plasma sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} materials were found to give excellent wear resistance in unlubricated tests and at extremely high temperatures (450{degrees}C) with a syntheticoil. All of these materials would offer substantial wear reductions compared to the conventional electroplated hard chromium ring facing and thermally sprayed metallic coatings, especially at high temperatures and with high-soot oils subjected to degradation in diesel environments. The LTAVD CrN coating provided the lowest lubricated wear rates of all the materials evaluated, but may be too thin (4 {mu}m) for use as a top ring facing. Most of the coatings evaluated showed higher wear rates with high-soot, engine-tested oil than with fresh oil, with increases of more than a factor of ten in some cases. Generally, metallic materials were found to be much more sensitive to soot/oil degradation than ceramic and cermet coatings. Thus, decreased soot sensitivity'' is a significant driving force for utilizing ceramic or cermet coatings in diesel engine wear applications.

  15. The inhibition of the adhesion of clinically isolated bacterial strains on multi-component cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol)-based polymer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, Isabel C. Saldarriaga; van der Mei, Henny C.; Lochhead, Michael J.; Grainger, David W.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined bacterial adhesion to a new multi-component cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol)-based polymer coating that can be applied by spin-coating or spraying onto diverse biomaterials. Adhesion of five clinically isolated bacterial strains involved in biomaterial-centered infections were

  16. Agglutination of Jelly Coat and Cortical Granule Components and the Block to Polyspermy in the Amphibian Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, Ron E.; Nishihara, Tatsuro; Hedrick, Jerry L.

    1974-01-01

    A block to polyspermy in amphibians is established at fertilization by the conversion of the vitelline envelope to the fertilization envelope. In Xenopus laevis a major ultrastructural change in the envelope at fertilization is the appearance of an electron-dense layer, termed the F layer, between the envelope and the inner-most jelly coat layer, J1. The F layer is derived, at least in part, from materials released from the cortical granules. Further definition of the origin and chemical nature of the F layer was sought by using isolated cortical granule (CG) exudate and jelly coat layer J1. In double diffusion experiments, the isolated components interacted in an agglutination reaction producing a band of precipitation. The agglutination involved α-galactoside residues and metal ions (Ca++). Employing chemically modified jelly, we demonstrated that sulfhydryl-disulfide interchanges were not involved in the agglutination and, with 35S-labeled jelly, that the agglutinating J1 component possessed sulfate esters. Both the CG exudate and the J1 components contained carbohydrate, as evidenced by their lectin reactivity. A number of ionic polymers, both natural and synthetic, were tested as chemical analogs of CG exudate and J1; none gave an agglutination band. Dissolved jelly coat material from eggs of two different species of frogs agglutinated with CG exudate, while jelly from sea urchin eggs and hyaluronic acid from mammalian eggs did not. Thus, the agglutination reaction was chemically and phylogenetically specific. An electron-dense layer, similar to the F layer, formed on the outer of the vitelline envelope when jellied unfertilized eggs were immersed in CG exudate; such eggs were not fertilizable. We suggest that in Xenopus laevis, and perhaps other organisms as well, an agglutination type of reaction between cortical granule components and egg integuments is a participant in the structural and molecular events establishing a block to polyspermy. Images PMID

  17. Lipid-coated hydrogel shapes as components of electrical circuits and mechanical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, K. Tanuj; Bayley, Hagan

    2012-11-01

    Recently, two-dimensional networks of aqueous droplets separated by lipid bilayers, with engineered protein pores as functional elements, were used to construct millimeter-sized devices such as a light sensor, a battery, and half- and full-wave rectifiers. Here, for the first time, we show that hydrogel shapes, coated with lipid monolayers, can be used as building blocks for such networks, yielding scalable electrical circuits and mechanical devices. Examples include a mechanical switch, a rotor driven by a magnetic field and painted circuits, analogous to printed circuit boards, made with centimeter-length agarose wires. Bottom-up fabrication with lipid-coated hydrogel shapes is therefore a useful step towards the synthetic biology of functional devices including minimal tissues.

  18. Components of coated vesicles and nuclear pore complexes share a common molecular architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Devos

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous features distinguish prokaryotes from eukaryotes, chief among which are the distinctive internal membrane systems of eukaryotic cells. These membrane systems form elaborate compartments and vesicular trafficking pathways, and sequester the chromatin within the nuclear envelope. The nuclear pore complex is the portal that specifically mediates macromolecular trafficking across the nuclear envelope. Although it is generally understood that these internal membrane systems evolved from specialized invaginations of the prokaryotic plasma membrane, it is not clear how the nuclear pore complex could have evolved from organisms with no analogous transport system. Here we use computational and biochemical methods to perform a structural analysis of the seven proteins comprising the yNup84/vNup107-160 subcomplex, a core building block of the nuclear pore complex. Our analysis indicates that all seven proteins contain either a beta-propeller fold, an alpha-solenoid fold, or a distinctive arrangement of both, revealing close similarities between the structures comprising the yNup84/vNup107-160 subcomplex and those comprising the major types of vesicle coating complexes that maintain vesicular trafficking pathways. These similarities suggest a common evolutionary origin for nuclear pore complexes and coated vesicles in an early membrane-curving module that led to the formation of the internal membrane systems in modern eukaryotes.

  19. Large area SiC coating technology of RBSC for semiconductor processing component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Weon Ju

    2001-06-01

    As the semiconductor process is developed for the larger area wafer and the larger-scale integration, the processing fixtures are required to have excellent mechanical and high temperature properties. This highlights the importance of silicon carbide-based materials as a substitute for quartz-based susceptors. In this study, SiC coating technology on reaction sintered (RS) SiC with thickness variation of +/- 10% within a diameter of 8 inch by low pressure chemical vapor deposition has been developed for making a plate type SiC fixture such as heater, baffle, etc., with a diameter of 12 inch. Additionally, a state of art on fabrication technology and products of the current commercial SiC fixtures has been described.

  20. Refurbishment of SRB aluminum components by walnut hull blast removal of protective coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colberg, W. R.; Gordon, G. H.; Jackson, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    A test program was conducted to develop, optimize, and scale up an abrasive blasting procedure was developed for refurbishment of specific SRB components: aft skirt, forward skirt, frustrum, and painted piece parts. Test specimens utilizing 2219 T87 aluminum substrate of varying thicknesses were prepared and blasted at progressively increasing pressures with selected abrasives. Specimens were analyzed for material response. The optimum blasting parameters were determined on panel specimens and verified on a large cylindrical integrated test bed.

  1. Isolation of a protein-containing cell surface component from Streptococcus sanguis which affects its adherence to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite.

    OpenAIRE

    Liljemark, W. F.; Bloomquist, C G

    1981-01-01

    The isolation and partial characterization of a protein-containing cell surface component from Streptococcus sanguis which blocks the adherence of this microbe to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite are described. Several methods of extraction were attempted. Sonication of whole cells and cell walls proved to be the most successful and yielded biologically active adherence-blocking components. The adherence-blocking ability of these components was effective in intraspecies blocking experiments. The ...

  2. Optical Coating Performance for Heat Reflectors of the JWST-ISIM Electronic Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashford, Robert A.; Perrygo, Charles M.; Garrison, Matthew B.; White, Bryant K.; Threat, Felix T.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Jeans, James W.; Huber, Frank K.; Bousquet, Robert R.; Shaw, Dave

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a thermal radiator design consisting of lightweight composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings for use on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) structure. The structure will have a Thermal Subsystem unit to provide passive cooling to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) control electronics. The ISIM, in the JWST observatory, is the platform that provides the mounting surfaces for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the control electronic generated-heat away from JWST is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft s own heat does not interfere with the infrared-light gathering of distant cosmic sources. The need to have lateral control in the emission direction of the IEC (ISIM Electronics Compartment) radiators led to the development of a directional baffle design that uses multiple curved mirrorlike surfaces. This concept started out from the so-called Winston non-imaging optical concentrators that use opposing parabolic reflector surfaces, where each parabola has its focus at the opposite edge of the exit aperture. For this reason they are often known as compound parabolic concentrators or CPCs. This radiator system with the circular section was chosen for the IEC reflectors because it offers two advantages over other designs. The first is that the area of the reflector strips for a given radiator area is less, which results in a lower mass baffle assembly. Secondly, the fraction of energy emitted by the radiator strips and subsequently reflected by the baffle is less. These fewer reflections reduced the amount of energy that is absorbed and eventually re-emitted, typically in a direction outside the design emission range angle. A baffle frame holds the mirrors in position above a radiator panel on the IEC. Together, these will direct the majority of the heat from the IEC above the sunshield away towards empty space.

  3. Thermochemistry of Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminum-Silicate (CMAS) and Components of Advanced Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo C. C.; Acosta, Waldo A.; Zhu, Dongming; Ghoshal, Anindya

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the degradation mechanism studies of thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) of gas turbines by molten CaO-MgO-Al(exp. 2)O(exp. 3)-SiO(exp. 2) CMAS). CMAS minerals are usually referred as silicon-containing sand dust and volcano ash materials that are carried by the intake air into gas turbines, e.g. in aircraft engines, and their deposits often react at high temperatures (greater than 1200 degrees C) with the engine turbine coating systems and components. The high temperature reactions causes degradation and accelerated failure of the static and rotating components of the turbine engines. We discuss some results of the reactions between the CMAS and Rare-Earth (RE = Y, Yb, Dy, Gd, Nd and Sm) - oxide stabilized ZrO(exp. 2) or HfO(exp. 2) systems, and the stability of the resulting oxides and silicates. Plasma sprayed hollow tube samples (outside diameter = 4.7 mm, wall thickness = 0.76 mm and = 26 mm height) were half filled with CMAS powder, wrapped and sealed with platinum foil, and heat treated at 1310 degrees C for 5h. Samples were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction, and cross-section electron microscopy analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It was found that CMAS penetrated the samples at the grain boundaries and dissolved the TEBC materials to form silicate phases containing the rare-earth elements. Furthermore, it was found that apatite crystalline phases were formed in the samples with total rare-earth content higher than 12 mol% in the reaction zone for the ZrO(exp. 2) system. In general, samples with the nominal compositions (30YSZ), HfO(exp. 2)-7Dy(exp. 2)O(exp. 2) and ZrO(exp. 2)-9.5Y(exp. 2)O(exp. 3)-2.25Gd(exp. 2)O(exp. 3)-2.25Yb(exp. 2)O(exp. 3) exhibited lower reactivity or more resistance to CMAS than the other coating compositions of this work.

  4. DETERMINATION OF THE THICKNESS OF THE COMPONENTS OF A DOUBLE-LAYER NICKEL-CHROMIUM COATING BY MAGNETIC PONDEROMOTIVE METHOD WITH UNILATERAL ACCESS TO THE CONTROLLED SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Gnutenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of thick-layer nickel (up to 700 μm and chromium (up to 200 μm coatings has been widely used to give the combustion chamber of a liquid-propellant rocket engine the required operational properties. The main parameter that determines the ability of a coating to fulfill its function is its thickness and uniformity of its distribution. The main problem of current nondestructive methods for determining the thickness of coatings under consideration is that they can be used only at the stage of production of rocket engineering products, when there is an access to the product from the side of the inner wall of the combustion chamber before and after applying a chromium coating to the nickel sublayer. However, when an already finished product arrives at subsequent stages of assembly to another enterprise, there is often a need of incoming control of the thicknesses of coatings from nickel and chromium. In this case, it is not possible to apply existing control techniques to a finished product, or the use of these techniques leads to unacceptable errors in the results of measurements. The goal of the research was to develop a technique for nondestructive determination of the thickness of each component of the two-layer nickel-chromium coating by the magnetic ponderomotive method under conditions of unilateral access to the finished product from the side of the chromium coating.A new technique for nondestructive determination of the thicknesses of nickel and chromium coatings of the double-layer structure on a finished product without a priori data on the properties or thicknesses of these coatings or a product in general is proposed using a magnetic ponderomotive method.This newly developed technique is implemented in the thickness gauge TEP-XN1 of double-layer nickel- chromium coatings, which is successfully used by enterprises of the rocket and space industry of the Russian Federation.

  5. Membrane-coating lattice scaffolds in the nuclear pore and vesicle coats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leksa, Nina C

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) regulates all traffic between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. It is a large protein assembly composed of multiple copies of ∼30 nucleoporins (nups). Structural studies of the NPC have been limited by its considerable size and complexity. Progress toward understanding the structure of this nanomachine has benefited from its modular nature, which allows for this 40–60 MDa assembly to be broken down into subcomplexes that can be studied individually. While recent work by both crystallographers and electron microscopists has greatly enhanced our model of the NPC, the resolution gap between crystal and EM structures remains too large to confidently place individual proteins within the context of the fully assembled NPC. In an effort to arrive at a veritable model of the NPC, we solved the structure of several scaffold nups and defined the ancestral coatomer element (ACE1) common to a set of nucleoporins and COPII vesicle coat proteins. Subsequently, we proposed a lattice-like model of the NPC, analogous to the COPII lattice, in which ACE1 proteins form the edge elements and β-propellers form the vertex elements. Here, we review our recent studies, speculate on how interactions between subcomplexes of the NPC are mediated, and outline the steps and challenges that lay ahead on the path to understanding this enormous assembly in molecular detail. PMID:21327078

  6. Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Tot

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique case of metaplastic breast carcinoma with an epithelial component showing tumoral necrosis and neuroectodermal stromal component is described. The tumor grew rapidly and measured 9 cm at the time of diagnosis. No lymph node metastases were present. The disease progressed rapidly and the patient died two years after the diagnosis from a hemorrhage caused by brain metastases. The morphology and phenotype of the tumor are described in detail and the differential diagnostic options are discussed.

  7. Qualification of thermal sprayed corrosion coatings of thick-walled components (QUAKOS). Final report; Qualifizierung thermisch gespritzter Korrosionsschutzschichten fuer dickwandige Behaelterkomponenten. QUAKOS. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tragsdorf, Inga Maren

    2015-11-15

    During the interim storage of thick-walled transport and storage components, damages at the surface may occur which break up the corrosion protection and thus may cause complex repair works during the operation period. The method of high velocity oxygen-fuel coating is intending to optimize the resulting requirements. In connection with loading of casks, parallelly, the application of more corrosion resistant, impact and scratch resistant inside coatings of casks is examined under consideration of an interim storage which time period is not foreseeable at present. The method of applying high velocity oxygen-fuel is generating dense sprayed coatings with excellent adhesive properties. This method is particularly suitable for generating extremely thin layers with a high grade of accuracy and low porosity; even a repair of defects is easy. In the project, different spraying powders (Metco 15F, Diamalloy 2001 and Hoeganaes 1660.02) are examined as spraying material for corrosion protection of the work material ductile graphite cast iron. An extensive pre-examination programme with an additional thermal spray method (arc wire) provides the basis for coating of a thick-walled small component. Coating of the small component is presented under consideration of procedural optimization and the examination methods (water tests and salt spray tests)

  8. Influence of pre-alloying process on microstructure and components of 22MnB5 hot stamping steel coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang ZHANG

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Using coating on the hot forming steel can effectively avoid the surface defects such as surface oxidation and decarburization in the thermoforming process, and make the workpiece have a certain degree of corrosion resistance after molding. This paper studies the effect of the variation of microstructure and heat treatment process in the heating process of 22MnB5 hot forming steel with Zn plating layer on coating microstructure and properties. The microstructure and morphology of 22MnB5 with zinc based coatings by different pre-alloying and austenitizing technology are analyzed by SEM, EDS, and glow spectrum analyzer. The results show that under the same pre-alloying time, with the temperature improved, the coating's phases change from ζ phase, δ phase, Γ1 phase and Γ phase to mainly Γ phase; under the same temperature, as the pre-alloying process time goes by, the contents of Fe gradually increases but Zn decreases, finally the Fe content could reach 88%, and Zn reaches 8% in the coating; the coating is almost all α-Fe (Zn with only a small amount of Γ phase on the surface, and the thickness of the coating is about 12 μm; high quality coatings could be obtained under the pre-alloying process of heating at 550 ℃ for 30 min and austenitizing at 920 ℃ for 4 min. The result provides important reference for developing new hot forming steel coating.

  9. Development of wear-resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components. Volume 1, Coating development and tribological testing: Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naylor, M.G.S. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The tribological properties of a variety of advanced coating materials have been evaluated under conditions which simulate the piston ring -- cylinder liner environment near top ring reversal in a heavy duty diesel engine. Coated ``ring`` samples were tested against a conventional pearlitic grey cast iron liner material using a high temperature reciprocating wear test rig. Tests were run with a fresh CE/SF 15W40lubricant at 200 and 350{degrees}C, with a high-soot, engine-tested oil at 200{degrees}C and with no lubrication at 200{degrees}C. For lowest wear under boundary lubricated conditions, the most promising candidates to emerge from this study were high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3} C{sub 2} - 20% NiCr and WC - 12% Co cermets, low temperature arc vapor deposited (LTAVD) CrN and plasma sprayed chromium oxides. Also,plasma sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} materials were found to give excellent wear resistance in unlubricated tests and at extremely high temperatures (450{degrees}C) with a syntheticoil. All of these materials would offer substantial wear reductions compared to the conventional electroplated hard chromium ring facing and thermally sprayed metallic coatings, especially at high temperatures and with high-soot oils subjected to degradation in diesel environments. The LTAVD CrN coating provided the lowest lubricated wear rates of all the materials evaluated, but may be too thin (4 {mu}m) for use as a top ring facing. Most of the coatings evaluated showed higher wear rates with high-soot, engine-tested oil than with fresh oil, with increases of more than a factor of ten in some cases. Generally, metallic materials were found to be much more sensitive to soot/oil degradation than ceramic and cermet coatings. Thus, decreased ``soot sensitivity`` is a significant driving force for utilizing ceramic or cermet coatings in diesel engine wear applications.

  10. Nanomechanical Properties and Deformation Behaviors of Multi-Component (AlCrTaTiZrNxSiy High-Entropy Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Yi Lin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study multi-component (AlCrTaTiZrNxSiy high-entropy coatings were developed by co-sputtering of AlCrTaTiZr alloy and Si in an Ar/N2 mixed atmosphere with the application of different substrate biases and Si-target powers. Their nanomechanical properties and deformation behaviors were characterized by nanoindentation tests. Because of the effect of high mixing entropies, all the deposited multi-component (AlCrTaTiZrNxSiy high-entropy coatings exhibited a simple face-centered cubic solid-solution structure. With an increased substrate bias and Si-target power, their microstructures changed from large columns with a [111] preferred orientation to a nanocomposite form with ultrafine grains. The hardness, H/E ratio and H3/E2 ratio of (AlCrTaTiZrN1.07Si0.15 coating reached 30.2 GPa, 0.12 and 0.41 GPa, respectively, suggesting markedly suppressed dislocation activities and a very high resistance to wear and plastic deformation, attributable to grain refinements and film densification by the application of substrate bias, a nanocomposite structure by the introduction of silicon nitrides, and a strengthening effect induced by severe lattice distortions. In the deformed regions under indents, stacking faults or partial dislocations were formed, while in the stress-released regions, near-perfect lattices recovered.

  11. The epsins define a family of proteins that interact with components of the clathrin coat and contain a new protein module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenthal, J A; Chen, H; Slepnev, V I

    1999-01-01

    with the binding of both proteins to Eps15. Epsin 2, like epsin 1, is enriched in brain, is present in a brain-derived clathrin-coated vesicle fraction, is concentrated in the peri-Golgi region and at the cell periphery of transfected cells, and partially colocalizes with clathrin. High overexpression of green...... fluorescent protein-epsin 2 mislocalizes components of the clathrin coat and inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The epsins define a new protein family implicated in membrane dynamics at the cell surface.......Epsin (epsin 1) is an interacting partner for the EH domain-containing region of Eps15 and has been implicated in conjunction with Eps15 in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We report here the characterization of a similar protein (epsin 2), which we have cloned from human and rat brain libraries...

  12. Analysis of components depth profile at the interface of Ti6242 alloy and TiNi coatings after high temperature oxidation in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galdikas, A. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Kaunas University of Medicine (Lithuania); Riviere, J.P.; Pichon, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, University of Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Petraitiene, A.; Moskalioviene, T. [Physics Department, Kaunas University of Technology, 50 Studentu st., Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2010-11-15

    We have analyzed the interfacial elemental depth profile evolution after high temperature isothermal oxidation of NiTi coatings deposited by dynamic ion mixing on a Ti6242 alloy (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo). NiTi coatings (thickness 0.4 {mu}m) were deposited at room temperature (RT) by ion beam sputtering. High temperature isothermal oxidation tests in 1 atm flowing synthetic air (80% N{sub 2}, 20% O{sub 2}) have been conducted at 500 C and 600 C during 100 hours. We have observed a non-monotonous depth distribution of nickel in GDOES depth profiles after oxidation of TiNi/Ti6242: nickel segregates to the surface of TiNi coating and to the interface between TiNi coating and Ti6242 alloy. We propose a kinetic model based on rate equations for analyzing the depth profile. This model includes microprocesses taking place during oxidation in air such as: adsorption of nitrogen and oxygen, diffusion of components through the film and interface, formation of chemical compounds. It is shown by modeling that non-monotonous depth profile of nickel occurs because nickel from TiNi coating is forming a nickel oxide compound when oxygen atoms reach the film/alloy interface. XRD analysis confirms the presence of nickel oxide in the TiNi/Ti6242 interface after oxidation at both temperatures 500 C and 600 C (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Isolation of a protein-containing cell surface component from Streptococcus sanguis which affects its adherence to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljemark, W F; Bloomquist, C G

    1981-01-01

    The isolation and partial characterization of a protein-containing cell surface component from Streptococcus sanguis which blocks the adherence of this microbe to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite are described. Several methods of extraction were attempted. Sonication of whole cells and cell walls proved to be the most successful and yielded biologically active adherence-blocking components. The adherence-blocking ability of these components was effective in intraspecies blocking experiments. The extract obtained from cell walls of S. sanguis was examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and shown to contain one major and two to three minor bands when stained with Coomassie blue. The molecular weight of the major band was estimated to be 70,000 to 90,000. Gel filtration of the sonified cell wall extract on 10% agarose yielded two active adherence-blocking peaks, the void volume and a second peak. Images PMID:6273317

  14. Estimation of metal temperature of MCrAlY coated IN738 components based on interdiffusion behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Hald, John

    2006-01-01

    fraction diagrams show that a precipitate free zone forms between the coating and superalloy and grows with time. The width of the growing zone was estimated on the basis of average intensity profiles obtained from experimental x-ray maps measured using energy dispersive spectroscopy in a scanning electron....... The developed model was used to estimate metal temperatures for a service exposed, first stage gas turbine blade....

  15. Traffic jams in fish bones: ER-to-Golgi protein transport during zebrafish development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, David B; Knapik, Ela W

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, morphogens and membrane receptors are synthesized in the ER and transported through the Golgi complex to the cell surface and the extracellular space. The first leg in this journey from the ER to Golgi is facilitated by the Coat Protein II (COPII) vesicular carriers. Genetic defects in genes encoding various COPII components cause a broad spectrum of human diseases, from anemia to skeletal deformities. Here, we summarize our findings in zebrafish and discuss how mutations in COPII elements may cause specific cellular and developmental defects.

  16. Traffic jams in fish bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, David B

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, morphogens and membrane receptors are synthesized in the ER and transported through the Golgi complex to the cell surface and the extracellular space. The first leg in this journey from the ER to Golgi is facilitated by the coat protein II (COPII) vesicular carriers. Genetic defects in genes encoding various COPII components cause a broad spectrum of human diseases, from anemia to skeletal deformities. Here, we summarize our findings in zebrafish and discuss how mutations in COPII elements may cause specific cellular and developmental defects. PMID:21178403

  17. Process Improvement by Eliminating Mixing of Whole Blood Units after an Overnight Hold Prior to Component Production Using the Buffy Coat Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastronardi, Cherie; Levin, Elena; Bhakta, Varsha; Yi, Qi-Long; Stewart, Tamiko; Jenkins, Craig; Lefresne, Wanda; Sheffield, William; Acker, Jason P.

    2013-01-01

    The elimination of a thorough manual mixing of whole blood (WB) which takes place following the overnight hold, but before the first centrifugation step, during buffy coat component production at Canadian Blood Services (CBS) was investigated. WB was pooled after donation and split. Pairs of platelet, red blood cell (RBC), and plasma components were produced, with half using the standard method and half using a method in which the mixing step was eliminated. Quality assessments included yield, pH, CD62P expression and morphology for platelets, hemoglobin, hematocrit, hemolysis, and supernatant K+ for RBCs, and volume and factor VIII activity levels for plasma. All components, produced using either method, met CBS quality control criteria. There were no significant differences in platelet yield between components produced with and without mixing. A significant difference was seen for RBC hemolysis at expiry (P = 0.03), but for both groups, levels met quality control requirements. Noninferiority of components produced without mixing was confirmed for all parameters. Manual mixing is laborious and has a risk of repetitive strain for production staff and its significance is unclear. Elimination of this step will improve process efficiencies without compromising quality. PMID:24066260

  18. Process Improvement by Eliminating Mixing of Whole Blood Units after an Overnight Hold Prior to Component Production Using the Buffy Coat Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherie Mastronardi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The elimination of a thorough manual mixing of whole blood (WB which takes place following the overnight hold, but before the first centrifugation step, during buffy coat component production at Canadian Blood Services (CBS was investigated. WB was pooled after donation and split. Pairs of platelet, red blood cell (RBC, and plasma components were produced, with half using the standard method and half using a method in which the mixing step was eliminated. Quality assessments included yield, pH, CD62P expression and morphology for platelets, hemoglobin, hematocrit, hemolysis, and supernatant K+ for RBCs, and volume and factor VIII activity levels for plasma. All components, produced using either method, met CBS quality control criteria. There were no significant differences in platelet yield between components produced with and without mixing. A significant difference was seen for RBC hemolysis at expiry (P=0.03, but for both groups, levels met quality control requirements. Noninferiority of components produced without mixing was confirmed for all parameters. Manual mixing is laborious and has a risk of repetitive strain for production staff and its significance is unclear. Elimination of this step will improve process efficiencies without compromising quality.

  19. In vitro evaluation of whole faba bean and its seed coat as a potential source of functional food components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalışkantürk Karataş, Selen; Günay, Demet; Sayar, Sedat

    2017-09-01

    In vitro studies were conducted to evaluate the particular nutritional benefits of whole faba bean seed (WFB) and fava bean seed coat (FBSC). Total dietary fiber contents of WFB and FBSC were 27.5% and 82.3%, respectively. FBSC were contained much higher total phenolic substances, condensed tannins, and total antioxidant activity than WFB. Bile acid (BA)-binding capacities of in vitro digested samples and nutritionally important products produced by in vitro fermentation of digestion residues were also studied. The BA-binding capacities of WFB and FBSC were 1.94 and 37.50μmol/100mg, respectively. Total BA bound by FBSC was even higher than the positive standard cholestyramine. Lignin and other constituents of the Klason residue were found to influence BA-binding properties. Moreover, the extent of the in vitro fermentation process showed that, fermentability of FBSC residue was significantly lower than that of WFB residue. Overall, faba bean, especially its seed coat, has great potential as a functional food. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A comparative study of "plasmacup" and "porous-coated" acetabular components: survival after 10 to 12 years of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Negreiros Vicente

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Our primary aim was to compare the long-term survivorship rates and the rates of successful osseointegration between two different types of uncemented acetabular components. INTRODUCTION: Two types of alloys have primarily been used for the manufacture of the uncemented acetabular components: titanium-based and cobalt-based alloys. A titanium-based alloy appears to be more effective with regard to interface stress transfer to the host bone because of its lower elastic modulus relative to a cobalt-based alloy. This supposed mechanical advantage of a titanium-based alloy component motivated this comparative study. METHODS: Two uncemented acetabular components, a porous-coated acetabulum and a Plasmacup®, were compared with a focus on long-term prosthesis survivorship and the development of acetabular osseointegration. Five radiographic signs of osseointegration were evaluated at the last follow-up appointment: (1 absence of radiolucent lines, (2 presence of a superolateral buttress, (3 medial stress-shielding, (4 radial trabeculae, and (5 an inferomedial buttress. We considered the presence of any three of these radiographic signs, in the absence of acetabular dislocation or symptoms, to be indicative of successful acetabular osseointegration. RESULTS: Among 70 patients implanted with the porous-coated acetabulum, 80% achieved osseointegration over a mean follow-up time of 11.9 years versus 75.3% of the 73 patients who received a Plasmacup insert over a mean of 10.7 years. Prosthesis survivorship rates were not different between the two groups. Revision surgery due to mild or severe acetabular osteolysis, polyethylene wear, and aseptic loosening occurred in eight patients (11.4% with a PCA versus nine (12.3% with a Plasmacup. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that, during the first ten years after surgery, there is no significant difference between these two types of uncemented cups with regard to either prosthesis survivorship or successful

  1. CHARACTERISTICS OF PROTECTIVE COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seljaev Vladimir Pavlovich

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the computer program «Statistical analysis of color components for paint and varnish coatings», methods are suggested and experimental results are obtained for decorative characteristics polyurethane coatings.

  2. Effects of the Acrylic Polyol Structure and the Selectivity of the Employed Catalyst on the Performance of Two-component Aqueous Polyurethane Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladin Gligoric

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of aqueous acrylic polyols (single step and multi step synthesis typehave been investigated for their performance in the two-component aqueous polyurethaneapplication, by using more selective catalysts. The aliphatic polyfunctional isocyanatesbased on hexamethylen diisocyanates have been employed as suitable hardeners. Thecomplex of zirconium, commercially known as K-KAT®XC-6212, and manganese (IIIcomplexes with mixed ligands based on the derivative of maleic acid have been used ascatalysts in this study. Both of the aqueous polyols give good results, in terms of applicationand hardness, when elevated temperatures and more selective catalysts are applied. A moreselective catalyst promotes the reaction between the isocyanate and polyol component. Thisincreases the percentage of urethane bonds and the degree of hardness in the films formedfrom the two components of aqueous polyurethane lacquers. The polyol based on the singlestep synthesis route is favourable concerning potlife and hardness. The obtained resultsshow that the performance of the two-component aqueous polyurethane coatings depends onthe polymer structure of the polyols as well as on the selectivity of the employed catalyst.

  3. Effect of adhesive properties of buffy coat on the quality of blood components produced with Top & Top and Top & Bottom bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerelli, Eugenio; Nocera, Martina; Di Bartolomeo, Erminia; Panzani, Paola; Baricchi, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    The Transfusion Medicine Unit of Reggio Emilia currently collects whole blood using conventional quadruple Fresenius Top & Top bags. In this study, new Fresenius Top & Bottom bags were assessed and compared to the routine method with regards to product quality and operational requirements. Twenty-one whole blood units were collected with both the new and the traditional bags, and then separated. Quality control data were evaluated and compared in order to estimate yield and quality of final blood components obtained with the two systems. We collected other bags, not included in the ordinary quality control programme, for comparison of platelet concentrates produced by pools of buffy coat. Compared to the traditional system, the whole blood units processed with Top & Bottom bags yielded larger plasma volumes (+5.7%) and a similar amount of concentrated red blood cells, but with a much lower contamination of lymphocytes (-61.5%) and platelets (-86.6%). Consequently, the pooled platelets contained less plasma (-26.3%) and were significantly richer in platelets (+17.9%). This study investigated the effect of centrifugation on the adhesiveness of the buffy coat to the bag used for whole blood collection. We analysed the mechanism by which this undesirable phenomenon affects the quality of packed red blood cells in two types of bags. We also documented the incomparability of measurements on platelet concentrates performed with different principles of cell counting: this vexing problem has important implications for biomedical research and for the establishment of universal product standards. Our results support the conclusion that the Top & Bottom bags produce components of higher quality than our usual system, while having equal operational efficiency. Use of the new bags could result in an important quality improvement in blood components manufacturing.

  4. Characterization of blood components separated from donated whole blood after an overnight holding at room temperature with the buffy coat method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fa Qiang; Kang, Wei; Peng, Yu; Wang, Wei Ming

    2011-10-01

    With buffy coat (BC) processing of whole blood (WB) donations, increase in WB storage time to facilitate overnight holding before the separation of blood components would be a logistically attractive development. This study undertakes a comparative in vitro characterization of blood components prepared from WB samples that were either processed within 8 hours or stored overnight at room temperature before processing by the BC method. The WB units (400 mL) collected were either processed within 8 hours (fresh blood) or stored overnight (overnight blood) at room temperature. WB units were separated into individual-component red blood cells (RBCs), BC, and plasma. The in vitro quality of these blood components (RBCs, pooled platelet concentrates [PCs], and plasma) was analyzed during storage. Levels of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) were found to be significantly lower immediately after processing, compared with the fresh WB samples, in RBCs that had been separated from an overnight-hold sample. However, this difference was not apparent after 14 days of storage. In pooled PCs, measurements for glucose, lactate, PO(2), PCO(2), extent of shape change, and hypotonic shock response were similar. The platelet yield in PCs prepared from an overnight-hold WB sample was significantly higher, while CD62P expression and annexin V binding were lower (p component that was most sensitive to the prolongation of production time and it only had 80% of the activity of the 8-hour FP. These data suggest that blood components (RBCs, pooled PCs, and FP) separated from WB that has been stored overnight at room temperature by the BC method are of acceptable quality. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  5. Three-component vesicle aggregation driven by adhesion interactions between Au nanoparticles and polydopamine-coated nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haibao; Zhou, Yongfeng; Huang, Wei; Zheng, Yongli; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2014-06-11

    Large-scale and robust vesicle aggregates were obtained through molecular recognition among cell-sized polymer vesicles, carbon nanotubes and AuNPs, driven by adhesion interactions between Au and polydopamine. Vesicle fusion was effectively avoided in this three-component vesicle aggregation process.

  6. Thermal-Fatigue Analysis of W-coated Ferritic-Martensitic Steel Mockup for Fusion Reactor Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Suk Kwon; Park, Seong Dae; Kim, Dong Jun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Se Yeon; Hong, Bong Guen [Chonbuk University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, commercial ANSYS-CFX for thermalhydraulic analysis and ANSYS-mechanical for the thermo-mechanical analysis are used to evaluate the thermal-lifetime of the mockup to determine the test conditions. Also, the Korea Heat Load Test facility with an Electron Beam (KoHLT-EB) will be used and its water cooling system is considered to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis especially for considering the two-phase analysis with a higher heat flux conditions. Through the ITER blanket first wall (BFW) development project in Korea, the joining methods were developed with a beryllium (Be) layer as a plasma-facing material, a copper alloy (CuCrZr) layer as a heat sink, and type 316L austenitic stainless steel (SS316L) as a structural material. And joining methods were developed such as Be as an armor and FMS as a structural material, or W as an armor and FMS as a structural material were developed through the test blanket module (TBM) program. As a candidate of PFC for DEMO, a new W/FMS joining methods, W coating with plasma torch, have been developed. The HHF test conditions are found by performing a thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical analysis with the conventional codes such as ANSYSCFX and .mechanical especially for considering the two-phase condition in cooling tube.

  7. A single-component inimer containing cross-linkable ultrathin polymer coating for dense polymer brush growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweat, Daniel P; Kim, Myungwoong; Yu, Xiang; Gopalan, Padma

    2013-03-19

    We have developed a highly versatile universal approach to grow polymer brushes from a variety of substrates with high grafting density by using a single-component system. We describe a random copolymer which consists of an inimer, p-(2-bromoisobutyloylmethyl)styrene (BiBMS), copolymerized with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Thermal cross-linking created a mat that was stable during long exposure in organic solvent even with sonication or during Soxhlet extraction. The absolute bromine density was determined via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to be 1.86 ± 0.12 Br atoms/nm(3). The ratio of experimental density to calculated absolute initiator density suggests that ~25% of the bromine is lost during cross-linking. Surface-initiated ATRP (SI-ATRP) was used to grow PMMA brushes on the substrate with sacrificial initiator in solution. The brushes were characterized by ellipsometry, XPS, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine thickness, composition, and homogeneity. By correlating the molecular weight of polymer grown in solution with the brush layer thickness, a high grafting density of 0.80 ± 0.06 chains/nm(2) was calculated. By synthesizing the copolymer before cross-linking on the substrate, this single-component approach avoids any issues with blend miscibility as might be present for a multicomponent curable mixture, while resulting in high chain density on a range of substrates.

  8. Effect of film thickness and viscoelasticity on separability of vapour classes by wavelet and principal component analyses of polymer-coated surface acoustic wave sensor transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant; Yadava, R. D. S.

    2011-02-01

    The transient response of a polymer-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) vapour sensor depends on partitioning and diffusion of vapour species into the polymer in conjunction with its thickness and viscoelastic properties. The shapes of transient signals carry information about vapour identities due to specificity of the partition coefficient and the diffusion coefficient. The analysis of transient signals therefore offers a simpler approach for vapour identification in comparison to conventional electronic nose systems that employ a broadly selective sensor array. The transient response-based methods are however not developed to a similar level of maturity as their sensor array counterparts. The main reason for this is associated with complex signal generation kinetics and polymer viscoelasticity. The latter is independent of vapour identities (assuming low concentrations) but influences sensor response through nonlinear dependences on polymer thickness and viscoelastic coefficients. In this paper, we endeavour to find out whether viscoelasticity and its manifestation through thickness dependences could be turned into an advantage for transient-based vapour identification. Using an established SAW sensor model with additive noise we analyse sensor transients by wavelet decomposition and principal component analysis (PCA) for various combinations of polymer thickness, viscoelastic storage and loss moduli and noise level. We calculate vapour class separability measures defined on the basis of scatter matrices of principal components of wavelet coefficients to determine the discrimination ability of sensor transients for various combinations of film thickness and viscoelastic parameters. The simulation experiments are performed by considering a polyisobutylene-coated SAW oscillator sensor under exposure to seven volatile organic compounds (chloroform, chlorobenzene, o-dichlorobenzene, n-heptane, toluene, n-hexane and n-octane). The film thicknesses are varied from thin

  9. Axisymmetric fretting analysis in coated cylinder

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    erties by coating the surface. There is rather scanty literature available on fretting analysis of coated components. Presence of such coatings has a large influence on the near surface state of stress. The effect of coatings on the severity of fretting is the focus of this paper. Results obtained for both hard and soft coatings are ...

  10. The tribology of PS212 coatings and PM212 composites for the lubrication of titanium 6Al-4V components of a Stirling engine space power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Lukaszewicz, Victor; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The Stirling space power machine incorporates a linear alternator to generate electrical power. The alternator is a reciprocating device that is driven by a solar or nuclear-powered Stirling engine. The power piston and cylinder are made of titanium 6Al-4V (Ti6-4) alloy, and are designed to be lubricated by a hydrodynamically-generated gas film. Rubbing occurs during starts and stops and there is the possibility of an occasional high speed rub. Since titanium is known to have a severe galling tendency in sliding contacts, a 'back-up', self-lubricating coating on the cylinder and/or the piston is needed. This report describes the results of a research program to study the lubrication of Ti6-4 with the following chromium carbide based materials: plasma-sprayed PS212 coatings and sintered PM212 counterfaces. Program objectives are to achieve adherent coatings on Ti6-4 and to measure the friction and wear characteristics of the following sliding combinations under conditions simulative of the Stirling-driven space power linear alternator: Ti6-4/Ti6-4 baseline, Ti6-4/PS212-coated Ti6-4, and PS212-coated Ti6-4/PM212.

  11. Switchable antifouling coatings and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, Michele L. Baca; Dirk, Shawn M.; Johnson, Ross Stefan

    2017-02-28

    The present invention relates to antifouling coatings capable of being switched by using heat or ultraviolet light. Prior to switching, the coating includes an onium cation component having antimicrobial and antibacterial properties. Upon switching, the coating is converted to a conjugated polymer state, and the cationic component is released with any adsorbed biofilm layer. Thus, the coatings herein have switchable and releasable properties. Methods of making and using such coatings are also described.

  12. Nanoparticles affect PCR primarily via surface interactions with PCR components: using amino-modified silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles as a main model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanomaterials have been widely reported to affect the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, many studies in which these effects were observed were not comprehensive, and many of the proposed mechanisms have been primarily speculative. In this work, we used amino-modified silica-coated magnetic n...

  13. European coatings conference - Marine coatings. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This volume contains 13 lectures (manuscripts or powerpoint foils) with the following topics: 1. Impact of containerization on polyurethane and polyurea in marine and protective coatings (Malte Homann); 2. The application of combinatorial/high-throughput methods to the development of marine coatings (Bret Chisholm); 3. Progress and perspectives in the AMBIO (advanced nanostructured surfaces for the control of biofouling) Project (James Callow); 4. Release behaviour due to shear and pull-off of silicone coatings with a thickness gradient (James G. Kohl); 5. New liquid rheology additives for high build marine coatings (Andreas Freytag); 6. Effective corrosion protection with polyaniline, polpyrrole and polythiophene as anticorrosice additives for marine paints (Carlos Aleman); 7. Potential applications of sol gel technology for marine applications (Robert Akid); 8: Performance of biocide-free Antifouling Coatings for leisure boats (Bernd Daehne); 9. Novel biocidefree nanostructured antifouling coatings - can nano do the job? (Corne Rentrop); 10. One component high solids, VOC compliant high durability finish technology (Adrian Andrews); 11. High solid coatings - the hybrid solution (Luca Prezzi); 12. Unique organofunctional silicone resins for environmentally friendly high-performance coatings (Dieter Heldmann); 13. Silicone-alkyd paints for marine applications: from battleship-grey to green (Thomas Easton).

  14. CK2 phosphorylates Sec31 and regulates ER-To-Golgi trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuko Koreishi

    Full Text Available Protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is an initial and rate-limiting step of molecular trafficking and secretion. This is mediated by coat protein II (COPII-coated vesicles, whose formation requires small GTPase Sar1 and 6 Sec proteins including Sec23 and Sec31. Sec31 is a component of the outer layer of COPII coat and has been identified as a phosphoprotein. The initiation and promotion of COPII vesicle formation is regulated by Sar1; however, the mechanism regulating the completion of COPII vesicle formation followed by vesicle release is largely unknown. Hypothesizing that the Sec31 phosphorylation may be such a mechanism, we identified phosphorylation sites in the middle linker region of Sec31. Sec31 phosphorylation appeared to decrease its association with ER membranes and Sec23. Non-phosphorylatable mutant of Sec31 stayed longer at ER exit sites and bound more strongly to Sec23. We also found that CK2 is one of the kinases responsible for Sec31 phosphorylation because CK2 knockdown decreased Sec31 phosphorylation, whereas CK2 overexpression increased Sec31 phosphorylation. Furthermore, CK2 knockdown increased affinity of Sec31 for Sec23 and inhibited ER-to-Golgi trafficking. These results suggest that Sec31 phosphorylation by CK2 controls the duration of COPII vesicle formation, which regulates ER-to-Golgi trafficking.

  15. HVOF Thermal Spray TiC/TiB2 Coatings for AUSC Boiler/Turbine Components for Enhanced Corrosion Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Kanchan [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes; Koc, Rasit [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes; Fan, Chinbay [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2016-12-07

    The high temperatures of operations still pose significant risk of degradation and fatigue from oxidizing, corroding and eroding environment. In addition to unused O2, water from combustion and SOx from the coal sulfur oxidation that result in highly corrosive environment, acid gases such as HCl and other sulfur compounds may also be present. These adverse effects are further accelerated due to the elevated temperatures. In addition, ash particulates and unburnt carbon and pyritic sulfur can cause erosion of the surface and thus loss of material. Unburnt carbon and pyritic sulfur may also cause localized reduction sites. Thus, fireside corrosion protection and steam oxidation protection alternatives to currently used Ni-Cr overlays need to be identified and evaluated. Titanium carbide (TiC) is a suitable alternative on account of the material features such as the high hardness, the high melting point, the high strength and the low density for the substitution or to be used in conjunction with NiCr for enhancing the fireside corrosion and erosion of the materials. Another alternative is the use of titanium boride as a coating for chemical stability required for long-term service and high erosion resistance over the state-of-the-art, high fracture toughness (K1C ~12 MPam1/2) and excellent corrosion resistance (kp~1.9X10-11 g2/cm4/s at 800°C in air). The overarching aim of the research endeavor was to synthesize oxidation, corrosion and wear resistant TiC and TiB2 coating powders, apply thermal spray coating on existing boiler materials and characterize the coated substrates for corrosion resistance for applications at high temperatures (500 -750 °C) and high pressures (~350 bars) using the HVOF process and to demonstrate the feasibility of these coating to be used in AUSC boilers and turbines.

  16. Surfaces: processing, coating, decontamination, pollution, etc. Surface mastering to prevent component corrosion; Surfaces: traitement, revetements, decontamination, pollution, etc. Maitrise de la surface pour prevenir la corrosion des composants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foucault, M. [Departement Corrosion Chimie, AREVA Centre Technique, BP 181, 71205 Le Creusot (France)

    2012-07-01

    In the primary and secondary circuits of nuclear Pressurized Water Reactors, AREVA uses several nickel-based alloys or austenitic stainless steels for the manufacture of safety components. The experience feedback of the last twenty years allows us to point out the major role hold by the component surface state in their life duration. In this paper, we present four examples of problem encountered and solved by a surface study and the definition and implementation of processes for the surface control of the repaired components. Then, we propose some ideas about the present needs in term of analysis means to improve the surface knowledge and control of the manufactured components. (author)

  17. Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion

    CERN Document Server

    Foret, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    The secretion of vesicles for intracellular transport often rely on the aggregation of specialized membrane-bound proteins into a coat able to curve cell membranes. The nucleation and growth of a protein coat is a kinetic process that competes with the energy-consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We propose a generic kinetic description of coat assembly and the formation of coated vesicles, and discuss its implication to the dynamics of COP vesicles that traffic within the Golgi and with the Endoplasmic Reticulum. We show that stationary coats of fixed area emerge from the competition between coat growth and the recycling of coat components, in a fashion resembling the treadmilling of cytoskeletal filaments. We further show that the turnover of coat components allows for a highly sensitive switching mechanism between a quiescent and a vesicle producing membrane, upon a slowing down of the exchange kinetics. We claim that the existence of this switching behaviour, also tri...

  18. Spray-Deposited Superconductor/Polymer Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Tran, Sang Q.; Hooker, Matthew W.

    1993-01-01

    Coatings that exhibit the Meissner effect formed at relatively low temperature. High-temperature-superconductor/polymer coatings that exhibit Meissner effect deposited onto components in variety of shapes and materials. Simple, readily available equipment needed in coating process, mean coatings produced economically. Coatings used to keep magnetic fields away from electronic circuits in such cryogenic applications as magnetic resonance imaging and detection of infrared, and in magnetic suspensions to provide levitation and/or damping of vibrations.

  19. Risk factors for post-operative periprosthetic fractures following primary total hip arthroplasty with a proximally coated double-tapered cementless femoral component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, K; Bersang, A; Nielsen, C S

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to identify patient- and surgery-related risk factors for sustaining an early periprosthetic fracture following primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) performed using a double-tapered cementless femoral component (Bi-Metric femoral stem; Biomet Inc., Warsaw, Indiana...... ratio were recorded post-operatively. Periprosthetic fractures were identified and classified according to the Vancouver classification. Regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for early periprosthetic fracture. RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 713 days (1 to 2058). A total of 48...... significant two times increased risk over time for post-operative fracture. CONCLUSION: Dorr type C is an independent risk factor for early periprosthetic fracture, following THA using a double tapered cementless stem such as the Bi-Metric. Surgeons should take bone morphology into consideration when planning...

  20. Absorptive coating for aluminum solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, D.; Jason, A.; Parr, A.

    1979-01-01

    Method for coating forming coating of copper oxide from copper component of sheet aluminum/copper alloy provides strong durable solar heat collector panels. Copper oxide coating has solar absorption characteristics similar to black chrome and is much simpler and less costly to produce.

  1. Zirconium influence on microstructure of aluminide coatings ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C) are protected by alumina coatings such as nickel aluminide. High temperature coatings based on β-NiAl intermatallic phase are extensively used to protect components against oxidation in gas turbine engines. However, aluminide coatings based on NiAl phase do not fulfil the requirements such as good adhesion of the.

  2. Enhanced electrochemical performance of Li-rich layered cathode materials via chemical activation of Li2MnO3 component and formation of spinel/carbon coating layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shengli; Xu, Kaijie; Wang, Yonggang; Shen, Xiangqian; Wang, Wenzhi; Su, Yanjing; Zhu, Meng; Xi, Xiaoming

    2017-10-01

    Li-rich layered oxides are promising cathode materials for advanced Li-ion batteries because of their high specific capacity and operating potential. In this work, the Li-rich layered oxide Li1·2Mn0·54Ni0·13Co0·13O2 (LMNC), is modified via a carbonization-reduction process (yielding the corresponding reduced compound denoted LMNC-R). Compared to the pristine oxide, LMNC-R delivers significantly enhanced initial discharge capacity/columbic efficiency, remarkably improved rate performance with an accelerated Li+ diffusion rate, and significantly increased capacity/voltage retention. The specific energy density and energy retention after 100 cycles increase from 378.2 Wh kg-1 and 47.7% for LMNC to 572.0 Wh kg-1 and 71.3%, respectively, for LMNC-R. The enhancement in the electrochemical performance of LMNC-R can be attributed to the synchronous formation of the oxygen non-stoichiometric Li2MnO3-δ component and to the carbon/spinel double coating layer in the material that resulted from the post-treatment process. Thus, the carbonization-reduction modification process can be used to tailor the structural evolution procedure and to suppress the metal ion dissolution of the Li-rich layered oxide during cycling.

  3. Tribological study of hard coatings without cobalt intended to isolation components of PWR primary cooling system; Etude tribologique de revetements durs sans cobalt destines aux organes d`isolement du circuit primaire des REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachon, L.

    1995-10-18

    The objective is to qualify coatings without cobalt to replace ``Stellites`` coatings in isolation valves of PWR primary cooling system, as Co is activated when passing in the reactor core and contaminated the cooling loop. Three families of coatings were tested: PVD thin films from 1 to 8 {mu}m monolayers of Cr/C{sub x} with x varying between 1.6 and 9.5 at% or multilayers of pure chromium and Cr/C{sub 1.6} at%, coatings with a thickness between 100 and 200 {mu}m of cermets NiCr{sub y} (y varying from 5 to 35 at%) matrix binding chromium or tungsten carbides, and thick coatings 2 mm thickness of cermets Nitronic 60 or Inconel 625 matrix binding 10, 20 or 30% titanium or niobium carbides. Stellite 6 (2 mm) is the reference coating for tribology. Coatings were qualified and selected by thermal shocks, corrosion and plane friction. The thin film and the thick families were disqualified by their destruction or by their high friction coefficient. Then coatings between 100 and 200 {mu}m were used in a valve mock-up working in PWR primary cooling system pressure and temperature conditions. Tests show that these coatings have better wear or tightness performances than stellite 6, except for a slightly higher friction coefficient. (A.B.).

  4. Sodium sulfur container with chromium/chromium oxide coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Frank A.; Higley, Lin R.

    1981-01-01

    A coating of chromium/chromium oxide is disclosed for coating the surfaces of electrically conducting components of a sodium sulfur battery. This chromium/chromium oxide coating is placed on the surfaces of the electrically conducting components of the battery which are in contact with molten polysulfide and sulfur reactants during battery operation.

  5. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylate ester copolymer coating. 175.210 Section 175.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES AND COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings...

  6. Foundry Coating Technology: A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2011-01-01

    The importance of foundry coating in improving the surface quality of castings cannot be over emphasized. The appli-cation of mould and core washes creates a high thermal integrity barrier between the metal and the mould resulting in the reduction of the thermal shock experienced by the sand system....... These thermal shock leads to series of surface de-fects such as veining/finning, metal penetration, burn-on/in, scab, rat tail, erosion etc. The use of coatings reduces the tendency of occurrence of these defects. However, the understanding of the coating, its components, characteristics and mechanism of action...... is important. In this review, a detailed description of these topics and examples are provided where necessary. A potential area of research in foundry coating development, using sol-gel process is suggested. The application of sol-gel technology in the development of foundry coatings is a novel approach....

  7. Battery components employing a silicate binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, Frank M [Albuquerque, NM; Reinhardt, Frederick W [Albuquerque, NM; Odinek, Judy G [Rio Rancho, NM

    2011-05-24

    A battery component structure employing inorganic-silicate binders. In some embodiments, casting or coating of components may be performed using aqueous slurries of silicates and electrode materials or separator materials.

  8. Structure and corrosion properties of PVD Cr-N coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, C; Ziegele, H; Leyland, A; Matthews, A

    2002-01-01

    PVD Cr-N coatings produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD) are increasingly used for mechanical and tribological applications in various industrial sectors. These coatings are particularly attractive for their excellent corrosion resistance, which further enhances the lifetime and service quality of coated components. PVD Cr-N coated steels in an aqueous solution are usually corroded by galvanic attack via through-coating 'permeable' defects (e.g., pores). Therefore, the corrosion performance of Cr-N coated steel is determined by a number of variables of the coating properties and corrosive environment. These variables include: (i) surface continuity and uniformity; (ii) through-coating porosity; (iii) film density and chemical stability; (iv) growth stresses; (v) interfacial and intermediate layers; (vi) coating thickness; (vii) coating composition; and (viii) substrate properties. In this article, PVD Cr-N coatings were prepared, by electron-beam PVD and sputter deposition, with different compositions, t...

  9. The tribology of PS212 coatings and PM212 composites for the lubrication of titanium 6A1-4V components of a Stirling engine space power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Lukaszewicz, Victor

    1995-01-01

    The Stirling space power machine incorporates a linear alternator to generate electrical power. The alternator is a reciprocating device that is driven by a solar or nuclear-powered Stirling engine. The power piston and cylinder are made of titanium 6A1-4V (Ti6-4) alloy, and are designed to be lubricated by a hydrodynamically-generated gas film. Rubbing occurs during starts and stops and there is a possibility of an occasional high speed rub. Since titanium is known to have a severe galling tendency in sliding contacts, a 'backup,' self-lubricating coating on the cylinder and/or the piston is needed. This report describes the results of a research program to study the lubrication of Ti6-4 with the following chromium carbide based materials: plasma-sprayed PS212 coatings and sintered PM212 counterfaces. Program objectives are to achieve adherent coatings on Ti6-4 and to measure the friction and wear characteristics of the following sliding combinations under conditions simulative of the Stirling-driven space power linear alternator: Ti6-4/Ti6-4 baseline, Ti6-4/PS212 coated Ti6-4, and Ps212 coated Ti6-4/PM212

  10. Quantitative analysis of thermal insulation coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2014-01-01

    This work concerns the development of simulation tools for mapping of insulation properties of thermal insulation coatings based on selected functional filler materials. A mathematical model, which includes the underlying physics (i.e. thermal conductivity of a heterogeneous two-component coating...

  11. spin coating

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROJET SOJA

    Intense UV photoluminescence is observed for intrinsic ZnO film. Keywords : thin films, oxidize zinc doped aluminium (ZnO:Al), sol-gel, spin coating, structural analysis, electric and optical properties. 1. Introduction. Depuis ces vingt dernières années les couches minces d'oxyde de zinc ont connu un intérêt croissant dans ...

  12. Micro/nano structured coatings of light alloys by cold spray for surface protection and repair of high value-added components: State of the art; Recubrimientos micro/nanoestructurados de aleaciones ligeras mediante proyeccion fria para la proteccion y reparacion de componentes de elevado valor anadido: Estado del arte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedoya, J.; Cinca, N.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2013-09-01

    The Cold Gas Spray - CGS technique has greatly attracted the attention of the researchers in the last decade due to advantages compared to other conventional thermal spray processes. It presents outstanding characteristics such as high density coatings and absence of thermal degradation (oxidation or phase transformation). In addition, CGS is an efficient and green technology. This paper presents a bibliographic review related to micro/nano structured aluminium-based coatings of by CGS on light alloy substrates. It provides an overview of the feasibility of using the Cold Gas Spray as a technique for the protection, recovery and repair of high value-added components, especially those made of light alloys (aluminium and magnesium base) which, by their low density and mechanical properties, are widely used in several industrial sectors such as transport, aerospace and power generation. (Author)

  13. spin coating

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROJET SOJA

    Dans ce travail nous avons préparé des couches minces de l'oxyde de zinc ZnO dopées à l'aluminium et non dopées par la technique Sol-Gel associée au « spin coating » sur des substrats en verre « pyrex » à partir de l'acétate de zinc dissous dans une solution de l'éthanol. Nous avons ensuite effectué des analyses ...

  14. Protection by high velocity thermal spraying coatings on thick walled permanent and interim store components for the diminution of repairs, corrosion and costs 'SHARK'. Overview at the end of the project; Schutz durch Hochgeschwindigkeitsflammspritzschichten auf dickwandigen End- und Zwischenlagerbauteilen zur Reduktion von Reparaturen, Korrosion und Kosten 'SHARK'. Ein Ueberblick zum Abschluss des Projektes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Sabine; Hassel, Thomas; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm [Unterwassertechnikum Hannover, Garbsen (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde; Steinwarz, Wolfgang; Dyllong, Nobert; Tragsdorf, Inga Maren [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH, Krefeld (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    The corrosion protection of the internal space of thick-walled interim and permanent storage facility components, such as Castor {sup copyright} containers, are ensured nowadays by a galvanic nickel layer. The method has proved itself and protects the base material of the containers at the underwater loading in the Nuclear power station from a corrosive attack. Although, the galvanic nickel plating is a relatively time consuming method, it lasts for several days for each container, and is with a layer thickness of 1,000 {mu}m also expensive. To develop an alternative, faster and more economical method, a BMBF research project named - 'SHARK - protection by high velocity thermal spraying layers on thick-walled permanent and interim store components for the diminution of repairs, corrosion and costs' in cooperation between Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH and the Institute of Materials Science of the Leibniz University of Hanover was established to investigate the suitability of the high velocity oxy fuel spraying technology (HVOF) for the corrosion protective coating of thickwalled interim and permanent storage facility components. Since the permanent storage depot components are manufactured from cast iron with globular graphite, this material was exclusively used as a base material in this project. The evaluation of the economical features of the application of different nickel base spraying materials on cast iron substratum was in focus, as well as the scientific characterization of the coating systems with regard to the corrosion protective properties. Furthermore, the feasibility of the transfer of the laboratory results on a large industrial setup as well as a general suitability of the coating process for a required repair procedure was to be investigated. The preliminary examination program identified chromium containing spraying materials as successful. Results of the preliminary examination program have been used for investigations with the CASOIK

  15. EST Table: CK504175 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CK504175 rswcc0_004813.y1 10/09/29 70 %/151 aa ref|XP_001658907.1| copii-coated ves...icle membrane protein P24 [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT48799.1| copii-coated vesicle membrane protein P24 [Aedes ae

  16. EST Table: CK505245 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CK505245 rswcc0_007310.y1 10/09/29 65 %/187 aa ref|XP_001658907.1| copii-coated ves...icle membrane protein P24 [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT48799.1| copii-coated vesicle membrane protein P24 [Aedes ae

  17. EST Table: CK532746 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CK532746 rswga0_012687.y1 10/09/29 75 %/115 aa ref|XP_001658907.1| copii-coated ves...icle membrane protein P24 [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT48799.1| copii-coated vesicle membrane protein P24 [Aedes ae

  18. Voltammetric Response of Alizarin Red S-Confined Film-Coated Electrodes to Diol and Polyol Compounds: Use of Phenylboronic Acid-Modified Poly(ethyleneimine) as Film Component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigehiro; Suzuki, Iwao; Ojima, Takuto; Minaki, Daichi; Anzai, Jun-Ichi

    2018-01-22

    Alizarin red S (ARS) was confined in layer-by-layer (LbL) films composed of phenylboronic acid-modified poly(ethyleneimine) (PBA-PEI) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to study the voltammetric response to diol and polyol compounds. The LbL film-coated gold (Au) electrode and quartz slide were immersed in an ARS solution to uptake ARS into the film. UV-visible absorption spectra of ARS-confined LbL film suggested that ARS formed boronate ester (ARS-PBS) in the film. The cyclic voltammetry of the ARS-confined LbL film-coated electrodes exhibited oxidation peaks at -0.50 and -0.62 V, which were ascribed to the oxidation reactions of ARS-PBS and free ARS, respectively, in the LbL film. The peak current at -0.62 V increased upon the addition of diol or polyol compounds such as L-dopa, glucose, and sorbitol into the solution, depending on the concentration, whereas the peak current at -0.50 V decreased. The results suggest a possible use of ARS-confined PBA-PEI/CMC LbL film-coated Au electrodes for the construction of voltammetric sensors for diol and polyol compounds.

  19. Voltammetric Response of Alizarin Red S-Confined Film-Coated Electrodes to Diol and Polyol Compounds: Use of Phenylboronic Acid-Modified Poly(ethyleneimine as Film Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Takahashi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alizarin red S (ARS was confined in layer-by-layer (LbL films composed of phenylboronic acid-modified poly(ethyleneimine (PBA-PEI and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC to study the voltammetric response to diol and polyol compounds. The LbL film-coated gold (Au electrode and quartz slide were immersed in an ARS solution to uptake ARS into the film. UV-visible absorption spectra of ARS-confined LbL film suggested that ARS formed boronate ester (ARS-PBS in the film. The cyclic voltammetry of the ARS-confined LbL film-coated electrodes exhibited oxidation peaks at −0.50 and −0.62 V, which were ascribed to the oxidation reactions of ARS-PBS and free ARS, respectively, in the LbL film. The peak current at −0.62 V increased upon the addition of diol or polyol compounds such as L-dopa, glucose, and sorbitol into the solution, depending on the concentration, whereas the peak current at −0.50 V decreased. The results suggest a possible use of ARS-confined PBA-PEI/CMC LbL film-coated Au electrodes for the construction of voltammetric sensors for diol and polyol compounds.

  20. New optical coatings for transparent building components for improved heat protection in summer - Annual report 2005; Neue optische Beschichtungen fuer transparente Gebaeudeteile im Hinblick auf einen verbesserten sommerlichen Waermeschutz - Jahresbericht 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, I.; Oelhafen, P.; Reber, G.; Romanyuk, A.; Steiner, R.

    2005-07-01

    This annual report for the year 2005 prepared for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) by the Physics Institute at the University of Basle summarises the further work done on the simulation and testing of new coatings for glass used in the transparent parts of buildings. On the basis of actual measurements made on a real object - the 'Donnerbaum' school in nearby Muttenz - various measures that could be taken to provide heat protection in summer were simulated. The report presents the results of measurements and simulations made. The various factors that were taken into consideration are described and the results of the simulations are presented. A total concept that includes night-time ventilation of the school building to provide cooling is commented on. The results obtained and the measurement equipment used are discussed. A data base on the spectral characteristics of the coated glasses which also includes the results of appropriate tests made on the windows of Swiss Railways rolling stock is introduced. An ideal glass coating is described. Finally, further work to be done is discussed.

  1. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  2. Graphene Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoot, Adam Carsten; Camilli, Luca; Bøggild, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its remarkable electrical and mechanical properties, graphene has been attracting tremendous interest in materials science. In particular, its chemical stability and impermeability make it a promising protective membrane. However, recent investigations reveal that single layer graphene...... cannot be used as a barrier in the long run, due to galvanic corrosion phenomena arising when oxygen or water penetrate through graphene cracks or domain boundaries. Here, we overcome this issue by using a multilayered (ML) graphene coating. Our lab- as well as industrial-scale tests demonstrate that ML...... graphene can effectively protect Ni in harsh environments, even after long term exposure. This is made possible by the presence of a high number of graphene layers, which can efficiently mask the cracks and domain boundaries defects found in individual layers of graphene. Our findings thus show...

  3. Self-Healing anticorrosive coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesterova, Tatyana

    Self-healing anticorrosive coatings are multi-component so-called smart materials, which have been proposed as a way to long-lasting corrosion protection of steel structures. The presently most promising technology route is based on microcapsules, filled with active healing agents, and has been...... to capillary forces. The healing agents then start to react, form a polymer network, and =glue‘ the crack. The approach has been applied to development of an epoxy-based self-healing anticorrosive coating for above water heavy duty corrosion protection. Emphasis has been on investigation of practical issues...... associated with development and testing of this type of coating. A laboratory investigation, to identify the most suitable method for production of mechanically stable (filled with industrially relevant core materials) and forming a free-flowing powder upon drying microcapsules, has been performed. Four...

  4. Electrocurtain coating process for coating solar mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Boyd, Donald W.; Buchanan, Michael J.; Kelly, Patrick; Kutilek, Luke A.; McCamy, James W.; McPheron, Douglas A.; Orosz, Gary R.; Limbacher, Raymond D.

    2013-10-15

    An electrically conductive protective coating or film is provided over the surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by flowing or directing a cation containing liquid and an anion containing liquid onto the conductive surface. The cation and the anion containing liquids are spaced from, and preferably out of contact with one another on the surface of the reflective coating as an electric current is moved through the anion containing liquid, the conductive surface between the liquids and the cation containing liquid to coat the conductive surface with the electrically conductive coating.

  5. Degradation of gas turbine coatings and life assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheruvu, N.S. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1998-12-31

    MCrAlY coatings are widely used on hot section components of gas turbines to provide hot corrosion and/or oxidation protection by formation of an oxide layer on the surface. As the protective oxide scale exfoliates during service, aluminum from the coating diffuses outward for reformation of the protective scale. Aluminum may also diffuse inward due to the differences in composition between the coating and the substrate. Thus, the coatings degrade due to oxidation, oxide scale spallation, and inward and outward diffusion of aluminum. Service life of these coatings is controlled by the aluminum content in the coating, operating temperature and start- shutdown cycles. In-service degradation of CoCrAlY and CoNiCrAlY coatings is presented. A procedure to predict the remaining service life of coatings under oxidizing conditions is discussed. (orig.) 12 refs.

  6. Interacting Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlic, B.; Broenink, Johannes F.; Welch, Peter; Kerridge, Jon; Barnes, Fred

    2006-01-01

    SystemCSP is a graphical modeling language based on both CSP and concepts of component-based software development. The component framework of SystemCSP enables specification of both interaction scenarios and relative execution ordering among components. Specification and implementation of

  7. Accessory Proteins at ERES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkenberg, Rafael David

    proteins. Together these components co‐operate in cargo‐selection as well as forming, loading and releasing budding vesicles from specific regions on the membrane surface of the ER. Coat components furthermore convey vesicle targeting towards the Golgi. However, not much is known about the mechanisms...... that regulate the COPII assembly at the vesicle bud site. This thesis provides the first regulatory mechanism of COPII assembly in relation to ER‐membrane lipid‐signal recognition by the accessory protein p125A (Sec23IP). The aim of the project was to characterize p125A function by dissecting two main domains...... in the protein; a putative lipid‐associating domain termed the DDHD domain that is defined by the four amino acid motif that gives the domain its name; and a ubiquitously found domain termed Sterile α‐motif (SAM), which is mostly associated with oligomerization and polymerization. We first show, that the DDHD...

  8. Laser coating of zirconium and ZrO(sub2) composites on Ti(sub6)Al(sub4)V for biomedical applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baloyi, NM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Coating is a technology for improving the surface properties of components. Laser coating produces uniform composition with thickened layers that display a good metallurgical bond to the base material. These coatings are dense and crack...

  9. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  10. Flow coating apparatus and method of coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanumanthu, Ramasubrahmaniam; Neyman, Patrick; MacDonald, Niles; Brophy, Brenor; Kopczynski, Kevin; Nair, Wood

    2014-03-11

    Disclosed is a flow coating apparatus, comprising a slot that can dispense a coating material in an approximately uniform manner along a distribution blade that increases uniformity by means of surface tension and transfers the uniform flow of coating material onto an inclined substrate such as for example glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed is a method of flow coating a substrate using the apparatus such that the substrate is positioned correctly relative to the distribution blade, a pre-wetting step is completed where both the blade and substrate are completed wetted with a pre-wet solution prior to dispensing of the coating material onto the distribution blade from the slot and hence onto the substrate. Thereafter the substrate is removed from the distribution blade and allowed to dry, thereby forming a coating.

  11. Investigation of metallurgical coatings for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jun Feng

    Metallurgical coatings have been widely used in the automotive industry from component machining, engine daily running to body decoration due to their high hardness, wear resistance, corrosion resistance and low friction coefficient. With high demands in energy saving, weight reduction and limiting environmental impact, the use of new materials such as light Aluminum/magnesium alloys with high strength-weight ratio for engine block and advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) with better performance in crash energy management for die stamping, are increasing. However, challenges are emerging when these new materials are applied such as the wear of the relative soft light alloys and machining tools for hard AHSS. The protective metallurgical coatings are the best option to profit from these new materials' advantages without altering largely in mass production equipments, machinery, tools and human labor. In this dissertation, a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating processing on aluminum alloys was introduced in engine cylinder bores to resist wear and corrosion. The tribological behavior of the PEO coatings under boundary and starve lubrication conditions was studied experimentally and numerically for the first time. Experimental results of the PEO coating demonstrated prominent wear resistance and low friction, taking into account the extreme working conditions. The numerical elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) and asperity contact based tribological study also showed a promising approach on designing low friction and high wear resistant PEO coatings. Other than the fabrication of the new coatings, a novel coating evaluation methodology, namely, inclined impact sliding tester was presented in the second part of this dissertation. This methodology has been developed and applied in testing and analyzing physical vapor deposition (PVD)/ chemical vapor deposition (CVD)/PEO coatings. Failure mechanisms of these common metallurgical hard coatings were systematically

  12. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  13. THE METHOD OF COMPUTER EXPRESS-ANALYSIS OF THE DECORATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PROTECTIVE COATINGS

    OpenAIRE

    Seljaev Vladimir Pavlovich; Nizina Tatyana Anatolevna; Egunova Elena Aleksandrovna

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the computer program «Statistical analysis of color components for paint and varnish coatings», methods are suggested and experimental results are obtained for decorative characteristics polyurethane coatings.

  14. Niobium pentoxide coating replacing zinc phosphate coating

    OpenAIRE

    RODRIGUES, P.R.P.; TERADA, M.; JUNIOR, O.R.A.; LOPES, A.C.; COSTA, I.; BANCZEK, E.P.

    2015-01-01

    A new coating made of niobium pentoxide, obtained through the sol-gel process, was developed for the carbon steel (SAE 1010). The corrosion protection provided by this coating was evaluated through electrochemical tests such as: open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and anodic potentiodynamic polarization in NaCl 0,5 mol L-1 solution. The morphology and composition of the coatings were analyzed using scanning electronic microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X...

  15. Electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  16. Infrared-reflective coatings for energy conservation in buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gertis, K.; Erhorn, H.

    1982-02-01

    Radiative heat transfer on the outer and inner surfaces of structural components may be reduced by coatings with low emission factor. The order of magnitude of the reduction of transmission heat losses has been investigated in studies on infrared-reflecting coatings of outer and inner walls and windows. The following results have been obtained: 1. Of the available coatings, only rubber coatings with aluminium pigments or certain plastic polymer coatings with aluminium pigments are suitable. An emission factor of about 0.2 is estimated. 2. Infrared-reflective coatings reduce heat losses only on inner walls and air-tight gaps or cavities. They are practically useless on outer walls. 3. In components with high-efficiency thermal insulation, infrared-reflective coatings are absurd. In older buildings with minimum thermal insulation, infrared-reflective coatings of the inner walls would save up to 12% of energy. 4. Window coatings and covers must be air-tight to be efficient. They may then reduce the transmission heat losses by 15 to 40%. The infrared coating must be applied to the surface facing the gap. Multiple coatings are not more efficient than just one.

  17. Study on Preparation Technologies of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Ning; Li, Yang; Wang, Hao; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yunshan

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is one of the main key technology for the high-pressure turbine blades which are the main components of the high-performance aerospace engines. It offers protection for underline metallic components from corrosion, oxidation and localized melting by insulating the metal from hot gases in the engine core. The properties and lifetime of TBCs are greatly influenced by the preparation technology, which includes plasma spraying (PS), physical vapor deposition (PVD) and laser re-melting (LM). In this paper, three technologies used to prepare the TBCs are reviewed. Resulting features of coating fabricated by each technology are also discussed such as: the porosity, the thermally grown oxide (TGO), the erosion resistance, the thermal shock and so on. Especially, it is pointed out that the performances of gradient coating and nano-coating are better than the traditional coatings. In addition, it is widely accepted that laser can be applied to re-melt the PS coating and even directly clad the gradient coating. In the future, the traditional preparation technology should be improved continually in order to enhance the coating lifetime, enhance the properties of coating and lower the cost of process. Moreover, the researches on gradient-nano-structured coatings preparation are absent and should be done with emphasis since the nano-structure and gradient structure can both benefit the lifetime and properties of coatings.

  18. Anti-reflective and anti-soiling coatings with self-cleaning properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Vinod; Brophy, Brenor L.

    2016-10-04

    Disclosed herein is a coated glass element including a glass component and a coating adhered to the glass component through siloxane linkages, the coating having at least one of an anti-reflective property, a high abrasion resistance property and a hydrophobic property, wherein the coating comprises a dried gel formed from at least one hydrolyzed alkoxysilane-based sol and at least one hydrolyzed organosilane-based sol.

  19. Corrosion inhibiting organic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasson, E.

    1984-10-16

    A corrosion inhibiting coating comprises a mixture of waxes, petroleum jelly, a hardener and a solvent. In particular, a corrosion inhibiting coating comprises candelilla wax, carnauba wax, microcrystalline waxes, white petrolatum, an oleoresin, lanolin and a solvent.

  20. Nanocrystalline coatings properties forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, E. N.; Yurov, V. M.; Guchenko, S. A.; Laurynas, V. Ch

    2017-06-01

    The paper considers various properties of nanocrystalline coatings. The methods of determining the surface tension of the deposited coating on the basis of the size dependence of their physical properties. It is shown that predict the mechanical properties of the coatings, their melting point, heat resistance, wear resistance, corrosion resistance, etc. It can be based on a theoretical evaluation of the surface tension.

  1. Spin coating of electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Maclay, G. Jordan

    1989-01-01

    Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

  2. PIT Coating Requirements Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MINTEER, D.J.

    2000-10-20

    This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

  3. Coating of graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, G.F.; Dekker, C.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of highly crystalline graphene and coating said graphene with a layer. Said graphene may have further structures, such as nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons. The coated graphene can be used for biomolecular analysis and modification, such as DNA-sequencing, as a sensor, etc. The invention therefor also relates to use of coated graphene.

  4. Durability of multi layered plasma and HVOF coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Mutairi, Sultan A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of variable compositional coating layers on their mechanical and chemical behaviour under certain environments typically experienced in the Oil and Gas Industry. The research centers on using thermal spray coating techniques such as the HVOF and plasma spray equipment. The coating was applied onto selected carbon steel substrates (API-5L, Schedule-40, Grade-B) to simulate the material application used in oil and gas components that subjec...

  5. Stresses in Coating with Gradient Interlayer caused by Contact Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Kulchytsky-Zhyhailo Roman; Bajkowski Adam Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional problem of elasticity concerning inhomogeneous half-space under normal and tangential loading applied in circular region was considered. The half-space is composed of the homogeneous body and double-layer coating which includes a homogeneous top coat and a gradient interlayer. The solution method is based on the two-dimensional integral Fourier transform. The influence of mechanical properties of coatings component and coefficient of friction on the first principal stres...

  6. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-02-23

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

  7. Coating defect evaluation based on stimulated thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Davide; Tamborrino, Rosanna; Galietti, Umberto

    2017-05-01

    Thermal Barrier Coatings are used to protect the materials from severe temperature and chemical environments. In particular, these materials are used in the engineering fields where high temperatures, corrosive environments and high mechanical stress are required. Defects present between substrate material and coating, as detachments may cause the break of coating and the consequent possibility to exposure the substrate material to the environment conditions. The capability to detect the defect zones with non-destructive techniques could allow the maintenance of coated components with great advantages in terms of costs and prediction of fatigue life. In this work, two different heat sources and two different thermographic techniques have been used to detect the adhesion defects among the base material and the coating. Moreover, an empirical thermographic method has been developed to evaluate the thickness of the thermal coating and to discriminate between an unevenness of the thickness and a defect zone. The study has been conducted on circular steel specimens with simulated adhesion defect and on specimens prepared with different thicknesses of thermal barrier coating.

  8. Antibacterial polymer coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Mollye C.; Allen, Ashley N.; Barnhart, Meghan; Tucker, Mark David; Hibbs, Michael R.

    2009-09-01

    A series of poly(sulfone)s with quaternary ammonium groups and another series with aldehyde groups are synthesized and tested for biocidal activity against vegetative bacteria and spores, respectively. The polymers are sprayed onto substrates as coatings which are then exposed to aqueous suspensions of organisms. The coatings are inherently biocidal and do not release any agents into the environment. The coatings adhere well to both glass and CARC-coated coupons and they exhibit significant biotoxicity. The most effective quaternary ammonium polymers kills 99.9% of both gram negative and gram positive bacteria and the best aldehyde coating kills 81% of the spores on its surface.

  9. ATHENA optimized coating design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Desiree Della Monica; Christensen, Finn Erland; Jakobsen, Anders Clemen

    2012-01-01

    The optimization of coating design for the ATHENA mission si described and the possibility of increasing the telescope effective area in the range between 0.1 and 10 keV is investigated. An independent computation of the on-axis effective area based on the mirror design of ATHENA is performed...... in order to review the current coating baseline. The performance of several material combinations, considering a simple bi-layer, simple multilayer and linear graded multilayer coatings are tested and simulation of the mirror performance considering both the optimized coating design and the coating...

  10. Atomically Bonded Transparent Superhydrophobic Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aytug, Tolga [ORNL

    2015-08-01

    Maintaining clarity and avoiding the accumulation of water and dirt on optically transparent surfaces such as US military vehicle windshields, viewports, periscope optical head windows, and electronic equipment cover glasses are critical to providing a high level of visibility, improved survivability, and much-needed safety for warfighters in the field. Through a combination of physical vapor deposition techniques and the exploitation of metastable phase separation in low-alkali borosilicate, a novel technology was developed for the fabrication of optically transparent, porous nanostructured silica thin film coatings that are strongly bonded to glass platforms. The nanotextured films, initially structurally superhydrophilic, exhibit superior superhydrophobicity, hence antisoiling ability, following a simple but robust modification in surface chemistry. The surfaces yield water droplet contact angles as high as 172°. Moreover, the nanostructured nature of these coatings provides increased light scattering in the UV regime and reduced reflectivity (i.e., enhanced transmission) over a broad range of the visible spectrum. In addition to these functionalities, the coatings exhibit superior mechanical resistance to abrasion and are thermally stable to temperatures approaching 500°C. The overall process technology relies on industry standard equipment and inherently scalable manufacturing processes and demands only nontoxic, naturally abundant, and inexpensive base materials. Such coatings, applied to the optical components of current and future combat equipment and military vehicles will provide a significant strategic advantage for warfighters. The inherent self-cleaning properties of such superhydrophobic coatings will also mitigate biofouling of optical windows exposed to high-humidity conditions and can help decrease repair/replacement costs, reduce maintenance, and increase readiness by limiting equipment downtime.

  11. Evaluation of HVOF coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Landová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Attention in this paper is devoted to the evaluation of wear coatings deposited using HVOF technology (high velocity oxy-fuel. There were evaluated three types of coatings based on WC-Co (next only 1343, WC-Co-Cr (next only 1350 and Cr3C2-25NiCr (next only 1375. There was assessed adherence of coatings, micro hardness, porosity and the tribological properties of erosive, abrasive, adhesive and wear resistance of coatings in terms of cyclic thermal load. Thanks to wide variety of suitable materials and their combinations, the area of utilization thermally sprayed coatings is very broad. It is possible to deposit coatings of various materials from pure metals to special alloys. The best results in the evaluated properties were achieved at the coating with the label 1375.

  12. Flexible Antibacterial Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musil, Jindřich

    2017-05-16

    This article reviews the present state of the art in the field of flexible antibacterial coatings which efficiently kill bacteria on their surfaces. Coatings are formed using a reactive magnetron sputtering. The effect of the elemental composition and structure of the coating on its antibacterial and mechanical properties is explained. The properties of Cr-Cu-O, Al-Cu-N, and Zr-Cu-N antibacterial coatings are used as examples and described in detail. The efficiency of killing of bacteria was tested for the Escherichia coli bacterium. The principle of the formation of thick, flexible antibacterial coatings which are resistant to cracking under bending is explained. It is shown that magnetron sputtering enables production of robust, several-micrometer thick, flexible antibacterial coatings for long-term use. The antibacterial coatings produced by magnetron sputtering present huge potential for many applications.

  13. Anticorrosive coatings: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per Aggerholm; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this review is to describe some of the important topics related to the use of marine and protective coatings for anticorrosive purposes. In this context, "protective" refers to coatings for containers, offshore constructions, wind turbines, storage tanks, bridges, rail cars...... of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have caused significant changes in the anticorrosive coating industry. The requirement for new VOC-compliant coating technologies means that coating manufacturers can no longer rely on the extensive track record of their time-served products to convince consumers......, and inhibitive coatings are outlined. In the past decades, several alternatives to organic solvent-borne coatings have reached the commercial market. This review also presents some of these technologies and discusses some of their advantages and limitations. Finally, some of the mechanisms leading to degradation...

  14. Coated Aerogel Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  15. Acrylic polymer nanocomposite resins for water borne coating applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nobel, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    Due to environmental and safety regulations the use of volatile organic components (VOC's) containing lacquers for exterior automotive purposes is under growing pressure. As a consequence there is a demand for more environmentally friendly alternatives like water borne coatings, high solid coatings,

  16. Evaluation of seed priming and coating on emergence, yield and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of seed priming and coating on emergence, yield and yield components of bread wheat. (Triticum aestivum ... and cow urine primed + Dynamic 200 FS + Disco™ AG Red L-431 + Genius coat™ coated seeds were tested using RCBD with .... fertilizer dose of 92 kg ha-1 N and 46 kg ha-1 P2O5 was used for both ...

  17. Coated silicon comprising material for protection against environmental corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, Brian Thomas (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, an article is disclosed. The article comprises a gas turbine engine component substrate comprising a silicon material; and an environmental barrier coating overlying the substrate, wherein the environmental barrier coating comprises cerium oxide, and the cerium oxide reduces formation of silicate glass on the substrate upon exposure to corrodant sulfates.

  18. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  19. Principal components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallin, M.; Hörmann, S.; Piegorsch, W.; El Shaarawi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Principal Components are probably the best known and most widely used of all multivariate analysis techniques. The essential idea consists in performing a linear transformation of the observed k-dimensional variables in such a way that the new variables are vectors of k mutually orthogonal

  20. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. To meet the aggressive Advanced Turbine Systems goals for efficiency, durability and the environment, it will be necessary to employ thermal barrier coatings on turbine airfoils and other hot section components. For The successful application of TBCs to ATS engines with 2600{degrees}F turbine inlet temperatures and required component lives 10 times greater than those for aircraft gas turbine engines, it is necessary to develop quantitative assessment techniques for TBC coating integrity with time and cycles in ATS engines. Thermal barrier coatings in production today consist of a metallic bond coat, such as an MCrAlY overlay coating or a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) diffusion coating. During heat treatment, both these coatings form a thin, tightly adherent alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) film. Failure of TBC coatings in engine service occurs by spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the bond coat to alumina or the alumina to zirconia bonds. Thus, it is the initial strength of these bonds and the stresses at the bond plane, and their changes with engine exposure, that determines coating durability. The purpose of this program is to provide, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of TBC bond strength and bond plane stresses as a function of engine time and cycles.

  1. Self-lubricating Hard Coatings for Extreme Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This program will develop low friction hard coatings for lubricating mechanical and tribological components used for exploring Mars, the Moon, asteroids, comets and...

  2. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for commercial gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Susan Manning; Gupta, Dinesh K.; Sheffler, Keith D.

    1991-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the short history, current status, and future prospects of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines. Particular attention is given to plasma-sprayed and electron beam-physical vapor deposited yttria-stabilized (7 wt pct Y2O3) zirconia systems. Recent advances include improvements in the spallation life of thermal barrier coatings, improved bond coat composition and spraying techniques, and improved component design. The discussion also covers field experience, life prediction modeling, and future directions in ceramic coatings in relation to gas turbine engine design.

  3. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  4. Probability of detection of defects in coatings with electronic shearography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, S. S.; Lansing, M. D.; Horton, C. M.; Gnacek, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research was to utilize statistical methods to evaluate the probability of detection (POD) of defects in coatings using electronic shearography. The coating system utilized in the POD studies was to be the paint system currently utilized on the external casings of the NASA space transportation system reusable solid rocket motor boosters. The population of samples was to be large enough to determine the minimum defect size for 90-percent POD of 95-percent confidence POD on these coatings. Also, the best methods to excite coatings on aerospace components to induce deformations for measurement by electronic shearography were to be determined.

  5. Nanostructured coatings for super hydrophobic textiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, silica nanoparticles can be suitably functionalized or can be used as a component of nanocom- posite coating to adhere with cotton surface. Amino functiona- lized silica nanoparticles applied on epoxy functionalized cotton fabric shows excellent super-hydrophobicity (∼170. ◦. ). The functionalization of silica and ...

  6. Titanium tungsten coatings for bioelectrochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Amato, Letizia; Łopacińska, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of titanium tungsten (TiW) coatings and their applicability as components of biosensing systems. The focus is put on using TiW as an electromechanical interface layer between carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and silicon nanograss (SiNG) cell scaffolds. Cytotoxicity...

  7. Axisymmetric fretting analysis in coated cylinder

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... elastic mismatch are illustrated through contour plots of stresses and strains. These results are expected to be helpful for identifying fretting failure zones and fracture mechanisms in coated components. Analytical results presented here could serve as useful benchmarks for calibrating numerical codes and experimental ...

  8. Lifetime Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are applied in gas turbines to enhance their thermal efficiency by isolating the metallic components from the aggressive hot gas. TBC lifetime is limited by damage processes originating at internal interfaces, which may ultimately lead to delamination and spallation.

  9. Preliminary coating design and coating developments for ATHENA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders Clemen; Ferreira, Desiree Della Monica; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2011-01-01

    We present initial novel coating design for ATHENA. We make use of both simple bilayer coatings of Ir and B4C and more complex constant period multilayer coatings to enhance the effective area and cover the energy range from 0.1 to 10 keV. We also present the coating technology used...... for these designs and present test results from coatings....

  10. Optically transparent, superhydrophobic, biocompatible thin film coatings and methods for producing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Beth L.; Aytug, Tolga; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Simpson, John T.; Hillesheim, Daniel A.; Trammell, Neil E.

    2017-09-05

    An optically transparent, hydrophobic coating, exhibiting an average contact angle of at least 100 degrees with a drop of water. The coating can be produced using low-cost, environmentally friendly components. Methods of preparing and using the optically transparent, hydrophobic coating.

  11. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.

  12. Improved Manganese Phosphate Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    AD K/ . / R-TR-75-034 IMPROVED MANGANESE PHOSPHATE COATINGS HENRY CRAIN - APRIL 1975 RESEARCH DIRECTORATE DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT Approved for public...which superior manganese phosphate coatings are producel. The phosphate coatings were applied at temp- eratures above 2124F and with -.anganese...temperature for the conversion of mlnganese dihydrogen phosphate [(P(HjPO•’)] to manganese phosphate [Nns(PO4)J]. 1 A ii UNCLASSIFIED SE[CURITY CL. A

  13. Nanostructured Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    understanding of PVD parameters, depositing coatings on practical substrates such as the Ti6Al4V used for turbine blades, and developing a versatile...Phase I objectives, particularly in enhancing the understanding of PVD parameters, depositing coatings on practical substrates such as the Ti6Al4V ...understanding of PVD parameters, depositing coatings on practical substrates such as the Ti6Al4V used for turbine blades, and developing a versatile

  14. Smooth Compliant Antifoulant Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-30

    team reviewed the state of the art in marine antifoulant tech- nology. As part of this technology review, the team visited the Naval Ship Research and...high payoff is the incorporation of the biocide within the substrate polymer chain. This permits the antifoulant to be held chemi- cally rather than by...traditionally used red lead as a basis for protection against marine fouling. The antifoulant coating consists of a metal pretreatment coat, four coats of an

  15. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  16. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  17. Gas turbine coatings eddy current quantitative and qualitative evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribichini, Remo; Giolli, Carlo; Scrinzi, Erica

    2017-02-01

    Gas turbine blades (buckets) are among the most critical and expensive components of the engine. Buckets rely on protective coatings in order to withstand the harsh environment in which they operate. The thickness and the microstructure of coatings during the lifespan of a unit are fundamental to evaluate their fitness for service. A frequency scanning Eddy Current instrument can allow the measurement of the thickness and of physical properties of coatings in a Non-Destructive manner. The method employed relies on the acquisition of impedance spectra and on the inversion of the experimental data to derive the coating properties and structure using some assumptions. This article describes the experimental validation performed on several samples and real components in order to assess the performance of the instrument as a coating thickness gage. The application of the technique to support residual life assessment of serviced buckets is also presented.

  18. Formulation development of carvedilol compression coated tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ritesh; Patel, Sachin; Patel, Hetal; Pandey, Sonia; Shah, Shailesh; Shah, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The aim of present research was to produce carvedilol compression coated tablet to provide biphasic drug release. A compressed coated tablet made of a sustained release core tablet and an immediate release coat tablet. Both the core and the coat contained carvedilol. The sustained release effect was achieved with polymers (HPMC K4M and PEO WSR 205) to modulate the release of the drug. The powder blends for core and coat tablets were evaluated for angle of repose, bulk density, compressibility index, and drug content. Compressed coated tablets were evaluated for thickness, diameter, weight variation test, drug content, hardness, friability, disintegration and in vitro release studies. The powder blends showed satisfactory flow properties, compressibility, drug content and all the tablet formulations showed acceptable pharmaco-technical properties. Carvedilol contained in the fast releasing component was released within 3 min, whereas the drug in the core tablet was released at different times up to 24 h, depending on the composition of the matrix tablet. The mechanism of drug release was fickian diffusion or anomalous behavior. Batch F7, containing 10 mg PEO WSR 205 and 5 mg HPMC K4M, showed maximum similarity with theoretical profile and zero order drug release kinetic.

  19. Superhydrophobic silica coating by dip coating method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadik, Satish A., E-mail: superhydrophobicmaterial2100@gmail.com [Air Glass Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, Maharashtra (India); Parale, Vinayak; Vhatkara, Rajiv S.; Mahadik, Dinesh B.; Kavale, Mahendra S. [Air Glass Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, Maharashtra (India); Wagh, Pratap B.; Gupta, Satish [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Gurav, Jyoti [Empa, Advanced Materials Processing laboratory, 3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2013-07-15

    Herein, we report a simple and low cost method for the fabrication of superhydrophobic coating surface on quartz substrates via sol-gel dip coating method at room temperature. Desired surface chemistry and texture growth for superhydrophobicity developed under double step sol–gel process at room temperature. The resultant superhydrophobic surfaces were characterized by Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Atomic force microscopy (AFM), water contact angle (WCA) measurement, differential thermal gravimetric analysis-differential thermal analysis (TGA-DTA) calorimetry and optical spectrometer. Coating shows the ultra high water contact angle about 168 ± 2° and water sliding angle 3 ± 1° and superoleophilic with petroleum oils. This approach allows a simple strategy for the fabrication process of superhydrophilic–superhydrophobic on same surfaces with high thermal stability of superhydrophobicity up to 560 °C. Thus, durability, special wettability and thermal stability of superhydrophobicity expand their application fields.

  20. Rocket Combustion Chamber Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); McKechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A coating with the ability to protect (1) the inside wall (i.e., lining) of a rocket engine combustion chamber and (2) parts of other apparatuses that utilize or are exposed to combustive or high temperature environments. The novelty of this invention lies in the manner a protective coating is embedded into the lining.

  1. Coated electroactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amine, Khalil; Abouimrane, Ali

    2016-08-30

    A process includes suspending an electroactive material in a solvent, suspending or dissolving a carbon precursor in the solvent; and depositing the carbon precursor on the electroactive material to form a carbon-coated electroactive material. Compositions include a graphene-coated electroactive material prepared from a solution phase mixture or suspension of an electroactive material and graphene, graphene oxide, or a mixture thereof.

  2. Coating of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, G.F.; Dekker, C.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of highly crystalline graphene and coating said graphene with a layer. Said graphene may have further structures, such as nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons. The coated graphene can be used for biomolecular analysis and modification, such as DNA-sequencing, as

  3. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  4. Program for plasma-sprayed self-lubricating coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for preparing composite powders of the three coating components was developed and a procedure that can be used in applying uniform coatings of the composite powders was demonstrated. Composite powders were prepared by adjusting particle sizes of the components and employing a small amount of monoaluminum phosphate as an inorganic binder. Quantitative microscopy (image analysis) was found to be a convenient method of characterizing the composition of the multiphase plasma-sprayed coatings. Area percentages and distribution of the components were readily obtained by this method. The adhesive strength of the coating to a nickel-chromium alloy substrate was increased by about 40 percent by a heat treatment of 20 hours at 650 C.

  5. EB/UV treatment of protective coatings for porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bemporad, E.; Carassiti, F.; Tata, A.; Gallinaro, G.; Paris, M

    2000-03-01

    A method for improving surface properties of porous inorganic materials is presented. The method is particularly tailored to cement-based materials in order to obtain properties suitable for mechanical applications such as dies manufacturing, where hardness, abrasion resistance and low friction are requested. The coating system is based upon using two coatings of different characteristics. The underlying base coating layer is infiltrated in air on three different formulations of hardened cement composite. Two different bi-component resins, one relatively soft and the other relatively hard, were tested as underlying surface coating. The outer surface coating, based upon a bi-component resin characterized by high hardness, is added after hardening and curing of the first layer. Both coatings were chemically hardened and then cured with EB. UV curing is also suitable for the outer surface coating. An experimental campaign was carried out in order to evaluate the influence of radiation processing as curing treatment with reference to particular investigated materials. Hardness and resistance to peeling of coating systems have been measured and are presented. (author)

  6. EB/UV treatment of protective coatings for porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemporad, E.; Carassiti, F.; Tata, A.; Gallinaro, G.; Paris, M.

    2000-03-01

    A method for improving surface properties of porous inorganic materials is presented. The method is particularly tailored to cement-based materials in order to obtain properties suitable for mechanical applications such as dies manufacturing, where hardness, abrasion resistance and low friction are requested. The coating system is based upon using two coatings of different characteristics. The underlying base coating layer is infiltrated in air on three different formulations of hardened cement composite. Two different bi-component resins, one relatively soft and the other relatively hard, were tested as underlying surface coating. The outer surface coating, based upon a bi-component resin characterized by high hardness, is added after hardening and curing of the first layer. Both coatings were chemically hardened and then cured with EB. UV curing is also suitable for the outer surface coating. An experimental campaign was carried out in order to evaluate the influence of radiation processing as curing treatment with reference to particular investigated materials. Hardness and resistance to peeling of coating systems have been measured and are presented.

  7. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Diffusion in Environmental Barrier Coating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Components (CMC) components for use in turbine engines offer a number of advantages compared with current practice. However, such components are subject to degradation through a variety of mechanisms. In particular, in the hot environment inside a turbine in operation a considerable amount of water vapor is present, and this can lead to corrosion and recession. Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) systems that limit the amount of oxygen and water reaching the component are required to reduce this degradation and extend component life. A number of silicate-based materials are under consideration for use in such coating systems, including Yttterbium and Yttrium di- and monosilicates. In this work, we present results of kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulations of oxygen diffusion in Yttrium disilicate, and compare with previous work on Yttterbium disilicate. Coatings may also exhibit cracking, and the cracks can provide a direct path for oxygen to reach the component. There is typically a bond coat between the coating and component surface, but the bond coat material is generally chosen for properties other than low oxygen diffusivity. Nevertheless, the degree to which the bond coat can inhibit oxygen diffusion is of interest, as it may form the final defense against oxygen impingement on the component. We have therefore performed similar simulations of oxygen diffusion through HfSiO4, a proposed bond coat material.

  8. Delamination-Indicating Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2007-01-01

    The risk of premature failure of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), typically composed of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), compromises the reliability of TBCs used to provide thermal protection for turbine engine components. Unfortunately, TBC delamination proceeds well beneath the TBC surface and cannot be monitored by visible inspection. Nondestructive diagnostic tools that could reliably probe the subsurface damage state of TBCs would alleviate the risk of TBC premature failure by indicating when the TBC needs to be replaced before the level of TBC damage threatens engine performance or safety. To meet this need, a new coating design for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that are self-indicating for delamination has been successfully implemented by incorporating a europium-doped luminescent sublayer at the base of a TBC composed of YSZ. The luminescent sublayer has the same YSZ composition as the rest of the TBC except for the addition of low-level europium doping and therefore does not alter TBC performance.

  9. Plasma sprayed coatings for RF wave absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanobashvili, S.; Matějíček, J.; Žáček, F.; Stőckel, J.; Chráska, P.; Brožek, V.

    2002-12-01

    High requirements for fusion reactor materials and for experimental fusion devices have led within the fusion community to the development and testing of various coatings of the surfaces of in-vessel components and biological shields for microwave heating systems. Based on contacts with ITER, W7X and the Spanish Stellarator TJ-II, IPP Prague has initiated a development, production and test program on various low- Z materials. This paper reports on the production, development and properties of B 4C, Si and Al 2O 3 coatings sprayed by water stabilized plasma. Main focus is on their radio frequency wave reflection properties. Further characterization includes the coating structure by microscopy, phase composition by X-ray diffraction and oxygen content measurement by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The results are discussed with respect to processing conditions as well as potential application.

  10. Plasma sprayed coatings for RF wave absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanobashvili, S.; Matejicek, J. E-mail: jmatejic@ipp.cas.cz; Zacek, F.; Stockel, J.; Chraska, P.; Brozek, V

    2002-12-01

    High requirements for fusion reactor materials and for experimental fusion devices have led within the fusion community to the development and testing of various coatings of the surfaces of in-vessel components and biological shields for microwave heating systems. Based on contacts with ITER, W7X and the Spanish Stellarator TJ-II, IPP Prague has initiated a development, production and test program on various low-Z materials. This paper reports on the production, development and properties of B{sub 4}C, Si and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings sprayed by water stabilized plasma. Main focus is on their radio frequency wave reflection properties. Further characterization includes the coating structure by microscopy, phase composition by X-ray diffraction and oxygen content measurement by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The results are discussed with respect to processing conditions as well as potential application.

  11. Fluorine Based Superhydrophobic Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Denis Brassard

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Superhydrophobic coatings, inspired by nature, are an emerging technology. These water repellent coatings can be used as solutions for corrosion, biofouling and even water and air drag reduction applications. In this work, synthesis of monodispersive silica nanoparticles of ~120 nm diameter has been realized via Stöber process and further functionalized using fluoroalkylsilane (FAS-17 molecules to incorporate the fluorinated groups with the silica nanoparticles in an ethanolic solution. The synthesized fluorinated silica nanoparticles have been spin coated on flat aluminum alloy, silicon and glass substrates. Functionalization of silica nanoparticles with fluorinated groups has been confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR by showing the presence of C-F and Si-O-Si bonds. The water contact angles and surface roughness increase with the number of spin-coated thin films layers. The critical size of ~119 nm renders aluminum surface superhydrophobic with three layers of coating using as-prepared nanoparticle suspended solution. On the other hand, seven layers are required for a 50 vol.% diluted solution to achieve superhydrophobicity. In both the cases, water contact angles were more than 150°, contact angle hysteresis was less than 2° having a critical roughness value of ~0.700 µm. The fluorinated silica nanoparticle coated surfaces are also transparent and can be used as paint additives to obtain transparent coatings.

  12. Coating powdered copper catalyst with yttria sol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kuan-Ying [Department of Chemical and Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Shen, Chia-Chieh, E-mail: ccshen@saturn.yzu.edu.tw [Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Graduate School of Renewable Energy Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen [Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Graduate School of Renewable Energy Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Leu, Chih-Hsing [Energy and Environment Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jung-Hui [Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Chuin-Tih [Department of Chemical and Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China); Fuel Cell Center, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The neutral Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} sol is an effective binder for coating powders of CuZnAl catalyst. {yields} A particle size ratio of 15 for catalyst to binder is suggested for stable coating. {yields} Sufficient stirring is an important step in the catalyst slurry preparation. - Abstract: A commercial Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} sol was tested as a binder for coating CuZnAl catalyst powder onto microchannels of a stainless steel plate (SSP). Coated plates were used to fabricate microchannel reactors that generate hydrogen via the steam reforming of methanol (SRM). Washcoating slurries were prepared by suspending catalyst powders into the sol. Slurry parameters, such as solid content, binder content, pH value, and stir time, were optimized to achieve a stable catalyst coating and good SRM performance. The expected stable coating could be obtained from neutral (pH 7) Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} slurry that is required for a negligible dissolution of the copper component of the catalyst. The experimental coating stability generally improved with the slurry stir time. Observed improvements were attributed to a dispersion of catalyst powders in the slurry through a two-step mechanism: the mechanical disassembly of agglomerated CuZnAl powders into primary particles, and the repelling of dissembled particles through adsorption of positively charged Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} binders. A reasonable reaction temperature of 280 deg. C was found for 95% conversion of methanol in SRM from the resulted microchannel reactors. A low CO fraction of 0.3% was also found in the hydrogen-rich gas reformed.

  13. TiO{sub 2} coated multi-wall carbon nanotube as a corrosion inhibitor for improving the corrosion resistance of BTESPT coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuping; Zhu, Hongzheng; Zhuang, Chen [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Songling Road 238, Qingdao, 266100 (China); Chen, Shougang, E-mail: sgchen@ouc.edu.cn [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Songling Road 238, Qingdao, 266100 (China); Wang, Longqiang [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Songling Road 238, Qingdao, 266100 (China); Dong, Lihua [Institute of Ocean Materials and Engineering, Shanghai Maritime University, Shanghai, 200135 (China); Yin, Yansheng, E-mail: ysyin@shmtu.edu.cn [Institute of Ocean Materials and Engineering, Shanghai Maritime University, Shanghai, 200135 (China)

    2016-08-15

    The composite coatings of TiO{sub 2} coated multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNTs)/bis-[triethoxysilylpropyl]tetrasulfide (BTESPT) with different components were prepared on AA 2024 by the cathodic electrophoretic deposition technique and the experimental conditions were optimized to attain the appropriate volume ratio. The modified MWCNTs obviously improved the corrosion resistance of BTESPT and BTESPT/TiO{sub 2} coatings, especially for the long-term corrosion resistance ability because of the good dispersion of MWCNTs. The geometry of composite coatings were explored by scanning electron microscopy, fourier transform infrared spectra and the surface coverage rate (θ), the results indicate that the composite coatings produce good cross-linked structure at the interfacial layer, the coating compactness increases gradually with the addition of TiO{sub 2} and/or MWCNTs, and the composite coating effectively postpones the production of cracks with the addition of MWCNTs. - Highlights: • The composite coatings with different components were prepared on AA 2024 by the cathodic electrophoretic deposition technology. • The formation of composite coating on AA 2024 surface considerably improved the corrosion resistance ability. • The composite coating with a TiO{sub 2} to MWCNTs volume ratio of 4/1 shows the best corrosion resistance. • The kinetic evaluation of inhibitive behavior for different coatings against immersion time was explored.

  14. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where they are needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into the microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy.

  15. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor); Antony, Leo V. M. (Inventor); O'Dell, Scott (Inventor); Power, Chris (Inventor); Tabor, Terry (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  16. One Component Encapsulating Material Matrix as High Barrier Coating Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for new flexible food packaging materials with effective high barrier against oxygen and moisture to protect food, minimize weight and...

  17. The Development of Erosion and Impact Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments and extend component lifetimes. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Advanced erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the doped thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion and impact damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be discussed.

  18. Aluminum phosphate coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambasivan, Sankar; Steiner, Kimberly A.; Rangan, Krishnaswamy K.

    2007-12-25

    Aluminophosphate compounds and compositions as can be used for substrate or composite films and coating to provide or enhance, without limitation, planarization, anti-biofouling and/or anti-microbial properties.

  19. Inorganic Coatings Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The inorganic Coatings Lab provides expertise to Navy and Joint Service platforms acquisition IPTs to aid in materials and processing choices which balance up-front...

  20. Investigation of high temperature sol-gel coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, M. [DTU Mekanik, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Vilhelmsen, T. [Vattenfall Heat Nordic, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bennedsen, J. [Teknologisk Institut, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2008-03-15

    The Danish Technological Institute (DTI) has developed a technique using Hybrid Sol-gel nanotechnology to produce coatings which can change the surface characteristics of various components. It is the purpose of this project to investigate where such coatings can be utilised in the power generating industry with respect to fouling and corrosion resistance. Sol-gel coatings were fabricated at DTI with the aim of being high temperature corrosion resistance. These coatings were investigated at DTU Mechanical Engineering. The coatings contained large amounts of aluminium, oxygen, silicon and titanium with also addition of mica. Tubes of various alloys (15Mo3, X20CrMoV121, TP347H and P91,) were received from DONG Energy/Vattenfall. They were mechanically cleaned and then 15Mo3, X20CrMoV121 and TP347H were cleaned in a 10% melamine solution for 30 minutes. All tubes were then polished and coated. Two different sol-gel coatings have been applied to each end of the tube. The one coating is white ({Psi}114) and the other black ({Psi}115). The specimens were heated for 3 thermal cycle periods of 8 hours. From the analysis of the various coatings, it is clear that the coatings exposed to thermal cycles of 500 deg. C have all oxides present below the sol-gel layer. In many cases especially for the grey coating, the coating has spalled. Thus these coatings do not prevent permeation of oxidising species either due to a permable coating or cracking of the coating due to thermal cycling. For the coating on the 15Mo3 tube, there was almost no oxide, however microscopy of the surface of the specimens revealed cracking. It is suggested that lack of oxide or very thin oxide on the 15Mo3 is due to the fact that oxidation is not so fast at 400 deg. C compared to 500 deg. C, and that a longer exposure time would have given a thicker oxide. It would be difficult to understand why 15Mo3 behaves differently to the under ferritic steels when it has a lower corrosion resistance and similar

  1. Plasma sprayed alumina coatings for radiation detector development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Conventional design of radiation detectors uses sintered ceramic insulating modules. The major drawback of these ceramic components is their inherent brittleness. Ion chambers, in which these ceramic spacers are replaced by metallic components with plasma spray coated alumina, have been developed in our ...

  2. Parasitic light scattered by complex optical coatings: modelization and metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerrad, Myriam; Lequime, Michel; Liukaityte, Simona; Amra, Claude

    2017-12-01

    Optical components realized for space applications have to be mastered in term of parasitic light. This paper present the last improvements performed at the Institute Fresnel to predict and measure scattering losses of optical components with a special care to complex optical coatings. Agreement between numerical models and metrology is now excellent. Some examples will be presented.

  3. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  4. Spin coating apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torczynski, John R.

    2000-01-01

    A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

  5. Characterization of cohesion, adhesion and creep-properties of dynamically loaded coatings through the impact tester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzakis, K.D.; Michailidis, N.; Lontos, A.; Siganos, A.; Hadjiyiannis, S.; Giannopoulos, G.; Maliaris, G. [Aristoteles Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece). Lab. for Machine Tools and Mfg. Engineering; Erkens, G. [CemeCon GmbH, Wuerselen (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    The coating impact test, in combination with finite elements method (FEM) simulation, is successfully used to characterize the fatigue performance of coatings. Critical values for stress components, responsible for distinctive fatigue failure modes of the coating, are obtained and the fatigue limits of various coatings are illustrated in form of generally applicable Smith and Woehler diagrams, determined through a developed evaluation software. This software takes into account the impact test experimental data, as well as coating and substrate constitutive laws. Herewith coating adhesive and cohesive failure modes are elucidated and a cutting performance prediction of coated tools can be carried out. On the other hand, creep phenomena of plasma sprayed coatings are quantitatively interpreted. (orig.)

  6. Process Optimization for Spray Coating of Poly (vinyl pyrrolidone)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bose, Sanjukta; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Boisen, Anja

    solvents [1]. Recently some studies have been published [2, 3] using micromechanical sensors to characterize thin polymer coatings under various conditions. With the final aim to deposit thin PVP film on cantilevers we studied the process optimization of PVP by spray coating on microscope glass slides....... Here, we present a study of the parameters determining the quality of the deposited film. Spray Coating was done in an Exacta Coat Ultrasonic Spraying System (Sonotek, USA) .The main components are illustrated in fig. 1. The tip of the ultrasonic atomizer nozzle was actuated at a frequency of 120 k......Hz. Nitrogen gas was connected to the inlet of the air focusing shroud. The nitrogen pressure was monitored by a pressure sensor and regulated by a valve. The gas flow and the position of the air focusing shroud allowed the control of the diameter and shape of the spray-coating beam. The movement of the nozzle...

  7. Biocompatibility of Niobium Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Olivares-Navarrete

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Niobium coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering were evaluated as a possible surface modification for stainless steel (SS substrates in biomedical implants. The Nb coatings were deposited on 15 mm diameter stainless steel substrates having an average surface roughness of 2 mm. To evaluate the biocompatibility of the coatings three different in vitro tests, using human alveolar bone derived cells, were performed: cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability. Stainless steel substrates and tissue culture plastic were also studied, in order to give comparative information. No toxic response was observed for any of the surfaces, indicating that the Nb coatings act as a biocompatible, bioinert material. Cell morphology was also studied by immune-fluorescence and the results confirmed the healthy state of the cells on the Nb surface. X-ray diffraction analysis of the coating shows that the film is polycrystalline with a body centered cubic structure. The surface composition and corrosion resistance of both the substrate and the Nb coating were also studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and potentiodynamic tests. Water contact angle measurements showed that the Nb surface is more hydrophobic than the SS substrate.

  8. Hydroxyapatite coatings for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings are of great importance in the biological and biomedical coatings fields, especially in the current era of nanotechnology and bioapplications. With a bonelike structure that promotes osseointegration, hydroxyapatite coating can be applied to otherwise bioinactive implants to make their surface bioactive, thus achieving faster healing and recovery. In addition to applications in orthopedic and dental implants, this coating can also be used in drug delivery. Hydroxyapatite Coatings for Biomedical Applications explores developments in the processing and property characteri

  9. Coated microneedles for transdermal delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Harvinder S.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    Coated microneedles have been shown to deliver proteins and DNA into the skin in a minimally invasive manner. However, detailed studies examining coating methods and their breadth of applicability are lacking. This study’s goal was to develop a simple, versatile and controlled microneedle coating process to make uniform coatings on microneedles and establish the breadth of molecules and particles that can be coated onto microneedles. First, microneedles were fabricated from stainless steel sh...

  10. Coated particle waste form development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oma, K.H.; Buckwalter, C.Q.; Chick, L.A.

    1981-12-01

    Coated particle waste forms have been developed as part of the multibarrier concept at Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the Alternative Waste Forms Program for the Department of Energy. Primary efforts were to coat simulated nuclear waste glass marbles and ceramic pellets with low-temperature pyrolytic carbon (LT-PyC) coatings via the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Fluidized bed (FB) coaters, screw agitated coaters (SAC), and rotating tube coaters were used. Coating temperatures were reduced by using catalysts and plasma activation. In general, the LT-PyC coatings did not provide the expected high leach resistance as previously measured for carbon alone. The coatings were friable and often spalled off the substrate. A totally different concept, thermal spray coating, was investigated at PNL as an alternative to CVD coating. Flame spray, wire gun, and plasma gun systems were evaluated using glass, ceramic, and metallic coating materials. Metal plasma spray coatings (Al, Sn, Zn, Pb) provided a two to three orders-of-magnitude increase in chemical durability. Because the aluminum coatings were porous, the superior leach resistance must be due to either a chemical interaction or to a pH buffer effect. Because they are complex, coated waste form processes rank low in process feasibility. Of all the possible coated particle processes, plasma sprayed marbles have the best rating. Carbon coating of pellets by CVD ranked ninth when compared with ten other processes. The plasma-spray-coated marble process ranked sixth out of eleven processes.

  11. SERDP-ESTCP Research and Development in Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Substrate Pretreatments for Multi-Material Systems ● Understanding the Science Behind How Methylene Chloride /Phenolic Chemical Paint Strippers Remove...Coatings FY2010 ● Environmentally Benign, High-Performance Non-Media Paint Strippers 11 Selected ESTCP Projects Related to Coatings ● FY2000: Non...Acceptable Alternatives for Liquid Spray Paint Pre-Mix Components ● Environmentally Benign Methods for the Removal of Radar Absorbing Material

  12. Mechanical Property of HVOF Inconel 718 Coating for Aeronautic Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyphout, Christophe; Fasth, Angelica; Nylen, Per

    2014-02-01

    The module of elasticity is one of the most important mechanical properties defining the strength of a material which is a prerequisite to design a component from its early stage of conception to its field of application. When a material is to be thermally sprayed, mechanical properties of the deposited layers differ from the bulk material, mainly due to the anisotropy of the highly textured coating microstructure. The mechanical response of the deposited layers significantly influences the overall performance of the coated component. It is, therefore, of importance to evaluate the effective module of elasticity of the coating. Conventional experimental methods such as microindentation, nanoindentation and four-point bending tests have been investigated and their results vary significantly, mainly due to inhomogeneous characteristics of the coating microstructure. Synchrotron radiation coupled with a tensile test rig has been proposed as an alternative method to determine the coating anisotropic elastic behavior dependence on crystallographic orientations. The investigation was performed on Inconel 718 (IN718) HVOF coatings sprayed on IN718 substrates. Combining these experimental techniques yield a deeper understanding of the nature of the HVOF coating Young's modulus and thus a tool for Design Practice for repair applications.

  13. Proceedings of the 1987 coatings for advanced heat engines workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This Workshop was conducted to enhance communication among those involved in coating development for improved heat engine performance and durability. We were fortunate to have Bill Goward review the steady progress and problems encountered along the way in the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in aircraft gas turbine engines. Navy contractors discussed their work toward the elusive goal of qualifying TBC for turbine airfoil applications. In the diesel community, Caterpillar and Cummins are developing TBC for combustion chamber components as part of the low heat rejection diesel engine concept. The diesel engine TBC work is based on gas turbine technology with a goal of more than twice the thickness used on gas turbine engine components. Adoption of TBC in production for diesel engines could justify a new generation of plasma spray coating equipment. Increasing interests in tribology were evident in this Workshop. Coatings have a significant role in reducing friction and wear under greater mechanical loadings at higher temperatures. The emergence of a high temperature synthetic lubricant could have an enormous impact on diesel engine design and operating conditions. The proven coating processes such as plasma spray, electron-beam physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition have shown enhanced capabilities, particularly with microprocessor controls. Also, the newer coating schemes such as ion implantation and cathodic arc are demonstrating intriguing potential for engine applications. Coatings will play an expanding role in higher efficiency, more durable heat engines.

  14. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  15. Hybrid calcium phosphate coatings for implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchikhina, Alena I.; Shesterikov, Evgeny V.; Bolbasov, Evgeny N.; Ignatov, Viktor P.; Tverdokhlebov, Sergei I.

    2016-08-01

    Monophasic biomaterials cannot provide all the necessary functions of bones or other calcined tissues. It is necessary to create for cancer patients the multiphase materials with the structure and composition simulating the natural bone. Such materials are classified as hybrid, obtained by a combination of chemically different components. The paper presents the physical, chemical and biological studies of coatings produced by hybrid technologies (HT), which combine primer layer and calcium phosphate (CaP) coating. The first HT type combines the method of vacuum arc titanium primer layer deposition on a stainless steel substrate with the following micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in phosphoric acid solution with addition of calcium compounds to achieve high supersaturated state. MAO CaP coatings feature high porosity (2-8%, pore size 5-7 µm) and surface morphology with the thickness greater than 5 µm. The thickness of Ti primer layer is 5-40 µm. Amorphous MAO CaP coating micro-hardness was measured at maximum normal load Fmax = 300 mN. It was 3.1 ± 0.8 GPa, surface layer elasticity modulus E = 110 ± 20 GPa, roughness Ra = 0.9 ± 0.1 µm, Rz = 7.5 ± 0.2 µm, which is less than the titanium primer layer roughness. Hybrid MAO CaP coating is biocompatible, able to form calcium phosphates from supersaturated body fluid (SBF) solution and also stimulates osteoinduction processes. The second HT type includes the oxide layer formation by thermal oxidation and then CaP target radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS). Oxide-RFMS CaP coating is a thin dense coating with good adhesion to the substrate material, which can be used for metal implants. The RFMS CaP coating has thickness 1.6 ± 0.1 µm and consists of main target elements calcium and phosphorus and Ca/P ratio 2.4. The second HT type can form calcium phosphates from SBF solution. In vivo study shows that hybrid RFMS CaP coating is biocompatible and produces fibrointegration processes.

  16. Quantitation of Surface Coating on Nanoparticles Using Thermogravimetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongargaonkar, Alpana A; Clogston, Jeffrey D

    2018-01-01

    Nanoparticles are critical components in nanomedicine and nanotherapeutic applications. Some nanoparticles, such as metallic nanoparticles, consist of a surface coating or surface modification to aid in its dispersion and stability. This surface coating may affect the behavior of nanoparticles in a biological environment, thus it is important to measure. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) can be used to determine the amount of coating on the surface of the nanoparticle. TGA experiments run under inert atmosphere can also be used to determine residual metal content present in the sample. In this chapter, the TGA technique and experimental method are described.

  17. Stresses in Coating with Gradient Interlayer caused by Contact Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulchytsky-Zhyhailo Roman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional problem of elasticity concerning inhomogeneous half-space under normal and tangential loading applied in circular region was considered. The half-space is composed of the homogeneous body and double-layer coating which includes a homogeneous top coat and a gradient interlayer. The solution method is based on the two-dimensional integral Fourier transform. The influence of mechanical properties of coatings component and coefficient of friction on the first principal stress distribution was considered.

  18. Pratt & Whitney thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornstein, N. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States); Marcin, J. [Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Co., East Hartford, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to develop ultra-high efficient, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems. The operating profiles of these industrial gas turbines are long, less cyclic with fewer transients-compared with those for aircraft gas turbine engines. Therefore, creep rather than thermal fatigue, becomes primary life-limiting for hot section components. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will be used to achieve the objectives of the program. TBCs allow surface temperatures to increase without compromising the structural properties of the alloy. TBCs typically consist of a ceramic insulating layer, deposited onto the substrate with an intervening metallic layer, which imparts oxidation protection to the substrate and provides a surface to which the ceramic layer can adhere.

  19. Steam initiated hydrotalcite conversion coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Lingli; Friis, Henrik; Roefzaad, Melanie

    2018-01-01

    in the following order: K2S2O8 > Na2SO4 > NH4NO3 > KNO3. Post-coating rinsing by Mg(CH3COO)2, in addition to Ce- and La- based salts, is capable of sealing the porous Al-Li HT coatings and increasing the corrosion resistance ability. The Ce modified Al-Li HT coatings show better corrosion protection than the La...... modified coatings, due to a behaviour of “active corrosion protection” that enables precipitation of insoluble Ce(IV) oxides to reinforce the existed HT coatings........ A range of coating processesased on the formation of HT surface layers has been developed to examine its effect on the coating's thicknessnd corrosion resistance properties. These varieties include pre-coating cleaning (grid blasting vs. chemicaltching), metal species in HT compounds (Al-Zn HT coating vs...

  20. The Development of Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Environment Effects on the Creep and Fatigue Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Topics covered include: Environmental barrier coating system development: needs, challenges and limitations; Advanced environmental barrier coating systems (EBCs) for CMC airfoils and combustors; NASA EBC systems and material system evolutions, Current turbine and combustor EBC coating emphases, Advanced development, processing, testing and modeling, EBC and EBC bond coats: recent advances; Design tool and life prediction of coated CMC components; Advanced CMC-EBC rig demonstrations; Summary and future directions.

  1. Measurements for stresses in machine components

    CERN Document Server

    Yakovlev, V F

    1964-01-01

    Measurements for Stresses in Machine Components focuses on the state of stress and strain of components and members, which determines the service life and strength of machines and structures. This book is divided into four chapters. Chapter I describes the physical basis of several methods of measuring strains, which includes strain gauges, photoelasticity, X-ray diffraction, brittle coatings, and dividing grids. The basic concepts of the electric strain gauge method for measuring stresses inside machine components are covered in Chapter II. Chapter III elaborates on the results of experim

  2. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, L. M.; Hintze, P. E.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Jolley, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effects of corrosion on various structures at the Kennedy Space Center, and the work to discover a corrosion control coating that will be autonomous and will indicate corrosion at an early point in the process. Kennedy Space Center has many environmental conditions that are corrosive: ocean salt spray, heat, humidity, sunlight and acidic exhaust from the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). Presented is a chart which shows the corrosion rates of carbon steel at various locations. KSC has the highest corrosion rates with 42.0 mils/yr, leading the next highest Galeta Point Beach, in the Panama Canal Zone with 27 mils/yr corrosion. A chart shows the changes in corrosion rate with the distance from the ocean. The three types of corrosion protective coatings are described: barrier (passive), Barrier plus active corrosion inhibiting components, and smart. A smart coating will detect and respond actively to changes in its environment in a functional and predictable manner and is capable of adapting its properties dynamically. The smart coating uses microcapsules, particles or liquid drops coated in polymers, that can detect and control the corrosion caused by the environment. The mechanism for a pH sensitive microcapsule and the hydrophobic core microcapsule are demonstrated and the chemistry is reviewed. When corrosion begins, the microcapsule will release the contents of the core (indicator, inhibitor, and self healing agent) in close proximity to the corrosion. The response to a pH increase is demonstrated by a series of pictures that show the breakdown of the microcapsule and the contents release. An example of bolt corrosion is used, as an example of corrosion in places that are difficult to ascertain. A comparison of various coating systems is shown.

  3. Protective Woodcutting Tool Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana D. Latushkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern woodworking industry applies resource-saving, environmentally appropriate technologies, providing both the metal removal performance enhancement and functioning with the optimal economic factors. Progressive cutting parameters require the application of the high-reliability cutting tools, eliminating machine-tool equipment standstill and increased cost of the expensive tool materials. In this paper it is suggested to increase the wood-cutting tool efficiency by means of the vacuum-arc separated coating deposition process optimization. The droplets are one of the main problems while generating vacuum-arc coatings, and they have a bad influence on the quality and operational coatings characteristics. The application of the separated system, allowing minimize the droplets content, is one of the most promising ways to solve this problem. Vacuum-arc deposition technique was used in this work to generate multicomponent coatings. The coatings deposition was directly carried out on the modernized vacuum-arc plant, equipped by Y-shaped macroparticles separator.

  4. A New Coating Process for Production of Coated Magnesium Powders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    .... In brief, Task 1 involved the construction and assembly of the coating system and supporting infrastructure, which was used for the scale-up and production of 1-lb batches of coated magnesium powder...

  5. Superheating in coated niobium

    OpenAIRE

    T. Junginger; Wasserman, W.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2017-01-01

    Using muon spin rotation it is shown that the field of first flux penetration H_entry in Nb is enhanced by about 30% if coated with an overlayer of Nb_3Sn or MgB_2. This is consistent with an increase from the lower critical magnetic field H_c1 up to the superheating field H_sh of the Nb substrate. In the experiments presented here coatings of Nb_3Sn and MgB_2 with a thickness between 50 and 2000nm have been tested. H_entry does not depend on material or thickness. This suggests that the ener...

  6. Advanced Coating Removal Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Jon

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the repair and protection against corrosion damage is the safe removal of the oxidation and protective coatings without further damaging the integrity of the substrate. Two such methods that are proving to be safe and effective in this task are liquid nitrogen and laser removal operations. Laser technology used for the removal of protective coatings is currently being researched and implemented in various areas of the aerospace industry. Delivering thousands of focused energy pulses, the laser ablates the coating surface by heating and dissolving the material applied to the substrate. The metal substrate will reflect the laser and redirect the energy to any remaining protective coating, thus preventing any collateral damage the substrate may suffer throughout the process. Liquid nitrogen jets are comparable to blasting with an ultra high-pressure water jet but without the residual liquid that requires collection and removal .As the liquid nitrogen reaches the surface it is transformed into gaseous nitrogen and reenters the atmosphere without any contamination to surrounding hardware. These innovative technologies simplify corrosion repair by eliminating hazardous chemicals and repetitive manual labor from the coating removal process. One very significant advantage is the reduction of particulate contamination exposure to personnel. With the removal of coatings adjacent to sensitive flight hardware, a benefit of each technique for the space program is that no contamination such as beads, water, or sanding residue is left behind when the job is finished. One primary concern is the safe removal of coatings from thin aluminum honeycomb face sheet. NASA recently conducted thermal testing on liquid nitrogen systems and found that no damage occurred on 1/6", aluminum substrates. Wright Patterson Air Force Base in conjunction with Boeing and NASA is currently testing the laser remOval technique for process qualification. Other applications of liquid

  7. Mechanically Invisible Polymer Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    phase comprises particles, said particles comprising a filler material and an encapsulating coating of a second polymeric material, wherein the backbones of the first and second polymeric materials are the same. The composition may be used in electroactive polymers (EAPs) in order to obtain mechanically......The present invention relates to a composition comprising encapsulated particles in a polymeric material. The composition comprises a continuous phase and a discontinuous phase incorporated therein, wherein the continuous phase comprises a first polymeric material and wherein the discontinuous...... invisible polymer coatings....

  8. Methods and means for coating paper by film coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Maarel, Marc; Ter Veer, Arend Berend Cornelis; Vrieling-Smit, Annet; Delnoye, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates to the field of paper coating, more in particular to means and methods for providing paper with at least one layer of pigment using film coating to obtain a well printable surface. Provided is a method for preparing coated paper comprising the steps of: a) providing a

  9. Estudo do método da extração da camada leucoplaquetária na produção de hemocomponentes: avaliação laboratorial A study of the Buffy-coat extraction method for blood component processing: laboratorial analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario I. Serinolli

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentre os métodos para a obtenção de hemocomponentes destaca-se o método do plasma rico em plaquetas (PRP e o método da extração da camada leucoplaquetária (ECLP. Este estudo tem por objetivo comparar os métodos do PRP e da ECLP na produção de hemocomponentes. Foram processadas 88 bolsas de sangue total (ST pelo método do PRP, 130 bolsas triplas pelo método da ECLP (ECLPT e 215 bolsas coletadas em bolsas quádruplas pelo método da ECLP (ECLPQ com o uso de extrator automático. Encontramos diferença estatisticamente significante na quantidade de Hb total /unidade entre ECLPT e ECLPQ (p=0,005 e entre ECLPT e PRP (p=0,007 no ST. Houve diferença estatisticamente entre ECLPT e ECLPQ (pThe most commonly used methods for blood component processing are the "plasma rich in platelets method" (PRP, and the Buffy-coat extraction method (BC.The purpose of this study was to compare these two methods in the processing of blood components. Eighty-eight whole blood units (WB were processed by the PRP method, 130 blood units were processed by the BC triple blood bag method (BCT and 215 blood units were collected in quadruple blood bags by the BC method (BCQ using an automatic extractor. A statistically significant difference was observed in the number in the total Hb per unit of WB between the BCT and BCQ methods (p=0.005 and between the BCT and PRP methods (p=0.007. There were also statistically significant differences between the BCT and BCQ methods (p<0.001 and between BCQ and PRP methods (p<0.001 in relation to leukocytes/mL. In the RBC concentrates, we found statistically significant differences between the PRP method and both the BCT and BCQ methods in respect to hematocrit levels, Hb recovery, total Hb, leukocytes, leukocyte depletion, platelets and platelet depletion (p<0.001 in all cases. We also found statistically significant differences between the PRP, BCT and BCQ methods for the volume, platelet recovery, and leukocyte depletion (p<0

  10. Mechanisms of Military Coatings Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    volume and bulk film compaction. Coating A is a less sterically and thermally stable biuret trimer of HDI in comparison to the HDI of coating system...developed coatings systems used by the Army, Marine Corps and Air Force. This study has incorporated numerous analytical tools and methods in an effort to...blistering. Peel away was evaluated as per ASTM D 3359, Method A and blistering was evaluated as per ASTM D 714. Coating systems are summarized

  11. Bone growth into a revised porous-coated patellar implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L N; Lund, B; Gotfredsen, K

    1990-01-01

    A noncemented and clinically stable porous-coated patellar component (PCA) was removed from a patient after 11 months because of infection. It was sectioned and examined histologically in undecalcified, thin-ground sections. The bone ingrowth into the porous space was measured at eight levels. Each...... histologic section was quantified by a conventional point-counting method using a square grid. There was inhomogeneous, but extensive, bone ingrowth, often extending to the core of the patellar component, with direct contact between bone and porous coating without any interstitial fibrous membrane....

  12. Coating method for graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banker, J.G.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1975-11-06

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided. The graphite surface is coated with a suspension of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4 percent by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

  13. Coatings for transport industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof LUKASZKOWICZ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigations concerned structural analysis, as well as mechanical properties and wear resistant of MeN/DLC double-layer coating deposited by hybrid PVD/PACVD method. In sliding dry friction conditions, after the break-in time, the friction coefficient for the investigated elements is set in the range between 0.03-0.06.

  14. The Spore Coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driks, Adam; Eichenberger, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Spores of Clostridiales and Bacillales are encased in a complex series of concentric shells that provide protection, facilitate germination, and mediate interactions with the environment. Analysis of diverse spore-forming species by thin-section transmission electron microscopy reveals that the number and morphology of these encasing shells vary greatly. In some species, they appear to be composed of a small number of discrete layers. In other species, they can comprise multiple, morphologically complex layers. In addition, spore surfaces can possess elaborate appendages. For all their variability, there is a consistent architecture to the layers encasing the spore. A hallmark of all Clostridiales and Bacillales spores is the cortex, a layer made of peptidoglycan. In close association with the cortex, all species examined possess, at a minimum, a series of proteinaceous layers, called the coat. In some species, including Bacillus subtilis, only the coat is present. In other species, including Bacillus anthracis, an additional layer, called the exosporium, surrounds the coat. Our goals here are to review the present understanding of the structure, composition, assembly, and functions of the coat, primarily in the model organism B. subtilis, but also in the small but growing number of other spore-forming species where new data are showing that there is much to be learned beyond the relatively well-developed basis of knowledge in B. subtilis. To help summarize this large field and define future directions for research, we will focus on key findings in recent years.

  15. HA-Coated Implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Henrik; Søballe, Kjeld; Bechtold, Joan E

    2014-01-01

    The goal of osseointegration of orthopedic and dental implants is the rapid achievement of a mechanically stable and long lasting fixation between living bone and the implant surface. In total joint replacements of cementless designs, coatings of calcium phosphates were introduced as a means...

  16. Durable superhydrophobic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, John T.; Polyzos, Georgios; Schaeffer, Daniel A.

    2017-11-28

    A superhydrophobic coating including a plurality of particles and a resin. The particles covalently bond to the resin and the resin does not fill the pores of the superhydrophobic particles such that the three dimensional surface topology of the superhydrophobic particles is preserved.

  17. REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-06-24

    Refractory coating for graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is described. The coating is an alumino-silicate refractory composition which may be used as a mold surface in solid form or as a coating applied to the graphite mold. The composition consists of a mixture of ball clay, kaolin, alumina cement, alumina, water, sodium silicate, and sodium carbonate.

  18. Edible coating as factor of preserving freshness and increasing biological value of gingerbread cakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Shulga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents experimental study on the feasibility of using edible films (in the coating as a means of preventing staling and method of increasing the biological value of gingerbread products. Grounded components of edible coating. Based on the organoleptic and physico-chemical showers properties (moisture content, water absorptivity and friability proved the feasibility and necessity of use last one edible coating, which also can increase the biological value of products, as part of the cover is linseed oil.

  19. Prior Surface Integrity Assessment of Coated and Uncoated Carbide Inserts Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulla Almazrouee; Ayman Alaskari; Samy Oraby

    2011-01-01

    Coated carbide inserts are considered vital components in machining processes and advanced functional surface integrity of inserts and their coating are decisive factors for tool life. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) implementation has gained acceptance over a wide spectrum of research and science applications. When used in a proper systematic manner, the AFM features can be a valuable tool for assessment of tool surface integrity. The aim of this paper is to assess the integrity of coated and ...

  20. Tribology of nitrided-coated steel-a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Santosh V.; Kudal, Hari N.

    2017-01-01

    Surface engineering such as surface treatment, coating, and surface modification are employed to increase surface hardness, minimize adhesion, and hence, to reduce friction and improve resistance to wear. To have optimal tribological performance of Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) hard coating to the substrate materials, pretreatment of the substrate materials is always advisable to avoid plastic deformation of the substrate, which may result in eventual coating failure. The surface treatment results in hardening of the substrate and increase in load support effect. Many approaches aim to improve the adhesion of the coatings onto the substrate and nitriding is the one of the best suitable options for the same. In addition to tribological properties, nitriding leads to improved corrosion resistance. Often corrosion resistance is better than that obtainable with other surface engineering processes such as hard-chrome and nickel plating. Ability of this layer to withstand thermal stresses gives stability which extends the surface life of tools and other components exposed to heat. Most importantly, the nitrogen picked-up by the diffusion layer increases the rotating-bending fatigue strength in components. The present article reviews mainly the tribological advancement of different nitrided-coated steels based on the types of coatings, structure, and the tribo-testing parameters, in recent years.

  1. Active Gripper for Hot Melt Joining of Micro Components

    OpenAIRE

    Rathmann, Sven; Raatz, Annika; Hesselbach, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Precision assembly of hybrid micro systems requires not only a high precision handling and adjusting of the parts but also a highly accurate and fast bonding technique. In this field adhesive technology is one of the major joining techniques. At the Collaboration Research Center 516, a batch process based on a joining technique using hot melt adhesives was developed. This technique allows the coating of micro components with hot melt in a batch. The coating process is ...

  2. A Review of Tribological Coatings for Control Drive Mechanisms in Space Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CJ Larkin; JD Edington; BJ Close

    2006-02-21

    Tribological coatings must provide lubrication for moving components of the control drive mechanism for a space reactor and prevent seizing due to friction or diffusion welding to provide highly reliable and precise control of reflector position over the mission lifetime. Several coatings were evaluated based on tribological performance at elevated temperatures and in ultrahigh vacuum environments. Candidates with proven performance in the anticipated environment are limited primarily to disulfide materials. Irradiation data for these coatings is nonexistent. Compatibility issues between coating materials and structural components may require the use of barrier layers between the solid lubricant and structural components to prevent deleterious interactions. It would be advisable to consider possible lubricant interactions prior to down-selection of structural materials. A battery of tests was proposed to provide the necessary data for eventual solid lubricant/coating selection.

  3. Initial Assessment of Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Prometheus Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Frederick

    2005-12-15

    Depending upon final design and materials selections, a variety of engineering solutions may need to be considered to avoid chemical degradation of components in a notional space nuclear power plant (SNPP). Coatings are one engineered approach that was considered. A comprehensive review of protective coating technology for various space-reactor structural materials is presented, including refractory metal alloys [molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W), rhenium (Re), tantalum (Ta), and niobium (Nb)], nickel (Ni)-base superalloys, and silicon carbide (Sic). A summary description of some common deposition techniques is included. A literature survey identified coatings based on silicides or iridium/rhenium as the primary methods for environmental protection of refractory metal alloys. Modified aluminide coatings have been identified for superalloys and multilayer ceramic coatings for protection of Sic. All reviewed research focused on protecting structural materials from extreme temperatures in highly oxidizing conditions. Thermodynamic analyses indicate that some of these coatings may not be protective in the high-temperature, impure-He environment expected in a Prometheus reactor system. Further research is proposed to determine extensibility of these coating materials to less-oxidizing or neutral environments.

  4. Feasibility study of submarine diesel exhaust valve interspace coating application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, W.; Zhou, M.; Bibby, D.; Huang, J.

    2008-05-15

    This document described a feasibility study conducted to evaluate surface coating systems applied to the surface of a diesel exhaust valve interspace on a VICTORIA Class submarine. A series of laboratory studies were conducted to determine the physical characteristics of the coatings, which will be subjected to high service temperatures, diesel exhaust gas, and seawater. The valves were made of Q1N steel castings. The surface coatings were designed to provide corrosion resistance and thermal protection to the valves. As part of the study, a survey was conducted on various state-of-the-art surface coating systems. Coatings were rated on their ability to protect the Q10 steel surface from corrosion, high temperatures and seawater. An additional requirement was that the coatings should not produce high amounts of hydrogen. Plating trials were conducted with a nickel-based alloy (Ni-Cu-P) placed on Q1N steel substrates with a hypophosphite reducing agent. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses suggested that the coatings can also be used to protect the external surfaces of various submarine components. 54 refs., 4 tabs., 10 figs.

  5. Polyurethane Coatings Reinforced by Halloysite Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diethelm Johannsmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pencil hardness of a two-component polyurethane coating was improved by adding halloysite nanotubes to the recipe at a weight fraction of less than 10%. The pencil hardness was around F for the unfilled coating and increased to around 2H upon filling. It was important to silanize the surface of the filler in order to achieve good coupling to the matrix. Sonicating the sample during drying also improved the hardness. Scanning electron micrographs suggest that the nanotubes are always well immersed into the bulk of the film. With a thickness between 10 and 20 µm, the optical clarity was good enough to clearly read letters through the film. The films can be used in applications where transparency is required.

  6. Quantitative analysis of silica aerogel-based thermal insulation coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical heat transfer model for a silica aerogel-based thermal insulation coating was developed. The model can estimate the thermal conductivity of a two-component (binder-aerogel) coating with potential binder intrusion into the nano-porous aerogel structure. The latter is modelled using......, to get an indication of the effect of important model parameters on the thermal conductivity of an insulation coating. With relevant data available for service life exposure conditions and raw material costs, the model can also be used as an optimization algorithm....... and experimental data with shell thickness and/or thermal conductivity of the shell as adjustable parameters. However, the experimental data was not sufficiently detailed to allow a separation of the effects of the two parameters. In the ideal case of no aerogel binder intrusion, a comparison with a coating...

  7. A study of DLC coatings for ironing of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, M. H.; Christiansen, P.; Bay, N.

    2017-09-01

    Stamping of sheet metal components without lubrication or using minimum amount of hazard free lubricant is a possible solution to diminish health hazards to personnel and environmental impact and to reduce production costs. This paper studies the application of diamond-like coating (DLC) under severe lubrication conditions by adopting strip reduction testing to replicate industrial ironing production of deep drawn, stainless steel cans. Three DLC coatings are investigated; multi-layer, double layer and single layer. Experiments revealed that the double layer coating worked successful, i.e. with no sign of galling using no lubrication even at elevated tool temperature, while the other two coatings peeled off and resulted in severe galling unless lubrication was applied.

  8. Protein and bacterial interactions with nanostructured polymer coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvonen, Helka; Oja, Terhi; Määttänen, Anni; Sarfraz, Jawad; Rosqvist, Emil; Riihimäki, Tiina A; Toivakka, Martti; Kulomaa, Markku; Vuorela, Pia; Fallarero, Adyary; Peltonen, Jouko; Ihalainen, Petri

    2015-12-01

    Adsorption of proteins and adhesion of bacteria to a surface is affected by chemical and physical interactions. In this study, polymer coatings and their ability to adsorb avidin and Staphylococcus aureus were investigated. The surface chemistry and topography of the polymer coatings was modified by changing the weight ratio of the hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) and the hydrophilic acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) components in the polymer blend. Avidin adsorbed less to the ABS phase compared with the PS phase. The side-on orientation of avidin on the ABS surface, however, resulted in a higher specific binding of biotinylated bovine serum albumin. Steric effects and hydrophobic protein-surface interactions decreased the activity of avidin on the PS phase. The increased hydrophobicity and roughness of the polymer coatings enhanced the adhesion of S. aureus. The avidin-coated latex surface with 55% relative surface coverage of the PS phase showed anti-microbial behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of tungsten carbide-cobalt coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Mark

    1999-09-01

    The discovery of WC, and the development of cemented carbides (WC-Co and WC-TiC-Co) have spawned advancements in higher speed machining of steel. The development of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) coatings has allowed even greater speeds to be realized. The production of titanium components, well known for their high specific strength, low density, corrosion resistance, and elevated temperature properties, would greatly benefit from a similar development allowing high speed machining processes. Currently, no known tool material exists that can effectively machine titanium at high speeds due to insufficient high temperature strength and/or chemical resistance. To address this problem an investigation into the development of a composite tool material combining toughness, high temperature strength and chemical resistance was pursued. Cemented carbide (WC-Co) is currently the most chemically resistant and commercially used tool material for machining Ti. The concept of applying a WC-Co coating on a high temperature deformation resistant substrate material was investigated. Two approaches, namely (i) laminated and (ii) co-deposited coatings, were chosen to chemically vapor deposit WC-Co. Thermodynamic and kinetic calculations were performed to aid in the development of CVD processes for deposition of WC and Co. The systems investigated were WF6-CH4-H2 and WCl6-CH4-H 2 for WC deposition and CoCl2-H2 for Co deposition. In the case of laminated structures the goal was to deposit nanometer scale alternating layers of WC and Co. However, development of a laminated structure led to the discovery that porosity always occurred in the Co layers at the WC/Co interface. Mass balance calculations, SEM, EDS, XRD, and metallographic analyses aided in determining that the porosity was due to the Kirkendall effect. It was observed that the diffusion of Co was enhanced by higher concentrations of soluble C in the Co layers. Effective diffusion barriers, such as TiC, were found to help

  10. Methods for Coating Particulate Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  11. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites - An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang; van Roode, Mark; Kashyap, Tania; Zhu, Dongming; Wiesner, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are increasingly being considered as structural materials for advanced power generation equipment because of their light weight, higher temperature capability, and oxidation resistance. Limitations of SiC/SiC CMCs include surface recession and component cracking and associated chemical changes in the CMC. The solutions pursued to improve the life of SiC/SiC CMCs include the incorporation of coating systems that provide surface protection, which has become known as an Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC). The development of EBCs for the protection of gas turbine hot section CMC components was a continuation of coating development work for corrosion protection of silicon-based monolithics. Work on EBC development for SiC/SiC CMCs has been ongoing at several national laboratories and the original gas turbine equipment manufacturers. The work includes extensive laboratory, rig and engine testing, including testing of EBC coated SiC/SiC CMCs in actual field applications. Another EBC degradation issue which is especially critical for CMC components used in aircraft engines is the degradation from glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) with other minor oxides. This paper addresses the need for and properties of external coatings on SiC/SiC CMCs to extend their useful life in service and the retention of their properties.

  12. Polystyrene film-coated glassware : a new means of reducing metal losses in trace metal speciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinheiro, J.P.; Bosker, W.T.E.

    2004-01-01

    A recently developed process for coating a glass surface with polystyrene (PS) film, by use of a simple chemical process has been used to reduce trace metal adsorption by cell components. The glass coating is a two-step procedure consisting of covalent attachment of vinyl-terminated PS to Si atoms

  13. Current status and future trends in turbine application of thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, Keith D.; Gupta, Dinesh K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current status and future trends in application of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) to turbine components, and in particular to high turbine airfoils. Included are descriptions of the favorable results achieved to date with bill-of-material applications of plasma deposited TBC, and recent experience with developmental coatings applied by electron beam-physical vapor deposition.

  14. Sprayable Phase Change Coating Thermal Protection Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Rod W.; Hayes, Paul W.; Kaul, Raj

    2005-01-01

    the launch and processing costs of a reusable space vehicle to an affordable level, refurbishment costs must be substantially reduced. A key component of such a cost effective approach is the use of a reusable, phase change, thermal protection coating.

  15. Scratch Behaviors of Cr-Coated Zr-Based Fuel Claddings for Accident-Tolerant Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Il-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    As the progression of Fukushima accident is worsened by the runaway reaction at a high temperature above 1200 .deg. C, it is essential to ensure the stabilities of coating layers on conventional Zr-based alloys during normal operations as well as severe accident conditions. This is because the failures of coating layer result in galvanic corrosion phenomenon by potential difference between coating layer and Zr alloy. Also, it is possible to damage the coating layer during handling and manufacturing process by contacting structural components of a fuel assembly. So, adhesion strength is one of the key factors determining the reliability of the coating layer on conventional Zr-based alloy. In this study, two kinds of Cr-coated Zr-based claddings were prepared using arc ion plating (AIP) and direct laser (DL) coating methods. The objective is to evaluate the scratch deformation behaviors of each coating layers on Zr alloys. Large area spallation below normal load of about 15 N appeared to be the predominant mode of failure in the AIP coating during scratch test. However, no tensile crack were found in entire stroke length. In DL coating, small plastic deformation and grooving behavior are more dominant scratching results. It was observed that the change of the slope of the COF curve did not coincide with the failure of coating layer.

  16. Experimental investigation on erosive wear behaviour of plasma spray coated stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girisha, K. G.; Sreenivas Rao, K. V.; Anil, K. C.; Sanman, S.

    2017-04-01

    Slurry erosion is an implicit problem in many engineering industrial components such as ore carrying pipelines, slurry pumps and extruders. Even the water turbine blades are subjected to erosive wear when the water contains considerable amount of silt. In the present study, Al2O3-40%TiO2 powder particles of average particle size of 50 micrometer were deposited on EN56B martenistic stainless steel by atmospheric plasma spray technique. Ni/Cr was pre coated to work as bond coat for good adhesion between coating and the substrate material. A coating thickness of 200 micrometer was achieved. Coated and un-coated substrates were subjected to slurry erosion test as per ASTM G-119 standard. Slurry erosion test rig was used to evaluate the erosion properties at room temperature condition by varying the spindle speed. Scanning electron microphotographs were taken before and after the slurry erosion test. Microstructures reveal uniform distribution of coating materials. Eroded surface shows lip, groove, and crater formation and dense coating resulting in less porosity. Micro hardness test was evaluated and reported. EDX analysis confirms the presence of Al, Ti and O2 particles. It was observed that, Al2O3-40%TiO2 coated substrates exhibit superior erosion resistance as compared to un-coated substrates due to higher hardness and less coating porosity.

  17. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  18. High Solids Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    36622 Aircraft Gray No, 3� Dark Green No 30219 Tan No 17875 Tnsignia White D. Applicat ion In addition to conventionl . air ,3pray, evaluation of...requirements are 60% for gloss colors and 20% for camouflage colors. Adhesion of the coating to the elongated surfaces was evaluated by placing 250 masking...tape (3M) to the surface, insuring adhesion and then removing with one abrupt pull. Any paintI removal constitutes failure. 2. Heat Resistance Test

  19. Microstructure of vapor deposited coatings on curved substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, Theron M.; Zhao, Hengbei; Wadley, Haydn N. G., E-mail: haydn@virginia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, 395 McCormick Rd., P.O. Box 400745, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Thermal barrier coating systems consisting of a metallic bond coat and ceramic over layer are widely used to extend the life of gas turbine engine components. They are applied using either high-vacuum physical vapor deposition techniques in which vapor atoms rarely experience scattering collisions during propagation to a substrate, or by gas jet assisted (low-vacuum) vapor deposition techniques that utilize scattering from streamlines to enable non-line-of-sight deposition. Both approaches require substrate motion to coat a substrate of complex shape. Here, direct simulation Monte Carlo and kinetic Monte Carlo simulation methods are combined to simulate the deposition of a nickel coating over the concave and convex surfaces of a model airfoil, and the simulation results are compared with those from experimental depositions. The simulation method successfully predicted variations in coating thickness, columnar growth angle, and porosity during both stationary and substrate rotated deposition. It was then used to investigate a wide range of vapor deposition conditions spanning high-vacuum physical vapor deposition to low-vacuum gas jet assisted vapor deposition. The average coating thickness was found to increase initially with gas pressure reaching a maximum at a chamber pressure of 8–10 Pa, but the best coating thickness uniformity was achieved under high vacuum deposition conditions. However, high vacuum conditions increased the variation in the coatings pore volume fraction over the surface of the airfoil. The simulation approach was combined with an optimization algorithm and used to investigate novel deposition concepts to tailor the local coating thickness.

  20. for zeolite coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Rambo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Biotemplating is the processing of microcellular ceramics by reproduction of natural morphologies, where the microstructural features of the biotemplate are maintained in the biomorphic ceramic. Different biotemplates with distinct pore anatomies were used to produce biomorphic supports for the zeolite coating: wood, cardboard, sea-sponge and sisal. The biomorphic ceramics were produced by distinguished processing routes: Al-gas infiltration-reaction, liquid-metal infiltration, dip-coating and sol-gel synthesis, in order to produce nitrides, carbides and oxides, depending on the processing conditions. The zeolite coating was performed by hydrothermal growth of MFI-type (Silicalite-1 and ZSM-5 zeolite crystals onto the internal pore walls of the biomorphic templates. The final biomorphic ceramic-zeolite composites were physically characterized, evaluated in terms of their gas adsorption capabilities and correlated to their microstructure and specific pore anatomy. The combination of the properties of the biomorphic ceramics with the adsorption properties of zeolites results in materials with distinct properties as potential candidates for adsorption and catalytic applications due to their characteristic porosity, molecular sieving capabilities and high thermo-mechanical strength.

  1. Thermal Spray Coatings for Blast Furnace Tuyere Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, A.; Sivakumar, G.; Prusty, D.; Shalini, J.; Dutta, M.; Joshi, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    The components in an integrated steel plant are invariably exposed to harsh working environments involving exposure to high temperatures, corrosive gases, and erosion/wear conditions. One such critical component in the blast furnace is the tuyere, which is prone to thermal damage by splashing of molten metal/slag, erosive damage by falling burden material, and corrosion from the ensuing gases. All the above, collectively or independently, accelerate tuyere failure, which presents a potential explosion hazard in a blast furnace. Recently, thermal spray coatings have emerged as an effective solution to mitigate such severe operational challenges. In the present work, five different coatings deposited using detonation spray and air plasma spray techniques were comprehensively characterized. Performance evaluation involving thermal cycling, hot corrosion, and erosion tests was also carried out. Based on the studies, a coating system was suggested for possible tuyere applications and found to yield substantial improvement in service life during actual field trials.

  2. Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating and Molecular Adsorber Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Kenneth M.; Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed two unique coating formulations that will keep surfaces clean and sanitary and contain contaminants.The Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating, modeled after the self-cleaning, water-repellant lotus leaf, disallows buildup of dust, dirt, water, and more on surfaces. This coating, has been successfully tested on painted, aluminum, glass, silica, and some composite surfaces, could aid in keeping medical assets clean.The Molecular Adsorber Coating is a zeolite-based, sprayable molecular adsorber coating, designed to prevent outgassing in materials in vacuums. The coating works well to adsorb volatiles and contaminates in manufacturing and processing, such as in pharmaceutical production. The addition of a biocide would also aid in controlling bacteria levels.

  3. Antibacterial activity of reactive quaternary ammonium compounds in solution and in nonleachable coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gozzelino, G.; Romero Tobar, D.E.; Chaitiemwong, N.; Hazeleger, W.C.; Beumer, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Antibacterial polymers suitable for coating applications without leaching of the biocidal component have been obtained by UV copolymerization of acrylic resins with acrylic monomers containing quaternary ammonium moieties. Suitable reactive biocides, based on quaternary ammonium monomers (QAMs),

  4. Turbine superalloy component defect repair with low-temperature curing resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, David W.; Allen, David B.

    2015-09-08

    Voids, cracks or other similar defects in substrates of thermal barrier coated superalloy components, such as turbine blades or vanes, are filled with resin, without need to remove substrate material surrounding the void by grinding or other processes. The resin is cured at a temperature under 200.degree. C., eliminating the need for post void-filling heat treatment. The void-filled substrate and resin are then coated with a thermal barrier coating.

  5. A study of DLC coatings for ironing of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulaiman, Mohd Hafis Bin; Christiansen, Peter; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2017-01-01

    Stamping of sheet metal components without lubrication or using minimum amount of hazard free lubricant is a possible solution to diminish health hazards to personnel and environmental impact and to reduce production costs. This paper studies the application of diamond-like coating (DLC) under se...

  6. Page 1 Optically selective coatings - 197 transparent layer between ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    films play a major role in the performance of various solar selective black metal coatings. Grading of optical constants is possible only by varying the composition of a film consisting of a mixture of two or more components of different optical constants. Alternatively, the grading is obtained by depositing ultrathin (a fraction of ...

  7. Macrophage behavior on multilayered DNA-coatings in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beucken, J.J.J.P van der; Walboomers, X.F.; Vos, M.R-J.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    A pivotal factor to consider in the development of biomaterials and biomaterial coatings is the inflammatory response to these materials. The insertion of implants is followed by protein adsorption and subsequent interactions with cellular components of the biological surroundings, in which

  8. Crack propagation studies and bond coat properties in thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ceramic based thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are currently considered as a candidate material for advanced stationary gas turbine components. Crack propagation studies under bending are described that were performed on plasma sprayed ZrO2, bonded by MCrAlY layer to Ni base superalloy. The crack propagation ...

  9. Comparative assessment of coated and uncoated ceramic tools on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study investigated the cutting performance of coated CC6050 and uncoated CC650 mixed ceramics in hard turning of hardened steel. The cutting performance was mainly evaluated by cutting force components and tool wear. The planning of experiments was based on Taguchi's L36 orthogonal array. Theresponse ...

  10. Nanoparticle/Polymer Nanocomposite Bond Coat or Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation addresses the problem of coatings (meant to reduce gas permeation) applied to polymer matrix composites spalling off in service due to incompatibility with the polymer matrix. A bond coat/coating has been created that uses chemically functionalized nanoparticles (either clay or graphene) to create a barrier film that bonds well to the matrix resin, and provides an outstanding barrier to gas permeation. There is interest in applying clay nanoparticles as a coating/bond coat to a polymer matrix composite. Often, nanoclays are chemically functionalized with an organic compound intended to facilitate dispersion of the clay in a matrix. That organic modifier generally degrades at the processing temperature of many high-temperature polymers, rendering the clay useless as a nano-additive to high-temperature polymers. However, this innovation includes the use of organic compounds compatible with hightemperature polymer matrix, and is suitable for nanoclay functionalization, the preparation of that clay into a coating/bondcoat for high-temperature polymers, the use of the clay as a coating for composites that do not have a hightemperature requirement, and a comparable approach to the preparation of graphene coatings/bond coats for polymer matrix composites.

  11. Dense protective coatings, methods for their preparation and coated articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulyani, Sonia; Bhatia, Tania; Smeggil, John G.

    2015-12-29

    A method for depositing a protective coating on a complex shaped substrate includes the steps of: (1) dipping a complex shaped substrate into a slurry to form a base coat thereon, the slurry comprising an aqueous solution, at least one refractory metal oxide, and at least one transient fluid additive present in an amount of about 0.1 percent to 10 percent by weight of the slurry; (2) curing the dipped substrate; (3) dipping the substrate into a precursor solution to form a top barrier coat thereon; and (4) heat treating the dipped, cured substrate to form a protective coating.

  12. Ammonia volatilization from coated urea forms

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Antonio Costa do Nascimento; Godofredo Cesar Vitti; Letícia de Abreu Faria; Pedro Henrique de Cerqueira Luz; Fernanda Latanze Mendes

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen fertilization is a major component of the cost of agricultural production, due to the high cost and low efficiency of fertilizers. In the case of urea, the low efficiency is mainly due to losses by volatilization, which are more pronounced in cultivation systems in which plant residues are left on the soil. The objective of this work was to compare the influence of urea coated with sulfur or boric acid and copper sulfate with conventional N fertilizers on N volatilization losses in s...

  13. Durable Hybrid Coatings. Annual Performance Report (2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    particulate in a two-component epoxy of Epon 828 resin and Encamide 3164 crosslinker that was supplied by Resolution Performance Products, Houston TX...polyurethane topcoat, MIL-PRF-85285D, were obtained from Deft, Inc. (Irvine, CA). An epoxy resin, Epon 1001-CX-75, and an amine-functional cross-linker...from the supplier. A Mg-rich primer coating was prepared as follows: 67 g of Epon 1001-CX-75 was dissolved in a solvent mixture composed of 45 g of

  14. Tablet coating by injection molding technology - Optimization of coating formulation attributes and coating process parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Parind M; Puri, Vibha; Brancazio, David; Halkude, Bhakti S; Hartman, Jeremy E; Wahane, Aniket V; Martinez, Alexander R; Jensen, Keith D; Harinath, Eranda; Braatz, Richard D; Chun, Jung-Hoon; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2018-01-01

    We developed and evaluated a solvent-free injection molding (IM) coating technology that could be suitable for continuous manufacturing via incorporation with IM tableting. Coating formulations (coating polymers and plasticizers) were prepared using hot-melt extrusion and screened via stress-strain analysis employing a universal testing machine. Selected coating formulations were studied for their melt flow characteristics. Tablets were coated using a vertical injection molding unit. Process parameters like softening temperature, injection pressure, and cooling temperature played a very important role in IM coating processing. IM coating employing polyethylene oxide (PEO) based formulations required sufficient room humidity (>30% RH) to avoid immediate cracks, whereas other formulations were insensitive to the room humidity. Tested formulations based on Eudrajit E PO and Kollicoat IR had unsuitable mechanical properties. Three coating formulations based on hydroxypropyl pea starch, PEO 1,000,000 and Opadry had favorable mechanical (35% elongation, >95×10 4 J/m 3 toughness) and melt flow (>0.4g/min) characteristics, that rendered acceptable IM coats. These three formulations increased the dissolution time by 10, 15 and 35min, respectively (75% drug release), compared to the uncoated tablets (15min). Coated tablets stored in several environmental conditions remained stable to cracking for the evaluated 8-week time period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 100% Solids Polyurethane Sequestration Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-11

    section of an aluminum flake loaded thiol-ene coating peeled off of a glass plate after cure. Adsorbents and Reactive Particles Nanoparticulate ...commercially to the oil drilling industry. The incorporation of CaCO3 nanoparticulate into thiol-ene coatings was demonstrated in our Phase I project...Porous, nanoparticulate SiO2 has also been identified and evaluated in coating systems. The effect of high capacity adsorbents on permeation through

  16. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Titanium for Nitric Acid Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2014-07-01

    Tantalum and Niobium have good corrosion resistance in nitric acid as well as in molten chloride salt medium encountered in spent fuel nuclear reprocessing plants. Commercially, pure Ti (Cp-Ti) exhibits good corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium; however, in vapor condensates of nitric acid, significant corrosion was observed. In the present study, a thermochemical diffusion method was pursued to coat Ta2O5, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5 on Ti to improve the corrosion resistance and enhance the life of critical components in reprocessing plants. The coated samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, profilometry, micro-scratch test, and ASTM A262 Practice-C test in 65 pct boiling nitric acid. The SEM micrograph of the coated samples showed that uniform dense coating containing Ta2O5 and/or Nb2O5 was formed. XRD patterns indicated the formation of TiO2, Ta2O5/Nb2O5, and mixed oxide/solid solution phase on coated Ti samples. ASTM A262 Practice-C test revealed reproducible outstanding corrosion resistance of Ta2O5-coated sample in comparison to Nb2O5- and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5-coated sample. The hardness of the Ta2O5-coated Cp-Ti sample was found to be twice that of uncoated Cp-Ti. The SEM and XRD results confirmed the presence of protective oxide layer (Ta2O5, rutile TiO2, and mixed phase) on coated sample which improved the corrosion resistance remarkably in boiling liquid phase of nitric acid compared to uncoated Cp-Ti and Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb alloy. Three phase corrosion test conducted on Ta2O5-coated samples in boiling 11.5 M nitric acid showed poor corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid due to poor adhesion of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coated samples needs to be optimized in order to improve the corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid.

  17. Coating materials for fusion application in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, G.-N.; Li, Q.; Liu, M.; Zheng, X. B.; Chen, J. L.; Guo, Q. G.; Liu, X.

    2011-10-01

    Thick SiC coatings of ˜100 μm on graphite tiles, prepared by chemical vapor infiltration of Si into the tiles and the following reactions between Si and C, are used as plasma facing material (PFM) on HT-7 superconducting tokamak and Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). With increase in the heating and driving power in EAST, the present plasma facing component (PFC) of the SiC/C tiles bolted to heat sink will be replaced by W coatings on actively cooled Cu heat sink, prepared by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) adopting different interlayer. The VPS-W/Cu PFC with built-in cooling channels were prepared and mounted into the HT-7 acting as a movable limiter. Behavior of heat load onto the limiter and the material was studied. The Cu coatings on the Inconel 625 tubes were successfully prepared by high velocity air-fuel (HVAF) thermal spraying, being used as the liquid nitrogen (LN2) shields of the in-vessel cryopump for divertor pumping in EAST.

  18. Ammonia volatilization from coated urea forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio Costa do Nascimento

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen fertilization is a major component of the cost of agricultural production, due to the high cost and low efficiency of fertilizers. In the case of urea, the low efficiency is mainly due to losses by volatilization, which are more pronounced in cultivation systems in which plant residues are left on the soil. The objective of this work was to compare the influence of urea coated with sulfur or boric acid and copper sulfate with conventional N fertilizers on N volatilization losses in sugar cane harvested after stubble burning. The sources urea, sulfur-coated urea, urea coated with boric acid and copper sulfate, as well as nitrate and ammonium sulfate, were tested at amounts containing N rates of 120 kg ha-1 N. The integration of new technologies in urea fertilization can reduce N losses by volatilization. These losses were most reduced when using nitrate and ammonium sulfate. The application of a readily acidified substance (boric acid to urea was more efficient in reducing volatilization losses and nutrient removal by sugar cane than that of a substance with gradual acidification (elemental sulfur.

  19. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  20. Coatings Technology Integration Office (CTIO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CTIO serves as the Air Force's central resource for aircraft coating systems and their applications. CTIO's primary objectives are pollution prevention and improved...

  1. Corrosion behavior of duplex coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Raghu Ram Mohan Reddy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The titanium alloys are used in defense, aerospace, automobile, chemical plants and biomedical applications due to their very high strength and lightweight properties. However, corrosion is a life-limiting factor when Ti alloys are exposed to different chemical environments at high temperatures. In the present paper, duplex NiCrAlY/WC–Co coating is coated onto Ti6Al4V substrate to investigate the corrosion behavior of both coated samples and the substrate. The duplex coating was performed with NiCrAlY as the intermediate coat of 200 μm thickness deposited by HVOF process and WC–Co ceramic top coat with varying thicknesses of 250 μm, 350 μm and 450 μm deposited by DS process. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were employed to investigate the corrosion performance of duplex coated samples and substrate in Ringer’s solution at 37 °C and pH value was set to 5.7. Finally the results reveal that 350 μm thick coated samples showed highest corrosion resistance compared to 250 μm thick samples as well as bare substrate. However, the 450 μm thick coated sample showed poor corrosion resistance compared to the substrate. The scale formed on the samples upon corrosion was characterized by using SEM analysis to understand the degree of corrosion behavior.

  2. Electrochemically switchable polypyrrole coated membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidlich, Claudia, E-mail: weidlich@dechema.d [DECHEMA e.V., Karl-Winnacker-Institut, Theodor-Heuss-Allee 25, D-60486 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Mangold, Klaus-Michael [DECHEMA e.V., Karl-Winnacker-Institut, Theodor-Heuss-Allee 25, D-60486 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-04-01

    A method for coating membranes with polypyrrole (PPy) has been developed. Different membranes, such as microfiltration as well as ion exchanger membranes have been coated with PPy to yield electrical conductivity of the membranes. The coated membranes have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy and their permeability and permselectivity have been tested. The results show that PPy can be tailored as cation or anion exchanger and its porosity can be controlled to avoid any impairment of the membrane by the polymer layer. These PPy coated membranes can be applied as electrochemically switchable, functionalised membranes with controllabel and variable separation properties.

  3. Effect of thermal dissipation by adding graphene materials to surface coating of LED lighting module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S; Jeong, J Y; Han, S H; Kim, J H; Kwon, K T; Hwang, M K; Kim, I T; Cho, G S

    2013-05-01

    The effect of thermal dissipation by adding graphene nano-platelets to two different commercially available thermal dissipation coatings (ceramic coating and powder coating) was studied. Steady state temperatures of each points of LED modules was monitored in a closed system, with an integral photo detection sphere where there is no external air flow. Having eliminated the contributions of thermal conduction and air flow convection, the module with a conventional heat dissipation coatings showed 8-16% enhancement of thermal dissipation compared to that of non-coated LED module. The addition of graphene is shown to have about 3% additional enhancement. By analyzing thermal resistance of each component of the LED module, the improved thermal conductivity of the graphene added coatings contributes to the enhancement of slight improvement with heat dissipation.

  4. High-temperature protective coatings for C/SiC composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Yang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC composites were well-established light weight materials combining high specific strength and damage tolerance. For high-temperature applications, protective coatings had to provide oxidation and corrosion resistance. The literature data introduced various technologies and materials, which were suitable for the application of coatings. Coating procedures and conditions, materials design limitations related to the reactivity of the components of C/SiC composites, new approaches and coating systems to the selection of protective coatings materials were examined. The focus of future work was on optimization by further multilayer coating systems and the anti-oxidation ability of C/SiC composites at temperatures up to 2073 K or higher in water vapor.

  5. Theoretical investigation on degradation behaviors of spectral properties of thermal control coatings induced by charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yuge; Ma, Wei; Xuan, Yimin, E-mail: ymxuan@mail.njust.edu.cn

    2013-10-01

    The degradation of spectral properties of thermal control coatings on spacecrafts is investigated in this paper. By studying their physical components and geometry structure, the factors which determine the spectral properties of the coatings are founded. A theoretical model for calculating the spectral absorptance of coatings is proposed based on the Mie's theory and Stratified Media theory. Mathematical expressions are introduced for accounting for the effect of the complicated environment. Based on these work, a predicting model for the degradation of spectral absorptance properties of the coatings is established. To validate this model, the predicted degradation performance of spectral properties of zinc oxide based coatings under electrons and protons exposure are compared with the experimental data. A good agreement is found at the wavelength between 250 nm and 2500 nm. Finally, a useful approach for predicting the degradation behaviors of thermal control coatings on spacecrafts in orbit is established.

  6. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  7. Conduit Coating Abrasion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    During my summer internship at NASA I have been working alongside the team members of the RESTORE project. Engineers working on the RESTORE project are creating ·a device that can go into space and service satellites that no longer work due to gas shortage or other technical difficulties. In order to complete the task of refueling the satellite a hose needs to be used and covered with a material that can withstand effects of space. The conduit coating abrasion test will help the researchers figure out what type of thermal coating to use on the hose that will be refueling the satellites. The objective of the project is to determine whether or not the conduit coating will withstand the effects of space. For the RESTORE project I will help with various aspects of the testing that needed to be done in order to determine which type of conduit should be used for refueling the satellite. During my time on the project I will be assisting with wiring a relay board that connected to the test set up by soldering, configuring wires and testing for continuity. Prior to the testing I will work on creating the testing site and help write the procedure for the test. The testing will take place over a span of two weeks and lead to an informative conclusion. Working alongside various RESTORE team members I will assist with the project's documentation and records. All in all, throughout my internship at NASA I hope to learn a number of valuable skills and be a part of a hard working team of engineers.

  8. Face Coat Materials Through Sessile Drop and Investment Casting Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xu; Yuan, Chen; Blackburn, Stuart; Withey, Paul A.

    2014-06-01

    Investment casting is uniquely suited to the manufacture of Ti alloys for the production of near net-shape components, reducing material waste, and machining costs. Because of the high reactivity of titanium and its based alloy, the molds which are used in the investment casting process require high chemical inertness, which results in them being very costly and non-recyclable. In order to reduce the cost of these molds, traditionally using yttria as the face coat, two alternative molds are developed in this study with face coat materials of Y2O3-Al2O3 and Y2O3-Al2O3-ZrO2. The slurry properties and chemical inertness of the face coats were evaluated for viscosity, thermal expansion, friability, and phase development. The chemical inertness of these two molds were determined using both the sessile drop test and investment casting to identify the levels of interaction with a Ti-45Al-2Mn-2Nb-0.2B alloy. The results illustrated that the molds using Y2O3-Al2O3 and Y2O3-Al2O3-ZrO2 as the face coats both showed excellent sintering properties and chemical inertness when compared to the yttria face coat. They can consequently be used as two alternative face coats for the investment casting of TiAl alloys.

  9. Characterization and fatigue damage of plasma sprayed HAp top coat with Ti and HAp/Ti bond coat layers on commercially pure titanium substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakngarm, Achariya; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2009-10-01

    The surface of commercially pure Ti (cp-Ti) substrate was grit-blasted with Al(2)O(3) powders and then wet-blasted with HAp/Ti mixed powders at room temperature. Then plasma spraying with Ti powders or HAp/Ti mixed powders on the blasted surface was carried out to form a bond coat layer, denoted as T50 and T100 bond coat for the former and HT100 bond coat for the later. The HAp top coat was subsequently sprayed with 100 mum thickness. The XRD patterns showed that the as-sprayed HT100 bond coat layer was mainly composed of HAp with minor components of Ti and TiO(2). EDS analysis also showed there co-existed HAp and Ti without reaction in the HT100 bond coat layer. Some cracks were observed in the bond coat and the top coat layers after compression-compression and tension-tension fatigue tests. The HT100 bond coat specimen produced less AE signal and a small amount of debonding and cracking in compression-compression fatigue test. The HT100 specimen could survive up to 10 million cycles at stress amplitude of 200 MPa, which is high enough compared to the maximum stress in bones: the order of 100 MPa. The degree of damage (debonding and cracking) in tension-tension fatigue test was more severe than that in compression-compression fatigue testing.

  10. Microplasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    ""This unique book on development of microplasma sprayed HAp coating has been organized in a very compact yet comprehensive manner. This book also highlights the horizons of future research that invites the attention of global community, particularly those in bio-medical materials and bio-medical engineering field. This book will surely act as a very useful reference material for both graduate/post-graduate students and researchers in the field of biomedical, orthopedic and manufacturing engineering and research. I truly believ that this is the first ever effort which covers almost all the

  11. Durable Hybrid Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    rich primers at 32% and 42% PVC. PVC Epon 828 (g) Epicure 2353 (g) MEK (g) Mg and Mg alloy Pigments (g) 3820 AM60 AZ91B LNR96 AM503 AZG...vol. ratio. Epon 1001-CX-75 is an epoxide containing 25 wt.% MIBK/xylene (vol. ratio 65/35) solvent mixture, and Epicure 3140 is a solventless...μm. Table 1. Formulation of Mg-rich Primer Coating Ingredients Weight, g Epon 1001-CX-75 67 111 Epicure 3140 9.5 Mg powder 95 Aerosil® R974 1

  12. Multifunctional Ceramic Nanostructured Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Stansky D.V., Petrznik M.I., Levashov E.A., Mavrin B.N. // Surf. Coat. Tech. -2007.-V.201.- P . 6143-6147. 7. Kauffmann F., Dehm G., Schier V...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER STCU Registration No: P -253 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Anatolij Tarasovich Pugachov...lead to the increase in crystalline lattice rigidness, hardness, melting temperature and oxidation resistance in Me2B→MeB→ MeB2 line [13]. Boron p

  13. Automotive component failures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyes, AM

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available in service for approximately 19\\999 km[ 1[1[ Visual examination Upon stripping the engine it was found that one of the combustion chambers showed heavy carbonaceous deposits indicative of the burning of oil "Fig[ 2# Circumferential black marks were found... whether failures in other vehicles could be expected[ 2[1[ Visual and stereo microscope examination The section of torsion bar submitted for examination was coated with a black paint coating which had ~aked o} at localised spots\\ where light rusting had...

  14. Characterization of the wear resistant aluminum oxide - 40% titaniumdioxide coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailo R. Mrdak

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasma spray coatings play an important role in the design of surface properties of engineering components in order to increase their durability and performance under different operating conditions. Coatings are the most often used for wear resistance. This paper presents the microstructure and mechanical properties Al2O3_­40wt.%TiO2 coating resistant to dry friction slide, grain abrasion and erosion of particles at operating temperatures up to 540°C. In order to obtain the optimal characteristics of coating was performed  optimization  of deposition parameters. The powder Al2O3­40wt.%TiO2 is deposited atmospheric plasma spraying (APS process with a plasma current of 700, 800 and 900A. Evaluate the quality of the coating Al2O3­40wt.%TiO2 were made on the basis of their hardness, tensile bond strength and microstructure. The best performance showed the deposited layers with 900A. The morphology of the powder particles Al2O3­40wt.%TiO2 was examined with SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope. Microstructure of the coatings was examined by light microscopy. Analysis of the deposited layers was performed in accordance with standard Pratt & Whitney. Evaluation of mechanical properties of the layers was done by examining HV0.3 microhardness and tensile strength of the tensile testing. Studies have shown that plasma currents significantly affects the mechanical properties and microstructure of coatings which are of crucial importance for the protection for components subjected to wear       

  15. Aerosol deposition of hydroxyapatite and 4-hexylresorcinol coatings on titanium alloys for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Gon; Hahn, Byung-Dong; Park, Dong-Soo; Lee, Yong-Chan; Choi, Eun-Jin; Chae, Weon-Sik; Baek, Dong-Heon; Choi, Je-Yong

    2011-11-01

    Aerosol deposition is a newly developed technique, and it can deliver the drug from a hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated surface. 4-Hexylresorcinol (4-HR) is a well-known antiseptic. The influence of the 4-HR component of HA coatings on titanium surfaces was studied in vitro and in vivo. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared techniques were used for the evaluation of the coating. The cellular response of the coating was evaluated by scanning electron microscopic study, MTT assay, alkaline phosphatase assay, and osteocalcin assay. In addition, the dental implant was coated with HA or HA + 4-HR. The implant was installed into the tibia of a rabbit after contamination by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The torque test and histologic analysis were then performed at 8 weeks after the operation. By use of an aerosol deposition technique, the combination of HA and 4-HR was successfully coated onto a titanium surface, which was confirmed by x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared techniques. MG63 cells attached more rapidly to the HA + 4-HR coating than to the HA-only coating. The HA + 4-HR coating had significantly increased osteocalcin expression and alkaline phosphatase activity compared with the HA-only coating (P extraction or who have poor-quality bone. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Monitoring of tablet coating processes with colored coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barimani, Shirin; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Endpoints of coating processes for colored tablets were determined using in-line Raman spectroscopy. Coatings were performed with six commercially available formulations of pink, yellow, red, beige, green and blue color. The coatings were comprising pigments and/or dyes, some causing fluorescence and interfering the Raman signal. Using non-contact optics, a Raman probe was used as process analytical technology (PAT) tool, and acquired spectra were correlated to the sprayed mass of aqueous coating suspension. Process endpoints were determined using univariate (UV) data analysis and three multivariate analysis methods, namely Projection to Latent Structures (PLS)-regression, Science-Based Calibration (SBC) and Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR). The methods were compared regarding model performance parameters. The endpoints of all coating experiments could be predicted until a total coating time of 50min corresponding to coating thicknesses between 21 and 38µm, depending on the density of the coat formulation. With the exception of SBC, all calibration methods resulted in R 2 values higher than 0.9. Additionally, the methods were evaluated regarding their capability for in-line process monitoring. For each color, at least two methods were feasible to do this. Overall, PLS-regression led to best model performance parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of Sol-Gel coatings exposed in the condenser at Fynsvaerket. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, M. [DTU Management Engineering, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Vilhelmsen, T. [Vattenfall Heat Nordic, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2007-10-15

    The Danish Technological Institute (DTI) has developed a coatings technique using Hybrid Sol-gel nanotechnology to produce coatings which can change the surface characteristics of various components. It is the purpose of this project to investigate where such coatings can be utilised in the power generating industry with respect to fouling and corrosion resistance. Four different sol-gel coatings have been applied to brass condenser tubes about 10 cm in length. The coatings are termed 23, 35, 38, 46. The exact composition of these different coatings was not given. These sections were mounted in the water chamber inlet before the tubes into the condenser and another set were placed on the condenser plate at the outlet. The condenser tube has a composition 76 wt.% Cu, 22 wt.% Zn and 2 wt.% Al corresponding to an aluminium brass. Based on the visual appearance of the four coatings it is clear that Sol-gel 38 does not reduced biological fouling and rust spots can be clearly seen on Sol-gel 46. Thus based on visual appearance, sol-gel 23 and sol-gel 35 are most promising. Due to the presence of corrosion products on the inner side of the unexposed tubes which influences the adherence and protectiveness of coatings applied, the inner side cannot be used to assess the coatings performance. In the next exposure test, better initial cleaning of the tubes is required. Based on visual assessment, Sol-gel 38 has not solved the problems with biological fouling compared to the other coatings. With respect to corrosion, it is observed that in all cases there are corrosion products, either chlorides or oxides/hydroxides/carbonates, present in the interface between the tube and the coating. Coating 38 also experienced lack of adhesion. This could be triggered by a build up of corrosion products under the coating which would eventually lead to delaminating of the coating. Whether the corrosion rate has been decreased compared to the uncoated tubes is not known, however in the next

  18. Variability and component composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van der Storm (Tijs)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn component-based product populations, feature models have to be described at the component level to be able to benefit from a product family approach. As a consequence, composition of components becomes very complex. We describe how component-level variability can be managed in the

  19. Mitigating component performance variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gara, Alan G.; Sylvester, Steve S.; Eastep, Jonathan M.; Nagappan, Ramkumar; Cantalupo, Christopher M.

    2018-01-09

    Apparatus and methods may provide for characterizing a plurality of similar components of a distributed computing system based on a maximum safe operation level associated with each component and storing characterization data in a database and allocating non-uniform power to each similar component based at least in part on the characterization data in the database to substantially equalize performance of the components.

  20. Superheating in coated niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junginger, T.; Wasserman, W.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2017-12-01

    Using muon spin rotation it is shown that the field of first flux penetration {H}{entry} in Nb is enhanced by about 30% if coated with an overlayer of Nb3Sn or MgB2. This is consistent with an increase from the lower critical magnetic field {H}{{c}1} up to the superheating field {H}{sh} of the Nb substrate. In the experiments presented here coatings of Nb3Sn and MgB2 with a thickness between 50 and 2000 nm have been tested. {H}{entry} does not depend on material or thickness. This suggests that the energy barrier at the boundary between the two materials prevents flux entry up to {H}{sh} of the substrate. A mechanism consistent with these findings is that the proximity effect recovers the stability of the energy barrier for flux penetration, which is suppressed by defects for uncoated samples. Additionally, a low temperature baked Nb sample has been tested. Here a 6% increase of {H}{entry} was found, also pushing {H}{entry} beyond {H}{{c}1}.

  1. Federal Highway Administration 100-year coating study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    The Federal Highway Administration 100-Year Coating Study was initiated in August 2009 to search for durable : coating systems at a reasonable cost. The objective of the study was to identify and evaluate coating materials that can : provide 100 year...

  2. Multifunctional biomaterial coatings: synthetic challenges and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Mareen; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2017-01-01

    A controlled interaction of materials with their surrounding biological environment is of great interest in many fields. Multifunctional coatings aim to provide simultaneous modulation of several biological signals. They can consist of various combinations of bioactive, and bioinert components as well as of reporter molecules to improve cell-material contacts, prevent infections or to analyze biochemical events on the surface. However, specific immobilization and particular assembly of various active molecules are challenging. Herein, an overview of multifunctional coatings for biomaterials is given, focusing on synthetic strategies and the biological benefits by displaying several motifs.

  3. The effect of zinc bath temperature on the morphology, texture and corrosion behaviour of industrially produced hot-dip galvanized coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bakhtiari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to identify the influence of zinc bath temperature on the morphology, texture and corrosion behavior of hot-dip galvanized coatings. Hot-dip galvanized samples were prepared at temperature in the range of 450-480 °C in steps of 10 °C, which is the conventional galvanizing temperature range in the galvanizing industries. The morphology of coatings was examined with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The composition of the coating layers was determined using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS analysis. The texture of the coatings was evaluated using X-ray diffraction. Corrosion behavior was performed using salt spray cabinet test and Tafel extrapolation test. From the experimental results, it was found that increasing the zinc bath temperature affects the morphology of the galvanized coatings provoking the appearance of cracks in the coating structure. These cracks prevent formation of a compact structure. In addition, it was concluded that (00.2 basal plane texture component was weakened by increasing the zinc bath temperature and, conversely, appearance of (10.1 prism component, (20.1 high angle pyramidal component and low angle component prevailed. Besides, coatings with strong (00.2 texture component and weaker (20.1 components have better corrosion resistance than the coatings with weak (00.2 and strong (20.1 texture components. Furthermore, corrosion resistance of the galvanized coatings was decreased by increasing the zinc bath temperature.

  4. Intumescent coatings under fast heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kristian Petersen; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Català, Pere

    2012-01-01

    Intumescent coatings are widely used to delay or minimise the destructive effects of fire. They are usually tested under conditions that simulate the relatively slow build-up of heat in a normal fire. Here, the effects of damage during a fire causing sudden heating of the coating were studied....

  5. Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

  6. Lignin based controlled release coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Harmsen, P.F.H.; Eastham, D.

    2011-01-01

    Urea is a commonly used fertilizer. Due to its high water-solubility, misuse easily leads to excess nitrogen levels in the soil. The aim of this research was to develop an economically feasible and biodegradable slow-release coating for urea. For this purpose, lignin was selected as coating

  7. External coating of colonic anastomoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Achiam, Michael Patrick; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Colon anastomotic leakage remains both a frequent and serious complication in gastrointestinal surgery. External coating of colonic anastomoses has been proposed as a means to lower the rate of this complication. The aim of this review was to evaluate existing studies on external coating of colonic...

  8. Pack cementation coatings for alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yi-Rong; Zheng, Minhui; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on a Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloy in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the composition of the pack and on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi{sub 2} and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. In cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air at 700 and 1050{degrees}C, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. The codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium into low alloy steel have been achieved using elemental Al and Cr powders and a two-step pack cementation process. Sequential process treatments at 925{degrees}C and 1150{degrees}C yield dense and uniform ferrite coatings, whose compositions are close to either Fe{sub 3}Al or else FeAl plus a lower Cr content, when processed under different conditions. The higher content of Al in the coatings was predicted by thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium in the gas phase. The effect of the particle size of the metal powders on the surface composition of the coating has been studied for various combinations of Al and Cr powders.

  9. Rapidly curable electrically conductive clear coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Mark P.; Anderson, Lawrence G.; Post, Gordon L.

    2018-01-16

    Rapidly curable electrically conductive clear coatings are applied to substrates. The electrically conductive clear coating includes to clear layer having a resinous binder with ultrafine non-stoichiometric tungsten oxide particles dispersed therein. The clear coating may be rapidly cured by subjecting the coating to infrared radiation that heats the tungsten oxide particles and surrounding resinous binder. Localized heating increases the temperature of the coating to thereby thermally cure the coating, while avoiding unwanted heating of the underlying substrate.

  10. coating layers under the UV loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulhavý Petr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For individual components as well as for the final products is need to determine their resistance and other mechanical properties, which can be changing due to the various conditions and simultaneously we try to get still closer to the real operating conditions.Currently, given the need to guarantee a perfect quality of the product throughout its entire life cycle, it is necessary to assess the protective layers that are in direct contact with the material itself or with the future products.This article presents the results of testing individual components of the selected materials and their resistance to the UV rays. These were some samples of a prelacquered sheet and a powder coated plate after their forming, next by pigment colored concrete cubes, artificial wood and a prototype sample of the translucent material Licrete. Compared to a conventional climate tests such as heat, cold, humidity or the salt chambers, the colored protection layers were subjected to a strong UV rays. Subsequently was evaluated the change of the colors, brightness and where it was possible also the adhesion parameters and thickness of the coated layer. The measurement wasn’t focused only on the adhesion and color stability, but also to a violation of microstructure due to high temperatures caused by the UV ray. The selected specimens were tested in a device which simulates solar radiation and then were them evaluated the changes of a colors and on the surface structure.

  11. Self-cleaning performance of superhydrophobic hybrid nanocomposite coatings on Al with excellent corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, V., E-mail: alaguraj2@rediffmail.com; Mohan Raj, R., E-mail: chem_mohan@rediffmail.com

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD) coatings were formed on Al by anodization and electro-polymerisation techniques. • The superhydrophobic coating was fabricated on copolymer by electrodeposition of zinc stearate. • The superhydrophobicity mechanism relies on morphologies and chemical components on surface is the key factor. • Ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate coated Al has excellent corrosion resistance and good self-cleaning performance. - Abstract: Protective ceramic-PANI, ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD) and ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite coatings were formed on Al surface by the processes involving anodization, electropolymerisation and electrodeposition under optimum conditions. The prepared nanocomposite coatings were evaluated by ATR-IR and XRD studies. SEM studies performed on nanocomposite coatings reveal that ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite coating shows a cauliflower-like cluster with crack-free morphology compared to ceramic-PANI and ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD) nanocomposite coatings. The mechanical properties of different nanocomposite coatings were measured using Vicker microhardness tester and Taber Abrasion tester. The ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite has higher mechanical stability. The corrosion resistance of the coatings measured by Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, shows that ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite coated aluminum has higher corrosion resistance than other coatings and bare Al. Wettability studies prove that superhydrophobic nature of ceramic-poly(Ani-co-oPD)-zinc stearate nanocomposite coating with contact angle of 155.8° is responsible for good self-cleaning property and excellent corrosion resistance of aluminum.

  12. Functional Plasma-Deposited Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykhaylo Pashechko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the problem of low adhesion of plasma sprayed coatings to the substrate. The subsequent laser treatment modes and their influence on the coating-substrate interface were studied. This allows to decrease the level of metstability of the coating, thus decreasing its hardness down to 11-12 GPa on the surface and to about 9 GPa on depth of 400 µm. The redistribution of alloying elements through solid and liquid diffusion improves mechanical properties and rises the adhesion up to 450 MPa after remelting and up to 90-110 MPa after laser-aided thermal cycling. At he same time, remelting of coating helps to decrease its porosity down to 1%. Obtained complex of properties also allows to improve wear resistance of coatings and to decrease friction factor.

  13. Multilayer Microlaminated Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coating

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu, Charles

    1997-01-01

    .... Both thermal and mechanical characteristics of the coatings can be potentially optimized, and the coating will be more tolerant towards strain damage, have better thermal insulation and provide...

  14. Mechanical properties determination of AM components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzugan, J.; Sibr, M.; Konopík, P.; Procházka, R.; Rund, M.

    2017-02-01

    Characterisation of engineering materials and components is a crucial part for design and save service life utilization. Due to components processing technologies and exploitation conditions local properties can significantly vary from location to location over larger components as well as over small material volumes with gradual material changes such as welds, coatings or additively manufactured parts. The current paper is dealing with local properties characterisation for additively manufacture (AM) components by micro tensile test (M-TT). Components produced by additive manufacturing techniques yield properties variation in dependence of the considered location within the component regarding to direction in relation to deposition process. Properties vary over the thickness, length, angle or contacts with the supporting structures necessary for a successful components production by additive manufacturing techniques. The properties differences are mainly related to varying heating/reheating and cooling conditions at various locations of usually very complex parts produced mainly by these technologies. The standard testing procedures fail to characterize such local properties of complex shaped objects due to large size requirements on specimens. Therefore, new techniques have to be established for such detailed local characterizations. Results of miniaturized tensile tests application for local properties and orientations are shown here.

  15. Advanced thermal barrier coatings for operation in high hydrogen content fueled gas turbines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampath, Sanjay [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-04-02

    The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology is investigating science and technology related to advanced metallic alloy bond coats and ceramic thermal barrier coatings for applications in the hot section of gasified coal-based high hydrogen turbine power systems. In conjunction with our OEM partners (GE and Siemens) and through strategic partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (materials degradation group and high temperature materials laboratory), a systems approach, considering all components of the TBC (multilayer ceramic top coat, metallic bond coat & superalloy substrate) is being taken during multi-layered coating design, process development and subsequent environmental testing. Recent advances in process science and advanced in situ thermal spray coating property measurement enabled within CTSR has been incorporated for full-field enhancement of coating and process reliability. The development of bond coat processing during this program explored various aspects of processing and microstructure and linked them to performance. The determination of the bond coat material was carried out during the initial stages of the program. Based on tests conducted both at Stony Brook University as well as those carried out at ORNL it was determined that the NiCoCrAlYHfSi (Amdry) bond coats had considerable benefits over NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Since the studies were also conducted at different cycling frequencies, thereby addressing an associated need for performance under different loading conditions, the Amdry bond coat was selected as the material of choice going forward in the program. With initial investigations focused on the fabrication of HVOF bond coats and the performance of TBC under furnace cycle tests , several processing strategies were developed. Two-layered HVOF bond coats were developed to render optimal balance of density and surface roughness

  16. Coatings to prevent frost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lusada, Ricardo; Holberg, Stefan; Bennedsen, Jeanette Marianne Dalgaard

    2016-01-01

    at temperatures just below 0°C, for example at −4°C, is low. Freezing of a single drop on aluminum leads, however, to instant freezing of the complete surface. On hydrophobic coatings, such a freezing drop is isolated; the frozen area grows slowly. At −4°C surface temperature in a +12°C/90% relative humidity...... environment, on surfaces providing a water contact angle hysteresis of about 10° and receding water contact angles higher than 90°, a rate for the growth of the average radius of the frozen area of about 2 µm/s was observed. Submitting the surface to an airflow of 1 m/s led to faster frost spreading in flow...

  17. Correlations between the mechanical loss and atomic structure of amorphous TiO2-doped Ta2O5 coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Bassiri, R.; Evans, K.; Borisenko, K. B.; Fejer, M. M.; Hough, J.; MacLaren, I.; Martin, I. W.; Route, R.K.; Rowan, S

    2013-01-01

    Highly reflective dielectric mirror coatings are critical components in a range of precision optics applications including frequency combs, optical atomic clocks, precision interferometry and ring laser gyroscopes. A key limitation to the performance in these applications is thermal noise, arising from the mechanical loss of the coatings. The origins of the mechanical loss from these coatings is not well understood.\\ud \\ud Recent work suggests that the mechanical loss of amorphous Ta2O5 coati...

  18. Nature Inspired Surface Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubner, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Materials Scientists more and more are looking to nature for clues on how to create highly functional surface coatings with exceptional properties. The fog harvesting capabilities of the Namib Desert beetle, the beautiful iridescent colors of the hummingbird, and the super water repellant abilities of the Lotus leaf are but a few examples of the amazing properties developed over many years in the natural world. Nature also makes extensive use of the pH-dependent behavior of weak functional groups such as carboxylic acid and amine functional groups. This presentation will explore synthetic mimics to the nano- and microstructures responsible for these fascinating properties. For example, we have demonstrated a pH-induced porosity transition that can be used to create porous films with pore sizes that are tunable from the nanometer scale to the multiple micron scale. The pores of these films, either nano- or micropores, can be reversibly opened and closed by changes in solution pH. The ability to engineer pH-gated porosity transitions in heterostructured thin films has led to the demonstration of broadband anti-reflection coatings that mimic the anti-reflection properties of the moth eye and pH-tunable Bragg reflectors with a structure and function similar to that found in hummingbird wings and the Longhorn beetle. In addition, the highly textured honeycomb-like surfaces created by the formation of micron-scale pores are ideally suited for the creation of superhydrophobic surfaces that mimic the behavior of the self-cleaning lotus leaf. The development of synthetic "backbacks" on immune system cells that may one day ferry drugs to disease sites will also be discussed.

  19. Microstructure of organic–inorganic composite coatings studied by TEM and XANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etsuo Hamada, Masayasu Nagoshi, Kaoru Sato, Akira Matsuzaki, Takafumi Yamaji and Kotaro Kuroda

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromate coatings on Zn or Zn alloy coated steel sheets often include silica for the aim to improve corrosion resistance. In the case of dry-in-place chromate coatings containing acrylic resin (hereafter referred to as an organic–inorganic composite coating, an addition of silica, however, did not show an improvement in corrosion resistance. The microstructures of the organic–inorganic composite coatings were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and the chemical states of Cr were investigated by the total electron yield X-ray absorption near edge structure (TEY-XANES method. TEM samples were successfully prepared by dry ultramicrotomy preventing water-soluble components in the coatings from dissolving out. TEY-XANES revealed the chemical states of components even in the organic matrix. Using these methods, it was found that the addition of silica changed just the morphology of the chromium compound in the organic–inorganic composite coating but not the chemical state of Cr. This is a reason for the addition of silica being not effective at improving corrosion resistance. The combination of dry ultramicrotomy-TEM and TEY-XANES spectroscopy was proven to be a powerful tool for characterizing organic–inorganic composite coatings.

  20. Deposition parameters to improve the fouling-release properties of thin siloxane coatings prepared by PACVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesso, Laurent; Navabpour, Parnia; Teer, Dennis; Pettitt, Michala E.; Callow, Maureen E.; Liu, Chen; Su, Xueju; Wang, Su; Zhao, Qi; Donik, Crtomir; Kocijan, Aleksandra; Jenko, Monika; Callow, James A.

    2009-04-01

    A range of SiO x-like coatings was deposited on glass slides from a hexamethylsiloxane precursor by plasma-assisted CVD. The effect of varying deposition parameters, specifically ion cleaning time and HMDSO/O 2 ratios, on the coating properties and antifouling performance was investigated. At low HMDSO/O 2 ratios, the resulting coatings were close to SiO 2. Carbon content in the bulk of the coatings increased with increasing HMDSO/O 2 ratio. Coatings deposited at high HMDSO/O 2 ratios and with the longest cleaning time (30 min), elevated the relative carbon content to 25 atomic %. Surface energies (22-43 mJ/m) were correlated with the degree of surface oxidation and hydrocarbon content. With the exception of the most polar coatings the apolar component of the surface energy ( γLW) was the dominant component. In the most hydrophilic coatings, the Lewis base component of the surface energy ( γ-) was dominant. Significantly improved antifouling performance was detected with the most reduced coatings deposited using the extended ion cleaning times. For both, the removal of sporelings of the marine green alga, Ulvalinza and the initial adhesion of the freshwater bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens, there was a strong, positive correlation between strength of attachment and ion cleaning time. Increased ion cleaning time will elevate the deposition temperature, increasing decomposition rates and thus the crosslinking of the polymer. Increased cross-linking may render these coatings less permeable to penetration and mechanical interlocking by the adhesive polymers used by these organisms, thus reducing their adhesion. Films with improved biological performance have potential for use as coatings in the control of biofouling in applications such as heat exchangers, where thin films are important for effective thermal transfer, or optical windows where transparency is important.

  1. Development of chitosan-based antimicrobial leather coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Isabel P; Amaral, Joana S; Pinto, Vera; Ferreira, Maria José; Barreiro, Maria Filomena

    2013-10-15

    The development of antimicrobial coatings for footwear components is of great interest both from industry and consumer's point of view. In this work, antimicrobial leather materials were developed taking advantage of chitosan intrinsic antimicrobial activity and film forming capacity. Considering the specificities of the leather tanning industry, different coating technologies, namely drum, calender and spray, were tested, being the best results achieved with the drum. This last approach was further investigated to assess the effect of chitosan content, type of solubilizing acid, and impregnation time on the achieved antimicrobial capacity. Considering chitosan price (economic reasons) and the obtained results (antimicrobial activity and coating effectiveness, as inspected by SEM), the impregnation in the drum using a chitosan content of 1% (w/v) in a formic acid solution during 2h, is proposed as the best option for obtaining leather with antimicrobial capacity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Thin Glass Coatings for the Corrosion Protection of Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampert, Felix

    This dissertation presents the research work aimed at developing functional submicrometer thick SiOx barrier coatings for the corrosion protection of stainless steel substrates in chloride containing media, which may enable the use of stainless steels as plate material for marine heat exchangers...... with localized corrosion and do not impact the heat transfer or the component performance. The herein presented approach focuses primarily on the formation of SiOx-like thin films from Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) –based “spin-on-glass” (SOG) precursor. The technology is well known for the deposition...... in corrosion sensitive applications. Since the deposition of SiOx thin films is a well-established technology, the SOG technology was directly benchmarked to PVD-based SiO2 coatings. The coating adhesion was assessed by cross cut testing and increasing load scratch testing and the efficiency of the sub...

  3. Photothermal detuning for absorption measurement of optical coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Honggang; Li, Bincheng

    2008-01-10

    A simple and sensitive photothermal technique--photothermal detuning, in which the spectral shift of an optical coating caused by absorption-induced temperature rise is used to measure the photothermal signal--and its application for the absorption measurement of coated optical components are developed theoretically and experimentally in detail for the first time to the best of our knowledge. The theoretical description of the photothermal detuning signal with a continuous-wave modulated laser beam excitation is presented. Experiments are conducted with a highly reflective coating used at 532 nm to measure the photothermal detuning signal and to evaluate the absorption at 532 nm by detecting the spectral shift with a probe beam at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. By optimizing the incident angle of the probe beam, the amplitude of the photothermal detuning signal is maximized. Good agreement is obtained between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions.

  4. Assessment of Automotive Coatings Used on Different Metallic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Bensalah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Four epoxy primers commonly used in the automotive industry were applied by gravity pneumatic spray gun over metallic substrates, specifically, steel, electrogalvanized steel, hot-dip galvanized steel, and aluminum. A two-component polyurethane resin was used as topcoat. To evaluate the performance of the different coating systems, the treated panels were submitted to mechanical testing using Persoz hardness, impact resistance, cupping, lattice method, and bending. Tribological properties of different coating systems were conducted using pin on disc machine. Immersion tests were carried out in 5% NaCl and immersion tests in 3% NaOH solutions. Results showed which of the coating systems is more suitable for each substrate in terms of mechanical, tribological, and anticorrosive performance.

  5. Mixed alumina and cobalt containing plasma electrolytic oxide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yar-Mukhamedova, G. Sh; Ved', M. V.; Karakurkchi, A. V.; Sakhnenko, N. D.

    2017-06-01

    Principles of plasma electrolytic oxidation of the AL25 aluminum alloy in diphosphate alkali solutions containing cobalt(2+) cations are discussed. It has been established that a variation in the concentration of the electrolyte components provides the formation of mixed-oxide coatings consisting of the basic matrix materials and the cobalt oxides of different content. An increase in the cobalt oxide content in the coating is achieved by the variation in electrolysis current density as well as the treatment time due to both the electrochemical and thermo-chemical reactions at substrate surface and in spark region. Current density intervals that provide micro-globular surface formation and uniform cobalt distribution in the coating are determined. The composition and morphology of the surface causes high catalytic properties of synthesized materials, which confirmed the results of testing in model reaction CO and benzene oxidation as well as fuel combustion for various modes of engine operation.

  6. ELECTROCHEMICAL METHODS TO IMPROVE THE WEAR RESISTANCE OF COATING DEPOSITED ON THE METAL SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurij Shalapko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It was established that existing methods show low accuracy when assessing the durability of coatings. Furthermore, they don’t allow assessment of the contribution into durability of structural components and fillers for thermodiffusion and polymer-composite coatings, respectively. A method to evaluate durability of thermal diffusion chrome coatings on carbon steel and gray cast irons has been developed - the speed υp of destruction of the structural components of the coating. In addition, the destruction of each structural component is characterized by a constant value of destruction speed υp and potential φ, and their sharp vibrations are in complete destruction of the coating and the beginning of the destruction of the base metal. From the start of the test until the abrupt change in the rate of destruction υp, which is found on the curve υp - τ is the assessment of durability coating t¶ hat is specified with the curve φ - τ. Accuracy of the durability decreases from ± 30 min to ± 2 min. Developed as a way to assess the durability fillers polymer composite coatings, along with the finding that the rate of destruction υp of the time includes total disability coverage t3aƧ and time breakdown cover τn which are fixed on the curve φ - τ.

  7. Reusable Component Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Reusable Component Services (RCS) is a super-catalog of components, services, solutions and technologies that facilitates search, discovery and collaboration in...

  8. Avian Egg and Egg Coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    An ovulated egg of vertebrates is surrounded by unique extracellular matrix, the egg coat or zona pellucida, playing important roles in fertilization and early development. The vertebrate egg coat is composed of two to six zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins that are characterized by the evolutionarily conserved ZP-domain module and classified into six subfamilies based on phylogenetic analyses. Interestingly, investigations of biochemical and functional features of the ZP glycoproteins show that the roles of each ZP-glycoprotein family member in the egg-coat formation and the egg-sperm interactions seemingly vary across vertebrates. This might be one reason why comprehensive understandings of the molecular basis of either architecture or physiological functions of egg coat still remain elusive despite more than 3 decades of intensive investigations. In this chapter, an overview of avian egg focusing on the oogenesis are provided in the first section, and unique features of avian egg coat, i.e., perivitelline layer, including the morphology, biogenesis pathway, and physiological functions are discussed mainly on chicken and quail in terms of the characteristics of ZP glycoproteins in the following sections. In addition, these features of avian egg coat are compared to mammalian zona pellucida, from the viewpoint that the structural and functional varieties of ZP glycoproteins might be associated with the evolutionary adaptation to their reproductive strategies. By comparing the egg coat of birds and mammals whose reproductive strategies are largely different, new insights into the molecular mechanisms of vertebrate egg-sperm interactions might be provided.

  9. Application of a production line phosphorescence sensor coating system on a jet engine for surface temperature detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollazzo, P. Y.; Feist, J. P.; Berthier, S.; Charnley, B.; Wells, J.; Heyes, A. L.

    2013-09-01

    Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) are used to reduce the working temperature of the high pressure turbine blade metal surface and hence permit engines to operate at higher temperatures/ efficiencies. A sensor TBC is an adaptation of existing TBCs to enhance their functionality, such that they become sensors and allow measurement of component temperatures. The sensing capability is introduced by embedding optically active materials into the TBC and by illuminating these coatings with excitation light phosphorescence can be observed. The phosphorescence carries temperature and structural information about the coating. This paper describes the first ever implementation of a sensor coating system on a full-scale jet engine. The system consists of three main components: industrially manufactured coatings, advanced remote detection optics with large stand-off distances and tailored control and readout software. The majority of coatings were based on yttrium stabilized zirconia doped with Dy and Eu, although other coatings were manufactured, too. Coatings were produced on a production line using atmospheric plasma spraying. An advanced optical system was designed, manufactured and operated permitting scanning of coated components using a wide acceptance angle. Successful measurements were taken from the nozzle guide vanes at the inlet to the turbine section and are reported in the paper.

  10. Electrophoretic Deposition as a New Bioactive Glass Coating Process for Orthodontic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyotaro Kawaguchi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the surface modification of orthodontic stainless steel using electrophoretic deposition (EPD of bioactive glass (BG. The BG coatings were characterized by spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction. The frictional properties were investigated using a progressive load scratch test. The remineralization ability of the etched dental enamel was studied according to the time-dependent mechanical properties of the enamel using a nano-indentation test. The EPD process using alternating current produced higher values in both reflectance and lightness. Additionally, the BG coating was thinner than that prepared using direct current, and was completely amorphous. All of the BG coatings displayed good interfacial adhesion, and Si and O were the major components. Most BG-coated specimens produced slightly higher frictional forces compared with non-coated specimens. The hardness and elastic modulus of etched enamel specimens immersed with most BG-coated specimens recovered significantly with increasing immersion time compared with the non-coated specimen, and significant acid-neutralization was observed for the BG-coated specimens. The surface modification technique using EPD and BG coating on orthodontic stainless steel may assist the development of new non-cytotoxic orthodontic metallic appliances having satisfactory appearance and remineralization ability.

  11. Preparation and properties of silicone fouling release coatings with long-life afterglow fluorescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhanping

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on polydimethylsiloxane, three-component coatings were prepared with different content of luminescence powder. The results showed that the illuminance of coatings increases with the content of luminescence powder, decays exponentially with the afterglow time, increases exponentially with the increase of exposure time. The afterglow illuminance augments with irradiated light illuminance. All coatings are hydrophobic and oleophilic. Surface free energy decreases with the increase of luminescence powder. They have highest impact-resistance and bend flexibility. The luminescence powder does not change obviously the shore hardness, tensile breaking strength, breaking elongation rate, elastic modular and roughness of coatings. The static test panels in sea generally could be covered obviously by biofouling including sponges, bryophytes and mussels, hydra, kelp, green algae after 2 months of immersion during growing season. But it never found that the barnacle attached on the coating surface during 4 years of immersion test. The static anti-fouling ability of the coatings is very limited. In addition, the sea creatures attached on the coating surface can be easily removed; even attached organisms will fall off and expose again the smooth coating surface. Consequently, all coatings with long-life afterglow fluorescent have a significant effect on preventing adhesion of barnacle and fouling-release performance.

  12. Noisy independent component analysis of autocorrelated components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knollmüller, Jakob; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2017-10-01

    We present a method for the separation of superimposed, independent, autocorrelated components from noisy multichannel measurement. The presented method simultaneously reconstructs and separates the components, taking all channels into account, and thereby increases the effective signal-to-noise ratio considerably, allowing separations even in the high-noise regime. Characteristics of the measurement instruments can be included, allowing for application in complex measurement situations. Independent posterior samples can be provided, permitting error estimates on all desired quantities. Using the concept of information field theory, the algorithm is not restricted to any dimensionality of the underlying space or discretization scheme thereof.

  13. Integrated Glass Coating Manufacturing Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brophy, Brenor [Enki Technology Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    This project aims to enable US module manufacturers to coat glass with Enki’s state of the art tunable functionalized AR coatings at the lowest possible cost and highest possible performance by encapsulating Enki’s coating process in an integrated tool that facilitates effective process improvement through metrology and data analysis for greater quality and performance while reducing footprint, operating and capital costs. The Phase 1 objective was a fully designed manufacturing line, including fully specified equipment ready for issue of purchase requisitions; a detailed economic justification based on market prices at the end of Phase 1 and projected manufacturing costs and a detailed deployment plan for the equipment.

  14. Laser-based coatings removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.A. [F2 Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D&D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building. This report describes the use of pulse-repetetion laser systems for the removal of paints and coatings.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF COMPLEX EQUIPMENT FOR PLASMA SPRAY CERAMIC COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Okovity

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Develop a set equipment for plasma forming ceramic coatings. The article presents characteristics and parameters of the developed complex equipment for formation of plasma ceramic coatings as well as results of its testing. Methods of research is based on studies of structural elements composite plasma coatings system ZrO2 – Y2O3  obtained  using  developed complex equipment. One of the most effective ways to protect the components from high temperature corrosion and oxidation is formation on the surface of plasma thermal barrier coatings. For thermal barrier coating has very strict requirements: сharacterized by a smooth change of physico-mechanical properties (porosity, microhardness, elastic modulus in the cross section of the metal substrate to the outer ceramic layer; to withstand multiple cycles of thermal cycling from room temperature to the operating temperature; to maintain gastightness under operating conditions and thus ensure a sufficiently high level of adhesive strength. For realization of new technological schemes applying thermal barrier coatings with high operational characteristics was developed, patented and manufactured a range of new equipment. The experiments show that authors developed PBG-1 plasmatron and powder feeder PPBG-04 have at least 2–3 times the service life during the deposition of ceramic materials compared to the standard equipment of the company "Plasma-Technik", by changing the structure of the cathode-anode plasma torch assembly and construction of the delivery unit of the feeder to facilitate the uniform supply of the powder into the plasma jet and the best of his penetration. The result is better plasma coatings with improved operational characteristics: adhesion strength is increased to 1.3–2 times, material utilization in 1.5–1.6 times microhardness 1.2–1.4 times the porosity is reduced by 2–2.5 times.

  16. Coatings for high energy applications. The Nova laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtenson, G. R.

    The combined requirements of energy density, multiple wavelength, and aperture make the coatings for the Nova Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laser unique. This ten beam neodymium glass laser system, built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has over a thousand major optical components; some larger than one meter in diameter and weighing 380 Kg. The laser operates at 1054 nm and can be frequency doubled to 527 nm or tripled to 351 nm by means of full aperture potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal arrays. The 1.0 nsec fluence varies along the laser chain, sometimes reaching values as high as 16 J/cm(2) at the input lens to one of the spatial filters. The design specifications of this massive optical system were changed several times as the state-of-the-art advanced. Each change required redesign of the optical coatings even as vendors were preparing for production runs. Frequency conversion to include shorter wavelengths mandated the first major coating redesign and was followed almost immediately by a second redesign to reduce solarization effects in borosilicate crown glass. The conventional thermal evaporation process although successful for the deposition of mirror coatings, was not able to produce antireflection coatings able to survive the locally high chain fluences. As a consequence it became necessary to develop another technique. Solution produced coatings were developed having transmissions exceeding 99% per part and damage threshold values equal to the bare substrate. The unique requirement of the Nova laser necessitated special deposition and metrology equipment. These programmatic developments will be reviewed in the context of the cooperative working relationship developed between LLNL and its vendors. It was this excellent relationship which has enabled LLNL to obtain these highly specialized coatings for the Nova laser.

  17. Coatings for Nigh Energy Applications: The Nova Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtenson, G. Richard

    1986-07-01

    The combined requirements of energy density, multiple wavelength, and aperture make the coatings for the Nova Inertial Confinement Fusion (irF) laser unique. This ten beam neodymium glass laser system, built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has over a thousand major optical components; some larger than one meter in diameter and weighing 380 Kg. The laser operates at 1 054 nm and can be frequency doubled to 527 nm or tripled to 351 nm by means of full aperture potassium dihydrogen phosphate (lePP) crystal arrays. The 1.0 nsec fluence varies along the laser chain, sometimes reaching values as high as 16 J/cm2 at the input lens to one of the spatial filters. The design specifications of this massive optical system were changed several times as the state-of-the-art advanced. Each change required redesign of the optical coatings even as vendors were preparing for production runs. Frequency conversion to include shorter wavelengths mandated the first major coating redesign and was followed almost immediately by a second redesign to reduce solarization effects in borosilicate crown glass. The conventional thermal evaporation process although successful for the deposition of mirror coatings, was not able to produce antireflection coatings able to survive the locally high chain fluences. As a consequence it became necessary to develop another technique. Solution produced coatings were developed having transmissions exceeding 99% per part and damage threshold values equal to the bare substrate. The unique requirement of the Nova laser necessitated special deposition and metrology equipment. These programmatic developments will be reviewed in the context of the cooperative working relationship developed between LLNL and its vendors. It was this excellent relationship which has enabled LLNL to obtain these highly specialized coatings for the Nova laser.

  18. Coatings for high energy applications. The Nova laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtenson, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    The combined requirements of energy density, multiple wavelength, and aperture make the coatings for the Nova Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laser unique. This ten beam neodymium glass laser system, built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has over a thousand major optical components; some larger than one meter in diameter and weighing 380 Kg. The laser operates at 1054 nm and can be frequency doubled to 527 nm or tripled to 351 nm by means of full aperture potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal arrays. The 1.0 nsec fluence varies along the laser chain, sometimes reaching values as high as 16 J/cm/sup 2/ at the input lens to one of the spatial filters. The design specifications of this massive optical system were changed several times as the state-of-the-art advanced. Each change required redesign of the optical coatings even as vendors were preparing for production runs. Frequency conversion to include shorter wavelengths mandated the first major coating redesign and was followed almost immediately by a second redesign to reduce solarization effects in borosilicate crown glass. The conventional thermal evaporation process although successful for the deposition of mirror coatings, was not able to produce antireflection coatings able to survive the locally high chain fluences. As a consequence it became necessary to develop another technique. Solution produced coatings were developed having transmissions exceeding 99% per part and damage threshold values equal to the bare substrate. The unique requirement of the Nova laser necessitated special deposition and metrology equipment. These programmatic developments will be reviewed in the context of the cooperative working relationship developed between LLNL and its vendors. It was this excellent relationship which has enabled LLNL to obtain these highly specialized coatings for the Nova laser.

  19. Conformal coating value/risk assessment for Sandia satellite programs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russick, Edward Mark; Thayer, Gayle Echo

    2008-03-01

    Conformal coatings are used in space applications on printed circuit board (PCB) assemblies primarily as a protective barrier against environmental contaminants. Such coatings have been used at Sandia for decades in satellite applications including the GPS satellite program. Recently, the value of conformal coating has been questioned because it is time consuming (requiring a 5-6 week schedule allowance) and delays due to difficulty of repairs and rework performed afterward are troublesome. In an effort to find opportunities where assembly time can be reduced, a review of the literature as well as discussions with satellite engineers both within and external to Sandia regarding the value of conformal coating was performed. Several sources on the value of conformal coating, the functions it performs, and on whether coatings are necessary and should be used at all were found, though nearly all were based on anecdotal information. The first section of this report, titled 'Conformal Coating for Space Applications', summarizes the results of an initial risk-value assessment of the conformal coating process for Sandia satellite programs based on information gathered. In the process of collecting information to perform the assessment, it was necessary to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the entire satellite box assembly process. A production time-line was constructed and is presented in the second section of this report, titled 'Satellite Box Assembly', specifically to identify potential sources of time delays, manufacturing issues, and component failures related to the conformal coating process in relation to the box assembly. The time-line also allows for identification of production issues that were anecdotally attributed to the conformal coating but actually were associated with other production steps in the box assembly process. It was constructed largely in consultation with GPS program engineers with empirical knowledge of times required

  20. Evaluation of microstructure and micro-hardness of 410L SS coatings fabricated using laser assisted cold spraying: process development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathebula, TE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available , contaminating and erosive environments which accelerate the degradation of these components. Surface coatings are generally used to protect and prolong the lifetime of the parts. Laser Assisted Cold Spray (LACS) is a relatively new surface coating process which...

  1. A Multifunctional Smart Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on micro-encapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy. This

  2. Smart microneedle coatings for controlled delivery and biomedical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, H; Mehta, P; Msallam, H; Armitage, D; Ahmad, Z

    2014-11-01

    The work presented demonstrates an unconventional approach in the preparation of smart microneedle (MN) coatings utilising electrohydrodynamic atomisation (EHDA) principles. Stainless steel (600-900 µm in height) MNs were coupled to a ground electrode (in the EHDA coating set-up) with the deposition distance and collecting methodology varied for an ethanol:methanol (50:50) vehicle system. The preparation of nano- and micrometre-scaled pharmaceutical coatings was achieved. Fluorescein dye (serving as potential drug, sensory materials or disease state markers) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, polymer matrix system) formed the remaining components of the coating formulation. Based on these excipients and by varying the coating process, particles (100 nm to 3 µm) and fibres (400 nm to 1 µm) were deposited directly on MNs in controlled and selectable fashion (flow rates variable ∼ 5-50 µL/min, applied voltage variable 6-19 kV). These demonstrated options for multiple targeting and analysis applications. The underlying EHDA process permits room temperature fabrication, controlled output and scale-up potential for emerging MN devices as drug systems or lab-chip testing devices.

  3. Silver-doped hydroxyapatite coatings formed on Ti–6Al–4V substrates and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanovska, A.A., E-mail: biophy@yandex.ru [Institute of Applied Physics National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 58, Sumy 40000 (Ukraine); Stanislavov, A.S. [Institute of Applied Physics National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 58, Sumy 40000 (Ukraine); Sukhodub, L.B. [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, 14-Puschinskaya St., Kharkov 61057 (Ukraine); Kuznetsov, V.N.; Illiashenko, V.Yu.; Danilchenko, S.N. [Institute of Applied Physics National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 58, Sumy 40000 (Ukraine); Sukhodub, L.F. [Sumy State University, Medical Institute, Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine, R. Korsakova Str. 2, Sumy 40007 (Ukraine)

    2014-03-01

    Coatings with antibacterial components for medical implants are recommended to reduce the risk of bacterial infections. Therefore hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings with addition of chitosan (CS) and silver (Ag) are proposed in this work in an attempt to resolve this problem. Ti–6Al–4V substrates were modified by a chitosan film to study the influence of surface modification on the formation of the HA–Ag and HA–CS–Ag coatings. Using a thermal substrate method, HA and HA–CS coatings doped with Ag{sup +} were prepared at low substrate temperatures (90 °C). Coated surfaces were examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The amount of silver in the deposited coatings was analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. From this study it is concluded that the substrate surface modified by a chitosan film promotes the coating formation and increases the antibacterial activity of produced coatings against a strain of Escherichia coli. The adhesion of E. coli (ATCC 25922) to sheep erythrocytes was decreased by 14% as compared with the reference samples without Ag. It could be explained by the inhibition of bacterial adhesins by Ag{sup +} ions released. The combined action of silver ions and chitosan resulted in a 21% decrease in adhesive index. - Highlights: • Silver doped hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings are deposited by thermal substrate method. • Surface modification of Ti–6Al–4V substrates by chitosan film is proposed. • The influence of surface modification on HA–Ag coating formation is investigated. • Substrates modified by a chitosan film promote the nucleation of the HA coatings. • Antibacterial effect on the E. coli is more expressed for coatings on modified surface.

  4. Nano-coatings on carbon structures for interfacial modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulikollu, Rajasekhar V.

    damages the ligaments and cell walls of carbon foam. This results in higher elastic modulus but lower strength. So, to get any benefit from such approaches the optimization window may be very narrow and marginal in controllability. An alternative solution would be to synthesize ultra thin film coatings without etching the surfaces. It is observed that plasma assisted coatings having thickness in the range of few nanometers (4-5nm) are completely covering the graphite substrates. The coating surface chemistry and morphology information is based upon XPS and AFM studies on pyrolytic graphite substrate. Two types of plasma surface modification techniques have been attempted: one is to make the surface more reactive for structural components and the other is to make the surface more inert for stand-alone structures. In order to achieve these goals plasma assisted oxide and fluorocarbon coatings are studied in detail. The synthesized oxide and fluorocarbon coating chemistries are comparable to conventional silica (SiO2) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, -CF2-). It is seen that the fluorocarbon coatings provide moisture resistance to graphitic foam by making the surface inert at the nanometer scale. On the other hand, plasma assisted oxide coating is a feasible and effective means of improving the wettability and dispersion of foam and nanofibers in organic polymer matrix material. Surface analysis as well as microstructural studies and mechanical tests have shown encouraging results. The interface reactions between graphite (coated and uncoated) and epoxy have also been studied in detail. Nano-scale plasma coatings have also been applied for metal matrix composites and semiconductor related applications. The fluorocarbon coating promote delamination/exfoliation of the metal on graphite, hence may be used for patterning or lithography. Oxide coatings seem to enhance the adhesion and metallic diffusion between graphite and metal, hence can be used for the development of metal

  5. Hex Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of the Hex Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics project is to evaluate and test pretreatment coating systems not containing hexavalent chrome in avionics and electronics housing applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing strong performing coating systems from prior NASA and DoD testing or new coating systems as determined by the stakeholders.

  6. Electrophoretic deposition of ZnO/alginate and ZnO-bioactive glass/alginate composite coatings for antimicrobial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero-Arias, L.; Cabanas-Polo, S.; Goudouri, O.M. [Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstrasse 6, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Misra, S.K. [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, Ahmedabad 382424 (India); Gilabert, J. [Institute of Ceramics Materials (ITC), University Jaume I, Avenida Vicent SosBaynat, 12006 Castellon (Spain); Valsami-Jones, E. [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Sanchez, E. [Institute of Ceramics Materials (ITC), University Jaume I, Avenida Vicent SosBaynat, 12006 Castellon (Spain); Virtanen, S. [Institute for Surface Science and Corrosion (LKO, WW4), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstrasse 7, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Boccaccini, A.R., E-mail: aldo.boccaccini@ww.uni-erlangen.de [Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstrasse 6, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-10-01

    Two organic/inorganic composite coatings based on alginate, as organic matrix, and zinc oxide nanoparticles (n-ZnO) with and without bioactive glass (BG), as inorganic components, intended for biomedical applications, were developed by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Different n-ZnO (1–10 g/L) and BG (1–1.5 g/L) contents were studied for a fixed alginate concentration (2 g/L). The presence of n-ZnO was confirmed to impart antibacterial properties to the coatings against gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, while the BG induced the formation of hydroxyapatite on coating surfaces thereby imparting bioactivity, making the coating suitable for bone replacement applications. Coating composition was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TG), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to study both the surface and the cross section morphology of the coatings. Polarization curves of the coated substrates made in cell culture media at 37 °C confirmed the corrosion protection function of the novel organic/inorganic composite coatings. - Highlights: • Organic–inorganic nanocomposite coatings fabricated by electrophoretic deposition • nZnO and bioactive glass containing alginate coatings exhibit antibacterial effect. • Bioactive character and anticorrosion function of coatings demonstrated.

  7. Mechanical properties of Cr-Cu coatings produced by electroplating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyadi, Tri Widodo Besar; Sarjito, Masyrukan, Riswan, Ricky Ary

    2017-06-01

    Hard chromium coatings has long been considered as the most used electrodeposited coating in several industrial applications such as in petrochemistry, oil and gas industries. When hard coatings used in fastener components, the sliding contact during fastening operation produces high tensile stresses on the surface which can generate microcracks. For component used in high oxidation and corrosion environment, deep cracks cannot be tolerated. In this work, a laminated structure of Cr-Cu coating was prepared using electroplating on carbon steel substrates. Two baths of chrome and copper electrolyte solutions were prepared to deposit Cr as the first layer and Cu as the second layer. The effect of current voltages on the thickness, hardness and specific wear rate of the Cu layer was investigated. The results show that an increase of the current voltages increased the thickness and hardness of the Cu layer, but reduced the specific wear rate. This study showed that the use of Cu can be a potential candidate as a laminated structure Cr-Cu for chromium plating.

  8. Fatigue resistant carbon coatings for rolling/sliding contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Harpal; Ramirez, Giovanni; Eryilmaz, Osman; Greco, Aaron; Doll, Gary; Erdemir, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The growing demands for renewable energy production have recently resulted in a significant increase in wind plant installation. Field data from these plants show that wind turbines suffer from costly repair, maintenance and high failure rates. Often times the reliability issues are linked with tribological components used in wind turbine drivetrains. The primary failure modes in bearings and gears are associated with micropitting, wear, brinelling, scuffing, smearing and macropitting all of which occur at or near the surface. Accordingly, a variety of surface engineering approaches are currently being considered to alter the near surface properties of such bearings and gears to prevent these tribological failures. In the present work, we have evaluated the tribological performance of compliant highly hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating developed at Argonne National Laboratory, under mixed rolling/sliding contact conditions for wind turbine drivetrain components. The coating was deposited on AISI 52100 steel specimens using a magnetron sputter deposition system. The experiments were performed on a PCS Micro-Pitting-Rig (MPR) with four material pairs at 1.79 GPa contact stress, 40% slide to roll ratio and in polyalphaolefin (PAO4) basestock oil (to ensure extreme boundary conditions). The post-test analysis was performed using optical microscopy, surface profilometry, and Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained show a potential for these coatings in sliding/rolling contact applications as no failures were observed with coated specimens even after 100 million cycles compared to uncoated pair in which they failed after 32 million cycles, under the given test conditions.

  9. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings for Advanced Turbine Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (T/EBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engine systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, thus help achieve engine low emission and high efficiency goals. Advanced T/EBCs are being developed for the low emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor applications by extending the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water vapor containing combustion environments. Low conductivity thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are also being developed for metallic turbine airfoil and combustor applications, providing the component temperature capability up to 1650 C (3000 F). In this paper, ceramic coating development considerations and requirements for both the ceramic and metallic components will be described for engine high temperature and high-heat-flux applications. The underlying coating failure mechanisms and life prediction approaches will be discussed based on the simulated engine tests and fracture mechanics modeling results.

  10. Protective coatings for commercial particulates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindl, B.; Teng, Y.H.; Liu, Y.L.

    1994-01-01

    SiC/Al composites are in large-scale production with Al-Si alloy matrices. The same composites with pure Al or low Si matrices need diffusion barriers on the SiC reinforcement to control the interfacial reaction. The present paper describes various approaches taken to obtain protective coatings...... of alumina and zirconia on SiC particulates by sol-gel techniques. Aqueous and organic precursors have been used. The extent of the reaction, i.e., the Si and Al4C3 content in the matrix, was determined by differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. The reaction rates of some coated particulates...... in liquid Al are decreased by as much as one order of magnitude during the first 15 min of immersion. Pretreatments of the SiC surface, the composition and thickness of the coating interphase and heat treatments of the coated materials have been studied, and are discussed in relation to their effect...

  11. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Gabarre, Sergio; Más, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality. PMID:25802848

  12. Smart Coatings for Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wendy; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  13. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA, calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality.

  14. Positron studies of polymeric coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean, Y.C. E-mail: jeany@umkc.edu; Mallon, P.E.; Zhang, R.; Chen Hongmin; Li Ying; Zhang Junjie; Wu, Y.C.; Sandreczki, T.C.; Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.; Gu, X.; Nguyen, T

    2003-11-01

    In complicated coating systems, positrons have shown sensitivity in detecting the early stage of deterioration due to weathering, specially, in probing a specific location or depth of coatings from the surface through interfaces and the bulk. Existing extensive experimental positron data show that positron annihilation signals respond quantitatively to the deterioration process due to weathering. Now it is possible to detect the very early stage of coating deterioration at the atomic and molecular scale by using positrons, typically in days as compared to years by conventional methods. This paper summarizes recent positron studies in polymeric coatings. Correlations between positron data and a variety of chemical, physical and engineering data from ESR, AFM, cross-link density, gloss, and cyclic loading are presented.

  15. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, J.R.

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  16. Coating of silicon pore optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Ackermann, M.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2009-01-01

    For the International X-ray observatory (IXO), a mirror module with an effective area of 3 m2 at 1.25 keV and at least 0.65 m2 at 6 keV has to be realized. To achieve this goal, coated silicon pore optics has been developed over the last years. One of the challenges is to coat the Si plates...

  17. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  18. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Jack J.; Elling, David; Reams, Walter

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  19. Evaluation of Manganese Phosphate Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    D-AiD9 434 EVALUATION OF MANGANESE PHOSPHATE COTINGS(I) ARMY v/1 ARMAMENT RESEARCH R D DEVELO MENT CENTER IdATERYL lET NY I LARGE CALIBER WEAPON...5Y IIARS 163 TECHNICAL REPORT ARLCB-TR- 64003 EVALUATION OF MANGANESE PHOSPHATE COATINGS R. A. FARRARA FEBRUARY 1984 N US ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH AND...84003 _____________ 4. TTLE and -bitle)5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED EVALUATION OF MANGANESE PHOSPHATE COATINGS Final 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT

  20. Coated substrate apparatus and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Zhenan; Diao, Ying; Mannsfeld, Stefan Christian Bernhardt; Tee, Chee-Keong; Becerril-Garcia, Hector A.; Zhou, Yan

    2018-01-09

    A coated substrate is formed with aligned objects such as small molecules, macromolecules and nanoscale particulates, such as inorganic, organic or inorganic/organic hybrid materials. In accordance with one or more embodiments, an apparatus or method involves an applicator having at least one surface patterned with protruded or indented features, and a coated substrate including a solution-based layer of objects having features and morphology attributes arranged as a function of the protruded or indented features.

  1. Silicone nanocomposite coatings for fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, Kenneth (Inventor); Lee, Stein S. (Inventor); Singhal, Amit (Inventor); Ou, Runqing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A silicone based coating for fabrics utilizing dual nanocomposite fillers providing enhanced mechanical and thermal properties to the silicone base. The first filler includes nanoclusters of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a metal oxide and a second filler of exfoliated clay nanoparticles. The coating is particularly suitable for inflatable fabrics used in several space, military, and consumer applications, including airbags, parachutes, rafts, boat sails, and inflatable shelters.

  2. Technical and Economical Aspects of Current Thermal Barrier Coating Systems for Gas Turbine Engines by Thermal Spray and EBPVD: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Albert; Knapp, James; Taylor, Thomas; Ashary, Adil; Bolcavage, Ann; Hitchman, Neil

    2008-06-01

    The most advanced thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems for aircraft engine and power generation hot section components consist of electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) applied yttria-stabilized zirconia and platinum modified diffusion aluminide bond coating. Thermally sprayed ceramic and MCrAlY bond coatings, however, are still used extensively for combustors and power generation blades and vanes. This article highlights the key features of plasma spray and HVOF, diffusion aluminizing, and EBPVD coating processes. The coating characteristics of thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coat as well as low density and dense vertically cracked (DVC) Zircoat TBC are described. Essential features of a typical EBPVD TBC coating system, consisting of a diffusion aluminide and a columnar TBC, are also presented. The major coating cost elements such as material, equipment and processing are explained for the different technologies, with a performance and cost comparison given for selected examples.

  3. Material Science Smart Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, A. I. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Sabirianov, R. F. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Namavar, Fereydoon [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The contribution of electrostatic interactions to the free energy of binding between model protein and a ceramic implant surface in the aqueous solvent, considered in the framework of the nonlocal electrostatic model, is calculated as a function of the implant low-frequency dielectric constant. We show that the existence of a dynamically ordered (low-dielectric) interfacial solvent layer at the protein-solvent and ceramic-solvent interface markedly increases charging energy of the protein and ceramic implant, and consequently makes the electrostatic contribution to the protein-ceramic binding energy more favorable (attractive). Our analysis shows that the corresponding electrostatic energy between protein and oxide ceramics depends nonmonotonically on the dielectric constant of ceramic, εC. Obtained results indicate that protein can attract electrostatically to the surface if ceramic material has a moderate εC below or about 35 (in particularly ZrO2 or Ta2O5). This is in contrast to classical (local) consideration of the solvent, which demonstrates an unfavorable electrostatic interaction of protein with typical metal oxide ceramic materials (εC>10). Thus, a solid implant coated by combining oxide ceramic with a reduced dielectric constant can be beneficial to strengthen the electrostatic binding of the protein-implant complex.

  4. CNT coated thread micro-electro-mechanical system for finger proprioception sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, A. A.; Wicaksono, D. H. B.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we aim to fabricate cotton thread based sensor for proprioceptive application. Cotton threads are utilized as the structural component of flexible sensors. The thread is coated with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) dispersion by using facile conventional dipping-drying method. The electrical characterization of the coated thread found that the resistance per meter of the coated thread decreased with increasing the number of dipping. The CNT coated thread sensor works based on piezoresistive theory in which the resistance of the coated thread changes when force is applied. This thread sensor is sewed on glove at the index finger between middle and proximal phalanx parts and the resistance change is measured upon grasping mechanism. The thread based microelectromechanical system (MEMS) enables the flexible sensor to easily fit perfectly on the finger joint and gives reliable response as proprioceptive sensing.

  5. 2D Heterostructure coatings of hBN-MoS2 layers for corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandana, Sajith; Kochat, Vidya; Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Yazdi, Sadegh; Shen, Jianfeng; Kosolwattana, Suppanat; Vinod, Soumya; Vajtai, Robert; Roy, Ajit K.; Sekhar Tiwary, Chandra; Ajayan, P. M.

    2017-02-01

    Heterostructures of atomically thin 2D materials could have improved physical, mechanical and chemical properties as compared to its individual components. Here we report, the effect of heterostructure coatings of hBN and MoS2 on the corrosion behavior as compared to coatings employing the individual 2D layer compositions. The poor corrosion resistance of MoS2 (widely used as wear resistant coating) can be improved by incorporating hBN sheets. Depending on the atomic stacking of the 2D sheets, we can further engineer the corrosion resistance properties of these coatings. A detailed spectroscopy and microscopy analysis has been used to characterize the different combinations of layered coatings. Detailed DFT based calculation reveals that the effect on the electrical properties due to atomic stacking is one of the major reasons for the improvement seen in corrosion resistance.

  6. Functionally gradient materials for thermal barrier coatings in advanced gas turbine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; Barmak, K.; Chan, H.M. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    New designs for advanced gas turbine engines for power production are required to have higher operating temperatures in order to increase efficiency. However, elevated temperatures will increase the magnitude and severity of environmental degradation of critical turbine components (e.g. combustor parts, turbine blades, etc{hor_ellipsis}). To offset this problem, the usage of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has become popular by allowing an increase in maximum inlet temperatures for an operating engine. Although thermal barrier technology is over thirty years old, the principle failure mechanism is the spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the ceramic/bond coat interface. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a coating that combines the thermal barrier qualities of the ceramic layer and the corrosion protection by the metallic bond coat without the detrimental effects associated with the localization of the ceramic/metal interface to a single plane.

  7. Chemical Vapor Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition of Coatings for Mechanical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, G. L.; Mensah, B. A.; Mohseni, H.; Scharf, T. W.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of films and coatings involves the chemical reaction of gases on or near a substrate surface. This deposition method can produce coatings with tightly controlled dimensions and novel structures. Furthermore, the non-line-of-sight-deposition capability of CVD facilitates the coating of complex-shaped mechanical components. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is also a chemical gas phase thin film deposition technique, but unlike CVD, it utilizes “self-limiting” surface adsorption reactions (chemisorption) to control the thickness of deposited films. This article provides an overview of CVD and ALD, discusses some of their fundamental and practical aspects, and examines their advantages and limitations versus other vapor processing techniques such as physical vapor deposition in regard to coatings for mechanical applications. Finally, site-specific cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy inside the wear track of an ALD ZnO/ZrO2 8 bilayers nanolaminate coating determined the mechanisms that control the friction and wear.

  8. Implementation of Carbon Thin Film Coatings in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) for Electron Cloud Mitigation

    CERN Document Server

    Costa Pinto, P; Basso, T; Edwards, P; Mensi, M; Sublet, A; Taborelli, M

    2014-01-01

    Low Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) carbon thin films eradicate electron multipacting in accelerator beam pipes. Two magnetic cells of the SPS were coated with such material and installed. In total more than forty vacuum vessels and magnet interconnections were treated. The feasibility of the coating process was validated. The performance of the carbon thin film will be tested with LHC nominal beams after the end of the long shutdown 1. Particular attention will be drawn to the long term behaviour. This paper presents the sputtering techniques used to coat the different components; their characterization (SEY measurements on coupons, RF multipacting tests and pump down curves); and the technology to etch the carbon film in case of a faulty coating. The strategy to coat the entire SPS will also be described.

  9. Model-based analysis of photoinitiated coating degradation under artificial exposure conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Coating degradation mechanisms of thermoset coatings exposed to ultraviolet radiation and humidity at constant temperature are investigated. The essential processes, photoinitiated oxidation reactions, intrafilm oxygen permeability, water absorption and diffusion, reduction of crosslink density......, and development of a thin surface oxidation zone are quantified and a mathematical model for degrading coatings developed. Front-tracking techniques are used to determine the rate of movement of the oxidation and ablation fronts, the positions of which define the extension of the surface oxidation zone. Three...... previous and independent experimental investigations with two-component, densely crosslinked, epoxy–amine model coatings were selected for verification of the mathematical model. Simulations can match and explain transient mass loss and coating thickness reduction data and are in agreement with infrared...

  10. Very Tough, Erosion-Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are receiving increased attention for advanced gas turbine engine applications. These coatings are considered to be technologically important because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, thus achieving higher engine efficiency, lower emissions, and increased performance goals. To take full advantage of the capabilities of these coatings, researchers need to use an aggressive design approach whenever possible--one that allows greater temperature reductions through the coating systems and less cooling air to the components. Advanced TBCs that have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better thermal stability than current coatings have been developed for future ultra-efficient, low-emission engine systems. Multicomponent-doped, defect-clustered TBCs have been shown to offer the low conductivity and high stability required for future high-temperature engine applications.

  11. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  12. Coupled field modeling of E/M impedance of piezoelectric wafer active sensor for cataphoretic coating thickness measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamas, T.; Tekkalmaz, M.

    2017-04-01

    The cataphoretic electro-coating is one of the most common methods that are used against corrosion as a primary coating layer. The cataphoretic electro-coating is commonly utilized technique especially in protecting of automobile components in automotive industry. This coating method has many advantages such as high corrosion resistance, ability of homogeneous and complete coating of components in any geometry, less pollution, and less risk of ignition. In this study, some specimens in the form of steel sheets coated by the cataphoretic electro-coating method are examined using electro-mechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) method. One of the extensively employed sensor technologies has been permanently installed piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) for in situ continuous structural health monitoring (SHM). Using the transduction of ultrasonic elastic waves into voltage and vice versa, PWAS has been emerged as one of the major SHM sensing technologies. EMIS method has been utilized as a dynamic descriptor of PWAS and the structure on which it is bonded. EMIS of PWAS-structure couple is a high frequency local modal sensing technique by applying standing waves to indicate the response of the PWAS resonator by determining the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies. To simulate the actual EMIS measurements in the present work, two-dimensional and three-dimensional coupled field finite element models are created for both uncoated and coated steel plates in a commercial FEA software, ANSYS®. The EMIS values of the specimens in certain sizes and coated in different thickness are going to be simulated in broad-band of frequency spectra. The thickness of the coating layer and coating time are of paramount importance for the corrosion resistance. The coating layer thickness and the corresponding coating period will be optimized by analyses of the values obtained from the 2D and 3D EMIS simulations.

  13. Polyester based hybrid organic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojiang

    Polyesters are a class of polymers widely used in organic coatings applications. In this work, four types of organic coatings based on polyester polyols were prepared: UV-curable polyester/poly(meth)acrylate coatings, thermal curable polyester polyurethane-urea coatings, thermal curable non-isocyanate polyurethane coatings, and UV-curable non-isocyanate polyurethane coatings. Polyester/poly(meth)acrylate block copolymers are synthesized using a combination of polycondensation and Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP). All block copolymers are characterized by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC). In the case of unsaturated-polyester-based block copolymers the main chain double bond in the polyester backbone remains almost unaffected during ATRP. The unsaturated block copolymers are crosslinkable and can form networks upon photo-irradiation in the presence of a suitable photoinitiator. These copolymers might be interesting candidates for coatings with better overall properties than those based on neat polyesters. Thermal curable polyester polyol based Polyurethane-Urea (PUU) coatings were formulated using Partially Blocked HDI isocyanurate (PBH), Isophorone Diamine (IPDA), and polyester polyol. As a comparison, the polyurethane coatings (PU) without adding IPDA were also prepared. The mechanical and viscoelastic properties of the PUU and PU coating were investigated by using tensile test and Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analyzer (DMTA). It was found that PUU coating exhibited higher crosslink density, Tg, tensile modulus and strength than the corresponding PU coating. Thermal curable non-isocyanate polyurethane coatings were prepared by using polyamine and cyclic carbonate terminated polyester. Cyclic carbonate terminated polyester was synthesized from the reaction of the carbon dioxide and epoxidized polyester which was prepared from the polyester polyol. The properties of the epoxidized and cyclic carbonate

  14. Coatings and Tints of Spectacle Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zeki Büyükyıldız

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Spectacle lenses are made of mineral or organic (plastic materials. Various coatings and tints are applied to the spectacle lenses according to the characteristic of the lens material, and for the personal needs and cosmetic purpose. The coatings may be classified in seven groups: 1 Anti-reflection coatings, 2 Hard coatings, 3 Clean coat, 4 Mirror coatings, 5 Color tint coating (one of coloring processes, 6 Photochromic coating (one of photochromic processes, and 7 Anti-fog coatings. Anti-reflection coatings reduce unwanted reflections from the lens surfaces and increase light transmission. Hard coatings are applied for preventing the plastic lens surface from scratches and abrasion. Hard coatings are not required for the mineral lenses due to their hardness. Clean coat makes the lens surface smooth and hydrophobic. Thus, it prevents the adherence of dust, tarnish, and dirt particles on the lens surface. Mirror coatings are applied onto the sunglasses for cosmetic purpose. Color tinted and photochromic lenses are used for sun protection and absorption of the harmful UV radiations. Anti-fog coatings make the lens surface hydrophilic and prevent the coalescence of tiny water droplets on the lens surface that reduces light transmission. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 359-69

  15. Sputter-ion plating of coatings for protection of gas-turbine blades against high-temperature oxidation and corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, J. P.; Restall, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Considerable effort is being devoted to the development of overlay coatings for protecting critical components such as turbine blades against high-temperature oxidation, corrosion, and erosion damage in service. The most commercially advanced methods for depositing coatings are electron-beam evaporation and plasma spraying. Sputter-ion plating (SIP) offers a potentially cheaper and simpler alternative method for depositing overlays. Experimental work on SIP of Co-Cr-Al-Y and Ni-Cr-Al-Ti alloy coatings is described. Results are presented of metallographic assessment of these coatings, and of the results obtained from high-velocity testing using a gas-turbine simulator rig.

  16. Supply chain components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieraşu, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article I will go through three main logistics components, which are represented by: transportation, inventory and facilities, and the three secondary logistical components: information, production location, price and how they determine performance of any supply chain. I will discuss then how these components are used in the design, planning and operation of a supply chain. I will also talk about some obstacles a supply chain manager may encounter.

  17. Electroless Plated Nanodiamond Coating for Stainless Steel Passivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Korinko, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Spencer, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Stein, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-15

    Tritium gas sample bottles and manifold components require passivation surface treatments to minimize the interaction of the hydrogen isotopes with surface contamination on the stainless steel containment materials. This document summarizes the effort to evaluate electroless plated nanodiamond coatings as a passivation layer for stainless steel. In this work, we developed an electroless nanodiamond (ND)-copper (Cu) coating process to deposit ND on stainless steel parts with the diamond loadings of 0%, 25% and 50% v/v in a Cu matrix. The coated Conflat Flanged Vessel Assemblies (CFVAs) were evaluated on surface morphology, composition, ND distribution, residual hydrogen release, and surface reactivity with deuterium. For as-received Cu and ND-Cu coated CFVAs, hydrogen off-gassing is rapid, and the off-gas rates of H2 was one to two orders of magnitude higher than that for both untreated and electropolished stainless steel CFVAs, and hydrogen and deuterium reacted to form HD as well. These results indicated that residual H2 was entrapped in the Cu and ND-Cu coated CFVAs during the coating process, and moisture was adsorbed on the surface, and ND and/or Cu might facilitate catalytic isotope exchange reaction for HD formation. However, hydrocarbons (i.e., CH3) did not form, and did not appear to be an issue for the Cu and ND-Cu coated CFVAs. After vacuum heating, residual H2 and adsorbed H2O in the Cu and ND-Cu coated CFVAs were dramatically reduced. The H2 off-gassing rate after the vacuum treatment of Cu and 50% ND-Cu coated CFVAs was on the level of 10-14 l mbar/s cm2, while H2O off-gas rate was on the level of 10-15 l mbar/s cm2, consistent with the untreated or electropolished stainless steel CFVA, but the HD formation remained. The Restek EP bottle was used as a reference for this work. The Restek Electro-Polished (EP) bottle and their Sil

  18. CORE COMPONENT POT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MARTIN RL; OMBERG RP

    1975-12-19

    The core component pot is an open top vessel used to hold both new and irradiated core components for storage in the IDS and for holding the components submerged in sodium while being trasported inside CLEM. The top of the CCP is equipped with a grapple lip which is engaged by the hoisting grapples. Heat for maintaining the preheat of new components and dissipation of decay heat of irradiated fuel assemblies is conducted between the wall of the pot and the surrounding environment by thermal radiation and convection.

  19. Hot gas path component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Kottilingam, Srikanth Chandrudu; Porter, Christopher Donald; Schick, David Edward

    2017-09-12

    Various embodiments of the disclosure include a turbomachine component. and methods of forming such a component. Some embodiments include a turbomachine component including: a first portion including at least one of a stainless steel or an alloy steel; and a second portion joined with the first portion, the second portion including a nickel alloy including an arced cooling feature extending therethrough, the second portion having a thermal expansion coefficient substantially similar to a thermal expansion coefficient of the first portion, wherein the arced cooling feature is located within the second portion to direct a portion of a coolant to a leakage area of the turbomachine component.

  20. Thermal Spray Coatings for Fusion Applications — Review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Chráska, Pavel; Linke, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2007), s. 64-83 ISSN 1059-9630 Grant - others:-(XE) EFDA Task DV4/04 (TW0; -(XE) EFDA Task TW5-TVM-PSW Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : beryllium * boron carbide * plasma facing components * plasma sprayed coatings * thermonuclear fusion * tungsten Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.204, year: 2007

  1. Antibody Immobilization on Conductive Polymer Coated Nonwoven Fibers for Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    McGraw, Shannon K.; Anderson, Michael J.; Alocilja, Evangelyn C.; Marek, Patrick J.; Kris J. SENECAL; Andre G. SENECAL

    2011-01-01

    This work is being performed to develop rapid and novel electrochemical biosensors for foodborne pathogen detection. This research focuses on electrotextile platforms to perform both capture and sensing functions in a single component. The biosensor uses nonwoven fiber membranes coated with conductive polymer and functionalized with antibodies for biological capture. This study examines three methods for antibody immobilization: passive adsorption, glutaraldehyde cross-linking, and EDC/Sulfo-...

  2. Temperature measurement involving nanostructured thermal barrier coating using a multiwavelength pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    It has been reported that erroneous results were obtained when a conventional pyrometer was used to measure the surface temperature of turbine engine components. Temperatures discrepancies were observed in components which were identical, except that one had its measured surface covered by a nanostructured thermal barrier coating (TBC) whereas the other component's surface was not so coated. These components were placed in an identical environment, receiving identical heat fluxes. A pyrometer measured the TBC covered surface hundreds degrees lower. These coatings were about 25 (mu)m thick, consisting of hundreds of layers of finer structures. The TBC's had very low thermal conductivity, heat flux calculations indicated that the temperatures of the coated surface should exhibit much higher temperature than the uncoated surface. Because these coatings were transparent to radiation from the visible to the infrared region, the temperatures measured by the pyrometer should be the temperature of the covered surface. Turbo components' performance and service life depend critically on the temperatures that it would experience; it is therefore important to know accurately and confidently the real surface temperature. Out of these concerns, an investigation into the measurement of nanostructured material surface temperature was carried out.

  3. The extracellular pollen coat in members of the Brassicaceae: composition, biosynthesis, and functions in pollination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D J

    2006-08-01

    I have used cellular and molecular genetic and bioinformatic approaches to characterise the components of the pollen coat in plants of the family Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis thaliana and several brassicas including Brassica napus, B. oleracea, and B. rapa. The pollen coat in these species is mostly made up of a unique mixture of lipids that is highly enriched in acylated compounds, such as sterol esters and phospholipids. These acyl lipids are characterised by an unusually high degree of saturation. The fatty acids typically contain 70-90% saturated acyl residues such as myristate, palmitate, and stearate. The major sterol components of the pollen coat are saturated fatty acyl esters of stigmasterol, campesterol, and campestdienol. In addition to lipids, the second major component of the pollen coat is a specific group of proteins that is dominated by a family of proteins that we term pollenins. Although pollenins are by far the major protein components of the pollen coat of members of the Brassicaceae, proteomic analysis reveals that there are several additional protein components, including lipases, protein kinases, a pectin esterase, and a caleosin. The biosynthesis of these lipids and proteins and their significance for overall pollen function are reviewed and discussed.

  4. Spacecraft thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaumon, Jean-Claude; Paillous, Alain

    1992-01-01

    The Experiment AO 138-6 was located on the trailing edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility as part of the French Cooperative Payload (FRECOPA) Experiment. It was purely passive in nature: material specimens 2 x 2 cm, independently mounted in sample-holders, with their surface in the same reference plane, were exposed to space. Thirty samples were set in a vacuum-tight canister which was opened in space a few days after LDEF deployment and closed while still in orbit ten months later; twenty-four samples were directly exposed to space for the total flight duration (preflight handling, shuttle bay environment, separation from shuttle, shuttle environment, LEO environment, docking, descent, transfer to KSC). Materials included paints (conductive or nonconductive), SSM's, polymeric films, surface coatings, composite materials, and metals. After sample retrieving, inspection and measurements were carried out in atmospheric laboratory conditions on each sample: observation with binocular lenses and scanning electron microscopy, spectral relectance and transmittance using an integrating sphere in the wavelength range 280-2300 nm, emissivity by the means of a Gier & Dunkle portable reflectometer, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis-x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA-XPS), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) measurements on some selected samples. The results obtained from flight were compared to laboratory data obtained in UV-irradiation tests when these data were available. As a general statement a good spectral concordance is observed for all samples not in the canister so long as air recoveries are taken into account. For one material, the degradation is more important for the sample in the canister than for those of the same material mounted at the surface of the tray; for most samples in the canister the degradation is slightly higher than the one which can be predicted from laboratory standard irradiations. Contamination problems having

  5. Relationship of the syntheses of spore coat protein and parasporal crystal protein in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    OpenAIRE

    Aronson, A I; Tyrell, D J; Fitz-James, P. C.; Bulla, L A

    1982-01-01

    Two major classes of polypeptides were extracted from the spore surface of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki: the 134,000-dalton protoxin that is the major component of the crystalline inclusion and spore coat polypeptides very similar to those found on Bacillus cereus spores. The quantity of spore coat polypeptides produced was reduced when compared with that produced by certain acrystalliferous mutants or by B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis. The latter organism produced an inclusion...

  6. A MICROPOROUS COATING OR STRUCTURE AND A PROCESS FOR PRODUCING IT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A microporous coating or structure is established as a thin metallic layer by deposition of one or more alloys on a metallic substrate, each of said alloys consisting of two or more phases, one of which can be selectively dissolved in a solution that will not significantly attack the other phase...... or phases. Such microporous coatings or structures are useful in the production of various product types, such as fuel cells, catalysts, microfilters, heat exchangers, micro-components and heat transfer devices....

  7. Investigation of microwave transitions and nonlinear magneto-optical rotation in anti-relaxation-coated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budker, D.; Hollberg, L.; Kimball, D.F.; Kitching, J.; Pustclny, S.; Robinson, H.G.; Yashchuk, V.V.

    2004-06-04

    Using laser optical pumping, widths and frequency shifts are determined for microwave transitions between the components of the ground-state hyperfine structure for {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb atoms contained in vapor cells with alkane anti-relaxation coatings. The results are compared with data on Zeeman relaxation obtained in nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) experiments, a comparison important for quantitative understanding of spin-relaxation mechanisms in coated cells. By comparing cells manufactured over a forty-year period we demonstrate the long-term stability of coated cells, which may be useful for atomic clocks and magnetometers.

  8. Microwave transitions and nonlinear magneto-optical rotation in anti-relaxation-coated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budker, Dmitry; Hollberg. Leo; Kimball, Derek F.; Kitching J.; Pustelny Szymon; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2004-08-12

    Using laser optical pumping, widths and frequency shifts are determined for microwave transitions between ground-state hyperfine components of {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb atoms contained in vapor cells with alkane anti-relaxation coatings. The results are compared with data on Zeeman relaxation obtained in nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) experiments, a comparison important for quantitative understanding of spin-relaxation mechanisms in coated cells. By comparing cells manufactured over a forty-year period we demonstrate the long-term stability of coated cells, an important property for atomic clocks and magnetometers.

  9. Potential benefits of a ceramic thermal barrier coating on large power generation gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. S.; Nainiger, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating design option offers benefit in terms of reduced electricity costs when used in utility gas turbines. Options considered include: increased firing temperature, increased component life, reduced cooling air requirements, and increased corrosion resistance (resulting in increased tolerance for dirty fuels). Performance and cost data were obtained. Simple, recuperated and combined cycle applications were considered, and distillate and residual fuels were assumed. The results indicate that thermal barrier coatings could produce large electricity cost savings if these coatings permit turbine operation with residual fuels at distillate-rated firing temperatures. The results also show that increased turbine inlet temperature can result in substantial savings in fuel and capital costs.

  10. Silicon release coating, method of making same, and method of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonczyk, Ralf [Wilmington, DE

    2011-11-22

    A method of making a release coating includes the following steps: forming a mixture that includes (a) solid components comprising (i) 20-99% silicon by weight and (ii) 1-80% silicon nitride by weight and (b) a solvent; applying the mixture to an inner portion of a crucible or graphite board adapted to form an ingot or wafer comprising silicon; and annealing the mixture in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from 1000 to 2000.degree. C. The invention may also relate to release coatings and methods of making a silicon ingot or wafer including the use of a release coating.

  11. Hydroxyapatite coating does not improve uncemented stem survival after total hip arthroplasty!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hailer, Nils P; Lazarinis, Stergios; Mäkelä, Keijo T

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose - It is still being debated whether HA coating of uncemented stems used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) improves implant survival. We therefore investigated different uncemented stem brands, with and without HA coating, regarding early and long-term survival. Patients...... to diagnoses other than osteoarthritis or pediatric hip disease, and procedures with missing information on the type of coating. 22 stem brands remained (which were used in 116,069 procedures) for analysis of revision of any component. 79,192 procedures from Denmark, Norway, and Sweden were analyzed...

  12. Mechanical Properties and Durability of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings in Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladinovich, Daniel S.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings are being developed and tested for use with SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) gas turbine engine components. Several oxide and silicate based compositons are being studied for use as top-coat and intermediate layers in a three or more layer environmental barrier coating system. Specifically, the room temperature Vickers-indentation-fracture-toughness testing and high-temperature stability reaction studies with Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS or "sand") are being conducted using advanced testing techniques such as high pressure burner rig tests as well as high heat flux laser tests.

  13. Coating Carbon Fibers With Platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Duncan, Peter; Coupland, Duncan; Rigali, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    A process for coating carbon fibers with platinum has been developed. The process may also be adaptable to coating carbon fibers with other noble and refractory metals, including rhenium and iridium. The coated carbon fibers would be used as ingredients of matrix/fiber composite materials that would resist oxidation at high temperatures. The metal coats would contribute to oxidation resistance by keeping atmospheric oxygen away from fibers when cracks form in the matrices. Other processes that have been used to coat carbon fibers with metals have significant disadvantages: Metal-vapor deposition processes yield coats that are nonuniform along both the lengths and the circumferences of the fibers. The electrical resistivities of carbon fibers are too high to be compatible with electrolytic processes. Metal/organic vapor deposition entails the use of expensive starting materials, it may be necessary to use a furnace, and the starting materials and/or materials generated in the process may be hazardous. The present process does not have these disadvantages. It yields uniform, nonporous coats and is relatively inexpensive. The process can be summarized as one of pretreatment followed by electroless deposition. The process consists of the following steps: The surfaces of the fiber are activated by deposition of palladium crystallites from a solution. The surface-activated fibers are immersed in a solution that contains platinum. A reducing agent is used to supply electrons to effect a chemical reduction in situ. The chemical reduction displaces the platinum from the solution. The displaced platinum becomes deposited on the fibers. Each platinum atom that has been deposited acts as a catalytic site for the deposition of another platinum atom. Hence, the deposition process can also be characterized as autocatalytic. The thickness of the deposited metal can be tailored via the duration of immersion and the chemical activity of the solution.

  14. Development of the M2A1 Container Coatings ECP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-11

    52891 Acrylic E-Coat Urethane Powder Results APPLICATION Low End One-Coat Dip Enamel High End One-Coat Electrocoat High End One-Coat Top Coat Cure...Properties Data MIL-E-52891 Acrylic E-Coat Urethane Powder Results APPLICATION Low End One-Coat Dip Enamel High End One-Coat Electrocoat High End One-Coat...To complete a finishing cost analysis for painting ammunition containers. Compare equipment, layout and operating costs for Electrocoat and powder

  15. A Novel Approach for Dry Powder Coating of Pellets with Ethylcellulose. Part II: Evaluation of Caffeine Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, Beatrice; Melegari, Cecilia; Bertoni, Serena; Dolci, Luisa Stella; Passerini, Nadia

    2018-02-13

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and the capability of a novel ethylcellulose-based dry-coating system to obtain prolonged and stable release profiles of caffeine-loaded pellets. Lauric and oleic acids at a suitable proportion were used to plasticize ethylcellulose. The effect of coating level, percentage of drug loading, inert core particle size, and composition of the coating formulation including the anti-sticking agent on the drug release profile were fully investigated. A coating level of 15% w/w was the maximum layered amount which could modify the drug release. The best controlled drug release was obtained by atomizing talc (2.5% w/w) together with the solid plasticizer during the dry powder-coating process. SEM pictures revealed a substantial drug re-crystallization on the pellet surface, and the release studies evidenced that caffeine diffused through the plasticized polymer acting as pore former. Therefore, the phenomenon of caffeine migration across the coating layer had a strong influence on the permeability of the coating membrane. Comparing dry powder-coated pellets to aqueous film-coated ones, drug migration happened during storage, though more sustained release profiles were obtained. The developed dry powder-coating process enabled the production of stable caffeine sustained release pellets. Surprisingly, the release properties of the dry-coated pellets were mainly influenced by the way of addition of talc into the dry powder-coating blend and by the drug nature and affinity to the coating components. It would be interesting to study the efficacy of novel coating system using a different API.

  16. Improvement in energy release properties of boron-based propellant by oxidant coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Daolun; Liu, Jianzhong, E-mail: jzliu@zju.edu.cn; Chen, Binghong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-08-20

    Highlights: • NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4}, KNO{sub 3}, KClO{sub 4} and HMX coated B were used to prepare propellant samples. • FTIR, XRD and SEM were used for the microstructure analysis of the prepared B. • Thermal oxidation and combustion characteristics of the propellants were studied. • HMX coating was the most beneficial to the energy release of the samples. - Abstract: The energy release properties of a propellant can be improved by coating boron (B) particles with oxidants. In the study, B was coated with four different oxidants, namely, NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4}, KNO{sub 3}, LiClO{sub 4}, and cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), and the corresponding propellant samples were prepared. First, the structural and morphological analyses of the pretreated B were carried out. Then, the thermal analysis and laser ignition experiments of the propellant samples were carried out. Coating with NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} showed a better performance than mechanical mixing with the same component. Coating with KNO{sub 3} efficiently improved the ignition characteristics of the samples. Coating with LiClO{sub 4} was the most beneficial in reducing the degree of difficulty of B oxidation. Coating with HMX was the most beneficial in the heat release of the samples. The KNO{sub 3}-coated sample had a very high combustion intensity in the beginning, but then it rapidly became weak. Large amounts of sparks were ejected during the combustion of the LiClO{sub 4}-coated sample. The HMX-coated sample had the longest self-sustaining combustion time (4332 ms) and the highest average combustion temperature (1163.92 °C).

  17. Investigation of Sol-Gel coatings exposed in the condenser at Fynsvaerket. Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, M. [DTU Mekanik, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Vilhelmsen, T. [Vattenfall Heat Nordic, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2009-05-15

    The Danish Technological Institute (DTI) has developed a technique using Hybrid Solgel nanotechnology to produce coatings which can change the surface characteristics of various components. It is the purpose of this project to investigate where such coatings can be utilised in the power generating industry with respect to fouling and corrosion resistance. The initial results with sol-gel coatings on the condenser tubes at Fysnvaerket showed that due to the presence of corrosion products on the unexposed tubes which influences the adherence and protectiveness of coatings applied, the effect of sol-gel coatings was difficult to assess. Further specimens were tested where the outer surface had been mechanically cleaned by sand blasting or by grinding and polishing. The results of 3 months exposure in the condenser plate at the outlet (hottest part of condenser) has been reported. Many coatings showed the anti-fouling effect, however closer inspection with scanning electron microscopy revealed cracks in the coating and oxide below the coating indicating the coating was permeable to corrosive species. The specimens described in this report are from the cold side of the condenser after 1 year's exposure. Due to lack of time, the assessment is based on visual assessment and light optical microscopy. Two different sol-gel coatings have been applied to brass and titanium condenser tubes about 10 cm in length. Based on the experience from previous exposures, the surface of the condenser tubes was mechanically cleaned before coating with the sol-gel components. One set was sandblasted and the other set was grinded to a polished finish using sandpaper. The specimens grinded and polished were exposed tubes that had been removed from the condenser. Investigations of unexposed cleaned condenser tubes with and without sol-gel have been reported previously. Before application of the coatings, the tubes were mechanically cleaned either by sandblasting or by grinding to a

  18. Discriminant Incoherent Component Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgakis, Christos; Panagakis, Yannis; Pantic, Maja

    Face images convey rich information which can be perceived as a superposition of low-complexity components associated with attributes, such as facial identity, expressions, and activation of facial action units (AUs). For instance, low-rank components characterizing neutral facial images are

  19. Ion Beam Sputtered Coatings of Bioglass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hench, Larry L.; Wilson, J.; Ruzakowski, Patricia Henrietta Anne

    1982-01-01

    The ion beam sputtering technique available at the NASA-Lewis was used to apply coatings of bioglass to ceramic, metallic, and polymeric substrates. Experiments in vivo and in vitro described investigate these coatings. Some degree of substrate masking was obtained in all samples although stability and reactivity equivalent to bulk bioglass was not observed in all coated samples. Some degree of stability was seen in all coated samples that were reacted in vitro. Both metallic and ceramic substrates coated in this manner failed to show significantly improved coatings over those obtained with existing techniques. Implantation of the coated ceramic substrate samples in bone gave no definite bonding as seen with bulk glass; however, partial and patchy bonding was seen. Polymeric substrates in these studies showed promise of success. The coatings applied were sufficient to mask the underlying reactive test surface and tissue adhesion of collagen to bioglass was seen. Hydrophilic, hydrophobic, charged, and uncharged polymeric surfaces were successfully coated.

  20. Simulation and experimental study of CVD process for low temperature nanocrystalline silicon carbide coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushal, Amit; Prakash, Jyoti, E-mail: jprakash@barc.gov.in; Dasgupta, Kinshuk; Chakravartty, Jayanta K.

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Parametric simulation was carried out for specially designed CVD reactor. • Effect of fluid velocity, heat flow and concentration were studied in CVD reactor. • Coating study carried out using low temperature and environmental safe CVD process. • Dense and uniform nanocrystalline SiC film was coated on zircaloy substrate. - Abstract: There is a huge requirement for development of a coating technique in nuclear industry, which is environmentally safe, economical and applicable to large scale components. In this view, simulation of gas-phase behavior in specially designed CVD reactor was carried out using computational tool, COMSOL. There were two important zones in CVD reactor first one is precursor vaporization zone and second one is coating zone. Optimized parameters for coating were derived from the simulation of gas phase dynamics in both zone of CVD reactor. The overall effect of fluid velocity, heat flow and concentration profile showed that Re = 54 is the optimum reaction condition for uniform coating in CVD system. In CVD coating experiments a synthesized halogen free, non-toxic and non-corrosive silicon carbide precursor was used. Uniform coating of SiC was obtained on zircaloy substrate at 900 °C using as synthesized organosilicon precursor. The X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis show that dense nano crystalline SiC film was deposited on zircaloy substrate.

  1. Isolation of nuclear proteins from flax (Linum usitatissimum L. seed coats for gene expression regulation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renouard Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While seed biology is well characterized and numerous studies have focused on this subject over the past years, the regulation of seed coat development and metabolism is for the most part still non-elucidated. It is well known that the seed coat has an essential role in seed development and its features are associated with important agronomical traits. It also constitutes a rich source of valuable compounds such as pharmaceuticals. Most of the cell genetic material is contained in the nucleus; therefore nuclear proteins constitute a major actor for gene expression regulation. Isolation of nuclear proteins responsible for specific seed coat expression is an important prerequisite for understanding seed coat metabolism and development. The extraction of nuclear proteins may be problematic due to the presence of specific components that can interfere with the extraction process. The seed coat is a rich source of mucilage and phenolics, which are good examples of these hindering compounds. Findings In the present study, we propose an optimized nuclear protein extraction protocol able to provide nuclear proteins from flax seed coat without contaminants and sufficient yield and quality for their use in transcriptional gene expression regulation by gel shift experiments. Conclusions Routinely, around 250 μg of nuclear proteins per gram of fresh weight were extracted from immature flax seed coats. The isolation protocol described hereafter may serve as an effective tool for gene expression regulation and seed coat-focused proteomics studies.

  2. Atomic force microscopy analysis and confocal Raman microimaging of coated pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringqvist, Ann; Taylor, Lynne S; Ekelund, Katarina; Ragnarsson, Gert; Engström, Sven; Axelsson, Anders

    2003-11-28

    Polymer-coated pellets with different coating thicknesses have been studied regarding coating morphology and drug release properties with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal Raman microscopy. The results were compared with those from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and drug release profiles, which have been measured previously for these systems and found to vary depending on coating thickness. Results from AFM studies indicated that these pellets differ in the amount of crystalline material on the surface of the coating. The amount was found to be highest on the pellet with the thinnest coating. Confocal Raman microscopy studies confirmed that the active component (remoxipride hydrochloride monohydrate) is present at or close to the surface and that the amount is higher for the thinnest coating. AFM studies in aqueous media showed that the crystalline material on the surface was almost instantaneously dissolved and released into the liquid. AFM has proven to be a powerful tool in the study of the surface of dry formulations and in the study of the controlled release mechanism of a pharmaceutical in a liquid cell. The method can be combined with Raman, giving the added possibility to identify the chemical composition in selected small areas of the coating surface.

  3. Microstructure of Al-Si Slurry Coatings on Austenitic High-Temperature Creep Resisting Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka E. Kochmańska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of microstructural examinations on slurry aluminide coatings using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction. Aluminide coatings were produced in air atmosphere on austenitic high-temperature creep resisting cast steel. The function of aluminide coatings is the protection of the equipment components against the high-temperature corrosion in a carburising atmosphere under thermal shock conditions. The obtained coatings had a multilayered structure composed of intermetallic compounds. The composition of newly developed slurry was powders of aluminium and silicon; NaCl, KCl, and NaF halide salts; and a water solution of a soluble glass as an inorganic binder. The application of the inorganic binder in the slurry allowed to produce the coatings in one single step without additional annealing at an intermediate temperature as it is when applied organic binder. The coatings were formed on both: the ground surface and on the raw cast surface. The main technological parameters were temperature (732–1068°C and time of annealing (3.3–11.7 h and the Al/Si ratio (4–14 in the slurry. The rotatable design was used to evaluate the effect of the production parameters on the coatings thickness. The correlation between the technological parameters and the coating structure was determined.

  4. Self-healing Characteristics of Collagen Coatings with Respect to Surface Abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-01-01

    A coating based on collagen with self-healing properties was developed for applications in mechanical components that are prone to abrasion due to contact with a counter surface. The inherent swelling behavior of collagen in water was exploited as the fundamental mechanism behind self-healing of a wear scar formed on the surface. The effects of freeze-drying process and water treatment of the collagen coatings on their mechanical and self-healing properties were analyzed. Water was also used as the medium to trigger the self-healing effect of the collagen coatings after the wear test. It was found that collagen coatings without freeze-drying did not demonstrate any self-healing effect whereas the coatings treated by freeze-drying process showed remarkable self-healing effect. Overall, collagen coatings that were freeze-dried and water treated showed the best friction and self-healing properties. Repeated self-healing ability of these coatings with respect to wear scar was also demonstrated. It was also confirmed that the self-healing property of the collagen coating was effective over a relatively wide range of temperature. PMID:27010967

  5. Surface free energies of electroless Ni-P based composite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Abel, E. W.

    2005-02-01

    Surface free energy of a solid surface gives a direct measure of intermolecular interactions at interfaces and has a strong influence on adsorption and adhesion behaviour. However few data are available for the surface free energies of electroless Ni-P based composition coatings. In this paper, the electroless Ni-P, Ni-P-surfactant, Ni-Cu-P, Ni-P-PTFE and Ni-Cu-P-PTFE composite coatings were prepared under various coating conditions. The chemical compositions, surface morphology and thickness of the coatings were measured using an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a digital micrometer respectively. The contact angles of water, diiodomethane and ethylene glycol on the coatings were measured automatically using dataphysics OCA-20 contact angle analyser. The surface free energy of the coatings and their components (e.g. dispersion, polar or acid/base portions) were calculated using various methods. The experimental results showed that the incorporation of surfactant or PTFE particles into Ni-P matrixes has a significant influence on the surface free energy of the coatings, while the incorporation of copper into Ni-P matrixes has no significant influence on the surface free energy of the coatings.

  6. Surface free energies of electroless Ni-P based composite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Q. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Nethergate, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: q.zhao@dundee.ac.uk; Liu, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Nethergate, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Abel, E.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Nethergate, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-15

    Surface free energy of a solid surface gives a direct measure of intermolecular interactions at interfaces and has a strong influence on adsorption and adhesion behaviour. However few data are available for the surface free energies of electroless Ni-P based composition coatings. In this paper, the electroless Ni-P, Ni-P-surfactant, Ni-Cu-P, Ni-P-PTFE and Ni-Cu-P-PTFE composite coatings were prepared under various coating conditions. The chemical compositions, surface morphology and thickness of the coatings were measured using an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a digital micrometer respectively. The contact angles of water, diiodomethane and ethylene glycol on the coatings were measured automatically using dataphysics OCA-20 contact angle analyser. The surface free energy of the coatings and their components (e.g. dispersion, polar or acid/base portions) were calculated using various methods. The experimental results showed that the incorporation of surfactant or PTFE particles into Ni-P matrixes has a significant influence on the surface free energy of the coatings, while the incorporation of copper into Ni-P matrixes has no significant influence on the surface free energy of the coatings.

  7. Coating with Autologous Plasma Improves Biocompatibility of Mesh Grafts In Vitro: Development Stage of a Surgical Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Gerullis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate mesh coating modalities with autologous blood components in a recently developed in vitro test system for biocompatibility assessment of alloplastic materials. Materials and Methods. Seven different mesh types, currently used in various indications, were randomly investigated. Meshes were coated prior to cultivation with autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, platelets, and blood plasma. Pretreated meshes were incubated over 6 weeks in a minced tissue assay, representative for fibroblasts, muscle cells, and endothelial cells originating from 10 different patients. Adherence of those tissues on the meshes was microscopically investigated and semiquantitatively assessed using a previously described scoring system. Results. Coating with peripheral blood mononuclear cells did not affect the adherence score, whereas coating with platelets and blood plasma increased the score suggesting improved biocompatibility in vitro. The previous ranking of native meshes remained consistent after coating. Conclusion. Plasma coating of meshes improves their biocompatibility score in a novel in vitro test system.

  8. Large area precision optical coatings by pulse magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frach, Peter; Gloess, Daniel; Goschurny, Thomas; Drescher, Andy; Hartung, Ullrich; Bartzsch, Hagen; Heisig, Andreas; Grune, Harald; Leischnig, Lothar; Leischnig, Steffen; Bundesmann, Carsten

    2017-05-01

    Pulse magnetron sputtering is very well suited for the deposition of optical coatings. Due to energetic activation during film growth, sputtered films are dense, smooth and show an excellent environmental stability. Films of materials like SiO2, Al2O3, Nb2O5 or Ta2O5 can be produced with very little absorption and scattering losses and are well suited for precision optics. FEP's coating plant PreSensLine, a deposition machine dedicated for the development and deposition of precision optical layer systems will be presented. The coating machine (VON ARDENNE) is equipped with dual magnetron systems (type RM by FEP). Concepts regarding machine design, process technology and process control as well as in situ monitoring are presented to realize the high demands on uniformity, accuracy and reproducibility. Results of gradient and multilayer type precision optical coatings are presented. Application examples are edge filters and special antireflective coatings for the backlight of 3D displays with substrate size up to 300 x 400mm. The machine allows deposition of rugate type gradient layers by rotating a rotary table with substrates between two sources of the dual magnetron system. By combination of the precision drive (by LSA) for the substrate movement and a special pulse parameter variation during the deposition process (available with the pulse unit UBS-C2 of FEP), it is possible to adjust the deposition rate as a function of the substrate position exactly. The aim of a current development is a technology for the uniform coating of 3D-substrates and freeform components as well as laterally graded layers.

  9. Anodic-modified anticorrosive coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Steel machine parts are exposed to electrochemical corrosion. This applies to many environments including atmosphere, soil, water, and even various fertilizers. High-carbon steel and low-alloyed steel are not stable (in terms of thermo-dynamics, do not feature effective passivation, and even the corrosion products do not form a stable protection layer. As a result, special anti-corrosion protection is critical. In heavy-corrosion environment, paint systems containing Zn have proven to be very effective. Presented text describes verification of paint systems with high Zn content and compares them to galvanic Zn coatings. Steel samples with protective coatings have been tested in condensation chamber with neutral salt-spray. This way, corrosion resistance of Zn-rich paint systems and galvanic Zn coatings has been evaluated and compared. Galvanic Zn-coatings have shown complete decomposition during the chamber exposition. Thus, further testing was adopted for paint systems only with a special attention being paid to gradual degradation of anti-corrosion layer. Final part of the text lists reasons of coating degradation process and outlines possible solutions of the issue.

  10. Engineered Polymer Composites Through Electrospun Nanofiber Coating of Fiber Tows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Bakis, Charles; Williams, Tiffany S.; Johnston, James C.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Composite materials offer significant weight savings in many aerospace applications. The toughness of the interface of fibers crossing at different angles often determines failure of composite components. A method for toughening the interface in fabric and filament wound components using directly electrospun thermoplastic nanofiber on carbon fiber tow is presented. The method was first demonstrated with limited trials, and then was scaled up to a continuous lab scale process. Filament wound tubes were fabricated and tested using unmodified baseline towpreg material and nanofiber coated towpreg.

  11. Chromate conversion coatings and their current application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes formation, composition and possible production technologies of application chromate coatings. Summation of common examples of applications of these coatings in corrosion protection of metals and alloys is provided. Individual chromate coatings are divided by their dominant anions either with CrVI or CrIII. Restrictions of chromate coatings with dominantly CrVI and related toxicity of hexavalent chromium is discussed in detail. In conclusion, examples of both chromium and other, alternative coatings are summed up. Application of these coatings as a protection for concrete hot-dip galvanized reinforcement is also reviewed.

  12. Improvement of Interaction in a Composite Structure by Using a Sol-Gel Functional Coating on Carbon Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Anna; Barcikowski, Michał; Leluk, Karol; Babiarczuk, Bartosz; Kaleta, Jerzy; Krzak, Justyna

    2017-08-25

    The modification of carbon fibers for improving adhesion between fibers and an epoxy resin in composite materials has become the focus of attention. In this work the carbon fiber coating process has been devised in a way preventing the stiffening and clumping of fibers. To improve interactions between coated fibers and a resin in composites, four types of silica coatings with different organic functional groups (3-aminopropyl-coating 1, 3-mercaptopropyl-coating 2, 2-(3,4-epoxycyclohexyl) ethyl-coating 3, methyl-coating 4) were obtained. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to distinguish the changes of a carbon fibers surface after coating deposition. The thickness of the obtained coatings, including the diversity of thickness, was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The increase in surface free energy (SFE) of modified fibers, including the distinction between the polar and dispersive parts, was examined by wettability measurements using a tensometric test. The developed coating preparation process allowed to cover fibers separately with nanoscale silica layers, which changed their morphology. The introduction of organic functional groups resulted in surface free energy changes, especially an increase in specific polar surface energy components.

  13. Scientific Software Component Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, S.; Dykman, N.; Kumfert, G.; Smolinski, B.

    2000-02-16

    We are developing new software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address issues of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology enables cross-project code re-use, reduces software development costs, and provides additional simulation capabilities for massively parallel laboratory application codes. The success of our approach will be measured by its impact on DOE mathematical and scientific software efforts. Thus, we are collaborating closely with library developers and application scientists in the Common Component Architecture forum, the Equation Solver Interface forum, and other DOE mathematical software groups to gather requirements, write and adopt a variety of design specifications, and develop demonstration projects to validate our approach. Numerical simulation is essential to the science mission at the laboratory. However, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage the complexity of modern simulation software. Computational scientists develop complex, three-dimensional, massively parallel, full-physics simulations that require the integration of diverse software packages written by outside development teams. Currently, the integration of a new software package, such as a new linear solver library, can require several months of effort. Current industry component technologies such as CORBA, JavaBeans, and COM have all been used successfully in the business domain to reduce software development costs and increase software quality. However, these existing industry component infrastructures will not scale to support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. In particular, they do not address issues related to high-performance parallel computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections between components, language interoperability for scientific languages such as Fortran, parallel data redistribution between components, and massively

  14. Mixed zirconia calcium phosphate coatings for dental implants: Tailoring coating stability and bioactivity potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardun, Karoline [University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Treccani, Laura, E-mail: treccani@uni-bremen.de [University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Volkmann, Eike [University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Streckbein, Philipp [University Hospital, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Department of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Klinikstrasse 33, 35385 Giessen (Germany); Heiss, Christian [University Hospital of Giessen-Marburg, Department of Trauma Surgery, Rudolf-Buchheim-Strasse 7, 35385 Giessen, Germany, (Germany); Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Kerkraderstrasse 9, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Destri, Giovanni Li; Marletta, Giovanni [Laboratory for Molecular Surfaces and Nanotechnology (LAMSUN), Department of Chemistry, University of Catania and CSGI, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Rezwan, Kurosch [University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Enhanced coating stability and adhesion are essential for long-term success of orthopedic and dental implants. In this study, the effect of coating composition on mechanical, physico-chemical and biological properties of coated zirconia specimens is investigated. Zirconia discs and dental screw implants are coated using the wet powder spraying (WPS) technique. The coatings are obtained by mixing yttria-stabilized zirconia (TZ) and hydroxyapatite (HA) in various ratios while a pure HA coating served as reference material. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical profilometer analysis confirm a similar coating morphology and roughness for all studied coatings, whereas the coating stability can be tailored with composition and is probed by insertion and dissections experiments in bovine bone with coated zirconia screw implants. An increasing content of calcium phosphate (CP) resulted in a decrease of mechanical and chemical stability, while the bioactivity increased in simulated body fluid (SBF). In vitro experiments with human osteoblast cells (HOB) revealed that the cells grew well on all samples but are affected by dissolution behavior of the studied coatings. This work demonstrates the overall good mechanical strength, the excellent interfacial bonding and the bioactivity potential of coatings with higher TZ contents, which provide a highly interesting coating for dental implants. - Highlights: • Different ratios of zirconia (TZ) and calcium phosphate (CP) were deposited on zirconia substrates. • Enhancement of TZ content in mixed coatings increased coating stability. • Enhancement of CP content in mixed coatings increased bioactivity. • All tested coating compositions were non-toxic.

  15. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (plastics. One possible way of processing nanoceramic coatings at low temperatures (plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  16. Explosives detection using nanoporous coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, María P.; Pellejero, Ismael; Urbiztondo, Miguel; Sesé, Javier; Santamaría, J.

    2011-06-01

    Zeolite-coated cantilevers provided with internal heating elements have been developed and used for the selective detection of nitroderivates, in particular o-nitrotoluene as an example of an explosive-related molecule. In particular, Co exchanged commercial BEA zeolites have been deployed of rectangular Si cantilevers by microdropping technique. In particular, two different strategies have been demonstrated to increase the zeolite modified cantilevers performance: the sensing coating and the operating temperature. As a result, o-nitrotoluene LOD values below 1 ppm are attained at room temperature conditions; whereas the interference of toluene at concentrations below 1000 ppm is completely suppressed by heating the cantilever.

  17. Testing Cadmium-Free Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    Metallic Platings • Zinc (Zn) • Nickel (Ni) • Zinc Nickel (ZnNi) • Tin Zinc (SnZn) “ Paint -like” Coatings • Zinc-Rich • Magnesium-Rich • Zinc Aluminum-Rich...None of these match all properties of Cd 6 OPSEC approved for public release Fastener Coating Issues Cont’d Siloxane/Polysiloxane  Silicate ...Polymer-based Zirconium-based These passivation chemistries do not match all properties of Cr6+ Either paint adhesion is reduced Or Corrosion protection

  18. Corrosion-resistant coating development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, D.M.; Martin, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    SiC-based heat exchangers have been identified as the prime candidate material for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants. Unfortunately, hot corrosion of the SiC-based materials created by alkali metal salts present in the combustion gases dictates the need for corrosion-resistant coatings. The well-documented corrosion resistance of CS-50 combined with its low (and tailorable) coefficient of thermal expansion and low modulus makes CS-50 an ideal candidate for this application. Coatings produced by gelcasting and traditional particulate processing have been evaluated.

  19. Towards Cognitive Component Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Ahrendt, Peter; Larsen, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive component analysis (COCA) is here defined as the process of unsupervised grouping of data such that the ensuing group structure is well-aligned with that resulting from human cognitive activity. We have earlier demonstrated that independent components analysis is relevant for representi...... semantics, not only in text, but also in dynamic text (chat), images, and combinations of text and images. Here we further expand on the relevance of the ICA model for representing context, including two new analyzes of abstract data: social networks and musical features.......Cognitive component analysis (COCA) is here defined as the process of unsupervised grouping of data such that the ensuing group structure is well-aligned with that resulting from human cognitive activity. We have earlier demonstrated that independent components analysis is relevant for representing...

  20. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  1. Nonlinear Principal Component Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    de Leeuw, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Two quite different forms of nonlinear principal component analysis have been proposed in the literature. The first one is associated with the names of Guttman, Burt, Hayashi, Benzécri, McDonald, De Leeuw, Hill, Nishisato. We call it multiple correspondence analysis. The second form has been discussed by Kruskal, Shepard, Roskam, Takane, Young, De Leeuw, Winsberg, Ramsay. We call it nonmetric principal component analysis. The two forms have been related and combined, both geometricall...

  2. Thick ceramic coating technique. Atsuniku ceramic coating gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sata, N. (Government Industrial Reserach Institute, Tohoku, Sendai (Japan))

    1987-10-15

    This paper describes a thick ceramic coating technique that uses a reactive bonding process. This process coats interior of a metallic cylinder or surface of a metal having optional curvature with thick (2 mm to 3 mm) ceramics composed mainly of alumina. The process features easiness in coating and simplicity of the equipment. Reactive heat generated from thermit reaction melts iron and alumina as the reaction products, and produces molten ceramics which is cooled on the metal surface to deposit and solidify as a ceramics layer, thus completing the synthesis and the coating in one process. Its application fields would include reaction tubes, abrasive fluid tubes, and high-temperature fluid tubes that can utilize the ceramics' resistance to abrasion, corrosion and heat as well as heat insulation. The ceramics layer has a hardness of about Hv 1500 and porosity from 2 to 3%. The bonding strength between the substrate metal and the ceramics layer can achieve 10 MPa to 20 MPa as a result of surface oxidation treatment and cooling treatment given initially to prevent the outer wall temperature from rising. 2 figs.

  3. Circuit bridging of components by smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.J.; Nowlen, S.P.; Anderson, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Smoke can adversely affect digital electronics; in the short term, it can lead to circuit bridging and in the long term to corrosion of metal parts. This report is a summary of the work to date and component-level tests by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the impact of smoke on digital instrumentation and control equipment. The component tests focused on short-term effects such as circuit bridging in typical components and the factors that can influence how much the smoke will affect them. These factors include the component technology and packaging, physical board protection, and environmental conditions such as the amount of smoke, temperature of burn, and humidity level. The likelihood of circuit bridging was tested by measuring leakage currents and converting those currents to resistance in ohms. Hermetically sealed ceramic packages were more resistant to smoke than plastic packages. Coating the boards with an acrylic spray provided some protection against circuit bridging. The smoke generation factors that affect the resistance the most are humidity, fuel level, and burn temperature. The use of CO{sub 2} as a fire suppressant, the presence of galvanic metal, and the presence of PVC did not significantly affect the outcome of these results.

  4. Metabolic markers and microecological characteristics of tongue coating in patients with chronic gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), tongue diagnosis has been an important diagnostic method for the last 3000 years. Tongue diagnosis is a non-invasive, simple and valuable diagnostic tool. TCM treats the tongue coating on a very sensitive scale that reflects physiological and pathological changes in the organs, especially the spleen and stomach. Tongue coating can diagnose disease severity and determine the TCM syndrome (“Zheng” in Chinese). The biological bases of different tongue coating appearances are still poorly understood and lack systematic investigation at the molecular level. Methods Tongue coating samples were collected from 70 chronic gastritis patients and 20 normal controls. 16S rRNA denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (16S rRNA–DGGE) and liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC–MS) were designed to profile tongue coatings. The statistical techniques used were principal component analysis and partial least squares–discriminate analysis. Results Ten potential metabolites or markers were found in chronic gastritis patients, including UDP-D-galactose, 3-ketolactose, and vitamin D2, based on LC–MS. Eight significantly different strips were observed in samples from chronic gastritis patients based on 16S rRNA–DGGE. Two strips, Strips 8 and 10, were selected for gene sequencing. Strip 10 sequencing showed a 100% similarity to Rothia mucilaginosa. Strip 8 sequencing showed a 96.2% similarity to Moraxella catarrhalis. Conclusions Changes in glucose metabolism could possibly form the basis of tongue coating conformation in chronic gastritis patients. The study revealed important connections between metabolic components, microecological components and tongue coating in chronic gastritis patients. Compared with other diagnostic regimens, such as blood tests or tissue biopsies, tongue coating is more amenable to, and more convenient for, both patients and doctors. PMID:24041039

  5. Hardness and microplasticity of nanocrystalline and amorphous calcium phosphate coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ievlev, V. M.; Kostyuchenko, A. V.; Darinskii, B. M.; Barinov, S. M.

    2014-02-01

    The hardness of thin (1.0-4.0 μm) hydroxyapatite coatings with different structures (nanocrystalline, amorphous-crystalline, and amorphous) grown by rf magnetron sputtering on Ti and Si plates has been studied using the nanoindentation method. All the grown structures are characterized by the strain which has reversible and irreversible components. The hardness of nanocrystalline coatings (about 10 GPa) corresponds to the average hardness of hydroxyapatite single crystals. The structure of nanocrystalline coatings in the indentation zone and outside it has been investigated and changes in the structure under the indenter have been revealed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. From a comparison of the hardnesses of coatings with different structures and based on an analysis of the intragranular structure, it has been assumed that the plastic deformation occurs according to a dislocation-free mechanism. The plastic deformation is interpreted in terms of the cluster representation of the hydroxyapatite structure and amorphous calcium phosphates of the same elemental composition and cluster-boundary sliding during the deformation.

  6. Crystal coating via spray drying to improve powder tabletability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoorne, V; Peeters, E; Van Snick, B; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2014-11-01

    A continuous crystal coating method was developed to improve both flowability and tabletability of powders. The method includes the introduction of solid, dry particles into an atomized spray during spray drying in order to coat and agglomerate individual particles. Paracetamol was used as a model drug as it exhibits poor flowability and high capping tendency upon compaction. The particle size enlargement and flowability were evaluated by the mean median particle size and flow index of the resulting powders. The crystal coating coprocessing method was successful for the production of powders containing 75% paracetamol with excellent tableting properties. However, the extent of agglomeration achieved during coprocessing was limited. Tablets compressed on a rotary tablet press in manual mode showed excellent compression properties without capping tendency. A formulation with 75% paracetamol, 5% PVP and 20% amorphous lactose yielded a tensile strength of 1.9 MPa at a compression pressure of 288 MPa. The friability of tablets compressed at 188 MPa was only 0.6%. The excellent tabletability of this formulation was attributed to the coating of paracetamol crystals with amorphous lactose and PVP through coprocessing and the presence of brittle and plastic components in the formulation. The coprocessing method was also successfully applied for the production of directly compressible lactose showing improved tensile strength and friability in comparison to a spray dried direct compression lactose grade.

  7. Collagen-lactoferrin fibrillar coatings enhance osteoblast proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandrovcova, Marta; Douglas, Timothy E L; Heinemann, Sascha; Scharnweber, Dieter; Dubruel, Peter; Bacakova, Lucie

    2015-02-01

    Lactoferrin is a milk-derived glycoprotein with anabolic effects on the bone tissue. In this study, artificial extracellular matrices (aECM) consisting of collagen type I fibrils formed in the presence of lactoferrin at two different concentrations (0.5 and 1 mg mL(-1) ) were prepared on the surface of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) foils. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of aECM on the adhesion, growth and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. On days 1 and 3 after seeding, higher numbers of cells were found on samples with collagen and collagen-lactoferrin coatings (particularly on those formed at the higher concentration of lacroferrin) than on control microscopic glass coverslips. Cells on coatings formed in the presence of lactoferrin had more numerous and better developed vinculin-containing focal adhesion plaques. On day 7, cells on coatings with and without lactoferrin produced significantly higher levels of osteocalcin than cells on control polystyrene cell culture dishes, the highest average values being found on samples with the lower concentration of lactoferrin. Expression of collagen I and alkaline phosphatase was on a similar level in cells on all tested samples and control polystyrene. Thus, lactoferrin promotes adhesion, growth and osteogenic differentiation of Saos-2 cells and is promising as a bone implant coating component. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effect of carbon coating on scuffing performance in diesel fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajayi, O. O.; Alzoubi, M. F.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    2000-06-29

    Low-sulfur and low-aromatic diesel fuels are being introduced in order to reduce various types of emissions in diesel engines to levels in compliance with current and impending US federal regulations. The low lubricity of these fuels, however, poses major reliability and durability problems for fuel injection components that depend on diesel fuel for their lubrication. In the present study, the authors evaluated the scuff resistance of surfaces in regular diesel fuel containing 500 ppm sulfur and in Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel fuel containing no sulfur or aromatics. Tests were conducted with the high frequency reciprocating test rig (HFRR) using 52100 steel balls and H-13 tool-steel flats with and without Argonne's special carbon coatings. Test results showed that the sulfur-containing fuels provide about 20% higher scuffing resistance than does fuel without sulfur. Use of the carbon coating on the flat increased scuffing resistance in both regular and synthetic fuels by about ten times, as measured by the contact severity index at scuffing. Scuffing failure in tests conducted with coated surfaces did not occur until the coating had been removed by the two distinct mechanisms of spalling and wear.

  9. Durable Dust Repellent Coating for Metals Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Durable Dust Repellent Coating (DDRC) consists of nano-phase silica, titania, or other oxide coatings to repel dust in a vacuum environment over a wide range of...

  10. Coated woven materials and method of preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreary, W.J.; Carroll, D.W.

    Coating of woven materials so that not only the outer surfaces are coated has been a problem. Now, a solution to that problem is by coating with materials, with metals or with pyrolytic carbon. Materials are deposited in Chemical Vapor Deposition (CND) reactions using a fluidized bed so that the porosity of the woven materials is retained and the tiny filaments which make up the strands which are woven (including inner as well as outer filaments) are substantially uniformly coated.

  11. Thermal barrier coating system having improved adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.; Sovey, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    The adherence between a ceramic thermal barrier coating and a metal bond coating is improved by ion sputtering a ceramic film on the bond cost. A ceramic thermal barrier coating is then plasma-sprayed onto this primer film. This improves the integrity and strength of the interface between the plasma-sprayed ceramic layer and metallic bond coat which insures stronger adherence between the metal and the ceramic.

  12. Fusion silicide coatings for tantalum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, R. V.; Stetson, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the performance of fusion silicide coatings under simulated atmospheric reentry conditions to a maximum temperature of 1810 K (2800 F). Both recently developed and commercially available coatings are included. Data are presented on oxidation rate with and without intentional defecting, the influence of the coatings on the ductile-brittle bend transition temperature, and the mechanical properties. Coatings appear capable of affording protection for at least 100 simulated cycles to 2600 F and 63 cycles to 2800 F.

  13. Rheological properties of strawberry fruit coating with methylcellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Nadim

    2016-04-01

    products. Results of factorial experiment in a completely randomized design were analyzed. In this study, the stress versus time graph was plotted and three-component Maxwell model coefficients were obtained. Results and Discussion: In this current study, application of MC significantly reduced the fresh strawberries decay. Fruit decay in strawberries increased with storage time, but the coating reduced rate of decay with the length of storage. According to the results, the application of these coatings has a positive impact on yield stress and energy of rupture product texture during the storage. Average yield stress and rupture energy for the coated samples and control were 0.11, 5.71 and 0.09, 4.12 MPa respectively. The effect of treatment and storage time on the yield strain and elastic modulus were not statistically significant. The results show that provided Maxwell model satisfactorily (RMSE0.96 fits the experimental data. Also, with a retention time, the elastic component of the model is relatively reduced and the application of the coating prevents the decrease in relaxation time and improves the rheological properties of fruit. Relaxation time is different based on the characteristics of the viscoelastic or viscous substances, but this time is wider in elastic material. The relaxation time depends on the moisture content of the product, so the increase of humidity and soft, reduced relaxation time. Coatings are effective physical barrier to moisture loss and slower rates of weight loss in coated fruits because of the cover features for gas diffusion of stomata, the organelles that regulate the transpiration process and gas exchange between the fruit and the surroundings. Conclusions: Edible films and coatings may reduce the moisture transfer, the rate of oxidation and respiration which are considered important to prolong the shelf-life of these products. This investigation showed that the MC coatings are effective for strawberries shelf life extension and

  14. Functionalization of the Polymeric Surface with Bioceramic Nanoparticles via a Novel, Nonthermal Dip Coating Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riau, Andri K; Mondal, Debasish; Setiawan, Melina; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Yam, Gary H F; Liedberg, Bo; Venkatraman, Subbu S; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2016-12-28

    The only nonthermal method of depositing a bioceramic-based coating on polymeric substrates is by incubation in liquid, e.g., simulated body fluid to form an apatite-like layer. The drawbacks of this method include the long processing time, the production of low scratch resistant coating, and an end product that does not resemble the intended bioceramic composition. Techniques, such as plasma spraying and magnetron sputtering, involving high processing temperature are unsuitable for polymers, e.g., PMMA. Here, we introduce a nonthermal coating method to immobilize hydroxyapatite (HAp) and TiO 2 nanoparticles on PMMA via a simple and fast dip coating method. Cavities that formed on the PMMA, induced by chloroform, appeared to trap the nanoparticles which accumulated to form layers of bioceramic coating only after 60 s. The resulting coating was hydrophilic and highly resistant to delamination. In the context of our research and to address the current clinical need, we demonstrate that the HAp-coated PMMA, which is intended to be used as a visual optic of a corneal prosthetic device, improves its bonding and biointegration with collagen, the main component of a corneal stroma. The HAp-coated PMMA resulted in better adhesion with the collagen than untreated PMMA in artificial tear fluid over 28 days. Human corneal stromal fibroblasts showed better attachment, viability, and proliferation rate on the HAp-coated PMMA than on untreated PMMA. This coating method is an innovative solution to immobilize various bioceramic nanoparticles on polymers and may be used in other biomedical implants.

  15. Preparation of micro/nano-fibrous brushite coating on titanium via chemical conversion for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bing [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji’nan 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji’nan, 250061 (China); Suzhou Institute, Shandong University, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Guo, Yong-yuan [Orthopedic Department, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Ji’nan, 250012 (China); Xiao, Gui-yong [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji’nan 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji’nan, 250061 (China); Suzhou Institute, Shandong University, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Lu, Yu-peng, E-mail: biosdu@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji’nan 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji’nan, 250061 (China); Suzhou Institute, Shandong University, Suzhou, 215123 (China)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • A chemical conversion brushite coating was prepared on titanium. • The coating exhibits fibrous morphology in micro/nano-scale. • The surface of the coating shows high hydrophilicity and corrosion resistance in the simulated body fluid. • An improvement of cell response was observed on the surface of coated Ti compared to that of the uncoated. - Abstract: Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied on the surface of Ti implants to realize better osseointegration. The formation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O), mineralogically named brushite on pure Ti substrate has been investigated via chemical conversion method. Coating composition and microstructure have been investigated by X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and field emission scanning electron microscope. The results reveal that the coatings are composed of high crystalline brushite with minor scholzite (CaZn{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O). A micro/nano-scaled fibrous morphology can be produced in the acidic chemical conversion bath with pH 5.00. The surface of the fibrous brushite coating exhibits high hydrophilicity and corrosion resistance in the simulated body fluid. The osteoblast cells grow and spread actively on the coated samples and the proliferation numbers and alkaline phosphate activities of the cells improve significantly compared to the uncoated Ti. It is suggested that the micro/nano-fibrous brushite coating can be a potential approach to improve the osteoinductivity and osteoconductivity of Ti implant, due to its similarity in morphology and dimension to inorganic components of biological hard tissues, and favorable responses to the osteoblasts.

  16. On air entrainment in coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, P G; Kuck, V J

    2003-07-15

    A series of experiments that clarify how air bubbles become entrained into coatings are described. The contact line dynamics at the air-liquid interface surrounding a fiber is characterized for a typical coating die operating under atmospheric and pressurized conditions. Glycerin and other viscous liquids are used to reveal that a critical fiber speed exists at which air entrainment begins. The observations confirm that the critical capillary number Ca(c) depends on the physical properties of the coating material, in the form of the Morton number. When the liquid supply is pressurized, the experiments show that adjusting the pressure can stabilize the displaced free surface interface at a prescribed location. Controlling the meniscus location in this way eliminates air entrainment. The threshold occurs when the applied pressure balances the shear exerted on the coating by the moving fiber. Using this approach it is possible to eliminate air entrainment and attain stable wetting at very large values of the capillary number, e.g., Ca congruent with 50.

  17. Terahertz antireflection coatings using metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hou-tong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhou, Jiangfeng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Azad, Abul K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Frank [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate terahertz metamaterial antireflection coatings (ARCs) that significantly reduce the reflection and enhance the transmission at an interface of dielectric media. They are able to operate over a wide range of incidence angles for both TM and TE polarizations. Experiments and finite-element simulations will be presented and discussed.

  18. Space stable thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Efforts to develop an engineering paint were concentrated on inorganic silicate-bonded systems as opposed to the silicone coatings. The UV-vacuum stability of potassium silicate-Zn2TiO4 paints were shown to be quite good. Reflectance optimization of these systems is being studied by maximizing thickness and pigment to binder ratio.

  19. Moisture transport in coated plaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, E.L.J.; Van der Spoel, W.H.; Bancken, E.L.J.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the research project: 'Water balance of water-borne paint systems on plaster substrates in relation to fungal growth', a study is carried out to moisture transport mechanisms in coated gypsum plaster. In this contribution, the set-up of the study is described. Besides a

  20. Polymer-coated quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomczak, N.; Liu, Rongrong; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals with distinct photophysical properties finding applications in biology, biosensing, and optoelectronics. Polymeric coatings of QDs are used primarily to provide long-term colloidal stability to QDs dispersed in solutions and also as a source of

  1. Industrial Coatings at Extreme Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subramanian, Srinath; Pérez Hornero, Clara; Pedersen, Lars Thorslund

    With the gradual depletion of oil wells operable at relatively lower temperatures and pressures, the upstream oil industry relies on High Pressure High Temperature (HPHT) wells to source crude oil and gas. HPHT well extraction and processing require anticorrosive coatings applied on substrates...

  2. Thermomechanical behaviour of thermal barrier coatings. Thermal Barrier Coatings II - interim report; Haltbarkeit thermomechanisch belasteter Waermedaemmschichtsysteme. Waermedaemmschichtsysteme II - Zwischenbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C.; Schmidt, A. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (DE). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde (IFW); Scholz, A.; Stamm, W. [Siemens Power AG, Muelheim/Ruhr (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The thermomechanical behaviour of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is being investigated by strain controlled service-type thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) tests in order to simulate creep fatigue life of coatings on gas turbine blades. A first service-type cycle with a cycle period of 20 min, a maximum temperature of 930 C and a minimum temperature of 60 C for industrial gas turbines and a second cycle with a cycle period of 8 min, a maximum temperature of 1050 C and a minimum temperature of 300 C for aero engine gas turbines are applied. A special test technique was developed for hollow test pieces with a component typical wall thickness of 1.8 mm made of a single crystal alloy. Different bondcoats (MCrAIY and PtAI) and an air plasma sprayed (APS-) topcoat as well as electron beam (EB-PVD) topcoat are under investigation. After each specific experiment microstructural investigation is used for damage characterisation. The growth of oxides together with thermal mismatch could be identified as the most important damaging effects. Data from long-term Pre-Oxidation experiments allows to adjust the thickness of the TGO for each specific TMF-experiment. The main objective is to ideal with the influence of different bond coat morphologies on the durability of the thermal barrier coating (TBC-) system. The influence of surface roughness, grain size in the bond coat as well as different bond coats (MCrAIY and PtAI) are investigated. First results show that the surface roughness may have a larger influence on the durability of the TBC-system than initially expected. In order to gain deeper understanding of the damaging mechanisms, finite elements calculations are performed to simulate critical local deformation in the TBC-system. The experiments allow deep insight into the damaging mechanisms governing TBC-systems under service-type conditions and thus are suitable for life time prediction TBC-systems. Although a lot of research has been done on this topic. The influence of

  3. Insulator coating for high temperature alloys method for producing insulator coating for high temperature alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Hee

    1998-01-01

    A method for fabricating an electrically insulating coating on a surface is disclosed comprising coating the surface with a metal, and reacting the metal coated surface with a nonmetal so as to create a film on the metal-coated surface. Alternatively, the invention provides for a method for producing a noncorrosive, electrically insulating coating on a surface saturated with a nonmetal comprising supplying a molten fluid, dissolving a metal in the molten fluid to create a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the saturated surface. Lastly, the invention provides an electrically insulative coating comprising an underlying structural substrate coated with an oxide or nitride compound

  4. Antireflective Coatings for Glass and Transparent Polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buskens, P.; Burghoorn, M.; Danho Mourad, M.C.; Vroon, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Antireflective coatings (ARCs) are applied to reduce surface reflections. We review coatings that reduce the reflection of the surface of the transparent substrates float glass, polyethylene terephthalate, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polycarbonate. Three main coating concepts exist to lower the

  5. Moisture in organic coatings - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, G.K. van der; Adan, O.C.G.

    1999-01-01

    A review is given on transport and equilibrium sorption of moisture in polymer films and organic coatings. Polymeric material forms the continuous phase of a coating and is therefore important for transport properties. Besides polymer, coatings consist of pigments and fillers and various additives,

  6. Thermal stability of phosphate coatings on steel

    OpenAIRE

    P. Pokorny; P. Szelag; Novak, M; L. Mastny; Brozek, V.

    2015-01-01

    The work was validated thermal stability of zinc, manganese and tri-cations phosphate coatings on steel, made from commercial phosphating bath type Pragofos. Thermogravimetric data dehydration of scholzite, phosphophylite and hureaulite coatings in the temperature range 160 °C – 400 °C define the conditions for applying paints with higher firing temperature or thermal spraying ceramic coatings.

  7. Applicability of coatings to control metal dusting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermse, C.G.M.; Wortel, J.C. van

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a long term comparative study between five wrought and three centricast materials, both as-is, and in coated condition. Two commercially available coatings were applied to each different alloy. One coating was aluminum based with a chromium rich intermediate layer. The other

  8. Deposition and Investigation of Hydrophobic Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safonov Aleksey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fluoropolymer coatings of different morphologies are deposited by the HWCVD (Hot Wire CVD method. The effect of activator filament temperature on the structure of fluoropolymer coating is shown. The results of studying the hydrophobic fluoropolymer coatings with different structures, deposited by the HWCVD method, are presented.

  9. Thermal stability of phosphate coatings on steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The work was validated thermal stability of zinc, manganese and tri-cations phosphate coatings on steel, made from commercial phosphating bath type Pragofos. Thermogravimetric data dehydration of scholzite, phosphophylite and hureaulite coatings in the temperature range 160 °C – 400 °C define the conditions for applying paints with higher firing temperature or thermal spraying ceramic coatings.

  10. Multispectral Image Analysis for Astaxanthin Coating Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungqvist, Martin Georg; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2012-01-01

    Industrial quality inspection using image analysis on astaxanthin coating in aquaculture feed pellets is of great importance for automatic production control. The pellets were divided into two groups: one with pellets coated using synthetic astaxanthin in fish oil and the other with pellets coated...

  11. Microstructures, hardness and bioactivity of hydroxyapatite coatings

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlotleng, Monnamme

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available spraying techniques are well founded. In this paper, HAP was coated on Ti–6Al–4V using direct laser melting (DLM) process. This process, unlike the traditional coating processes, is able to achieve coatings with good metallurgical bonding and little...

  12. Scientific Component Technology Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, S; Bosl, B; Dahlgren, T; Kumfert, G; Smith, S

    2003-02-07

    The laboratory has invested a significant amount of resources towards the development of high-performance scientific simulation software, including numerical libraries, visualization, steering, software frameworks, and physics packages. Unfortunately, because this software was not designed for interoperability and re-use, it is often difficult to share these sophisticated software packages among applications due to differences in implementation language, programming style, or calling interfaces. This LDRD Strategic Initiative investigated and developed software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address problems of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology is an extension of scripting and object-oriented software development techniques that specifically focuses on the needs of software interoperability. Component approaches based on CORBA, COM, and Java technologies are widely used in industry; however, they do not support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. Our research focused on the unique requirements of scientific computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections among components, language interoperability for scientific languages, and data distribution support for massively parallel SPMD components.

  13. Preparation of Metal Coatings on Steel Balls Using Mechanical Coating Technique and Its Process Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Hao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We successfully applied mechanical coating technique to prepare Ti coatings on the substrates of steel balls and stainless steel balls. The prepared samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The weight increase of the ball substrates and the average thickness of Ti coatings were also monitored. The results show that continuous Ti coatings were prepared at different revolution speeds after different durations. Higher revolution speed can accelerate the formation of continuous Ti coatings. Substrate hardness also markedly affected the formation of Ti coatings. Specifically, the substance with lower surface hardness was more suitable as the substrate on which to prepare Ti coatings. The substrate material plays a key role in the formation of Ti coatings. Specifically, Ti coatings formed more easily on metal/alloy balls than ceramic balls. The above conclusion can also be applied to other metal or alloy coatings on metal/alloy and ceramic substrates.

  14. Failure Mechanisms of the Coating/Metal Interface in Waterborne Coatings: The Effect of Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Wan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Waterborne coating is the most popular type of coating, and improving its performance is a key point of research. Cathodic delamination is one of the major modes of failure for organic coatings. It refers to the weakening or loss of adhesion between the coating and substrate. Physical and chemical characteristics of coatings have been studied via scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS. Early heterogeneous swelling at the metal-coating interface in non-defective coated metals was elucidated using frequency-dependent alternating-current scanning electrochemical microscopy. Two types of coatings (styrene-acrylic coating and terpolymer coating were compared. The effects of thickness, surface roughness, and chemical bonding on cathodic delamination were investigated.

  15. Failure Mechanisms of the Coating/Metal Interface in Waterborne Coatings: The Effect of Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hongxia; Song, Dongdong; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Dawei; Gao, Jin; Du, Cuiwei

    2017-04-09

    Waterborne coating is the most popular type of coating, and improving its performance is a key point of research. Cathodic delamination is one of the major modes of failure for organic coatings. It refers to the weakening or loss of adhesion between the coating and substrate. Physical and chemical characteristics of coatings have been studied via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Early heterogeneous swelling at the metal-coating interface in non-defective coated metals was elucidated using frequency-dependent alternating-current scanning electrochemical microscopy. Two types of coatings (styrene-acrylic coating and terpolymer coating) were compared. The effects of thickness, surface roughness, and chemical bonding on cathodic delamination were investigated.

  16. UNDERWATER COATINGS FOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) deactivated several aging nuclear fuel storage basins. Planners for this effort were greatly concerned that radioactive contamination present on the basin walls could become airborne as the sides of the basins became exposed during deactivation and allowed to dry after water removal. One way to control this airborne contamination was to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls were still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market for marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives were easily applied and adhered well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INL fuel pools. Lab-scale experiments were conducted by applying fourteen different commercial underwater coatings to four substrate materials representative of the storage basin construction materials, and evaluating their performance. The coupons included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The evaluation criteria included ease of application, adherence to the four surfaces of interest, no change on water clarity or chemistry, non-hazardous in final applied form and be proven in underwater applications. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected from the underwater coatings tested for application to all four pools. Divers scrubbed loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuumed up the sludge. The divers then applied the coating using a special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pools with no detectable airborne contamination releases.

  17. An integrated magnetics component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an integrated magnetics component comprising a magnetically permeable core comprising a base member extending in a horizontal plane and first, second, third and fourth legs protruding substantially perpendicularly from the base member. First, second, third...... and fourth output inductor windings are wound around the first, second, third and fourth legs, respectively. A first input conductor of the integrated magnetics component has a first conductor axis and extends in-between the first, second, third and fourth legs to induce a first magnetic flux through a first...... flux path of the magnetically permeable core. A second input conductor of the integrated magnetics component has a second coil axis extending substantially perpendicularly to the first conductor axis to induce a second magnetic flux through a second flux path of the magnetically permeable core...

  18. Solid state lighting component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Thomas; Keller, Bernd; Tarsa, Eric; Ibbetson, James; Morgan, Frederick; Dowling, Kevin; Lys, Ihor

    2017-10-17

    An LED component according to the present invention comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The array can comprise LED chips emitting at two colors of light wherein the LED component emits light comprising the combination of the two colors of light. A single lens is included over the array of LED chips. The LED chip array can emit light of greater than 800 lumens with a drive current of less than 150 milli-Amps. The LED chip component can also operate at temperatures less than 3000 degrees K. In one embodiment, the LED array is in a substantially circular pattern on the submount.

  19. Cognitive Component Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ling

    2008-01-01

    -documented that unsupervised learning discovers statistical regularities. However human cognition is too complicated and not yet fully understood. Nevertheless, in our approach we represent human cognitive processes as a classification rule in supervised learning. Thus we have devised a testable protocol to test......This dissertation concerns the investigation of the consistency of statistical regularities in a signaling ecology and human cognition, while inferring appropriate actions for a speech-based perceptual task. It is based on unsupervised Independent Component Analysis providing a rich spectrum...... of audio contexts along with pattern recognition methods to map components to known contexts. It also involves looking for the right representations for auditory inputs, i.e. the data analytic processing pipelines invoked by human brains. The main ideas refer to Cognitive Component Analysis, defined...

  20. Failure Mechanisms of the Coating/Metal Interface in Waterborne Coatings: The Effect of Bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Hongxia Wan; Dongdong Song; Xiaogang Li; Dawei Zhang; Jin Gao; Cuiwei Du

    2017-01-01

    Waterborne coating is the most popular type of coating, and improving its performance is a key point of research. Cathodic delamination is one of the major modes of failure for organic coatings. It refers to the weakening or loss of adhesion between the coating and substrate. Physical and chemical characteristics of coatings have been studied via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and s...

  1. Reducing Friction and Wear of Tribological Systems through Hybrid Tribofilm Consisting of Coating and Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichiro Yazawa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of surface protective additives becomes vital when operating conditions become severe and moving components operate in a boundary lubrication regime. After protecting film is slowly removed by rubbing, it can regenerate through the tribochemical reaction of the additives at the contact. However, there are limitations about the regeneration of the protecting film when additives are totally consumed. On the other hand, there are a lot of hard coatings to protect the steel surface from wear. These can enable the functioning of tribological systems, even in adverse lubrication conditions. However, hard coatings usually make the friction coefficient higher, because of their high interfacial shear strength. Amongst hard coatings, diamond-like carbon (DLC is widely used, because of its relatively low friction and superior wear resistance. In practice, conventional lubricants that are essentially formulated for a steel/steel surface are still used for lubricating machine component surfaces provided with protective coatings, such as DLCs, despite the fact that the surface properties of coatings are quite different from those of steel. It is therefore important that the design of additive molecules and their interaction with coatings should be re-considered. The main aim of this paper is to discuss the DLC and the additive combination that enable tribofilm formation and effective lubrication of tribological systems.

  2. Study on the Preparation of a High-Efficiency Carbon Fiber Dissipating Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The working temperature of electronic components directly determines their service life and stability. In order to ensure normal operation of electronic components, cooling the coating is one of the best ways to solve the problem. Based on an acrylic amino-resin system, a dissipating coating was prepared with carbon fiber (CF as the main thermal conductive filler. The influence of the CF content on the thermal conductivity was determined by the single factor method. The surface structure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results show: With the increase of the CF mass fraction, both the heat dispersion and heat conduction coefficient of the coating tend to increase at first and then decrease, and the heat dissipation effect is optimum when the CF mass fraction is 12.3 wt %. At this point, the coating shows an excellent comprehensive performance, such as 1st level adhesion, H grade hardness, and thermal conductivity of 1.61 W/m·K. Furthermore, this paper explored the radiating mechanism of coating in which CF produces a coating which forms a heat “channel” for rapid heat conduction. When the optimal value is exceeded, the cooling effect is reduced because of the accumulation and the anisotropy of CF.

  3. Progress and Challenges of Ultrasonic Testing for Stress in Remanufacturing Laser Cladding Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiao-Ling; Dong, Shi-Yun; Xu, Bin-Shi; Cao, Yong

    2018-02-13

    Stress in laser cladding coating is an important factor affecting the safe operation of remanufacturing components. Ultrasonic testing has become a popular approach in the nondestructive evaluation of stress, because it has the advantages of safety, nondestructiveness, and online detection. This paper provides a review of ultrasonic testing for stress in remanufacturing laser cladding coating. It summarizes the recent research outcomes on ultrasonic testing for stress, and analyzes the mechanism of ultrasonic testing for stress. Remanufacturing laser cladding coating shows typical anisotropic behaviors. The ultrasonic testing signal in laser cladding coating is influenced by many complex factors, such as microstructure, defect, temperature, and surface roughness, among others. At present, ultrasonic testing for stress in laser cladding coating can only be done roughly. This paper discusses the active mechanism of micro/macro factors in the reliability of stress measurement, as well as the impact of stress measurement on the quality and safety of remanufacturing components. Based on the discussion, this paper proposes strategies to nondestructively, rapidly, and accurately measure stress in remanufacturing laser cladding coating.

  4. Component Reengineering Workshops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    2004-01-01

    In mature domains, a number of competing product lines may emerge, and from the point of view of customers of such product lines, reengineering and reuse of assets across product lines from different vendors becomes important. To address this issue we present a low-cost approach, component...... reengineering workshops, for assessing reengineering costs of reusing components between different product lines. The approach works on the level of software architectures, and relies critically on input from various (technical) stakeholders. It has been validated through case studies that are also presented...

  5. Electronic components and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, W H

    2013-01-01

    Electronic Components and Systems focuses on the principles and processes in the field of electronics and the integrated circuit. Covered in the book are basic aspects and physical fundamentals; different types of materials involved in the field; and passive and active electronic components such as capacitors, inductors, diodes, and transistors. Also covered in the book are topics such as the fabrication of semiconductors and integrated circuits; analog circuitry; digital logic technology; and microprocessors. The monograph is recommended for beginning electrical engineers who would like to kn

  6. Adaptable component frameworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katajainen, Jyrki; Simonsen, Bo

    2009-01-01

    provide at least one realization for each container that has the specified characteristics with respect to performance and safety. In the CPH STL project, our goal is to provide several alternative realizations for each STL container. For example, for associative containers we can provide almost any kind...... of balanced search tree. Also, we do provide safe and compact versions of each container. To ease the maintenance of this large collection of implementations, we have developed component frameworks for the STL containers. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a component framework...

  7. The Role of Ni-P Coating Structure on Fly Ash Cenospheres in the Formation of Magnesium Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braszczyńska-Malik, Katarzyna N.; Kamieniak, Jacek

    2017-11-01

    The role of the Ni-P coating structure on fly ash cenospheres in the fabrication of magnesium matrix composites has been investigated. Two composites based on AZ91 commercial magnesium alloys with hollow aluminosilicate cenospheres were fabricated by the negative pressure infiltration technique. Two kinds of cenospheres ( i.e., as Ni-P coated and after heat treatment) were used in order to determine the influence of the Ni-P coating structure on creating interfaces between the components. Microstructure analyses were carried out by light microscopy, atomic force microscopy, XRD, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. Al3Ni2 and Mg2Ni intermetallic phases at the component interfaces were formed in the composite with as-received Ni-P-coated cenospheres. After heat treatment of the Ni-P-coated cenospheres, NiO was created outside the external layer of the Ni-P coatings and this oxide remained stable at the component interfaces during composite fabrication. In both cases, the Ni-P coating prevented the reaction between the cenosphere walls and the magnesium matrix alloy, which contributed to obtaining intact cenospheres, unfilled by the matrix alloy.

  8. Advanced Thermal Barrier and Environmental Barrier Coating Development at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Robinson, Craig

    2017-01-01

    This presentation summarizes NASA's advanced thermal barrier and environmental barrier coating systems, and the coating performance improvements that has recently been achieved and documented in laboratory simulated rig test conditions. One of the emphases has been placed on the toughness and impact resistance enhancements of the low conductivity, defect cluster thermal barrier coating systems. The advances in the next generation environmental barrier coatings for SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites have also been highlighted, particularly in the design of a new series of oxide-silicate composition systems to be integrated with next generation SiC-SiC turbine engine components for 2700F coating applications. Major technical barriers in developing the thermal and environmental barrier coating systems are also described. The performance and model validations in the rig simulated turbine combustion, heat flux, steam and calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) environments have helped the current progress in improved temperature capability, environmental stability, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability of the advanced thermal and environmental barrier coating systems.

  9. Deep sequencing reveals microbiota dysbiosis of tongue coat in patients with liver carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haifeng; Ren, Zhigang; Li, Ang; Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Jianwen; Xu, Shaoyan; Luo, Qixia; Zhou, Kai; Sun, Xiaoli; Zheng, Shusen; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-09-01

    Liver carcinoma (LC) is a common malignancy worldwide, associated with high morbidity and mortality. Characterizing microbiome profiles of tongue coat may provide useful insights and potential diagnostic marker for LC patients. Herein, we are the first time to investigate tongue coat microbiome of LC patients with cirrhosis based on 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing. After strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, 35 early LC patients with cirrhosis and 25 matched healthy subjects were enrolled. Microbiome diversity of tongue coat in LC patients was significantly increased shown by Shannon, Simpson and Chao 1 indexes. Microbiome on tongue coat was significantly distinguished LC patients from healthy subjects by principal component analysis. Tongue coat microbial profiles represented 38 operational taxonomic units assigned to 23 different genera, distinguishing LC patients. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size (LEfSe) reveals significant microbial dysbiosis of tongue coats in LC patients. Strikingly, Oribacterium and Fusobacterium could distinguish LC patients from healthy subjects. LEfSe outputs show microbial gene functions related to categories of nickel/iron_transport, amino_acid_transport, energy produced system and metabolism between LC patients and healthy subjects. These findings firstly identify microbiota dysbiosis of tongue coat in LC patients, may providing novel and non-invasive potential diagnostic biomarker of LC.

  10. Influence of the cooling method on the structure of 55AlZn coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendala, J, E-mail: jacek.mendala@polsl.pl [Department of Materials Technology, Silesian University of Technology, Krasinskiego 8, 40-019 Katowice (Poland)

    2011-05-15

    In metallization processes, metals or metal alloys are used which have a low melting point and good anticorrosion properties. Moreover, they must form durable intermetallic compounds with iron or its alloys. The most common hot-dip metallization technology involves galvanizing, however, molten multi-component metal alloys are used as well. An addition of aluminium to the zinc bath causes an increase in corrosion resistance of the obtained coatings. The article presents results of tests of obtaining coatings by the batch hot-dip method in an 55AlZn bath. Kinetics of the coating growth in the tested alloys were determined in the changeable conditions of bath temperature, dip time and type of cooling. The structure of coatings and their phase composition were revealed. As a result of the tests performed, it has been found that an increase in total thickness of the coatings as a function of the dipping time at a constant temperature is almost of a parabolic nature, whereas an increase in the transient layer is of a linear nature. The structure was identified by the XRD analysis and the morphology of the coatings was tested by means of SEM. It has been found that the cooling process with the use of higher rates of cooling causes a size reduction of the structure in the outer layer and a reduction of thickness of both the intermediate diffusion layer and the whole coating by ca. 25 %.

  11. Beyond CANLUB: an improvement alternative coating development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahani, M.; Ferrier, G.A; Chan, P.K.; Corcoran, E.C., E-mail: Paul.Chan@rmc.ca, E-mail: Emily.Corcoran@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Pant, A. [Cameco Fuel Manufacturing Limited, Port Hope/Cobourg, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The CANLUB graphite coating is exclusively used in CANDU nuclear reactors to protect fuel sheaths from stress corrosion cracking. However, uncertainties regarding its quality control, manufacturing continuity, and performance at high burnups provide sufficient motivation for exploring alternative coating materials. Since the chemistry of polysiloxanes may offer improved protection against stress corrosion cracking, we describe the physical and elemental characterization of CANLUB and three commercial polysiloxane coatings. Preliminary results suggest that the Pyromark coating has the greatest potential to replace the CANLUB coating. (author)

  12. Evaluation of irradiated coating material specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Jin; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Lee Moon [RCS Korea Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Evaluation result of irradiated coating material specimens - Coating material specimens radiated Gamma Energy(Co 60) in air condition. - Evaluation conditions was above 1 X 10{sup 4} Gy/hr, and radiated TID 2.0 X 10{sup 6} Gy. - The radiated coating material specimens, No Checking, Cracking, Flaking, Delamination, Peeling and Blistering. - Coating system at the Kori no. 1 and APR 1400 Nuclear power plant, evaluation of irradiated coating materials is in accordance with owner's requirement(2.0 X 10{sup 6} Gy)

  13. Transparent nanocrystalline diamond coatings and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Khan, Adam

    2017-08-22

    A method for coating a substrate comprises producing a plasma ball using a microwave plasma source in the presence of a mixture of gases. The plasma ball has a diameter. The plasma ball is disposed at a first distance from the substrate and the substrate is maintained at a first temperature. The plasma ball is maintained at the first distance from the substrate, and a diamond coating is deposited on the substrate. The diamond coating has a thickness. Furthermore, the diamond coating has an optical transparency of greater than about 80%. The diamond coating can include nanocrystalline diamond. The microwave plasma source can have a frequency of about 915 MHz.

  14. Underwater sound radiation from an elastically coated infinite plate with periodic inhomogeneities of finite width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanni; Huang, Hai; Pan, Jie

    2017-07-01

    The underwater sound radiation from a line-force-driven coated infinite plate with periodically attached distributed inhomogeneities is investigated. A typical example of a distributed inhomogeneity is a signal conditioning plate (SCP), which can be inserted between the coating and a hydrophone to increase the strength of the incoming signal. Using the wavenumber transform approach, the surface normal velocity and radiated sound power of the plate are determined by solving the indexed equations of the wavenumber components. This study demonstrates that the elastic coating between the base plate and periodic inhomogeneities may reduce the effect of band-passes and band-gaps on the radiated sound power caused by the inhomogeneities. This is explained in detail by the insulation effect of the coating as a decoupler. The effect of the SCP's width and spatial period on the radiated sound is also examined. Finally, recommendations are given for the application of SCPs for underwater sensing purposes.

  15. Modelling of the mercury loss in fluorescent lamps under the influence of metal oxide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Abreu, A.; Mayer, J.; Lenk, D.; Horn, S.; Konrad, A.; Tidecks, R.

    2016-11-01

    The mercury transport and loss mechanisms in the metal oxide coatings of mercury low pressure discharge fluorescent lamps have been investigated. An existing model based on a ballistic process is discussed in the context of experimental mercury loss data. Two different approaches to the modeling of the mercury loss have been developed. The first one is based on mercury transition rates between the plasma, the coating, and the glass without specifying the underlying physical processes. The second one is based on a transport process driven by diffusion and a binding process of mercury reacting to mercury oxide inside the layers. Moreover, we extended the diffusion based model to handle multi-component coatings. All approaches are applied to describe mercury loss experiments under the influence of an Al 2 O 3 coating.

  16. CMAS Interactions with Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited via Plasma Spray- Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, B. J.; Wiesner, V. L.; Zhu, D.; Johnson, N. S.

    2017-01-01

    Materials for advanced turbine engines are expected to have temperature capabilities in the range of 1370-1500C. At these temperatures the ingestion of sand and dust particulate can result in the formation of corrosive glass deposits referred to as CMAS. The presence of this glass can both thermomechanically and thermochemically significantly degrade protective coatings on metallic and ceramic components. Plasma Spray- Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) was used to deposit advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems for investigation on their interaction with CMAS compositions. Coatings were exposed to CMAS and furnace tested in air from 1 to 50 hours at temperatures ranging from 1200-1500C. Coating composition and crystal structure were tracked with X-ray diffraction and microstructure with electron microscopy.

  17. Commercialization of NASA PS304 Solid Lubricant Coating Enhanced by Fundamental Powder Flow Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Malcolm K.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a patented high-temperature solid lubricant coating, designated PS304, for reducing friction and wear in bearing systems. The material used to produce the coating is initially a blend of metallic and ceramic powders that are deposited on the bearing surface by the plasma spray process. PS304 was developed to lubricate foil air bearings in Oil-Free turbomachinery, where the moving surfaces are coated with a hydrodynamic air film except at the beginning and end of an operation cycle when the air film is not present. The coating has been successful in several applications including turbochargers, land-based turbines, and industrial drying furnace conveyor components, with current development activities directed at implementation in Oil-Free aeropropulsion engines.

  18. Autonomous component carrier selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Luis Guilherme Uzeda; Pedersen, Klaus; Mogensen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    in local areas, basing our study case on LTE-Advanced. We present extensive network simulation results to demonstrate that a simple and robust interference management scheme, called autonomous component carrier selection allows each cell to select the most attractive frequency configuration; improving...

  19. Euler principal component analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liwicki, Stephan; Tzimiropoulos, Georgios; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Pantic, Maja

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is perhaps the most prominent learning tool for dimensionality reduction in pattern recognition and computer vision. However, the ℓ 2-norm employed by standard PCA is not robust to outliers. In this paper, we propose a kernel PCA method for fast and robust PCA,

  20. Hybrid wars’ information component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Nevskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The war of the new generation - hybrid war, the information component which is directed not so much on the direct destruction of the enemy, how to achieve the goals without warfare. Fighting in the information field is no less important than immediate military action.

  1. Component-oriented programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, J; Szyperski, C; Weck, W; Buschmann, F; Buchmann, AP; Cilia, MA

    2003-01-01

    This report covers the eighth Workshop on Component-Oriented Programming (WCOP). WCOP has been affiliated with ECOOP since its inception in 1996. The report summarizes the contributions made by authors of accepted position papers as well as those made by all attendees of the workshop sessions.

  2. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  3. High efficiency turbine blade coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youchison, Dennis L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gallis, Michail A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The development of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) that exhibit lower thermal conductivity through better control of electron beam - physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processing is of prime interest to both the aerospace and power industries. This report summarizes the work performed under a two-year Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project (38664) to produce lower thermal conductivity, graded-layer thermal barrier coatings for turbine blades in an effort to increase the efficiency of high temperature gas turbines. This project was sponsored by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Investment Area. Therefore, particular importance was given to the processing of the large blades required for industrial gas turbines proposed for use in the Brayton cycle of nuclear plants powered by high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). During this modest (~1 full-time equivalent (FTE)) project, the processing technology was developed to create graded TBCs by coupling ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) with substrate pivoting in the alumina-YSZ system. The Electron Beam - 1200 kW (EB-1200) PVD system was used to deposit a variety of TBC coatings with micron layered microstructures and reduced thermal conductivity below 1.5 W/m.K. The use of IBAD produced fully stoichiometric coatings at a reduced substrate temperature of 600°C and a reduced oxygen background pressure of 0.1 Pa. IBAD was also used to successfully demonstrate the transitioning of amorphous PVD-deposited alumina to the -phase alumina required as an oxygen diffusion barrier and for good adhesion to the substrate Ni2Al3 bondcoat. This process replaces the time consuming thermally grown oxide formation required before the YSZ deposition. In addition to the process technology, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo plume modeling and spectroscopic characterization of the PVD plumes were performed. The project consisted of five tasks. These included the

  4. Properties of Plasma and HVOF Sprayed Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Żórawski

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The work compares the properties of plasma and HVOF thermally sprayed coatings obtained by blending the NiCrBSi and Fe2O3 powders. The deposition was performed by means of the Plancer PN-120 and the Diamond Jet guns for plasma spraying and HVOF spraying respectively. The SEM (EDS method was employed to study the microstructure of the produced coatings. Although the blended powders differ in particle size, shape, and distribution, it is possible to obtain composite coatings with an NiCrBSi matrix containing iron oxides. Except for a different microstructure, plasma and HVOF coatings have a different phase composition, which was examined using the Bruker D-8 Advance diffractometer. Studies of the coatings wear and scuffing resistance showed that an optimal content of Fe2O3 is about 26 % for plasma sprayed coatings and 22.5 % for HVOF deposited coatings.

  5. Wear performance of laser processed tantalum coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrick, Stanley; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit, E-mail: amitband@wsu.edu

    2011-12-01

    This first generation investigation evaluates the in vitro tribological performance of laser-processed Ta coatings on Ti for load-bearing implant applications. Linear reciprocating wear tests in simulated body fluid showed one order of magnitude less wear rate, of the order of 10{sup -4} mm{sup 3}(N.m){sup -1}, for Ta coatings compared to Ti. Our results demonstrate that Ta coatings can potentially minimize the early-stage bone-implant interface micro-motion induced wear debris generation due to their excellent bioactivity comparable to that of hydroxyapatite (HA), high wear resistance and toughness compared to popular HA coatings. Highlights: {yields} In vitro wear performance of laser processed Ta coatings on Ti was evaluated. {yields} Wear tests in SBF showed one order of magnitude less wear for Ta coatings than Ti. {yields} Ta coatings can minimize early-stage micro-motion induced wear debris generation.

  6. Silane based coating of aluminium mold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A method of preparing an aluminum mold for injection molding is provided, the method comprises the steps of providing an aluminum mold having a least one surface, subjecting the at least one surface to a gas or liquid phase silane to thereby form an anti-stiction coating, the anti-stiction coating...... comprising a chemically bonded monolayer of silane compounds on the at least one surface wherein the silane is a halogenated silane. The at least one surface coated with the anti-stiction coating may be configured to withstand an injection molding process at a pressure above 100 MPa. Furthermore, a mold...... having at least one closed cavity is provided, at least one surface of the at least one cavity being an aluminium surface coated with a silane based coating layer. The silane based anti-stiction coating improves the anti-stiction properties of the mold which may allow for molding and demolding...

  7. Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  8. Nanostructured thin films and coatings mechanical properties

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    The first volume in "The Handbook of Nanostructured Thin Films and Coatings" set, this book concentrates on the mechanical properties, such as hardness, toughness, and adhesion, of thin films and coatings. It discusses processing, properties, and performance and provides a detailed analysis of theories and size effects. The book presents the fundamentals of hard and superhard nanocomposites and heterostructures, assesses fracture toughness and interfacial adhesion strength of thin films and hard nanocomposite coatings, and covers the processing and mechanical properties of hybrid sol-gel-derived nanocomposite coatings. It also uses nanomechanics to optimize coatings for cutting tools and explores various other coatings, such as diamond, metal-containing amorphous carbon nanostructured, and transition metal nitride-based nanolayered multilayer coatings.

  9. Design and operation of equipment used to develop remote coating capability for HTGR fuel particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchomel, R.R.; Stinton, D.P.; Preston, M.K.; Heck, J.L.; Bolfing, B.J.; Lackey, W.J.

    1978-12-01

    Refabrication of HTGR fuels is a manufacturing process that consists of preparation of fuel kernels, application of multiple layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, preparation of fuel rods, and assembly of fuel rods into fuel elements. All the equipment for refabrication of /sup 233/U-containing fuel must be designed for completely remote operation and maintenance in hot-cell facilities. Equipment to remotely coated HTGR fuel particles has been designed and operated. Although not all of the equipment development needed for a fully remote coating system has been completed, significant progress has been made. The most important component of the coating furnace is the gas distributor, which must be simple, reliable, and easily maintainable. Techniques for loading and unloading the coater and handling microspheres have been developed. An engineering-scale system, currently in operation, is being used to verify the workability of these concepts. Coating crucible handling components are used to remove the crucible from the furnace, remove coated particles, and exchange the crucible, if necessary. After the batch of particles has been unloaded, it is transferred, weighed, and sampled. The components used in these processes have been tested to ensure that no particle breakage or holdup occurs. Tests of the particle handling system have been very encouraging because no major problems have been encountered. Instrumentation that controls the equipment performed very smoothly and reliably and can be operated remotely.

  10. Investigation on the cold rolling and structuring of cold sprayed copper-coated steel sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Wiesner, S.; Gerdt, L.; Senge, S.; Hirt, G.

    2017-03-01

    A current driving force of research is lightweight design. One of the approaches to reduce the weight of a component without causing an overall stiffness decrease is the use of multi-material components. One of the main challenges of this approach is the low bonding strength between different materials. Focusing on steel-aluminum multi-material components, thermally sprayed copper coatings can come into use as a bonding agent between steel sheets and high pressure die cast aluminum to improve the bonding strength. This paper presents a combination of cold gas spraying of copper coatings and their subsequent structuring by rolling as surface pretreatment method of the steel inserts. Therefore, flat rolling experiments are performed with samples in “as sprayed” and heat treated conditions to determine the influence of the rolling process on the bond strength and the formability of the coating. Furthermore, the influence of the rolling on the roughness and the hardness of the coating was examined. In the next step, the coated surface was structured, to create a surface topology suited for a form closure connection in a subsequent high-pressure die casting process. No cracks were observed after the cold rolling process with a thickness reduction of up to ε = 14 % for heat treated samples. Structuring of heat treated samples could be realized without delamination and cracking.

  11. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program: Topical report I, selection of candidate alloys. Volume 3. Selection of surface coating/substrate systems for screening creep and structural stability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-20

    Considering the high temperature, low O/sub 2/, high C environment of operation in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Systems, the utilization of coatings is envisaged to hold potential for extending component lifetimes through the formation of stable and continuous oxide films with enhanced resistance to C diffusion. A survey of the current state of technology for high temperature coatings has been performed. The usefulness of these coatings on the Mo, Ni, and Fe base alloys is discussed. Specifically, no coating substitute was identified for TZM other than the well known W-3 (pack silicide) and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ forming coatings were recommended for the Fe and Ni base structural materials. Recommendations as to coating types and processng have been made based on the predicted VHTR component size, shape, base metal and operational environment. Four tests designed to evaluate the effects of selected combinations of coatings and substrate matrices are recommended for consideration.

  12. Impact of dilution on the microstructure and properties of Ni-based 625 alloy coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Jose Antoszczyszyn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nickel-based alloy IN 625 is used to protect components of aircrafts, power generation and oil refinery due to an association of toughness and high corrosion resistance. These properties are associated with the chemical composition and microstructure of coatings which depend on the processing parameters and the composition of the component being protected. This paper assessed impact of dilution on the microstructure and properties of the Ni alloy IN 625 deposited by Plasma Transferred Arc (PTA on two substrates: carbon steel API 5L and stainless steel AISI 316L. Differences due to the interaction with the substrate were maximized analyzing single layer coatings, processed with three deposition current: 120, 150 and 180 A. Correlation with a cast Nickel-based alloy sample contributed to assess the impact of dilution on coatings. Dilution was determined by the area ratio and Vickers hardness measured on the transverse section of coatings. Scanning electron and Laser confocal microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were carried out to characterize the microstructure. Results indicated the increasing dilution with the deposition current was deeply influenced by the substrate. Dilution ranging from 5 to 29% was measured on coatings processed on the API 5L steel and from 22 to 51% on the low thermal conductivity AISI 316L steel substrate. Differences on the microstructure and properties of coatings can be associated with the interaction with each substrate. Higher fraction of carbides account for the higher coating hardness when processing on API 5L whereas the low thermal conductivity of AISI 316L and the higher Fe content in solid solution contributed to the lower hardness of coatings.

  13. Phased-Array Focusing Potential in Pipe with Viscoelastic Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Velsor, J. K.; Zhang, L.; Breon, L. J.; Rose, J. L.

    2007-03-01

    This work investigates the effectiveness of traditional guided-wave focusing techniques in piping with viscoelastic coating. Focusing results for an uncoated pipe are compared to that of pipe with a fusion-bonded epoxy coating, a coal-tar mastic coating, a coal-tar epoxy coating, a coal-tar tape coating, a wax coating, and an enamel coating. Experimental results are compared to computationally derived models. Results show that, for most coating types, focusing can be achieved without special consideration of the coating. This is significant in that it demonstrates the immediate applicability of traditional focusing techniques to coated pipeline.

  14. Comparison on mechanical properties of single layered and bilayered chitosan-gelatin coated porous hydroxyapatite scaffold prepared through freeze drying method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effendi, M. D.; Gustiono, D.; Lukmana; Ayu, D.; Kurniawati, F.

    2017-02-01

    Biopolymer coated porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds were prepared for tissue engineering trough freeze drying method and impregnation. in this study, to mimic the mineral and organic component of natural bone, synthetic hydroxapatite (HA) scaffolds coated by polymer were prepared. Highly porous Hap scaffolds, fabricated by synthetic HA impregnation method on polyurethane foam, were coated with polymer coating solution, consisting of chitosan, Gelatin, and bilayered chitosan-gelatin prepared by aging and impregnating technique. For the purpose of comparison, The bare scaffolds without polymer coating layer were investigated. The Bare scaffolds were highly porous and interconnected with a pore size of around 150 µm-714 µm, has porosity at around 67,7% -85,7%, and has mechanical strength at around 0.06 Mpa - 0.071 Mpa, which is suitable for osteoblast cell Proliferation. Chitosan coated porous HA scaffold and gelatin coated porous HA scaffold had mechanical strength at around 0.81-0.85 Mpa, and 1.32-1.34 Mpa, respectively, with weight ratio of biopolymer and Hap was around 18%-22%. To compare these results, the coating on the bare scaffold with gelatin and chitosan had been conducted. Based on the result of FTIR, it could be concluded that coating procedure applied on porous hydroxy apatite (HA) coated by gelatin, chitosan coated HA scaffold, and bilayered Gelatin-chitosan coated porous HA scaffold, confirming that for allsampleshad no significant chemical effect on the coating structure. The compressive strength of bilayered Gelatin-chitosan coated HA scaffold had middle values between the rest, at around 1,06-1.2 Mpa for the samples at the same weight ratio of biopolymer: HA (around 18% - 22%). These results also confirming that coating by gelatin on porous hydroxyapatite was highest compresive strength and can be applied to improve mechanical properties of porous hydroxyapatite bare scaffold

  15. Seed coat sculpturing in Halophila

    OpenAIRE

    Japar, Sidik Bujang; Muta, Harah Zakaria; Suzalina, Akma Awing; Nojima, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2006-01-01

    This study furnishes information on external morphology of the seed coats of selected Halophila. Fruiting plants of Halophila beccarii, H. ovalis, H. decipiens, Halophila sp. were collected from various locations around Malaysia and including Halophila stipulacea from Mauritus. Seeds extracted from mature fruits were fixed in 2.5% glutaradehyde. Fixed seeds were washed in 0.1M Sodium cacodylate buffer at 4℃ for 10 minutes. The washing procedure was repeated three times. The seeds were dehydra...

  16. Multiphase-Multifunctional Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-30

    Ceramic Coatings Performing Organization names: Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional – Unidad Queretaro...University of California, Santa Barbara Principal Investigator / Organization: Dr . Luis Gerardo Trápaga Martínez CINVESTAV-Querétaro Principal...Investigator US collaboration / Organization: Dr . Carlos G. Levi University of California, Santa Barbara Reporting Period Final Dates covered

  17. Food Components and Supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr

    2012-01-01

    the growth of these bacteria (prebiotics) are added to food to achieve health effects exceeding its pure nutritional function. Several of these effects are mediated by enzyme systems involved in xenobiotic and drug metabolism, and in some cases this might lead to undesired interactions with medication.......g., secondary plant metabolites such as flavonoids), or as contaminants that enter the food chain at different stages or during the food production process. For these components, a wide spectrum of biological effects was observed that ranges from health-threatening impacts (e.g., polycyclic aromatic amines...... cases, nutrients, food contaminants, and secondary plant metabolites can themselves become substrates for xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, resulting in health-promoting or health-threatening products. This chapter focuses on how important components of our daily nutrition and supplements can interfere...

  18. Towards Software Component Procurement Automation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gross, H.G.; Lormans, M.; Zhou, J.

    2007-01-01

    One of the first steps of component procurement is the identification of required component features in large repositories of existing components. On the highest level of abstraction, component requirements as well as component descriptions are usually written in natural language. Therefore, we can

  19. The effect of composition and thermodynamics on the surface morphology of durable superhydrophobic polymer coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahum T

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tehila Nahum,1 Hanna Dodiuk,2 Samuel Kenig,2 Artee Panwar,1 Carol Barry,1 Joey Mead,1 1Department of Plastics Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA, USA; 2Department of Polymers and Plastics Engineering, Shenkar College of Engineering Design and Art, Ramat Gan, Israel Abstract: Durable superhydrophobic coatings were synthesized using a system of silica nanoparticles (NPs to provide nanoscale roughness, fluorosilane to give hydrophobic chemistry, and three different polymer binders: urethane acrylate, ethyl 2-cyanoacrylate, and epoxy. Coatings composed of different binders incorporating NPs in various concentrations exhibited different superhydrophobic attributes when applied on polycarbonate (PC and glass substrates and as a function of coating composition. It was found that the substrate surface characteristics and wettability affected the superhydrophobic characteristics of the coatings. Interfacial tension and spreading coefficient parameters (thermodynamics of the coating components were used to predict the localization of the NPs for the different binders’ concentrations. The thermodynamic analysis of the NPs localization was in good agreement with the experimental observations. On the basis of the thermodynamic analysis and the experimental scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, profilometry, and atomic force microscopy results, it was concluded that localization of the NPs on the surface was critical to provide the necessary roughness and resulting superhydrophobicity. The durability evaluated by tape testing of the epoxy formulations was the best on both glass and PC. Several coating compositions retained their superhydrophobicity after the tape test. In summary, it was concluded that thermodynamic analysis is a powerful tool to predict the roughness of the coating due to the location of NPs on the surface, and hence can be used in the design of superhydrophobic coatings. Keywords

  20. Effects of tongue cleaning on bacterial flora in tongue coating and dental plaque: a crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Miki; Chosa, Naoyuki; Shimoyama, Yu; Minami, Kentaro; Kimura, Shigenobu; Kishi, Mitsuo

    2014-01-14

    The effects of tongue cleaning on reconstruction of bacterial flora in dental plaque and tongue coating itself are obscure. We assessed changes in the amounts of total bacteria as well as Fusobacterium nucleatum in tongue coating and dental plaque specimens obtained with and without tongue cleaning. We conducted a randomized examiner-blind crossover study using 30 volunteers (average 23.7 ± 3.2 years old) without periodontitis. After dividing randomly into 2 groups, 1 group was instructed to clean the tongue, while the other did not. On days 1 (baseline), 3, and 10, tongue coating and dental plaque samples were collected after recording tongue coating score (Winkel tongue coating index: WTCI). After a washout period of 3 weeks, the same examinations were performed with the subjects allocated to the alternate group. Genomic DNA was purified from the samples and applied to SYBR® Green-based real-time PCR to quantify the amounts of total bacteria and F. nucleatum. After 3 days, the WTCI score recovered to baseline, though the amount of total bacteria in tongue coating was significantly lower as compared to the baseline. In plaque samples, the bacterial amounts on day 3 and 10 were significantly lower than the baseline with and without tongue cleaning. Principal component analysis showed that variations of bacterial amounts in the tongue coating and dental plaque samples were independent from each other. Furthermore, we found a strong association between amounts of total bacteria and F. nucleatum in specimens both. Tongue cleaning reduced the amount of bacteria in tongue coating. However, the cleaning had no obvious contribution to inhibit dental plaque formation. Furthermore, recovery of the total bacterial amount induced an increase in F. nucleatum in both tongue coating and dental plaque. Thus, it is recommended that tongue cleaning and tooth brushing should both be performed for promoting oral health.