WorldWideScience

Sample records for cooperative signaling roles

  1. Cooperation of endothelin-1 signaling with melanosomes plays a role in developing and/or maintaining human skin hyperpigmentation

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    Daiki Murase

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Skin hyperpigmentation is characterized by increased melanin synthesis and deposition that can cause significant psychosocial and psychological distress. Although several cytokine-receptor signaling cascades contribute to the formation of ultraviolet B-induced cutaneous hyperpigmentation, their possible involvement in other types of skin hyperpigmentation has never been clearly addressed. Since our continuous studies using skin specimens from more than 30 subjects with ethnic skin diversity emphasized a consistent augmentation in the expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1 and its receptor (Endothelin B receptor, ET-B in hyperpigmented lesions, including senile lentigos (SLs, the precise function of ET-1 signaling was investigated in the present study. In line with previous studies, ET-1 significantly induced melanogenesis followed by increases in melanosome transport in melanocytes and in its transfer to keratinocytes while inhibition of ET-B function substantially depressed melanogenic ability in tissue-cultured SLs. Additionally, in agreement with a previous report that the formation of autophagosomes rather than melanosomes is stimulated according to starvation or defective melanosome production, ET-1 was found to remarkably augment the expression of components necessary for early melanosome formation, indicating its counteraction against autophagy-targeting melanosome degradation in melanocytes. Despite the lack of substantial impact of ET-1 on keratinocyte melanogenic functions, the expression of ET-1 was enhanced following melanosome uptake by keratinocytes. Taken together, our data suggest that ET-1 plays a substantial role in the development and/or maintenance of skin hyperpigmentation in reciprocal cooperation with increased melanosome incorporation.

  2. Uncalculating cooperation is used to signal trustworthiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jillian J; Hoffman, Moshe; Nowak, Martin A; Rand, David G

    2016-08-02

    Humans frequently cooperate without carefully weighing the costs and benefits. As a result, people may wind up cooperating when it is not worthwhile to do so. Why risk making costly mistakes? Here, we present experimental evidence that reputation concerns provide an answer: people cooperate in an uncalculating way to signal their trustworthiness to observers. We present two economic game experiments in which uncalculating versus calculating decision-making is operationalized by either a subject's choice of whether to reveal the precise costs of cooperating (Exp. 1) or the time a subject spends considering these costs (Exp. 2). In both experiments, we find that participants are more likely to engage in uncalculating cooperation when their decision-making process is observable to others. Furthermore, we confirm that people who engage in uncalculating cooperation are perceived as, and actually are, more trustworthy than people who cooperate in a calculating way. Taken together, these data provide the first empirical evidence, to our knowledge, that uncalculating cooperation is used to signal trustworthiness, and is not merely an efficient decision-making strategy that reduces cognitive costs. Our results thus help to explain a range of puzzling behaviors, such as extreme altruism, the use of ethical principles, and romantic love.

  3. Evolution of Cooperation Via Covert Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Smaldino, Paul E; McElreath, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Human sociality depends upon the benefits of mutual aid and extensive communication. However mutual aid is made difficult by the problems of coordinating diverse norms and preferences, and communication is harried by substantial ambiguity in meaning. Here we demonstrate that these two facts can work together to allow cooperation to develop, by the strategic use of deliberately ambiguous signals, covert signaling. Covert signaling is the transmission of information that is accurately received by its intended audience but obscured when perceived by others. Such signals may allow coordination and enhanced cooperation while also avoiding the alienation or hostile reactions of individuals with different preferences. Although the empirical literature has identified potential mechanisms of covert signaling, such as encryption in humor, there is to date no formal theory of its dynamics. We introduce a novel mathematical model to assess the conditions under which a covert signaling strategy will be favored. We show th...

  4. The source of high signal cooperativity in bacterial chemosensory arrays.

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    Piñas, Germán E; Frank, Vered; Vaknin, Ady; Parkinson, John S

    2016-03-22

    The Escherichia coli chemosensory system consists of large arrays of transmembrane chemoreceptors associated with a dedicated histidine kinase, CheA, and a linker protein, CheW, that couples CheA activity to receptor control. The kinase activity responses to receptor ligand occupancy changes can be highly cooperative, reflecting allosteric coupling of multiple CheA and receptor molecules. Recent structural and functional studies have led to a working model in which receptor core complexes, the minimal units of signaling, are linked into hexagonal arrays through a unique interface 2 interaction between CheW and the P5 domain of CheA. To test this array model, we constructed and characterized CheA and CheW mutants with amino acid replacements at key interface 2 residues. The mutant proteins proved defective in interface 2-specific in vivo cross-linking assays, and formed signaling complexes that were dispersed around the cell membrane rather than clustered at the cell poles as in wild type chemosensory arrays. Interface 2 mutants down-regulated CheA activity in response to attractant stimuli in vivo, but with much less cooperativity than the wild type. Moreover, mutant cells containing fluorophore-tagged receptors exhibited greater basal anisotropy that changed rapidly in response to attractant stimuli, consistent with facile changes in loosely packed receptors. We conclude that interface 2 lesions disrupt important network connections between core complexes, preventing receptors from operating in large, allosteric teams. This work confirms the critical role of interface 2 in organizing the chemosensory array, in directing the clustered array to the cell poles, and in producing its highly cooperative signaling properties.

  5. Afghanistan's Role in Regional Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Karzai

    2006-01-01

    @@ At the invitation of Cui Liru, President of China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations (CICIR), Mr.Hamid Karzai,President of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, paid a visit to CICIR on June 20, 2006.In his speech before an audience of several hundred researchers, President Karzai addressed many issues Afghanistan is now facing, including the achievements of peace and reconstruction, the necessities and ways for Afghanistan to re-join in the regional affairs and the international community, the role of Afghanistan in the regional development and prosperity, and the meaning of a stable Afghanistan to China. Following are the contents of his speech.

  6. Cooperative Signaling with Soft Information Combining

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    Rui Lin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a Decode-and-Forward (DF scheme using distributed Turbo code (DTC for a three-node (source, relay, and destination wireless cooperative communication system. The relay decodes, then interleaves, and reencodes the decoded data. It then forwards the reencoded packet and its instantaneous receive SNR to the destination. The performances using both ideal and quantized SNR are studied. The destination uses a modified metric within a Turbo decoding algorithm to scale the soft information calculated for the relay code. The proposed scheme is simple to implement and performs well.

  7. Information theoretical quantification of cooperativity in signalling complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaerts, Tom; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Schymkowitz, Joost

    2009-01-01

    Background: Intra-cellular information exchange, propelled by cascades of interacting signalling proteins, is essential for the proper functioning and survival of cells. Now that the interactome of several organisms is being mapped and several structural mechanisms of cooperativity at the molecul...

  8. The Teacher's Role in Implementing Cooperative Learning in the Classroom.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillies, R.; Ashman, A.; Terwel, J.

    The teacher’s role in implementing cooperative learning in the classroom provides a comprehensive overview of the theories, research outcomes, challenges and issues in guided cooperative learning. In many chapters there are clear guidelines and discussion about how cooperative learning practices can

  9. Signalling and the evolution of cooperative foraging in dynamic environments.

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    Colin J Torney

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding cooperation in animal social groups remains a significant challenge for evolutionary theory. Observed behaviours that benefit others but incur some cost appear incompatible with classical notions of natural selection; however, these behaviours may be explained by concepts such as inclusive fitness, reciprocity, intra-specific mutualism or manipulation. In this work, we examine a seemingly altruistic behaviour, the active recruitment of conspecifics to a food resource through signalling. Here collective, cooperative behaviour may provide highly nonlinear benefits to individuals, since group functionality has the potential to be far greater than the sum of the component parts, for example by enabling the effective tracking of a dynamic resource. We show that due to this effect, signalling to others is an evolutionarily stable strategy under certain environmental conditions, even when there is a cost associated to this behaviour. While exploitation is possible, in the limiting case of a sparse, ephemeral but locally abundant nutrient source, a given environmental profile will support a fixed number of signalling individuals. Through a quantitative analysis, this effective carrying capacity for cooperation is related to the characteristic length and time scales of the resource field.

  10. Signalling and the evolution of cooperative foraging in dynamic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torney, Colin J; Berdahl, Andrew; Couzin, Iain D

    2011-09-01

    Understanding cooperation in animal social groups remains a significant challenge for evolutionary theory. Observed behaviours that benefit others but incur some cost appear incompatible with classical notions of natural selection; however, these behaviours may be explained by concepts such as inclusive fitness, reciprocity, intra-specific mutualism or manipulation. In this work, we examine a seemingly altruistic behaviour, the active recruitment of conspecifics to a food resource through signalling. Here collective, cooperative behaviour may provide highly nonlinear benefits to individuals, since group functionality has the potential to be far greater than the sum of the component parts, for example by enabling the effective tracking of a dynamic resource. We show that due to this effect, signalling to others is an evolutionarily stable strategy under certain environmental conditions, even when there is a cost associated to this behaviour. While exploitation is possible, in the limiting case of a sparse, ephemeral but locally abundant nutrient source, a given environmental profile will support a fixed number of signalling individuals. Through a quantitative analysis, this effective carrying capacity for cooperation is related to the characteristic length and time scales of the resource field.

  11. Signal co-operation between integrins and other receptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streuli, Charles H; Akhtar, Nasreen

    2009-03-15

    The multicellular nature of metazoans means that all cellular processes need to be tuned by adhesive interactions between cells and their local microenvironment. The spatial organization of cells within tissues requires sophisticated networks of extracellular signals to control their survival and proliferation, movements and positioning, and differentiated function. These cellular characteristics are mediated by multiple inputs from adhesion systems in combination with soluble and developmental signals. In the present review we explore how one class of adhesion receptor, the integrins, co-operate with other types of receptor to control diverse aspects of cell fate. In particular we discuss: (i) how beta3 and beta1 integrins work together with growth factors to control angiogenesis; (ii) how alpha6beta4 integrin co-operates with receptor tyrosine kinases in normal epithelial function and cancer; (iii) the interplay between beta1 integrins and EGF (epidermal growth factor) receptor; (iv) signal integration connecting integrins and cytokine receptors for interleukins, prolactin and interferons; and (v) how integrins and syndecans co-operate in cell migration.

  12. The Inner Eye Theory of Laughter: Mindreader Signals Cooperator Value

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    Wonil Edward Jung

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this hypothesis paper, I propose a three-component set of jointly necessary and sufficient trigger criteria for all cases of involuntary laughter. The theory incorporates concepts from the theory of mind in cognitive science. I then examine the information content of the laughter signal from a game theoretic perspective. I conclude that laughter is a signal of cooperator value as it provides information on the laugher's empathy with the attributed mental states and her sympathy levels for all affected by the laugh-inducing situation. Laughter also indicates what types of mental representations children, autistic people, nonhuman primates and adults possess and can falsify.

  13. Role of aspiration-induced migration in cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Both cooperation and migration are ubiquitous in human society and animal world. In this Rapid Communication, we propose an aspiration-induced migration in which individuals will migrate to new sites provided that their payoffs are below some aspiration level. It is found that moderate aspiration level can best favor cooperative behavior. In particular, moderate aspiration level enables cooperator clusters to maintain and expand whereas induces defector clusters to disintegrate, thus promoting the diffusion of cooperation among population. Our results provide insights into understanding the role played by migration in the emergence of cooperative behavior.

  14. Cooperation in Construction: The role of values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Peter; Storgaard, Kresten

    2016-01-01

    the communication and sociological values of the actors involved and saw it as essential for their way of cooperating. The cooperation included and combined elements of traditional industrial building production, with concepts and initiatives that had to be understood by means of sociological analysis. Tentatively....... The management logic of the main contractor is interpreted as based on a sociology-inspired understanding focusing on norms and social values rather than on contractual (law) and functional (engineering) logic, which had hitherto been prevalent in Danish construction management....

  15. Role of collective influence in promoting cooperation

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    Huang, Z.-G.; Wu, Z.-X.; Wu, A.-C.; Yang, L.; Wang, Y.-H.

    2008-12-01

    The collective influence on the individuals' behavior have attracted much attention, and interesting phenomena such as social facilitation and social loafing have been studied. In this paper, we consider how the collective influence affects the evolution of cooperation in a structured population of individuals who nourish and benefit from public goods in groups. Individuals are supposed to distribute endowments to different groups to nourish the corresponding public goods. The collective influence is indicated by a tunable parameter α, with larger α corresponding to the players' higher preference to contribute more to the larger groups, which is similar to the social-facilitation effect in the real world, whereas, with smaller α corresponding to individuals' contrary preference, i.e., the social-loafing effect. Interestingly, we find that the heterogeneity of public-goods setting favors cooperation. Furthermore, the system where social loafing occurs performs better than that with social facilitation, in the case of heterogeneous formation.

  16. Cooperation as a signal of genetic or phenotypic quality in female mate choice? Evidence from preferences across the menstrual cycle.

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    Farrelly, Daniel

    2011-08-01

    Previous research highlighting the role sexual selection may play in the evolution of human cooperation has yet to distinguish what qualities such behaviours actually signal. The aim here was to examine whether female preferences for male cooperative behaviours are because they signal genetic or indirect phenotypic quality. This was possible by taking into account female participants' stage of menstrual cycle, as much research has shown that females at the most fertile stage show greater preferences specifically for signals of genetic quality than any other stage, particularly for short-term relationships. Therefore, different examples of cooperation (personality, costly signals, heroism) and the mate preferences for altruistic traits self-report scale were used across a series of four experiments to examine females' attitudes towards cooperation in potential mates for different relationship lengths at different stages of the menstrual cycle. The results here consistently show that female fertility had no effect on perceptions of cooperative behaviour, and that such traits were considered more important for long-term relationships. Therefore, this provides strong evidence that cooperative behaviour is important in mate choice as predominantly a signal of phenotypic rather than genetic quality.

  17. Social role specialization promotes cooperation between parents.

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    Barta, Zoltán; Székely, Tamás; Liker, András; Harrison, Freya

    2014-06-01

    Biparental care of offspring is a widespread social behavior, and various ecological, life-history, and demographic factors have been proposed to explain its evolution and maintenance. Raising offspring generally requires several types of care (e.g., feeding, brooding, and defense), and males and females often specialize in providing different types of care. However, theoretical models of care often assume that care is a single variable and hence that a unit of care by the mother is interchangeable with a unit of care by the father. We hypothesize that the ability of one parent to provide all types of care may be limited by nonadditive costs or by sex-based asymmetries in the costs of particular care types. Using an individual-based simulation, we show that synergistic costs of investing in two tasks or negligible sex-based cost asymmetries select for task specialization and biparental care. Biparental care persists despite intense sexual selection and sex-biased mortality, suggesting that previous models make overly restrictive predictions of the conditions under which cooperation can be maintained. Our model provides a mechanistic underpinning for published models that show that the synergistic benefits of individuals cooperating can stabilize cooperation, both in the context of parental care and in other social scenarios.

  18. The Economic Role of the Portuguese Agricultural Cooperatives

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    João Rebelo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since 2008 Portugal began to be influenced by a financial crisis, public budget troubles and an economic crisis. In line with the new economic paradigm within the EU, is publicly acknowledged that the overcoming of this crisis should be based on the production of transactional goods, where the agricultural sector deserves a special attention. The objective of this paper is to analyze the economic role of the Portuguese agricultural marketing cooperatives, including an overview of the Portuguese agricultural sector, the typology of Portuguese cooperatives and position in the agro food chain, the institutional environment, internal governance and performance of the agricultural cooperatives.

  19. Second-chance signal transduction explains cooperative flagellar switching.

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    Henry G Zot

    Full Text Available The reversal of flagellar motion (switching results from the interaction between a switch complex of the flagellar rotor and a torque-generating stationary unit, or stator (motor unit. To explain the steeply cooperative ligand-induced switching, present models propose allosteric interactions between subunits of the rotor, but do not address the possibility of a reaction that stimulates a bidirectional motor unit to reverse direction of torque. During flagellar motion, the binding of a ligand-bound switch complex at the dwell site could excite a motor unit. The probability that another switch complex of the rotor, moving according to steady-state rotation, will reach the same dwell site before that motor unit returns to ground state will be determined by the independent decay rate of the excited-state motor unit. Here, we derive an analytical expression for the energy coupling between a switch complex and a motor unit of the stator complex of a flagellum, and demonstrate that this model accounts for the cooperative switching response without the need for allosteric interactions. The analytical result can be reproduced by simulation when (1 the motion of the rotor delivers a subsequent ligand-bound switch to the excited motor unit, thereby providing the excited motor unit with a second chance to remain excited, and (2 the outputs from multiple independent motor units are constrained to a single all-or-none event. In this proposed model, a motor unit and switch complex represent the components of a mathematically defined signal transduction mechanism in which energy coupling is driven by steady-state and is regulated by stochastic ligand binding. Mathematical derivation of the model shows the analytical function to be a general form of the Hill equation (Hill AV (1910 The possible effects of the aggregation of the molecules of haemoglobin on its dissociation curves. J Physiol 40: iv-vii.

  20. Using reservoir-engineering to convert a coherent signal in optomechanics with small optomechanical cooperativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tao, E-mail: suiyueqiaoqiao@163.com [Key Lab of Coherent Light, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy, Ministry of Education, and College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); College of Physics, Tonghua Normal University, Tonghua 134000 (China); Wang, Tie [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Fu, Changbao [College of Physics, Tonghua Normal University, Tonghua 134000 (China); Su, Xuemei, E-mail: suxm@jlu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Coherent Light, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy, Ministry of Education, and College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2017-05-10

    Optomechanical dark mode plays a central role in effective mechanically-mediated conversion of two different cavity fields. In this paper, we present a more efficient method to utilize the dark mode to transfer a coherent signal. When an auxiliary cavity mode is exploited, two approaches are proposed to effectively eliminate the optomechanical bright mode, and only the optomechanical dark mode is left to facilitate state transfer. Even with small cooperativity and different losses for the two target modes, the internal cavity mode-conversion efficiency can also reach unity. - Highlights: • Reservoir-engineering is used for state conversion. • The optomechanical bright mode can be absolutely eliminated. • Small cooperativity and different losses are feasible for ideal conversion efficiency.

  1. HPV16 E6 and E6AP differentially cooperate to stimulate or augment Wnt signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sominsky, Sophia, E-mail: sophia.tab@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Kuslansky, Yael, E-mail: ykuslansky@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Shapiro, Beny, E-mail: benyshap@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Jackman, Anna, E-mail: jackman@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Haupt, Ygal, E-mail: ygal.haupt@petermac.org [Research Division, The Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina, E-mail: arina@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Sherman, Levana, E-mail: lsherman@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    The present study investigated the roles of E6 and E6AP in the Wnt pathway. We showed that E6 levels are markedly reduced in cells in which Wnt signaling is activated. Coexpression of wild-type or mutant E6AP (C820A) in Wnt-activated cells stabilized E6 and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin/TCF transcription. Expression of E6AP alone in nonstimulated cells elevated β-catenin level, promoted its nuclear accumulation, and activated β-catenin/TCF transcription. A knockdown of E6AP lowered β-catenin levels. Coexpression with E6 intensified the activities of E6AP. Further experiments proved that E6AP/E6 stabilize β-catenin by protecting it from proteasomal degradation. This function was dependent on the catalytic activity of E6AP, the kinase activity of GSK3β and the susceptibility of β-catenin to GSK3β phosphorylation. Thus, this study identified E6AP as a novel regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway, capable of cooperating with E6 in stimulating or augmenting Wnt/β-catenin signaling, thereby possibly contributing to HPV carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • The roles of E6 and E6AP in the Wnt pathway were investigated. • E6AP stabilizes E6 and enhances E6 activity in augmentation of Wnt signaling. • E6AP cooperates with E6 to stabilize β-catenin and stimulate Wnt/β-catenin signaling. • E6AP and E6 act through different mechanisms to augment or stimulate Wnt signaling.

  2. Cooperating Teachers' Roles and Responsibilities in a MATESOL Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payant, Caroline; Murphy, John

    2012-01-01

    Responding to a gap in relevant literatures, this study explores cooperating teachers' perceptions of their roles and responsibilities as contributors to the practicum experiences of preservice teachers of English as a second language who were pursuing a master's degree. Research tools featured focus group and individual interviews with 11…

  3. How Teachers Compare the Roles of Cooperating Teacher and Mentor.

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    Ganser, Tom

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 94 teachers who served as cooperating teachers or mentored beginning teachers indicated that, despite few extrinsic rewards, they were motivated to undertake these roles; many had no formal preparation for them. Without clear expectations and high-quality training, their ability to enhance student and beginning teachers' practice may…

  4. The role of roles: physical cooperation between humans and robots

    OpenAIRE

    Küçükyılmaz, Ayşe; Sezgin, Tevfik Metin; Başdoğan, Çağatay; Moertl, Alexander; Lawitzky, Martin; Hirche, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Since the strict separation of working spaces of humans and robots has experienced a softening due to recent robotics research achievements, close interaction of humans and robots comes rapidly into reach. In this context, physical human-robot interaction raises a number of questions regarding a desired intuitive robot behavior. The continuous bilateral information and energy exchange requires an appropriate continuous robot feedback. Investigating a cooperative manipulation task, the desired...

  5. The role of cooperatives in food safety management of fresh produce chains: Case studies in four strawberry cooperatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirezieva, K.K.; Bijman, J.; Jacxsens, L.; Luning, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent outbreaks with fresh produce have raised questions regarding management of quality and safety in the complex supply chains, where cooperatives play a central role. The overall objective of this article was to investigate the role of cooperatives in food quality and safety management in the fr

  6. The role of cooperatives in food safety management of fresh produce chains: Case studies in four strawberry cooperatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirezieva, K.K.; Bijman, J.; Jacxsens, L.; Luning, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent outbreaks with fresh produce have raised questions regarding management of quality and safety in the complex supply chains, where cooperatives play a central role. The overall objective of this article was to investigate the role of cooperatives in food quality and safety management in the

  7. Cooperation of Notch and Ras/MAPK signaling pathways in human breast carcinogenesis

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    Dey Devaveena

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have implicated aberrant Notch signaling in breast cancers. Yet, relatively little is known about the pattern of expression of various components of the Notch pathway, or its mechanism of action. To better understand the role of the Notch pathway in breast cancer, we have undertaken a detailed expression analysis of various Notch receptors, their ligands, and downstream targets at different stages of breast cancer progression. Results We report here that there is a general increase in the expression levels of Notch 1, 2, 4, Jagged1, Jagged2, and Delta-like 4 proteins in breast cancers, with simultaneous upregulation of multiple Notch receptors and ligands in a given cancer tissue. While Notch3 and Delta-like1 were undetectable in normal tissues, moderate to high expression was detected in several cancers. We detected the presence of active, cleaved Notch1, along with downstream targets of the Notch pathway, Hes1/Hes5, in ~75% of breast cancers, clearly indicating that in a large proportion of breast cancers Notch signaling is aberrantly activated. Furthermore, we detected cleaved Notch1 and Hes1/5 in early precursors of breast cancers - hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ - suggesting that aberrant Notch activation may be an early event in breast cancer progression. Mechanistically, while constitutively active Notch1 alone failed to transform immortalized breast cells, it synergized with the Ras/MAPK pathway to mediate transformation. This cooperation is reflected in vivo, as a subset of cleaved Notch positive tumors additionally expressed phopsho-Erk1/2 in the nuclei. Such cases exhibited high node positivity, suggesting that Notch-Ras cooperation may lead to poor prognosis. Conclusions High level expression of Notch receptors and ligands, and its increased activation in several breast cancers and early precursors, places Notch signaling as a key player in breast cancer pathogenesis. Its cooperation with

  8. IL-17A/F modulates fibrocyte functions in cooperation with CD40-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hisako; Kawakita, Akiko; Okazaki, Shintaro; Yasutomi, Motoko; Murai, Hiroki; Ohshima, Yusei

    2013-08-01

    T helper 17 (Th17) cells that produce interleukin (IL)-17A and IL-17F have been found to participate in the development of bronchial asthma and bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. However, whether they play a causative role in the airway remodeling observed in these respiratory diseases remains unclear. Because fibrocytes are involved in tissue repair and fibrosis and are presumably precursors of lung fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, we examined the effects of IL-17A/F on fibrocyte functions. Both IL-17A and IL-17F enhanced fibrocytes' α-smooth muscle actin expression. Priming fibrocytes with IL-17A enhanced their CD40-mediated IL-6 production, whereas IL-17F-priming increased the CD40-mediated mRNA expression of collagen I, vascular endothelial growth factor, and angiogenin. CD4(+) T cells co-cultured with fibrocytes produced IL-17A, which was inhibited by blocking CD40 and CD40 ligand interactions. These findings suggest that cooperative interactions between fibrocytes and Th17 cells play an important role via CD40- and IL-17A/F-mediated signaling for collagen and proangiogenic factor production, which may lead to the extracellular matrix deposition and neovascularization seen in airway remodeling.

  9. Idiographic Roles of Cooperating Teachers as Mentors in Pre-Service Distance Teacher Education

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    Koc, Ebru Melek

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to define the roles of cooperating teachers as mentors in the context of distance-learning teacher education. The participants included 358 cooperating teachers who mentored 4th-year student teachers in a Distance English Language Teacher Training Program in Turkey. To determine the roles that were perceived as mentoring roles by…

  10. When cooperation begets cooperation: the role of key individuals in galvanizing support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Katherine; Wrangham, Richard; Glowacki, Luke; Russell, Andrew F

    2015-12-05

    Life abounds with examples of conspecifics actively cooperating to a common end, despite conflicts of interest being expected concerning how much each individual should contribute. Mathematical models typically find that such conflict can be resolved by partial-response strategies, leading investors to contribute relatively equitably. Using a case study approach, we show that such model expectations can be contradicted in at least four disparate contexts: (i) bi-parental care; (ii) cooperative breeding; (iii) cooperative hunting; and (iv) human cooperation. We highlight that: (a) marked variation in contributions is commonplace; and (b) individuals can often respond positively rather than negatively to the contributions of others. Existing models have surprisingly limited power in explaining these phenomena. Here, we propose that, although among-individual variation in cooperative contributions will be influenced by differential costs and benefits, there is likely to be a strong genetic or epigenetic component. We then suggest that selection can maintain high investors (key individuals) when their contributions promote support by increasing the benefits and/or reducing the costs for others. Our intentions are to raise awareness in--and provide testable hypotheses of--two of the most poorly understood, yet integral, questions regarding cooperative ventures: why do individuals vary in their contributions and when does cooperation beget cooperation? © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. The role of cooperatives in sustaining the livelihoods of rural communities: The case of rural cooperatives in Shurugwi District, Zimbabwe

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    Smart Mhembwe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main focus of the research was to analyse the role of cooperatives in sustaining the livelihoods of local rural communities in Shurugwi District in Zimbabwe. Descriptive survey design was used in this mixed method approach to the study. A questionnaire, interviews and observation methods were employed as the main research instruments. Purposive sampling technique was adopted and data were collected from government officials and from members of the six cooperatives in Shurugwi District. A total of 50 research participants were involved in the study. It was found that cooperatives were established as a strategy to sustain livelihoods of rural communities. With the adoption of cooperatives, people in the rural communities managed to generate employment, boost food production, empower the marginalised, especially women, and promote social cohesion and integration, thereby improving their livelihoods and reducing poverty. Most cooperatives face a number of challenges that include lack of financial support, poor management and lack of management skills, and lack of competitive markets to sell their produce. The study recommends that the government and the banking sector render financial support to cooperatives in rural communities to allow them to expand and diversify their business operations; constant training on leadership and management skills is provided to cooperatives’ members. There is also a need for cooperatives, especially those in the agricultural sector, to form some producer associations so as to easily market their produce. Lastly, the study recommends that future research should focus on investigating issues that hinder the growth of the cooperative movement in rural communities of Zimbabwe. It is hoped that policy-makers, the academia and communities would benefit from the study.

  12. Blind Compressed Sensing Parameter Estimation of Non-cooperative Frequency Hopping Signal

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    Chen Ying

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the disadvantages of a non-cooperative frequency hopping communication system, such as a high sampling rate and inadequate prior information, parameter estimation based on Blind Compressed Sensing (BCS is proposed. The signal is precisely reconstructed by the alternating iteration of sparse coding and basis updating, and the hopping frequencies are directly estimated based on the results. Compared with conventional compressive sensing, blind compressed sensing does not require prior information of the frequency hopping signals; hence, it offers an effective solution to the inadequate prior information problem. In the proposed method, the signal is first modeled and then reconstructed by Orthonormal Block Diagonal Blind Compressed Sensing (OBD-BCS, and the hopping frequencies and hop period are finally estimated. The simulation results suggest that the proposed method can reconstruct and estimate the parameters of noncooperative frequency hopping signals with a low signal-to-noise ratio.

  13. Role of delay-based reward in the spatial cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-Wen; Nie, Sen; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Wang, Bing-Hong; Chen, Shi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Strategy selection in games, a typical decision making, usually brings noticeable reward for players which have discounted value if the delay appears. The discounted value is measure: earning sooner with a small reward or later with a delayed larger reward. Here, we investigate effects of delayed rewards on the cooperation in structured population. It is found that delayed reward supports the spreading of cooperation in square lattice, small-world and random networks. In particular, intermediate reward differences between delays impel the highest cooperation level. Interestingly, cooperative individuals with the same delay time steps form clusters to resist the invasion of defects, and cooperative individuals with lowest delay reward survive because they form the largest clusters in the lattice.

  14. Cooperative monitoring and its role in regional security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biringer, K.; Olsen, J.; Lincoln, R.; Wehling, F. [and others

    1997-03-01

    Cooperative monitoring systems can play an important part in promoting the implementation of regional cooperative security agreements. These agreements advance the national security interests of the United States in a post Cold War environment. Regional issues as widely varying as nuclear nonproliferation, trade and environmental pollution can be the source of tensions which may escalate to armed conflict which could have global implications. The Office of National Security Policy Analysis at the US Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in seeking ways to promote regional cooperation that can reduce the threats posed by regional conflict. DOE technologies and technical expertise can contribute to developing solutions to a wide variety of these international problems. Much of this DOE expertise has been developed in support of the US nuclear weapons and arms control missions. It is now being made available to other agencies and foreign governments in their search for regional security and cooperation. This report presents two examples of interest to DOE in which monitoring technologies could be employed to promote cooperation through experimentation. The two scenarios include nuclear transparency in Northeast Asia and environmental restoration in the Black Sea. Both offer the potential for the use of technology to promote regional cooperation. The issues associated with both of these monitoring applications are presented along with examples of appropriate monitoring technologies, potential experiments and potential DOE contributions to the scenarios.

  15. A signal combining technique based on channel shortening for cooperative sensor networks

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Syed Imtiaz

    2010-06-01

    The cooperative relaying process needs proper coordination among the communicating and the relaying nodes. This coordination and the required capabilities may not be available in some wireless systems, e.g. wireless sensor networks where the nodes are equipped with very basic communication hardware. In this paper, we consider a scenario where the source node transmits its signal to the destination through multiple relays in an uncoordinated fashion. The destination can capture the multiple copies of the transmitted signal through a Rake receiver. We analyze a situation where the number of Rake fingers N is less than that of the relaying nodes L. In this case, the receiver can combine N strongest signals out of L. The remaining signals will be lost and act as interference to the desired signal components. To tackle this problem, we develop a novel signal combining technique based on channel shortening. This technique proposes a processing block before the Rake reception which compresses the energy of L signal components over N branches while keeping the noise level at its minimum. The proposed scheme saves the system resources and makes the received signal compatible to the available hardware. Simulation results show that it outperforms the selection combining scheme. ©2010 IEEE.

  16. The Role of Child Characteristics and Peer Experiences in the Development of Peer Cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endedijk, Hinke M.; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Bekkering, Harold; Cox, R.F.A; Hunnius, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Cooperation with peers is challenging for young children, and there are large individual differences in the development of cooperation. The roles of child characteristics and peer experiences for peer interaction during free play have been studied extensively, but it is unclear which factors predict

  17. An Analysis of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service's Role in Bridging the Digital Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Antoine J.; Hilton, Lashawn; English, Chastity Warren; Elbert, Chanda; Wakefield, Dexter

    2011-01-01

    The study reported here sought to determine the perception of North Carolina County Cooperative Extension directors in regard to the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service's role in bridging the digital divide. It was perceived by respondents that variables such as income, education, gender, disability status, race/ethnicity, age, and…

  18. The role of cooperatives in the Georgian wine industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvariani Levani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of the Georgian wine industry is not fully utilized. High fragmentation of agricultural land leads to limited production that restricts farmers' access to capital resources, finances, and markets, and prevents further development of the Georgian wine industry. Grape collectors and wine makers need help to join their capital and efforts, to gain economies of scale in production and marketing by jointly accessing agricultural inputs. This study aims to identify the importance of farmer cooperatives for grape producers in the Georgian wine industry in order to overcome inefficiency in the sector. Furthermore, this research project investigates the barriers and driving forces of smallholder grape farmers or wine makers to join cooperatives. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with stakeholders of the Georgian wine industry in order to assess different perspectives on the importance and benefits of farmer cooperatives in the local context. The interview results permit economic analysis of transaction costs, agency theory and property rights in the context of the nascent cooperative movement in the Georgian wine industry. The interviews revealed that development of agriculture cooperatives in the Georgian wine industry is strongly dependent on both farmer enthusiasm and governmental support.1

  19. Transatlantic Relations: The Role of Nationalism in Multinational Space Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    international cooperation), thus the cancellation of the spacecraft. Nationalism can also been seen in the early 1981 telex from Alan Lovelace, acting...NASA administrator, to Director- General Erik Quistgaard of ESA. The telex states: In view of the scientific importance of the solar polar research

  20. Promoting cooperation by preventing exploitation: The role of network structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkovski, Zoran; Stojkoski, Viktor; Basnarkov, Lasko; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2017-08-01

    A growing body of empirical evidence indicates that social and cooperative behavior can be affected by cognitive and neurological factors, suggesting the existence of state-based decision-making mechanisms that may have emerged by evolution. Motivated by these observations, we propose a simple mechanism of anonymous network interactions identified as a form of generalized reciprocity—a concept organized around the premise "help anyone if helped by someone'—and study its dynamics on random graphs. In the presence of such a mechanism, the evolution of cooperation is related to the dynamics of the levels of investments (i.e., probabilities of cooperation) of the individual nodes engaging in interactions. We demonstrate that the propensity for cooperation is determined by a network centrality measure here referred to as neighborhood importance index and discuss relevant implications to natural and artificial systems. To address the robustness of the state-based strategies to an invasion of defectors, we additionally provide an analysis which redefines the results for the case when a fraction of the nodes behave as unconditional defectors.

  1. Low complexity method for spreading sequence estimation of DSSS signal in non-cooperative communication systems*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Liang; Wang Fuping; Wang Zanji

    2009-01-01

    It is a necessary step to estimate the spreading sequence of direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) signal for blind despreading and demodulation in non-cooperative communications. Two innovative and effective detection statistics axe proposed to implement the synchronization and spreading sequence estimation procedure. The proposed algorithm also has a low computational complexity with only linear additions and modifications. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the algorithm performs quite well in low SNR environment, and is much better than all the existing typical algorithms with a comprehensive consideration both in performance and computational complexity.

  2. Cooperative Spectrum Sensing Using Eigenvalue Fusion for OFDMA and Other Wideband Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayan A. Guimarães

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new approach for the detection of OFDMA and other wideband signals in the context of centralized cooperative spectrum sensing for cognitive radio (CR applications. The approach is based on the eigenvalues of the received signal covariance matrix whose samples are in the frequency domain. Soft combining of the eigenvalues at the fusion center is the main novelty. This combining strategy is applied to variants of four test statistics for binary hypothesis test, namely: the eigenvalue-based generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT, the maximum-minimum eigenvalue detection (MMED, the maximum eigenvalue detection (MED and the energy detection (ED. It is shown that the eigenvalue fusion can outperform schemes based on decision fusion and sample fusion. A tradeoff is also established between complexity and volume of data sent to the fusion center in all combining strategies.

  3. A Simulation-Based Framework for the Cooperation of VMS Travel Guidance and Traffic Signal Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, both travel guidance systems and traffic signal control systems are quite common for urban traffic management. In order to achieve collaborative effect, different models had been proposed in the last two decades. In recent years, with the development of variable message sign (VMS technology, more and more VMS panels are installed on major arterials to provide highly visible and concise graphs or text messages to drivers, especially in developing countries. To discover drivers’ responses to VMS, we establish a drivers’ en route diversion model according to a stated-preference survey. Basically, we proposed a cooperative mechanism and systematic framework of VMS travel guidance and major arterials signal operations. And then a two-stage nested optimization problem is formulated. To solve this optimization problem, a simulation-based optimization method is adopted to optimize the cooperative strategies with TRANSIMS. The proposed method is applied to the real network of Tianjin City comprising of 30 nodes and 46 links. Simulations show that this new method could well improve the network condition by 26.3%. And analysis reveals that GA with nested dynamic programming is an effective technique to solve the optimization problem.

  4. Trastuzumab Resistance: Role for Notch Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinnari Mehta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (ErbB-2/HER2 is a potent breast oncogene that has been shown to be amplified in 20% of breast cancers. Overexpression of ErbB-2 predicts for aggressive tumor behavior, resistance to some cytotoxic and antihormonal therapies, and poor overall survival. Trastuzumab, the humanized, monoclonal antibody directed against ErbB-2 has shown tremendous efficacy and improved overall survival for women when combined with a taxane-based chemotherapy. However, resistance to trastuzumab remains a major concern, most notably in women with metastatic breast cancer. Numerous mechanisms that include overexpression of alternate receptor tyrosine kinases and/or loss of critical tumor suppressors have been proposed in the last several years to elucidate trastuzumab resistance. Here we review the many possible mechanisms of action that could contribute to resistance, and novel therapies to prevent or reverse the resistant phenotype. Moreover, we provide a critical role for Notch signaling cross-talk with overlapping or new signaling networks in trastuzumab-resistant breast.

  5. Role of investment heterogeneity in the cooperation on spatial public goods game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wu-Jie; Xia, Cheng-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Public cooperation plays a significant role in the survival and maintenance of biological species, to elucidate its origin thus becomes an interesting question from various disciplines. Through long-term development, the public goods game has proven to be a useful tool, where cooperator making contribution can beat again the free-rides. Differentiating from the traditional homogeneous investment, individual trend of making contribution is more likely affected by the investment level of his neighborhood. Based on this fact, we here investigate the impact of heterogeneous investment on public cooperation, where the investment sum is mapped to the proportion of cooperators determined by parameter α. Interestingly, we find, irrespective of interaction networks, that the increment of α (increment of heterogeneous investment) is beneficial for promoting cooperation and even guarantees the complete cooperation dominance under weak replication factor. While this promotion effect can be attributed to the formation of more robust cooperator clusters and shortening END period. Moreover, we find that this simple mechanism can change the potential interaction network, which results in the change of phase diagrams. We hope that our work may shed light on the understanding of the cooperative behavior in other social dilemmas.

  6. Role of investment heterogeneity in the cooperation on spatial public goods game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Jie Yuan

    Full Text Available Public cooperation plays a significant role in the survival and maintenance of biological species, to elucidate its origin thus becomes an interesting question from various disciplines. Through long-term development, the public goods game has proven to be a useful tool, where cooperator making contribution can beat again the free-rides. Differentiating from the traditional homogeneous investment, individual trend of making contribution is more likely affected by the investment level of his neighborhood. Based on this fact, we here investigate the impact of heterogeneous investment on public cooperation, where the investment sum is mapped to the proportion of cooperators determined by parameter α. Interestingly, we find, irrespective of interaction networks, that the increment of α (increment of heterogeneous investment is beneficial for promoting cooperation and even guarantees the complete cooperation dominance under weak replication factor. While this promotion effect can be attributed to the formation of more robust cooperator clusters and shortening END period. Moreover, we find that this simple mechanism can change the potential interaction network, which results in the change of phase diagrams. We hope that our work may shed light on the understanding of the cooperative behavior in other social dilemmas.

  7. How Public High School Students Assume Cooperative Roles to Develop Their EFL Speaking Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Natalie Parra Espinel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes an investigation we carried out in order to identify how the specific roles that 7th grade public school students assumed when they worked cooperatively were related to their development of speaking skills in English. Data were gathered through interviews, field notes, students’ reflections and audio recordings. The findings revealed that students who were involved in cooperative activities chose and assumed roles taking into account preferences, skills and personality traits. In the same manner, when learners worked together, their roles were affected by each other and they put into practice some social strategies with the purpose of supporting their embryonic speaking development.

  8. A Role Model Approach to Job Transition for Disadvantaged Cooperative Home Economics Students. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestle, Ruth

    A pilot project implemented a role-model approach to job transition for disadvantaged cooperative home economics students in Tulsa and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. From 1974 through 1976, 21 students in four urban high schools were matched with role models on the job. Sixteen of these students retained their jobs. The matches included many different…

  9. Promote or hinder? The role of punishment in the emergence of cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shiping; Wu, Te; Nie, Suli; Wang, Long

    2015-12-07

    Investigation of anti-social punishment has shaken the positive role of punishment in the evolution of cooperation. However, punishment is ubiquitous in nature, and the centralized, apposed to decentralized, punishment is more favored by certain modern societies in particular. To explore the underlying principle of such phenomenon, we study the evolution of cooperation in the context of pro- and anti-social punishments subject to two distinct patterns: costly centralized and decentralized punishments. The results suggest that the pattern of punishment has a great effect on the role of punishment in the evolution of cooperation. In the absence of anti-social punishment, the costly centralized punishment is more effective in promoting the emergence of cooperation. Anti-social punishment can subvert the positive role of punishment when anti- and pro-social punishments are in the same pattern. However, driven by centralized pro-social punishment, cooperation can be more advantageous than defection even in the presence of decentralized anti-social punishment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cooperative signaling between Slit2 and Ephrin-A1 regulates a balance between angiogenesis and angiostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaway, Charlene M; Hwang, Yoonha; Lindsley, Craig W; Cook, Rebecca S; Wu, Jane Y; Boothby, Mark; Chen, Jin; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M

    2011-02-01

    Slit proteins induce cytoskeletal remodeling through interaction with roundabout (Robo) receptors, regulating migration of neurons and nonneuronal cells, including leukocytes, tumor cells, and endothelium. The role of Slit2 in vascular remodeling, however, remains controversial, with reports of both pro- and antiangiogenic activity. We report here that cooperation between Slit2 and ephrin-A1 regulates a balance between the pro- and antiangiogenic functions of Slit2. While Slit2 promotes angiogenesis in culture and in vivo as a single agent, Slit2 potently inhibits angiogenic remodeling in the presence of ephrin-A1. Slit2 stimulates angiogenesis through mTORC2-dependent activation of Akt and Rac GTPase, the activities of which are inhibited in the presence of ephrin-A1. Activated Rac or Akt partially rescues vascular assembly and motility in costimulated endothelium. Taken together, these data suggest that Slit2 differentially regulates angiogenesis in the context of ephrin-A1, providing a plausible mechanism for the pro- versus antiangiogenic functions of Slit2. Our results suggest that the complex roles of Slit-Robo signaling in angiogenesis involve context-dependent mechanisms.

  11. Effects of gender and role selection in cooperative learning groups on science inquiry achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affhalter, Maria Geralyn

    An action research project using science inquiry labs and cooperative learning groups examined the effects of same-gender and co-educational classrooms on science achievement and teacher-assigned or self-selected group roles on students' role preferences. Fifty-nine seventh grade students from a small rural school district participated in two inquiry labs in co-educational classrooms or in an all-female classroom, as determined by parents at the beginning of the academic year. Students were assigned to the same cooperative groups for the duration of the study. Pretests and posttests were administered for each inquiry-based science lab. Posttest assessments included questions for student reflection on role assignment and role preference. Instruction did not vary and a female science teacher taught all class sections. The same-gender classroom and co-ed classrooms produced similar science achievement scores on posttests. Students' cooperative group roles, whether teacher-assigned or self-selected, produced similar science achievement scores on posttests. Male and female students shared equally in favorable and unfavorable reactions to their group roles during the science inquiry labs. Reflections on the selection of the leader role revealed a need for females in co-ed groups to be "in charge". When reflecting on her favorite role of leader, one female student in a co-ed group stated, "I like to have people actually listen to me".

  12. Helping as a signal and the effect of a potential audience during provisioning visits in a cooperative bird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDonald, Paul G.; Te Marvelde, Luc; Kazem, Anahita J. N.; Wright, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Research on cooperative breeding has begun to focus on direct fitness benefits gained by helpers, particularly when individuals are unrelated to those they assist. There has been considerable interest in helping possibly operating as a signal, either to show off individual quality to potential mates

  13. Role of inositol phospholipid signaling in natural killer cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew eGumbleton

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are important in the host defense against malignancy and infection. At a cellular level NK cells are activated when signals from activating receptors exceed signaling from inhibitory receptors. At a molecular level NK cells undergo an education process to prevent autoimmunity. Mouse models have shown important roles for inositol phospholipid signaling in lymphocytes. NK cells from mice with deletion in different members of the PI3K signaling pathway have defective development, natural killer cell repertoire expression (NKRR and effector function. Here we review the role of inositol phospholipid signaling in NK cell biology.

  14. Local and Sustainable Food Supply: The Role of European Retail Consumer Co-operatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hingley

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  This paper investigates the rationale for local and sustainable food systems and retailer co-operatives as their entry points within local conditions. Emphasis is on localised food networks and connection between socially as well as environmentally sustainable production, distribution and consumption. Investigated is the premise that co-operative organisational structures, for reasons of their long-term socially responsible origins are at the forefront of development of local and sustainable food systems and are thereby in a position to offer a specific contribution to market development. Two key research questions are proposed: Firstly, is there a pre-determination of co-operatives to issues of sustainable and local food sourcing given the historical and practical context of their ethical/socially responsible and stakeholder-based business model? Secondly, do co-ops express support for re-localising food systems and what contribution do they make concerning sustainable food and their relationships with local food suppliers? The method of investigation is through a two country retailer co-operative sector analysis and comparison (Finland and Italy. The enquiry is qualitative and exploratory in nature in the form of an embedded, multiple case design. The paper makes practical and theoretical contribution to knowledge concerning interpretation of ‘localness’ in food, the role of co-operatives and the co-operative ethos in sustainable food systems and the development of the local food economy. Results of the study show a positive relationship between co-operative ethos and (social sustainability in local food, but the de-centralised nature of retailer co-operation also provides a barrier to replication of good practice.

  15. RESENHA DO LIVRO: "RESHAPING DEFENCE DIPLOMACY: NEW ROLES FOR MILITARY COOPERATION AND ASSISTANCE"

    OpenAIRE

    Rezende, Lucas Pereira; UFRGS / Facamp

    2011-01-01

    Resenha do livro Rehaping Defense Diplomacy: New Roles for Military Cooperation and Assistance. Trata-se de uma obra que discorre a respeito dos novos papéis da cooperação militar em tempos de paz no período pós-1990, apontando padrões, sucessos e desafios a serem enfrentados.

  16. Role of Notch signaling in the mammalian heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.L.; Liu, J.C. [Department of Cardiac Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang University, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi (China)

    2013-12-12

    Notch signaling is an evolutionarily ancient, highly conserved pathway important for deciding cell fate, cellular development, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Notch signaling is also critical in mammalian cardiogenesis, as mutations in this signaling pathway are linked to human congenital heart disease. Furthermore, Notch signaling can repair myocardial injury by promoting myocardial regeneration, protecting ischemic myocardium, inducing angiogenesis, and negatively regulating cardiac fibroblast-myofibroblast transformation. This review provides an update on the known roles of Notch signaling in the mammalian heart. The goal is to assist in developing strategies to influence Notch signaling and optimize myocardial injury repair.

  17. The functional role of Notch signaling in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2010-01-01

    have been referred to as brain cancer stem cells (bCSC), as they share similarities to normal neural stem cells in the brain. The Notch signaling pathway is involved in cell fate decisions throughout normal development and in stem cell proliferation and maintenance. The role of Notch in cancer is now...... firmly established, and recent data implicate a role for Notch signaling also in gliomas and bCSC. In this review, we explore the role of the Notch signaling pathway in gliomas with emphasis on its role in normal brain development and its interplay with pathways and processes that are characteristic...

  18. Roles of RUNX in Hippo Pathway Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaniti, Antonino; Brusgard, Jessica L; Qiao, Yiting; Sudol, Marius; Finch-Edmondson, Megan

    2017-01-01

    The Runt-domain (RD) transcription factors (RUNX genes) are an important family of transcriptional mediators that interact with a variety of proteins including the Hippo pathway effector proteins, YAP and TAZ. In this chapter we focus on two examples of RUNX-TAZ/YAP interactions that have particular significance in human cancer. Specifically, recent evidence has found that RUNX2 cooperates with TAZ to promote epithelial to mesenchymal transition mediated by the soluble N-terminal ectodomain of E-Cadherin, sE-Cad. Contrastingly, in gastric cancer, RUNX3 acts as a tumor suppressor via inhibition of the YAP-TEAD complex and disruption of downstream YAP-mediated gene transcription and the oncogenic phenotype. The reports highlighted in this chapter add to the growing repertoire of instances of Hippo pathway crosstalk that have been identified in cancer. Elucidation of these increasingly complex interactions may help to identify novel strategies to target Hippo pathway dysregulation in human cancer.

  19. [Roles and cooperation of medical professionals in natural disasters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tadayoshi

    2013-01-01

    We have reconsidered the responsibility of occupational therapists who have been supporting the victims of the Great East Japan Earthquake. They can analyze problems and provide appropriate support for victims with rehabilitation and occupational therapy as well as for handicapped people. Support measures that can be provided by occupational therapists are as follows: 1) Maintenance and improvement of mind and body functions through occupational therapy. 2) Mental care. 3) Coordination of social circumstances for elderly and handicapped people. 4) Maintenance and improvement of ability to perform common activities of daily living. 5) Choice and adaptation of welfare equipment. Especially, occupational therapy provided with the aim to open victims' minds has an effect on mental care. Their mental wounds cannot be healed easily. However, networking and work activities play important roles in dealing with daily life. Occupational therapists will be expected to provide long-term treatment for victims through work activities with professional skills.

  20. Iran’s Role in Iraq: Room for U.S.-Iran Cooperation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Perspective Expert insights on a timely policy issueC O R P O R A T I O N Iran’s Role in Iraq Room for U.S.- Iran Cooperation? Alireza Nader The rise of...Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) has led to argu- ments in favor of U.S.- Iran cooperation in combating the group, as immediate American and...the-ground presence in Iraq. While the United States and Iran ultimately have divergent long-term goals for Iraq, and face disagreements on many other

  1. Cooperation between cAMP signalling and sulfonylurea in insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, T; Takahashi, T; Takahashi, H; Seino, S

    2014-09-01

    Although glucose is physiologically the most important regulator of insulin secretion, glucose-induced insulin secretion is modulated by hormonal and neural inputs to pancreatic β-cells. Most of the hormones and neurotransmitters evoke intracellular signals such as cAMP, Ca²⁺ , and phospholipid-derived molecules by activating G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In particular, cAMP is a key second messenger that amplifies insulin secretion in a glucose concentration-dependent manner. The action of cAMP on insulin secretion is mediated by both protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent and Epac2A-dependent mechanisms. Many of the proteins expressed in β-cells are phosphorylated by PKA in vitro, but only a few proteins in which PKA phosphorylation directly affects insulin secretion have been identified. On the other hand, Epac2A activates the Ras-like small G protein Rap in a cAMP-dependent manner. Epac2A is also directly activated by various sulfonylureas, except for gliclazide. 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analogue, and glibenclamide, a sulfonylurea, synergistically activate Epac2A and Rap1, whereas adrenaline, which suppresses cAMP production in pancreatic β-cells, blocks activation of Epac2A and Rap1 by glibenclamide. Thus, cAMP signalling and sulfonylurea cooperatively activate Epac2A and Rap1. This interaction could account, at least in part, for the synergistic effects of incretin-related drugs and sulfonylureas in insulin secretion. Accordingly, clarification of the mechanism of Epac2A activation may provide therapeutic strategies to improve insulin secretion in diabetes.

  2. Role of Interdisciplinary Cooperation in Process of Documentation of Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindřich Hodač

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on presentation of results of long-term interdisciplinary cooperation in a process of documentation of Cultural Heritage. There are two sides joined in this cooperation. The first side is a ,,submitter” - in our case it means architect-historian (Mr. Rykl. The second side is a ,,contractor” - in our case it means surveyorphotogrammetrist (Mr. Hodač and his students. We are cooperating mostly on projects of metrical documentation of Culture Heritage buildings and sites. Our cooperation is realizing mainly in bachelor„s/master’s projects. Other opportunity for our collaboration is our course [1]. We are offering this course to students of two faculties/specializations (surveyors + architects. Beside the wide range of real results (2D drawings, 3D models, photomaps etc. we also collected quite a lot of experience with process of collaboration itself. Cooperation and communication of submitter and contactor are playing key roles for successful project. It is possible to generally expect that submitter will give the ,,task” and contractor will try to find proper technology to solve it. The process of communication should be permanent because new circumstances and findings are arising all the time. It is very important for all together to find common language across specializations to understand each other. Surveyors are ,,slightly pressed” to get more knowledge about historical building constructions. Architects-historians should get basic awareness about various recent technologies for metrical documentation and its ,,pros and cons”.

  3. The role of neuroimmune signaling in alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Fulton T; Lawrimore, Colleen J; Walter, T Jordan; Coleman, Leon G

    2017-08-01

    Alcohol consumption and stress increase brain levels of known innate immune signaling molecules. Microglia, the innate immune cells of the brain, and neurons respond to alcohol, signaling through Toll-like receptors (TLRs), high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), miRNAs, pro-inflammatory cytokines and their associated receptors involved in signaling between microglia, other glia and neurons. Repeated cycles of alcohol and stress cause a progressive, persistent induction of HMGB1, miRNA and TLR receptors in brain that appear to underlie the progressive and persistent loss of behavioral control, increased impulsivity and anxiety, as well as craving, coupled with increasing ventral striatal responses that promote reward seeking behavior and increase risk of developing alcohol use disorders. Studies employing anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-depressant, and innate immune antagonists further link innate immune gene expression to addiction-like behaviors. Innate immune molecules are novel targets for addiction and affective disorders therapies. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled "Alcoholism". Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Transposon mutagenesis reveals cooperation of ETS family transcription factors with signaling pathways in erythro-megakaryocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian Zhong; Carmichael, Catherine L; Shi, Wei; Metcalf, Donald; Ng, Ashley P; Hyland, Craig D; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Howell, Viive M; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe; Smyth, Gordon K; Kile, Benjamin T; Alexander, Warren S

    2013-04-09

    To define genetic lesions driving leukemia, we targeted cre-dependent Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis to the blood-forming system using a hematopoietic-selective vav 1 oncogene (vav1) promoter. Leukemias of diverse lineages ensued, most commonly lymphoid leukemia and erythroleukemia. The inclusion of a transgenic allele of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)V617F resulted in acceleration of transposon-driven disease and strong selection for erythroleukemic pathology with transformation of bipotential erythro-megakaryocytic cells. The genes encoding the E-twenty-six (ETS) transcription factors Ets related gene (Erg) and Ets1 were the most common sites for transposon insertion in SB-induced JAK2V617F-positive erythroleukemias, present in 87.5% and 65%, respectively, of independent leukemias examined. The role of activated Erg was validated by reproducing erythroleukemic pathology in mice transplanted with fetal liver cells expressing translocated in liposarcoma (TLS)-ERG, an activated form of ERG found in human leukemia. Via application of SB mutagenesis to TLS-ERG-induced erythroid transformation, we identified multiple loci as likely collaborators with activation of Erg. Jak2 was identified as a common transposon insertion site in TLS-ERG-induced disease, strongly validating the cooperation between JAK2V617F and transposon insertion at the Erg locus in the JAK2V617F-positive leukemias. Moreover, loci expressing other regulators of signal transduction pathways were conspicuous among the common transposon insertion sites in TLS-ERG-driven leukemia, suggesting that a key mechanism in erythroleukemia may be the collaboration of lesions disturbing erythroid maturation, most notably in genes of the ETS family, with mutations that reduce dependence on exogenous signals.

  5. Quantifying the Role of Homophily in Human Cooperation Using Multiplex Evolutionary Game Theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Di Stefano

    Full Text Available Nature shows as human beings live and grow inside social structures. This assumption allows us to explain and explore how it may shape most of our behaviours and choices, and why we are not just blindly driven by instincts: our decisions are based on more complex cognitive reasons, based on our connectedness on different spaces. Thus, human cooperation emerges from this complex nature of social network. Our paper, focusing on the evolutionary dynamics, is intended to explore how and why it happens, and what kind of impact is caused by homophily among people. We investigate the evolution of human cooperation using evolutionary game theory on multiplex. Multiplexity, as an extra dimension of analysis, allows us to unveil the hidden dynamics and observe non-trivial patterns within a population across network layers. More importantly, we find a striking role of homophily, as the higher the homophily between individuals, the quicker is the convergence towards cooperation in the social dilemma. The simulation results, conducted both macroscopically and microscopically across the network layers in the multiplex, show quantitatively the role of homophily in human cooperation.

  6. Quantifying the Role of Homophily in Human Cooperation Using Multiplex Evolutionary Game Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Alessandro; Scatà, Marialisa; La Corte, Aurelio; Liò, Pietro; Catania, Emanuele; Guardo, Ermanno; Pagano, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Nature shows as human beings live and grow inside social structures. This assumption allows us to explain and explore how it may shape most of our behaviours and choices, and why we are not just blindly driven by instincts: our decisions are based on more complex cognitive reasons, based on our connectedness on different spaces. Thus, human cooperation emerges from this complex nature of social network. Our paper, focusing on the evolutionary dynamics, is intended to explore how and why it happens, and what kind of impact is caused by homophily among people. We investigate the evolution of human cooperation using evolutionary game theory on multiplex. Multiplexity, as an extra dimension of analysis, allows us to unveil the hidden dynamics and observe non-trivial patterns within a population across network layers. More importantly, we find a striking role of homophily, as the higher the homophily between individuals, the quicker is the convergence towards cooperation in the social dilemma. The simulation results, conducted both macroscopically and microscopically across the network layers in the multiplex, show quantitatively the role of homophily in human cooperation.

  7. Role of NAADP in Coordinating Spatiotemporal Aspects of Calcium Signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Grant C.; Galione, Antony

    We outline the roles of two low molecular weight phosphorylated compounds as intracellular messengers in calcium signaling. These new intracellular messengers (cyclic ADP-ribose-cADPR and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate-NAADP) have been shown to regulate calcium signalling across the plant and animal kingdoms. A central question in cell biology is what are the mechanisms by which calcium ions, arguably most important and universal regulator of cell activation, can encode specificity. The hypothesis that we have been testing is that exist in cells multiple signalling molecules and pathways which give rise to different patterns of calcium signals leading to highly specific cellular responses. We discuss new information about the molecular components of these new Ca 2+ signalling pathways and their role in generating Ca 2+ signals.

  8. The Krüppel traffic report: Cooperative signals direct KLF8 nuclear transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Estefanía Rodríguez; John A Martignetti

    2009-01-01

    @@ The Krüppel-like transcription fac-tor (KLF) family consists of 17 dis-tinct family members involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes including differentiation, cell prolifera-tion, growth-related signal transduction, angiogenesis and apoptosis (recently reviewed in [1]). In addition to their currently known biologic roles, the discovery that at least one member of the family, KLF6, can be alternatively spliced into biologically active isoforms with antagonistic functions and a dis-tinct subcellular localization pattern [2], highlights the fact that nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of KLF proteins may represent an additional layer of functional regulation and the possibility of an even more diverse and completely unexplored role for KLF family mem-bers in both health and disease.

  9. Role of the phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway in the endometrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenza Rita Lo Vasco

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium concentration triggers physiological events in all cell types. Unregulated elevation in calcium concentrations is often cytotoxic.In fact, uncontrolled calcium levels alter proteins’ function, apoptosis regulation, as well as proliferation, secretion and contraction.Calcium levels are tightly regulated.A great interest was paid to signal transduction pathways for their role in mammalian reproduction.The role of phosphoinositide(PI) signal transduction pathway and related phosphoinositide-specific phospholipaseC(PI-PLC) enzymes in the regulation of calcium levels was actively studied and characterized.However, the role of PI signaling andPI-PLC enzymes in the endometrium is far to be completely highlighted.In the present review the role ofPI, the expression of selectedPI-PLC enzymes and the crosstalk with further signaling systems in the endometrium will be discussed.

  10. FGF signalling: diverse roles during early vertebrate embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorey, Karel; Amaya, Enrique

    2010-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling has been implicated during several phases of early embryogenesis, including the patterning of the embryonic axes, the induction and/or maintenance of several cell lineages and the coordination of morphogenetic movements. Here, we summarise our current understanding of the regulation and roles of FGF signalling during early vertebrate development.

  11. The role of leadership in bridging the cultural divide within university-industry cooperative research centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahdad, Maral; Bogers, Marcel; Piccaluga, Andrea

    The purpose of this study is to understand the role of leadership in bridging the cultural gap within university-industry cooperative research centres. Many different aspects of university-industry collaborations have been researched, but the role of leadership in such organizations has not been...... deeply investigated. In order to advance our understanding in this context, our multiple case study addresses the question of how leadership bridges the cultural divide within university-industry joint laboratories. Our results are derived from 53 in-depth interviews with laboratory directors...... by distributed leadership practices at the collective level as being crucial in bridging the cultural divide between individuals within university-industry research centres. Our qualitative analysis draws on an analytical framework for leadership of university-industry cooperative research centres. Our findings...

  12. The role of cooperation for improved stewardship of marine social-ecological systems in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Villasante

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Latin American and Caribbean (LAC countries are among the worlds' richest in marine biodiversity. Fish stocks in these regions are important for fishing communities, and fishing activities engage several million people. These fisheries depend on the natural services provided by a diverse range of marine social-ecological systems, but many LAC fisheries are in a degraded state, and concerns about overexploitation are widespread. With most fishery resources fully exploited or overexploited, opportunities for development lie primarily in restoring depleted stocks and using stocks more efficiently. The papers published in the Special Feature "Cooperation, Local Communities, and Marine Social-Ecological Systems: New Findings from Latin America" present a range of experiences with ecosystem stewardship in the region and highlight promising perspectives for the future. The Special Feature consists of papers that deal with new findings from case studies which show how cooperation is key for building resilience in LAC fisheries. These case studies illustrate the effects of different types of cooperation and the roles of diverse stakeholders (fishers, scientists, environmental nongovernmental organizations, and national administrations, among others in different countries of the region. Combined, these papers describe social processes, leadership, and institutional and organizational changes of relevance for stewardship of marine social-ecological systems in Latin America. The field of resilience research is still in an explorative phase in the region, and our ambition with this Special Feature is that the new discoveries presented may stimulate additional research in this field, including increased international cooperation with LAC scientists.

  13. Role of Dopamine Signaling in Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan; Nong, Zhihuan; Li, Yaoxuan; Huang, Jianping; Chen, Chunxia; Huang, Luying

    2017-01-01

    Addiction is a chronic, relapsing disease of the brain that includes drug-induced compulsive seeking behavior and consumption of drugs. Dopamine (DA) is considered to be critical in drug addiction due to reward mechanisms in the midbrain. In this article, we review the major animal models in addictive drug experiments in vivo and in vitro. We discuss the relevance of the structure and pharmacological function of DA receptors. To improve the understanding of the role of DA receptors in reward pathways, specific brain regions, including the Ventral tegmental area, Nucleus accumbens, Prefrontal cortex, and Habenula, are highlighted. These factors contribute to the development of novel therapeutic targets that act at DA receptors. In addiction, the development of neuroimaging method will increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying drug addiction. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. The functional role of Notch signaling in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2010-01-01

    have been referred to as brain cancer stem cells (bCSC), as they share similarities to normal neural stem cells in the brain. The Notch signaling pathway is involved in cell fate decisions throughout normal development and in stem cell proliferation and maintenance. The role of Notch in cancer is now......Gliomas are among the most devastating adult tumors for which there is currently no cure. The tumors are derived from brain glial tissue and comprise several diverse tumor forms and grades. Recent reports highlight the importance of cancer-initiating cells in the malignancy of gliomas. These cells...... firmly established, and recent data implicate a role for Notch signaling also in gliomas and bCSC. In this review, we explore the role of the Notch signaling pathway in gliomas with emphasis on its role in normal brain development and its interplay with pathways and processes that are characteristic...

  15. The Hedgehog-binding proteins Gas1 and Cdo cooperate to positively regulate Shh signaling during mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Benjamin L; Tenzen, Toyoaki; McMahon, Andrew P

    2007-05-15

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is critical for patterning and growth during mammalian embryogenesis. Transcriptional profiling identified Growth-arrest-specific 1 (Gas1) as a general negative target of Shh signaling. Data presented here define Gas1 as a novel positive component of the Shh signaling cascade. Removal of Gas1 results in a Shh dose-dependent loss of cell identities in the ventral neural tube and facial and skeletal defects, also consistent with reduced Shh signaling. In contrast, ectopic Gas1 expression results in Shh-dependent cell-autonomous promotion of ventral cell identities. These properties mirror those of Cdo, an unrelated, cell surface Shh-binding protein. We show that Gas1 and Cdo cooperate to promote Shh signaling during neural tube patterning, craniofacial, and vertebral development. Overall, these data support a new paradigm in Shh signaling whereby positively acting ligand-binding components, which are initially expressed in responding tissues to promote signaling, are then down-regulated by active Hh signaling, thereby modulating responses to ligand input.

  16. The cooperation between hMena overexpression and HER2 signalling in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Modugno, Francesca; Mottolese, Marcella; DeMonte, Lucia; Trono, Paola; Balsamo, Michele; Conidi, Andrea; Melucci, Elisa; Terrenato, Irene; Belleudi, Francesca; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Alessio, Massimo; Santoni, Angela; Nisticò, Paola

    2010-12-30

    hMena and the epithelial specific isoform hMena(11a) are actin cytoskeleton regulatory proteins belonging to the Ena/VASP family. EGF treatment of breast cancer cell lines upregulates hMena/hMena(11a) expression and phosphorylates hMena(11a), suggesting cross-talk between the ErbB receptor family and hMena/hMena(11a) in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether the hMena/hMena(11a) overexpression cooperates with HER-2 signalling, thereby affecting the HER2 mitogenic activity in breast cancer. In a cohort of breast cancer tissue samples a significant correlation among hMena, HER2 overexpression, the proliferation index (high Ki67), and phosphorylated MAPK and AKT was found and among the molecular subtypes the highest frequency of hMena overexpressing tumors was found in the HER2 subtype. From a clinical viewpoint, concomitant overexpression of HER2 and hMena identifies a subgroup of breast cancer patients showing the worst prognosis, indicating that hMena overexpression adds prognostic information to HER2 overexpressing tumors. To identify a functional link between HER2 and hMena, we show here that HER2 transfection in MCF7 cells increased hMena/hMena(11a) expression and hMena(11a) phosphorylation. On the other hand, hMena/hMena(11a) knock-down reduced HER3, AKT and p44/42 MAPK phosphorylation and inhibited the EGF and NRG1-dependent HER2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation. Of functional significance, hMena/hMena(11a) knock-down reduced the mitogenic activity of EGF and NRG1. Collectively these data provide new insights into the relevance of hMena and hMena(11a) as downstream effectors of the ErbB receptor family which may represent a novel prognostic indicator in breast cancer progression, helping to stratify patients.

  17. The cooperation between hMena overexpression and HER2 signalling in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Di Modugno

    Full Text Available hMena and the epithelial specific isoform hMena(11a are actin cytoskeleton regulatory proteins belonging to the Ena/VASP family. EGF treatment of breast cancer cell lines upregulates hMena/hMena(11a expression and phosphorylates hMena(11a, suggesting cross-talk between the ErbB receptor family and hMena/hMena(11a in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether the hMena/hMena(11a overexpression cooperates with HER-2 signalling, thereby affecting the HER2 mitogenic activity in breast cancer. In a cohort of breast cancer tissue samples a significant correlation among hMena, HER2 overexpression, the proliferation index (high Ki67, and phosphorylated MAPK and AKT was found and among the molecular subtypes the highest frequency of hMena overexpressing tumors was found in the HER2 subtype. From a clinical viewpoint, concomitant overexpression of HER2 and hMena identifies a subgroup of breast cancer patients showing the worst prognosis, indicating that hMena overexpression adds prognostic information to HER2 overexpressing tumors. To identify a functional link between HER2 and hMena, we show here that HER2 transfection in MCF7 cells increased hMena/hMena(11a expression and hMena(11a phosphorylation. On the other hand, hMena/hMena(11a knock-down reduced HER3, AKT and p44/42 MAPK phosphorylation and inhibited the EGF and NRG1-dependent HER2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation. Of functional significance, hMena/hMena(11a knock-down reduced the mitogenic activity of EGF and NRG1. Collectively these data provide new insights into the relevance of hMena and hMena(11a as downstream effectors of the ErbB receptor family which may represent a novel prognostic indicator in breast cancer progression, helping to stratify patients.

  18. A conserved role for retinoid signaling in vertebrate pancreas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, D; Hornbruch, A; Mueller, P R; Prince, V E

    2004-09-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) signaling plays critical roles in the regionalization of the central nervous system and mesoderm of all vertebrates that have been examined. However, to date, a role for RA in pancreas and liver development has only been demonstrated for the teleost zebrafish. Here, we demonstrate that RA signaling is required for development of the pancreas but not the liver in the amphibian Xenopus laevis and the avian quail. We disrupted RA signaling in Xenopus tadpoles, using both a pharmacological and a dominant-negative strategy. RA-deficient quail embryos were obtained from hens with a dietary deficiency in vitamin A. In both species we found that pancreas development was dependent on RA signaling. Furthermore, treatment of Xenopus tadpoles with exogenous RA led to an expansion of the pancreatic field. By contrast, liver development was not perturbed by manipulation of RA signaling. Taken together with our previous finding that RA signaling is necessary and sufficient for zebrafish pancreas development, these data support the hypothesis that a critical role for RA signaling in pancreas development is a conserved feature of the vertebrates.

  19. The Role of Cooperation and Information Exchange in Transnational River Basins: the Zambezi River case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelletti, A.; Giuliani, M.; Soncini-Sessa, R.

    2012-12-01

    The presence of multiple, institutionally independent but physically interconnected decision-makers is a distinctive features of many water resources systems, especially of transnational river basins. The adoption of a centralized approach to study the optimal operation of these systems, as mostly done in the water resources literature, is conceptually interesting to quantify the best achievable performance, but of little practical impact given the real political and institutional setting. Centralized management indeed assumes a cooperative attitude and full information exchange by the involved parties. However, when decision-makers belong to different countries or institutions, it is very likely that they act considering only their local objectives, producing global externalities that negatively impact on other objectives. In this work we adopt a Multi-Agent Systems framework, which naturally allows to represent a set of self-interested agents (decision-makers and/or stakeholders) acting in a distributed decision-making process. According to this agent-based approach, each agent represents a decision-maker, whose decisions are defined by an explicit optimization problem considering only the agent's local interests. In particular, this work assesses the role of information exchange and increasing level of cooperation among originally non-cooperative agents. The Zambezi River basin is used to illustrate the methodology: the four largest reservoirs in the basin (Ithezhithezhi, Kafue-Gorge, Kariba and Cahora Bassa) are mainly operated for maximizing the economic revenue from hydropower energy production with considerably negative effects on the aquatic ecosystem in the Zambezi delta due to the alteration of the natural flow regime. We comparatively analyse the ideal centralized solution and the current situation where all the decision-makers act independently and non-cooperatively. Indeed, although a new basin-level institution called Zambezi Watercourse Commission

  20. Novel roles for GlcNAc in cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Shamoon; Parrino, Salvatore M; Buenten, Dane M; Konopka, James B

    2012-03-01

    N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) has long been known to play important roles in cell surface structure. Recent studies are now revealing new functions for GlcNAc in cell signaling. Exposure to GlcNAc regulates virulence functions in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans and in pathogenic bacteria. These signaling pathways sense exogenous GlcNAc and are distinct from the O-GlcNAc signaling pathways in mammalian cells in which increased levels of intracellular GlcNAc synthesis leads to post-translational modification of proteins by attachment of O-GlcNAc. The novel roles of GlcNAc in cell signaling will be the subject of this mini-review.

  1. Role of signal peptides in targeting of proteins in cyanobacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Mackle, M M; Zilinskas, B A

    1994-01-01

    Proteins of cyanobacteria may be transported across one of two membrane systems: the typical eubacterial cell envelope (consisting of an inner membrane, periplasmic space, and an outer membrane) and the photosynthetic thylakoids. To investigate the role of signal peptides in targeting in cyanobacteria, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was transformed with vectors carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene fused to coding sequences for one of four different signal peptides. ...

  2. Neural tube derived Wnt signals cooperate with FGF signaling in the formation and differentiation of the trigeminal placodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Anthony

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenic placodes are focal thickenings of the embryonic ectoderm that form in the vertebrate head. It is within these structures that the precursors of the majority of the sensory neurons of the cranial ganglia are specified. The trigeminal placodes, the ophthalmic and maxillomandibular, form close to the midbrain-hindbrain boundary and many lines of evidence have shown that signals emanating from this level of the neuraxis are important for the development of the ophthalmic placode. Results Here, we provide the first evidence that both the ophthalmic and maxillomandibular placodes form under the influence of isthmic Wnt and FGF signals. Activated Wnt signals direct development of the Pax3 expressing ophthalmic placodal field and induce premature differentiation of both the ophthalmic and the maxillomandibular placodes. Similarly, overexpression of Fgf8 directs premature differentiation of the trigeminal placodes. Wnt signals require FGF receptor activity to initiate Pax3 expression and, subsequently, the expression of neural markers, such as Brn3a, within the cranial ectoderm. Furthermore, fibroblast growth factor signaling via the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway is required to maintain early neuronal differentiation within the trigeminal placodes. Conclusion We demonstrate the identity of inductive signals that are necessary for trigeminal ganglion formation. This is the first report that describes how isthmic derived Wnt signals act in concert with fibroblast growth factor signaling. Together, both are necessary and sufficient for the establishment and differentiation of the ophthalmic and maxillomandibular placodes and, consequently, the trigeminal ganglion.

  3. Notch signaling: its roles and therapeutic potential in hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yisu; Masiero, Massimo; Banham, Alison H

    2016-05-17

    Notch is a highly conserved signaling system that allows neighboring cells to communicate, thereby controlling their differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, with the outcome of its activation being highly dependent on signal strength and cell type. As such, there is growing evidence that disturbances in physiological Notch signaling contribute to cancer development and growth through various mechanisms. Notch was first reported to contribute to tumorigenesis in the early 90s, through identification of the involvement of the Notch1 gene in the chromosomal translocation t(7;9)(q34;q34.3), found in a small subset of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since then, Notch mutations and aberrant Notch signaling have been reported in numerous other precursor and mature hematological malignancies, of both myeloid and lymphoid origin, as well as many epithelial tumor types. Of note, Notch has been reported to have both oncogenic and tumor suppressor roles, dependent on the cancer cell type. In this review, we will first give a general description of the Notch signaling pathway, and its physiologic role in hematopoiesis. Next, we will review the role of aberrant Notch signaling in several hematological malignancies. Finally, we will discuss current and potential future therapeutic approaches targeting this pathway.

  4. Wnt Signaling Cascades and the Roles of Syndecan Proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pataki, Csilla A; Couchman, John R; Brábek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Wnt signaling comprises a group of pathways emanating from the extracellular environment through cell-surface receptors into the intracellular milieu. Wnt signaling cascades can be divided into two main branches, the canonical/β-catenin pathway and the non-canonical pathways containing the Wnt....../planar cell polarity and Wnt/calcium signaling. Syndecans are type I transmembrane proteoglycans with a long evolutionary history, being expressed in all Bilateria and in almost all cell types. Both Wnt pathways have been extensively studied over the past 30 years and shown to have roles during development...

  5. Role of sphingosine kinase localization in sphingolipid signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Binks; W; Wattenberg

    2010-01-01

    The sphingosine kinases, SK1 and SK2, produce the potent signaling lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). These enzymes have garnered increasing interest for their roles in tumorigenesis, inflammation, vascular diseases, and immunity, as well as other functions. The sphingosine kinases are considered signaling enzymes by producing S1P, and their activity is acutely regulated by a variety of agonists. However, these enzymes are also key players in the control of sphingolipid metabolism. A variety of sphingolipids, such as sphingosine and the ceramides, are potent signaling molecules in their own right. The role of sphingosine kinases in regulating sphingolipid metabolism is potentially a critical aspect of their signaling function. A central aspect of signaling lipids is that their hydrophobic nature constrains them to membranes. Most enzymes of sphingolipid metabolism, including the enzymes that degrade S1P, are membrane enzymes. Therefore the localization of the sphingosine kinases and S1P is likely to be important in S1P signaling. Sphingosine kinase localization affects sphingolipid signaling in several ways. Translocation of SK1 to theplasma membrane promotes extracellular secretion of S1P. SK1 and SK2 localization to specific sites appears to direct S1P to intracellular protein effectors. SK localization also determines the access of these enzymes to their substrates. This may be an important mechanism for the regulation of ceramide biosynthesis by diverting dihydrosphingosine, a precursor in the ceramide biosynthetic pathway, from the de novo production of ceramide.

  6. Vacuolar ion channels: Roles in plant nutrition and signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isayenkov, Stanislav; Isner, Jean Charles; Maathuis, Frans J M

    2010-05-17

    Vacuoles play various roles in many physiologically relevant processes in plants. Some of the more prominent are turgor provision, the storage of minerals and nutrients, and cellular signalling. To fulfil these functions a complement of membrane transporters is present at the tonoplast. Prolific patch clamp studies have shown that amongst these, both selective and non-selective ion channels participate in turgor regulation, nutrient storage and signalling. This article reviews the physiological roles, expression patterns and structure function properties of plant vacuolar anion and cation channels that are gated by voltage and ligands.

  7. Role of cooperative-societies in community development in Sokoto metropolis, Sokoto state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Najamuddeen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted in order assess the role of cooperatives in community development in Sokoto metropolis. The data for this research were obtained by sampling the opinion of 60 respondents all of which are members of different cooperatives in the study area using simple random sampling technique. The research instrument used was questionnaire administration and the data obtained were analyzed using descriptive statistics (frequencies and percentages.The study showed that 50% of the respondents were between the ages of 20 and 30 years. 62% of them sourced their money through personal contributions. The research revealed that the contribution of cooperatives societies in community development through self help effort are more of schools rehabilitation, road construction and other community projects (mosques construction, rehabilitation, donation of books and medicine to schools and community clinic, financial and material assistance to disabled people. 70% of the respondents have stated that that they have not received any assistance from the government. Recommendations were made and an appeal to the government to intensify its effort in financing capacity building and provision of technical facilities.

  8. The role delegation authorization model of a computer-supported cooperative design system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hongxue; LIU Yongxian; GUO Xiuying; SHENG Zhongqi

    2007-01-01

    According to the specific characteristics of a computer-supported cooperative design(CSCD)system,the characteristics of role delegation authorization(RDA)are analyzed and deduced,and a set of fitful status is arrived at.Because of the diversified characteristics of RDA features in different systems,the RDA model has multi-varying status.On the basis of the basic model of role-based access control (RBAC),some basic characteristics of RDA are summed up.Then,according to the specific characteristics of CSCD system,the characteristics of RDA are recombined to develop a RDA model that is suitable for the CSCD system.It is different from the conventional role authorization models of RBAC,that is,it adopts the decentralized authorization management instead of the centralized one in CSCD system,which makes the management more flexible.This model is verified through a specific case of CSCD system.

  9. Cooperation between CD4 and CD8 T cells for anti-tumor activity is enhanced by OX40 signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Aihua; Song, Jianxun; Tang, Xiaohong; Croft, Michael

    2007-05-01

    The relative contribution of OX40 (CD134) to priming of CD8 T cells in complex systems where CD4 and CD8 cells respond and cooperate together is not clear. We previously found that OX40 expressed on tumor-reactive CD8 T cells controls their initial persistence when adoptively transferred in vivo and is required for delayed tumor growth. We now show that exogenous stimulation of OX40 with agonist antibody augments its ability to suppress the growth of new as well as established tumors, correlating with marked expansion of adoptively transferred CD8 T cells. Concomitantly, anti-OX40 strongly enhanced the number of tumor antigen-reactive CD4 T cells. Moreover, the augmented accumulation of CD8 T cells was prevented in animals lacking MHC class II or depleted of CD4 cells and did not occur in OX40-deficient animals receiving wild-type CD8 cells, demonstrating that non-CD8 cells are the major target of OX40 signals. These results suggest that while OX40 signaling to a CD8 T cell can control its expansion, OX40 expressed on non-CD8 cells strongly influences CD8 priming and in vivo activity. OX40 therefore represents an important signal for allowing effective cooperation between CD4 and CD8 cells and for promoting cell interplay and tumor rejection where CD8 activity is limiting.

  10. Role of IKK-alpha in EGFR Signaling Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    We herein identified a novel posttranslational modification of EGFR which plays an indispensable role in regulation of EGFR signaling pathways. We...stringently modulated by a previously unknown and reversible modification , ubiquitination through a distinct TRAF6 binding motif of GSK3β. The...factor, plays an important role in many cancer types. The modification patterns of EGFR are critical for its function and the understanding of these

  11. TGF-β Signaling Cooperates with AT Motif-Binding Factor-1 for Repression of the α-Fetoprotein Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Sakata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available α-Fetoprotein (AFP is known to be highly produced in fetal liver despite its barely detectable level in normal adult liver. On the other hand, hepatocellular carcinoma often shows high expression of AFP. Thus, AFP seems to be an oncogenic marker. In our present study, we investigated how TGF-β signaling cooperates with AT motif-binding factor-1 (ATBF1 to inhibit AFP transcription. Indeed, the expression of AFP mRNA in HuH-7 cells was negatively regulated by TGF-β signaling. To further understand how TGF-β suppresses the transcription of the AFP gene, we analyzed the activity of the AFP promoter in the presence of TGF-β. We found that the TGF-β signaling and ATBF1 suppressed AFP transcription through two ATBF1 binding elements (AT-motifs. Using a heterologous reporter system, both AT-motifs were required for transcriptional repression upon TGF-β stimulation. Furthermore, Smads were found to interact with ATBF1 at both its N-terminal and C-terminal regions. Since the N-terminal (ATBF1N and C-terminal regions of ATBF1 (ATBF1C lack the ability of DNA binding, both truncated mutants rescued the cooperative inhibitory action by the TGF-β signaling and ATBF1 in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings indicate that TGF-β signaling can act in concert with ATBF1 to suppress the activity of the AFP promoter through direct interaction of ATBF1 with Smads.

  12. Expectation and cooperation in prisoner's dilemmas: The moderating role of game riskiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Gary Ting Tat; Au, Wing Tung

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigated the effect of risk orientation, game riskiness, and expectation of cooperation on cooperation in one-shot prisoner's dilemmas (PD). Participants in pairs played PD games that varied on game riskiness such that for half of the games cooperation was more risky than defection (more risky games) while for another half cooperation was less risky (less risky games). They estimated how likely it was that the other player was going to cooperate (expectation of cooperation) before they made their cooperation/defection decision on each game. Supporting the Goal/Expectation Hypothesis, we replicated the effect that expectation of cooperation enhanced cooperation. We also found that risk-seeking individuals cooperated more in more risky games whereas risk-averse individuals cooperated more in less risky games. More importantly, we found that game riskiness moderated the effect of expectation of cooperation on cooperation. The positive effect of expectation of cooperation on cooperation was stronger for more risky games than for less risky games. Our results illustrated how the relation between expectation and cooperation as stipulated by the Goal/Expectation Hypothesis was moderated by riskiness of the situations.

  13. Role of Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Oligodendrocyte Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chun; Almazan, Guillermina

    2016-12-01

    During development, the secreted molecule Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is required for lineage specification and proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs), which are the glia cells responsible for the myelination of axons in the central nervous system (CNS). Shh signaling has been implicated in controlling both the generation of oligodendrocytes (OLGs) during embryonic development and their production in adulthood. Although, some evidence points to a role of Shh signaling in OLG development, its involvement in OLG differentiation remains to be fully determined. The objective of this study was to assess whether Shh signaling is involved in OLG differentiation after neural stem cell commitment to the OLG lineage. To address these questions, we manipulated Shh signaling using cyclopamine, a potent inhibitor of Shh signaling activator Smoothened (Smo), alone or combined with the agonist SAG in OLG primary cultures and assessed expression of myelin-specific markers. We found that inactivation of Shh signaling caused a dose-dependent decrease in myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in differentiating OLGs. Co-treatment of the cells with SAG reversed the inhibitory effect of cyclopamine on both myelin-specific protein levels and morphological changes associated with it. Further experiments are required to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which Shh signaling regulates OLG differentiation.

  14. Efficient and Secure Information Sharing For Security Personnels: A Role and Cooperation Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.K. Pradhan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate users to interact with and share information without difficulty and faultlessly across various networks and databases nationwide, a secure and trusted information-sharing environment has been recognized as an imperative requirement and to advance homeland security effort. The key incentive following this research is to build a secure and trusted information-sharing approach for governmentdepartments. This paper presents an efficient role and cooperation based information sharing approach for secure exchange of confidential and top secret information amongst security personnels and government departments within the national boundaries using public key cryptography. The devised approach makes use of cryptographic hash function; public key cryptosystem and a unique and complex mapping function for securely exchanging confidential information. Furthermore, the proposed approach facilitates privacy preserving information sharing with probable restrictions based on the rank of the security personnels. The developed role and cooperation based information sharing approach ensures secure and stream-lined information sharing among security personnels and government intelligence departments to avoid threatening activities. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of theproposed information sharing approach.

  15. Signal recognition particle and SecA cooperate during export of secretory proteins with highly hydrophobic signal sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufan Zhou

    Full Text Available The Sec translocon of bacterial plasma membranes mediates the linear translocation of secretory proteins as well as the lateral integration of membrane proteins. Integration of many membrane proteins occurs co-translationally via the signal recognition particle (SRP-dependent targeting of ribosome-associated nascent chains to the Sec translocon. In contrast, translocation of classical secretory proteins across the Sec translocon is a post-translational event requiring no SRP but the motor protein SecA. Secretory proteins were, however, reported to utilize SRP in addition to SecA, if the hydrophobicity of their signal sequences exceeds a certain threshold value. Here we have analyzed transport of this subgroup of secretory proteins across the Sec translocon employing an entirely defined in vitro system. We thus found SecA to be both necessary and sufficient for translocation of secretory proteins with hydrophobic signal sequences, whereas SRP and its receptor improved translocation efficiency. This SRP-mediated boost of translocation is likely due to the early capture of the hydrophobic signal sequence by SRP as revealed by site-specific photo cross-linking of ribosome nascent chain complexes.

  16. The duality of gaze: Eyes extract and signal social information during sustained cooperative and competitive dyadic gaze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle eJarick

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to nonhuman primate eyes, which have a dark sclera surrounding a dark iris, human eyes have a white sclera that surrounds a dark iris. This high contrast morphology allows humans to determine quickly and easily where others are looking and infer what they are attending to. In recent years an enormous body of work has used photos and schematic images of faces to study these aspects of social attention, e.g., the selection of the eyes of others and the shift of attention to where those eyes are directed. However, evolutionary theory holds that humans did not develop a high contrast morphology simply to use the eyes of others as attentional cues; rather they sacrificed camouflage for communication, that is, to signal their thoughts and intentions to others. In the present study we demonstrate the importance of this by taking as our starting point the hypothesis that a cornerstone of nonverbal communication is the eye contact between individuals and the time that it is held. In a single simple study we show experimentally that the effect of eye contact can be quickly and profoundly altered merely by having participants, who had never met before, play a game in a cooperative or competitive manner. After the game participants were asked to make eye contact for a prolonged period of time (10 minutes. Those who had played the game cooperatively found this terribly difficult to do, repeatedly talking and breaking gaze. In contrast, those who had played the game competitively were able to stare quietly at each other for a sustained period. Collectively these data demonstrate that when looking at the eyes of a real person one both acquires and signals information to the other person. This duality of gaze is critical to nonverbal communication, with the nature of that communication shaped by the relationship between individuals, e.g., cooperative or competitive.

  17. Role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinsei; Lee, Min Goo

    2014-06-01

    Transepithelial bicarbonate secretion plays a key role in the maintenance of fluid and protein secretion from epithelial cells and the protection of the epithelial cell surface from various pathogens. Epithelial bicarbonate secretion is mainly under the control of cAMP and calcium signaling. While the physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of cAMP-induced bicarbonate secretion are relatively well defined, those induced by calcium signaling remain poorly understood in most epithelia. The present review summarizes the current status of knowledge on the role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion. Specifically, this review introduces how cytosolic calcium signaling can increase bicarbonate secretion by regulating membrane transport proteins and how it synergizes with cAMP-induced mechanisms in epithelial cells. In addition, tissue-specific variations in the pancreas, salivary glands, intestines, bile ducts, and airways are discussed. We hope that the present report will stimulate further research into this important topic. These studies will provide the basis for future medicines for a wide spectrum of epithelial disorders including cystic fibrosis, Sjögren's syndrome, and chronic pancreatitis.

  18. Parameter estimation of DSSS signals in non-cooperative communication system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaoming; Zhang Zhongzhao

    2007-01-01

    A new adaptive estimator for direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) signals using fourth-order cumulant based adaptive method is considered. The general higher-order statistics may not be easily applied in signal processing with too complex computation. Based on the fourth-order cumulant with 1-D slices and adaptive filters, an efficient algorithm is proposed to solve the problem and is extended for nonstationary stochastic processes. In order to achieve thc accurate parameter estimation of direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) signals, the firrst step uses the modified fourth-order cumulant to reduce the computing complexity. While the second step employs an adaptive recursive system to estimate the power spectrum in the frequency domain. In the case of intercepted signals without large enough data samples, the estimator provides good performance in parameter estimation and white Gaussian noise suppression. Computer simulations are included to corroborate the theoretical development with different signal-to-noise ratio conditions and recursive coefficients.

  19. Nemo-like kinase 1 (Nlk1) and paraxial protocadherin (PAPC) cooperatively control Xenopus gastrulation through regulation of Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Ciprianidis, Anja; Theiß, Susanne; Steinbeißer, Herbert; Kaufmann, Lilian T

    The Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway directs cell migration during vertebrate gastrulation and is essential for proper embryonic development. Paraxial protocadherin (PAPC, Gene Symbol pcdh8.2) is an important activator of Wnt/PCP signaling during Xenopus gastrulation, but how PAPC activity is controlled is incompletely understood. Here we show that Nemo-like kinase 1 (Nlk1), an atypical mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, physically associates with the C-terminus of PAPC. This interaction mutually stabilizes both proteins by inhibiting polyubiquitination. The Nlk1 mediated stabilization of PAPC is essential for Wnt/PCP signaling, tissue separation and gastrulation movements. We identified two conserved putative phosphorylation sites in the PAPC C-terminus that are critical for Nlk1 mediated PAPC stabilization and Wnt/PCP regulation. Intriguingly, the kinase activity of Nlk1 itself was not essential for its cooperation with PAPC, suggesting an indirect regulation for example by impeding a different kinase that promotes protein degradation. Overall these results outline a novel, kinase independent role of Nlk1, wherein Nlk1 regulates PAPC stabilization and thereby controls gastrulation movements and Wnt/PCP signaling during development. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of Notch signaling in kidney podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Katsuhiko; Oliva Trejo, Juan Alejandro; Tanaka, Eriko

    2017-02-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a basic cell-to-cell communication mechanism. This pathway is activated by the interaction between Notch receptors and the ligands of adjacent cells. Once activated, Notch receptors are cleaved and the intracellular domains translocate into the nucleus, where the transcription of target genes starts. In the mammalian kidney, Notch receptors are activated during nephrogenesis. Afterwards, in the mature glomeruli, the Notch pathway becomes silent. However, many researchers have reported the activation of Notch receptors in mature podocytes under pathological conditions. In this review, we discuss the role of Notch signaling in podocytes.

  1. Pathophysiological roles of Fgf signaling in the heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki eItoh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac remodeling progresses to heart failure, which represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Cardiomyokines, cardiac secreted proteins, may play roles in cardiac remodeling. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs are secreted proteins with diverse functions, mainly in development and metabolism. However, some FGFs play pathophysiological roles in cardiac remodelling as cardiomyokines. FGF2 promotes cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis by activating MAPK signaling through the activation of FGF receptor (FGFR 1c. In contrast, FGF16 may prevent these by competing with FGF2 for the binding site of FGFR1c. FGF21 prevents cardiac hypertrophy by activating MAPK signaling through the activation of FGFR1c with β-Klotho as a co-receptor. In contrast, FGF23 induces cardiac hypertrophy by activating calcineurin/NFAT signaling without αKlotho. These FGFs play crucial roles in cardiac remodeling via distinct action mechanisms. These findings provide new insights into the pathophysiological roles of FGFs in the heart and may provide potential therapeutic strategies for heart failure.

  2. Role of the right inferior frontal gyrus in turn-based cooperation and competition: A near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Saito, Hirofumi; Oi, Misato

    2015-10-01

    Interpersonal interaction can be classified into two types: concurrent and turn-based interaction, requiring synchronized body-movement and complementary behaviors across persons, respectively. To examine the neural mechanism of turn-based interaction, we simultaneously measured paired participants activations in their bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the bilateral inferior parietal lobule (IPL) in a turn-taking game using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Pairs of participants were assigned to either one of two roles (game builder and the partner) in the game. The builder's task was to make a copy of a target disk-pattern by placing disks on a monitor, while the partner's task was to aid the builder in his/her goal (cooperation condition) or to obstruct it (competition condition). The builder always took the initial move and the partner followed. The NIRS data demonstrated an interaction of role (builder vs. partner) by task-type (cooperation vs. competition) in the right IFG. The builder in the cooperation condition showed higher activation than the cooperator, but the same builder in the competition condition showed lower activation than in the cooperation condition. The activations in the competitor-builder pairs showed positive correlation between their right IFG, but the activations in the cooperator-builder pairs did not. These results suggest that the builder's activation in the right IFG is reduced/increased in the context of interacting with a cooperative/competitive partner. Also, the competitor may actively trace the builder's disk manipulation, leading to deeper mind-set synchronization in the competition condition, while the cooperator may passively follow the builder's move, leading to shallower mind-set synchronization in the cooperation condition.

  3. dsRNA-Dependent Protein Kinase PKR and its Role in Stress, Signaling and HCV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane F. Meurs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR plays multiple roles in cells, in response to different stress situations. As a member of the interferon (IFN‑Stimulated Genes, PKR was initially recognized as an actor in the antiviral action of IFN, due to its ability to control translation, through phosphorylation, of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2a. As such, PKR participates in the generation of stress granules, or autophagy and a number of viruses have designed strategies to inhibit its action. However, PKR deficient mice resist most viral infections, indicating that PKR may play other roles in the cell other than just acting as an antiviral agent. Indeed, PKR regulates several signaling pathways, either as an adapter protein and/or using its kinase activity. Here we review the role of PKR as an eIF2a kinase, its participation in the regulation of the NF-kB, p38MAPK and insulin pathways, and we focus on its role during infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV. PKR binds the HCV IRES RNA, cooperates with some functions of the HCV core protein and may represent a target for NS5A or E2. Novel data points out for a role of PKR as a pro-HCV agent, both as an adapter protein and as an eIF2a-kinase, and in cooperation with the di-ubiquitin-like protein ISG15. Developing pharmaceutical inhibitors of PKR may help in resolving some viral infections as well as stress-related damages.

  4. Low Cost, Low Complexity Sensor Design for Non-Cooperative Geolocation via Received Signal Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    sent through a low pass filter (FLT3) where the 26 signal experiences slight power loss due to filter coloration. The signal is amplified by operational...Markets”. PELOUS Group, NJ, Tech. Rep., 2001. 9. “Wi-Fi Location-Based Services (4.1 Desing Guidie)”, May 2008. URL http: //www.cisco.com/en/US/docs...Architectures, Algorithms and Experiments ”. URL http://paduaresearch.cab.unipd.it/1046/1/EWSN08. 12. Chen, Y. and H. Kobayshi. “Signal Strength Based

  5. The role of SLAM family receptors in immune cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrakhovitch, Elena A; Li, Shawn S-C

    2006-12-01

    The signaling lymphocyte-activating molecule (SLAM) family immunoreceptors are expressed in a wide array of immune cells, including both T and B lymphocytes. By virtue of their ability to transduce tyrosine phosphorylation signals through the so-called ITSM (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif) sequences, they play an important part in regulating both innate and adaptive immune responses. The critical role of the SLAM immunoreceptors in mediating normal immune reactions was highlighted in recent findings that SAP, a SLAM-associated protein, modulates the activities of various immune cells through interactions with different members of the SLAM family expressed in these cells. Importantly, mutations or deletions of the sap gene in humans result in the X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome. In this review, we summarize current knowledge and survey the latest developments in signal transduction events triggered by the activation of SLAM family receptors in different cell types.

  6. The Role of Cultural Diplomacy for Intensifying the Cross Border Cooperation within Danube Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasimir Koev

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The main objective of the paper is to highlight the role of cultural diplomacy for strengthening the international cooperation within the Danube macro-region. Prior Work: Some leading points of view in the field of cultural diplomacy serve as a theoretical background of the paper. In order to prove the theses of the research, existing empirical results are discussed and analyzed. Approach: The research uses interdisciplinary approach to conceptualization of cultural diplomacy and applies the methods of observation and systematic analysis and synthesis. Results: The presented empirical data indicate that some measures and actions are needed in the Danube macro-region in order to enhance the culture-based awareness of its citizens and intensify the intercultural cooperation. The establishment of a University Centre for Cultural Diplomacy in the Danube Region (UCDR is presented as a possible tool for the achievement of this goal. Implications: The results of the study can be interesting for public authorities and academics. Value: the promotion of the idea for UCDR is the first of its kind.

  7. Pivotal Role of mTOR Signaling in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Augusto; Chiang, Derek Y.; Newell, Pippa; Peix, Judit; Thung, Swan; Alsinet, Clara; Tovar, Victoria; Roayaie, Sasan; Minguez, Beatriz; Sole, Manel; Battiston, Carlo; van Laarhoven, Stijn; Fiel, Maria I; Di Feo, Analisa; Hoshida, Yujin; Yea, Steven; Toffanin, Sara; Ramos, Alex; Martignetti, John A.; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Bruix, Jordi; Waxman, Samuel; Schwartz, Myron; Meyerson, Matthew; Friedman, Scott L.; Llovet, Josep M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND The advent of targeted therapies in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has underscored the importance of pathway characterization to identify novel molecular targets for treatment. Based on its role in cell growth and differentiation, we evaluated mTOR signaling activation in human HCC, as well as the anti-tumoral effect of a dual-level blockade of the mTOR pathway. METHODS The mTOR pathway was assessed using integrated data from mutation analysis (direct sequencing), DNA copy number changes (SNP-array), mRNA levels (qRT-PCR and gene expression microarray), and protein activation (immunostaining) in 351 human samples, including HCC (n=314), and non-tumoral tissue (n=37). Effects of dual blockade of mTOR signaling using a rapamycin analog (everolimus) and an EGFR/VEGFR inhibitor (AEE788) were evaluated in liver cancer cell lines, and in a tumor xenograft model. RESULTS Aberrant mTOR signaling (phosphorylated-RPS6) was present in half of the cases, associated with IGF pathway activation, EGF upregulation, and PTEN dysregulation. PTEN and PI3KCA-B mutations were rare events. Chromosomal gains in RICTOR (25% of patients) and positive pRPS6 staining correlated with recurrence. RICTOR-specific siRNA downregulation reduced tumor cell viability in vitro. Blockage of mTOR signaling with everolimus in vitro and in a xenograft model decelerated tumor growth and increased survival. This effect was enhanced in vivo after EGFR blockade. CONCLUSIONS MTOR signaling has a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCC, with evidence for the role of RICTOR in tumor oncogenesis. MTOR blockade with everolimus is effective in vivo. These findings establish a rationale for targeting mTOR pathway in clinical trials in HCC. PMID:18929564

  8. Roles of MAP kinase signaling pathway in oocyte meiosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a family of Ser/Thr protein kinases expressed widely in eukaryotic cells. MAPK is activated by a cascade of protein kinase phosphorylation and plays pivotal roles in regulating meiosis process in oocytes. As an important physical substrate of MAPK, p90rsk mediates numerous MAPK functions. MAPK was activated at G2/M transition during meiosis. Its activity reached the peak at MⅠ stage and maintained at this level until the time before the pronuclear formation after fertilization. There is complex interplay between MAPK and MPF in the meiosis regulation. Furthermore, other intracellular signal transducers, such as cAMP, protein kinase C and protein phosphotase, ect., also regulated the activity of MAPK at different stages during meiosis in oocytes. In the present article, the roles of MAPK signaling pathway in oocyte meiosis are reviewed and discussed.

  9. Role of Notch signaling pathway in gastric cancer pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Notch signaling pathway is activated dynamically during evolution playing significant role in cell fate determination and differentiation. It has been known that alterations of this pathway may lead to human malignancies, including gastric cancer. Despite a decline in the overall incidence, this disease still remains an important global health problem. Therefore, a better understanding of the molecular alterations underlying gastric cancer may contribute to the development of rationally desig...

  10. Essential role of Stat6 in IL-4 signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, K; Tanaka, T; Shi, W; Matsumoto, M; Minami, M; Kashiwamura, S; Nakanishi, K; Yoshida, N; Kishimoto, T; Akira, S

    1996-04-18

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is a pleiotropic lymphokine which plays an important role in the immune system. IL-4 activates two distinct signalling pathways through tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat6, a signal transducer and activator of transcription, and of a 170K protein called 4PS. To investigate the functional role of Stat6 in IL-4 signalling, we generated mice deficient in Stat6 by gene targeting. We report here that in the mutant mice, expression of CD23 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II in resting B cells was not enhanced in response to IL-4. IL-4 induced B-cell proliferation costimulated by anti-IgM antibody was abolished. The T-cell proliferative response was also notably reduced. Furthermore, production of Th2 cytokines from T cells as well as IgE and IgG1 responses after nematode infection were profoundly reduced. These findings agreed with those obtained in IL-4 deficient mice or using antibodies to IL-4 and the IL-4 receptor. We conclude that Stat6 plays a central role in exerting IL-4 mediated biological responses.

  11. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannonier, Shellese A.; Sterling, Julie A., E-mail: Julie.sterling@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Veterans Affairs, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Vanderbilt Center for Bone Biology, Department of Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 372335 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2015-08-26

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors.

  12. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shellese A. Cannonier

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung, directly invade into bone (head and neck or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors.

  13. The role of microbial signals in plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortíz-Castro, Randy; Contreras-Cornejo, Hexon Angel; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes; López-Bucio, José

    2009-08-01

    Plant growth and development involves a tight coordination of the spatial and temporal organization of cell division, cell expansion and cell differentiation. Orchestration of these events requires the exchange of signaling molecules between the root and shoot, which can be affected by both biotic and abiotic factors. The interactions that occur between plants and their associated microorganisms have long been of interest, as knowledge of these processes could lead to the development of novel agricultural applications. Plants produce a wide range of organic compounds including sugars, organic acids and vitamins, which can be used as nutrients or signals by microbial populations. On the other hand, microorganisms release phytohormones, small molecules or volatile compounds, which may act directly or indirectly to activate plant immunity or regulate plant growth and morphogenesis. In this review, we focus on recent developments in the identification of signals from free-living bacteria and fungi that interact with plants in a beneficial way. Evidence has accumulated indicating that classic plant signals such as auxins and cytokinins can be produced by microorganisms to efficiently colonize the root and modulate root system architecture. Other classes of signals, including N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones, which are used by bacteria for cell-to-cell communication, can be perceived by plants to modulate gene expression, metabolism and growth. Finally, we discuss the role played by volatile organic compounds released by certain plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria in plant immunity and developmental processes. The picture that emerges is one in which plants and microbes communicate themselves through transkingdom signaling systems involving classic and novel signals.

  14. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/4: Missile Control in South Asia and the Role of Cooperative Monitoring Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, N.; Sawhney, P.

    1998-10-01

    The succession of nuclear tests by India and Pakistan in May 1998 has changed the nature of their missile rivalry, which is only one of numerous manifestations of their relationship as hardened adversaries, deeply sensitive to each other's existing and evolving defense capabilities. The political context surrounding this costly rivalry remains unmediated by arms control measures or by any nascent prospect of detente. As a parallel development, sensible voices in both countries will continue to talk of building mutual confidence through openness to avert accidents, misjudgments, and misinterpretations. To facilitate a future peace process, this paper offers possible suggestions for stabilization that could be applied to India's and Pakistan's missile situation. Appendices include descriptions of existing missile agreements that have contributed to better relations for other countries as well as a list of the cooperative monitoring technologies available to provide information useful in implementing subcontinent missile regimes.

  15. The Role of Ubiquitination in TWEAK-Stimulated Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucic, Domagoj

    2013-12-19

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily ligands and receptors are responsible for development, immunity, and homeostasis of metazoan organisms. Thus, it is not surprising that signals emanating from these receptors are tightly regulated. Binding of TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) to its cognate receptor, FN14, triggers the assembly of receptor-associated signaling complex, which allows the activation of canonical and non-canonical nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) as well as mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Ubiquitin ligases cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1 and 2 (c-IAP1 and 2) and adaptor proteins TNFR-associated factors 2 and 3 (TRAF2 and TRAF3) are crucial for the regulation of TWEAK signaling as they facilitate the recruitment of distal signaling components including IKK and linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex complexes. At the same time c-IAP1/2, together with TRAF2 and TRAF3, promote constitutive ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK) - a kinase with critical role in the activation of non-canonical NF-κB signaling. While c-IAP1/2 mediated ubiquitination allows the activation of TWEAK-stimulated canonical NF-κB signaling, these E3 ligases are negative regulators of non-canonical signaling. TWEAK stimulation prompts the recruitment of c-IAP1/2 as well as TRAF2 and TRAF3 to the FN14 signaling complex leading to c-IAP1/2 autoubiquitination and degradation, which stabilizes NIK and allows subsequent phosphorylation of IKKα and partial proteasomal processing of p100 to activate gene expression. Recent studies have revealed that the spatio-temporal pattern of TWEAK-stimulated ubiquitination is a carefully orchestrated process involving several substrates that are modified by different ubiquitin linkages. Understanding the significance of ubiquitination for TWEAK signaling is important for the overall understanding of TWEAK biology and for the design of therapeutics that can be used in the

  16. Genetic evidence for a tight cooperation of TatB and TatC during productive recognition of twin-arginine (Tat signal peptides in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Lausberg

    Full Text Available The twin arginine translocation (Tat pathway transports folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria. Tat signal peptides contain a consensus motif (S/T-R-R-X-F-L-K that is thought to play a crucial role in substrate recognition by the Tat translocase. Replacement of the phenylalanine at the +2 consensus position in the signal peptide of a Tat-specific reporter protein (TorA-MalE by aspartate blocked export of the corresponding TorA(D(+2-MalE precursor, indicating that this mutation prevents a productive binding of the TorA(D(+2 signal peptide to the Tat translocase. Mutations were identified in the extreme amino-terminal regions of TatB and TatC that synergistically suppressed the export defect of TorA(D(+2-MalE when present in pairwise or triple combinations. The observed synergistic suppression activities were even more pronounced in the restoration of membrane translocation of another export-defective precursor, TorA(KQ-MalE, in which the conserved twin arginine residues had been replaced by lysine-glutamine. Collectively, these findings indicate that the extreme amino-terminal regions of TatB and TatC cooperate tightly during recognition and productive binding of Tat-dependent precursor proteins and, furthermore, that TatB and TatC are both involved in the formation of a specific signal peptide binding site that reaches out as far as the end of the TatB transmembrane segment.

  17. The role of mesodermal signals during liver organogenesis in zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Three germ cell layers, the ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm, are established during the gastrulation stage. All cell types in different organs and tissues are derived from these 3 germ cell layers at later stages. For example, skin epithelial cells and neuronal cells are derived from the ectoderm, while endothelial cells and muscle cells from the mesoderm and lung, and intestine epithelial cells from the endoderm. While in a normal situation different germ cells are destined to specific cell fates in different organs and tissues, each type of germ cells or its derivatives also produce extracellular signaling molecules to direct and facilitate the specification and differentiation of other germ cells during organogenesis. Liver is derived from the endoderm, but completion of liver organogenesis is regulated at different levels. While the pan-endoderm factors (e.g. FoxA and Gata families) and liver specific factors (e.g. Prox1 and Hhex) are essential intrinsic factors for endoderm cells to be differentiated into hepatoblasts, the role of signals produced by neighboring mesoderm cells for liver organogenesis is equally important. This review summarizes recent progress in studying the role of Bone morphogenetic proteins (Bmp), Fibroblast growth factors (Fgf), retinoic acid (RA) and Wingless and Int (Wnt), the 4 types of signaling molecules produced by the mesoderm cells, in liver organogenesis in zebrafish.

  18. An obligatory role of mind bomb-1 in notch signaling of mammalian development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bon-Kyoung Koo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Notch signaling pathway is an evolutionarily conserved intercellular signaling module essential for cell fate specification that requires endocytosis of Notch ligands. Structurally distinct E3 ubiquitin ligases, Neuralized (Neur and Mind bomb (Mib, cooperatively regulate the endocytosis of Notch ligands in Drosophila. However, the respective roles of the mammalian E3 ubiquitin ligases, Neur1, Neur2, Mib1, and Mib2, in mammalian development are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Through extensive use of mammalian genetics, here we show that Neur1 and Neur2 double mutants and Mib2(-/- mice were viable and grossly normal. In contrast, conditional inactivation of Mib1 in various tissues revealed the representative Notch phenotypes: defects of arterial specification as deltalike4 mutants, abnormal cerebellum and skin development as jagged1 conditional mutants, and syndactylism as jagged2 mutants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provide the first evidence that Mib1 is essential for Jagged as well as Deltalike ligand-mediated Notch signaling in mammalian development, while Neur1, Neur2, and Mib2 are dispensable.

  19. The Role of Adenosine Signaling in Headache: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T. Fried

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is the third most prevalent disease on the planet, yet our understanding of its mechanisms and pathophysiology is surprisingly incomplete. Recent studies have built upon decades of evidence that adenosine, a purine nucleoside that can act as a neuromodulator, is involved in pain transmission and sensitization. Clinical evidence and rodent studies have suggested that adenosine signaling also plays a critical role in migraine headache. This is further supported by the widespread use of caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, in several headache treatments. In this review, we highlight evidence that supports the involvement of adenosine signaling in different forms of headache, headache triggers, and basic headache physiology. This evidence supports adenosine A2A receptors as a critical adenosine receptor subtype involved in headache pain. Adenosine A2A receptor signaling may contribute to headache via the modulation of intracellular Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP production or 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activity in neurons and glia to affect glutamatergic synaptic transmission within the brainstem. This evidence supports the further study of adenosine signaling in headache and potentially illuminates it as a novel therapeutic target for migraine.

  20. Cooperative inputs of Bmp and Fgf signaling induce tail regeneration in urodele amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makanae, Aki; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Satoh, Akira

    2016-02-01

    Urodele amphibians have remarkable organ regeneration ability. They can regenerate not only limbs but also a tail throughout their life. It has been demonstrated that the regeneration of some organs are governed by the presence of neural tissues. For instance, limb regeneration cannot be induced without nerves. Thus, identifying the nerve factors has been the primary focus in amphibian organ regeneration research. Recently, substitute molecules for nerves in limb regeneration, Bmp and Fgfs, were identified. Cooperative inputs of Bmp and Fgfs can induce limb regeneration in the absence of nerves. In the present study, we investigated whether similar or same regeneration mechanisms control another neural tissue governed organ regeneration, i.e., tail regeneration, in Ambystoma mexicanum. Neural tissues in a tail, which is the spinal cord, could transform wound healing responses into organ regeneration responses, similar to nerves in limb regeneration. Furthermore, the identified regeneration inducer Fgf2+Fgf8+Bmp7 showed similar inductive effects. However, further analysis revealed that the blastema cells induced by Fgf2+Fgf8+Bmp7 could participate in the regeneration of several tissues, but could not organize a patterned tail. Regeneration inductive ability of Fgf2+Fgf8+Bmp7 was confirmed in another urodele, Pleurodeles waltl. These results suggest that the organ regeneration ability in urodele amphibians is controlled by a common mechanism.

  1. FGF, Insulin, and SMAD Signaling Cooperate for Avian Primordial Germ Cell Self-Renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemima Whyte

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Precise self-renewal of the germ cell lineage is fundamental to fertility and reproductive success. The early precursors for the germ lineage, primordial germ cells (PGCs, survive and proliferate in several embryonic locations during their migration to the embryonic gonad. By elucidating the active signaling pathways in migratory PGCs in vivo, we were able to create culture conditions that recapitulate this embryonic germ cell environment. In defined medium conditions without feeder cells, the growth factors FGF2, insulin, and Activin A, signaling through their cognate-signaling pathways, were sufficient for self-renewal of germline-competent PGCs. Forced expression of constitutively active MEK1, AKT, and SMAD3 proteins could replace their respective upstream growth factors. Unexpectedly, we found that BMP4 could replace Activin A in non-clonal growth conditions. These defined medium conditions identify the key molecular pathways required for PGC self-renewal and will facilitate efforts in biobanking of chicken genetic resources and genome editing.

  2. The role of auxin signaling in early embryo pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Margot E; Weijers, Dolf

    2015-12-01

    Pattern formation of the early Arabidopsis embryo generates precursors to all major cell types, and is profoundly controlled by the signaling molecule auxin. Here we discuss recent milestones in our understanding of auxin-dependent embryo patterning. Auxin biosynthesis, transport and response mechanisms interact to generate local auxin accumulation in the early embryo. New auxin-dependent reporters help identifying these sites, while atomic structures of transcriptional response mediators help explain the diverse outputs of auxin signaling. Key auxin outputs are control of cell identity and cell division orientation, and progress has been made towards understanding the cellular basis of each. Importantly, a number of studies have combined computational modeling and experiments to analyze the developmental role, genetic circuitry and molecular mechanisms of auxin-dependent cell division control.

  3. Vasoprotection by Dietary Supplements and Exercise: Role of TNFα Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanrui Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. Dietary supplements, including fish oil, dietary fibers, and various natural products, and exercise training exert vasoprotective effects. However, the mechanisms underlying the vasoprotective benefits of dietary supplements and physical activity demand extensive investigation. Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα plays a pivotal role in the dysregulation of macrovascular and microvascular function. TNFα induces vascular inflammation, monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, vascular oxidative stress, apoptosis, and atherogenic response and participates in the regulation of thrombosis and coagulation through multiple signaling pathways involving NFκB, Sp1, activator protein 1, JNK, p38, STAT3, and so forth. Dietary supplements and exercise training decrease TNFα production and ameliorate TNFα-mediated pathological changes in vasculature. Thus, the inhibitory effects of dietary supplements and physical exercise on TNFα production and TNFα signaling may contribute to their vasoprotective properties.

  4. Signaling mechanisms and functional roles of cofilin phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kensaku

    2013-02-01

    Cofilin and actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) are actin-binding proteins that play an essential role in regulating actin filament dynamics and reorganization by stimulating the severance and depolymerization of actin filaments. Cofilin/ADF are inactivated by phosphorylation at the serine residue at position 3 by LIM-kinases (LIMKs) and testicular protein kinases (TESKs) and are reactivated by dephosphorylation by the slingshot (SSH) family of protein phosphatases and chronophin. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the signaling mechanisms regulating LIMKs and SSHs and the functional roles of cofilin phospho-regulation in cell migration, tumor invasion, mitosis, neuronal development, and synaptic plasticity. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that the phospho-regulation of cofilin/ADF is a key convergence point of cell signaling networks that link extracellular stimuli to actin cytoskeletal dynamics and that spatiotemporal control of cofilin/ADF activity by LIMKs and SSHs plays a crucial role in a diverse array of cellular and physiological processes. Perturbations in the normal control of cofilin/ADF activity underlie many pathological conditions, including cancer metastasis and neurological and cardiovascular disorders.

  5. Electric energy cooperation in the Baltic Sea region and the role of Russia in it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zverev Yuri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines cooperation in the electric energy sector in the Baltic region. The author explores the existing undersea HVDC power exchange projects. It is emphasised that cooperation in the electric energy sector is concentrated largely in the EU member states despite earlier plans to establish the Baltic energy ring, which would also include Russia and Belarus. The author stresses that one of the most acute problems for the EU today is overcoming isolation of the energy systems of the Baltic States (Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia from that of the major part of the EU. This task has become especially relevant after the closing of the Ignalina NPP (Lithuania, which used to be the primary energy source for the three Baltic States. The article examines key projects of the construction of new international power transmission lines in the framework of the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan (BEMIP and the prospects of the Visaginas NPP (Lithuania in solving energy problems of the Baltic States. The author analyses Russia’s role in the electric energy market and focuses on a possible increase of the country’s energy market share following the construction of the Baltic NPP and the export of generated electric energy to Poland, Lithuania, Germany, and Sweden. The author concludes that the prospects of Russia’s energy export to the Baltic Sea region will be determined not only by technological, economic and market factors, but rather by the general state of relations between Russia and the EU. Moreover, a lot depends on Lithuania’s decision on the construction of the Visaginas NPP, as well as the way the EU and the Baltic States solve the problem of energy supply in case the NPP project is terminated.

  6. [Speech by the chairperson: roles and practices of university hospitals in regional cooperation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemitsu, Keiji

    2013-12-01

    A medical department has been established for each of the six prefectures constituting the Tohoku Region. In addition to their traditional roles in education, medical examination and treatment, and research, university hospitals play significant roles in community health care. In the aftermath of the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, in particular, many medical institutions were paralyzed, damaging the health of the general population, including evacuees, and putting many through emotional turmoil. The situation, including damage directly caused by the disaster, varied across localities, and medical institutions engaged in vastly different activities depended on the manpower available in their laboratory medicine (test) departments, specializations of doctors and technicians, and available resources. The disaster caused serious problems such as infectious diseases, regional infection control, economy class syndrome experienced by residents in temporary housing, and radiation exposure in Fukushima Prefecture. Here, each speaker will present how the laboratory medicine department of his/her university has established regional cooperation, and we will discuss their achievements and issues.

  7. Dual roles for spike signaling in cortical neural populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana eBallard

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A prominent feature of signaling in cortical neurons is that of randomness in the action potential. The output of a typical pyramidal cell can be well fit with a Poisson model, and variations in the Poisson rate repeatedly have been shown to be correlated with stimuli. However while the rate provides a very useful characterization of neural spike data, it may not be the most fundamental description of the signaling code. Recent data showing γ frequency range multi-cell action potential correlations, together with spike timing dependent plasticity, are spurring a re-examination of the classical model, since precise timing codes imply that the generation of spikes is essentially deterministic. Could the observed Poisson randomness and timing determinism reflect two separate modes of communication, or do they somehow derive from a single process? We investigate in a timing-based model whether the apparent incompatibility between these probabilistic and deterministic observations may be resolved by examining how spikes could be used in the underlying neural circuits. The crucial component of this model draws on dual roles for spike signaling. In learning receptive fields from ensembles of inputs, spikes need to behave probabilistically, whereas for fast signaling of individual stimuli, the spikes need to behave deterministically. Our simulations show that this combination is possible if deterministic signals using γ latency coding are probabilistically routed through different members of a cortical cell population at different times. This model exhibits standard features characteristic of Poisson models such as orientation tuning post-stimulus histograms and exponential interval histograms. In addition it makes testable predictions that follow from the γ latency coding.

  8. Role of chrysin on expression of insulin signaling molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kottireddy Satyanarayana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently available drugs are unsuccessful for the treatment of tye-2 diabetes due to their adverseside-effects. Hence, a search for novel drugs, especially ofplant origin, continues. Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone is a flavonoid, natural component of traditional medicinal herbs, present in honey, propolis and many plant extracts that hasbeen used in traditional medicine around the world to treat numerous ailments. Objective: The present study was aimed to identify the protective role of chrysin on the expression of insulin-signaling molecules in the skeletal muscle of high fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic adult male rats. Materials and Methods: The oral effective dose of chrysin (100 mg/kg body weight was given once a day until the end of the study (30 days post-induction of diabetes to high fat diet-induced diabetic rats.At the end of the experimental period, fasting blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance, serum lipid profile, lipid peroxidation (LPO and free radical generation, as well as the levels of insulin signaling molecules and tissue glycogen in the gastrocnemius muscle were assessed. Results: Diabetic rats showed impaired glucose tolerance and impairment in insulin signaling molecules (IR, IRS-1, p-IRS-1Tyr 632 , p- Akt Thr308 , glucose transporter subtype 4 [GLUT4] proteins and glycogen concentration. Serum insulin, lipid profile, LPO and free radical generation were found to be increased in diabetic control rats.The treatment with chrysin normalized the altered levels of blood glucose, serum insulin, lipid profile, LPO and insulin signaling molecules as well as GLUT4 proteins. Conclusion: Our present findings indicate that chrysin improves glycemic control through activation of insulin signal transduction in the gastrocnemius muscle of high fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic male rats.

  9. Seed producer cooperatives in the Ethiopian seed sector and their role in seed supply improvement: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sisay, D.T.; Verhees, F.J.H.M.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    The role of seed producer cooperatives (SPCs) in the Ethiopian seed sector and their contribution to seed supply improvement have received attention from researchers, policymakers, and development partners. However, limited work has been done in reviewing and documenting their involvement in the

  10. Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) Role in Ciliary Assembly, Resorption and Signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte B; Rosenbaum, Joel L

    2008-01-01

    is a complex, multistep process that is tightly coordinated with cell cycle progression and differentiation. The ciliary axoneme is extended from a modified centriole, the basal body, which migrates to and docks onto the apical plasma membrane early in ciliogenesis as cells enter growth arrest. The ciliary......Cilia and flagella have attracted tremendous attention in recent years as research demonstrated crucial roles for these organelles in coordinating a number of physiologically and developmentally important signaling pathways, including the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) alpha, Sonic...

  11. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) phosphorylation sites and docking domain on the nuclear pore complex protein Tpr cooperatively regulate ERK2-Tpr interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vomastek, Tomás; Iwanicki, Marcin P; Burack, W Richard; Tiwari, Divya; Kumar, Devanand; Parsons, J Thomas; Weber, Michael J; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2008-11-01

    Identifying direct substrates of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and understanding how those substrates are selected is central to understanding how these ubiquitously activated enzymes generate diverse biological responses. In previous work, we identified several new candidate substrates for the MAPK ERK2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2), including the nuclear pore complex protein Tpr (translocated promoter region). In this report, we identify sites on Tpr for ERK2 phosphorylation and binding and demonstrate their functional interaction. ERK2 phosphorylation and dimerization are necessary for ERK2-Tpr binding, and this occurs through a DEF (docking site for ERK2, FXF) domain on Tpr. Surprisingly, the DEF domain and the phosphorylation sites displayed positive cooperativity to promote ERK2 binding to Tpr, in contrast to substrates where phosphorylation reduces binding. Ectopic expression or depletion of Tpr resulted in decreased movement of activated ERK2 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, implying a role for Tpr in ERK2 translocation. Collectively, the data provide direct evidence that a component of the nuclear pore complex is a bona fide substrate of ERK2 in vivo and that activated ERK2 stably associates with this substrate after phosphorylation, where it could play a continuing role in nuclear pore function. We propose that Tpr is both a substrate and a scaffold for activated ERKs.

  12. A functional role for EGFR signaling in myelination and remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Adan; Dupree, Jeff L; Mangin, J M; Gallo, Vittorio

    2007-08-01

    Cellular strategies for oligodendrocyte regeneration and remyelination involve characterizing endogenous neural progenitors that are capable of generating oligodendrocytes during normal development and after demyelination, and identifying the molecular signals that enhance oligodendrogenesis from these progenitors. Using both gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we explored the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in adult myelin repair and in oligodendrogenesis. We show that 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) promoter-driven overexpression of human EGFR (hEGFR) accelerated remyelination and functional recovery following focal demyelination of mouse corpus callosum. Lesion repopulation by Cspg4+ (also known as NG2) Ascl1+ (also known as Mash1) Olig2+ progenitors and functional remyelination were accelerated in CNP-hEGFR mice compared with wild-type mice. EGFR overexpression in subventricular zone (SVZ) and corpus callosum during early postnatal development also expanded this NG2+Mash1+Olig2+ progenitor population and promoted SVZ-to-lesion migration, enhancing oligodendrocyte generation and axonal myelination. Analysis of hypomorphic EGFR-mutant mice confirmed that EGFR signaling regulates oligodendrogenesis and remyelination by NG2+Mash1+Olig2+ progenitors. EGFR targeting holds promise for enhancing oligodendrocyte regeneration and myelin repair.

  13. International cooperation and non-profit organizations: re-reading the institutional role in combating neglected diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Vinício Chein Feres

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyze the juridical role of patent rights and the importance of international cooperation concerning the health system, especially those held between the countries of the South, as well as not-for-profit organizations for the prevention and combating neglected diseases. From the theoretical perspective of law as identity, and the methodological approach of qualitative content analysis, some cases of cooperation between states and public and private institutions were collected and analyzed in order to develop new drugs to combat neglected diseases and ensure equity of access to these drugs.

  14. LncRNA Directs Cooperative Epigenetic Regulation Downstream of Chemokine Signals

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Zhen; Lin, Aifu; Li, Chunlai; Liang, Ke; Wang, Shouyu; Liu, Yang; Park, Peter; Li QIN; Wei, Yongkun; Hawke, David; Hung, Mien-Chie; Lin, Chunru; Yang, Liuqing

    2014-01-01

    LncRNAs are known to regulate a number of different development and tumorigenic processes. Here we report a role for lncRNA BCAR4 in breast cancer metastasis that is mediated by chemokine-induced binding of BCAR4 to two transcription factors with extended regulatory consequences. BCAR4 binding of SNIP1 and PNUTS in response to CCL21 releases the SNIP1's inhibition of p300-dependent histone acetylation that in turn enables the BCAR4-recruited PNUTS to bind H3K18ac and relieve inhibition of RNA...

  15. Cutthroat cooperation: the effects of team role decisions on adaptation to alternative reward structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, B.; Hollenbeck, J.R.; Conlon, D.E.; Humphrey, S.E.; Moon, H.; Ilgen, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    Structural Adaptation Theory proposes that it is more difficult for teams to change from competitive to cooperative reward conditions than it is for them to change in the opposite direction, and this has been labeled the cutthroat cooperation effect [Johnson, M. D., Hollenbeck, J. R., Ilgen, D. R.,

  16. Cutthroat cooperation: the effects of team role decisions on adaptation to alternative reward structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, B.; Hollenbeck, J.R.; Conlon, D.E.; Humphrey, S.E.; Moon, H.; Ilgen, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    Structural Adaptation Theory proposes that it is more difficult for teams to change from competitive to cooperative reward conditions than it is for them to change in the opposite direction, and this has been labeled the cutthroat cooperation effect [Johnson, M. D., Hollenbeck, J. R., Ilgen, D. R.,

  17. Receiver-Controlled Multi-Node Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Ye; Yue Li; XueJun Sha; Esko Alasaarela

    2014-01-01

    Since wireless links in Ad hoc networks are more fragile than those in traditional wireless networks due to route flapping, multi-node cooperation plays an important role in ensuring the quality of service ( QoS) . Based on the authors’ previous work, this paper proposes a receiver-controlled multi-node cooperation routing protocol, known as AODV-RCC. In this protocol, nodes form a cooperation group based on signal power. In a cooperation group, signal power between a partner and a transmitter, as well as signal power between the partner and the receiver, must be larger than the signal power between the transmitter and the receiver. Otherwise, the transmission will not benefit from cooperation. To avoid collision or congestion, each cooperation group only contains one partner. This partner offers both data and ACK cooperative retransmission. Its retransmission time should be shorter than the internal retry time of the transmitter’ s MAC layer, because it is better for the partner to retransmit firstly, as it offers a more reliable cooperative link. In AODV-RCC, it is the receiver that chooses the partner, because the link between the partner and the receiver is the most important. According to our simulation results, AODV-RCC shortens the end-to-end delay and increases the packet delivery ratio.

  18. PLK1 Signaling in Breast Cancer Cells Cooperates with Estrogen Receptor-Dependent Gene Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wierer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1 is a key regulator of cell division and is overexpressed in many types of human cancers. Compared to its well-characterized role in mitosis, little is known about PLK1 functions in interphase. Here, we report that PLK1 mediates estrogen receptor (ER-regulated gene transcription in human breast cancer cells. PLK1 interacts with ER and is recruited to ER cis-elements on chromatin. PLK1-coactivated genes included classical ER target genes such as Ps2, Wisp2, and Serpina3 and were enriched in developmental and tumor-suppressive functions. Performing large-scale phosphoproteomics of estradiol-treated MCF7 cells in the presence or absence of the specific PLK1 inhibitor BI2536, we identified several PLK1 end targets involved in transcription, including the histone H3K4 trimethylase MLL2, the function of which on ER target genes was impaired by PLK1 inhibition. Our results propose a mechanism for the tumor-suppressive role of PLK1 in mammals as an interphase transcriptional regulator.

  19. Brazils Role in environmental governance: Analysis of possibilities for increased Brazil-Norway cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valberg, Anna Helene

    2011-07-01

    This report examines the role played by Brazil in connection with certain international negotiations, such as the climate negotiations and the CBD. It identifies the driving factors that have influenced environmental politics and standards in Brazil, and take note of conflicts that must be discussed when Norway is seeking expanded cooperation with Brazil. In line with the mandate, FNI identifies areas of particular interest for further collaboration between the two countries, and recommend directions for supplementary Norwegian policy-making in light of a broadened scope for Norway-Brazil interaction. In recent years, the Norwegian government has initiated an extensive process aimed at reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD). This is the most obvious shared environmental scope between Norway and Brazil. However, given the large body of literature that already exists on this field, this report will concentrate instead on issues more on the outskirts of the REDD discourse, such as biodiversity conservation, biofuel efficiency and challenges concerning hydropower, all of which threaten to impact negatively on the Amazonian areas. In our recommendations, we cite tangible examples to illustrate issues where we believe lessons learnt in Norway may have applicability to Brazil.(auth)

  20. Organochlorine pesticides dieldrin and lindane induce cooperative toxicity in dopaminergic neurons: role of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Heera; Zhang, Ping; Barber, David S; Liu, Bin

    2010-03-01

    Elevated environmental exposure to pesticides has been implicated as a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive movement disorder resulted from degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) pathway. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) including dieldrin and lindane remain ubiquitous in the environment and food supply due to their resistance to degradation and bioaccumulation along the food chain. While prior studies have gained insight into the neurotoxic effects of individual OCPs such as dieldrin, the effect of combinations of coexisting OCPs is lacking. In this study, we determined the combined effect of dieldrin and lindane on DA neurons and potential mechanism of action. Combinations of dieldrin and lindane (5-25 microM) were more effective in causing toxicity in immortalized rat N27 DA neurons than when used alone. Mechanistically, dieldrin and lindane combination induced a rapid increase in the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspase 3/7. Pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine blocked the effect of dieldrin and lindane on ROS generation and mitochondrial membrane potential and protected against dieldrin- and lindane-induced neurotoxicity. These results demonstrate that dieldrin and lindane work cooperatively to induce DA neurotoxicity through the induction of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings may advance understanding of the role of pesticides in the multi-factorial etiology of PD. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling the role of negative cooperativity in metabolic regulation and homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliot C Bush

    Full Text Available A significant proportion of enzymes display cooperativity in binding ligand molecules, and such effects have an important impact on metabolic regulation. This is easiest to understand in the case of positive cooperativity. Sharp responses to changes in metabolite concentrations can allow organisms to better respond to environmental changes and maintain metabolic homeostasis. However, despite the fact that negative cooperativity is almost as common as positive, it has been harder to imagine what advantages it provides. Here we use computational models to explore the utility of negative cooperativity in one particular context: that of an inhibitor binding to an enzyme. We identify several factors which may contribute, and show that acting together they can make negative cooperativity advantageous.

  2. Conserved Genetic Interactions between Ciliopathy Complexes Cooperatively Support Ciliogenesis and Ciliary Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Yee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes encoding cilia proteins cause human ciliopathies, diverse disorders affecting many tissues. Individual genes can be linked to ciliopathies with dramatically different phenotypes, suggesting that genetic modifiers may participate in their pathogenesis. The ciliary transition zone contains two protein complexes affected in the ciliopathies Meckel syndrome (MKS and nephronophthisis (NPHP. The BBSome is a third protein complex, affected in the ciliopathy Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS. We tested whether mutations in MKS, NPHP and BBS complex genes modify the phenotypic consequences of one another in both C. elegans and mice. To this end, we identified TCTN-1, the C. elegans ortholog of vertebrate MKS complex components called Tectonics, as an evolutionarily conserved transition zone protein. Neither disruption of TCTN-1 alone or together with MKS complex components abrogated ciliary structure in C. elegans. In contrast, disruption of TCTN-1 together with either of two NPHP complex components, NPHP-1 or NPHP-4, compromised ciliary structure. Similarly, disruption of an NPHP complex component and the BBS complex component BBS-5 individually did not compromise ciliary structure, but together did. As in nematodes, disrupting two components of the mouse MKS complex did not cause additive phenotypes compared to single mutants. However, disrupting both Tctn1 and either Nphp1 or Nphp4 exacerbated defects in ciliogenesis and cilia-associated developmental signaling, as did disrupting both Tctn1 and the BBSome component Bbs1. Thus, we demonstrate that ciliary complexes act in parallel to support ciliary function and suggest that human ciliopathy phenotypes are altered by genetic interactions between different ciliary biochemical complexes.

  3. In Drosophila, RhoGEF2 cooperates with activated Ras in tumorigenesis through a pathway involving Rho1–Rok–Myosin-II and JNK signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peytee Khoo

    2013-05-01

    The Ras oncogene contributes to ∼30% of human cancers, but alone is not sufficient for tumorigenesis. In a Drosophila screen for oncogenes that cooperate with an activated allele of Ras (RasACT to promote tissue overgrowth and invasion, we identified the GTP exchange factor RhoGEF2, an activator of Rho-family signalling. Here, we show that RhoGEF2 also cooperates with an activated allele of a downstream effector of Ras, Raf (RafGOF. We dissect the downstream pathways through which RhoGEF2 cooperates with RasACT (and RafGOF, and show that RhoGEF2 requires Rho1, but not Rac, for tumorigenesis. Furthermore, of the Rho1 effectors, we show that RhoGEF2 + Ras (Raf-mediated tumorigenesis requires the Rho kinase (Rok–Myosin-II pathway, but not Diaphanous, Lim kinase or protein kinase N. The Rho1–Rok–Myosin-II pathway leads to the activation of Jun kinase (JNK, in cooperation with RasACT. Moreover, we show that activation of Rok or Myosin II, using constitutively active transgenes, is sufficient for cooperative tumorigenesis with RasACT, and together with RasACT leads to strong activation of JNK. Our results show that Rok–Myosin-II activity is necessary and sufficient for Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. Our observation that activation of Myosin II, which regulates Filamentous actin (F-actin contractility without affecting F-actin levels, cooperates with RasACT to promote JNK activation and tumorigenesis, suggests that increased cell contractility is a key factor in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we show that signalling via the Tumour necrosis factor (TNF; also known as Egr-ligand–JNK pathway is most likely the predominant pathway that activates JNK upon Rok activation. Overall, our analysis highlights the need for further analysis of the Rok–Myosin-II pathway in cooperation with Ras in human cancers.

  4. Peroxiredoxin II promotes hepatic tumorigenesis through cooperation with Ras/Forkhead box M1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y-H; Kim, S-U; Kwon, T-H; Kim, J-M; Song, I-S; Shin, H-J; Lee, B-K; Bang, D-H; Lee, S-J; Lee, D-S; Chang, K-T; Kim, B-Y; Yu, D-Y

    2016-07-07

    The current study was carried out to define the involvement of Peroxiredoxin (Prx) II in progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the underlying molecular mechanism(s). Expression and function of Prx II in HCC was determined using H-ras(G12V)-transformed HCC cells (H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells) and the tumor livers from H-ras(G12V)-transgenic (Tg) mice and HCC patients. Prx II was upregulated in H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells and H-ras(G12V)-Tg mouse tumor livers, the expression pattern of which highly similar to that of forkhead Box M1 (FoxM1). Moreover, either knockdown of FoxM1 or site-directed mutagenesis of FoxM1-binding site of Prx II promoter significantly reduced Prx II levels in H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells, indicating FoxM1 as a direct transcription factor of Prx II in HCC. Interestingly, the null mutation of Prx II markedly decreased the number and size of tumors in H-ras(G12V)-Tg livers. Consistent with this, knockdown of Prx II in H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells reduced the expression of cyclin D1, cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth and tumor formation in athymic nude mice, whereas overexpression of Prx II increased or aggravated the tumor phenotypes. Importantly, the expression of Prx II was correlated with that of FoxM1 in HCC patients. The activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) pathway and the expression of FoxM1 and cyclin D1 were highly dependent on Prx II in H-ras(G12V)-HCC cells and H-ras(G12V)-Tg livers. Prx II is FoxM1-dependently-expressed antioxidant in HCC and function as an enhancer of Ras(G12V) oncogenic potential in hepatic tumorigenesis through activation of ERK/FoxM1/cyclin D1 cascade.

  5. LncRNA Directs Cooperative Epigenetic Regulation Downstream of Chemokine Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouyu; Liu, Yang; Park, Peter; Qin, Li; Wei, Yongkun; Hawke, David; Hung, Mien-Chie; Lin, Chunru; Yang, Liuqing

    2014-01-01

    Summary LncRNAs are known to regulate a number of different development and tumorigenic processes. Here we report a role for lncRNA BCAR4 in breast cancer metastasis that is mediated by chemokine-induced binding of BCAR4 to two transcription factors with extended regulatory consequences. BCAR4 binding of SNIP1 and PNUTS in response to CCL21 releases the SNIP1's inhibition of p300-dependent histone acetylation that in turn enables the BCAR4-recruited PNUTS to bind H3K18ac and relieve inhibition of RNA Pol II via activation of the PP1 phosphatase. This mechanism activates a noncanonical Hedgehog/GLI2 transcriptional program that promotes cell migration. BCAR4 expression correlates with advanced breast cancers and therapeutic delivery of Locked Nucleic Acids (LNAs) targeting BCAR4 strongly suppresses breast cancer metastasis in mouse models. The findings reveal a disease-relevant lncRNA mechanism consisting of both direct coordinated protein recruitment and indirect regulation of transcription factors. PMID:25416949

  6. Mechanical signalling in tissues and its possible role in nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Silvano

    2011-01-01

    Mechanotransduction is known to play a key role in physiological as well as pathological processes. In the present work, the possibility is discussed that even weak mechanical signals travelling through the extracellular matrix can elicit significant cellular responses, by causing gel/sol transitions and actomyosin contractions. Such mechanical cues can result from both physiological activities, such as the heartbeat, and noxious stimuli to which tissues respond by rearranging the cells' cytoskeleton and remodelling the extracellular matrix. The possibility is explored that such viscoelastic modifications also affect the function of nociceptors, thus modulating pain transmission. Growing evidence indicates that the rearrangement of the axonal cytoskeleton represents a key step in nociception. Hyperalgesia is suggested to result from an exceedingly dynamical state of the nociceptor's cytoskeleton, which would lead to enhanced electrical conduction and synaptic facilitation.

  7. Success and failure of firms' innovation co-operations: The role of intermediaries and reciprocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantner, U.; Meder, A.; Wolf, T.

    2011-01-01

    attempts to fill this gap by investigating the possible presence of two problems in co-operation: the lack of intermediation and of reciprocity. Based on data gathered for firms in two German regions and one French region, we find that the success of co-operation projects depends on the perceived...... importance, rather than on the perceived quality, of intermediate actors. Hence, the major problem for intermediating suitable partners is more related to communication than it is a programmatic issue. Trust and reciprocity in co-operation between firms is found to be relevant ex-post in the sense of being...

  8. Role of acetylcholine on plant root-shoot signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The role of acetylcholine (ACh) on plant root- shoot communication was investigated using the root-split system of Vicia faba L. In the experiments, slight osmotic stress caused the decrease of ACh content in root tips and the xylem sap transported up per time unit from root tip to the shoot when the water potential of the shoot was kept unchanged. It also caused the decrease of ACh content in the abaxial epidermis. The decrease was highly correlative to the changes of transpiration rate, suggesting that the decrease of ACh content probably functions as a signal to regulate stomatal behavior. The effect of osmotic stress might be mainly through the inhibition of the ACh synthesis in root tip; thus further influences the ACh content in root tip, xylem sap and abaxial epidermis and resulting in the changes of stomatal behavior. These results provide new evidence that plants transduce positive and negative signals among roots and shoots to coordinate stomatal behavior and adapt to variable environments.

  9. The role of GPR1 signaling in mice corpus luteum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Li; Ren, Li-Rong; Sun, Li-Feng; Huang, Chen; Xiao, Tian-Xia; Wang, Bao-Bei; Chen, Jie; Zabel, Brian A; Ren, Peigen; Zhang, Jian V

    2016-07-01

    Chemerin, a chemokine, plays important roles in immune responses, inflammation, adipogenesis, and carbohydrate metabolism. Our recent research has shown that chemerin has an inhibitory effect on hormone secretion from the testis and ovary. However, whether G protein-coupled receptor 1 (GPR1), the active receptor for chemerin, regulates steroidogenesis and luteolysis in the corpus luteum is still unknown. In this study, we established a pregnant mare serum gonadotropin-human chorionic gonadotropin (PMSG-hCG) superovulation model, a prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) luteolysis model, and follicle and corpus luteum culture models to analyze the role of chemerin signaling through GPR1 in the synthesis and secretion of gonadal hormones during follicular/luteal development and luteolysis. Our results, for the first time, show that chemerin and GPR1 are both differentially expressed in the ovary over the course of the estrous cycle, with highest levels in estrus and metestrus. GPR1 has been localized to granulosa cells, cumulus cells, and the corpus luteum by immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vitro, we found that chemerin suppresses hCG-induced progesterone production in cultured follicle and corpus luteum and that this effect is attenuated significantly by anti-GPR1 MAB treatment. Furthermore, when the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway was blocked, the attenuating effect of GPR1 MAB was abrogated. Interestingly, PGF2α induces luteolysis through activation of caspase-3, leading to a reduction in progesterone secretion. Treatment with GPR1 MAB blocked the PGF2α effect on caspase-3 expression and progesterone secretion. This study indicates that chemerin/GPR1 signaling directly or indirectly regulates progesterone synthesis and secretion during the processes of follicular development, corpus luteum formation, and PGF2α-induced luteolysis.

  10. EPA's Role with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) brings together the governments of countries committed to democracy and the market economy from around the world to support sustainable economic growth.

  11. The potential role of oral pH in the persistence of Trichomonas gallinae in Cooper's Hawks (Accipiter cooperii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Elizabeth H; Mannan, R William

    2014-01-01

    Trichomoniasis, caused by the protozoan Trichomonas gallinae, affects a variety of species worldwide including avivorious raptors. Existing information suggests that the disease is most prevalent in young birds, and differential susceptibility to trichomoniasis among individuals in different age groups was documented in Cooper's Hawks (Accipiter cooperii) nesting in Tucson, Arizona. In that population, 85% of nestling Cooper's Hawks had T. gallinae in their oral cavity, compared to only 1% of breeding-age hawks. Trichomonads generally are sensitive to environmental pH and we explored the possibility that differences in oral pH may contribute to the differential prevalence of infection between age groups. We measured the pH of the fluid in the oral cavity in 375 Cooper's Hawks from three age groups (nestlings, fledglings, and breeding age) in Tucson, Arizona, in 2010 and 2011 and clinically tested for T. gallinae in a subsample of hawks. Oral pH of nestlings (∼ 6.8) was 7.3 times less acidic than in fledgling or breeding Cooper's Hawks (∼ 6.1). The incidence of T. gallinae was higher in nestlings (16%) than in either fledglings or breeding hawks (0%). Our findings indicate that oral pH becomes more acidic in Cooper's Hawks soon after they leave the nest. Trichomonas gallinae thrives when pH is between 6.5 and 7.5 (optimum 7.2), but is less viable in more acidic conditions. Higher levels of acidity in the oral cavity of fledglings and breeding Cooper's Hawks may reduce their susceptibility to trichomoniasis, and play a role in the differential prevalence of infection among age groups.

  12. Lattice model of equilibrium polymerization. VII. Understanding the role of "cooperativity" in self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jack F; Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F

    2008-06-14

    Cooperativity is an emergent many-body phenomenon related to the degree to which elementary entities (particles, molecules, organisms) collectively interact to form larger scale structures. From the standpoint of a formal mean field description of chemical reactions, the cooperativity index m, describing the number of elements involved in this structural self-organization, is the order of the reaction. Thus, m for molecular self-assembly is the number of molecules in the final organized structure, e.g., spherical micelles. Although cooperativity is crucial for regulating the thermodynamics and dynamics of self-assembly, there is a limited understanding of this aspect of self-assembly. We analyze the cooperativity by calculating essential thermodynamic properties of the classical mth order reaction model of self-assembly (FAm model), including universal scaling functions describing the temperature and concentration dependence of the order parameter and average cluster size. The competition between self-assembly and phase separation is also described. We demonstrate that a sequential model of thermally activated equilibrium polymerization can quantitatively be related to the FAm model. Our analysis indicates that the essential requirement for "cooperative" self-assembly is the introduction of constraints (often nonlocal) acting on the individual assembly events to regulate the thermodynamic free energy landscape and, thus, the thermodynamic sharpness of the assembly transition. An effective value of m is defined for general self-assembly transitions, and we find a general tendency for self-assembly to become a true phase transition as m-->infinity. Finally, various quantitative measures of self-assembly cooperativity are discussed in order to identify experimental signatures of cooperativity in self-assembling systems and to provide a reliable metric for the degree of transition cooperativity.

  13. Cooperation and Its Role in Facilitation of Foreign Expansion: Example of Slovak Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÁRIA ŠÁŠIKOVÁ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to point out the importance of cooperation between companies in order to facilitate their internationalization, based on the example of Slovak-foreign joint ventures and to present institutions supporting these partnerships. According to the survey, the majority of companies are satisfied with joint venture performance and plan to continue their cooperation. Motives linked to the foreign expansion are among the most important for the joint venture establishment.

  14. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heltemes-Harris, L M; Larson, J D; Starr, T K; Hubbard, G K; Sarver, A L; Largaespada, D A; Farrar, M A

    2016-06-30

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia, we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) with mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b-CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the Janus kinase/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B-cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor-suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways have in B-ALL.

  15. Multiple roles of the PGE2 -EP receptor signal in vascular permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, K; Kida, T; Hori, M; Ozaki, H; Murata, T

    2014-11-01

    PGE2 is a major prostanoid that regulates inflammation by stimulating EP1-4 receptors. However, how PGE2 induces an initial inflammatory response to vascular hyper-permeability remains unknown. Here we investigated the role of the PGE2 -EP receptor signal in modulating vascular permeability both in vivo and in vitro. We used a modified Miles assay and intravital microscopy to examine vascular permeability in vivo. Endothelial barrier property was assessed by measuring transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) in vitro. Local administration of PGE2 , an EP2 or EP4 receptor agonist into FVB/NJcl mouse ear skin caused vascular leakage, indicated by dye extravasation. Intravital microscopy and laser Doppler blood-flow imaging revealed that these treatments dilated peripheral vessels and increased local blood flow. Pretreatment with the vasoconstrictor phenylephrine inhibited the PGE2 -induced blood flow increase and vascular leakage. In contrast to the EP2 and EP4 receptor agonists, administration of an EP3 receptor agonist suppressed vascular leakage without altering vascular diameter or blood flow. In isolated HUVECs, the EP3 receptor agonist elevated TER and blocked thrombin-induced dextran passage. Inhibiting PKA restored the hypo-permeability induced by the EP3 receptor agonist. Activation of the PGE2 -EP2 or -EP4 receptor signal induces vasodilatation in mural cells, resulting in increased local blood flow and hyper-permeability. In contrast, activation of the PGE2 -EP3 receptor signal induces a cAMP-dependent enhancement of the endothelial barrier, leading to hypo-permeability. We provide the first evidence that endothelial cells and mural cells cooperate to modulate vascular permeability. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. THE ROLE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS ON THE GROWTH OF ITALIAN SOCIAL COOPERATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Agliata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Third Sector in Italy records a slow but constant growth due to the increase of the number of entities but not of their dimension. The difficulties in financial management, generated by a low attraction of debt and equity financial resources and a low level of managerial skills characterized the non profit organizations. Focused on the social cooperatives, the article describe the effects on the financial structure of innovative financial instruments as the participative loan. In the last years in Italy there has been an increasing attention towards the ethical finance. The consideration of the social co-ops as a part of the Third Sector allows them to have a privileged interlocution with the institutions of the ethical finance. But the development of this institutions, although it is originated from the will to support the social responsible development, at the moment seems not to support a substantial resolution of the financial needs related to the management of the social cooperatives. The article shows an analysis on a particular financial intermediary, the Cooperazione Finanza Impresa (CFI. This institution is a private equity investor which since twenty years is dedicated to worker cooperatives and social cooperatives. The interest for this institution, besides the entities financed, is based on a particular form of participative loan developed. The investigation start from the observation of a singular social cooperatives with the elaboration of a set of indicators based on the financial ratio analysis. The evaluation regard the financial structure previous to the financing operation and its subsequent modification. Due to the first conclusions, the investigation enlarged the analysis to a sample of 10 social cooperatives in order to confirm the first results. The observation of modified financial structure up a period of five years shows significative positive change that support both the economic and the financial equilibrium, with

  17. LIN28 cooperates with WNT signaling to drive invasive intestinal and colorectal adenocarcinoma in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ho-Chou; Schwitalla, Sarah; Qian, Zhirong; LaPier, Grace S; Yermalovich, Alena; Ku, Yuan-Chieh; Chen, Shann-Ching; Viswanathan, Srinivas R; Zhu, Hao; Nishihara, Reiko; Inamura, Kentaro; Kim, Sun A; Morikawa, Teppei; Mima, Kosuke; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Yang, Juhong; Meredith, Gavin; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji; Daley, George Q

    2015-05-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a major contributor to cancer-related mortality. LIN28A and LIN28B are highly related RNA-binding protein paralogs that regulate biogenesis of let-7 microRNAs and influence development, metabolism, tissue regeneration, and oncogenesis. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of either LIN28 paralog cooperates with the Wnt pathway to promote invasive intestinal adenocarcinoma in murine models. When LIN28 alone is induced genetically, half of the resulting tumors harbor Ctnnb1 (β-catenin) mutation. When overexpressed in Apc(Min/+) mice, LIN28 accelerates tumor formation and enhances proliferation and invasiveness. In conditional genetic models, enforced expression of a LIN28-resistant form of the let-7 microRNA reduces LIN28-induced tumor burden, while silencing of LIN28 expression reduces tumor volume and increases tumor differentiation, indicating that LIN28 contributes to tumor maintenance. We detected aberrant expression of LIN28A and/or LIN28B in 38% of a large series of human CRC samples (n = 595), where LIN28 expression levels were associated with invasive tumor growth. Our late-stage CRC murine models and analysis of primary human tumors demonstrate prominent roles for both LIN28 paralogs in promoting CRC growth and progression and implicate the LIN28/let-7 pathway as a therapeutic target. © 2015 Tu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heltemes-Harris, Lynn M.; Larson, Jon D.; Starr, Timothy K.; Hubbard, Gregory K.; Sarver, Aaron L.; Largaespada, David A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    STAT5 activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) to mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b–CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the JAK/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, ERK and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways play in B-ALL. PMID:26500062

  19. Does kisspeptin signalling have a role in the testes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei eHua

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Kisspeptins are a family of overlapping neuropeptides encoded by the Kiss1 gene that regulate the mammalian reproductive axis by a central action in the hypothalamus to stimulate GnRH release. Kisspeptins and their receptor (Gpr54 also called Kiss1r are also expressed in the testes but a functional role in this tissue has not been confirmed. We examined which cell types in the testes expressed kisspeptin and its receptor by staining for β-galactosidase activity using tissue from transgenic mice with LacZ targetted to either the Kiss1 or the Gpr54 genes. Expression of both genes appeared to be restricted to haploid spermatids and this was confirmed by a temporal expression analysis, which showed expression appearing with the first wave of haploid spermatid cells at puberty. We could not detect any kisspeptin protein in spermatids however, suggesting that the Kiss1 mRNA may be translationally repressed. We tested whether kisspeptin could act on Leydig cells by examining the effects of kisspeptin on the immortalized Leydig cell line MA-10. Although MA-10 cells were shown to express Gpr54 by RT-PCR, they did not respond to kisspeptin stimulation. We also tested whether kisspeptin could stimulate testosterone release by a direct action on the testes using explants of seminiferous tubules. The explants did not show any response to kisspeptin. The functional integrity of the MA-10 cells and the seminiferous tubule explants was confirmed by showing appropriate responses to the LH analogue, human chorionic gonadotrophin. These data suggest that kisspeptin signalling does not have a significant role in testes function in the mouse.

  20. BAD contributes to RAF-mediated proliferation and cooperates with B-RAF-V600E in cancer signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzien, Lisa; Baljuls, Angela; Albrecht, Marco; Hekman, Mirko; Rapp, Ulf R

    2011-05-20

    BAD (Bcl-2 antagonist of cell death) belongs to the proapoptotic BH3-only subfamily of Bcl-2 proteins. Physiological activity of BAD is highly controlled by phosphorylation. To further analyze the regulation of BAD function, we investigated the role of recently identified phosphorylation sites on BAD-mediated apoptosis. We found that in contrast to the N-terminal phosphorylation sites, the serines 124 and 134 act in an antiapoptotic manner because the replacement by alanine led to enhanced cell death. Our results further indicate that RAF kinases represent, besides PAK1, BAD serine 134 phosphorylating kinases. Importantly, in the presence of wild type BAD, co-expression of survival kinases, such as RAF and PAK1, leads to a strongly increased proliferation, whereas substitution of serine 134 by alanine abolishes this process. Furthermore, we identified BAD serine 134 to be strongly involved in survival signaling of B-RAF-V600E-containing tumor cells and found that phosphorylation of BAD at this residue is critical for efficient proliferation in these cells. Collectively, our findings provide new insights into the regulation of BAD function by phosphorylation and its role in cancer signaling.

  1. The role of purinergic signalling in exocrine pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haanes, Kristian Agmund

    ATP is a fundamentally important molecule in intracellular processes, especially recognised as the molecular source of energy. ATP is however also released as a signal from most cell types, and extracellular signalling by ATP goes under the common name purinergic signalling and it includes releas...

  2. The role of the Wnt canonical signaling in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libro, Rosaliana; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-08-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin or Wnt canonical pathway controls multiple biological processes throughout development and adult life. Growing evidences have suggested that deregulation of the Wnt canonical pathway could be involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. The Wnt canonical signaling is a pathway tightly regulated, which activation results in the inhibition of the Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β (GSK-3β) function and in increased β-catenin activity, that migrates into the nucleus, activating the transcription of the Wnt target genes. Conversely, when the Wnt canonical pathway is turned off, increased levels of GSK-3β promote β-catenin degradation. Hence, GSK-3β could be considered as a key regulator of the Wnt canonical pathway. Of note, GSK-3β has also been involved in the modulation of inflammation and apoptosis, determining the delicate balance between immune tolerance/inflammation and neuronal survival/neurodegeneration. In this review, we have summarized the current acknowledgements about the role of the Wnt canonical pathway in the pathogenesis of some neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, cerebral ischemia, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with particular regard to the main in vitro and in vivo studies in this field, by reviewing 85 research articles about. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Central Role of ULK1 in Type I Interferon Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Saleiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We provide evidence that the Unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1 is activated during engagement of the type I interferon (IFN receptor (IFNR. Our studies demonstrate that the function of ULK1 is required for gene transcription mediated via IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE and IFNγ activation site (GAS elements and controls expression of key IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs. We identify ULK1 as an upstream regulator of p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and establish that the regulatory effects of ULK1 on ISG expression are mediated possibly by engagement of the p38 MAPK pathway. Importantly, we demonstrate that ULK1 is essential for antiproliferative responses and type I IFN-induced antineoplastic effects against malignant erythroid precursors from patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. Together, these data reveal a role for ULK1 as a key mediator of type I IFNR-generated signals that control gene transcription and induction of antineoplastic responses.

  4. Role of purinergic signaling in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierhut, Marco; Dyckhoff, Susanne; Masouris, Ilias; Klein, Matthias; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Pfister, Hans-Walter; Ayata, Korcan; Idzko, Marco; Koedel, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Excessive neutrophilic inflammation contributes to brain pathology and adverse outcome in pneumococcal meningitis (PM). Recently, we identified the NLRP3 inflammasome/interleukin (IL)-1β pathway as a key driver of inflammation in PM. A critical membrane receptor for NLRP3 inflammasome activation is the ATP-activated P2 purinoceptor (P2R) P2X7. Thus, we hypothesized involvement of ATP and P2Rs in PM. The functional role of ATP was investigated in a mouse meningitis model using P2R antagonists. Brain expression of P2Rs was assessed by RT-PCR. ATP levels were determined in murine CSF and cell culture experiments. Treatment with the P2R antagonists suramin or brilliant blue G did not have any impact on disease course. This lack of effect might be attributed to meningitis-associated down-regulation of brain P2R expression and/or a drop of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ATP, as demonstrated by RT-PCR and ATP analyses. Supplemental cell culture experiments suggest that the reduction in CSF ATP is, at least partly, due to ATP hydrolysis by ectonucleotidases of neutrophils and macrophages. In conclusion, this study suggests that ATP-P2R signaling is only of minor or even no significance in PM. This may be explained by down-regulation of P2R expression and decreased CSF ATP levels. PMID:28300164

  5. Longitudinal analysis of virtual community perceptions of cohesion: The role of cooperation, communication, and competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Annmarie A; Loomis, Colleen; Mama, Scherezade K; Siddiqi, Sameer; Lee, Rebecca E

    2016-09-14

    Online, virtual group interactions may help adherence to health promotion programs. The purpose of this study was to explore longitudinal relationships among dimensions of group cohesion and group-interaction variables to inform and improve group-based strategies within programs aimed at promoting physical activity in virtual communities. In all, 56 online virtual users completed a group dynamics-based physical activity promotion intervention and assessments of group cohesion and group interaction at baseline and 4 weeks. Friendly competition and cooperation were consistently strong predictors of cohesion. Facilitating a sense of friendly competition and cooperation may increase engagement in physical activity programs by bolstering group cohesion.

  6. Nitric oxide signaling and its role in oxidative stress response in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Rika Indri; Watanabe, Daisuke; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-30

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we found that the putative NO dioxygenase SPAC869.02c (named Yhb1) and the S-nitrosoglutathione reductase Fmd2 cooperatively reduced intracellular NO levels as NO-detoxification enzymes. Although both mRNA and protein levels were increased with exogenous NO, their expression patterns were different during growth phases. While treatment with an NO synthase inhibitor in the log phase abrogated both NO production and Yhb1 expression, induction of Fmd2 in the stationary phase was correlated with elevated mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) activity, confirmed by the fact that inhibition of MRC complex III led to a decrease in Fmd2 and NO levels. Moreover, NO was localized in the mitochondria in the stationary phase, suggesting that there are two distinctive types of NO signaling in S. pombe. For mitochondria, pretreatment with an NO donor rescued cell growth by repressing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under oxidative stress. DNA microarray analysis revealed that exogenous NO contributes to tolerance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by (i) inhibition of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) conversion, (ii) upregulation of the H2O2-detoxifying enzymes, and (iii) downregulation of the MRC genes, suggesting that NO plays a pivotal role in the negative feedback system to regulate ROS levels in S. pombe.

  7. Intention recognition, commitment and their roles in the evolution of cooperation from artificial intelligence techniques to evolutionary game theory models

    CERN Document Server

    Han, The Anh

    2013-01-01

    This original and timely monograph describes a unique self-contained excursion that reveals to the readers the roles of two basic cognitive abilities, i.e. intention recognition and arranging commitments, in the evolution of cooperative behavior. This book analyses intention recognition, an important ability that helps agents predict others’ behavior, in its artificial intelligence and evolutionary computational modeling aspects, and proposes a novel intention recognition method. Furthermore, the book presents a new framework for intention-based decision making and illustrates several ways in which an ability to recognize intentions of others can enhance a decision making process. By employing the new intention recognition method and the tools of evolutionary game theory, this book introduces computational models demonstrating that intention recognition promotes the emergence of cooperation within populations of self-regarding agents. Finally, the book describes how commitment provides a pathway to the evol...

  8. Changing Roles of a University Cooperative Extension Service in Response to Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Thelma C.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have acknowledged that cooperative extension organizations should rethink dominant agricultural foci and be more inclusive of nontraditional audiences. An extension organization in the southeastern United States has experienced declining workshop participation, requests for technical assistance, and local office visits. These declines…

  9. The Role of Structured Cooperative Learning Groups for Enhancing Chinese Primary Students' Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Yin-Kum

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effectiveness of two types of cooperative learning groups used in reciprocal teaching (RT) classes (i.e. high-structured vs. low-structured groups) for enhancing students' reading comprehension. The participants were 235 Hong Kong Chinese Grade 6 students in nine classes. Reading comprehension tests and…

  10. Preschoolers' Understanding of the Role of Communication and Cooperation in Establishing Property Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, Federico; Fiedler, Lydia; Tomasello, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Property as a social "agreement" comprises both a communicative component, in which someone makes a claim that she is entitled to some piece of property, and a cooperative component, in which others in the community respect that claim as legitimate. In the current study, preschool children were (a) given the opportunity to mark some…

  11. The economic role of cooperatives and the need for appropriate legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Gadea Soler

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper has dual objectives: it aims to analyse the historical origin and current economic purpose of cooperative companies while also making a critical study of applicable regulations with a view to defining the bases of future legislation.Received: 31.05.11Accepted: 05.07.11

  12. The Role of Student Affairs in Promoting Religious and Secular Pluralism and Interfaith Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocet, Michael M.; Stewart, Dafina Lazarus

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores the contributions of student affairs professionals to religious and secular pluralism and interfaith cooperation in higher education. The authors propose a preliminary model of competencies necessary for student affairs professionals to engage in conversations effectively with students about issues of religion, spirituality,…

  13. Cooperating Teachers' Role in Preparing Preservice Special Education Teachers: Moving beyond Sink or Swim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Carly A.; Benedict, Amber E.; Thomas, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    Practicum experiences, a crucial component of preservice teacher preparation, help establish the foundational knowledge and skills necessary for beginning special education teachers (SETs). Preservice SETs need cooperating teachers (CTs) who support preservice SETs in proper emotional development (i.e., feeling like a teacher), who can model and…

  14. Engaging Bioanthropology College Students: The Role of Active and Cooperative Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soluri, Kathaeryne Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines the design and implementation of an active, cooperative pedagogy in an undergraduate biological anthropology course. The research draws upon a theoretical framework constructed from anthropology, education, and psychology research. The pedagogy studied was developed for and used in the laboratory component of a large,…

  15. Differential roles of fairness- and compassion-based motivations for cooperation, defection, and punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Tania; Steinbeis, Nikolaus

    2009-06-01

    The present paper briefly describes and contrasts two different motivations crucially involved in decision making and cooperation, namely fairness-based and compassion-based motivation. Whereas both can lead to cooperation in comparable social situations, we suggest that they are driven by fundamentally different mechanisms and, overall, predict different behavioral outcomes. First, we provide a brief definition of each and discuss the relevant behavioral and neuroscientific literature with regards to cooperation in the context of economic games. We suggest that, whereas both fairness- and compassion-based motivation can support cooperation, fairness-based motivation leads to punishment in cases of norm violation, while compassion-based motivation can, in cases of defection, counteract a desire for revenge and buffer the decline into iterative noncooperation. However, those with compassion-based motivation alone may get exploited. Finally, we argue that the affective states underlying fairness-based and compassion-based motivation are fundamentally different, the former driven by anger or fear of being punished and the latter by a wish for the other person's well-being.

  16. Rethinking the Role of Pedagogical Assistants: Establishing Cooperation between Roma Families and Schools in Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcevic, Jelena; Dimitrijevic, Bojana; Macura-Milovanovic, Suncica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to examine the risks and challenges related to the cooperation of pedagogical assistants (PAs) with Roma parents/families and their work with Roma pupils, as well as to offer further insight into ways to overcome these risks and challenges. Roma pupils and parents/families face numerous difficulties in education,…

  17. Co-evolution between sociality and dispersal: the role of synergistic cooperative benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Jessica; Brelsford, Alan; Avilés, Leticia

    2012-11-07

    Explaining the evolution of sociality is challenging because social individuals face disadvantages that must be balanced by intrinsic benefits of living in a group. One potential route towards the evolution of sociality may emerge from the avoidance of dispersal, which can be risky in some environments. Although early studies found that local competition may cancel the benefits of cooperation in viscous populations, subsequent studies have identified conditions, such as the presence of kin recognition or specific demographic conditions, under which altruism will still spread. Most of these studies assume that the costs of cooperating outweigh the direct benefits (strong altruism). In nature, however, many organisms gain synergistic benefits from group living, which may counterbalance even costly altruistic behaviours. Here, we use an individual based model to investigate how dispersal and social behaviour co-evolve when social behaviours result in synergistic benefits that counterbalance the relative cost of altruism to a greater extent than assumed in previous models. When the cost of cooperation is high, selection for sociality responds strongly to the cost of dispersal. In particular, cooperation can begin to spread in a population when higher cooperation levels become correlated with lower dispersal tendencies within individuals. In contrast, less costly social behaviours are less sensitive to the cost of dispersal. In line with previous studies, we find that mechanisms of global population control also affect this relationship: when whole patches (groups) go extinct each generation, selection favours a relatively high dispersal propensity, and social behaviours evolve only when they are not very costly. If random individuals within groups experience mortality each generation to maintain a global carrying capacity, on the other hand, social behaviours spread and dispersal is reduced, even when the latter is not costly.

  18. Role of Standard Demand Response Signals for Advanced Automated Aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-11-18

    Emerging standards such as OpenADR enable Demand Response (DR) Resources to interact directly with Utilities and Independent System Operators to allow their facility automation equipment to respond to a variety of DR signals ranging from day ahead to real time ancillary services. In addition, there are Aggregators in today’s markets who are capable of bringing together collections of aggregated DR assets and selling them to the grid as a single resource. However, in most cases these aggregated resources are not automated and when they are, they typically use proprietary technologies. There is a need for a framework for dealing with aggregated resources that supports the following requirements: • Allows demand-side resources to participate in multiple DR markets ranging from wholesale ancillary services to retail tariffs without being completely committed to a single entity like an Aggregator; • Allow aggregated groups of demand-side resources to be formed in an ad hoc fashion to address specific grid-side issues and support the optimization of the collective response of an aggregated group along a number of different dimensions. This is important in order to taylor the aggregated performance envelope to the needs to of the grid; • Allow aggregated groups to be formed in a hierarchical fashion so that each group can participate in variety of markets from wholesale ancillary services to distribution level retail tariffs. This paper explores the issues of aggregated groups of DR resources as described above especially within the context of emerging smart grid standards and the role they will play in both the management and interaction of various grid-side entities with those resources.

  19. The role of nuclear localization signal in parvovirus life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun

    2017-04-14

    Parvoviruses are small, non-enveloped viruses with an approximately 5.0 kb, single-stranded DNA genome. Usually, the parvovirus capsid gene contains one or more nuclear localization signals (NLSs), which are required for guiding the virus particle into the nucleus through the nuclear pore. However, several classical NLSs (cNLSs) and non-classical NLSs (ncNLSs) have been identified in non-structural genes, and the ncNLSs can also target non-structural proteins into the nucleus. In this review, we have summarized recent research findings on parvovirus NLSs. The capsid protein of the adeno-associated virus has four potential nuclear localization sequences, named basic region 1 (BR), BR2, BR3 and BR4. BR3 was identified as an NLS by fusing it with green fluorescent protein. Moreover, BR3 and BR4 are required for infectivity and virion assembly. In Protoparvovirus, the canine parvovirus has a common cNLS located in the VP1 unique region, similar to parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) and porcine parvovirus. Moreover, an ncNLS is found in the C-terminal region of MVM VP1/2. Parvovirus B19 also contains an ncNLS in the C-terminal region of VP1/2, which is essential for the nuclear transport of VP1/VP2. Approximately 1 or 2 cNLSs and 1 ncNLS have been reported in the non-structural protein of bocaviruses. Understanding the role of the NLS in the process of parvovirus infection and its mechanism of nuclear transport will contribute to the development of therapeutic vaccines and novel antiviral medicines.

  20. Role of autonomous androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer initiation is dichotomous and depends on the oncogenic signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarzadeh, Sanaz; Cai, Houjian; Janzen, Deanna M; Xin, Li; Lukacs, Rita; Riedinger, Mireille; Zong, Yang; DeGendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2011-05-10

    The steroid hormone signaling axis is thought to play a central role in initiation and progression of many hormonally regulated epithelial tumors. It is unclear whether all cancer-initiating signals depend on an intact hormone receptor signaling machinery. To ascertain whether cell autonomous androgen receptor (AR) is essential for initiation of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), the response of AR-null prostate epithelia to paracrine and cell autonomous oncogenic signals was assessed in vivo by using the prostate regeneration model system. Epithelial-specific loss of AR blocked paracrine FGF10-induced PIN, whereas the add back of exogenous AR restored this response. In contrast, PIN initiated by cell-autonomous, chronic-activated AKT developed independent of epithelial AR signaling. Our findings demonstrate a selective role for AR in the initiation of PIN, dependent on the signaling pathways driving tumor formation. Insights into the role of hormone receptor signaling in the initiation of epithelial tumors may help define this axis as a target for chemoprevention of carcinomas.

  1. The Role of Delay and Connectivity in Throughput Reduction of Cooperative Decentralized Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Alkhayyat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a multiple relay selection protocol for decentralized wireless networks. The proposed relays selection protocol aims to address three issues: (1 selecting relays within the coverage area of the source and destination to ensure that the relays are positioned one hop away from the destination, (2 ensuring that the best node (best relays with less distance and attenuation from the destination access the channel first, and (3 ensuring that the proposed relays selection is collision-free. Our analysis also considers three important characteristics of decentralized wireless networks that are directly affected by cooperation: delay, connectivity, and throughput. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate that improving connectivity and increasing number of relays reduce the throughput of cooperative decentralized wireless networks; consequently, a trade-off equation has been derived.

  2. The role of cultural group selection in explaining human cooperation is a hard case to prove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Ruth; Silva, Antonio S

    2016-01-01

    We believe cultural group selection is an elegant theoretical framework to study the evolution of complex human behaviours, including large-scale cooperation. However, the empirical evidence on key theoretical issues - such as levels of within- and between-group variation and effects of intergroup competition - is so far patchy, with no clear case where all the relevant assumptions and predictions of cultural group selection are met, to the exclusion of other explanations.

  3. Cooperation among Asymmetric Countries:A Study for the Role of Side Payment in International Environmental Agreements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Da-xin

    2012-01-01

    By a survey of a range of existing literatures, this article makes a rough summary for previous theoretical findings about the role of side payment in international environmental agreements. If countries are symmetric, we can hardly exploit the transfer to enhance international cooperation. On the contrary, under asymmetric countries assumption, the side payment is often helpful to obtaining better global outcome in environmental issues. Even though no general theoretical conclusion can be claimed so far, many meaningful implications will be revealed with the going on of this article.

  4. Distinct Wnt signaling pathways have opposing roles in appendage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoick-Cooper, Cristi L; Weidinger, Gilbert; Riehle, Kimberly J; Hubbert, Charlotte; Major, Michael B; Fausto, Nelson; Moon, Randall T

    2007-02-01

    In contrast to mammals, lower vertebrates have a remarkable capacity to regenerate complex structures damaged by injury or disease. This process, termed epimorphic regeneration, involves progenitor cells created through the reprogramming of differentiated cells or through the activation of resident stem cells. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling regulates progenitor cell fate and proliferation during embryonic development and stem cell function in adults, but its functional involvement in epimorphic regeneration has not been addressed. Using transgenic fish lines, we show that Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is activated in the regenerating zebrafish tail fin and is required for formation and subsequent proliferation of the progenitor cells of the blastema. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling appears to act upstream of FGF signaling, which has recently been found to be essential for fin regeneration. Intriguingly, increased Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is sufficient to augment regeneration, as tail fins regenerate faster in fish heterozygous for a loss-of-function mutation in axin1, a negative regulator of the pathway. Likewise, activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling by overexpression of wnt8 increases proliferation of progenitor cells in the regenerating fin. By contrast, overexpression of wnt5b (pipetail) reduces expression of Wnt/beta-catenin target genes, impairs proliferation of progenitors and inhibits fin regeneration. Importantly, fin regeneration is accelerated in wnt5b mutant fish. These data suggest that Wnt/beta-catenin signaling promotes regeneration, whereas a distinct pathway activated by wnt5b acts in a negative-feedback loop to limit regeneration.

  5. Cooperative antiproliferative signaling by aspirin and indole-3-carbinol targets microphthalmia-associated transcription factor gene expression and promoter activity in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, Kevin M; Matthew, Susanne; Aronchik, Ida; Firestone, Gary L

    2016-04-01

    Antiproliferative signaling of combinations of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural indolecarbinol compound derived from cruciferous vegetables, was investigated in human melanoma cells. Melanoma cell lines with distinct mutational profiles were sensitive to different extents to the antiproliferative response of aspirin, with oncogenic BRAF-expressing G361 cells and wild-type BRAF-expressing SK-MEL-30 cells being the most responsive. I3C triggered a strong proliferative arrest of G361 melanoma cells and caused only a modest decrease in the proliferation of SK-MEL-30 cells. In both cell lines, combinations of aspirin and I3C cooperatively arrested cell proliferation and induced a G1 cell cycle arrest, and nearly ablated protein and transcript levels of the melanocyte master regulator microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoform M (MITF-M). In melanoma cells transfected with a -333/+120-bp MITF-M promoter-luciferase reporter plasmid, treatment with aspirin and I3C cooperatively disrupted MITF-M promoter activity, which accounted for the loss of MITF-M gene products. Mutational analysis revealed that the aspirin required the LEF1 binding site, whereas I3C required the BRN2 binding site to mediate their combined and individual effects on MITF-M promoter activity. Consistent with LEF1 being a downstream effector of Wnt signaling, aspirin, but not I3C, downregulated protein levels of the Wnt co-receptor LDL receptor-related protein-6 and β-catenin and upregulated the β-catenin destruction complex component Axin. Taken together, our results demonstrate that aspirin-regulated Wnt signaling and I3C-targeted signaling pathways converge at distinct DNA elements in the MITF-M promoter to cooperatively disrupt MITF-M expression and melanoma cell proliferation.

  6. Co-operating STAT5 and AKT signaling pathways in chronic myeloid leukemia and mastocytosis: possible new targets of therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Siham; Arslanhan, Melis Dilara; Langenfeld, Florent; Jeanningros, Sylvie; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Tchertanov, Luba; Moriggl, Richard; Valent, Peter; Arock, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis are myeloid neoplasms sharing a number of pathogenetic and clinical features. In both conditions, an aberrantly activated oncoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity, namely BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia, and mutant KIT, mostly KIT D816V, in systemic mastocytosis, is key to disease evolution. The appreciation of the role of such tyrosine kinases in these diseases has led to the development of improved therapies with tyrosine kinase-targeted inhibitors. However, most drugs, including new KIT D816V-blocking agents, have failed to achieve long-lasting remissions in advanced systemic mastocytosis, and there is a similar problem in chronic myeloid leukemia, where imatinib-resistant patients sometimes fail to achieve remission, even with second- or third-line BCR-ABL1 specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors. During disease progression, additional signaling pathways become activated in neoplastic cells, but most converge into major downstream networks. Among these, the AKT and STAT5 pathways appear most critical and may result in drug-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis. Inhibition of phosphorylation of these targets has proven their crucial role in disease-evolution in both malignancies. Together, these observations suggest that STAT5 and AKT are key drivers of oncogenesis in drug-resistant forms of the diseases, and that targeting STAT5 and AKT might be an interesting approach in these malignancies. The present article provides an overview of our current knowledge about the critical role of AKT and STAT5 in the pathophysiology of chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis and on their potential value as therapeutic targets in these neoplasms.

  7. Roles of phosphotase 2A in nociceptive signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Multiple protein kinases affect the responses of dorsal horn neurons through phosphorylation of synaptic receptors and proteins involved in intracellular signal transduction pathways, and the consequences of this modulation may be spinal central sensitization. In contrast, the phosphatases catalyze an opposing reaction of de-phosphorylation, which may also modulate the functions of crucial proteins in signaling nociception. This is an important mechanism in the regulation of intracellular signal transduction pathways in nociceptive neurons. Accumulated evidence has shown that phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a serine/threonine specific phosphatase, is implicated in synaptic plasticity of the central nervous system and central sensitization of nociception. Therefore, targeting protein phosphotase 2A may provide an effective and novel strategy for the treatment of clinical pain. This review will characterize the structure and functional regulation of neuronal PP2A and bring together recent advances on the modulation of PP2A in targeted downstream substrates and relevant multiple nociceptive signaling molecules. PMID:24010880

  8. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in signalling and oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Results reported in this Thesis contribute to the comprehension of the complicated world of “redox biology”. ROS regulate signalling pathways both in physiological responses and in pathogenesis and progression of diseases. In cancer cells, the increase in ROS generation from metabolic abnormalities and oncogenic signalling may trigger a redox adaptation response, leading to an up-regulation of antioxidant capacity in order to maintain the ROS level below the toxic threshold. Thus, cancer c...

  9. Roles of FGF Signals in Heart Development, Health, and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Nobuyuki; Ohta, Hiroya; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika

    2016-01-01

    The heart provides the body with oxygen and nutrients and assists in the removal of metabolic waste through the blood vessels of the circulatory system. It is the first organ to form during embryonic morphogenesis. FGFs with diverse functions in development, health, and disease are signaling proteins, mostly as paracrine growth factors or endocrine hormones. The human/mouse FGF family comprises 22 members. Findings obtained from mouse models and human diseases with FGF signaling disorders hav...

  10. The role of Smad signaling in hematopoiesis and translational hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, U; Karlsson, S

    2011-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in the bone marrow (BM) of adult individuals and function to produce and regenerate the entire blood and immune system over the course of an individual's lifetime. Historically, HSCs are among the most thoroughly characterized tissue-specific stem cells. Despite this, the regulation of fate options, such as self-renewal and differentiation, has remained elusive, partly because of the expansive plethora of factors and signaling cues that govern HSC behavior in vivo. In the BM, HSCs are housed in specialized niches that dovetail the behavior of HSCs with the need of the organism. The Smad-signaling pathway, which operates downstream of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily of ligands, regulates a diverse set of biological processes, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, in many different organ systems. Much of the function of Smad signaling in hematopoiesis has remained nebulous due to early embryonic lethality of most knockout mouse models. However, recently new data have been uncovered, suggesting that the Smad-signaling circuitry is intimately linked to HSC regulation. In this review, we bring the Smad-signaling pathway into focus, chronicling key concepts and recent advances with respect to TGF-β-superfamily signaling in normal and leukemic hematopoiesis.

  11. Role of CSL-dependent and independent Notch signaling pathways in cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chong; Xing, Rui; Liu, Jing; Xing, Feiyue

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a normally biological phenomenon in various organisms, involving complexly molecular mechanisms with a series of signaling processes. Notch signaling is found evolutionarily conserved in many species, playing a critical role in embryonic development, normal tissue homeostasis, angiogenesis and immunoregulation. The focus of this review is on currently novel advances about roles of CSL-dependent and independent Notch signaling pathways in cell apoptosis. The CSL can bind Notch intracellular domain (NIC) to act as a switch in mediating transcriptional activation or inactivation of the Notch signaling pathway downstream genes in the nucleus. It shows that CSL-dependent signaling regulates the cell apoptosis through Hes-1-PTEN-AKT-mTOR signaling, but rather the CSL-independent signaling mediates the cell apoptosis possibly via NIC-mTORC2-AKT-mTOR signaling, providing a new insight into apoptotic mechanisms.

  12. Aggressive regulator or passive price-taker: what role should HIPCs (health insurance purchasing cooperatives) play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, E K

    1993-01-01

    Despite extensive variations on the theme, managed competition continues to be the favored model of federal and state governments in crafting health reform. A critical element in managed competition is the establishment of health insurance purchasing cooperatives (HIPCs), which band together the collective buying power of individuals or employers to give them market "clout". Policymakers must decide whether they want a HIPC to be an aggressive regulator--using its power to force changes among health plans--or a passive price-taker that contracts with plans meeting key criteria.

  13. Regulatory Roles of Metabolites in Cell Signaling Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Li; Wei Xu; Shimin Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that cellular metabolites,in addition to being sources of fuel and macromolecular substrates,are actively involved in signaling and epigenetic regulation.Many metabolites,such as cyclic AMP,which regulates phosphorylation/dephosphorylation,have been identified to modulate DNA and histone methylation and protein stability.Metabolite-driven cellular regulation occurs through two distinct mechanisms:proteins allosterically bind or serve as substrates for protein signaling pathways,and metabolites covalently modify proteins to regulate their functions.Such novel protein metabolites include fumarate,succinyl-CoA,propionyl-CoA,butyryl-CoA and crontonyl-CoA.Other metabolites,including α-ketoglutarate,succinate and fumarate,regulate epigenetic processes and cell signaling via protein binding.Here,we summarize recent progress in metabolite-derived post-translational protein modification and metabolite-binding associated signaling regulation.Uncovering metabolites upstream of cell signaling and epigenetic networks permits the linkage of metabolic disorders and human diseases,and suggests that metabolite modulation may be a strategy for innovative therapeutics and disease prevention techniques.

  14. The role of purinergic signalling in exocrine pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haanes, Kristian Agmund

    ATP is a fundamentally important molecule in intracellular processes, especially recognised as the molecular source of energy. ATP is however also released as a signal from most cell types, and extracellular signalling by ATP goes under the common name purinergic signalling and it includes releas....... At low concentrations it simulates proliferation, whereas it at higher concentrations is lethal to the cells, both caused by the purinergic P2X7 receptor....... mechanisms, receptors and br akdown enzymes. The work presented herein illustrates that ATP is present and is taken up into the zymogen granules of pancreatic acinar cells by the vesicular nucleotide transporter. Zymogen granules also contain the digestive enzymes in the acinar cells. Various stimuli release...

  15. The Hedgehog-binding proteins Gas1 and Cdo cooperate to positively regulate Shh signaling during mouse development

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Benjamin L.; Tenzen, Toyoaki; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2007-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is critical for patterning and growth during mammalian embryogenesis. Transcriptional profiling identified Growth-arrest-specific 1 (Gas1) as a general negative target of Shh signaling. Data presented here define Gas1 as a novel positive component of the Shh signaling cascade. Removal of Gas1 results in a Shh dose-dependent loss of cell identities in the ventral neural tube and facial and skeletal defects, also consistent with reduced Shh signaling. In contrast, ectopi...

  16. Cooperative hydration effect causes thermal unfolding of proteins and water activity plays a key role in protein stability in solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Osato; Dozen, Michiko; Hirota, Kaede

    2016-08-01

    The protein unfolding process observed in a narrow temperature range was clearly explained by evaluating the small difference in the enthalpy of hydrogen-bonding between amino acid residues and the hydration of amino acid residue separately. In aqueous solutions, the effect of cosolute on the protein stability is primarily dependent on water activity, aw, the role of which has been long neglected in the literature. The effect of aw on protein stability works as a power law so that a small change in aw is amplified substantially through the cooperative hydration effect. In the present approach, the role of hydrophobic interaction stands behind. This affects protein stability indirectly through the change in solution structure caused by the existence of cosolute.

  17. Roles of lipid turnover in transmembrane signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, B R

    1991-11-01

    Cells of higher organisms respond to external stimuli with a cascade of intracellular biochemical events initiated by binding of a hormone, growth factor, or neurotransmitter to a specific cell surface receptor. Previously well-characterized signal transduction pathways involve cyclic nucleotides as intracellular second messengers. Over the past decade, increasing attention has been focused on other signaling pathways in which membrane lipids serve as second messengers or their precursors. This review describes current understanding of these pathways and points to recent discoveries likely to open new frontiers in the coming decade.

  18. Role of Redox Signaling in Neuroinflammation and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsi-Lung Hsieh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS, a redox signal, are produced by various enzymatic reactions and chemical processes, which are essential for many physiological functions and act as second messengers. However, accumulating evidence has implicated the pathogenesis of several human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders related to increased oxidative stress. Under pathological conditions, increasing ROS production can regulate the expression of diverse inflammatory mediators during brain injury. Elevated levels of several proinflammatory factors including cytokines, peptides, pathogenic structures, and peroxidants in the central nervous system (CNS have been detected in patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. These proinflammatory factors act as potent stimuli in brain inflammation through upregulation of diverse inflammatory genes, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, and adhesion molecules. To date, the intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying the expression of target proteins regulated by these factors are elusive. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying the intracellular signaling pathways, especially ROS, involved in the expression of several inflammatory proteins induced by proinflammatory factors in brain resident cells. Understanding redox signaling transduction mechanisms involved in the expression of target proteins and genes may provide useful therapeutic strategies for brain injury, inflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. The role of auxin signaling in early embryo pattern formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Margot E.; Weijers, Dolf

    2015-01-01

    Pattern formation of the early Arabidopsis embryo generates precursors to all major cell types, and is profoundly controlled by the signaling molecule auxin. Here we discuss recent milestones in our understanding of auxin-dependent embryo patterning. Auxin biosynthesis, transport and response mec

  20. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies.

  1. Signaling behind bars: a role for bar domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kreuk, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we describe several novel components of growth factor receptor and RhoGTPase activation and signaling. We have demonstrated that the F-BAR protein PACSIN2 is an important regulator of Rac1 output and, as a consequence, cell spreading and migration. This study further established the i

  2. Redox Signaling in Skeletal Muscle: Role of Aging and Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Li Li

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contraction is associated with the production of ROS due to altered O[subscript 2] distribution and flux in the cell. Despite a highly efficient antioxidant defense, a small surplus of ROS, such as hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, may serve as signaling molecules to stimulate cellular adaptation to reach new homeostasis largely…

  3. The Role of Signals in Online Auction Purchase Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cypryjański Jacek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in behavioural economics contradicting the empirical prediction of rational choice theory once applied to online auctions. The issue is of particular relevance due to the large use of online auctions and the anticipated growth in the future. Online auctions combine the conventional auction model with information technology. However, information asymmetry within such auctions causes risks and uncertainties that influence consumer purchase intentions. The research investigates online consumers’ behaviour. The Authors suggest that due to the high perceived risk of the online buying process consumers are prompted to use cues of seller’ reputation. In a series of six experiments conducted via the auction site Allegro.pl in Poland a number of signals from auction web pages has been manipulated to influence purchase intention. The results suggest that several signals can be used to stimulate online customers’ behaviour. The results of these experiments indicate that buyers are more susceptible to the influence of “visual” signals than signals that require greater involvement of the buyer (to read information. The conducted experiments contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of online auction users’ behaviour. And finally it provides some managerial implications to increase online auction effectiveness from the seller’s perspective.

  4. A role for TOR complex 2 signaling in promoting autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Powers, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a central regulator of cell growth in response to nutrient availability. TOR forms 2 structurally and functionally distinct complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, and negatively regulates autophagy via TORC1. Here we demonstrate TOR also operates independently through the TORC2 signaling pathway to promote autophagy upon amino acid limitation. Under these conditions, TORC2, through its downstream target kinase Ypk1, inhibits the Ca(2+)- and Cmd1/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, to enable the activation of the amino acid-sensing EIF2S1/eIF2α kinase, Gcn2, and promote autophagy. Thus TORC2 signaling regulates autophagy in a pathway distinct from TORC1 to provide a tunable response to the cellular metabolic state.

  5. Role of IRS-2 in insulin and cytokine signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X J; Wang, L M; Zhang, Y; Yenush, L; Myers, M G; Glasheen, E; Lane, W S; Pierce, J H; White, M F

    1995-09-14

    The protein IRS-1 acts as an interface between signalling proteins with Src-homology-2 domains (SH2 proteins) and the receptors for insulin, IGF-1, growth hormone, several interleukins (IL-4, IL-9, IL-13) and other cytokines. It regulates gene expression and stimulates mitogenesis, and appears to mediate insulin/IGF-1-stimulated glucose transport. Thus, survival of the IRS-1-/- mouse with only mild resistance to insulin was surprising. This dilemma is provisionally resolved with our discovery of a second IRS-signalling protein. We purified and cloned a likely candidate called 4PS from myeloid progenitor cells and, because of its resemblance to IRS-1, we designate it IRS-2. Alignment of the sequences of IRS-2 and IRS-1 revealed a highly conserved amino terminus containing a pleckstrin-homology domain and a phosphotyrosine-binding domain, and a poorly conserved carboxy terminus containing several tyrosine phosphorylation motifs. IRS-2 is expressed in many cells, including tissues from IRS-1-/- mice, and may be essential for signalling by several receptor systems.

  6. Role of ROBO4 Signalling in Developmental and Pathological Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Singh Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmembrane roundabout receptor family members (ROBO1–ROBO4 principally orchestrate the neuronal guidance mechanism of the nervous system. Secreted glycoprotein SLITs are the most appreciated ligands for ROBOs. Recently identified ROBO4 is the key mediator of SLIT-ROBO mediated developmental and pathological angiogenesis. Although SLIT2 has been shown to interact with ROBO4 as ligand, it remains an open question whether this protein is the physiologic partner of ROBO4. The purpose of this review is to summarise how reliable SLIT2 as ligand for ROBO4 is, if not what the other possible mechanisms demonstrated till date for ROBO4 mediated developmental and pathological angiogenesis are. We conclude that ROBO4 is expressed specially in vascular endothelial cells and maintains the vascular integrity via either SLIT2 dependent or SLIT2 independent manner. On the contrary, it promotes the pathological angiogenesis by involving different signalling arm(s/unknown ligand(s. This review explores the interactions SLIT2/ROBO1, SLIT2/ROBO1–ROBO4, ROBO1/ROBO4, and ROBO4/UNC5B which can be promising and potential therapeutic targets for developmental angiogenesis defects and pathological angiogenesis. Finally we have reviewed the ROBO4 signalling pathways and made an effort to elaborate the insight of this signalling as therapeutic target of pathological angiogenesis.

  7. Loss of the Drosophila cell polarity regulator Scribbled promotes epithelial tissue overgrowth and cooperation with oncogenic Ras-Raf through impaired Hippo pathway signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grusche Felix A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial neoplasias are associated with alterations in cell polarity and excessive cell proliferation, yet how these neoplastic properties are related to one another is still poorly understood. The study of Drosophila genes that function as neoplastic tumor suppressors by regulating both of these properties has significant potential to clarify this relationship. Results Here we show in Drosophila that loss of Scribbled (Scrib, a cell polarity regulator and neoplastic tumor suppressor, results in impaired Hippo pathway signaling in the epithelial tissues of both the eye and wing imaginal disc. scrib mutant tissue overgrowth, but not the loss of cell polarity, is dependent upon defective Hippo signaling and can be rescued by knockdown of either the TEAD/TEF family transcription factor Scalloped or the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie in the eye disc, or reducing levels of Yorkie in the wing disc. Furthermore, loss of Scrib sensitizes tissue to transformation by oncogenic Ras-Raf signaling, and Yorkie-Scalloped activity is required to promote this cooperative tumor overgrowth. The inhibition of Hippo signaling in scrib mutant eye disc clones is not dependent upon JNK activity, but can be significantly rescued by reducing aPKC kinase activity, and ectopic aPKC activity is sufficient to impair Hippo signaling in the eye disc, even when JNK signaling is blocked. In contrast, warts mutant overgrowth does not require aPKC activity. Moreover, reducing endogenous levels of aPKC or increasing Scrib or Lethal giant larvae levels does not promote increased Hippo signaling, suggesting that aPKC activity is not normally rate limiting for Hippo pathway activity. Epistasis experiments suggest that Hippo pathway inhibition in scrib mutants occurs, at least in part, downstream or in parallel to both the Expanded and Fat arms of Hippo pathway regulation. Conclusions Loss of Scrib promotes Yorkie/Scalloped-dependent epithelial tissue

  8. The role of the Public Private Partnership (PPP) in Cross Border Cooperation (CBC) as strategic practice in the EU Policies and cooperation tools for 2014-2020

    OpenAIRE

    Lussi, Manoela

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasingly widespread acknowledgement among all active actors in the development co-operation sector that the Public Private Partnership (PPP) can be a new important tool, not only to build important infrastructure (public works) but also to provide services to the citizens at central and local level as well as to have a strategic value in the Cross-Border Co-operation (CBC) in the next future. The European Commission defines PPPs in a rather broad and general way without giv...

  9. Role of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) Signaling in Bladder Cancer Stemness and Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Islam S; Pedram, Akbari; Farhat, Walid A

    2016-02-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway has emerged as a critical component of bladder development, cancer initiation, and progression. While the role of Shh signaling in bladder development is well documented, its role in bladder cancer progression is uncertain. Additionally, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been identified to promote bladder cancer progression in the initial stages and also contribute to drug resistance in the later stage and ultimately metastasis. We speculate that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) and Shh fuel the carcinogenesis process. This review presents the most recent studies focusing on the role of Shh signaling in bladder cancer progression.

  10. The role of purinergic signaling in depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperlagh, Beata; Csolle, Cecilia; Ando, Romeo D; Goloncser, Flora; Kittel, Agnes; Baranyi, Maria

    2012-12-01

    The purinergic signaling system consists of transporters, enzymes and receptors responsible for the synthesis, release, action and extracellular inactivation of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and its extracellular breakdown product adenosine. The actions of ATP are mediated ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptor subfamilies, whilst the actions of adenosine are mediated by P1 adenosine receptors. Purinergic signaling pathways are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and participate in its normal and pathological functions. Among P2X receptors, the P2X7 receptor (P2rx7) has received considerable interest in both basic and clinical neuropsychiatric research because of its profound effects in animal CNS pathology and its potential involvement as a susceptibility gene in mood disorders. Although genetic findings were not always consistently replicated, several studies demonstrated that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human P2X7 gene (P2RX7) show significant association with major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. Animal studies revealed that the genetic knock-down or pharmacological antagonism leads to reduced depressive-like behavior, attenuated response in mania-model and alterations in stress reactivity. A potential mechanism of P2rx7 activation on mood related behavior is increased glutamate release, activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors and subsequent enduring changes in neuroplasticity. In addition, dysregulation of monoaminergic transmission and HPA axis reactivity could also contribute to the observed changes in behavior. Besides P2rx7, the inhibition of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors also mediate antidepressant-like effects in animal experiments. In conclusion, despite contradictions between existing data, these findings point to the therapeutic potential of the purinergic signaling system in mood disorders.

  11. Roles of signaling and transcriptional networks in pathological lymphangiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimatsu, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Hideki; Watabe, Tetsuro

    2016-04-01

    Lymphangiogenesis, the generation of new lymphatic vessels, plays important roles in cancer metastasis. Outstanding progress during the past decade has dramatically increased the novel knowledge and insights of the mechanisms underlying the generation of new lymphatic vessels, the roles of transcription factors and lymphangiogenic growth factors during physiological development and pathological processes such as cancer and inflammation. Furthermore, an understanding of the molecular consequences during tumor lymphangiogenesis has provided chances to develop better diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that aim to limit the progression of cancer. In this article, we will explain the current knowledge of how lymphatic function is altered in various pathological conditions including cancer progression.

  12. Roles of histone ubiquitylation in DNA damage signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sui-Sui DONG; Michael S. Y. HUEN

    2011-01-01

    Histone ubiquitylation has emerged as an important chromatin modification associated with DNA damage signaling and repair pathways.These histone marks,laid down by E3 ubiquitin ligases that include RNF8 and RNF168,decorate chromatin domains surrounding DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs).Recent work implicated ubiquitylated histones in orchestrating cell cycle checkpoints,DNA repair and gene transcription.Here we summarize recent advances that contribute to our current knowledge of the highly dynamic nature of DSB-associated histone ubiquitylation,and discuss major challenges ahead in understanding the versatility of ubiquitin conjugation in maintaining genome stability.

  13. Sustainable Relations in International Development Cooperation Projects: The Role of Organizational Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Rota

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available  The importance of the human side of project management to assess the success of international development project has not been fully considered yet. An analysis of the literature on the project success definition, focused on the success criteria and success factors, was carried out. The organization’s effectiveness, in terms of Relations Sustainability, emerged as a criteria integrating the "time, cost, performance" approach to define a project success. Based on previous research contributions on the factors influencing the organization’s effectiveness, the paper expands the analysis of the influence of Organizational Climate on the Relation Sustainability between project manager and project team involved in international cooperation for development. The statistical methods used include confirmatory factors analysis and structural equation modeling. The results carry implications for project management identifying five dimensions of Organizational Climate (trust, innovation, social cohesion, communication and job challenge influencing Relations Sustainability. This finding suggests that Organizational Climate contributes to project success by creating trust, stimulating commitment and generating satisfaction to overcome conflicts between project manager and project team.

  14. The role of host traits, season and group size on parasite burdens in a cooperative mammal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermien Viljoen

    Full Text Available The distribution of parasites among hosts is often characterised by a high degree of heterogeneity with a small number of hosts harbouring the majority of parasites. Such patterns of aggregation have been linked to variation in host exposure and susceptibility as well as parasite traits and environmental factors. Host exposure and susceptibility may differ with sexes, reproductive effort and group size. Furthermore, environmental factors may affect both the host and parasite directly and contribute to temporal heterogeneities in parasite loads. We investigated the contributions of host and parasite traits as well as season on parasite loads in highveld mole-rats (Cryptomys hottentotus pretoriae. This cooperative breeder exhibits a reproductive division of labour and animals live in colonies of varying sizes that procreate seasonally. Mole-rats were parasitised by lice, mites, cestodes and nematodes with mites (Androlaelaps sp. and cestodes (Mathevotaenia sp. being the dominant ecto- and endoparasites, respectively. Sex and reproductive status contributed little to the observed parasite prevalence and abundances possibly as a result of the shared burrow system. Clear seasonal patterns of parasite prevalence and abundance emerged with peaks in summer for mites and in winter for cestodes. Group size correlated negatively with mite abundance while it had no effect on cestode burdens and group membership affected infestation with both parasites. We propose that the mode of transmission as well as social factors constrain parasite propagation generating parasite patterns deviating from those commonly predicted.

  15. Cooperative role of electrical stimulation on microbial metabolism and selection of thermophilic communities for p-fluoronitrobenzene treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueqin; Shen, Dongsheng; Feng, Huajun; Wang, Yanfeng; Li, Na; Han, Jingyi; Long, Yuyang

    2015-01-01

    A novel thermophilic bioelectrochemical system (TBES) based on electrical stimulation was established for the enhanced treatment of p-fluoronitrobenzene (p-FNB) wastewater. p-FNB removal rate constant in the TBES was 78.6% higher than that of the mesophilic BES (MBES), the elevation of which owing to high-temperature overtook the rate improvement of 50.8% in the electrocatalytic system (ECS). Additionally, an overwhelming mineralization efficiency of 91.96% ± 5.70% was obtained in the TBES. The superiority of TBES was attributed to the integrated role of electrical stimulation and high-temperature. Electrical stimulation provided an alternative for the microbial growth independent energy requirements, compensating insufficient energy support from p-FNB metabolism under the high-temperature stress. Besides, electrical stimulation facilitated microbial community evolution to form specific thermophilic biocatalysis. The uniquely selected thermophilic microorganisms including Coprothermobacter sp. and other ones cooperated to enhance p-FNB mineralization.

  16. Cooperative gating between ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kee-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative gating between ion channels, i.e. the gating of one channel directly coupled to the gating of neighboring channels, has been observed in diverse channel types at the single-channel level. Positively coupled gating could enhance channel-mediated signaling while negative coupling may effectively reduce channel gating noise. Indeed, the physiological significance of cooperative channel gating in signal transduction has been recognized in several in vivo studies. Moreover, coupled gating of ion channels was reported to be associated with some human disease states. In this review, physiological roles for channel cooperativity and channel clustering observed in vitro and in vivo are introduced, and stimulation-induced channel clustering and direct channel cross linking are suggested as the physical mechanisms of channel assembly. Along with physical clustering, several molecular mechanisms proposed as the molecular basis for functional coupling of neighboring channels are covered: permeant ions as a channel coupling mediator, concerted channel activation through the membrane, and allosteric mechanisms. Also, single-channel analysis methods for cooperative gating such as the binomial analysis, the variance analysis, the conditional dwell time density analysis, and the maximum likelihood fitting analysis are reviewed and discussed.

  17. How open is too open? The mitigating role of appropriation mechanisms in R&D cooperation settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, Theresa; Lorenz, Annika; Blind, Knut

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the influence of firms’ R&D cooperation activities on their likelihood to experience imitation. Analyses of firm-level survey data concerning the R&D cooperation behavior of 2,797 German firms reveal that companies engaging in R&D cooperation face significantly more i

  18. How open is too open? The mitigating role of appropriation mechanisms in R&D cooperation settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, Theresa; Lorenz, Annika; Blind, Knut

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the influence of firms’ R&D cooperation activities on their likelihood to experience imitation. Analyses of firm-level survey data concerning the R&D cooperation behavior of 2,797 German firms reveal that companies engaging in R&D cooperation face significantly more

  19. Cooperative strategies European perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Killing, J Peter

    1997-01-01

    Cooperative Strategies: European Perspectives is one of three geographically targeted volumes in which the contributors present the most current research on topics such as advances in theories of cooperative strategies, the formation of cooperative alliances, the dynamics of partner relationships, and the role of information and knowledge in cooperative alliances. Blending conceptual insights with empirical analyses, the contributors highlight commonalities and differences across national, cultural, and trade zones. The chapters in this volume are anchored in a wide set of theoretical approaches, conceptual frameworks, and models, illustrating how rich the area of cooperative strategies is for scholarly inquiry.

  20. Role of notch signaling in osteoimmunology-from the standpoint of osteoclast differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duan, Li; Ren, Yijin

    2013-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a highly conserved cell signaling system present in most multicellular organisms. Osteoimmunology comprises the interplay between the immune system and bone metabolism. Osteoclasts, cells that resorb bone, play a crucial role in bone metabolism. In this review, we disc

  1. The role of starburst amacrine cells in visual signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAYLOR, W.R.; SMITH, R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Starburst amacrine cells (SBACs) within the adult mammalian retina provide the critical inhibition that underlies the receptive field properties of direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs). The SBACs generate direction-selective output of GABA that differentially inhibits the DSGCs. We review the biophysical mechanisms that produce directional GABA release from SBACs and test a network model that predicts the effects of reciprocal inhibition between adjacent SBACs. The results of the model simulations suggest that reciprocal inhibitory connections between closely spaced SBACs should be spatially selective, while connections between more widely spaced cells could be indiscriminate. SBACs were initially identified as cholinergic neurons and were subsequently shown to contain release both acetylcholine and GABA. While the role of the GABAergic transmission is well established, the role of the cholinergic transmission remains unclear. PMID:22310373

  2. Cooperative Control of Caspase Recruitment Domain-containing Protein 11 (CARD11) Signaling by an Unusual Array of Redundant Repressive Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jattani, Rakhi P; Tritapoe, Julia M; Pomerantz, Joel L

    2016-04-15

    Several classes of signaling proteins contain autoinhibitory domains that prevent unwarranted signaling and coordinate the induction of activity in response to external cues. CARD11, a scaffold protein critical for antigen receptor signaling to NF-κB, undergoes autoregulation by a poorly understood inhibitory domain (ID), which keeps CARD11 inactive in the absence of receptor triggering through inhibitory intramolecular interactions. This autoinhibitory strategy makes CARD11 highly susceptible to gain-of-function mutations that are frequently observed in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and that disrupt ID-mediated autoinhibition, leading to constitutive NF-κB activity, which can promote lymphoma proliferation. Although DLBCL-associated CARD11 mutations in the caspase recruitment domain (CARD), LATCH domain, and coiled coil have been shown to disrupt intramolecular ID binding, surprisingly, no gain-of-function mutations in the ID itself have been reported and validated. In this study, we solve this paradox and report that the CARD11 ID contains an unusual array of four repressive elements that function cooperatively with redundancy to prevent spontaneous NF-κB activation. Our quantitative analysis suggests that potent oncogenic CARD11 mutations must perturb autoinhibition by at least three repressive elements. Our results explain the lack of ID mutations in DLBCL and reveal an unusual autoinhibitory domain structure and strategy for preventing unwarranted scaffold signaling to NF-κB.

  3. Zinc Transporters and Zinc Signaling: New Insights into Their Role in Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element that plays a vital role in many biological processes including growth and development, immunity, and metabolism. Recent studies have highlighted zinc’s dynamic role as a “cellular second messenger” in the control of insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, mechanisms that contribute to dysfunctional zinc signaling are suggested to be associated with metabolic disease states including cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and dia...

  4. Role of oxytocin signaling in the regulation of body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, James E; Ho, Jacqueline M

    2013-12-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic disorders are growing health concerns in the US and worldwide. In the US alone, more than two-thirds of the adult population is classified as either overweight or obese [1], highlighting the need to develop new, effective treatments for these conditions. Whereas the hormone oxytocin is well known for its peripheral effects on uterine contraction during parturition and milk ejection during lactation, release of oxytocin from somatodendrites and axonal terminals within the central nervous system (CNS) is implicated in both the formation of prosocial behaviors and in the control of energy balance. Recent findings demonstrate that chronic administration of oxytocin reduces food intake and body weight in diet-induced obese (DIO) and genetically obese rodents with impaired or defective leptin signaling. Importantly, chronic systemic administration of oxytocin out to 6 weeks recapitulates the effects of central administration on body weight loss in DIO rodents at doses that do not result in the development of tolerance. Furthermore, these effects are coupled with induction of Fos (a marker of neuronal activation) in hindbrain areas (e.g. dorsal vagal complex (DVC)) linked to the control of meal size and forebrain areas (e.g. hypothalamus, amygdala) linked to the regulation of food intake and body weight. This review assesses the potential central and peripheral targets by which oxytocin may inhibit body weight gain, its regulation by anorexigenic and orexigenic signals, and its potential use as a therapy that can circumvent leptin resistance and reverse the behavioral and metabolic abnormalities associated with DIO and genetically obese models.

  5. Cooperative coupling and role of heme a in the proton pump of heme-copper oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, S; Capitanio, N; Villani, G; Capitanio, G; Bizzoca, A; Palese, L L; Carlino, V; De Nitto, E

    1998-10-01

    In the last few years, evidence has accumulated supporting the applicability of the cooperative model of proton pumps in cytochrome systems, vectorial Bohr mechanisms, to heme-copper oxidases. The vectorial Bohr mechanism is based on short- and long-range protonmotive cooperative effects linked to redox transitions of the metal centers. The crystal structure of oxidized and reduced bovine-heart cytochrome c oxidase reveals, upon reduction, the occurrence of long-range conformational changes in subunit I of the oxidase. Analysis of the crystal structure of cytochrome c oxidase shows the existence of hydrogen-bonded networks of amino acid residues which could undergo redox-linked pK shifts resulting in transmembrane proton translocation. Our group has identified four proteolytic groups undergoing reversible redox-linked pK shifts. Two groups result in being linked to redox transitions of heme a3. One group is apparently linked to CuB. The fourth group is linked to oxido-reduction of heme a. We have shown that the proton transfer resulting from the redox Bohr effects linked to heme a and CuB in the bovine oxidase displays membrane vectorial asymmetry, i.e., protons are taken up from the inner aqueous space (N), upon reduction, and released in the external space (P), upon oxidation of the metals. This direction of proton uptake and release is just what is expected from the vectorial Bohr mechanism. The group linked to heme a, which can transfer up to 0.9 H+/e- at pHs around neutrality, can provide the major contribution to the proton pump. It is proposed that translocation of pumped protons, linked to electron flow through heme a, utilizes a channel (channel D) which extends from a conserved aspartate at the N entrance to a conserved glutamate located between heme a and the binuclear center. The carboxylic group of this glutamic acid, after having delivered, upon electron flow through heme a, pumped protons towards the P phase, once reprotonated from the N phase, moves

  6. Gratefully received, gratefully repaid: the role of perceived fairness in cooperative interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence K Ma

    Full Text Available It is well documented that people would remunerate fair behaviours and penalize unfair behaviours. It is argued that individuals' reactions following the receipt of a gift depend on the perceived intentions of the donors. Fair intentions should prompt positive affect, like gratitude, triggering cooperative behaviours; while intended unfairness should trigger negative affect, like anger, fostering anti-social actions. It is, however, contended that when people lack information to infer others' intention they may use 'normative' beliefs about fairness - what a typical fair individual 'should' do in these circumstances - to guide their behaviour. In this experiment we examined this assertion. We had 122 participants play a one-shot, double-anonymous game with half playing as potential helpers (P1s and half as recipients (P2s. Whether a participant was a P1 or P2 was chance-determined and all participants knew this. P1s decided whether to help P2s and whether to make their help unconditional (no repayment needed or conditional (full or 'taxed' repayment. P2s decided whether to accept the offer and whatever conditions attached but were blind to the list of helping options available to P1s. We anticipated that recipients would refer to the 'injunctive norm' that 'fair people should help "for free" when it is only by chance that they are in a position to help'. Therefore, without knowing P1s' different helping options, unconditional offers should be rated by recipients as fairer than conditional offers, and this should be linked to greater gratitude with greater gratitude linked to greater reciprocation. Path analyses confirmed this serial mediation. The results showed that recipients of unconditional offers, compared to conditional ones, interpreted the helpers' motives as more helpful, experienced greater gratitude and were more eager to reciprocate. The behavioural data further revealed that, when given a latter option to default, 38% of recipients

  7. The autoimmunity risk variant LYP-W620 cooperates with CSK in the regulation of TCR signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa de la Puerta

    Full Text Available The protein tyrosine phosphatase LYP, a key regulator of TCR signaling, presents a single nucleotide polymorphism, C1858T, associated with several autoimmune diseases such as type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus. This polymorphism changes an R by a W in the P1 Pro rich motif of LYP, which binds to CSK SH3 domain, another negative regulator of TCR signaling. Based on the analysis of the mouse homologue, Pep, it was proposed that LYP and CSK bind constitutively to inhibit LCK and subsequently TCR signaling. The detailed study of LYP/CSK interaction, here presented, showed that LYP/CSK interaction was inducible upon TCR stimulation, and involved LYP P1 and P2 motifs, and CSK SH3 and SH2 domains. Abrogating LYP/CSK interaction did not preclude the regulation of TCR signaling by these proteins.

  8. Distinct roles of PTCH2 splice variants in Hedgehog signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnama, Fahimeh; Toftgård, Rune; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2004-03-01

    The human PTCH2 gene is highly similar to PTCH1, a tumour suppressor gene frequently mutated in basal cell carcinoma and several other tumour types. PTCH1 is a transmembrane protein believed to inhibit another transmembrane protein SMO (Smoothened), which mediates HH (Hedgehog) signalling. In this study, we analysed the biological properties of several PTCH2 splice variants. An mRNA form that lacked the last exon was abundantly expressed in all tissues examined, in contrast with the one that included it. Moreover, a transcript lacking exon 9, which is a part of a conserved sterol-sensing domain, was identified in intestine, prostate and cerebellum. In ovary, spleen, testis, cerebellum and skin, an mRNA lacking both exons 9 and 10 could also be observed. The different PTCH2 isoforms localized in the cytoplasm were capable of internalizing the N-terminal fragment of Sonic HH (Shh-N). Additionally, the PTCH2 gene was found to be a target of HH signalling. PTCH2 promoter regulation assays demonstrated that only one of the PTCH2 variants could inhibit the activity of SHH-N, whereas none was capable of inhibiting the activated form of SMO (SMO-M2) and this contrasts with PTCH1. Despite the fact that the PTCH2 isoforms lacked the ability to inhibit SMO-M2 activity, all PTCH2 variants as well as PTCH1, on co-transfection with Smo, were able to change Smo localization from being largely dispersed in the cytoplasm to the juxtanuclear region. Furthermore, the PTCH2 isoforms and PTCH1 co-localized in doubly transfected cells and an interaction between them was confirmed using immunoprecipitation assays. Using Ptch1-/- mouse cells, it was shown that the PTCH2 variants and PTCH1 differentially act to reconstitute not only the SHH but also the Desert HH-dependent transcriptional response. We conclude that in spite of their structural similarities, the PTCH2 isoforms have distinct functional properties when compared with PTCH1.

  9. Emerging role of Hpo signaling and YAP in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valero V III

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vicente Valero III,1 Timothy M Pawlik,1 Robert A Anders21Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, 2Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the sixth most common cancer and the third most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Due to the poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options, there is great interest in further understanding better the molecular underpinnings and potential molecular targets associated with HCC. The Hippo (Hpo signaling pathway and YAP, its principal downstream effector, represent an innovative area of research in HCC. Pioneered in Drosophila melanogaster, the Hpo cascade controls tissue homeostasis including organ size, cell proliferation, apoptosis, as well as cell-cycle regulation and differentiation. This conserved kinase cascade in mammals depends on central control by the tumor suppressor mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1/2 (Mst1/2. The Mst1/2 commences the downstream kinase cascade, ultimately activating the oncoprotein YAP and allowing its physical association with downstream targets to enhance the gene expression signatures that are involved in proliferation and survival. Alterations in YAP expression and defective regulation of other key Hpo pathway members, such as Mst1/2, Salvador, neurofibromatosis and Mer (Nf2/mer, large tumor suppressor homolog 1/2 (Lats1/2, and Mps one binder kinase activator-like 1A and 1B (Mob1 drive carcinogenesis in animal models. The dysregulation of the Hpo pathway – resulting in an unchecked activation of YAP – culminates in the development of a broad range of human tumor types, including HCC. The abrogation of Mst1/2-mediated YAP phosphorylation permits YAP entry into the nucleus in murine models and functions similarly in human HCCs. Chemoresistance mechanisms displayed by HCC tumors occur in a YAP-dependent manner. The HCC specimens

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury: Exploring the Role of Cooperative Extension in Kansas Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Debra M.; Garcia, Jane Mertz

    2012-01-01

    TBI"options" helps survivors of traumatic brain injury and their families identify, locate, and contact helpful organizations in their local communities to promote successful living. This article discusses the role of county agents in the program and the support offered by community partners. Results of pre- and post-surveys for both…

  11. DMPD: Transcriptional signaling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15733829 Transcriptional signaling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. Sen GC, Sa... signaling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. PubmedID 15733829 Title Transcriptional signaling by double-stranded RNA: role

  12. DMPD: Signaling by IL-12 and IL-23 and the immunoregulatory roles of STAT4. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15546391 Signaling by IL-12 and IL-23 and the immunoregulatory roles of STAT4. Watf...html) (.csml) Show Signaling by IL-12 and IL-23 and the immunoregulatory roles of STAT4. PubmedID 15546391 T...itle Signaling by IL-12 and IL-23 and the immunoregulatory roles of STAT4. Author

  13. Role of Polyphenols and Other Phytochemicals on Molecular Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Swapna; Dixit, Madhulika

    2015-01-01

    Optimized nutrition through supplementation of diet with plant derived phytochemicals has attracted significant attention to prevent the onset of many chronic diseases including cardiovascular impairments, cancer, and metabolic disorder. These phytonutrients alone or in combination with others are believed to impart beneficial effects and play pivotal role in metabolic abnormalities such as dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, hypertension, glucose intolerance, systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress. Epidemiological and preclinical studies demonstrated that fruits, vegetables, and beverages rich in carotenoids, isoflavones, phytoestrogens, and phytosterols delay the onset of atherosclerosis or act as a chemoprotective agent by interacting with the underlying pathomechanisms. Phytochemicals exert their beneficial effects either by reducing the circulating levels of cholesterol or by inhibiting lipid oxidation, while others exhibit anti-inflammatory and antiplatelet activities. Additionally, they reduce neointimal thickening by inhibiting proliferation of smooth muscle cells and also improve endothelium dependent vasorelaxation by modulating bioavailability of nitric-oxide and voltage-gated ion channels. However, detailed and profound knowledge on specific molecular targets of each phytochemical is very important to ensure safe use of these active compounds as a therapeutic agent. Thus, this paper reviews the active antioxidative, antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, or antiangiogenesis role of various phytochemicals for prevention of chronic diseases.

  14. Role of Polyphenols and Other Phytochemicals on Molecular Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Upadhyay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimized nutrition through supplementation of diet with plant derived phytochemicals has attracted significant attention to prevent the onset of many chronic diseases including cardiovascular impairments, cancer, and metabolic disorder. These phytonutrients alone or in combination with others are believed to impart beneficial effects and play pivotal role in metabolic abnormalities such as dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, hypertension, glucose intolerance, systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress. Epidemiological and preclinical studies demonstrated that fruits, vegetables, and beverages rich in carotenoids, isoflavones, phytoestrogens, and phytosterols delay the onset of atherosclerosis or act as a chemoprotective agent by interacting with the underlying pathomechanisms. Phytochemicals exert their beneficial effects either by reducing the circulating levels of cholesterol or by inhibiting lipid oxidation, while others exhibit anti-inflammatory and antiplatelet activities. Additionally, they reduce neointimal thickening by inhibiting proliferation of smooth muscle cells and also improve endothelium dependent vasorelaxation by modulating bioavailability of nitric-oxide and voltage-gated ion channels. However, detailed and profound knowledge on specific molecular targets of each phytochemical is very important to ensure safe use of these active compounds as a therapeutic agent. Thus, this paper reviews the active antioxidative, antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, or antiangiogenesis role of various phytochemicals for prevention of chronic diseases.

  15. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Potential Role of Endocannabinoids Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balapal S. Basavarajappa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the unique features of prenatal alcohol exposure in humans is impaired cognitive and behavioral function resulting from damage to the central nervous system (CNS, which leads to a spectrum of impairments referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD. Human FASD phenotypes can be reproduced in the rodent CNS following prenatal ethanol exposure. Several mechanisms are expected to contribute to the detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing fetus, particularly in the developing CNS. These mechanisms may act simultaneously or consecutively and differ among a variety of cell types at specific developmental stages in particular brain regions. Studies have identified numerous potential mechanisms through which alcohol can act on the fetus. Among these mechanisms are increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, interference with the activity of growth factors, glia cells, cell adhesion molecules, gene expression during CNS development and impaired function of signaling molecules involved in neuronal communication and circuit formation. These alcohol-induced deficits result in long-lasting abnormalities in neuronal plasticity and learning and memory and can explain many of the neurobehavioral abnormalities found in FASD. In this review, the author discusses the mechanisms that are associated with FASD and provides a current status on the endocannabinoid system in the development of FASD.

  16. Calcium signaling in plant endosymbiotic organelles: mechanism and role in physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Hironari; Shiina, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that chloroplasts and mitochondria evoke specific Ca(2+) signals in response to biotic and abiotic stresses in a stress-dependent manner. The identification of Ca(2+) transporters and Ca(2+) signaling molecules in chloroplasts and mitochondria implies that they play roles in controlling not only intra-organellar functions, but also extra-organellar processes such as plant immunity and stress responses. It appears that organellar Ca(2+) signaling might be more important to plant cell functions than previously thought. This review briefly summarizes what is known about the molecular basis of Ca(2+) signaling in plant mitochondria and chloroplasts.

  17. A role for Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling during lens fiber cell differentiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Stump, R J W; Lovicu, F J; McAvoy, J W

    2006-12-01

    Wnt signaling through frizzled (Fz) receptors plays key roles in just about every developmental system that has been studied. Several Wnt-Fz signaling pathways have been identified including the Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. PCP signaling is crucial for many developmental processes that require major cytoskeletal rearrangements. Downstream of Fz, PCP signaling is thought to involve the GTPases, Rho, Rac and Cdc42 and regulation of the JNK cascade. Here we report on the localization of these GTPases and JNK in the lens and assess their involvement in the cytoskeletal reorganisation that is a key element of FGF-induced lens fiber cell differentiation.

  18. Browning of white adipose tissue: role of hypothalamic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Sheng; Li, Lin

    2013-10-01

    Two types of fat, white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT), exist in mammals including adult humans. While WAT stores excess calories and an excessive accumulation of fat causes obesity, BAT dissipates energy to produce heat through nonshivering thermogenesis for protection against cold environments and provides the potential for the development of novel anti-obesity treatments. The hypothalamus plays a central role in the control of energy balance. Specifically, recent observations indicate the importance of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) in thermoregulation. We have found that the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the DMH has distinct actions in modulating adiposity and BAT thermogenesis. Knockdown of NPY in the DMH elevates the thermogenic activity of classic BAT and promotes the development of brown adipocytes in WAT, leading to increased thermogenesis. These findings identify a novel potential target for combating obesity.

  19. SCIENCE COMMUNICATION ROLE IN DEVELOPMENT OF COOPERATION BETWEEN UNIVERSITY AND INDUSTRY IN LATVIA

    OpenAIRE

    Justīne Vīķe

    2016-01-01

    Transfer of results of scientific research to society for discussion and consumption is nowadays one of scientists’ responsibilities. Along with the change of roles of scientific institutions, scientists have also become obliged to distribute results of scientific research, not only within their own community, but also to the part of society that does not consist of specialists in the respective field of research, and that consists of potential consumers of the results of scientific research,...

  20. Cooperation Not Competition: Bihemispheric tDCS and fMRI Show Role for Ipsilateral Hemisphere in Motor Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Sheena; Wiestler, Tobias; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2017-08-02

    What is the role of ipsilateral motor and premotor areas in motor learning? One view is that ipsilateral activity suppresses contralateral motor cortex and, accordingly, that inhibiting ipsilateral regions can improve motor learning. Alternatively, the ipsilateral motor cortex may play an active role in the control and/or learning of unilateral hand movements. We approached this question by applying double-blind bihemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over both contralateral and ipsilateral motor cortex in a between-group design during 4 d of unimanual explicit sequence training in human participants. Independently of whether the anode was placed over contralateral or ipsilateral motor cortex, bihemispheric stimulation yielded substantial performance gains relative to unihemispheric or sham stimulation. This performance advantage appeared to be supported by plastic changes in both hemispheres. First, we found that behavioral advantages generalized strongly to the untrained hand, suggesting that tDCS strengthened effector-independent representations. Second, functional imaging during speed-matched execution of trained sequences conducted 48 h after training revealed sustained, polarity-independent increases in activity in both motor cortices relative to the sham group. These results suggest a cooperative rather than competitive interaction of the two motor cortices during skill learning and suggest that bihemispheric brain stimulation during unimanual skill learning may be beneficial because it harnesses plasticity in the ipsilateral hemisphere.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many neurorehabilitation approaches are based on the idea that is beneficial to boost excitability in the contralateral hemisphere while attenuating that of the ipsilateral cortex to reduce interhemispheric inhibition. We observed that bihemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with the excitatory anode either over contralateral or ipsilateral motor cortex

  1. The Lipocalin LPR-1 Cooperates with LIN-3/EGF Signaling To Maintain Narrow Tube Integrity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Pu; Stone, Craig E; Burdick, Joshua T; Murray, John I; Sundaram, Meera V

    2016-12-30

    Lipocalins are secreted cup-shaped glycoproteins that bind sterols, fatty acids, and other lipophilic molecules. Lipocalins have been implicated in a wide array of processes related to lipophilic cargo transport, sequestration and signaling, and several are used as biomarkers for human disease, but the functions of most lipocalins remain poorly understood. Here we show that the C. elegans lipocalin LPR-1 is required to maintain apical membrane integrity and a continuous lumen in two narrow, unicellular tubes, the excretory duct and pore, during a period of rapid lumen elongation. LPR-1 fusion protein is expressed by the duct and pore and accumulates both intracellularly and in apical extracellular compartments, but it can also function cell non-autonomously when provided from outside of the excretory system. lpr-1 mutant defects can be rescued by increased signaling through the Epidermal growth factor (EGF) - Ras - Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, which promotes the more elongated duct vs. less elongated pore tube fate. Spatial and temporal rescue experiments indicate that Ras signaling acts within the duct and pore tubes during or prior to cell fate determination to bypass the requirement for LPR-1. lpr-1 mutations did not disrupt LIN-3/EGF-dependent duct fate specification, prevent functioning of any specific LIN-3/EGF isoform, or alter LET-23/EGFR localization, and reduced signaling did not phenocopy or enhance lpr-1 mutant defects. These data suggest that LPR-1 protects lumen integrity through a LIN-3/EGF-independent mechanism, but that increased signaling upregulates some target(s) that can compensate for lpr-1 absence.

  2. Roles of sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoh; Takuwa; Yasuo; Okamoto; Noriko; Takuwa; Kazuaki; Yoshioka

    2010-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a blood-borne lipid mediator with pleiotropic biological activities. S1P acts via the specific cell surface G-protein-coupled receptors, S1P1-5. S1P1 and S1P2 were originally identified from vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells, respectively. Emerging evidence shows that S1P plays crucial roles in the regulation of vascular functions, including vascular formation, barrier protection and vascular tone via S1P1, S1P2 and S1P3. In particular, S1P regulates vascular formation through multiple mechanisms; S1P exerts both positive and negative effects on angiogenesis and vascular maturation. The positive and negative effects of S1P are mediated by S1P1 and S1P2, respectively. These effects of S1P1 and S1P2 are probably mediated by the S1P receptors expressed in multiple cell types including ECs and bone-marrow-derived cells. The receptor-subtype-specific, distinct effects ofS1P favor the development of novel therapeutic tactics for antitumor angiogenesis in cancer and therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic diseases.

  3. The Changing Role of International Cooperation in Developing Countries (as They Develop): A Case Study of Skills Development Policies in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    A focus on the changes in the relationship between international cooperation and local actors in the skills development field in Peru as the country strengthened its financial position in the last two decades allows us to examine the role of the economic factor in these changes. The paper argues that indeed there is an association between the two.…

  4. The role of Wnt signaling in neuronal dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toledo Enrique M

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent evidence supports a neuroprotective role for Wnt signaling in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease (AD. In fact, a relationship between amyloid-β-peptide (Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and a decrease in the cytoplasmic levels of β-catenin has been observed. Apparently Aβ binds to the extracellular cysteine-rich domain of the Frizzled receptor (Fz inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Cross-talk with other signaling cascades that regulate Wnt/β-catenin signaling, including the activation of M1 muscarinic receptor and PKC, the use of Ibuprofen-ChE bi-functional compounds, PPAR α, γ agonists, nicotine and some antioxidants, results in neuroprotection against Aβ. These studies indicate that a sustained loss of Wnt signaling function may be involved in the Aβ-dependent neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer's brain. In conclusion the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway could be proposed as a therapeutic target for the treatment of AD.

  5. Role of Glycolytic Intermediates in Global Regulation and Signal Transduction. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J.C.

    2000-05-08

    The goal of this project is to determine the role of glycolytic intermediates in regulation of cell physiology. It is known that many glycolytic intermediates are involved in regulation of enzyme activities at the kinetic level. However, little is known regarding the role of these metabolites in global regulation and signal transduction. This project aims to investigate the role of glycolytic intermediates in the regulation of gene expression.

  6. O-fucose monosaccharide of Drosophila Notch has a temperature-sensitive function and cooperates with O-glucose glycan in Notch transport and Notch signaling activation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ishio, Akira; Sasamura, Takeshi; Ayukawa, Tomonori; Kuroda, Junpei; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki O; Aoyama, Naoki; Matsumoto, Kenjiroo; Gushiken, Takuma; Okajima, Tetsuya; Yamakawa, Tomoko; Matsuno, Kenji

    ...), and the O-fut1 gene is essential for N signaling. However, the role of the monosaccharide O-fucose on N is unclear, because O-Fut1 also appears to have O-fucosyltransferase activity-independent functions, including as an N-specific chaperon...

  7. Sex and hedgehog: roles of genes in the hedgehog signaling pathway in mammalian sexual differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Heather L; Yao, Humphrey H-C

    2012-01-01

    The chromosome status of the mammalian embryo initiates a multistage process of sexual development in which the bipotential reproductive system establishes itself as either male or female. These events are governed by intricate cell-cell and interorgan communication that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways. The hedgehog signaling pathway was originally identified for its key role in the development of Drosophila, but is now recognized as a critical developmental regulator in many species, including humans. In addition to its developmental roles, the hedgehog signaling pathway also modulates adult organ function, and misregulation of this pathway often leads to diseases, such as cancer. The hedgehog signaling pathway acts through its morphogenetic ligands that signal from ligand-producing cells to target cells over a specified distance. The target cells then respond in a graded manner based on the concentration of the ligands that they are exposed to. Through this unique mechanism of action, the hedgehog signaling pathway elicits cell fate determination, epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, and cellular homeostasis. Here, we review current findings on the roles of hedgehog signaling in the sexually dimorphic development of the reproductive organs with an emphasis on mammals and comparative evidence in other species.

  8. Nonlinear signaling on biological networks: The role of stochasticity and spectral clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Hernandez, Gonzalo; Myers, Jesse; Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2017-03-01

    Signal transduction within biological cells is governed by networks of interacting proteins. Communication between these proteins is mediated by signaling molecules which bind to receptors and induce stochastic transitions between different conformational states. Signaling is typically a cooperative process which requires the occurrence of multiple binding events so that reaction rates have a nonlinear dependence on the amount of signaling molecule. It is this nonlinearity that endows biological signaling networks with robust switchlike properties which are critical to their biological function. In this study we investigate how the properties of these signaling systems depend on the network architecture. Our main result is that these nonlinear networks exhibit bistability where the network activity can switch between states that correspond to a low and high activity level. We show that this bistable regime emerges at a critical coupling strength that is determined by the spectral structure of the network. In particular, the set of nodes that correspond to large components of the leading eigenvector of the adjacency matrix determines the onset of bistability. Above this transition the eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix determine a hierarchy of clusters, defined by its spectral properties, which are activated sequentially with increasing network activity. We argue further that the onset of bistability occurs either continuously or discontinuously depending upon whether the leading eigenvector is localized or delocalized. Finally, we show that at low network coupling stochastic transitions to the active branch are also driven by the set of nodes that contribute more strongly to the leading eigenvector. However, at high coupling, transitions are insensitive to network structure since the network can be activated by stochastic transitions of a few nodes. Thus this work identifies important features of biological signaling networks that may underlie their biological

  9. Signaling Role of Fructose Mediated by FINS1/FBP in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Hee; Yoo, Sang-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Sugars are evolutionarily conserved signaling molecules that regulate the growth and development of both unicellular and multicellular organisms. As sugar-producing photosynthetic organisms, plants utilize glucose as one of their major signaling molecules. However, the details of other sugar signaling molecules and their regulatory factors have remained elusive, due to the complexity of the metabolite and hormone interactions that control physiological and developmental programs in plants. We combined information from a gain-of-function cell-based screen and a loss-of-function reverse-genetic analysis to demonstrate that fructose acts as a signaling molecule in Arabidopsis thaliana. Fructose signaling induced seedling developmental arrest and interacted with plant stress hormone signaling in a manner similar to that of glucose. For fructose signaling responses, the plant glucose sensor HEXOKINASE1 (HXK1) was dispensable, while FRUCTOSE INSENSITIVE1 (FINS1), a putative FRUCTOSE-1,6-BISPHOSPHATASE, played a crucial role. Interestingly, FINS1 function in fructose signaling appeared to be independent of its catalytic activity in sugar metabolism. Genetic analysis further indicated that FINS1–dependent fructose signaling may act downstream of the abscisic acid pathway, in spite of the fact that HXK1–dependent glucose signaling works upstream of hormone synthesis. Our findings revealed that multiple layers of controls by fructose, glucose, and abscisic acid finely tune the plant autotrophic transition and modulate early seedling establishment after seed germination. PMID:21253566

  10. Environmental Empowerment - the role of Co-operation between Civil Society, Universities and Science Shops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Søsser; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Hansen, Anne Grethe

    2006-01-01

    . Increasing internationalisation of the environmental agenda has contributed to this as well as a general acceptance of environmental considerations in industry policy and strategy. However, with departure point in three different Science Shop projects, the article proposes that Science Shops are still......The University based Science Shops were established in the 1970s in the Netherlands, and in Denmark and other countries in the 1980s and 1990s. The aim was to give civil society organisations access to scientific knowledge and to empower citizen participation regarding environmental and social...... improvements. It has recently been suggested that the role of Science Shops should change as a consequence of the stated increasing professionalisation of the Non Governmental Organisations and Civil Society Organisations, and of industry’s increasing interest in introducing environmental management measures...

  11. [International cooperation and affirmative action policies: the role of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maio, Marcos Chor; Pires-Alves, Fernando A; Paiva, Carlos Henrique Assunção; Silva Magalhães, Rodrigo Cesar da

    2010-07-01

    The article analyzes the formulation, legitimation, and implementation of a policy with an ethnic/race approach by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). The study includes the emergence of the theme within this international organization, the institutional dynamics related to it, and the proposals focused on the Black population in Latin America. These issues are discussed on the basis of interaction between PAHO and a range of intergovernmental agencies and private organizations working in the international health domain. Participation by PAHO in the ethnic/racial theme provides elements for understanding the dual role played by intergovernmental organizations in the new global scenario, as both social actors and arenas. As an important social actor in the international health field, PAHO has produced and disseminated values and guidelines related to the ethnic/racial theme. As an arena, the organization has proven open to various interests, seeking to work harmoniously with them through its internal administration.

  12. The process of university students' becoming autonomous and cooperative concerning their learning in general education : from the viewpoint of role reconstruction in the learning community

    OpenAIRE

    杉原, 真晃

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines (1) what kind of "role" students play in cooperative learning, and (2) what kind of "stumbles" they face in their learning in a students-centered education as part of the general education of a university. The role is one of the very important viewpoints in learning theory, and students cannot develop their learning without various stumbles, compromises, and even failures as well. In this case, students faced three stumbles“, Gap between students," "Making their activity a...

  13. Mechanistic pathways and biological roles for receptor-independent activators of G-protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Joe B; Smrcka, Alan V; Lanier, Stephen M

    2007-03-01

    Signal processing via heterotrimeric G-proteins in response to cell surface receptors is a central and much investigated aspect of how cells integrate cellular stimuli to produce coordinated biological responses. The system is a target of numerous therapeutic agents and plays an important role in adaptive processes of organs; aberrant processing of signals through these transducing systems is a component of various disease states. In addition to G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated activation of G-protein signaling, nature has evolved creative ways to manipulate and utilize the Galphabetagamma heterotrimer or Galpha and Gbetagamma subunits independent of the cell surface receptor stimuli. In such situations, the G-protein subunits (Galpha and Gbetagamma) may actually be complexed with alternative binding partners independent of the typical heterotrimeric Galphabetagamma. Such regulatory accessory proteins include the family of regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins that accelerate the GTPase activity of Galpha and various entities that influence nucleotide binding properties and/or subunit interaction. The latter group of proteins includes receptor-independent activators of G-protein signaling (AGS) proteins that play surprising roles in signal processing. This review provides an overview of our current knowledge regarding AGS proteins. AGS proteins are indicative of a growing number of accessory proteins that influence signal propagation, facilitate cross talk between various types of signaling pathways, and provide a platform for diverse functions of both the heterotrimeric Galphabetagamma and the individual Galpha and Gbetagamma subunits.

  14. Five glutamic acid residues in the C-terminal domain of the ChlD subunit play a major role in conferring Mg(2+) cooperativity upon magnesium chelatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindley, Amanda A; Adams, Nathan B P; Hunter, C Neil; Reid, James D

    2015-11-10

    Magnesium chelatase catalyzes the first committed step in chlorophyll biosynthesis by inserting a Mg(2+) ion into protoporphyrin IX in an ATP-dependent manner. The cyanobacterial (Synechocystis) and higher-plant chelatases exhibit a complex cooperative response to free magnesium, while the chelatases from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and photosynthetic bacteria do not. To investigate the basis for this cooperativity, we constructed a series of chimeric ChlD proteins using N-terminal, central, and C-terminal domains from Synechocystis and Thermosynechococcus. We show that five glutamic acid residues in the C-terminal domain play a major role in this process.

  15. Hipk2 and PP1c Cooperate to Maintain Dvl Protein Levels Required for Wnt Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Shimizu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The phosphoprotein Dishevelled (Dvl is a common essential component of Wnt/β-catenin and Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP signaling pathways. However, the regulation and significance of Dvl phosphorylation are not fully understood. Here, we show that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (Hipk2 facilitates protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1c-mediated dephosphorylation of Dvl via its C-terminal domain and that this dephosphorylation blocks ubiquitination and consequent degradation mediated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch, which targets the phosphorylated form of Dvl proteins. Inhibition of Hipk2 or PP1c function reduces Dvl protein levels and suppresses Wnt/β-catenin and Wnt/PCP pathway-dependent events in mammalian cells and zebrafish embryos, suggesting that Hipk2 and PP1c are essential for maintaining Dvl protein levels that are sufficient to activate Wnt signaling. We also show that Wnt-3a, a Wnt/β-catenin ligand, induces dissociation of the Dvl-Hipk2-PP1c complex and Dvl degradation under high-cell-density conditions. This regulation may be a negative feedback mechanism that fine-tunes Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  16. Unique and shared signaling pathways cooperate to regulate the differentiation of human CD4+ T cells into distinct effector subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cindy S; Wong, Natalie; Rao, Geetha; Nguyen, Akira; Avery, Danielle T; Payne, Kathryn; Torpy, James; O'Young, Patrick; Deenick, Elissa; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Okada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Elliott, Michael; Sebnem Kilic, Sara; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Bousfiha, Aziz; Robertson, Nic; Hambleton, Sophie; Arkwright, Peter D; French, Martyn; Blincoe, Annaliesse K; Hsu, Peter; Campbell, Dianne E; Stormon, Michael O; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Fulcher, David A; Cook, Matthew C; Stepensky, Polina; Boztug, Kaan; Beier, Rita; Ikincioğullari, Aydan; Ziegler, John B; Gray, Paul; Picard, Capucine; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Phan, Tri Giang; Grimbacher, Bodo; Warnatz, Klaus; Holland, Steven M; Uzel, Gulbu; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Tangye, Stuart G

    2016-07-25

    Naive CD4(+) T cells differentiate into specific effector subsets-Th1, Th2, Th17, and T follicular helper (Tfh)-that provide immunity against pathogen infection. The signaling pathways involved in generating these effector cells are partially known. However, the effects of mutations underlying human primary immunodeficiencies on these processes, and how they compromise specific immune responses, remain unresolved. By studying individuals with mutations in key signaling pathways, we identified nonredundant pathways regulating human CD4(+) T cell differentiation in vitro. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and IFN-γR/STAT1 function in a feed-forward loop to induce Th1 cells, whereas IL-21/IL-21R/STAT3 signaling is required for Th17, Tfh, and IL-10-secreting cells. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and NEMO are also required for Th17 induction. Strikingly, gain-of-function STAT1 mutations recapitulated the impact of dominant-negative STAT3 mutations on Tfh and Th17 cells, revealing a putative inhibitory effect of hypermorphic STAT1 over STAT3. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the requirements for human T cell effector function, and explain clinical manifestations of these immunodeficient conditions. Furthermore, they identify molecules that could be targeted to modulate CD4(+) T cell effector function in the settings of infection, vaccination, or immune dysregulation. © 2016 Ma et al.

  17. The Role of Verbal and Nonverbal Communication in a Two-Person, Cooperative Manipulation Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarangi P. Parikh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the differences between human and robot teams, we investigated the role of verbal communication between human teammates as they work together to move a large object to a series of target locations. Only one member of the group was told the target sequence by the experimenters, while the second teammate had no target knowledge. The two experimental conditions we compared were haptic-verbal (teammates are allowed to talk and haptic only (no talking allowed. The team’s trajectory was recorded and evaluated. In addition, participants completed a NASA TLX-style postexperimental survey which gauges workload along 6 different dimensions. In our initial experiment we found no significant difference in performance when verbal communication was added. In a follow-up experiment, using a different manipulation task, we did find that the addition of verbal communication significantly improved performance and reduced the perceived workload. In both experiments, for the haptic-only condition, we found that a remarkable number of groups independently improvised common haptic communication protocols (CHIPs. We speculate that such protocols can be substituted for verbal communication and that the performance difference between verbal and nonverbal communication may be related to how easy it is to distinguish the CHIPs from motions required for task completion.

  18. Cooperative role for tetraspanins in adhesin-mediated attachment of bacterial species to human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Luke R; Monk, Peter N; Partridge, Lynda J; Morris, Paul; Gorringe, Andrew R; Read, Robert C

    2011-06-01

    The tetraspanins are a superfamily of transmembrane proteins with diverse functions and can form extended microdomains within the plasma membrane in conjunction with partner proteins, which probably includes receptors for bacterial adhesins. Neisseria meningitidis, the causative agent of meningococcal disease, attaches to host nasopharyngeal epithelial cells via type IV pili and opacity (Opa) proteins. We examined the role of tetraspanin function in Neisseria meningitidis adherence to epithelial cells. Tetraspanins CD9, CD63, and CD151 were expressed by HEC-1-B and DETROIT 562 cells. Coincubation of cells with antibodies against all three tetraspanin molecules used individually or in combination, with recombinant tetraspanin extracellular domains (EC2), or with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) significantly reduced adherence of Neisseria meningitidis. In contrast, recombinant CD81, a different tetraspanin, had no effect on meningococcal adherence. Antitetraspanin antibodies reduced the adherence to epithelial cells of Neisseria meningitidis strain derivatives expressing Opa and pili significantly more than isogenic strains lacking these determinants. Adherence to epithelial cells of strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria lactamica, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pneumoniae was also reduced by pretreatment of cells with tetraspanin antibodies and recombinant proteins. These data suggest that tetraspanins are required for optimal function of epithelial adhesion platforms containing specific receptors for Neisseria meningitidis and potentially for multiple species of bacteria.

  19. The role of stop-signal probability and expectation in proactive inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Matthijs; Kaldewaij, Reinoud; Zandbelt, Bram B; Pas, Pascal; du Plessis, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The subjective belief of what will happen plays an important role across many cognitive domains, including response inhibition. However, tasks that study inhibition do not distinguish between the processing of objective contextual cues indicating stop-signal probability and the subjective expectation that a stop-signal will or will not occur. Here we investigated the effects of stop-signal probability and the expectation of a stop-signal on proactive inhibition. Twenty participants performed a modified stop-signal anticipation task while being scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging. At the beginning of each trial, the stop-signal probability was indicated by a cue (0% or > 0%), and participants had to indicate whether they expected a stop-signal to occur (yes/no/don't know). Participants slowed down responding on trials with a > 0% stop-signal probability, but this proactive response slowing was even greater when they expected a stop-signal to occur. Analyses were performed in brain regions previously associated with proactive inhibition. Activation in the striatum, supplementary motor area and left dorsal premotor cortex during the cue period was increased when participants expected a stop-signal to occur. In contrast, activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus and right inferior parietal cortex activity during the stimulus-response period was related to the processing of contextual cues signalling objective stop-signal probability, regardless of expectation. These data show that proactive inhibition depends on both the processing of objective contextual task information and the subjective expectation of stop-signals.

  20. The role of liver insulin signalling pathways in carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Simmgen, M.

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is rapidly rising worldwide, despite an increasing awareness of the problem. Hepatic insulin resistance is a key factor in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The liver is central to the maintenance of glucose homeostasis, but the role of intrinsic liver insulin signalling versus indirect effects on the regulation of hepatic metabolism remains under debate. Insulin receptor substrate-2 is a major signalling molecule downstream of the insulin recepto...

  1. Alcohol,nutrition and liver cancer:Role of Toll-like receptor signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samuel; W; French; Joan; Oliva; Barbara; A; French; Fawzia; Bardag-Gorce

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the evidence that ties the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to the natural immune pro-inflammatory response to chronic liver disease, with a focus on the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling as the mechanism of liver stem cell/progenitor transformation to HCC. Two exemplary models of this phenomenon are reviewed in detail. One model applies chronic ethanol/lipopolysaccharide feeding to the activated TLR4 signaling pathway. The other applies chronic feeding of a carcin...

  2. The role of Toll signaling in dorsoventral axis formation in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yen-Ta

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of dorsoventral (DV) axis in the Drosophila embryo relies on the Toll/Dorsal signaling pathway. The transcription factor Dorsal acts downstream of Toll forming a nuclear gradient that determines different cell fates along the DV axis. The formation of the DV axis has been studied in two other holometabolous insects, the bee- tle Tribolium and the wasp Nasonia. However, the role of Toll signaling has not been addressed in the more basally branching hemimetabolous insects. Her...

  3. ITSN protein family: regulation of diversity, role in signalling and pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Tsyba L. O.; Dergai M. V.; Skrypkina I. Ya.; Nikolaienko O. V.; Dergai O. V.; Kropyvko S. V.; Novokhatska O. V.; Morderer D. Ye.; Gryaznova T. A.; Gubar O. S.; Rynditch A. V.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptor/scaffold proteins of the intersectin (ITSN) family are important components of endocytic and signalling complexes. They coordinate trafficking events with actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and modulate the activity of a variety of signalling pathways. In this review, we present our results as a part of recent findings on the function of ITSNs, the role of alternative splicing in the generation of ITSN1 diversity and the potential relevance of ITSNs for neurodegenerative diseases, cancer.

  4. ITSN protein family: regulation of diversity, role in signalling and pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsyba L. O.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Adaptor/scaffold proteins of the intersectin (ITSN family are important components of endocytic and signalling complexes. They coordinate trafficking events with actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and modulate the activity of a variety of signalling pathways. In this review, we present our results as a part of recent findings on the function of ITSNs, the role of alternative splicing in the generation of ITSN1 diversity and the potential relevance of ITSNs for neurodegenerative diseases, cancer.

  5. Performance of Cooperative Learning Groups in a Postgraduate Education Research Methodology Course: The Role of Social Interdependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Jiao, Qun G.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the degree that social interdependence predicted the achievement of 26 cooperative learning groups. Social interdependence was assessed in terms of postgraduate students' individual orientation (that is, cooperative, competitive, and individualistic). Participants were 84 postgraduate students enrolled in an…

  6. Performance of Cooperative Learning Groups in a Postgraduate Education Research Methodology Course: The Role of Social Interdependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Jiao, Qun G.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the degree that social interdependence predicted the achievement of 26 cooperative learning groups. Social interdependence was assessed in terms of postgraduate students' individual orientation (that is, cooperative, competitive, and individualistic). Participants were 84 postgraduate students enrolled in an…

  7. Cooperative Group Performance in Graduate Research Methodology Courses: The Role of Study Coping and Examination-Taking Coping Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qun G.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to examine the extent to which cooperative group members' levels of coping strategies (study and examination-taking coping strategies) and the degree that heterogeneity (variability of study coping strategies and examination-taking coping strategies) predict cooperative groups' levels of achievement in research methodology…

  8. Role of signaling pathways and miRNAs in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Pei-pei; WANG Xin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To summarize the recent findings of dysregulation of signaling pathways and miRNAs in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).Data sources We searched PubMed database with the keywords "chronic lymphocytic leukemia","signal pathway",or "miRNA" for relevant articles in recent years.Study selection Research articles and reviews about signaling pathways and miRNAs in CLL were chosen for review.Results Dysregulation of signaling pathways,such as B cell receptor,toll-like receptor,PI3K,nuclear factor KB,notch signaling pathway,Wnt/Fzd signaling pathway,and Hedgehog and Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling pathway,as the terminal events of the aberrant gene expression and the pro-survival effects of microenvironment,plays a crucial role in the process of CLL.miRNAs,a novel found noncoding RNA,which regulate gene expression at transcription or post-transcription level and correlate with pathogenesis of CLL provide us new avenues to better evaluating prognosis and therapy of it.Conclusion Further investigation of the dysregulation of signaling pathways and miRNAs and their relationship may provide us a new prospective to understand the pathogenesis of CLL and may provide us new strategies to resolve the clinical nodi in treatment of CLL.

  9. Role of Notch signaling in regulating innate immunity and inflammation in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingli Shang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Notch signaling pathway is conserved from Drosophila to mammals and is critically involved in developmental processes. In the immune system, it has been established that Notch signaling regulates multiple steps of T and B cell development in both central and peripheral lymphoid organs. Relative to the well documented role of Notch signaling in lymphocyte development, less is known about its role in regulating myeloid lineage development and function, especially in the context of acute and chronic inflammation. In this review article, we will describe the evidence accumulated during the recent years to support a key regulatory role of the Notch pathway in innate immune and inflammatory responses and discuss the potential implications of such regulation for pathogenesis and therapy of inflammatory disorders.

  10. [Shh signal and its functional roles in normal and diseased brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruat, Martial; Angot, Elodie; Traiffort, Elisabeth

    2011-11-01

    The identification of a Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway in the adult vertebrate central nervous system has paved the way to the characterization of the functional roles of Shh signals in normal and diseased brain. This morphogen is proposed to play a key role in the establishment and maintenance of adult neurogenic niches and to modulate the proliferation of neuronal or glial precursors. Consistent with its role during embryogenesis, alteration of Shh signaling is associated with tumorigenesis while its recruitment in damaged neural tissue might be part of the regenerating process. We will discuss the most recent data of the Hedgehog pathway in the adult brain and its relevance as a novel therapeutic approach for brain diseases including brain tumors.

  11. Building visual identity of scientific and research units and the role of visualization in cooperation with business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfreda Kamińska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for commercialization of scientific research leads to the necessity of changing the orientation of scientific-research units to marketing orientation, which is characterized by, among others, conducting research aimed at learning the clients’ needs and building better communication with the recipients. What is an important element of a unit’s marketing communication is its visual identity system, which the recipients use to build their opinion and their picture of the unit. The goal of this article is an attempt to define the key rules of designing visual identity of scientific and research institutions, as well as presenting the role of visualization in their cooperation with business. In the article the notions of image, identity, corporate identity and visual identity are subject to analysis. The article also presents the significance of visualization in the functioning of research and scientific units, elements of visual identity system and the rules of designing visual identity of scientific and research institutions. An analysis of chosen research-scientific units was carried out with regard to visualization.

  12. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Prado

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as a chaperone for the CGRP receptor. Instead, RCP is a novel signal transduction molecule that couples the CGRP receptor to the cellular signal transduction machinery. RCP thus represents a prototype for a new class of signal transduction proteins that are required for regulation of G protein-coupled receptors.

  13. Readings in Cooperative Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Jerome I.

    Twenty-three journal articles on cooperative education were selected in a review of the literature by two Temple University graduate classes in the fall of 1975 and the spring of 1976 for those interested in the role of coordinating cooperative education programs. The journal readings consist of articles on theory/planning (6), implementation…

  14. [Advance studies of Slit-Robo signal pathway and its roles in ocular neovascularisation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yichun; Zhao, Kanxing

    2014-05-01

    The migration and patterning of axons and blood vessels share similar guidance mechanisms. Slits and their Roundabout (Robo) receptors were initially characterized as repulsive guidance cues for neuronal axons and mediate the migration of neuronal precursor cells during neural development. In recent years, the research of Slit/Robo signal pathway on neovascularization has become one of hot topics. This review will focus on the role of Slit/Robo signal pathway in ocular neovascularization to promote the research of Slit/Robo signaling on ophthalmology.

  15. Role of FGF/FGFR signaling in skeletal development and homeostasis:learning from mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Su; Min Jin; Lin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling plays essential roles in bone development and diseases. Missense mutations in FGFs and FGFRs in humans can cause various congenital bone diseases, including chondrodysplasia syndromes, craniosynostosis syndromes and syndromes with dysregulated phosphate metabolism. FGF/FGFR signaling is also an important pathway involved in the maintenance of adult bone homeostasis. Multiple kinds of mouse models, mimicking human skeleton diseases caused by missense mutations in FGFs and FGFRs, have been established by knock-in/out and transgenic technologies. These genetically modified mice provide good models for studying the role of FGF/FGFR signaling in skeleton development and homeostasis. In this review, we summarize the mouse models of FGF signaling-related skeleton diseases and recent progresses regarding the molecular mechanisms, underlying the role of FGFs/FGFRs in the regulation of bone development and homeostasis. This review also provides a perspective view on future works to explore the roles of FGF signaling in skeletal development and homeostasis.

  16. Distinct roles of Shh and Fgf signaling in regulating cell proliferation during zebrafish pectoral fin development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumann Carl J

    2008-09-01

    Shh and Fgf signaling are crucial for outgrowth of the vertebrate limb. The results presented here show that the role of Shh in this process is indirect, and is mediated by its effect on Fgf signaling. By contrast, the activity of the Fgf pathway affects proliferation directly and independently of its effect on Shh. These results show that Fgf signaling is of primary importance in directing outgrowth of the limb bud, and clarify the role of the Shh-Fgf feedback loop in regulating proliferation.

  17. Attack-Tolerant Cooperative Spectrum Sensing Algorithm for Faded and Low-Power Primary User Signal Detection Over Cognitive Radio Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akbari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive radio (CR is a novel scheme that is proposed recently to overcome the spectrum scarcity problem in wireless networks through dynamic spectrum access techniques. In this realm, detection of the legitimate users, called primary user (PU, is a primary mission that must be done carefully to prohibit causing any confliction. PU detection in low signal to noise ratio (SNR regime is one of the main challenges of CR users that measure the energy level of the PU for sensing the spectrum. This process will be more complicated when the SNR fluctuations due to wireless channel effects are taking into accounts. Another source of ambiguity is the false sensing data that might be reported by malfunctioning or malicious secondary nodes, the so called spectrum sensing data falsification attackers (SSDF. This paper utilizes the potential benefits of cooperative spectrum sensing method in a way that it can become applicable when the CR nodes encounter wireless channel uncertainty and (or some CR nodes that behave maliciously. To this end, the estimated PU-signal and channel statistics are employed to determine the likelihood of CR sensing reports in a MAP hypothesis test scheme for decision about channel occupancy. Also, in order to determine the trustworthiness of each CR-user's data and eliminate the effect of SSDF attackers, a computational trust evaluation algorithm is proposed that is based on the resolved likelihood of CR sensing reports

  18. CD147, CD44, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway cooperate to regulate breast epithelial cell invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass, G Daniel; Tolliver, Lauren B; Bratoeva, Momka; Toole, Bryan P

    2013-09-06

    The immunoglobulin superfamily glycoprotein CD147 (emmprin; basigin) is associated with an invasive phenotype in various types of cancers, including malignant breast cancer. We showed recently that up-regulation of CD147 in non-transformed, non-invasive breast epithelial cells is sufficient to induce an invasive phenotype characterized by membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)-dependent invadopodia activity (Grass, G. D., Bratoeva, M., and Toole, B. P. (2012) Regulation of invadopodia formation and activity by CD147. J. Cell Sci. 125, 777-788). Here we found that CD147 induces breast epithelial cell invasiveness by promoting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-ERK signaling in a manner dependent on hyaluronan-CD44 interaction. Furthermore, CD147 promotes assembly of signaling complexes containing CD147, CD44, and EGFR in lipid raftlike domains. We also found that oncogenic Ras regulates CD147 expression, hyaluronan synthesis, and formation of CD147-CD44-EGFR complexes, thus forming a positive feedback loop that may amplify invasiveness. Last, we showed that malignant breast cancer cells are heterogeneous in their expression of surface-associated CD147 and that high levels of membrane CD147 correlate with cell surface EGFR and CD44 levels, activated EGFR and ERK1, and activated invadopodia. Future studies should evaluate CD147 as a potential therapeutic target and disease stratification marker in breast cancer.

  19. Folliculin-interacting proteins Fnip1 and Fnip2 play critical roles in kidney tumor suppression in cooperation with Flcn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumi, Hisashi; Baba, Masaya; Hasumi, Yukiko; Lang, Martin; Huang, Ying; Oh, HyoungBin F; Matsuo, Masayuki; Merino, Maria J; Yao, Masahiro; Ito, Yusuke; Furuya, Mitsuko; Iribe, Yasuhiro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Southon, Eileen; Tessarollo, Lino; Nagashima, Kunio; Haines, Diana C; Linehan, W Marston; Schmidt, Laura S

    2015-03-31

    Folliculin (FLCN)-interacting proteins 1 and 2 (FNIP1, FNIP2) are homologous binding partners of FLCN, a tumor suppressor for kidney cancer. Recent studies have revealed potential functions for Flcn in kidney; however, kidney-specific functions for Fnip1 and Fnip2 are unknown. Here we demonstrate that Fnip1 and Fnip2 play critical roles in kidney tumor suppression in cooperation with Flcn. We observed no detectable phenotype in Fnip2 knockout mice, whereas Fnip1 deficiency produced phenotypes similar to those seen in Flcn-deficient mice in multiple organs, but not in kidneys. We found that absolute Fnip2 mRNA copy number was low relative to Fnip1 in organs that showed phenotypes under Fnip1 deficiency but was comparable to Fnip1 mRNA copy number in mouse kidney. Strikingly, kidney-targeted Fnip1/Fnip2 double inactivation produced enlarged polycystic kidneys, as was previously reported in Flcn-deficient kidneys. Kidney-specific Flcn inactivation did not further augment kidney size or cystic histology of Fnip1/Fnip2 double-deficient kidneys, suggesting pathways dysregulated in Flcn-deficient kidneys and Fnip1/Fnip2 double-deficient kidneys are convergent. Heterozygous Fnip1/homozygous Fnip2 double-knockout mice developed kidney cancer at 24 mo of age, analogous to the heterozygous Flcn knockout mouse model, further supporting the concept that Fnip1 and Fnip2 are essential for the tumor-suppressive function of Flcn and that kidney tumorigenesis in human Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome may be triggered by loss of interactions among Flcn, Fnip1, and Fnip2. Our findings uncover important roles for Fnip1 and Fnip2 in kidney tumor suppression and may provide molecular targets for the development of novel therapeutics for kidney cancer.

  20. Novel roles for phospholipase C in plant stress signalling and development

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Q

    2017-01-01

    For many years, efforts have been made to explore PLC signaling in plants. Compared to the classical PLC signaling pathway, a different picture is emerging for plants. Several roles for PLC in plant development and stress responses have been claimed but genetic evidence for this is mostly missing. In this thesis, we functionally characterized the role of PLC3, PLC5 and PLC7 in Arabidopsis. PLC3 (Chapter 2) was mainly expressed in vasculature. Loss-of-function mutants showed delayed seed germi...

  1. "Importin" signaling roles for import proteins: the function of Drosophila importin-7 (DIM-7) in muscle-tendon signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze Cindy; Geisbrecht, Erika R

    2012-01-01

    The formation of a mature myotendinous junction (MTJ) between a muscle and its site of attachment is a highly regulated process that involves myofiber migration, cell-cell signaling, and culminates with the stable adhesion between the adjacent muscle-tendon cells. Improper establishment or maintenance of muscle-tendon attachment sites results in a decrease in force generation during muscle contraction and progressive muscular dystrophies in vertebrate models. Many studies have demonstrated the important role of the integrins and integrin-associated proteins in the formation and maintenance of the MTJ. We recently demonstrated that moleskin (msk), the gene that encodes for Drosophila importin-7 (DIM-7), is required for the proper formation of muscle-tendon adhesion sites in the developing embryo. Further studies demonstrated an enrichment of DIM-7 to the ends of muscles where the muscles attach to their target tendon cells. Genetic analysis supports a model whereby msk is required in the muscle and signals via the secreted epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) ligand Vein to regulate tendon cell maturation. These data demonstrate a novel role for the canonical nuclear import protein DIM-7 in establishment of the MTJ.

  2. Emerging roles of protein kinase CK2 in abscisic acid (ABA signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belmiro eVilela

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA regulates many aspects of plant growth and development as well as responses to multiple stresses. Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation or ubiquitination have pivotal roles in the regulation of ABA signaling. In addition to the positive regulator sucrose non-fermenting-1 related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2, the relevance of the role of other protein kinases, such as CK2, has been recently highlighted. We have recently established that CK2 phosphorylates the maize ortholog of open stomata 1 OST1, ZmOST1, suggesting a role of CK2 phosphorylation in the control of ZmOST1 protein degradation (Vilela et al., 2015. CK2 is a pleiotropic enzyme involved in multiple developmental and stress-responsive pathways. This review summarizes recent advances that taken together suggest a prominent role of protein kinase CK2 in ABA signaling and related processes.

  3. The cooperative roles of the dopamine receptors, D1R and D5R, on the regulation of renal sodium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, John J; Shah, Ishan T; Van Sciver, Robert E; Israel, Jonathan A; Enzensperger, Christoph; McGrath, Helen E; Jose, Pedro A; Felder, Robin A

    2014-07-01

    Determining the individual roles of the two dopamine D1-like receptors (D1R and D5R) on sodium transport in the human renal proximal tubule has been complicated by their structural and functional similarity. Here we used a novel D5R-selective antagonist (LE-PM436) and D1R- or D5R-specific gene silencing to determine second messenger coupling pathways and heterologous receptor interaction between the two receptors. D1R and D5R colocalize in renal proximal tubule cells and physically interact, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescent resonance energy transfer microscopy. Stimulation of renal proximal tubule cells with fenoldopam (D1R/D5R agonist) led to both adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C (PLC) activation using real-time fluorescent resonance energy transfer biosensors ICUE3 and CYPHR, respectively. Fenoldopam increased cAMP accumulation and PLC activity and inhibited both NHE3 and NaKATPase activities. LE-PM436 and D5R siRNA blocked the fenoldopam-stimulated PLC pathway but not cAMP accumulation, whereas D1R siRNA blocked both fenoldopam-stimulated cAMP accumulation and PLC signaling. Either D1R or D5R siRNA, or LE-PM436 blocked the fenoldopam-dependent inhibition of sodium transport. Further studies using the cAMP-selective D1R/D5R agonist SKF83822 and PLC-selective D1R/D5R agonist SKF83959 confirmed the cooperative influence of the two pathways on sodium transport. Thus, D1R and D5R interact in the inhibition of NHE3 and NaKATPase activity, the D1R primarily by cAMP, whereas the D1R/D5R heteromer modulates the D1R effect through a PLC pathway.

  4. Agonistic and antagonistic roles for TNIK and MINK in non-canonical and canonical Wnt signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mikryukov

    Full Text Available Wnt signalling is a key regulatory factor in animal development and homeostasis and plays an important role in the establishment and progression of cancer. Wnt signals are predominantly transduced via the Frizzled family of serpentine receptors to two distinct pathways, the canonical ß-catenin pathway and a non-canonical pathway controlling planar cell polarity and convergent extension. Interference between these pathways is an important determinant of cellular and phenotypic responses, but is poorly understood. Here we show that TNIK (Traf2 and Nck-interacting kinase and MINK (Misshapen/NIKs-related kinase MAP4K signalling kinases are integral components of both canonical and non-canonical pathways in Xenopus. xTNIK and xMINK interact and are proteolytically cleaved in vivo to generate Kinase domain fragments that are active in signal transduction, and Citron-NIK-Homology (CNH Domain fragments that are suppressive. The catalytic activity of the Kinase domain fragments of both xTNIK and xMINK mediate non-canonical signalling. However, while the Kinase domain fragments of xTNIK also mediate canonical signalling, the analogous fragments derived from xMINK strongly antagonize this signalling. Our data suggest that the proteolytic cleavage of xTNIK and xMINK determines their respective activities and is an important factor in controlling the balance between canonical and non-canonical Wnt signalling in vivo.

  5. Roles of FGFs As Paracrine or Endocrine Signals in Liver Development, Health, and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Nobuyuki; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays important roles in multiple processes including metabolism, the immune system, and detoxification and also has a unique capacity for regeneration. FGFs are growth factors that have diverse functions in development, health, and disease. The FGF family now comprises 22 members. Several FGFs have been shown to play roles as paracrine signals in liver development, health, and disease. FGF8 and FGF10 are involved in embryonic liver development, FGF7 and FGF9 in repair in response t...

  6. DMPD: Dual role of oxidized LDL on the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15346645 Dual role of oxidized LDL on the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. Robbesyn F, ...Salvayre R, Negre-Salvayre A. Free Radic Res. 2004 Jun;38(6):541-51. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Dual role... of oxidized LDL on the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. PubmedID 15346645 Title Dual role of oxidized LDL

  7. O-fucose monosaccharide of Drosophila Notch has a temperature-sensitive function and cooperates with O-glucose glycan in Notch transport and Notch signaling activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishio, Akira; Sasamura, Takeshi; Ayukawa, Tomonori; Kuroda, Junpei; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki O; Aoyama, Naoki; Matsumoto, Kenjiroo; Gushiken, Takuma; Okajima, Tetsuya; Yamakawa, Tomoko; Matsuno, Kenji

    2015-01-02

    Notch (N) is a transmembrane receptor that mediates the cell-cell interactions necessary for many cell fate decisions. N has many epidermal growth factor-like repeats that are O-fucosylated by the protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (O-Fut1), and the O-fut1 gene is essential for N signaling. However, the role of the monosaccharide O-fucose on N is unclear, because O-Fut1 also appears to have O-fucosyltransferase activity-independent functions, including as an N-specific chaperon. Such an enzymatic activity-independent function could account for the essential role of O-fut1 in N signaling. To evaluate the role of the monosaccharide O-fucose modification in N signaling, here we generated a knock-in mutant of O-fut1 (O-fut1(R245A knock-in)), which expresses a mutant protein that lacks O-fucosyltransferase activity but maintains the N-specific chaperon activity. Using O-fut1(R245A knock-in) and other gene mutations that abolish the O-fucosylation of N, we found that the monosaccharide O-fucose modification of N has a temperature-sensitive function that is essential for N signaling. The O-fucose monosaccharide and O-glucose glycan modification, catalyzed by Rumi, function redundantly in the activation of N signaling. We also showed that the redundant function of these two modifications is responsible for the presence of N at the cell surface. Our findings elucidate how different forms of glycosylation on a protein can influence the protein's functions.

  8. Primary cilium and sonic hedgehog signaling during neural tube patterning: role of GPCRs and second messengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Kasturi; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat

    2015-04-01

    The ventral neural tube in vertebrates is patterned by a gradient of sonic hedgehog (Shh) secreted from the notochord and floor plate. Forward genetic screens first pointed to the role of the primary cilium in ventral neural tube patterning. Further research has shown that most components of the Shh pathway localize to or shuttle through the primary cilium. In the absence of Shh, the bifunctional Gli transcription factors are proteolytically processed into repressor forms in a protein kinase A (PKA)- and cilium-dependent manner. Recent work suggests that the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Gpr161 localizes to cilia, and functions as a negative regulator of Shh signaling by determining Gli processing via cAMP signaling. The primary cilium also functions as a signaling compartment for calcium in the Shh pathway. A better understanding of the role of the cilium as a signaling compartment, and the interplay of second messenger systems that regulate PKA activation and Gli amplification during signaling is critical for deciphering the role of Shh during development, neuronal differentiation, and tumorigenesis.

  9. Role of Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 in cell growth and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooks, Shelley B; Cummings, Brian S

    2008-10-30

    Phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) are esterases that cleave glycerophospholipids to release fatty acids and lysophospholipids. Several studies demonstrate that PLA(2) regulate growth and signaling in several cell types. However, few of these studies have focused on Ca2+-independent phospholipase A(2) (iPLA(2) or Group VI PLA(2)). This class of PLA(2) was originally suggested to mediate phospholipid remodeling in several cell types including macrophages. As such, it was labeled as a housekeeping protein and thought not to play as significant of roles in cell growth as its older counterparts cytosolic PLA(2) (cPLA(2) or Group IV PLA(2)) and secretory PLA(2) (sPLA(2) or Groups I-III, V and IX-XIV PLA(2)). However, several recent studies demonstrate that iPLA(2) mediate cell growth, and do so by participating in signal transduction pathways that include epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR), mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), mdm2, and even the tumor suppressor protein p53 and the cell cycle regulator p21. The exact mechanism by which iPLA(2) mediates these pathways are not known, but likely involve the generation of lipid signals such as arachidonic acid, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and lysophosphocholines (LPC). This review discusses the role of iPLA(2) in cell growth with special emphasis placed on their role in cell signaling. The putative lipid signals involved are also discussed.

  10. Spectrum Sharing between Cooperative Relay and Ad-hoc Networks: Dynamic Transmissions under Computation and Signaling Limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Yin; Li, Yunzhou; Zhou, Shidong; Xu, Xibin

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies a spectrum sharing scenario between an uplink cognitive relay network (CRN) and some nearby low power ad-hoc networks. In particular, the dynamic resource allocation of the CRN is analyzed, which aims to minimize the average interfering time with the ad-hoc networks subject to a minimal average uplink throughput constraint. A long term average rate formula is considered, which is achieved by a half-duplex decode-and-forward (DF) relay strategy with multi-channel transmissions. Both the source and relay are allowed to queue their data, by which they can adjust the transmission rates flexibly based on sensing and predicting the channel state and ad-hoc traffic. The dynamic resource allocation of the CRN is formulated as a non-convex stochastic optimization problem. By carefully analyzing the optimal transmission time scheduling, it is reduced to a stochastic convex optimization problem and solved by the dual optimization method. The signaling and computation processes are designed carefully t...

  11. Genetic analysis of the two zebrafish patched homologues identifies novel roles for the hedgehog signaling pathway.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudijs, M.J.; den Broeder, M.J.; Groot, E.; van Eeden, F.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in different organisms has shown the importance of this family of morphogens during development. Genetic screens in zebrafish have assigned specific roles for Hh in proliferation, differentiation and patterning, but mainly as a r

  12. Developmental role for endocannabinoid signaling in regulating glucose metabolism and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiying; Schmidt, Sarah F; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2013-07-01

    Treatment of ob/ob (obese) mice with a cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) antagonist reduces food intake, suggesting a role for endocannabinoid signaling in leptin action. We further evaluated the role of endocannabinoid signaling by analyzing the phenotype of Cnr1 knockout ob/ob mice. Double mutant animals show a more severe growth retardation than ob/ob mice with similar levels of adiposity and reduced IGF-I levels without alterations of growth hormone (GH) levels. The double mutant mice are also significantly more glucose intolerant than ob/ob mice. This is in contrast to treatment of ob/ob mice with a Cnr1 antagonist that had no effect on glucose metabolism, suggesting a possible requirement for endocannabinoid signaling during development for normal glucose homeostasis. Double mutant animals also showed similar leptin sensitivity as ob/ob mice, suggesting that there are developmental changes that compensate for the loss of Cnr1 signaling. These data establish a role for Cnr1 during development and suggest that compensatory changes during development may mitigate the requirement for Cnr1 in mediating the effects of leptin. The data also suggest a developmental role for Cnr1 to promote growth, regulate the GH/IGF-I axis, and improve β-cell function and glucose homeostasis in the setting of leptin deficiency.

  13. Roles of octopaminergic and dopaminergic neurons in mediating reward and punishment signals in insect visual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unoki, Sae; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Mizunami, Makoto

    2006-10-01

    Insects, like vertebrates, have considerable ability to associate visual, olfactory or other sensory signals with reward or punishment. Previous studies in crickets, honey bees and fruit-flies have suggested that octopamine (OA, invertebrate counterpart of noradrenaline) and dopamine (DA) mediate various kinds of reward and punishment signals in olfactory learning. However, whether the roles of OA and DA in mediating positive and negative reinforcing signals can be generalized to learning of sensory signals other than odors remained unknown. Here we first established a visual learning paradigm in which to associate a visual pattern with water reward or saline punishment for crickets and found that memory after aversive conditioning decayed much faster than that after appetitive conditioning. Then, we pharmacologically studied the roles of OA and DA in appetitive and aversive forms of visual learning. Crickets injected with epinastine or mianserin, OA receptor antagonists, into the hemolymph exhibited a complete impairment of appetitive learning to associate a visual pattern with water reward, but aversive learning with saline punishment was unaffected. By contrast, fluphenazine, chlorpromazine or spiperone, DA receptor antagonists, completely impaired aversive learning without affecting appetitive learning. The results demonstrate that OA and DA participate in reward and punishment conditioning in visual learning. This finding, together with results of previous studies on the roles of OA and DA in olfactory learning, suggests ubiquitous roles of the octopaminergic reward system and dopaminergic punishment system in insect learning.

  14. The role of stop-signal probability and expectation in proactive inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, M.; Kaldewaij, R.; Zandbelt, B.B.; Pas, P.; Plessis, S. du

    2015-01-01

    The subjective belief of what will happen plays an important role across many cognitive domains, including response inhibition. However, tasks that study inhibition do not distinguish between the processing of objective contextual cues indicating stop-signal probability and the subjective

  15. The role of stop-signal probability and expectation in proactive inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, Matthijs; Kaldewaij, Reinoud; Zandbelt, Bram B; Pas, Pascal; du Plessis, Stefan

    The subjective belief of what will happen plays an important role across many cognitive domains, including response inhibition. However, tasks that study inhibition do not distinguish between the processing of objective contextual cues indicating stop-signal probability and the subjective

  16. Differential TGF-beta Signaling in Retinal Vascular Cells: A Role in Diabetic Retinopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. van der Geest; I. Klaassen; I.M.C. Vogels; C.J.F. van Noorden; R.O. Schlingemann

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE. An early hallmark of preclinical diabetic retinopathy is thickening of the capillary basal lamina (BL). TGF-beta, a multipotent cytokine acting through its receptors ALK5 and -1, has been postulated to be involved in this phenomenon. In light of this possible role, TGF-beta signaling and it

  17. Elsevier Trophoblast Research Award lecture: The multifaceted role of Nodal signaling during mammalian reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C B; Dufort, D

    2011-03-01

    Nodal, a secreted signaling protein in the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily, has established roles in vertebrate development. However, components of the Nodal signaling pathway are also expressed at the maternal-fetal interface and have been implicated in many processes of mammalian reproduction. Emerging evidence indicates that Nodal and its extracellular inhibitor Lefty are expressed in the uterus and complex interactions between the two proteins mediate menstruation, decidualization and embryo implantation. Furthermore, several studies have shown that Nodal from both fetal and maternal sources may regulate trophoblast cell fate and facilitate placentation as both embryonic and uterine-specific Nodal knockout mouse strains exhibit disrupted placenta morphology. Here we review the established and prospective roles of Nodal signaling in facilitating successful pregnancy, including recent evidence supporting a potential link to parturition and preterm birth.

  18. Regulation of Signal Transduction and Role of Platelets in Liver Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nowatari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Among all organs, the liver has a unique regeneration capability after sustaining injury or the loss of tissue that occurs mainly due to mitosis in the hepatocytes that are quiescent under normal conditions. Liver regeneration is induced through a cascade of various cytokines and growth factors, such as, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6, hepatocyte growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor, which activate nuclear factor κB, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase signaling pathways. We previously reported that platelets can play important roles in liver regeneration through a direct effect on hepatocytes and collaborative effects with the nonparenchymal cells of the liver, including Kupffer cells and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, which participate in liver regeneration through the production of various growth factors and cytokines. In this paper, the roles of platelets and nonparenchymal cells in liver regeneration, including the associated cytokines, growth factors, and signaling pathways, are described.

  19. Epigenetics of Estrogen Receptor Signaling: Role in Hormonal Cancer Progression and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Monica; Cortez, Valerie [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, UTHSCSA, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Vadlamudi, Ratna K., E-mail: vadlamudi@uthscsa.edu [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, UTHSCSA, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2011-03-29

    Estrogen receptor (ERα) signaling plays a key role in hormonal cancer progression. ERα is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that modulates gene transcription via recruitment to the target gene chromatin. Emerging evidence suggests that ERα signaling has the potential to contribute to epigenetic changes. Estrogen stimulation is shown to induce several histone modifications at the ERα target gene promoters including acetylation, phosphorylation and methylation via dynamic interactions with histone modifying enzymes. Deregulation of enzymes involved in the ERα -mediated epigenetic pathway could play a vital role in ERα driven neoplastic processes. Unlike genetic alterations, epigenetic changes are reversible, and hence offer novel therapeutic opportunities to reverse ERα driven epigenetic changes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on mechanisms by which ERα signaling potentiates epigenetic changes in cancer cells via histone modifications.

  20. The emerging role of Wnt/PCP signaling in organ formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Rodney M; Sisson, Barbara E; Topczewski, Jacek

    2009-03-01

    Over the last two decades zebrafish has been an excellent model organism to study vertebrate development. Mutant analysis combined with gene knockdown and other manipulations revealed an essential role of Wnt signaling, independent of beta-catenin, during development. Especially well characterized is the function of Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling in the regulation of gastrulation movements and neurulation, described in other reviews within this special issue. Here, we set out to highlight some of the new and exciting research that is being carried out in zebrafish to elucidate the role that Wnt/PCP signaling plays in the formation of specific organs, including the lateral line, craniofacial development, and regeneration. We also summarized the emerging connection of the Wnt/PCP pathway with primary cilia function, an essential organelle in several organ activities.

  1. Comparative analysis of a tourism cluster in the Baikal region: role of cooperation as a factor of development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Nikolayevna Danilenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates cooperation in the field of tourism as a factor and feature of tourism clusters development. The analysis of tourism clusters development, trends and most common forms of cooperation between the participants in two regions of the Baikal region (Irkutsk region and the Republic of Buryatia was carried out based on the results of interviews with representatives of tourism business, education and government. The results indicate that compared with European practice, the areas of cooperation of Russian tourism sector enterprises with other economic actors are less diverse. Some attributes of cluster development based on cooperation are indicated in the Republic of Buryatia, whereas they are missing in the Irkutsk region, although two regions are the objects of a number of national and regional development programs aimed at tourism clusters development.

  2. Studies of transformational leadership in consumer service: leadership trust and the mediating-moderating role of cooperative conflict management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Feng

    2012-02-01

    This is the third in a series of studies evaluating how transformational leadership is associated with related variables such as job satisfaction, change commitment, leadership trust, cooperative conflict management, and market orientation. The present paper evaluates the effects of transformational leadership and cooperative conflict management along with their mediating and moderating of leadership trust in the life insurance industry for two sample groups, sales managers and sales employees. The main effect of leadership trust was mediated and moderated by cooperative conflict management. Cooperative conflict management made a more important contribution than transformational leadership or the moderating effect (interaction), but these three together were the most important variables predicting highest leadership trust. Transformational leadership has an indirect influence on leadership trust. This work summarizes the specific contribution and importance of building successful leadership trust associations with employees in relation to leadership and satisfaction with change commitment.

  3. A novel role of the checkpoint kinase ATR in leptin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Elke; Wennberg Huldt, Charlotte; Strömstedt, Maria; Brodin, Peter

    2015-09-05

    In a world with increasing incidences of obesity, it becomes critical to understand the detailed regulation of appetite. To identify novel regulators of the signaling mediated by one of the key hormones of energy homeostasis, leptin, we screened a set of compounds for their effect on the downstream Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling. Interestingly, cells exposed to inhibitors of the Ataxia Telangiectasia and RAD3-related protein ATR increased their leptin dependent STAT3 activity. This was due to failure of the cells to induce the negative feedback mediator Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 (SOCS3), suggesting that ATR has a previously unknown role in the negative feedback regulation of leptin signaling. This is an important finding not only because it sheds light on additional genes involved in leptin signaling, but also because it brings forward a new potential therapeutic intervention point for increasing leptin signaling in obese individuals. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. The Role of AGE/RAGE Signaling in Diabetes-Mediated Vascular Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber M. Kay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AGE/RAGE signaling has been a well-studied cascade in many different disease states, particularly diabetes. Due to the complex nature of the receptor and multiple intersecting pathways, the AGE/RAGE signaling mechanism is still not well understood. The purpose of this review is to highlight key areas of AGE/RAGE mediated vascular calcification as a complication of diabetes. AGE/RAGE signaling heavily influences both cellular and systemic responses to increase bone matrix proteins through PKC, p38 MAPK, fetuin-A, TGF-β, NFκB, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in both hyperglycemic and calcification conditions. AGE/RAGE signaling has been shown to increase oxidative stress to promote diabetes-mediated vascular calcification through activation of Nox-1 and decreased expression of SOD-1. AGE/RAGE signaling in diabetes-mediated vascular calcification was also attributed to increased oxidative stress resulting in the phenotypic switch of VSMCs to osteoblast-like cells in AGEs-induced calcification. Researchers found that pharmacological agents and certain antioxidants decreased the level of calcium deposition in AGEs-induced diabetes-mediated vascular calcification. By understanding the role the AGE/RAGE signaling cascade plays diabetes-mediated vascular calcification will allow for pharmacological intervention to decrease the severity of this diabetic complication.

  5. Role of Ca2+ and L-Phe in regulating functional cooperativity of disease-associated "toggle" calcium-sensing receptor mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhang

    Full Text Available The Ca(2+-sensing receptor (CaSR regulates Ca(2+ homeostasis in the body by monitoring extracellular levels of Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+]o and amino acids. Mutations at the hinge region of the N-terminal Venus flytrap domain (VFTD produce either receptor inactivation (L173P, P221Q or activation (L173F, P221L related to hypercalcemic or hypocalcemic disorders. In this paper, we report that both L173P and P221Q markedly impair the functional positive cooperativity of the CaSR as reflected by [Ca(2+]o-induced [Ca(2+]i oscillations, inositol-1-phosphate (IP1 accumulation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2 activity. In contrast, L173F and P221L show enhanced responsiveness of these three functional readouts to [Ca(2+]o. Further analysis of the dynamics of the VFTD mutants using computational simulation studies supports disruption in the correlated motions in the loss-of-function CaSR mutants, while these motions are enhanced in the gain-of-function mutants. Wild type (WT CaSR was modulated by L-Phe in a heterotropic positive cooperative way, achieving an EC50 similar to those of the two activating mutations. The response of the inactivating P221Q mutant to [Ca(2+]o was partially rescued by L-Phe, illustrating the capacity of the L-Phe binding site to enhance the positive homotropic cooperativity of CaSR. L-Phe had no effect on the other inactivating mutant. Moreover, our results carried out both in silico and in intact cells indicate that residue Leu(173, which is close to residues that are part of the L-Phe-binding pocket, exhibited impaired heterotropic cooperativity in the presence of L-Phe. Thus, Pro(221 and Leu(173 are important for the positive homo- and heterotropic cooperative regulation elicited by agonist binding.

  6. Conflictual cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axel, Erik

    2011-01-01

    , cooperation appeared as the continuous reworking of contradictions in the local arrangement of societal con- ditions. Subjects were distributed and distributed themselves according to social privileges, resources, and dilemmas in cooperation. Here, the subjects’ activities and understandings took form from...

  7. EphA4 Regulates the Balance between Self-Renewal and Differentiation of Radial Glial Cells and Intermediate Neuronal Precursors in Cooperation with FGF Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingfa Chen

    Full Text Available In mouse cerebral corticogenesis, neurons are generated from radial glial cells (RGCs or from their immediate progeny, intermediate neuronal precursors (INPs. The balance between self-renewal of these neuronal precursors and specification of cell fate is critical for proper cortical development, but the signaling mechanisms that regulate this progression are poorly understood. EphA4, a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily, is expressed in RGCs during embryogenesis. To illuminate the function of EphA4 in RGC cell fate determination during early corticogenesis, we deleted Epha4 in cortical cells at E11.5 or E13.5. Loss of EphA4 at both stages led to precocious in vivo RGC differentiation toward neurogenesis. Cortical cells isolated at E14.5 and E15.5 from both deletion mutants showed reduced capacity for neurosphere formation with greater differentiation toward neurons. They also exhibited lower phosphorylation of ERK and FRS2α in the presence of FGF. The size of the cerebral cortex at P0 was smaller than that of controls when Epha4 was deleted at E11.5 but not when it was deleted at E13.5, although the cortical layers were formed normally in both mutants. The number of PAX6-positive RGCs decreased at later developmental stages only in the E11.5 Epha4 deletion mutant. These results suggest that EphA4, in cooperation with an FGF signal, contributes to the maintenance of RGC self-renewal and repression of RGC differentiation through the neuronal lineage. This function of EphA4 is especially critical and uncompensated in early stages of corticogenesis, and thus deletion at E11.5 reduces the size of the neonatal cortex.

  8. TACI-BLyS signaling via B-cell–dendritic cell cooperation is required for naive CD8+ T-cell priming in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-de-Durana, Yaiza; Mantchev, George T.; Bram, Richard J.; Franco, Alessandra

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrated that B-cell–dendritic cell (DC) interactions via transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand (CAML) interactor (TACI) and B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) provide an early signal critical to generate adequate numbers of mature antigen presenting cells (APCs) to prime naive CD8+ T cells (CTLs) in vivo. Evidence that B cells are required for efficient CTL generation in mice and that reconstitution with wild-type but not TACI-knockout B cells restored normal CTL responses support our conclusion. Moreover, low doses of a TACI fusion protein (TACI-Fc) that express the extracellular domain of TACI (amino acid [aa] 1-126) restored CTL priming in B-cell–deficient mice in vivo and induced DC maturation in vitro. In fact, following interactions with B cells, splenic DCs rapidly express the CD86 costimulatory molecule, to an extent comparable to the exposure to antigenic stimuli. BLyShigh peptide-pulsed bone marrow–derived DCs, used as vaccines in vivo, cannot generate CTLs in B-cell–deficient and TACI-deficient mice, strongly supporting a need for B-cell–DC cooperation through TACI-BLyS during CTL first encounter with antigens in vivo. PMID:16195331

  9. The role of IL17B-IL17RB signaling pathway in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinejad, Vahideh; Dolati, Sanam; Motallebnezhad, Morteza; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most important cause of death in women globally. Though, improved survival is due to the developments in the screening techniques, initial diagnosis, and advances in treatments. Numerous factors contributed in the progression of breast cancer, such as inflammation. The most significant factor involved in the inflammatory process, is T helper 17 (Th17) cells. Th17 cells have an exceptional role in many of inflammatory diseases like psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and breast cancer through production of proinflammatory cytokine (IL17). As the collected indication recommends a possible relevance between chronic inflammation and cancer tumorigenesis, it appears that this cytokine can stimulate the tumorigenesis of breast tumor cells. The IL17 family consist of 6 protein members, among them IL17B and its receptor, and IL17RB signaling pathway plays a key role in development and progression of breast cancer, and targeting this signaling pathway or its specific downstream mediators by a chemotherapy drug and small interfering RNA interference is a potentially novel therapeutic pathway for inhibition of this disease. This comprehensive review details the recognition of activity, signaling, and the roles of IL17B-IL17RB in breast cancer have caused to determination of new therapeutic mechanisms with the purpose of introduction this system and the regulation of its signaling pathway.

  10. Role of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling pathway in longevity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Lei Cheng; Tian-Qin Gao; Zhen Wang; Dian-Dong Li

    2005-01-01

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling pathway is evolutionary conserved in diverse species including C.elegans, saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, rodents and humans, which is involved in many interrelated functions that are necessary for metabolism, growth and reproduction. Interestingly,more and more research has revealed that insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in the regulation of longevity. Generally, disruption of the power of this pathway will extend longevity in species ranging from C.elegansto humans. The role of insulin/IGF-1 in longevity is probably related to stress resistance. Although the underlying mechanisms of longevity are not fully understood,the Insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway has attracted substantial attention and it will be a novel target to prevent or postpone age-related diseases and extend life span.In this review, we mainly focus on the similar constitution and role of insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway in C.elegans,saccharomyces cerevisiae, rodents and humans.

  11. Analysis of the Role of Insulin Signaling in Bone Turnover Induced by Fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinyi; Liu, Hui; Yu, Xiuhua; Wang, Yan; Yang, Chen; Xu, Hui

    2016-06-01

    The role of insulin signaling on the mechanism underlying fluoride induced osteopathology was studied. We analyzed the expression of genes related with bone turnover and insulin signaling in rats treated by varying dose of fluoride with or without streptozotocin (STZ) in vivo. Furthermore, insulin receptor (InR) expression in MC3T3-E1 cells (pre-osteoblast cell line) was interfered with small interfering RNA (siRNA), and genes related with osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation were investigated in cells exposed to fluoride in vitro for 2 days. The in vivo study indicated the possible role of insulin in bone lesion induced by excessive amount of fluoride. Fluoride activated the InR and Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling, which were involved in the mechanism underlying fluoride induced bone turnover. The TGFβ1 and Wnt10/β-catenin pathway took part in the mechanism of bone lesion induced by fluoride, and insulin probably modulated the TGFβ1 and β-catenin to exert action on bone turnover during the development of bone lesion. The in vitro study showed the concomitant decrease of OPG, osterix and OCN with inhibition of InR expression in osteoblast, and three genes still was low in cells co-treated with fluoride and InR siRNA, which suggested that fluoride probably stimulated the expression of OPG, osterix and OCN through InR signaling. In conclusion, insulin played the important role in bone lesion induced by excessive amount of fluoride through mediating InR receptor signaling, and IGF1 signaling probably exerted action on bone turnover caused by overdose of fluoride.

  12. Cooperative Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桑莹莹

    2015-01-01

    This paper is about the cooperative learning as a teaching method in a second language learning class. It mainly talks about the background, foundation, features, definitions, components, goals, advantages and disadvantages of cooperative learning. And as the encounter of the disadvantages in cooperative learning, this paper also proposes some strategies.

  13. Revisiting the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jeffrey A; Logan, Susan K

    2017-02-09

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a widely accepted therapeutic target in prostate cancer and multiple studies indicate that the AR and Wnt/β-catenin pathways intersect. Recent genome-wide analysis of prostate cancer metastases illustrate the importance of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in prostate cancer and compel us to reexamine the interaction of the AR and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. This review includes newer areas of interest such as non-canonical Wnt signaling and the role of Wnts in prostate cancer stem cells. The effort to develop Wnt modulating therapeutics, both biologics and small molecules, is also discussed.

  14. Investigation on the role of IGF-1 signal transduction in the biological radiation responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, U Hee; Jo, Sung Kee; Park, Hae Ran; Oh, Soo Jin; Cho, Eun Hee; Eom, Hyun Soo; Ju, Eun Jin

    2009-05-15

    Effects of {gamma}-irradiation on the IGF-1 related gene expressions and activations in various cell lines - Various expression patterns of IGF-1 and IGF-1R following {gamma}-irradiation were observed according to the cell lines - The increased expressions of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were observed in Balb/3T3 and NIH/3T3 cells - Among the IGF-1 downstream signaling molecules, the phosphorylated ERK5 were not changed by {gamma}-irradiation in all three examined cell lines, whereas the phosphorylated p65 were increased by {gamma} -irradiation in all cell lines. The role of IGF-1 and p38 signaling in {gamma}-irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells - In MEF cells, IGF-1 signaling molecules were decreased and p21/phosphorylated p38 were increased by {gamma}-irradiation - The experiments with IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) revealed that IGF-1 signaling is involved but not essential in radiation-induced cell growth arrest and senescence and that p38 MAP kinase play a important role in this cellular radiation response. The role of IGF-1 and p38 signaling in {gamma}-irradiated mouse fibroblast (NIH/3T3) cell - In NIH/3T3 cells, IGF-1 signaling molecules and p21/phosphorylated p38 were increased by {gamma} -irradiation. - However, the experiments with IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) revealed that IGF-1 and p38 signaling do not play a crucial role in radiation-induced cell growth arrest and senescence in NIH/3T3 cells. Effects of {gamma}-irradiation on the expressions and activations on the genes related to the IGF-1 signaling in mouse tissues - In {gamma}-irradiated mice, the increased expressions of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were observed in the lung and kidney at 2 months after irradiation, and in all the tissues examined (lung, liver and kidney) at 6 months after irradiation. - In the lung of {gamma}-irradiated mice at 6 months after irradiation, the increases of IGF-1R, phosphorylated FOXO3a, p65, p38, p21 were observed. - The

  15. Emerging Roles of Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Sarah E; Lee, Nam Y

    2017-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus affecting about one third of diabetic adults. Despite its prevalence, treatment options are limited and often implemented only in the later stages of the disease. To date, the pathogenesis of DR has been extensively characterized in the context of elevated glucose, insulin, and VEGF signaling, although a growing number of other growth factors and molecules, including transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) are being recognized as important contributors and/or therapeutic targets. Here, we review the complex roles of TGF-β signaling in DR pathogenesis and progression. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 486-489, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp) in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Prado, M.A.; B. Evans-Bain; Santi, S. L.; Dickerson, I M

    2001-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-receptor component protein (RCP) is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as...

  17. [The role of disturbances in the hormonal signaling systems in etiology and pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakov, A O

    2014-01-01

    The role of disturbances in the hormonal signaling systems of brain and peripheral tissues in etiology and pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM) of the types 1 and 2 is discussed. Available data confirming the hypothesis of central genesis of some forms of DM caused by disturbances in the brain neurotransmitter systems are presented. It is concluded that the study of disturbances in the hormonal signaling systems is a promising approach for development of new strategies of DM treatment, based on correction of these disturbances in the CNS and the periphery.

  18. THE ROLE OF SUPPORT GROUPS IN THE COOPERATION BETWEEN PARENTS OF PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES AND PROFESSIONAL STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metka NOVAK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the ways of building and developing a better cooperative relationship between parents of people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities and professional staff is the inclusion of parents in support groups for parents and staff in support groups for staff. Goal: To examine the correlation of the level of cooperative relationship between the parents of people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities and professional staff with the inclusion of parents in support groups for parents and staff in support groups for staff. Methodology: Respondents: parents (296 of people with severe and profound learning disabilities and staff (298 in five centres across Slovenia; Methods: descriptive statistics, test of homogeneity, the rankit method, one-way analysis of variance; Procedures: survey questionnaires for parents and staff. The data was processed using SPSS software for personal computers. Results: The difference between the variances of the groups (parent found is statistically significant (F = 6.16; p = 0.01. Staff included in support groups have a significantly lower level of cooperative relationship with parents (f=10; M = - 0.12 than staff not included in these groups (f = 191; M = 0.04. Conclusion:In contrast to theoretical findings the results indicated less successful cooperation for professional staff included in support groups. The results furthermore did not confirm any differences in the cooperative relationship of parents included in support groups and those who are not. We suggest an in-depth analysis of the workings of support groups.

  19. Role of Notch signalling pathway in cancer and its association with DNA methylation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhuri G. S. Aithal; Narayanappa Rajeswari

    2013-12-01

    The Notch signalling pathway is an evolutionarily conserved cell signalling pathway involved in the development of organisms as diverse as humans and fruit flies. It plays a pivotal role in cell fate determination. Dysregulated Notch signalling is oncogenic, inhibits apoptosis and promotes cell survival. Abnormal Notch signalling is seen in many cancers like T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, acute myeloid leukaemia and cancers of the breast, cervix, colon, pancreas, skin and brain. Inhibition of Notch signalling leads to growth arrest and differentiation in those cells in which Notch pathway is activated and this represents a new target for cancer therapy. Cancer develops from genome defects, including both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Epigenetics deals with heritable changes in gene function that occur without a change in the DNA sequence. Among various epigenetic alterations such as acetylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitylation and sumoylation, promoter region methylation is considered as an important component in cancer development. Epigenetic alterations can be used as biomarkers in screening, detection, diagnosis, staging and risk stratification of various cancers. DNA methylation can be therapeutically reversed and demethylating drugs have proven to be promising in cancer treatment. This review focusses on the methylation status of genes in Notch signalling pathway from various cancers and how this epigenetic alteration can be used as a biomarker for cancer diagnosis and subsequent treatment.

  20. THE EMERGING ROLE OF INSULIN AND INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR SIGNALING IN CANCER STEM CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta eMalaguarnera

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells frequently exploit the IGF signaling, a fundamental pathway mediating development, cell growth and survival. As a consequence, several components of the IGF signaling are deregulated in cancer and sustain cancer progression. However, specific targeting of IGF-IR in humans has resulted efficacious only in small subsets of cancers, making researches wondering whether IGF system targeting is still worth pursuing in the clinical setting. Although no definite answer is yet available, it has become increasingly clear that other components of the IGF signaling pathway, such as IR-A, may substitute for the lack of IGF-IR, and induce cancer resistance and/or clonal selection. Moreover, accumulating evidence now indicates that IGF signaling is a central player in the induction/maintenance of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT and cell stemness, two strictly related programs, which play a key role in metastatic spread and resistance to cancer treatments. Here we review the evidences indicating that IGF signaling enhances the expression of transcription factors implicated in the EMT program and has extensive crosstalk with specific pathways involved in cell pluripotency and stemness maintenance. In turn, EMT and cell stemness activate positive feed-back mechanisms causing upregulation of various IGF signaling components. These findings may have novel translational implications.

  1. A Multifaceted Role for Myd88-Dependent Signaling in Progression of Murine Mammary Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Mary J.; Serrano, Antonio; Boateng, Kofi Y.; Parsons, Victoria A.; Phuong, Tiffany; Seifert, Alyssa; Ricca, Jacob M.; Tucker, Kyle C.; Eidelman, Alec S.; Carey, Maureen A.; Kurt, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous data obtained in our laboratory suggested that there may be constitutive signaling through the myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (Myd88)-dependent signaling cascade in murine mammary carcinoma. Here, we extended these findings by showing that, in the absence of an added Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, the myddosome complex was preformed in 4T1 tumor cells, and that Myd88 influenced cytoplasmic extracellular signal–regulated kinase (Erk)1/Erk2 levels, nuclear levels of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), tumor-derived chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) expression, and in vitro and in vivo tumor growth. In addition, RNA-sequencing revealed that Myd88-dependent signaling enhanced the expression of genes that could contribute to breast cancer progression and genes previously associated with poor outcome for patients with breast cancer, in addition to suppressing the expression of genes capable of inhibiting breast cancer progression. Yet, Myd88-dependent signaling in tumor cells also suppressed expression of genes that could contribute to tumor progression. Collectively, these data revealed a multifaceted role for Myd88-dependent signaling in murine mammary carcinoma. PMID:27812285

  2. A critical role for PDGFRα signaling in medial nasal process development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenglei He

    Full Text Available The primitive face is composed of neural crest cell (NCC derived prominences. The medial nasal processes (MNP give rise to the upper lip and vomeronasal organ, and are essential for normal craniofacial development, but the mechanism of MNP development remains largely unknown. PDGFRα signaling is known to be critical for NCC development and craniofacial morphogenesis. In this study, we show that PDGFRα is required for MNP development by maintaining the migration of progenitor neural crest cells (NCCs and the proliferation of MNP cells. Further investigations reveal that PI3K/Akt and Rac1 signaling mediate PDGFRα function during MNP development. We thus establish PDGFRα as a novel regulator of MNP development and elucidate the roles of its downstream signaling pathways at cellular and molecular levels.

  3. lschemic preconditioning in pigs: a causal role for signal transducer and activator of transcription 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, Sabine; Skyschally, Andreas; Kleinbongard, Petra; Heusch, Gerd

    2017-03-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC), i.e., brief episodes of nonlethal myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) before sustained ischemia with subsequent reperfusion, reduces infarct size in all species tested so far, including humans. In rodents, the cardioprotective signal transduction causally involves an activation of Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3. However, there are apparent species differences in the signal transduction between rodents and larger mammals such as pigs, where data on IPC's signal transduction are inconsistent for Akt and ERK1/2. The role of STAT3 has not yet been analyzed. Pigs were subjected to 60 min of left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion and 180 min of reperfusion without or with IPC (2 cycles of 3-min occlusion separated by 2 min of reperfusion 15 min before sustained I/R). Infarct size was analyzed by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining, and Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3 phosphorylation was quantified in myocardial biopsies taken at baseline and early reperfusion. AG490 was used to block the STAT3 signaling pathway. IPC reduced infarct size (%area at risk; mean ± SE, I/R, 45 ± 3 vs. IPC, 18 ± 3, P IPC. In contrast, STAT3 phosphorylation at early reperfusion was only increased with IPC (%baseline; mean ± SE, I/R, 126 ± 29 vs. IPC, 408 ± 147, P IPC-related increase of STAT3 phosphorylation at reperfusion (%baseline; mean ± SE, 82 ± 12) and abolished IPC's cardioprotection (%area at risk; mean ± SE, 35 ± 4). In pigs, increased phosphorylation of STAT3 is causally involved, whereas Akt and ERK1/2 seem to play no role in IPC's cardioprotection.NEW & NOTEWORTHY In pig hearts in situ, ischemic preconditioning (IPC) causally involves increased phosphorylation of STAT3, whereas Akt and ERK1/2 play no role for cardioprotection. The cardioprotective signal transduction of IPC is similar to that of ischemic postconditioning and remote IPC in pigs.

  4. Comparative expression profiling identifies differential roles for Myogenin and p38α MAPK signaling in myogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Cai Liu; Marjorie Brand; Carol Perez-Iratxeta; F. Jeffrey Dilworth; Xiao-Hui Zha; Hervé Faralli; Hang Yin; Caroline Louis-Jeune; Eusebio Perdiguero; Erinija Pranckeviciene; Pura Mu(n)oz-Cànoves; Michael A. Rudnicki

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle differentiation is mediated by a complex gene expression program requiring both the muscle-specific transcription factor Myogenin (Myog) and p38α MAPK (p38α) signaling.However,the relative contribution of Myog and p38α to the formation of mature myotubes remains unknown.Here,we have uncoupled the activity of Myog from that of p38α to gain insight into the individual roles of these proteins in myoganesis.Comparative expression profiling confirmed that Myog activates the expression of genes involved in muscle function.Furthermore,we found that in the absence of p38α signaling,Myog expression leads to the down-regulation of genes involved in cell cycle progression.Consistent with this,the expression of Myog is sufficient to induce cell cycle exit.Interestingly,p38α-defective,Myog-expressing myoblasts fail to form multinucleated myotubes,suggesting an important role for p38α in cell fusion.Through the analysis of p38α up-regulated genes,the tetraspanin CD53 was identified as a candidate fusion protein,a role confirmed both ex vivo in primary myoblasts,and in vivo during myofiber regeneration in mice.Thus,our study has revealed an unexpected role for Myog in mediating cell cycle exit and has identified an essential role for p38α in cell fusion through the up-regulation of CD53.

  5. Role of cell adhesion signal molecules in hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Min Su; Li-Ying Wang; Yu-Long Liang; Xi-Liang Zha

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Cell adhesion molecules and their signal molecules play a very important role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of these molecules and the signal molecules of integrins and E-cadherins, such as (focal adhesion kinase) FAK, (integrin linked kinase)ILK, and β-catenin in hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.METHODS: We first synthesized the small molecular compound, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), and identified it, by element analysis and 1H NMR. To establish the apoptosis model of the SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma cell, we treated cells with DCVC in EBSS for different concentrations or for various length times in the presence of 20 μmol/L N,N-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine,which blocks necrotic cell death and identified this model by flow cytometry and DNA ladder. Then we studied the changes of FAK, ILK, β-catenin, and PKB in this apoptotic model by Western blot.RESULTS: We found that the loss or decrease of cell adhesion signal molecules is an important reason in apoptosis of SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma cell and the apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cell was preceded by the loss or decrease of FAK, ILK, PKB, and β-catenin or the damage of cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion.CONCLUSION: Our results suggested that the decrease of adhesion signal molecules, FAK, ILK, PKB, and β-catenin,could induce hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.

  6. A role for nitric oxide-driven retrograde signaling in the consolidation of a fear memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathie A Overeem

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In both invertebrate and vertebrate models of synaptic plasticity, signaling via the putative “retrograde messenger” nitric oxide (NO has been hypothesized to serve as a critical link between functional and structural alterations at pre- and postsynaptic sites. However, while in vitro models of synaptic plasticity have consistently implicated NO signaling in linking postsynaptic induction mechanisms with accompanying presynaptic changes, a convincing role of such “retrograde signaling” in mammalian memory formation has remained elusive. Using auditory Pavlovian fear conditioning, we show that synaptic plasticity and NO signaling in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA regulate the expression of the ERK-driven immediate early gene early growth response gene I (EGR-1 in regions of the auditory thalamus that are presynaptic to the LA. Further, antisense knockdown of EGR-1 in the auditory thalamus impairs both fear memory consolidation and the training-induced elevation of two presynaptically localized proteins in the LA. These findings indicate that synaptic plasticity and NO signaling in the LA during auditory fear conditioning promote alterations in ERK-driven gene expression in auditory thalamic neurons that are required for both fear memory consolidation as well as presynaptic correlates of fear memory formation in the LA, and provide general support for a role of NO as a “retrograde signal” in mammalian memory formation.

  7. Potential role of Shh-Gli1-BMI1 signaling pathway nexus in glioma chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, M H; Farheen, S; Mariyath, M P M; Castresana, J S

    2016-11-01

    Chemoresistance is a common hurdle for the proper treatment of gliomas. The role of Shh-Gli1 signaling in glioma progression has been reported. However, its role in glioma chemoresistance has not been well studied yet. In this work, we found that Shh-Gli1 signaling regulates the expression of one stem cell marker, BMI1 (B cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus), in glioma. Interestingly, we also demonstrated high expression of MRP1 (multi-drug resistance protein 1) in glioma. MRP1 expression was decreased by BMI1 siRNA and Shh-Gli1 cell signaling specific inhibitor GANT61 in our experiments. GANT61 very efficiently inhibited cell colony growth in glioma cell lines, compared to temozolomide. Moreover, a synergic effect of GANT61 and temozolomide drastically decreased the LD50 of temozolomide in the cell colony experiments. Therefore, our results suggest that there is a potential nexus of Shh-Gli1-BMI1 cell signaling to regulate MRP1 and to promote chemoresistance in glioma. Henceforth, our study opens the possibility of facing new targets, Gli1 and BMI1, for the effective treatment of glioma suppression of chemoresistance with adjuvant therapy of GANT61 and temozolomide.

  8. The Protective Role of Vitamin D Signaling in Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bikle, Daniel D., E-mail: daniel.bikle@ucsf.edu; Jiang, Yan [Department of Medicine and Endocrine, Research Unit and Department of Dermatology, VA Medical Center, University of California San Francisco, 4150 Clement St (111N), San Francisco, CA 94121 (United States)

    2013-11-05

    Although the epidemiologic evidence that adequate vitamin D nutrition protects against non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is limited, recent evidence that the vitamin D receptor (VDR) is protective is compelling. The role of vitamin D signaling in limiting the proliferation while promoting the differentiation of keratinocytes, the major cell in the epidermis from which NMSC are derived, is well known. However, recent findings that mice lacking the VDR are predisposed to skin cancer has brought to the fore the question of how the VDR is protective. In this review we will look first at the role of vitamin D signaling in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. We will examine two pathways, β-catenin (CTNNB) and hedgehog (HH), that are regulated by vitamin D signaling and may contribute to the dysregulated proliferation and differentiation in the absence of VDR. We will then examine the failure of VDR deficient keratinocytes to repair DNA damaged by UVB. Finally we will examine the change in long non-coding RNA (LncRNA) expression in VDR null keratinocytes that in other cells is associated with malignant transformation, a potential newly appreciated mechanism by which vitamin D signaling is protective against NMSC.

  9. Wnt/Fz signaling and the cytoskeleton: potential roles in tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shih-Lei Lai; Andy J Chien; Randall T Moon

    2009-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin regulates cellular functions related to tumor initiation and progression, cell proliferation, differ-entiation, survival, and adhesion. β-Catenin-independent Wnt pathways have been proposed to regulate cell polarity and migration, including metastasis, In this review, we discuss the possible roles of both β-catenin-dependent and -independent signaling pathways in tumor progression, with an emphasis on their regulation of Rho-family GTPases, cytoskeletal remodeling, and relationships with cell-cell adhesion and cilia/ciliogenesis.

  10. Evidence for a role of vertebrate Disp1 in long-range Shh signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Etheridge, L. Alton; Crawford, T. Quinn; Zhang, Shile; Roelink, Henk

    2010-01-01

    Dispatched 1 (Disp1) encodes a twelve transmembrane domain protein that is required for long-range sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Inhibition of Disp1 function, both by RNAi or dominant-negative constructs, prevents secretion and results in the accumulation of Shh in source cells. Measuring the Shh response in neuralized embryoid bodies (EBs) derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells, with or without Disp1 function, demonstrates an additional role for Disp1 in cells transporting Shh. Co-cultures...

  11. Multifunctional DDX3: dual roles in various cancer development and its related signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Luqing; Mao, Yitao; Zhou, Jianhua; Zhao, Yuelong; Cao, Ya; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicase 3 (DDX3) is a highly conserved family member of DEAD-box protein, which is a cluster of ATP-dependent and the largest family of RNA helicase. DEAD-box family is characterized by the regulation of ATPase and helicase activities, the modulation of RNA metabolism, and the actors of RNA binding proteins or molecular chaperones to interact with other proteins or RNA. For DDX3, it exerts its multifaceted roles in viral manipulation, stress response, hypoxia, radiation response and apoptosis, and is closely related to cancer development and progression. DDX3 has dual roles in different cancer types and can act as either an oncogene or tumor suppressor gene during cancer progression. In the present review, we mainly provide an overview of current knowledge on dual roles of DDX3 in various types of cancer, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, oral squamous cell carcinoma, Ewing sarcoma, glioblastoma multiforme and gallbladder carcinoma, and illustrate the regulatory mechanisms for leading these two controversial biological effects. Furthermore, we summarize the essential signaling pathways that DDX3 participated, especially the Wnt/β-catenin signaling and EMT related signaling (TGF-β, Notch, Hedgehog pathways), which are crucial to DDX3 mediated cancer metastasis process. Thoroughly exploring the dual roles of DDX3 in cancer development and the essential signaling pathways it involved, it will help us open new perspectives to develop novel promising targets to elevate therapeutic effects and facilitate the "Personalized medicine" or "Precision medicine" to come into clinic.

  12. Differential role of Hedgehog signaling in human pancreatic (patho-) physiology: An up to date review

    OpenAIRE

    Klieser, Eckhard; SWIERCZYNSKI, STEFAN; Mayr, Christian; Jäger, Tarkan; Schmidt, Johanna; Neureiter, Daniel; KIESSLICH, TOBIAS; Illig, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in drosophila melanogaster, our knowledge of the role of Hh in embryonic development, inflammation, and cancerogenesis in humans has dramatically increased over the last decades. This is the case especially concerning the pancreas, however, real therapeutic breakthroughs are missing until now. In general, Hh signaling is essential for pancreatic organogenesis, development, and tissue maturation. In the case of acute pancreatitis, Hh has a prote...

  13. Roles of dorsomedial hypothalamic cholecystokinin signaling in the controls of meal patterns and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangjing; Yan, Jianqun; Smith, Wanli W; Moran, Timothy H; Bi, Sheng

    2012-01-18

    A role for dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) cholecystokinin (CCK) signaling in feeding control has been proposed. Administration of CCK into the DMH reduces food intake and OLETF rats lacking CCK1 receptors (CCK1R) become hyperphagic and obese. We hypothesized that site specific replenishment of CCK1R in the DMH of OLETF rats would attenuate aspects of their feeding deficits. Recombinant vectors of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated expression of CCK1R (AAVCCK1R) were bilaterally delivered into the DMH of OLETF. OLETF rats with AAVCCK1R injections demonstrated a 65% replenishment of Cck1r mRNA expression in the DMH relative to lean LETO control rats. Although this level of replenishment did not significantly affect overall food intake or body weight through 14 weeks following viral injections, meal patterns were partially normalized in OLETF rats receiving AAVCCK1R with a significant decrease in dark cycle meal size and a small but significant decrease in daily food intake in the meal analysis chambers. Importantly, the elevation in blood glucose level of OLETF rats was attenuated by the AAVCCK1R injections (p=0.03), suggesting a role for DMH CCK signaling in glucose homeostasis. In support of this role, administration of CCK into the DMH of intact rats enhanced glucose tolerance, as this occurred through activation of CCK1R but not CCK2R signaling. In conclusion, partial replenishment of CCK1R in the DMH of OLETF rats, although insufficient for altering overall food intake and body weight, normalizes meal pattern changes and reduces blood glucose levels. Our study also shows a novel role of DMH CCK signaling in glucose homeostasis.

  14. Investigating Cooperative Behavior in Ecological Settings: An EEG Hyperscanning Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Manuela; He, Eric J.; De Giusti, Vittorio; He, Bin; Astolfi, Laura; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated interactions between individuals are fundamental for the success of the activities in some professional categories. We reported on brain-to-brain cooperative interactions between civil pilots during a simulated flight. We demonstrated for the first time how the combination of neuroelectrical hyperscanning and intersubject connectivity could provide indicators sensitive to the humans’ degree of synchronization under a highly demanding task performed in an ecological environment. Our results showed how intersubject connectivity was able to i) characterize the degree of cooperation between pilots in different phases of the flight, and ii) to highlight the role of specific brain macro areas in cooperative behavior. During the most cooperative flight phases pilots showed, in fact, dense patterns of interbrain connectivity, mainly linking frontal and parietal brain areas. On the contrary, the amount of interbrain connections went close to zero in the non-cooperative phase. The reliability of the interbrain connectivity patterns was verified by means of a baseline condition represented by formal couples, i.e. pilots paired offline for the connectivity analysis but not simultaneously recorded during the flight. Interbrain density was, in fact, significantly higher in real couples with respect to formal couples in the cooperative flight phases. All the achieved results demonstrated how the description of brain networks at the basis of cooperation could effectively benefit from a hyperscanning approach. Interbrain connectivity was, in fact, more informative in the investigation of cooperative behavior with respect to established EEG signal processing methodologies applied at a single subject level. PMID:27124558

  15. Investigating Cooperative Behavior in Ecological Settings: An EEG Hyperscanning Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppi, Jlenia; Borghini, Gianluca; Petti, Manuela; He, Eric J; De Giusti, Vittorio; He, Bin; Astolfi, Laura; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated interactions between individuals are fundamental for the success of the activities in some professional categories. We reported on brain-to-brain cooperative interactions between civil pilots during a simulated flight. We demonstrated for the first time how the combination of neuroelectrical hyperscanning and intersubject connectivity could provide indicators sensitive to the humans' degree of synchronization under a highly demanding task performed in an ecological environment. Our results showed how intersubject connectivity was able to i) characterize the degree of cooperation between pilots in different phases of the flight, and ii) to highlight the role of specific brain macro areas in cooperative behavior. During the most cooperative flight phases pilots showed, in fact, dense patterns of interbrain connectivity, mainly linking frontal and parietal brain areas. On the contrary, the amount of interbrain connections went close to zero in the non-cooperative phase. The reliability of the interbrain connectivity patterns was verified by means of a baseline condition represented by formal couples, i.e. pilots paired offline for the connectivity analysis but not simultaneously recorded during the flight. Interbrain density was, in fact, significantly higher in real couples with respect to formal couples in the cooperative flight phases. All the achieved results demonstrated how the description of brain networks at the basis of cooperation could effectively benefit from a hyperscanning approach. Interbrain connectivity was, in fact, more informative in the investigation of cooperative behavior with respect to established EEG signal processing methodologies applied at a single subject level.

  16. Investigating Cooperative Behavior in Ecological Settings: An EEG Hyperscanning Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jlenia Toppi

    Full Text Available The coordinated interactions between individuals are fundamental for the success of the activities in some professional categories. We reported on brain-to-brain cooperative interactions between civil pilots during a simulated flight. We demonstrated for the first time how the combination of neuroelectrical hyperscanning and intersubject connectivity could provide indicators sensitive to the humans' degree of synchronization under a highly demanding task performed in an ecological environment. Our results showed how intersubject connectivity was able to i characterize the degree of cooperation between pilots in different phases of the flight, and ii to highlight the role of specific brain macro areas in cooperative behavior. During the most cooperative flight phases pilots showed, in fact, dense patterns of interbrain connectivity, mainly linking frontal and parietal brain areas. On the contrary, the amount of interbrain connections went close to zero in the non-cooperative phase. The reliability of the interbrain connectivity patterns was verified by means of a baseline condition represented by formal couples, i.e. pilots paired offline for the connectivity analysis but not simultaneously recorded during the flight. Interbrain density was, in fact, significantly higher in real couples with respect to formal couples in the cooperative flight phases. All the achieved results demonstrated how the description of brain networks at the basis of cooperation could effectively benefit from a hyperscanning approach. Interbrain connectivity was, in fact, more informative in the investigation of cooperative behavior with respect to established EEG signal processing methodologies applied at a single subject level.

  17. Towards a unified theory of cooperative breeding : The role of ecology and life history re-examined

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pen, I.; Weissing, F.J.

    2000-01-01

    We present quantitative models that unify several adaptive hypotheses for the evolution of cooperative breeding in a single framework: the ecological constraints hypothesis, the life-history hypothesis and the benefits-of-philopatry hypothesis. Our goal is to explain interspecific variation in the

  18. Conference RSIS (The role of science in the information society) - Contributions to Economic Development - Building 40 S2 - B01 - Mr. John Dryden, Chairman, Deputy Director, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Conference RSIS (The role of science in the information society) - Contributions to Economic Development - Building 40 S2 - B01 - Mr. John Dryden, Chairman, Deputy Director, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.

  19. Intertwining of Activin A and TGFβ Signaling: Dual Roles in Cancer Progression and Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomans, Holli A. [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Andl, Claudia D., E-mail: claudia.andl@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Vanderbilt Digestive Disease Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Vanderbilt Epithelial Biology Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2014-12-30

    In recent years, a significant amount of research has examined the controversial role of activin A in cancer. Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily, is best characterized for its function during embryogenesis in mesoderm cell fate differentiation and reproduction. During embryogenesis, TGFβ superfamily ligands, TGFβ, bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and activins, act as potent morphogens. Similar to TGFβs and BMPs, activin A is a protein that is highly systemically expressed during early embryogenesis; however, post-natal expression is overall reduced and remains under strict spatiotemporal regulation. Of importance, normal post-natal expression of activin A has been implicated in the migration and invasive properties of various immune cell types, as well as endometrial cells. Aberrant activin A signaling during development results in significant morphological defects and premature mortality. Interestingly, activin A has been found to have both oncogenic and tumor suppressor roles in cancer. Investigations into the role of activin A in prostate and breast cancer has demonstrated tumor suppressive effects, while in lung and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, it has been consistently shown that activin A expression is correlated with increased proliferation, invasion and poor patient prognosis. Activin A signaling is highly context-dependent, which is demonstrated in studies of epithelial cell tumors and the microenvironment. This review discusses normal activin A signaling in comparison to TGFβ and highlights how its dysregulation contributes to cancer progression and cell invasion.

  20. The Role of Signaling via Aqueous Pore Formation in Resistance Responses to Amphotericin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B Eleazar

    2016-09-01

    Drug resistance studies have played an important role in the validation of antibiotic targets. In the case of the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B (AmB), such studies have demonstrated the essential role that depletion of ergosterol plays in the development of AmB-resistant (AmB-R) organisms. However, AmB-R strains also occur in fungi and parasitic protozoa that maintain a normal level of ergosterol at the plasma membrane. Here, I review evidence that shows not only that there is increased protection against the deleterious consequences of AmB-induced ion leakage across the membrane in these resistant pathogens but also that a set of events are activated that block the cell signaling responses that trigger the oxidative damage produced by the antibiotic. Such signaling events appear to be the consequence of a membrane-thinning effect that is exerted upon lipid-anchored Ras proteins by the aqueous pores formed by AmB. A similar membrane disturbance effect may also explain the activity of AmB on mammalian cells containing Toll-like receptors. These resistance mechanisms expand our current understanding of the role that the formation of AmB aqueous pores plays in triggering signal transduction responses in both pathogens and host immune cells.

  1. Role of Paraventricular Nucleus Glutamate Signaling in Regulation of HPA Axis Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanson, Nathan K; Herman, James P

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is the main neuroendocrine arm of the stress response, activation of which leads to the production of glucocorticoid hormones. Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones that are secreted from the adrenal cortex, and have a variety of effects on the body, including modulation of the immune system, suppression of reproductive hormones maintenance of blood glucose levels, and maintenance of blood pressure. Glutamate plays an important role in coordination of HPA axis output. There is strong evidence that glutamate drives HPA axis stress responses through excitatory signaling via ionotropic glutamate receptor signaling. However, glutamate signaling via kainate receptors and group I metabotropic receptors inhibit HPA drive, probably via presynaptic inhibitory mechanisms. Notably, kainate receptors are also localized in the median eminence, and appear to play an excitatory role in control of CRH release at the nerve terminals. Finally, glutamate innervation of the PVN undergoes neuroplastic changes under conditions of chronic stress, and may be involved in sensitization of HPA axis responses. Altogether, the data suggest that glutamate plays a complex role in excitation of CRH neurons, acting at multiple levels to both drive HPA axis responses and limit over-activation.

  2. The Role of Ubiquitin and the 26S Proteasome in Plant Abiotic Stress Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone L Sophia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin is a small, highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed eukaryotic protein with immensely important and diverse regulatory functions. A well-studied function of ubiquitin is its role in selective proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS. The UPS has emerged as an integral player in plant response and adaptation to environmental stresses such as drought, salinity, cold and nutrient deprivation. The UPS has also been shown to influence the production and signal transduction of stress-related hormones such as abscisic acid. Understanding UPS function has centered mainly on defining the role of E3 ubiquitin ligases, which are the substrate-recruiting component of the ubiquitination pathway. The recent identification of stress signaling/regulatory proteins that are the subject of ubiquitin-dependent degradation has increased our knowledge of how the UPS facilitate responses to adverse environmental conditions. A brief overview is provided on role of the UPS in modulating protein stability during abiotic stress signaling. E3 ubiquitin ligases for which stress-related substrate proteins have been identified are discussed.

  3. Anti-apoptotic role of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in the proliferation of ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Shiori; Mitsuyasu, Takeshi; Nakao, Yu; Kawano, Shintaro; Goto, Yuichi; Matsubara, Ryota; Nakamura, Seiji

    2013-09-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway is crucial to growth and patterning during organogenesis. Aberrant activation of the SHH signaling pathway can result in tumor formation. We examined the expression of SHH signaling molecules and investigated the involvement of the SHH pathway in the proliferation of ameloblastoma, the most common benign tumor of the jaws. We used immunohistochemistry on ameloblastoma specimens and immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR on the ameloblastoma cell line AM-1. We also used the inhibitors of SHH signaling, SHH neutralizing antibody and cyclopamine, to assess the effects of SHH on the proliferation of AM-1 cells. We detected expression of SHH, patched, GLI1, GLI2 and GLI3 in the ameloblastoma specimens and AM-1 cells. The proliferation of these cells was significantly inhibited in the presence of SHH neutralizing antibody or cyclopamine; this was confirmed by BrdU incorporation assays. Furthermore, in the presence of SHH neutralizing antibody, nuclear translocation of GLI1 and GLI2 was abolished, apoptosis was induced, BCL-2 expression decreased and BAX expression increased. Our results suggest that the SHH signaling pathway is constitutively active in ameloblastoma and plays an anti-apoptotic role in the proliferation of ameloblastoma cells through autocrine loop stimulation.

  4. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N

    2015-08-14

    Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA). Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the hypertrophy of MSCs-derived in vitro differentiated chondrocytes and chondrocytes, with an emphasis on the crosstalk between these pathways. Insight into the exact regulation of hypertrophy by the signaling network is necessary for the efficient application of MSCs for articular cartilage repair and for developing novel strategies for curing OA. We focus on articles describing the role of the main signaling pathways in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy-like changes. Most studies report hypertrophic differentiation in chondrogenesis of MSCs, in both human OA and experimental OA. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is not under the strict control of a single pathway but appears to be regulated by an intricately regulated network of multiple signaling pathways, such as WNT, Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ), Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), Indian hedgehog (IHH), Fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Insulin like growth factor (IGF) and Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). This comprehensive review describes how this intricate signaling network influences tissue-engineering applications of MSCs in articular cartilage (AC) repair, and improves understanding of the disease stages and cellular responses within an OA articular joint.

  5. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA. Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the hypertrophy of MSCs-derived in vitro differentiated chondrocytes and chondrocytes, with an emphasis on the crosstalk between these pathways. Insight into the exact regulation of hypertrophy by the signaling network is necessary for the efficient application of MSCs for articular cartilage repair and for developing novel strategies for curing OA. We focus on articles describing the role of the main signaling pathways in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy-like changes. Most studies report hypertrophic differentiation in chondrogenesis of MSCs, in both human OA and experimental OA. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is not under the strict control of a single pathway but appears to be regulated by an intricately regulated network of multiple signaling pathways, such as WNT, Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP/Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ, Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP, Indian hedgehog (IHH, Fibroblast growth factor (FGF, Insulin like growth factor (IGF and Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF. This comprehensive review describes how this intricate signaling network influences tissue-engineering applications of MSCs in articular cartilage (AC repair, and improves understanding of the disease stages and cellular responses within an OA articular joint.

  6. Signaling mechanisms in alcoholic liver injury: Role of transcription factors,kinases and heat shock proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Alcoholic liver injury comprises of interactions of various intracellular signaling events in the liver. Innate immune responses in the resident Kupffer cells of the liver, oxidative stress-induced activation of hepatocytes,fibrotic events in liver stellate cells and activation of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells all contribute to alcoholic liver injury. The signaling mechanisms associated with alcoholic liver injury vary based on the cell type involved and the extent of alcohol consumption. In this review we will elucidate the oxidative stress and signaling pathways affected by alcohol in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells in the liver by alcohol. The toll-like receptors and their down-stream signaling events that play an important role in alcohol-induced inflammation will be discussed. Alcohol-induced alterations of various intracellular transcription factors such as NFκB, PPARs and AP-1, as well as MAPK kinases in hepatocytes and macrophages leading to induction of target genes that contribute to liver injury will be reviewed. Finally, we will discuss the significance of heat shock proteins as chaperones and their functional regulation in the liver that could provide new mechanistic insights into the contributions of stress-induced signaling mechanisms in alcoholic liver injury.

  7. Pivotal Role of Regulator of G-protein Signaling 12 in Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jia; Chen, Lijuan; Yao, Yuyu; Tang, Chengchun; Ding, Jiandong; Fu, Cong; Li, Hongliang; Ma, Genshan

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a major predictor of heart failure and is regulated by diverse signaling pathways. As a typical multi-domain member of the regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) family, RGS12 plays a regulatory role in various signaling pathways. However, the precise effect of RGS12 on cardiac hypertrophy remains largely unknown. In this study, we observed increased expression of RGS12 in the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. We then generated genetically engineered mice and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes to investigate the effects of RGS12 during this pathological process. Four weeks after aortic banding, RGS12-deficient hearts showed decreased cardiomyocyte cross area (374.7±43.2 μm(2) versus 487.1±47.9 μm(2) in controls; Phypertrophy in isolated cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, our data indicated that the activation of MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling may be responsible for the prohypertrophic action of RGS12. In addition, the requirement of the MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling for RGS12-mediated cardiac hypertrophy was confirmed in rescue experiments using the MEK1/2-specific inhibitor U0126. In conclusion, our findings provide a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. The Wnt receptor Ryk plays a role in mammalian planar cell polarity signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheda, Maria L; Sun, Willy W; Kugathasan, Kumudhini; Hogan, Benjamin M; Bower, Neil I; Halford, Michael M; Zhang, You Fang; Jacques, Bonnie E; Lieschke, Graham J; Dabdoub, Alain; Stacker, Steven A

    2012-08-24

    Wnts are essential for a wide range of developmental processes, including cell growth, division, and differentiation. Some of these processes signal via the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, which is a β-catenin-independent Wnt signaling pathway. Previous studies have shown that Ryk, a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family, can bind to Wnts. Ryk is required for normal axon guidance and neuronal differentiation during development. Here, we demonstrate that mammalian Ryk interacts with the Wnt/PCP pathway. In vitro analysis showed that the Wnt inhibitory factor domain of Ryk was necessary for Wnt binding. Detailed analysis of two vertebrate model organisms showed Ryk phenotypes consistent with PCP signaling. In zebrafish, gene knockdown using morpholinos revealed a genetic interaction between Ryk and Wnt11 during the PCP pathway-regulated process of embryo convergent extension. Ryk-deficient mouse embryos displayed disrupted polarity of stereociliary hair cells in the cochlea, a characteristic of disturbed PCP signaling. This PCP defect was also observed in mouse embryos that were double heterozygotes for Ryk and Looptail (containing a mutation in the core Wnt/PCP pathway gene Vangl2) but not in either of the single heterozygotes, suggesting a genetic interaction between Ryk and Vangl2. Co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that RYK and VANGL2 proteins form a complex, whereas RYK also activated RhoA, a downstream effector of PCP signaling. Overall, our data suggest an important role for Ryk in Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling during vertebrate development via the Vangl2 signaling pathway, as demonstrated in the mouse cochlea.

  9. Role Of S-Nitrosylation In The Extrinsic Apoptotic Signalling Pathway In Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Plenchette

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the key features of tumour cells is the acquisition of resistance to apoptosis. Thus, determining therapeutic strategies that circumvent apoptotic resistance and result in tumor regression is a challenge. One strategy to induce apoptosis is to activate death receptor signalling pathways. Members of the Tumor Necrosis Factor TNF-family death receptors ligand (TRAIL, FasL and TNF-α can originate from immune and non-immune cells. Death receptors, engaged by cognate ligands, can initiate multiple signaling pathways, which can generate diverse outcomes, including non-apoptosis-related signal. Knowledge on the molecular mechanisms (that determine death or survival of tumour cells following exposure to the TNF-family death receptors ligands have demonstrated that post-translational modifications of the signaling pathway components play a critical role in determining cell fate. Cell death can be sensed by nitric oxide (NO in a wide variety of tumour cells. S-nitrosylation, the covalent modification of a protein cysteine thiol by an NO moiety, has emerged as an important post-translational regulation for the TNF-family death receptor signaling pathways. It has been demonstrated that death receptor DR4 (TRAIL-R1 becomes S-nitrosylated and promotes apoptosis following a specific NO donor treatment (Tang et al., 2006. Then, our group has shown that S-nitrosylation of Fas, following glyceryl trinitrate (GTN exposure, promotes redistribution of the receptor to lipid rafts, formation of the death-inducing signal complex (DISC, and induction of cell death. Finally, I will discuss our recent efforts to decipher regulatory mechanism of the TNF-α/TNFR1 signalling cell death pathway by S-nitrosylation following GTN treatment.

  10. ChIP-exo signal associated with DNA-binding motifs provides insight into the genomic binding of the glucocorticoid receptor and cooperating transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starick, Stephan R; Ibn-Salem, Jonas; Jurk, Marcel; Hernandez, Céline; Love, Michael I; Chung, Ho-Ryun; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H

    2015-06-01

    The classical DNA recognition sequence of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) appears to be present at only a fraction of bound genomic regions. To identify sequences responsible for recruitment of this transcription factor (TF) to individual loci, we turned to the high-resolution ChIP-exo approach. We exploited this signal by determining footprint profiles of TF binding at single-base-pair resolution using ExoProfiler, a computational pipeline based on DNA binding motifs. When applied to our GR and the few available public ChIP-exo data sets, we find that ChIP-exo footprints are protein- and recognition sequence-specific signatures of genomic TF association. Furthermore, we show that ChIP-exo captures information about TFs other than the one directly targeted by the antibody in the ChIP procedure. Consequently, the shape of the ChIP-exo footprint can be used to discriminate between direct and indirect (tethering to other DNA-bound proteins) DNA association of GR. Together, our findings indicate that the absence of classical recognition sequences can be explained by direct GR binding to a broader spectrum of sequences than previously known, either as a homodimer or as a heterodimer binding together with a member of the ETS or TEAD families of TFs, or alternatively by indirect recruitment via FOX or STAT proteins. ChIP-exo footprints also bring structural insights and locate DNA:protein cross-link points that are compatible with crystal structures of the studied TFs. Overall, our generically applicable footprint-based approach uncovers new structural and functional insights into the diverse ways of genomic cooperation and association of TFs. © 2015 Starick et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. An unexplored role for Peroxiredoxin in exercise-induced redox signalling?

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    Alex J. Wadley

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxin (PRDX is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase protein with a conserved ionised thiol that permits catalysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 up to a million times faster than any thiol-containing signalling protein. The increased production of H2O2 within active tissues during exercise is thought to oxidise conserved cysteine thiols, which may in turn facilitate a wide variety of physiological adaptations. The precise mechanisms linking H2O2 with the oxidation of signalling thiol proteins (phosphates, kinases and transcription factors are unclear due to these proteins' low reactivity with H2O2 relative to abundant thiol peroxidases such as PRDX. Recent work has shown that following exposure to H2O2 in vitro, the sulfenic acid of the PRDX cysteine can form mixed disulphides with transcription factors associated with cell survival. This implicates PRDX as an ‘active’ redox relay in transmitting the oxidising equivalent of H2O2 to downstream proteins. Furthermore, under oxidative stress, PRDX can form stable oxidised dimers that can be secreted into the extracellular space, potentially acting as an extracellular ‘stress’ signal. There is extensive literature assessing non-specific markers of oxidative stress in response to exercise, however the PRDX catalytic cycle may offer a more robust approach for measuring changes in redox balance following exercise. This review discusses studies assessing PRDX-mediated cellular signalling and integrates the recent advances in redox biology with investigations that have examined the role of PRDX during exercise in humans and animals. Future studies should explore the role of PRDX as a key regulator of peroxide mediated-signal transduction during exercise in humans.

  12. Genetic analysis of the two zebrafish patched homologues identifies novel roles for the hedgehog signaling pathway

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    Groot Evelyn

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway in different organisms has shown the importance of this family of morphogens during development. Genetic screens in zebrafish have assigned specific roles for Hh in proliferation, differentiation and patterning, but mainly as a result of a loss of its activity. We attempted to fully activate the Hh pathway by removing both receptors for the Hh proteins, called Patched1 and 2, which are functioning as negative regulators in this pathway. Results Here we describe a splice-donor mutation in Ptc1, called ptc1hu1602, which in a homozygous state results in a subtle eye and somite phenotype. Since we recently positionally cloned a ptc2 mutant, a ptc1;ptc2 double mutant was generated, showing severely increased levels of ptc1, gli1 and nkx2.2a, confirming an aberrant activation of Hh signaling. As a consequence, a number of phenotypes were observed that have not been reported previously using Shh mRNA overexpression. Somites of ptc1;ptc2 double mutants do not express anteroposterior polarity markers, however initial segmentation of the somites itself is not affected. This is the first evidence that segmentation and anterior/posterior (A/P patterning of the somites are genetically uncoupled processes. Furthermore, a novel negative function of Hh signaling is observed in the induction of the fin field, acting well before any of the previously reported function of Shh in fin formation and in a way that is different from the proposed early role of Gli3 in limb/fin bud patterning. Conclusion The generation and characterization of the ptc1;ptc2 double mutant assigned novel and unexpected functions to the Hh signaling pathway. Additionally, these mutants will provide a useful system to further investigate the consequences of constitutively activated Hh signaling during vertebrate development.

  13. Mechanisms for similarity based cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traulsen, A.

    2008-06-01

    Cooperation based on similarity has been discussed since Richard Dawkins introduced the term “green beard” effect. In these models, individuals cooperate based on an aribtrary signal (or tag) such as the famous green beard. Here, two different models for such tag based cooperation are analysed. As neutral drift is important in both models, a finite population framework is applied. The first model, which we term “cooperative tags” considers a situation in which groups of cooperators are formed by some joint signal. Defectors adopting the signal and exploiting the group can lead to a breakdown of cooperation. In this case, conditions are derived under which the average abundance of the more cooperative strategy exceeds 50%. The second model considers a situation in which individuals start defecting towards others that are not similar to them. This situation is termed “defective tags”. It is shown that in this case, individuals using tags to cooperate exclusively with their own kind dominate over unconditional cooperators.

  14. Illuminating the role of cholinergic signaling in circuits of attention and emotionally salient behaviors

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    Antonio eLuchicchi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh signaling underlies specific aspects of cognitive functions and behaviors, including attention, learning, memory and motivation. Alterations in ACh signaling are involved in the pathophysiology of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders. In the central nervous system, ACh transmission is mainly guaranteed by dense innervation of select cortical and subcortical regions from disperse groups of cholinergic neurons within the basal forebrain (e.g. diagonal band, medial septal, nucleus basalis and the pontine-mesencephalic nuclei, respectively. Despite the fundamental role of cholinergic signaling in the CNS and the long standing knowledge of the organization of cholinergic circuitry, remarkably little is known about precisely how ACh release modulates cortical and subcortical neural activity and the behaviors these circuits subserve. Growing interest in cholinergic signaling in the CNS focuses on the mechanism(s of action by which endogenously released ACh regulates cognitive functions, acting as a neuromodulator and /or as a direct transmitter via nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. The development of optogenetic techniques has provided a valuable toolbox with which we can address these questions, as it allows the selective manipulation of the excitability of cholinergic inputs to the diverse array of cholinergic target fields within cortical and subcortical domains. Here, we review recent papers that use the light-sensitive opsins in the cholinergic system to elucidate the role of ACh in circuits related to attention and emotionally salient behaviors. In particular, we highlight recent optogenetic studies which have tried to disentangle the precise role of ACh in the modulation of cortical-, hippocampal- and striatal-dependent functions.

  15. Multiple roles for mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in both glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Matthew C; Chen, Hongmei; Swann, John W

    2012-08-15

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in neurons integrates a variety of extracellular signals to produce appropriate translational responses. mTOR signaling is hyperactive in neurological syndromes in both humans and mouse models that are characterized by epilepsy, autism, and cognitive disturbances. In addition, rapamycin, a clinically important immunosuppressant, is a specific and potent inhibitor of mTOR signaling. While mTOR is known to regulate growth and synaptic plasticity of glutamatergic neurons, its effects on basic parameters of synaptic transmission are less well studied, and its role in regulating GABAergic transmission is unexplored. We therefore performed an electrophysiological and morphological comparison of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in which mTOR signaling was either increased by loss of the repressor Pten or decreased by treatment with rapamycin. We found that hyperactive mTOR signaling increased evoked synaptic responses in both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons by ∼50%, due to an increase in the number of synaptic vesicles available for release, the number of synapses formed, and the miniature event size. Prolonged (72 h) rapamycin treatment prevented these abnormalities and also decreased synaptic transmission in wild-type glutamatergic, but not GABAergic, neurons. Further analyses suggested that hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway also impairs presynaptic function, possibly by interfering with vesicle fusion. Despite this presynaptic impairment, the net effect of Pten loss is enhanced synaptic transmission in both GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, which has numerous implications, depending on where in the brain mutations of an mTOR suppressor gene occur.

  16. The role of actin in capacitation-related signaling: an in silico and in vitro study

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    Lucidi Pia

    2011-03-01

    with the in vitro experiments, which strengthen the idea that the actin cytoskeleton is not only a mechanical support for the cell, but that it exerts a key role in signaling during the sperm capacitation.

  17. The Role of MAPK Modules and ABA during Abiotic Stress Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Zélicourt, Axel de

    2016-05-01

    To respond to abiotic stresses, plants have developed specific mechanisms that allow them to rapidly perceive and respond to environmental changes. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) was shown to be a pivotal regulator of abiotic stress responses in plants, triggering major changes in plant physiology. The ABA core signaling pathway largely relies on the activation of SnRK2 kinases to mediate several rapid responses, including gene regulation, stomatal closure, and plant growth modulation. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have also been implicated in ABA signaling, but an entire ABA-activated MAPK module was uncovered only recently. In this review, we discuss the evidence for a role of MAPK modules in the context of different plant ABA signaling pathways. Abiotic stresses impact average yield in agriculture by more than 50% globally.Since ABA is a key regulator of abiotic stress responses, an understanding of its functioning at the molecular level is essential for plant breeding. Although the ABA core signaling pathway has been unraveled, several downstream events are still unclear.MAPKs are involved in most plant developmental stages and in response to stresses. Several members of the MAPK family were shown to be directly or indirectly activated by the ABA core signaling pathway.Recent evidence shows that the complete MAP3K17/18-MKK3-MPK1/2/7/14 module is under the control of ABA, whose members are under the transcriptional and post-translational control of the ABA core signaling pathway. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Roles of Pofut1 and O-fucose in mammalian Notch signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Mark; Uemura, Kazuhide; Ge, Changhui; Shi, Shaolin; Tashima, Yuko; Stanley, Pamela

    2008-05-16

    Mammalian Notch receptors contain 29-36 epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats that may be modified by protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (Pofut1), an essential component of the canonical Notch signaling pathway. The Drosophila orthologue Ofut1 is proposed to function as both a chaperone required for stable cell surface expression of Notch and a protein O-fucosyltransferase. Here we investigate these dual roles of Pofut1 in relation to endogenous Notch receptors of Chinese hamster ovary and murine embryonic stem (ES) cells. We show that fucosylation-deficient Lec13 Chinese hamster ovary cells have wild type levels of Pofut1 and cell surface Notch receptors. Nevertheless, they have reduced binding of Notch ligands and low levels of Delta1- and Jagged1-induced Notch signaling. Exogenous fucose but not galactose rescues both ligand binding and Notch signaling. Murine ES cells lacking Pofut1 also have wild type levels of cell surface Notch receptors. However, Pofut1-/- ES cells do not bind Notch ligands or exhibit Notch signaling. Although overexpression of fucosyltransferase-defective Pofut1 R245A in Pofut1-/- cells partially rescues ligand binding and Notch signaling, this effect is not specific. The same rescue is achieved by an unrelated, inactive, endoplasmic reticulum glucosidase. Therefore, mammalian Notch receptors require Pofut1 for the generation of optimally functional Notch receptors, but, in contrast to Drosophila, Pofut1 is not required for stable cell surface expression of Notch. Importantly, we also show that, under certain circumstances, mammalian Notch receptors are capable of signaling in the absence of Pofut1 and O-fucose.

  19. Ubiquitin-Related Roles of β-Arrestins in Endocytic Trafficking and Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Charles, Pierre-Yves; Rajiv, Vishwaesh; Shenoy, Sudha K

    2016-10-01

    The non-visual arrestins, β-arrestin1, and β-arrestin2 were originally identified as proteins that bind to seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs, also called G protein-coupled receptors, GPCRs) and block heterotrimeric G protein activation, thus leading to desensitization of transmembrane signaling. However, as subsequent discoveries have continually demonstrated, their functionality is not constrained to desensitization. They are now recognized for their critical roles in mediating intracellular trafficking of 7TMRs, growth factor receptors, ion transporters, ion channels, nuclear receptors, and non-receptor proteins. Additionally, they function as crucial mediators of ubiquitination of 7TMRs as well as other receptors and non-receptor proteins. Recently, emerging studies suggest that a class of proteins with predicted structural features of β-arrestins regulate substrate ubiquitination in yeast and higher mammals, lending support to the idea that the adaptor role of β-arrestins in protein ubiquitination is evolutionarily conserved. β-arrestins also function as scaffolds for kinases and transduce signals from 7TMRs through pathways that do not require G protein activation. Remarkably, the endocytic and scaffolding functions of β-arrestin are intertwined with its ubiquitination status; the dynamic and site specific ubiquitination on β-arrestin plays a critical role in stabilizing β-arrestin-7TMR association and the formation of signalosomes. This review summarizes the current findings on ubiquitin-dependent regulation of 7TMRs as well as β-arrestins and the potential role of reversible ubiquitination as a "biological switch" in signal transduction. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2071-2080, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Role of Calcium Signaling in the Transcriptional Regulation of the Apicoplast Genome of Plasmodium falciparum

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    Sabna Cheemadan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is a universal second messenger that plays an important role in regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. To understand calcium-dependent signaling in malaria parasites, we analyzed transcriptional responses of Plasmodium falciparum to two calcium ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin that cause redistribution of intracellular calcium within the cytoplasm. While ionomycin induced a specific transcriptional response defined by up- or downregulation of a narrow set of genes, A23187 caused a developmental arrest in the schizont stage. In addition, we observed a dramatic decrease of mRNA levels of the transcripts encoded by the apicoplast genome during the exposure of P. falciparum to both calcium ionophores. Neither of the ionophores caused any disruptions to the DNA replication or the overall apicoplast morphology. This suggests that the mRNA downregulation reflects direct inhibition of the apicoplast gene transcription. Next, we identify a nuclear encoded protein with a calcium binding domain (EF-hand that is localized to the apicoplast. Overexpression of this protein (termed PfACBP1 in P. falciparum cells mediates an increased resistance to the ionophores which suggests its role in calcium-dependent signaling within the apicoplast. Our data indicate that the P. falciparum apicoplast requires calcium-dependent signaling that involves a novel protein PfACBP1.

  1. Selecting danger signals: dissociable roles of nucleus accumbens shell and core glutamate in predictive fear learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Susan S Y; McNally, Gavan P

    2015-06-01

    Conditioned stimuli (CSs) vary in their reliability as predictors of danger. Animals must therefore select among CSs those that are appropriate to enter into an association with the aversive unconditioned stimulus (US). The actions of prediction error instruct this stimulus selection so that when prediction error is large, attention to the CS is maintained and learning occurs but when prediction is small attention to the CS is withdrawn and learning is prevented. Here we studied the role of glutamate acting at rat nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) and core (AcbC) α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors in this selection of danger signals. Using associative blocking and unblocking designs in rats, we show that antagonizing AcbSh AMPA receptors via infusions of 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulphamoyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX; 0.5 μg) prevents the unblocking of fear learning, whereas antagonizing AcbC AMPA receptors via infusions of NBQX (0.5 μg) prevents both the blocking and unblocking of fear learning. These results identify dissociable but complementary roles for AcbSh and AcbC glutamate acting at AMPA receptors in selecting danger signals: AcbSh AMPA receptors upregulate attention and learning to CSs that signal surprising USs, whereas AcbC AMPA receptors encode the predicted outcome of each trial.

  2. Leptin signaling plays a critical role in the geniposide-induced decrease of tau phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianhui; Liu, Zixuan; Zhang, Yonglan; Yin, Fei

    2015-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that geniposide attenuates the production of Aβ1-42 both in vitro and in vivo via enhancing leptin receptor signaling. But the role played by geniposide in the phosphorylation of tau and its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of geniposide on the phosphorylation of tau and the role of leptin signaling in this process. Our data suggested that, accompanied by the up-regulation of leptin receptor expression, geniposide significantly decreased the phosphorylation of tau in rat primary cultured cortical neurons and in APP/PS1 transgenic mice, and this geniposide-induced decrease of tau phosphorylation could be prevented by leptin antagonist (LA). Furthermore, LA also prevented the phosphorylation of Akt at Ser-473 site and GSK-3β at Ser-9 site induced by geniposide. All these results indicate that geniposide may regulate tau phosphorylation through leptin signaling, and geniposide may be a promising therapeutic compound for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease in the future.

  3. Signaling roles of ceramide and its metabolites in cutaneous antimicrobial defense

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    Yoshikazu Uchida

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The skin epidermis is a multipurpose barrier (i.e., against epidermal permeability disruption and oxidative/UV irradiation as well as a mechanical barrier and antimicrobial barrier, to protect cells/tissues from external perturbants. When there is a normal barrier, function is restored and/or enhanced in the epidermis in response to external perturbations. Ceramide (Cer is a well-known, key lipid constituent of the epidermal permeability barrier in the extracellular domain of the stratum corneum. Cer and its metabolites also serve as signaling lipids to regulate cellular function (e.g., proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Recent studies from our laboratory demonstrate that the Cer metabolites, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P and ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P, generate signaling transcriptionally to stimulate cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP, and human beta-defensin (hBD 2 and hBD3 production, respectively, in cells, including in epidermal keratinocytes. S1P and C1P production are increased by external perturbation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. These studies illuminate a mechanism through which external perturbations signal to stimulate antimicrobial peptides without evidence of microbial infections. In this work, we describe the signaling roles of Cer, S1P, and C1P in cells.

  4. Multiple roles for membrane-associated protein trafficking and signaling in gravitropism

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    Allison Karen Strohm

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Gravitropism is a process that allows plant organs to guide their growth relative to the gravity vector. It requires plant organs to sense changes in their orientation relative to the gravity vector and then generate a biochemical signal that they transmit to a responding zone where a curvature response will ensue, realigning the organs’ growth relative to gravity. Trafficking between the plasma membrane and endosomal compartments is important for all of these phases of the gravitropic response. The sedimentation of starch-filled organelles called amyloplasts plays a key role in sensing reorientation, and vacuolar integrity is required for amyloplast sedimentation in shoots. Other proteins associated with the vesicle trafficking pathway contribute to early gravity signal transduction independently of amyloplast sedimentation in both roots and hypocotyls. Phosphatidylinositol signaling, which starts at the plasma membrane and later affects the localization of auxin efflux facilitators, is a likely second messenger in the signal transduction phase of gravitropism. Finally, membrane-localized auxin influx and efflux facilitators contribute to a differential auxin gradient across the gravistimulated organs, which directs root curvature.

  5. The Role of nAChR and Calcium Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer Initiation and Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaal, Courtney [Department of Tumor Biology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Padmanabhan, Jaya [Department of Molecular Medicine and USF Health Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute, University of South Florida, 4001 E. Fletcher Ave., Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Chellappan, Srikumar, E-mail: Srikumar.Chellappan@moffitt.org [Department of Tumor Biology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Pancreatic cancer shows a strong correlation with smoking and the current therapeutic strategies have been relatively ineffective in improving the survival of patients. Efforts have been made over the past many years to understand the molecular events that drive the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, especially in the context of smoking. It has become clear that components of tobacco smoke not only initiate these cancers, especially pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) through their mutagenic properties, but can also promote the growth and metastasis of these tumors by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Studies in cell culture systems, animal models and human samples have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activation enhances these tumor-promoting events by channeling signaling through multiple pathways. In this context, signaling through calcium channels appear to facilitate pancreatic cancer growth by itself or downstream of nAChRs. This review article highlights the role of nAChR downstream signaling events and calcium signaling in the growth, metastasis as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Intrinsic Disorder in Transmembrane Proteins: Roles in Signaling and Topology Prediction.

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    Jérôme Bürgi

    Full Text Available Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs are peculiar stretches of amino acids that lack stable conformations in solution. Intrinsic Disorder containing Proteins (IDP are defined by the presence of at least one large IDR and have been linked to multiple cellular processes including cell signaling, DNA binding and cancer. Here we used computational analyses and publicly available databases to deepen insight into the prevalence and function of IDRs specifically in transmembrane proteins, which are somewhat neglected in most studies. We found that 50% of transmembrane proteins have at least one IDR of 30 amino acids or more. Interestingly, these domains preferentially localize to the cytoplasmic side especially of multi-pass transmembrane proteins, suggesting that disorder prediction could increase the confidence of topology prediction algorithms. This was supported by the successful prediction of the topology of the uncharacterized multi-pass transmembrane protein TMEM117, as confirmed experimentally. Pathway analysis indicated that IDPs are enriched in cell projection and axons and appear to play an important role in cell adhesion, signaling and ion binding. In addition, we found that IDP are enriched in phosphorylation sites, a crucial post translational modification in signal transduction, when compared to fully ordered proteins and to be implicated in more protein-protein interaction events. Accordingly, IDPs were highly enriched in short protein binding regions called Molecular Recognition Features (MoRFs. Altogether our analyses strongly support the notion that the transmembrane IDPs act as hubs in cellular signal events.

  7. Role of Carnitine Acetyl Transferase in Regulation of Nitric Oxide Signaling in Pulmonary Arterial Endothelial Cells

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    Stephen M. Black

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart defects with increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF result in pulmonary endothelial dysfunction that is dependent, at least in part, on decreases in nitric oxide (NO signaling. Utilizing a lamb model with left-to-right shunting of blood and increased PBF that mimics the human disease, we have recently shown that a disruption in carnitine homeostasis, due to a decreased carnitine acetyl transferase (CrAT activity, correlates with decreased bioavailable NO. Thus, we undertook this study to test the hypothesis that the CrAT enzyme plays a major role in regulating NO signaling through its effect on mitochondrial function. We utilized the siRNA gene knockdown approach to mimic the effect of decreased CrAT activity in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC. Our data indicate that silencing the CrAT gene disrupted cellular carnitine homeostasis, reduced the expression of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase-and resulted in an increase in oxidative stress within the mitochondrion. CrAT gene silencing also disrupted mitochondrial bioenergetics resulting in reduced ATP generation and decreased NO signaling secondary to a reduction in eNOS/Hsp90 interactions. Thus, this study links the disruption of carnitine homeostasis to the loss of NO signaling observed in children with CHD. Preserving carnitine homeostasis may have important clinical implications that warrant further investigation.

  8. A role for Raptor phosphorylation in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, John W; Jacobs, Brittany L; Goodman, Craig A; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-02-01

    The activation of mTOR signaling is necessary for mechanically-induced changes in skeletal muscle mass, but the mechanisms that regulate the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling remain poorly defined. In this study, we set out to determine if changes in the phosphorylation of Raptor contribute to the mechanical activation of mTOR. To accomplish this goal, mouse skeletal muscles were subjected to mechanical stimulation via a bout of eccentric contractions (EC). Using mass spectrometry and Western blot analysis, we found that ECs induced an increase in Raptor S696, T706, and S863 phosphorylation, and this effect was not inhibited by rapamycin. This observation suggested that changes in Raptor phosphorylation might be an upstream event in the pathway through which mechanical stimuli activate mTOR. To test this, we employed a phospho-defective mutant of Raptor (S696A/T706A/S863A) and found that the EC-induced activation of mTOR signaling was significantly blunted in muscles expressing this mutant. Furthermore, mutation of the three phosphorylation sites altered the interactions of Raptor with PRAS40 and p70(S6k), and it also prevented the EC-induced dissociation of Raptor from p70(S6k). Combined, these results suggest that changes in the phosphorylation of Raptor play an important role in the pathway through which mechanical stimuli activate mTOR signaling.

  9. Stage-specific roles of FGF2 signaling in human neural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabiec, Marta; Hříbková, Hana; Vařecha, Miroslav; Střítecká, Dana; Hampl, Aleš; Dvořák, Petr; Sun, Yuh-Man

    2016-09-01

    This study elucidated the stage-specific roles of FGF2 signaling during neural development using in-vitro human embryonic stem cell-based developmental modeling. We found that the dysregulation of FGF2 signaling prior to the onset of neural induction resulted in the malformation of neural rosettes (a neural tube-like structure), despite cells having undergone neural induction. The aberrant neural rosette formation may be attributed to the misplacement of ZO-1, which is a polarized tight junction protein and shown co-localized with FGF2/FGFR1 in the apical region of neural rosettes, subsequently led to abnormal neurogenesis. Moreover, the FGF2 signaling inhibition at the stage of neural rosettes caused a reduction in cell proliferation, an increase in numbers of cells with cell-cycle exit, and premature neurogenesis. These effects may be mediated by NUMB, to which expression was observed enriched in the apical region of neural rosettes after FGF2 signaling inhibition coinciding with the disappearance of PAX6(+)/Ki67(+) neural stem cells and the emergence of MAP2(+) neurons. Moreover, our results suggested that the hESC-based developmental system reserved a similar neural stem cell niche in vivo.

  10. Immunopathological Roles of Cytokines, Chemokines, Signaling Molecules, and Pattern-Recognition Receptors in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Shui-Lian Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease with unknown etiology affecting more than one million individuals each year. It is characterized by B- and T-cell hyperactivity and by defects in the clearance of apoptotic cells and immune complexes. Understanding the complex process involved and the interaction between various cytokines, chemokines, signaling molecules, and pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs in the immune pathways will provide valuable information on the development of novel therapeutic targets for treating SLE. In this paper, we review the immunopathological roles of novel cytokines, chemokines, signaling molecules, PRRs, and their interactions in immunoregulatory networks and suggest how their disturbances may implicate pathological conditions in SLE.

  11. Role of functionality in two-component signal transduction: A stochastic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Alok Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Arnab; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Banik, Suman K.

    2014-03-01

    We present a stochastic formalism for signal transduction processes in a bacterial two-component system. Using elementary mass action kinetics, the proposed model takes care of signal transduction in terms of a phosphotransfer mechanism between the cognate partners of a two-component system, viz., the sensor kinase and the response regulator. Based on the difference in functionality of the sensor kinase, the noisy phosphotransfer mechanism has been studied for monofunctional and bifunctional two-component systems using the formalism of the linear noise approximation. Steady-state analysis of both models quantifies different physically realizable quantities, e.g., the variance, the Fano factor (variance/mean), and mutual information. The resultant data reveal that both systems reliably transfer information of extracellular environment under low external stimulus and in a high-kinase-and-phosphatase regime. We extend our analysis further by studying the role of the two-component system in downstream gene regulation.

  12. Role of ATP as a Key Signaling Molecule Mediating Radiation-Induced Biological Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Shuji; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signaling molecule for adaptive responses to a variety of cytotoxic agents and plays an important role in mediating the radiation stress-induced responses that serve to mitigate or repair the injurious effects of γ radiation on the body. Indeed, low doses of radiation may have a net beneficial effect by activating a variety of protective mechanisms, including antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, ATP signaling may be involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells. Here, focusing on our previous work, we review the evidence that low-dose γ irradiation (0.25-0.5 Gy) induces release of extracellular ATP, and that the released ATP mediates multiple radiation-induced responses, including increased intracellular antioxidant synthesis, cell-mediated immune responses, induction of DNA damage repair systems, and differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  13. Role of ATP as a Key Signaling Molecule Mediating Radiation-Induced Biological Effects

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    Shuji Kojima

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP serves as a signaling molecule for adaptive responses to a variety of cytotoxic agents and plays an important role in mediating the radiation stress-induced responses that serve to mitigate or repair the injurious effects of γ radiation on the body. Indeed, low doses of radiation may have a net beneficial effect by activating a variety of protective mechanisms, including antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, ATP signaling may be involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells. Here, focusing on our previous work, we review the evidence that low-dose γ irradiation (0.25-0.5 Gy induces release of extracellular ATP, and that the released ATP mediates multiple radiation-induced responses, including increased intracellular antioxidant synthesis, cell-mediated immune responses, induction of DNA damage repair systems, and differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  14. Role of ATP as a Key Signaling Molecule Mediating Radiation-Induced Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signaling molecule for adaptive responses to a variety of cytotoxic agents and plays an important role in mediating the radiation stress-induced responses that serve to mitigate or repair the injurious effects of γ radiation on the body. Indeed, low doses of radiation may have a net beneficial effect by activating a variety of protective mechanisms, including antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, ATP signaling may be involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells. Here, focusing on our previous work, we review the evidence that low-dose γ irradiation (0.25-0.5 Gy) induces release of extracellular ATP, and that the released ATP mediates multiple radiation-induced responses, including increased intracellular antioxidant synthesis, cell-mediated immune responses, induction of DNA damage repair systems, and differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  15. The neuroprotective role of acupuncture and activation of the BDNF signaling pathway.

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    Lin, Dong; De La Pena, Ike; Lin, Lili; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Borlongan, Cesar V; Cao, Chuanhai

    2014-02-21

    Recent studies have been conducted to examine the neuroprotective effects of acupuncture in many neurological disorders. Although the neuroprotective effects of acupuncture has been linked to changes in signaling pathways, accumulating evidence suggest the participation of endogenous biological mediators, such as the neurotrophin (NT) family of proteins, specifically, the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Accordingly, acupuncture can inhibit neurodegeneration via expression and activation of BDNF. Moreover, recent studies have reported that acupuncture can increase ATP levels at local stimulated points. We have also demonstrated that acupuncture could activate monocytes and increase the expression of BDNF via the stimulation of ATP. The purpose of this article is to review the recent findings and ongoing studies on the neuroprotective roles of acupuncture and therapeutic implications of acupuncture-induced activation of BDNF and its signaling pathway.

  16. The Neuroprotective Role of Acupuncture and Activation of the BDNF Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Lin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have been conducted to examine the neuroprotective effects of acupuncture in many neurological disorders. Although the neuroprotective effects of acupuncture has been linked to changes in signaling pathways, accumulating evidence suggest the participation of endogenous biological mediators, such as the neurotrophin (NT family of proteins, specifically, the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Accordingly, acupuncture can inhibit neurodegeneration via expression and activation of BDNF. Moreover, recent studies have reported that acupuncture can increase ATP levels at local stimulated points. We have also demonstrated that acupuncture could activate monocytes and increase the expression of BDNF via the stimulation of ATP. The purpose of this article is to review the recent findings and ongoing studies on the neuroprotective roles of acupuncture and therapeutic implications of acupuncture-induced activation of BDNF and its signaling pathway.

  17. Recent insights into the role of hypothalamic AMPK signaling cascade upon metabolic control

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    Marc eClaret

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, two seminal papers focused on the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in the hypothalamus opened new avenues of research in the field of the central regulation of energy homeostasis. Over the following 8 years, hundreds of studies have firmly established hypothalamic AMPK as a key sensor and integrator of hormonal and nutritional signals with neurochemical and neurophysiological responses to regulate whole-body energy balance. In this review article we aim to discuss the most recent findings in this particular area of research, highlighting the function of hypothalamic AMPK in appetite, thermogenesis and peripheral glucose metabolism. The diversity of mechanisms by which hypothalamic AMPK regulates energy homeostasis illustrates the importance of this evolutionary-conserved energy signaling cascade in the control of this complex and fundamental biological process.

  18. A novel role for FOXA2 and SHH in organizing midbrain signaling centers.

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    Bayly, Roy D; Brown, Charmaine Y; Agarwala, Seema

    2012-09-01

    The floor plate (FP) is a midline signaling center, known to direct ventral cell fates and axon guidance in the neural tube. The recent identification of midbrain FP as a source of dopaminergic neurons has renewed interest in its specification and organization, which remain poorly understood. In this study, we have examined the chick midbrain and spinal FP and show that both can be partitioned into medial (MFP) and lateral (LFP) subdivisions. Although Hedgehog (HH) signaling is necessary and sufficient for LFP specification, it is not sufficient for MFP induction. By contrast, the transcription factor FOXA2 can execute the full midbrain and spinal cord FP program via HH-independent and dependent mechanisms. Interestingly, although HH-independent FOXA2 activity is necessary and sufficient for inducing MFP-specific gene expression (e.g., LMX1B, BMP7), it cannot confer ventral identity to midline cells without also turning on Sonic hedgehog (SHH). We also note that the signaling centers of the midbrain, the FP, roof plate (RP) and the midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) are physically contiguous, with each expressing LMX1B and BMP7. Possibly as a result, SHH or FOXA2 misexpression can transform the MHB into FP and also suppress RP induction. Conversely, HH or FOXA2 knockdown expands the endogenous RP and transforms the MFP into a RP and/or MHB fate. Finally, combined HH blockade and FOXA2 misexpression in ventral midbrain induces LMX1B expression, which triggers the specification of the RP, rather than the MFP. Thus we identify HH-independent and dependent roles for FOXA2 in specifying the FP. In addition, we elucidate for the first time, a novel role for SHH in determining whether a midbrain signaling center will become the FP, MHB or RP.

  19. The Role of the MAPK Signaling, Topoisomerase and Dietary Bioactives in Controlling Cancer Incidence

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    Khaled A. Selim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are common products of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xenobiotics metabolism and are generated in response to several environmental stress conditions. Some of them play important biochemical roles in cellular signal transduction and gene transcription. On the other hand, ROS are known to be involved in a wide range of human diseases, including cancer. The excessive production of such ROS together with disruption of homeostasis detoxifying mechanisms can mediate a series of cellular oxidative stresses. The oxidative stress of redundant free radicals production can lead to oxidative denaturation of cellular macromolecules including proteins, lipids and DNA. Moreover, oxidative damage is one of the major causes of DNA mutations, replication errors and genomic abnormalities which result in either inhibition or induction of transcription, and end with the disturbance of signal transduction pathways. Among affected signaling pathways are redox-sensitive kinases. The stimulation of these kinases induces several transcription factors through the phosphorylation of their module proteins. The activation of such pathways induces proliferation and cellular transformation. A diet rich in antioxidant compounds has potential health benefits, and there is a growing interest in the role of natural antioxidants in nutrition for prevention and cure of cancer diseases. A controversy has risen regarding the relation between antioxidants and the significant decrease in the risk of cancer incidence. In this review, we will focus on redox-sensitive kinases signaling pathways, highlighting the effects of dietary antioxidant on the prevention, incidence, prognosis or even treatment of human cancers. In addition, we will place emphasis on the chemical classes of pterocarpans as natural anti-oxidants/cancers as well as their underlying mechanisms of action, including their effects on MAPKs and topoisomerase activities.

  20. Leptin signaling in adipose tissue: role in lipid accumulation and weight gain.

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    Singh, Prachi; Peterson, Timothy E; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima H; Glenn, Jason A; Davison, Diane E; Romero-Corral, Abel; Pusalavidyasagar, Snigdha; Jensen, Michael D; Somers, Virend K

    2012-08-17

    The link between obesity, hyperleptinemia, and development of cardiovascular disease is not completely understood. Increases in leptin have been shown to impair leptin signaling via caveolin-1-dependent mechanisms. However, the role of hyperleptinemia versus impaired leptin signaling in adipose tissue is not known. To determine the presence and significance of leptin-dependent increases in adipose tissue caveolin-1 expression in humans. We designed a longitudinal study to investigate the effects of increases in leptin on adipose tissue caveolin-1 expression during weight gain in humans. Ten volunteers underwent 8 weeks of overfeeding, during which they gained an average weight of 4.1±1.4 kg, with leptin increases from 7±3.8 to 12±5.7 ng/mL. Weight gain also resulted in changes in adipose tissue caveolin-1 expression, which correlated with increases in leptin (rho=0.79, P=0.01). In cultured human white preadipocytes, leptin increased caveolin-1 expression, which in turn impaired leptin cellular signaling. Functionally, leptin decreased lipid accumulation in differentiating human white preadipocytes, which was prevented by caveolin-1 overexpression. Further, leptin decreased perilipin and fatty acid synthase expression, which play an important role in lipid storage and biogenesis. In healthy humans, increases in leptin, as seen with modest weight gain, may increase caveolin-1 expression in adipose tissue. Increased caveolin-1 expression in turn impairs leptin signaling and attenuates leptin-dependent lowering of intracellular lipid accumulation. Our study suggests a leptin-dependent feedback mechanism that may be essential to facilitate adipocyte lipid storage during weight gain.

  1. Zebrafish eda and edar mutants reveal conserved and ancestral roles of ectodysplasin signaling in vertebrates.

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    Matthew P Harris

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The genetic basis of the development and variation of adult form of vertebrates is not well understood. To address this problem, we performed a mutant screen to identify genes essential for the formation of adult skeletal structures of the zebrafish. Here, we describe the phenotypic and molecular characterization of a set of mutants showing loss of adult structures of the dermal skeleton, such as the rays of the fins and the scales, as well as the pharyngeal teeth. The mutations represent adult-viable, loss of function alleles in the ectodysplasin (eda and ectodysplasin receptor (edar genes. These genes are frequently mutated in the human hereditary disease hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED; OMIM 224900, 305100 that affects the development of integumentary appendages such as hair and teeth. We find mutations in zebrafish edar that affect similar residues as mutated in human cases of HED and show similar phenotypic consequences. eda and edar are not required for early zebrafish development, but are rather specific for the development of adult skeletal and dental structures. We find that the defects of the fins and scales are due to the role of Eda signaling in organizing epidermal cells into discrete signaling centers of the scale epidermal placode and fin fold. Our genetic analysis demonstrates dose-sensitive and organ-specific response to alteration in levels of Eda signaling. In addition, we show substantial buffering of the effect of loss of edar function in different genetic backgrounds, suggesting canalization of this developmental system. We uncover a previously unknown role of Eda signaling in teleosts and show conservation of the developmental mechanisms involved in the formation and variation of both integumentary appendages and limbs. Lastly, our findings point to the utility of adult genetic screens in the zebrafish in identifying essential developmental processes involved in human disease and in morphological evolution.

  2. Zebrafish eda and edar Mutants Reveal Conserved and Ancestral Roles of Ectodysplasin Signaling in Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Matthew P.; Rohner, Nicolas; Schwarz, Heinz; Perathoner, Simon; Konstantinidis, Peter; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    The genetic basis of the development and variation of adult form of vertebrates is not well understood. To address this problem, we performed a mutant screen to identify genes essential for the formation of adult skeletal structures of the zebrafish. Here, we describe the phenotypic and molecular characterization of a set of mutants showing loss of adult structures of the dermal skeleton, such as the rays of the fins and the scales, as well as the pharyngeal teeth. The mutations represent adult-viable, loss of function alleles in the ectodysplasin (eda) and ectodysplasin receptor (edar) genes. These genes are frequently mutated in the human hereditary disease hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED; OMIM 224900, 305100) that affects the development of integumentary appendages such as hair and teeth. We find mutations in zebrafish edar that affect similar residues as mutated in human cases of HED and show similar phenotypic consequences. eda and edar are not required for early zebrafish development, but are rather specific for the development of adult skeletal and dental structures. We find that the defects of the fins and scales are due to the role of Eda signaling in organizing epidermal cells into discrete signaling centers of the scale epidermal placode and fin fold. Our genetic analysis demonstrates dose-sensitive and organ-specific response to alteration in levels of Eda signaling. In addition, we show substantial buffering of the effect of loss of edar function in different genetic backgrounds, suggesting canalization of this developmental system. We uncover a previously unknown role of Eda signaling in teleosts and show conservation of the developmental mechanisms involved in the formation and variation of both integumentary appendages and limbs. Lastly, our findings point to the utility of adult genetic screens in the zebrafish in identifying essential developmental processes involved in human disease and in morphological evolution. PMID:18833299

  3. Medial nucleus tractus solitarius oxytocin receptor signaling and food intake control: the role of gastrointestinal satiation signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Zhi Yi; Alhadeff, Amber L; Grill, Harvey J

    2015-05-01

    Central oxytocin (OT) administration reduces food intake and its effects are mediated, in part, by hindbrain oxytocin receptor (OT-R) signaling. The neural substrate and mechanisms mediating the intake inhibitory effects of hindbrain OT-R signaling are undefined. We examined the hypothesis that hindbrain OT-R-mediated feeding inhibition results from an interaction between medial nucleus tractus solitarius (mNTS) OT-R signaling and the processing of gastrointestinal (GI) satiation signals by neurons of the mNTS. Here, we demonstrated that mNTS or fourth ventricle (4V) microinjections of OT in rats reduced chow intake in a dose-dependent manner. To examine whether the intake suppressive effects of mNTS OT-R signaling is mediated by GI signal processing, rats were injected with OT to the 4V (1 μg) or mNTS (0.3 μg), followed by self-ingestion of a nutrient preload, where either treatment was designed to be without effect on chow intake. Results showed that the combination of mNTS OT-R signaling and GI signaling processing by preload ingestion reduced chow intake significantly and to a greater extent than either stimulus alone. Using enzyme immunoassay, endogenous OT content in mNTS-enriched dorsal vagal complex (DVC) in response to ingestion of nutrient preload was measured. Results revealed that preload ingestion significantly elevated endogenous DVC OT content. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that mNTS neurons are a site of action for hindbrain OT-R signaling in food intake control and that the intake inhibitory effects of hindbrain mNTS OT-R signaling are mediated by interactions with GI satiation signal processing by mNTS neurons.

  4. Role of RhoA/Rho kinase signaling pathway in microgroove induced stem cell myogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaqiong; Wen, Feng; Wang, Xincai; Tan, Lay Poh

    2015-06-01

    In our previous report, the authors have demonstrated that direct laser machined microchannels would trigger upregulation of myogenic markers in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through promotion of cell elongation. However, the molecular basis signaling pathways behind this observation remains unclear. In this work, three types of microchannels generated by femtosecond laser were utilized to investigate possible mechanisms behind the induction of hMSCs myogenesis by microchannels. The authors hypothesized that small G-proteins RhoA and Rac1 play a vital role on myogenesis of hMSCs through regulating cytoskeleton rearrangement, via cell tension signaling cascades. The RhoA and Rac1 activities were evaluated for cells cultured on the micropatterned substrates, using a flat unpatterned substrate as control. It was found that significant activation of RhoA GTPase was exhibited for cells cultured on narrow microchannels (20-20-20 and 30-30-20), while no obvious differences were obtained on wide ones (80-30-20). Meanwhile, no significant difference was found for Rac1 activities on all tested groups. To further deduce the role of RhoA signaling pathway in microchannel directed stem cell myogenesis, the effectors of Rho, Rho kinase (ROCK) was chosen to explore how cell shape regulate myogenesis of hMSCs cultured on laser micropatterned substrate. A pharmacological ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632, was used to treat the cells and the effect on RhoA activation was investigated. Our data on the role of RhoA/ROCK in regulating cell myogenic differentiation on lasered microchannels substrates may provide a mechanistic insight on hMSCs fate directed by substrate topography.

  5. Further evidence supporting a role for gs signal transduction in severe malaria pathogenesis.

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    Sarah Auburn

    Full Text Available With the functional demonstration of a role in erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum parasites, implications in the aetiology of common conditions that prevail in individuals of African origin, and a wealth of pharmacological knowledge, the stimulatory G protein (Gs signal transduction pathway presents an exciting target for anti-malarial drug intervention. Having previously demonstrated a role for the G-alpha-s gene, GNAS, in severe malaria disease, we sought to identify other important components of the Gs pathway. Using meta-analysis across case-control and family trio (affected child and parental controls studies of severe malaria from The Gambia and Malawi, we sought evidence of association in six Gs pathway candidate genes: adenosine receptor 2A (ADORA2A and 2B (ADORA2B, beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 1 (ADRBK1, adenylyl cyclase 9 (ADCY9, G protein beta subunit 3 (GNB3, and regulator of G protein signalling 2 (RGS2. Our study amassed a total of 2278 cases and 2364 controls. Allele-based models of association were investigated in all genes, and genotype and haplotype-based models were investigated where significant allelic associations were identified. Although no significant associations were observed in the other genes, several were identified in ADORA2A. The most significant association was observed at the rs9624472 locus, where the G allele (approximately 20% frequency appeared to confer enhanced risk to severe malaria [OR = 1.22 (1.09-1.37; P = 0.001]. Further investigation of the ADORA2A gene region is required to validate the associations identified here, and to identify and functionally characterize the responsible causal variant(s. Our results provide further evidence supporting a role of the Gs signal transduction pathway in the regulation of severe malaria, and request further exploration of this pathway in future studies.

  6. Oncogenic role and therapeutic target of leptin signaling in breast cancer and cancer stem cells

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    Guo, Shanchun; Liu, Mingli; Wang, Guangdi; Torroella-Kouri, Marta; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R.

    2012-01-01

    Significant correlations between obesity and incidence of various cancers have been reported. Obesity, considered a mild inflammatory process, is characterized by a high level of secretion of several cytokines from adipose tissue. These molecules have disparate effects, which could be relevant to cancer development. Among the inflammatory molecules, leptin, mainly produced by adipose tissue and overexpressed with its receptor (Ob-R) in cancer cells is the most studied adipokine. Mutations of leptin or Ob-R genes associated with obesity or cancer are rarely found. However, leptin is an anti-apoptotic molecule in many cell types, and its central roles in obesity-related cancers are based on its pro-angiogenic, pro-inflammatory and mitogenic actions. Notably, these leptin actions are commonly reinforced through entangled crosstalk with multiple oncogenes, cytokines and growth factors. Leptin-induced signals comprise several pathways commonly triggered by many cytokines (i.e, canonical: JAK2/STAT; MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI-3K/AKT1 and, non-canonical signaling pathways: PKC, JNK and p38 MAP kinase). Each of these leptin-induced signals is essential to its biological effects on food intake, energy balance, adiposity, immune and endocrine systems, as well as oncogenesis. This review is mainly focused on the current knowledge of the oncogenic role of leptin in breast cancer. Additionally, leptin pro-angiogenic molecular mechanisms and its potential role in breast cancer stem cells will be reviewed. Strict biunivocal binding-affinity and activation of leptin/Ob-R complex makes it a unique molecular target for prevention and treatment of breast cancer, particularly in obesity contexts. PMID:22289780

  7. The role of PRAJA and ELF in TGF-beta signaling and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Lopa; Katuri, Varalakshmi; Evans, Stephen

    2005-07-01

    Emerging research has shown that the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) pathway plays a key role in the suppression of gastric carcinoma. Biological signals for TGF-beta are transduced through transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptors, which in turn signal to Smad proteins. Inactivation of the TGF-beta pathway often occurs in malignancies of the gastrointestinal system, including gastric cancer. Yet, only a fraction of sporadic gastric tumors exhibit inactivating mutations in early stages of cancer formation, suggesting that other mechanisms play a critical role in the inactivation of this pathway. Smad4, a tumor suppressor, is often mutated in human gastrointestinal cancers. The mechanism of Smad4 inactivation, however, remains uncertain and could be mediated through E3-mediated ubiquitination of Smad4/adaptor protein complexes. The regulation of the TGF-beta pathway through a PRAJA, a RING finger (RING-H2) protein, and ELF, a beta-Spectrin adaptor protein, both which were originally identified in endodermal stem/progenitor cells committed to foregut lineage, could play a pivotal role in gastric carcinogenesis. PRAJA, which functions as an E3 ligase, interacts with ELF in a TGF-beta-dependent manner in gastric cancer cell lines. PRAJA is increased five-fold in human gastric cancers, and inactivates ELF. This is particularly significant since ELF, a Smad4 adaptor protein, possesses potent anti-oncogenic activity and is frequently seen to be inactivated in carcinogenic gastric cells. Strikingly, PRAJA manifests substantial E3-dependent ubiquitination of ELF and Smad3, but not Smad4. The alteration of ELF and/or Smad4 expression and function in the TGF-beta signaling pathway may be induced by enhancement of ELF degradation, which is mediated by the high level expression of PRAJA in gastrointestinal cancers. These studies reveal a mechanism for gastric tumorigenesis whereby defects in adaptor proteins for Smads, such as ELF, can undergo degradation by

  8. Growth factor-activated stem cell circuits and stromal signals cooperatively accelerate non-integrated iPSC reprogramming of human myeloid progenitors.

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    Tea Soon Park

    Full Text Available Nonviral conversion of skin or blood cells into clinically useful human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC occurs in only rare fractions (~0.001%-0.5% of donor cells transfected with non-integrating reprogramming factors. Pluripotency induction of developmentally immature stem-progenitors is generally more efficient than differentiated somatic cell targets. However, the nature of augmented progenitor reprogramming remains obscure, and its potential has not been fully explored for improving the extremely slow pace of non-integrated reprogramming. Here, we report highly optimized four-factor reprogramming of lineage-committed cord blood (CB myeloid progenitors with bulk efficiencies of ~50% in purified episome-expressing cells. Lineage-committed CD33(+CD45(+CD34(- myeloid cells and not primitive hematopoietic stem-progenitors were the main targets of a rapid and nearly complete non-integrated reprogramming. The efficient conversion of mature myeloid populations into NANOG(+TRA-1-81(+ hiPSC was mediated by synergies between hematopoietic growth factor (GF, stromal activation signals, and episomal Yamanaka factor expression. Using a modular bioinformatics approach, we demonstrated that efficient myeloid reprogramming correlated not to increased proliferation or endogenous Core factor expressions, but to poised expression of GF-activated transcriptional circuits that commonly regulate plasticity in both hematopoietic progenitors and embryonic stem cells (ESC. Factor-driven conversion of myeloid progenitors to a high-fidelity pluripotent state was further accelerated by soluble and contact-dependent stromal signals that included an implied and unexpected role for Toll receptor-NFκB signaling. These data provide a paradigm for understanding the augmented reprogramming capacity of somatic progenitors, and reveal that efficient induced pluripotency in other cell types may also require extrinsic activation of a molecular framework that commonly

  9. Cooperation of tyrosine kinase receptor TrkB and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling enhances migration and dispersal of lung tumor cells.

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    Rudolf Götz

    Full Text Available TrkB mediates the effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in neuronal and nonnneuronal cells. Based on recent reports that TrkB can also be transactivated through epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR signaling and thus regulates migration of early neurons, we investigated the role of TrkB in migration of lung tumor cells. Early metastasis remains a major challenge in the clinical management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. TrkB receptor signaling is associated with metastasis and poor patient prognosis in NSCLC. Expression of this receptor in A549 cells and in another adenocarcinoma cell line, NCI-H441, promoted enhanced migratory capacity in wound healing assays in the presence of the TrkB ligand BDNF. Furthermore, TrkB expression in A549 cells potentiated the stimulatory effect of EGF in wound healing and in Boyden chamber migration experiments. Consistent with a potential loss of cell polarity upon TrkB expression, cell dispersal and de-clustering was induced in A549 cells independently of exogeneous BDNF. Morphological transformation involved extensive cytoskeletal changes, reduced E-cadherin expression and suppression of E-cadherin expression on the cell surface in TrkB expressing tumor cells. This function depended on MEK and Akt kinase activity but was independent of Src. These data indicate that TrkB expression in lung adenoma cells is an early step in tumor cell dissemination, and thus could represent a target for therapy development.

  10. An emerging role for Hippo-YAP signaling in cardiovascular development.

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    Zhou, Jiliang

    2014-07-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway was originally discovered in Drosophila and shown to be critical for organ size control and tumorigenesis. This pathway consists of a cascade of kinases and several adaptors that lead to the phosphorylation and inhibition, through nuclear exclusion, of the transcriptional cofactor Yorkie in Drosophila or YAP (yes associated protein) in mammals. Recent studies demonstrate that cardiac-specific deletion of the Hippo pathway kinase Mst (STE20-like protein kinases) co-activator WW45 (WW domain-containing adaptor 45), Mst1, Mst2, or Lats2 (large tumor suppressor homologue 2) in mice result in over-grown hearts with elevated cardiomyocyte proliferation. Consistent with these observations, over-expression of YAP in the mouse embryonic heart increases heart size and promotes cardiac regeneration and contractility after myocardial infarction by inducing cardiomyocyte proliferation, whereas deletion of YAP in the mouse heart impedes cardiomyocyte proliferation, causing myocardial hypoplasia and embryonic or premature lethality. YAP has also been shown to play an important role in the vascular system. Specific-deletion of YAP from vascular smooth muscle cells in mice results in aberrant development of large arteries with a hypoplastic arterial wall phenotype. Hippo-YAP signaling cross-talks with other signaling pathways such as IGF (insulin-like growth factor) and Wnt signaling to promote heart growth by increasing expression of cell cycle genes. The purpose of this review is to summarize these recent findings and discuss potential diagnostic or therapeutic strategies in cardiovascular system based on manipulating the Hippo-YAP signaling.

  11. NF-κB signaling dynamics play a key role in infection control in tuberculosis

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    Mohammad eFallahi-Sichani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The NF-κB signaling pathway is central to the body’s response to many pathogens. Mathematical models based on cell culture experiments have identified important molecular mechanisms controlling the dynamics of NF-κB signaling, but the dynamics of this pathway have never been studied in the context of an infection in a host. Here, we incorporate these dynamics into a virtual infection setting. We build a multi-scale model of the immune response to the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb to explore the impact of NF-κB dynamics occurring across molecular, cellular and tissue scales in the lung. NF-κB signaling is triggered via tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF binding to receptors on macrophages; TNF has been shown to play a key role in infection dynamics in humans and multiple animal systems. Using our multi-scale model, we predict the impact of TNF-induced NF-κB-mediated responses on the outcome of infection at the level of a granuloma, an aggregate of immune cells and bacteria that forms in response to infection and is key to containment of infection and clinical latency. We show how the stability of mRNA transcripts corresponding to NF-κB-mediated responses significantly controls bacterial load in a granuloma, inflammation level in tissue, and granuloma size. Because we incorporate intracellular signaling pathways explicitly, our analysis also elucidates NF-κB associated signaling molecules and processes that may be new targets for infection control.

  12. Role of signaling lymphocytic activation molecule in T helper cell responses

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    Jan E. de Vries

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM; CDw150 is a 70 kDa glycoprotein. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule is constitutively expressed on memory T cells, CD56+ T cells, a subset of T cell receptor γδ+ cells, immature thymocytes and, at low levels, on a proportion of peripheral blood B cells. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule is rapidly upregulated on all T and B cells after activation. Engagement of SLAM by F(ab’2 fragments of an anti-SLAM monoclonal antibody (mAb A12 enhances antigen-specific T cell proliferation. In addition, mAb A12 was directly mitogenic for T cell clones and activated T cells. T cell proliferation induced by mAb A12 is independent of interleukin (IL-2, IL-4, IL-12 and IL-15, but is cyclosporin A sensitive. Ligation of SLAM during antigen-specific T cell proliferation resulted in upregulation of interferon (IFN-γ production, even by allergen-specific T helper cell (Th 2 clones, whereas the levels of IL-4 and IL-5 production were only marginally affected. The mAb A12 was unable to induce IL-4 and IL-5 production by Th1 clones. Co-stimulation of skin-derived Der P1-specific Th2 cells from patients with atopic dermatitis via SLAM resulted in the generation of a population of IFN-γ-producing cells, thereby reverting their phenotype to a Th0 pattern. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule is a high-affinity self ligand mediating homophilic cell interaction. In addition, soluble SLAM enhances both T and B cell proliferation. Collectively, these data indicate that SLAM molecules act both as receptors and ligands that are not only involved in T cell expansion but also drive the expanding T cells during immune responses into the Th0/Th1 pathway. This suggests that signaling through SLAM plays a role in directing Th0/Th1 development.

  13. Role of the JNK signal transduction pathway in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Praveen K Roy; Farzana Rashid; Jack Bragg; Jamal A Ibdah

    2008-01-01

    The c-Jun NH2-terminal Kinase CJNK) pathway represents one sub-group of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP)kinases which plays an important role in various inflammatory diseases states, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Significant progress towards understanding the function of the JNK signaling pathway has been achieved during the past few years. Blockade of the JNK pathway with JNK inhibitors in animal models of IBD lead to resolution of intestinal inflammation.Current data suggest specific JNK inhibitors hold promise as novel therapies in IBD.

  14. Pre-Service Teachers’ Experiences during Off-Campus Observation: Basis for Improving the Roles of Teacher Education Institutions and Cooperating Schools

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    Maripaz C. Abas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Observing experienced teachers is an indispensable part of practicum studies in teacher education.  This paper examined the perceptions of pre-service teachers from five major fields of teacher education program on their experiences during off-campus observation in selected secondary schools. This used qualitative content analysis method in order to “subjectively interpret the content of text data through the systematic classification process of coding and identifying themes or patterns” (Hsieh & Shanon, 2005 p. 1278 . Data were taken from 136 pre-service teachers  through open-ended questions and two high school principals, 10 cooperating teachers, six student supervisors and 12 pre-service teachers through Focus Group Interview (FGI and Key Informant Interview (KII. Codes and emerging themes were derived using content analysis.  Results showed 18 themes for desirable experiences and 24 themes for undesirable experiences. Pre-service teachers’ experiences mostly focused on students’ attitudes and behaviors. Suggestions to improve off-campus observation from multi-level participants of the study concentrated on preparedness,  orientation programs, supervision and monitoring,  personal attributes and roles, values, attitudes and behaviors, deployment, post conferences,  supervisory plan, observation policies and guidelines,  required documents, seminars, time management, evaluation, coordination, and cultural diversity. To sustain the desirable experiences, both cooperating teachers and student supervisors believed that their roles were to serve as model, guide, leader, monitor, planner, and motivator. The varied experiences of pre-service teachers imply that Teacher Education Institutions (TEIs and cooperating schools should provide opportunities, develop competencies, take responsibilities and strengthen partnership to enhance off-campus observation.

  15. Evidence for a role of vertebrate Disp1 in long-range Shh signaling.

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    Etheridge, L Alton; Crawford, T Quinn; Zhang, Shile; Roelink, Henk

    2010-01-01

    Dispatched 1 (Disp1) encodes a twelve transmembrane domain protein that is required for long-range sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Inhibition of Disp1 function, both by RNAi or dominant-negative constructs, prevents secretion and results in the accumulation of Shh in source cells. Measuring the Shh response in neuralized embryoid bodies (EBs) derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells, with or without Disp1 function, demonstrates an additional role for Disp1 in cells transporting Shh. Co-cultures with Shh-expressing cells revealed a significant reduction in the range of the contact-dependent Shh response in Disp1(-/-) neuralized EBs. These observations support a dual role for Disp1, not only in the secretion of Shh from the source cells, but also in the subsequent transport of Shh through tissue.

  16. Orchestration of Morphogenesis in Filamentous Fungi: Conserved Roles for Ras Signaling Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortwendel, Jarrod R.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungi undergo complex developmental programs including conidial germination, polarized morphogenesis, and differentiation of sexual and asexual structures. For many fungi, the coordinated completion of development is required for pathogenicity, as specialized morphological structures must be produced by the invading fungus. Ras proteins are highly conserved GTPase signal transducers and function as major regulators of growth and development in eukaryotes. Filamentous fungi typically express two Ras homologues, comprising distinct groups of Ras1-like and Ras2-like proteins based on sequence homology. Recent evidence suggests shared roles for both Ras1 and Ras2 homologues, but also supports the existence of unique functions in the areas of stress response and virulence. This review focuses on the roles played by both Ras protein groups during growth, development, and pathogenicity of a diverse array of filamentous fungi. PMID:26257821

  17. The role of endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling in cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan

    2011-04-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is an orphan nuclear receptor with a primary function of mediating xenobiotic metabolism through transcriptional activation of Phase I and Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. Although no high-affinity physiological activators of AHR have been discovered, the endogenous signaling of the AHR pathway is believed to play an important role in the development and function of the cardiovascular system, based on the observations on ahr gene-deficient mice. The AHR knockout mice develop cardiac hypertrophy, abnormal vascular structure in multiple organs and altered blood pressure depending on their host environment. In this review, the endogenous role of AHR in cardiovascular physiology, including heart function, vascular development and blood pressure regulation has been summarized and discussed.

  18. The role of JAK-STAT signaling in adipose tissue function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Allison J; Stephens, Jacqueline M

    2014-03-01

    Adipocytes play important roles in lipid storage, energy homeostasis and whole body insulin sensitivity. The JAK-STAT (Janus Kinase-Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription) pathway mediates a variety of physiological processes including development, hematopoiesis, and inflammation. Although the JAK-STAT signaling pathway occurs in all cells, this pathway can mediate cell specific responses. Studies in the last two decades have identified hormones and cytokines that activate the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. These cytokines and hormones have profound effects on adipocytes. The content of this review will introduce the types of adipocytes and immune cells that make up adipose tissue, the impact of obesity on adipose cellular composition and function, and the general constituents of the JAK-STAT pathway and how its activators regulate adipose tissue development and physiology. A summary of the identification of STAT target genes in adipocytes reveals how these transcription factors impact various areas of adipocyte metabolism including insulin action, modulation of lipid stores, and glucose homeostasis. Lastly, we will evaluate exciting new data linking the JAK-STAT pathway and brown adipose tissue and consider the future outlook in this area of investigation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Photoactivation approaches reveal a role for Rab11 in FGFR4 recycling and signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugsten, Ellen M; Brech, Andreas; Liestøl, Knut; Norman, Jim C; Wesche, Jørgen

    2014-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) plays important roles during development and in the adult to maintain tissue homeostasis. Moreover, overexpression of FGFR4 or activating mutations in FGFR4 has been identified as tumour-promoting events in several forms of cancer. Endocytosis is important for regulation of signalling receptors and we have previously shown that FGFR4 is mainly localized to transferrin-positive structures after ligand-induced endocytosis. Here, using a cell line with a defined pericentriolar endocytic recycling compartment, we show that FGFR4 accumulates in this compartment after endocytosis. Furthermore, using classical recycling assays and a new, photoactivatable FGFR4-PA-GFP fusion protein combined with live-cell imaging, we demonstrate that recycling of FGFR4 is dependent on Rab11. Upon Rab11b depletion, FGFR4 is trapped in the pericentriolar recycling compartment and the total levels of FGFR4 in cells are increased. Moreover, fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1)-induced autophosphorylation of FGFR4 as well as phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)-γ is prolonged in cells depleted of Rab11. Interestingly, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and AKT pathways were not prolonged but rather reduced in Rab11-depleted cells, indicating that recycling of FGFR4 is important for the nature of its signalling output. Thus, Rab11-dependent recycling of FGFR4 maintains proper levels of FGFR4 in cells and regulates FGF1-induced FGFR4 signalling.

  20. The Signaling Role of CD40 Ligand in Platelet Biology and in Platelet Component Transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaker Aoui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The CD40 ligand (CD40L is a transmembrane molecule of crucial interest in cell signaling in innate and adaptive immunity. It is expressed by a variety of cells, but mainly by activated T-lymphocytes and platelets. CD40L may be cleaved into a soluble form (sCD40L that has a cytokine-like activity. Both forms bind to several receptors, including CD40. This interaction is necessary for the antigen specific immune response. Furthermore, CD40L and sCD40L are involved in inflammation and a panoply of immune related and vascular pathologies. Soluble CD40L is primarily produced by platelets after activation, degranulation and cleavage, which may present a problem for transfusion. Soluble CD40L is involved in adverse transfusion events including transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI. Although platelet storage designed for transfusion occurs in sterile conditions, platelets are activated and release sCD40L without known agonists. Recently, proteomic studies identified signaling pathways activated in platelet concentrates. Soluble CD40L is a good candidate for platelet activation in an auto-amplification loop. In this review, we describe the immunomodulatory role of CD40L in physiological and pathological conditions. We will focus on the main signaling pathways activated by CD40L after binding to its different receptors.

  1. Genetic Disruption of 2-Arachidonoylglycerol Synthesis Reveals a Key Role for Endocannabinoid Signaling in Anxiety Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Shonesy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoid (eCB signaling has been heavily implicated in the modulation of anxiety and depressive behaviors and emotional learning. However, the role of the most-abundant endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG in the physiological regulation of affective behaviors is not well understood. Here, we show that genetic deletion of the 2-AG synthetic enzyme diacylglycerol lipase α (DAGLα in mice reduces brain, but not circulating, 2-AG levels. DAGLα deletion also results in anxiety-like and sex-specific anhedonic phenotypes associated with impaired activity-dependent eCB retrograde signaling at amygdala glutamatergic synapses. Importantly, acute pharmacological normalization of 2-AG levels reverses both phenotypes of DAGLα-deficient mice. These data suggest 2-AG deficiency could contribute to the pathogenesis of affective disorders and that pharmacological normalization of 2-AG signaling could represent an approach for the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders.

  2. The Multifaceted Roles of STAT3 Signaling in the Progression of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Jennifer L.; Thaper, Daksh; Zoubeidi, Amina, E-mail: azoubeidi@prostatecentre.com [The Vancouver Prostate Centre, Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, 2660 Oak Street, Vancouver British Columbia, V6H 3Z6 (Canada)

    2014-04-09

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 governs essential functions of epithelial and hematopoietic cells that are often dysregulated in cancer. While the role for STAT3 in promoting the progression of many solid and hematopoietic malignancies is well established, this review will focus on the importance of STAT3 in prostate cancer progression to the incurable metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Indeed, STAT3 integrates different signaling pathways involved in the reactivation of androgen receptor pathway, stem like cells and the epithelial to mesenchymal transition that drive progression to mCRPC. As equally important, STAT3 regulates interactions between tumor cells and the microenvironment as well as immune cell activation. This makes it a major factor in facilitating prostate cancer escape from detection of the immune response, promoting an immunosuppressive environment that allows growth and metastasis. Based on the multifaceted nature of STAT3 signaling in the progression to mCRPC, the promise of STAT3 as a therapeutic target to prevent prostate cancer progression and the variety of STAT3 inhibitors used in cancer therapies is discussed.

  3. Role of TGF-β signaling in inherited and acquired myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burks Tyesha N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β superfamily consists of a variety of cytokines expressed in many different cell types including skeletal muscle. Members of this superfamily that are of particular importance in skeletal muscle are TGF-β1, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, and myostatin. These signaling molecules play important roles in skeletal muscle homeostasis and in a variety of inherited and acquired neuromuscular disorders. Expression of these molecules is linked to normal processes in skeletal muscle such as growth, differentiation, regeneration, and stress response. However, chronic elevation of TGF-β1, MAPKs, and myostatin is linked to various features of muscle pathology, including impaired regeneration and atrophy. In this review, we focus on the aberrant signaling of TGF-β in various disorders such as Marfan syndrome, muscular dystrophies, sarcopenia, and critical illness myopathy. We also discuss how the inhibition of several members of the TGF-β signaling pathway has been implicated in ameliorating disease phenotypes, opening up novel therapeutic avenues for a large group of neuromuscular disorders.

  4. The role of innate immune signaling in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and consequences for treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skabytska, Yuliya; Kaesler, Susanne; Volz, Thomas; Biedermann, Tilo

    2016-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ at the interface between the environment and the host. Consequently, the skin plays a central role in mounting effective host defense. In addition to pathogens, the microbiota and the host immune system are in permanent contact and communication via the skin. Consequences of this permanent interaction are a unique and partly symbiotic relationship, a tight interdependence between these partners, and also a functional "setting the clock," in which, in the healthy steady state, an induction of protective responses to pathogens is guaranteed. At the same time, commensal microbes contribute to the alertness of the immune system and to the maintenance of immune tolerance. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease based on a complex genetic trait with defects in cutaneous barrier, in stabilizing skin integrity. Most of AD patients develop deviated innate and adaptive immune responses. As a result, increased susceptibility to cutaneous infection is found in AD patients, and the interactions between these microbes and the skin participate in the development of chronic cutaneous inflammation. The role of the adaptive immune system was characterized in much detail, less though the contribution of innate immunity to AD pathogenesis. It is rather recent evidence that demonstrates a dominant role of components of the innate immune system not only for protecting from microbial invasion but also by orchestrating chronic skin inflammation. In this review we discuss the role of innate immune signaling and consecutive immune networks important for the pathogenesis and management of AD.

  5. Physiological Role of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems in Food-Associated Lactic Acid Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monedero, Vicente; Revilla-Guarinos, Ainhoa; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are widespread signal transduction pathways mainly found in bacteria where they play a major role in adaptation to changing environmental conditions. TCSs generally consist of sensor histidine kinases that autophosphorylate in response to a specific stimulus and subsequently transfer the phosphate group to their cognate response regulators thus modulating their activity, usually as transcriptional regulators. In this review we present the current knowledge on the physiological role of TCSs in species of the families Lactobacillaceae and Leuconostocaceae of the group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). LAB are microorganisms of great relevance for health and food production as the group spans from starter organisms to pathogens. Whereas the role of TCSs in pathogenic LAB (most of them belonging to the family Streptococcaceae) has focused the attention, the roles of TCSs in commensal LAB, such as most species of Lactobacillaceae and Leuconostocaceae, have been somewhat neglected. However, evidence available indicates that TCSs are key players in the regulation of the physiology of these bacteria. The first studies in food-associated LAB showed the involvement of some TCSs in quorum sensing and production of bacteriocins, but subsequent studies have shown that TCSs participate in other physiological processes, such as stress response, regulation of nitrogen metabolism, regulation of malate metabolism, and resistance to antimicrobial peptides, among others. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The role of water channel proteins and nitric oxide signaling in rice seed germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Yan Liu; Xin Yu; Da-Yong Cui; Mei-Hao Sun; Wei-Ning Sun; Zhang-Cheng Tang; Sang-Soo Kwak; Wei-Ai Su

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the possible role of several aquaporins in seed germination. But systematic investigation of the role of aquaporin family members in this process is lacking. Here, the developmental regulation of plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) expression throughout germination and post-germination processes in rice embryos was analyzed. The expression patterns of the PIPs suggest these aquaporins play different roles in seed germination and seedling growth. Partial silencing of the water channel genes, OsPIP1; 1 and OsPIP1;3, reduced seed germination while over-expression of OsPIPl;3 promoted seed germination under water-stress conditions. Moreover, spatial expression analysis indicates that OsPIP1;3 is expressed predominantly in embryo during seed germination. Our data also revealed that the nitric oxide (NO) donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), promoted seed germination; furthermore, the NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, inhibited germination and reduced the stimulative effects of SNP and GSNO on rice germination. Exogenous NO stimulated the transcription of OsPIP1;1, OsPIP1;2, OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;8 in germinating seeds. These results suggest that water channels play an important role in seed germination, acting, at least partly, in response to the NO signaling pathway.

  7. Role of NLRP3 and NLRP1 inflammasomes signaling pathways in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Wang; Chang-Liang Zhu; Shuai Wang; Li-Wen Mo; Guo-Dong Yang; Jun Hu; Fan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the role ofNLRP3 andNLRP1 inflammasomes signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis(RA).Methods:A total of36 patients withRA were selected, peripheral blood mononuclear cell(PBMC) and granulocyte were separated from venous blood.RT-qPCR method was used to detect the expression level and diversity ofNLRP3 andNLRP1 inPBMC and granulocyte mRNA in patients withRA, and detect the mRNA expression of downstream factor IL-1β.The correlation betweenRA and the expression ofNLRP3 andNLRP1 was analyzed. Normal30 cases were set as control group.Results:Expression levels ofNLRP1, and caspase-1 mRNA inPBMC ofRA group were significantly lower than those of control group(P0.05);NLRP3, caspase-1, andASC mRNA expression in granulocyte ofRA patients were significantly lower than those in control group(P0.05);NLRP1,IL-1β mRNA expression level had a negative correlation with anti-rheumatoid factor antibody(P=0.0332,0.0340).Conclusions:NLRP3 andNLRP1 inflammasomes signaling pathways are involved inRA inflammatory reaction process as protective factors, and play an important role inRA inflammatory mechanisms.

  8. Cannabinoid Receptors in the Central Nervous System: Their Signaling and Roles in Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Debra A.; Yudowski, Guillermo A.

    2017-01-01

    The identification and cloning of the two major cannabinoid (CB1 and CB2) receptors together with the discovery of their endogenous ligands in the late 80s and early 90s, resulted in a major effort aimed at understanding the mechanisms and physiological roles of the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Due to its expression and localization in the central nervous system (CNS), the CB1 receptor together with its endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids (eCB)) and the enzymes involved in their synthesis and degradation, has been implicated in multiple pathophysiological events ranging from memory deficits to neurodegenerative disorders among others. In this review, we will provide a general overview of the ECS with emphasis on the CB1 receptor in health and disease. We will describe our current understanding of the complex aspects of receptor signaling and trafficking, including the non-canonical signaling pathways such as those mediated by β-arrestins within the context of functional selectivity and ligand bias. Finally, we will highlight some of the disorders in which CB1 receptors have been implicated. Significant knowledge has been achieved over the last 30 years. However, much more research is still needed to fully understand the complex roles of the ECS, particularly in vivo and to unlock its true potential as a source of therapeutic targets. PMID:28101004

  9. Divergent and conserved roles of Dll1 signaling in development of craniofacial and trunk muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowski, Maciej T; Rassek, Claudia; Lenhard, Diana C; Bröhl, Dominique; Birchmeier, Carmen

    2014-11-15

    Craniofacial and trunk skeletal muscles are evolutionarily distinct and derive from cranial and somitic mesoderm, respectively. Different regulatory hierarchies act upstream of myogenic regulatory factors in cranial and somitic mesoderm, but the same core regulatory network - MyoD, Myf5 and Mrf4 - executes the myogenic differentiation program. Notch signaling controls self-renewal of myogenic progenitors as well as satellite cell homing during formation of trunk muscle, but its role in craniofacial muscles has been little investigated. We show here that the pool of myogenic progenitor cells in craniofacial muscle of Dll1(LacZ/Ki) mutant mice is depleted in early fetal development, which is accompanied by a major deficit in muscle growth. At the expense of progenitor cells, supernumerary differentiating myoblasts appear transiently and these express MyoD. The progenitor pool in craniofacial muscle of Dll1(LacZ/Ki) mutants is largely rescued by an additional mutation of MyoD. We conclude from this that Notch exerts its decisive role in craniofacial myogenesis by repression of MyoD. This function is similar to the one previously observed in trunk myogenesis, and is thus conserved in cranial and trunk muscle. However, in cranial mesoderm-derived progenitors, Notch signaling is not required for Pax7 expression and impinges little on the homing of satellite cells. Thus, Dll1 functions in satellite cell homing and Pax7 expression diverge in cranial- and somite-derived muscle. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of calcium signalling in the chondrogenic response of mesenchymal stem cells to hydrostatic pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ Steward

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to elucidate the role of Ca++ signalling in the chondrogenic response of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to hydrostatic pressure (HP. MSCs were seeded into agarose hydrogels, subjected to HP or kept in free swelling conditions, and were cultured either with or without pharmacological inhibitors of Ca++ mobility and downstream targets. Chelating free Ca++, inhibiting voltage-gated calcium channels, and depleting intracellular calcium storessuppressed the beneficial effect of HP on chondrogenesis, indicating that Ca++ mobility may play an important role in the mechanotransduction of HP. However, inhibition of stretch-activated calcium channels in the current experiment yielded similar results to the control group, suggesting that mechanotransduction of HP is distinct from loads that generate cell deformations. Inhibition of the downstream targets calmodulin, calmodulin kinase II, and calcineurin all knocked down the effect of HP on chondrogenesis, implicating these targets in MSCs response to HP. All of the pharmacological inhibitors that abolished the chondrogenic response to HP also maintained a punctate vimentin organisation in the presence of HP, as opposed to the mechanoresponsive groups where the vimentin structure became more diffuse. These results suggest that Ca++ signalling may transduce HP via vimentin adaptation to loading.

  11. Role of TWEAK/Fn14 signalling pathway in lupus nephritis and other clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sánchez, Diego A; Álvarez, Cristian M; Vásquez, Gloria; Gómez-Puerta, José A

    2016-08-29

    Knowledge of the signalling pathways involved in various diseases has enabled advances in the understanding of pathophysiological, diagnostic and therapeutic models of several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a widely studied autoimmune disease that can affect multiple organs, with a major impact on morbidity and mortality when it involves the kidneys. Over the past 10 years, interest in the role of the TWEAK/Fn14 signalling pathway in lupus nephritis, as well as other clinical settings, has increased. By reviewing the literature, this article assesses the role of this pathway in lupus nephritis, underlines the importance of TWEAK in urine (uTWEAK) as a biomarker of the disease and stresses the favourable results published in the literature from the inhibition of the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway as a therapeutic target in experimental animal models, demonstrating its potential application in other settings. Results of ongoing clinical trials and future research will give us a better understanding of the real benefit of blocking this pathway in the clinical course of several conditions.

  12. Cooperative Directors: Perspective and Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian, John L., Jr.; Kiser, Stephen L.

    2000-01-01

    Cooperative directors’ perceptions of their roles, knowledge, and implementation of cooperative principles, business decision making, financial analysis, cooperative law, and division of responsibility with management were analyzed using data from forty-eight agricultural and thirty-one rural electric directors. Directors performed well in these areas with the best performance being related to decision-making scenarios. Self-assessments and performance for capabilities/situational items wer...

  13. Mammary stem cells and breast cancer--role of Notch signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnie, Gillian; Clarke, Robert B

    2007-06-01

    Adult stem cells are found in numerous tissues of the body and play a role in tissue development, replacement and repair. Evidence shows that breast stem cells are multipotent and can self renew, which are key characteristics of stem cells, and a single cell enriched with cell surface markers has the ability to grow a fully functional mammary gland in vivo. Many groups have extrapolated the cancer stem cell hypothesis from the haematopoietic system to solid cancers, where using in vitro culture techniques and in vivo transplant models have established evidence of cancer stem cells in colon, pancreas, prostate, brain and breast cancers. In the report we describe the evidence for breast cancer stem cells; studies consistently show that stem cell like and breast cancer initiating populations can be enriched using cell surface makers CD44+/CD24- and have upregulated genes which include Notch. Notch signalling has been highlighted as a pathway involved in the development of the breast and is frequently dysregulated in invasive breast cancer. We have investigated the role of Notch in a pre-invasive breast lesion, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and have found that aberrant activation of Notch signalling is an early event in breast cancer. High expression of Notch 1 intracellular domain (NICD) in DCIS also predicted a reduced time to recurrence 5 years after surgery. Using a non-adherent sphere culture technique we have grown DCIS mammospheres from primary DCIS tissue, where self-renewal capacity, measured by the number of mammosphere initiating cells, were increased from normal breast tissue. A gamma-secretase inhibitor, DAPT, which inhibits all four Notch receptors and a Notch 4 neutralising antibody were shown to reduce DCIS mammosphere formation, indicating that Notch signalling and other stem cell self-renewal pathways may represent novel therapeutic targets to prevent recurrence of pre-invasive and invasive breast cancer.

  14. The role of APE/Ref-1 signaling pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Yang, Sun; Misner, Bobbye J; Liu-Smith, Feng; Meyskens, Frank L

    2014-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is responsible for a third of the estimated cancer-caused deaths worldwide. To deeply understand the mechanisms controlling HCC progression is of primary importance to develop new approaches for treatment. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1/redox effector factor 1 (APE/Ref-1) has been uncovered elevated in various types of cancer, including HCC. Additionally, HCC progression is always correlated with elevated copper (Cu). Our previous data demonstrated that Cu treatment initiated APE/Ref-1 expression and its downstream targets. Therefore, we hypothesized that APE/Ref-1 may be involved in HCC progression through mediating the effect of Cu to its signaling cascades. Following different treatments, human HCC cell line (Hep3B) and immortalized non-malignant hepatocyte cell line (THLE3) were analyzed to explore the role of APE/Ref-1 signaling pathway. Unstained human tissue microarrays (TMA) were subjected to IHC analysis to study the relationship between APE/Ref-1 expression and clinic features. APE/Ref-1 was upregulated in HCC cells consistent with the strong expression of APE/Ref-1 in HCC tissue microarray. Greater cytoplasmic accumulation of APE/Ref-1 was found in poorly differentiated and more aggressive tumors. Also we provide evidence to show that APE/Ref-1 signaling pathway stimulates cellular proliferation, enhances anti-apoptosis, and facilitates metastasis through experimental knockdown of APE/Ref-1 using siRNA in Hep3B cells or overexpressing APE/Ref-1 in THLE3 cells. These results define a novel role of APE/Ref-1 in HCC progression as being an important mediating and potentiating molecule, and also provide a basis for further investigations utilizing appropriate APE/Ref-1 inhibitors in combination with chemo-drugs for HCC treatment.

  15. Prosocial Signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahsay, Goytom Abraha

    In contrast to the standard economic theory predictions, it seems clear that people do spend their time and resource to benefit others. Many lab and field experiment studies show that people display prosocial preferences such as altruism, reciprocity and conditional cooperation, fairness, etc...... economic and environmental domains. This thesis consists of five papers which can be divided into three parts. The first part consists of three papers which all investigate consumers’ behavior when prosocial signalling is important. The second part of the thesis consists of one paper which focuses...... empirical evidence on the role of indigenous social networks, namely iddir associations, in facilitating factor-input transactions among smallholder farmers. Iddir networks provide information advantages, trust, and reputation based contract enforcement. It finds that iddir membership improves household...

  16. Cooperative Planning in Action: The Washington Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Marilyn

    1976-01-01

    Library cooperation in the Metropolitan Washington area is described, along with its problems and successes, and the significant role special libraries can play in an ambitious intertype library cooperative. (Author/PF)

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICITY, REDOX SIGNALING AND LUNG INFLAMMATION: THE ROLE OF GLUTATHIONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Saibal K; Rahman, Irfan

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione (γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine, GSH) is the most abundant intracellular antioxidant thiol and is central to redox defense during oxidative stress. GSH metabolism is tightly regulated and has been implicated in redox signaling and also in protection against environmental oxidant-mediated injury. Changes in the ratio of the reduced and disulfide form (GSH/GSSG) can affect signaling pathways that participate in a broad array of physiological responses from cell proliferation, autophagy and apoptosis to gene expression that involve H2O2 as a second messenger. Oxidative stress due to oxidant/antioxidant imbalance and also due to environmental oxidants is an important component during inflammation and respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and asthma. It is known to activate multiple stress kinase pathways and redox sensitive transcription factors such as Nrf2, NF-κB and AP-1, which differentially regulate the genes for pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as the protective antioxidant genes. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms for the induction of antioxidants, such as GSH, versus pro-inflammatory mediators at sites of oxidant-directed injuries may allow for the development of novel therapies which will allow pharmacological manipulation GSH synthesis during inflammation and oxidative injury. This article features the current knowledge about the role of GSH in redox signaling, GSH biosynthesis and particularly the regulation of transcription factor Nrf2 by GSH and downstream signaling during oxidative stress and inflammation in various pulmonary diseases. We also discussed the current therapeutic clinical trials using GSH and other thiol compounds, such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine, fudosteine, carbocysteine, erdosteine in environment-induced airways disease. PMID:18760298

  18. ACK1/TNK2 tyrosine kinase: molecular signaling and evolving role in cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, K; Mahajan, N P

    2015-08-01

    Deregulated tyrosine kinase signaling alters cellular homeostasis to drive cancer progression. The emergence of a non-receptor tyrosine kinase (non-RTK), ACK1 (also known as activated Cdc42-associated kinase 1 or TNK2) as an oncogenic kinase, has uncovered novel mechanisms by which tyrosine kinase signaling promotes cancer progression. Although early studies focused on ACK1 as a cytosolic effector of activated transmembrane RTKs, wherein it shuttles between the cytosol and the nucleus to rapidly transduce extracellular signals from the RTKs to the intracellular effectors, recent data unfold a new aspect of its functionality as an epigenetic regulator. ACK1 interacts with the estrogen receptor (ER)/histone demethylase KDM3A (JHDM2a) complex, which modifies KDM3A by tyrosine phosphorylation to regulate the transcriptional outcome at HOXA1 locus to promote the growth of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer. It is also well established that ACK1 regulates the activity of androgen receptor (AR) by tyrosine phosphorylation to fuel the growth of hormone-refractory prostate cancers. Further, recent explosion in genomic sequencing has revealed recurrent ACK1 gene amplification and somatic mutations in a variety of human malignancies, providing a molecular basis for its role in neoplastic transformation. In this review, we will discuss the various facets of ACK1 signaling, including its newly uncovered epigenetic regulator function, which enables cells to bypass the blockade to major survival pathways to promote resistance to standard cancer treatments. Not surprisingly, cancer cells appear to acquire an 'addiction' to ACK1-mediated survival, particularly under stress conditions, such as growth factor deprivation or genotoxic insults or hormone deprivation. With the accelerated development of potent and selective ACK1 inhibitors, targeted treatment for cancers harboring aberrant ACK1 activity may soon become a clinical reality.

  19. General aspects of two-component regulatory circuits in bacteria: Domains, signals and roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Vaca, Felipe; Mondragón-Jaimes, Verónica; Franco, Bernardo

    2016-08-09

    All living organisms are subject to changing environments, which must be sensed in order to respond swiftly and efficiently. Two-component systems (TCS) are signal transduction regulatory circuits based typically on a membrane bound sensor kinase and a cytoplasmic response regulator, that is activated through a histidine to aspartate phosphorelay reactions. Activated response regulator acts usually as a transcription factor. The best known examples were identified in bacteria, but they are also found in fungi, algae and plants. Thus far, they are not found in mammals. Regulatory circuits coupled to two-component systems exhibit a myriad of responses to environmental stimuli such as: redox potential, pH, specific metabolites, pressure, light and more recently to specific antimicrobial peptides that activate a sensor kinase responsible for expressing virulence factors through the active response regulator. In this review we explore general aspects on two-component systems that ultimately can play a role on virulence regulation, also the intriguing domain properties of the sensor kinases that can be a potential target for antimicrobial compounds. Only a handful of sensor kinases are extensively characterized, the vast majority belong to what we call 'the dark matter of bacterial signal transduction' since no known signal, structure and biochemical properties are available. Regulatory circuits from vertebrate pathogenic organisms can explain virulence in terms of either response to environmental factors or specific niche occupancy. Hopefully, knowledge on these signal transduction systems can lead to identify novel molecules that target two-component systems, since the increase of drug resistant microorganisms is worrisome.

  20. A Protective Role for Interleukin-1 Signaling during Mouse Adenovirus Type 1-Induced Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Jorge, Luiza A; Pretto, Carla D; Smith, Asa B; Foreman, Oded; Carnahan, Kelly E; Spindler, Katherine R

    2017-02-15

    encephalitis in its natural host, providing a good model for studying factors involved in encephalitis development. We investigated the role of IL-1 signaling during MAV-1-induced encephalitis. Unexpectedly, the lack of IL-1 signaling increased the mortality and inflammation in mice infected with MAV-1. Also, there was an increase in the transcription of type I IFN-stimulated genes that correlated with the observed increased mortality and inflammation. The findings highlight the complex nature of encephalitis and suggests that IL-1 has a protective effect for the development of MAV-1-induced encephalitis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. DMPD: Regulation of TLR4 signaling and the host interface with pathogens and danger:the role of RP105. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17470533 Regulation of TLR4 signaling and the host interface with pathogens and danger:the role...tion of TLR4 signaling and the host interface with pathogens and danger:the role ...of RP105. PubmedID 17470533 Title Regulation of TLR4 signaling and the host interface with pathogens and danger:the role

  2. Constitutive plasmacytoid dendritic cell migration to the splenic white pulp is cooperatively regulated by CCR7- and CXCR4-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Eiji; Otani, Kazuhiro; Ikeno, Takashi; Verjan Garcia, Noel; Hayasaka, Haruko; Bai, Zhongbin; Jang, Myoung Ho; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Nagasawa, Takashi; Ueda, Koichi; Miyasaka, Masayuki

    2012-07-01

    Although the spleen plays an important role in host defense against infection, the mechanism underlying the migration of the innate immune cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), into the spleen remains ill defined. In this article, we report that pDCs constitutively migrate into the splenic white pulp (WP) in a manner dependent on the chemokine receptors CCR7 and CXCR4. In CCR7-deficient mice and CCR7 ligand-deficient mice, compared with wild-type (WT) mice, substantially fewer pDCs were found in the periarteriolar lymphoid sheath of the splenic WP under steady-state conditions. In addition, the migration of adoptively transferred CCR7-deficient pDCs into the WP was significantly worse than that of WT pDCs, supporting the idea that pDC trafficking to the splenic WP requires CCR7 signaling. WT pDCs responded to a CCR7 ligand with modest chemotaxis and ICAM-1 binding in vitro, and priming with the CCR7 ligand enabled the pDCs to migrate efficiently toward low concentrations of CXCL12 in a CXCR4-dependent manner, raising the possibility that CCR7 signaling enhances CXCR4-mediated pDC migration. In agreement with this hypothesis, CCL21 and CXCL12 were colocalized on fibroblastic reticular cells in the T cell zone and in the marginal zone bridging channels, through which pDCs appeared to enter the WP. Furthermore, functional blockage of CCR7 and CXCR4 abrogated pDC trafficking into the WP. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that pDCs employ both CCR7 and CXCR4 as critical chemokine receptors to migrate into the WP under steady-state conditions.

  3. A Joint Less Ordinary: Intriguing Roles for Hedgehog Signalling in the Development of the Temporomandibular Synovial Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Kubiak

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the essential role of Hedgehog (Hh signalling in the developmental steps of temporomandibular joint (TMJ formation. We review evidence for intra- and potentially inter-tissue Hh signaling as well as Glioma-Associated Oncogene Homolog (GLI dependent and independent functions. Morphogenesis and maturation of the TMJ’s individual components and the general landscape of Hh signalling is also covered. Comparison of the appendicular knee and axial TMJ also reveals interesting differences and similarities in their mechanisms of development, chondrogenesis and reliance on Hh signalling.

  4. Differential role of Hedgehog signaling in human pancreatic (patho-) physiology: An up to date review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klieser, Eckhard; Swierczynski, Stefan; Mayr, Christian; Jäger, Tarkan; Schmidt, Johanna; Neureiter, Daniel; Kiesslich, Tobias; Illig, Romana

    2016-05-15

    Since the discovery of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in drosophila melanogaster, our knowledge of the role of Hh in embryonic development, inflammation, and cancerogenesis in humans has dramatically increased over the last decades. This is the case especially concerning the pancreas, however, real therapeutic breakthroughs are missing until now. In general, Hh signaling is essential for pancreatic organogenesis, development, and tissue maturation. In the case of acute pancreatitis, Hh has a protective role, whereas in chronic pancreatitis, Hh interacts with pancreatic stellate cells, leading to destructive parenchym fibrosis and atrophy, as well as to irregular tissue remodeling with potency of initiating cancerogenesis. In vitro and in situ analysis of Hh in pancreatic cancer revealed that the Hh pathway participates in the development of pancreatic precursor lesions and ductal adenocarcinoma including critical interactions with the tumor microenvironment. The application of specific inhibitors of components of the Hh pathway is currently subject of ongoing clinical trials (phases 1 and 2). Furthermore, a combination of Hh pathway inhibitors and established chemotherapeutic drugs could also represent a promising therapeutic approach. In this review, we give a structured survey of the role of the Hh pathway in pancreatic development, pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinogenesis and pancreatic cancer as well as an overview of current clinical trials concerning Hh pathway inhibitors and pancreas cancer.

  5. Fundamental Limits of Cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, Angel; Andrews, Jeffrey G

    2012-01-01

    Cooperation is viewed as a key ingredient for interference management in wireless systems. This paper shows that cooperation has fundamental limitations. The main result is that even full cooperation between transmitters cannot in general change an interference-limited network to a noise-limited network. The key idea is that there exists a spectral efficiency upper bound that is independent of the transmit power. First, a spectral efficiency upper bound is established for systems that rely on pilot-assisted channel estimation; in this framework, cooperation is shown to be possible only within clusters of limited size, which are subject to out-of-cluster interference whose power scales with that of the in-cluster signals. Second, an upper bound is also shown to exist when cooperation is through noncoherent communication; thus, the spectral efficiency limitation is not a by-product of the reliance on pilot-assisted channel estimation. Consequently, existing literature that routinely assumes the high-power spect...

  6. EGFR-ras-raf signaling in epidermal stem cells: roles in hair follicle development, regeneration, tissue remodeling and epidermal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doma, Eszter; Rupp, Christian; Baccarini, Manuela

    2013-09-25

    The mammalian skin is the largest organ of the body and its outermost layer, the epidermis, undergoes dynamic lifetime renewal through the activity of somatic stem cell populations. The EGFR-Ras-Raf pathway has a well-described role in skin development and tumor formation. While research mainly focuses on its role in cutaneous tumor initiation and maintenance, much less is known about Ras signaling in the epidermal stem cells, which are the main targets of skin carcinogenesis. In this review, we briefly discuss the properties of the epidermal stem cells and review the role of EGFR-Ras-Raf signaling in keratinocyte stem cells during homeostatic and pathological conditions.

  7. Essential role of interleukin-1 signaling in host defenses against group B streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondo, Carmelo; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Midiri, Angelina; Signorino, Giacomo; Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Teti, Giuseppe; Beninati, Concetta

    2014-09-09

    Signal transduction via MyD88, an adaptor protein engaged by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) family receptors, has a crucial role in host defenses against group B streptococcus (GBS). To examine the contribution of IL-1R signaling to MyD88-dependent host defenses, we analyzed GBS infection in type I IL-1R (IL-1RI)-deficient mice. Most of these animals displayed clinical signs of sepsis and neurological disease and died after a challenge with a bacterial dose that did not cause illness or death in any of the wild-type animals. Moreover, bacterial numbers in the blood and brains of the immunodefective mice were considerably increased. The ability of blood leukocytes or bone marrow-derived macrophages to kill GBS in vitro was not affected by a lack of IL-1RI. However, it was found in a newly developed model of GBS-induced peritoneal inflammation that IL-1 signaling selectively promoted the production of the chemokines KC and MIP-1α and neutrophil recruitment. Moreover, the secretion of KC and MIP-1α, but not tumor necrosis factor alpha, by peritoneal macrophages stimulated with GBS was significantly decreased in the absence of IL-1RI. Accordingly, the number of neutrophils in the blood and the concentration of myeloperoxidase, a neutrophil marker, in infected organs were severely reduced in the immunodefective mice during GBS disease, concomitantly with a reduction in tissue KC and MIP-1α levels. In conclusion, IL-1RI plays a crucial role in host defenses against GBS by inducing the high-level production of chemokines and the subsequent recruitment of neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes to infection sites. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a serious and frequent human pathogen. Experimental infection with this bacterium has been widely used to understand the mechanism whereby the body's first line of defense, represented by cells and molecules of the innate immune system, fights infections. In both humans and mice, defective

  8. Insulin signaling disruption in male mice due to perinatal bisphenol A exposure: Role of insulin signaling in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fangfang; Gao, Yue; Wang, Tingwei; Chen, Donglong; Liu, Jingli; Qian, Wenyi; Cheng, Jie; Gao, Rong; Wang, Jun; Xiao, Hang

    2016-03-14

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental estrogenic endocrine disruptor, is widely used for producing polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Available data have shown that perinatal exposure to BPA contributes to peripheral insulin resistance, while in the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of perinatal BPA exposure on insulin signaling and glucose transport in the cortex of offspring mice. The pregnant mice were administrated either vehicle or BPA (100 μg/kg/day) at three perinatal stages. Stage I: from day 6 of gestation until parturition (P6-PND0 fetus exposure); Stage II: from lactation until delactation (PND0-PND21 newborn exposure) and Stage III: from day 6 of pregnancy until delactation (P6-PND21 fetus and newborn exposure). At 8 months of age for the offspring mice, the insulin signaling pathways and glucose transporters (GLUTs) were detected. Our data indicated that the insulin signaling including insulin, phosphorylated insulin receptor (IR), phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-AKT), phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3β (p-GSK3β) and phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (p-ERK) were significantly decreased in the brain. In parallel, GLUTs (GLUT1/3/4) were obviously decreased as well in BPA-treated group in mice brain. Noteworthily, the phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) were markedly up-regulated in all BPA-treated groups. These results, taken together, suggest the adverse effects of BPA on insulin signaling and GLUTs, which might subsequently contribute to the increment of p-tau and APP in the brain of adult offspring. Therefore, perinatal BPA exposure might be a risk factor for the long-term neurodegenerative changes in offspring male mice.

  9. Inflammatory Mediators and Insulin Resistance in Obesity: Role of Nuclear Receptor Signaling in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Fuentes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Visceral obesity is coupled to a general low-grade chronic inflammatory state characterized by macrophage activation and inflammatory cytokine production, leading to insulin resistance (IR. The balance between proinflammatory M1 and antiinflammatory M2 macrophage phenotypes within visceral adipose tissue appears to be crucially involved in the development of obesity-associated IR and consequent metabolic abnormalities. The ligand-dependent transcription factors peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs have recently been implicated in the determination of the M1/M2 phenotype. Liver X receptors (LXRs, which form another subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily, are also important regulators of proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. Disregulation of macrophage-mediated inflammation by PPARs and LXRs therefore underlies the development of IR. This review summarizes the role of PPAR and LXR signaling in macrophages and current knowledge about the impact of these actions in the manifestation of IR and obesity comorbidities such as liver steatosis and diabetic osteopenia.

  10. Emerging roles of tRNA in adaptive translation, signalling dynamics and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Sebastian; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-02-01

    tRNAs, nexus molecules between mRNAs and proteins, have a central role in translation. Recent discoveries have revealed unprecedented complexity of tRNA biosynthesis, modification patterns, regulation and function. In this Review, we present emerging concepts regarding how tRNA abundance is dynamically regulated and how tRNAs (and their nucleolytic fragments) are centrally involved in stress signalling and adaptive translation, operating across a wide range of timescales. Mutations in tRNAs or in genes affecting tRNA biogenesis are also linked to complex human diseases with surprising heterogeneity in tissue vulnerability, and we highlight cell-specific aspects that modulate the disease penetrance of tRNA-based pathologies.

  11. New roles for Smad signaling and phosphatidic acid in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Craig A; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is essential for normal bodily function and the loss of skeletal muscle (i.e. muscle atrophy/wasting) can have a major impact on mobility, whole-body metabolism, disease resistance, and quality of life. Thus, there is a clear need for the development of therapies that can prevent the loss, or increase, of skeletal muscle mass. However, in order to develop such therapies, we will first have to develop a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate muscle mass. Fortunately, our knowledge is rapidly advancing, and in this review, we will summarize recent studies that have expanded our understanding of the roles that Smad signaling and the synthesis of phosphatidic acid play in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

  12. The role of mitochondria in reactive oxygen species metabolism and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, Anatoly A

    2008-12-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a major contributor to the etiology of both "normal" senescence and severe pathologies with serious public health implications. Several cellular sources, including mitochondria, are known to produce significant amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may contribute to intracellular oxidative stress. Mitochondria possess at least 10 known sites that are capable of generating ROS, but they also feature a sophisticated multilayered ROS defense system that is much less studied. This review summarizes the current knowledge about major components involved in mitochondrial ROS metabolism and factors that regulate ROS generation and removal at the level of mitochondria. An integrative systemic approach is applied to analysis of mitochondrial ROS metabolism, which is "dissected" into ROS generation, ROS emission, and ROS scavenging. The in vitro ROS-producing capacity of several mitochondrial sites is compared in the metabolic context and the role of mitochondria in ROS-dependent intracellular signaling is discussed.

  13. Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays a key role in the development of spondyloarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wanqing; Zhou, Lijiang; Li, Shan; Hui, Tianqian; Chen, Di

    2015-01-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a group of diseases consisting of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), reactive arthritis, arthritis related to inflammatory bowel disease (a subgroup of juvenile idiopathic arthritis), and ankylosing spondylitis (the prototype of SpA). Axial bone formation and the combination of concurrent erosion and new bone formation are specific characteristics of SpA disease. The use of anti-proinflammatory cytokines, such as inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), appears to be the greatest advance in the treatment of SpA over the past 20 years. However, TNF-α blockers do not halt new bone formation. Recent clinical observations and animal studies demonstrate that Wnt signaling proteins and natural Wnt inhibitors, such as DKK1 and sclerostin, are likely to play important roles in the process of ankylosis in SpA, and could potentially serve as therapeutic targets for the treatment of SpA. PMID:26629686

  14. Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays a key role in the development of spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wanqing; Zhou, Lijiang; Li, Shan; Hui, Tianqian; Chen, Di

    2016-01-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a group of diseases consisting of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), reactive arthritis, arthritis related to inflammatory bowel disease (a subgroup of juvenile idiopathic arthritis), and ankylosing spondylitis (the prototype of SpA). Axial bone formation and the combination of concurrent erosion and new bone formation are specific characteristics of SpA disease. The use of antiproinflammatory cytokines, such as inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), appears to be the greatest advance in the treatment of SpA over the past 20 years. However, TNF-α blockers do not halt new bone formation. Recent clinical observations and animal studies demonstrate that Wnt signaling proteins and natural Wnt inhibitors, such as DKK1 and sclerostin, are likely to play important roles in the process of ankylosis in SpA, and could potentially serve as therapeutic targets for the treatment of SpA.

  15. A plural role for lipids in motor neuron diseases: energy, signaling and structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent eSCHMITT

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Motor neuron diseases (MNDs are characterized by selective death of motor neurons and include mainly adult-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. Neurodegeneration is not the single pathogenic event occurring during disease progression. There are multiple lines of evidence for the existence of defects in lipid metabolism at peripheral level. For instance, hypermetabolism is well characterized in ALS, and dyslipidemia correlates with better prognosis in patients. Lipid metabolism plays also a role in other MNDs. In SMA, misuse of lipids as energetic nutrients is described in patients and in related animal models. The composition of structural lipids in the central nervous system is modified, with repercussion on membrane fluidity and on cell signaling mediated by bioactive lipids. Here, we review the main epidemiologic and mechanistic findings that link alterations of lipid metabolism and motor neuron degeneration, and we discuss the rationale of targeting these modifications for therapeutic management of MNDs.

  16. Functional recovery after cervical spinal cord injury: Role of neurotrophin and glutamatergic signaling in phrenic motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Luther C; Gransee, Heather M; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2016-06-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) interrupts descending neural drive to phrenic motoneurons causing diaphragm muscle (DIAm) paralysis. Recent studies using a well-established model of SCI, unilateral spinal hemisection of the C2 segment of the cervical spinal cord (SH), provide novel information regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of functional recovery after SCI. Over time post-SH, gradual recovery of rhythmic ipsilateral DIAm activity occurs. Recovery of ipsilateral DIAm electromyogram (EMG) activity following SH is enhanced by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the region of the phrenic motoneuron pool. Delivery of exogenous BDNF either via intrathecal infusion or via mesenchymal stem cells engineered to release BDNF similarly enhance recovery. Conversely, recovery after SH is blunted by quenching endogenous BDNF with the fusion-protein TrkB-Fc in the region of the phrenic motoneuron pool or by selective inhibition of TrkB kinase activity using a chemical-genetic approach in TrkB(F616A) mice. Furthermore, the importance of BDNF signaling via TrkB receptors at phrenic motoneurons is highlighted by the blunting of recovery by siRNA-mediated downregulation of TrkB receptor expression in phrenic motoneurons and by the enhancement of recovery evident following virally-induced increases in TrkB expression specifically in phrenic motoneurons. BDNF/TrkB signaling regulates synaptic plasticity in various neuronal systems, including glutamatergic pathways. Glutamatergic neurotransmission constitutes the main inspiratory-related, excitatory drive to motoneurons, and following SH, spontaneous neuroplasticity is associated with increased expression of ionotropic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in phrenic motoneurons. Evidence for the role of BDNF/TrkB and glutamatergic signaling in recovery of DIAm activity following cervical SCI is reviewed.

  17. Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Suppression of Hepatocarcinorigenesis in Rats: Possible Role of Wnt Signaling

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abdel Aziz, Mohamed T

    2011-05-05

    Abstract Background The present study was conducted to evaluate the tumor suppressive effects of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in an experimental hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model in rats and to investigate the possible role of Wnt signaling in hepato-carcinogenesis. Methods Ninety rats were included in the study and were divided equally into: Control group, rats which received MSCs only, rats which received MSCs vehicle only, HCC group induced by diethylnitroseamine (DENA) and CCl 4 , rats which received MSCs after HCC induction, rats which received MSCs before HCC induction. Histopathological examination and gene expression of Wnt signaling target genes by real time, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in rat liver tissue, in addition to serum levels of ALT, AST and alpha fetoprotein were performed in all groups. Results Histopathological examination of liver tissue from animals which received DENA-CCl4 only, revealed the presence of anaplastic carcinoma cells and macro-regenerative nodules type II with foci of large and small cell dysplasia. Administration of MSCs into rats after induction of experimental HCC improved the histopathological picture which showed minimal liver cell damage, reversible changes, areas of cell drop out filled with stem cells. Gene expression in rat liver tissue demonstrated that MSCs downregulated β-catenin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cyclin D and survivin genes expression in liver tissues after HCC induction. Amelioration of the liver status after administration of MSCs has been inferred by the significant decrease of ALT, AST and Alpha fetoprotein serum levels. Administration of MSCs before HCC induction did not show any tumor suppressive or protective effect. Conclusions Administration of MSCs in chemically induced HCC has tumor suppressive effects as evidenced by down regulation of Wnt signaling target genes concerned with antiapoptosis, mitogenesis, cell proliferation

  18. Common and distinct roles of juvenile hormone signaling genes in metamorphosis of holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Konopova

    Full Text Available Insect larvae metamorphose to winged and reproductive adults either directly (hemimetaboly or through an intermediary pupal stage (holometaboly. In either case juvenile hormone (JH prevents metamorphosis until a larva has attained an appropriate phase of development. In holometabolous insects, JH acts through its putative receptor Methoprene-tolerant (Met to regulate Krüppel-homolog 1 (Kr-h1 and Broad-Complex (BR-C genes. While Met and Kr-h1 prevent precocious metamorphosis in pre-final larval instars, BR-C specifies the pupal stage. How JH signaling operates in hemimetabolous insects is poorly understood. Here, we compare the function of Met, Kr-h1 and BR-C genes in the two types of insects. Using systemic RNAi in the hemimetabolous true bug, Pyrrhocoris apterus, we show that Met conveys the JH signal to prevent premature metamorphosis by maintaining high expression of Kr-h1. Knockdown of either Met or Kr-h1 (but not of BR-C in penultimate-instar Pyrrhocoris larvae causes precocious development of adult color pattern, wings and genitalia. A natural fall of Kr-h1 expression in the last larval instar normally permits adult development, and treatment with an exogenous JH mimic methoprene at this time requires both Met and Kr-h1 to block the adult program and induce an extra larval instar. Met and Kr-h1 therefore serve as JH-dependent repressors of deleterious precocious metamorphic changes in both hemimetabolous and holometabolous juveniles, whereas BR-C has been recruited for a new role in specifying the holometabolous pupa. These results show that despite considerable evolutionary distance, insects with diverse developmental strategies employ a common-core JH signaling pathway to commit to adult morphogenesis.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates uranium-induced acute hepatotoxicity in rats: Role of antioxidant and antiapoptotic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yan; Zheng, Jifang; Zhao, Tingting; Tang, Xiaoqing; Hu, Nan

    2017-02-01

    As an endogenous gaseous mediator, H2 S exerts antioxidative, antiapoptotic, and cytoprotective effects in livers. This study was designed to investigate the protective role of H2 S against uranium-induced hepatotoxicity in adult SD male rats after in vivo effect of uranium on endogenous H2 S production was determined in livers. The levels of endogenous H2 S and H2 S-producing enzymes (CBS and CSE) were measured in liver homogenates from uranium -intoxicated rats. In rats injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with uranyl acetate or NaHS (an H2 S donor) alone or in combination, we examined biochemical parameters to assess liver function, revealed hepatic histopathological alteration, investigated oxidative stress markers, and explored apoptotic signaling in liver homogenates. The results suggest that uranium-intoxication in rats decreased CBS and CSE protein expression, H2 S synthesis capacity, and endogenous H2 S generation. NaHS administration in uranium-intoxicated rats produced amelioration in liver biochemical indices and histopathological effects, decreased MDA content, and increased GSH level and antioxidative enzymes activities like SOD, CAT, GPx, and GST. NaHS administration in uranium-intoxicated rats attenuated uranium-activated phosphorylation state of JNK. NaHS treatment in uranium-intoxicated rats increased antiapoptotic Bcl-2 but decreased pro-apoptotic Bax, resulting in the rise of Bcl-2/Bax ratio. NaHS treatment in uranium-intoxicated rats reduced the apoptosis mediator caspase-3 and cytochrome c release and elevated ATP contents. Taken together, these data implicate that H2 S can afford protection to rat livers against uranium-induced adverse effects mediated by up-regulation of antioxidant and antiapoptotic signaling. The anti-apoptotic property of H2 S may be involved, at least in part, in inhibiting JNK signaling. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 581-593, 2017.

  20. Common and distinct roles of juvenile hormone signaling genes in metamorphosis of holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopova, Barbora; Smykal, Vlastimil; Jindra, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Insect larvae metamorphose to winged and reproductive adults either directly (hemimetaboly) or through an intermediary pupal stage (holometaboly). In either case juvenile hormone (JH) prevents metamorphosis until a larva has attained an appropriate phase of development. In holometabolous insects, JH acts through its putative receptor Methoprene-tolerant (Met) to regulate Krüppel-homolog 1 (Kr-h1) and Broad-Complex (BR-C) genes. While Met and Kr-h1 prevent precocious metamorphosis in pre-final larval instars, BR-C specifies the pupal stage. How JH signaling operates in hemimetabolous insects is poorly understood. Here, we compare the function of Met, Kr-h1 and BR-C genes in the two types of insects. Using systemic RNAi in the hemimetabolous true bug, Pyrrhocoris apterus, we show that Met conveys the JH signal to prevent premature metamorphosis by maintaining high expression of Kr-h1. Knockdown of either Met or Kr-h1 (but not of BR-C) in penultimate-instar Pyrrhocoris larvae causes precocious development of adult color pattern, wings and genitalia. A natural fall of Kr-h1 expression in the last larval instar normally permits adult development, and treatment with an exogenous JH mimic methoprene at this time requires both Met and Kr-h1 to block the adult program and induce an extra larval instar. Met and Kr-h1 therefore serve as JH-dependent repressors of deleterious precocious metamorphic changes in both hemimetabolous and holometabolous juveniles, whereas BR-C has been recruited for a new role in specifying the holometabolous pupa. These results show that despite considerable evolutionary distance, insects with diverse developmental strategies employ a common-core JH signaling pathway to commit to adult morphogenesis.

  1. Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Suppression of Hepatocarcinorigenesis in Rats: Possible Role of Wnt Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Dina

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was conducted to evaluate the tumor suppressive effects of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in an experimental hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC model in rats and to investigate the possible role of Wnt signaling in hepato-carcinogenesis. Methods Ninety rats were included in the study and were divided equally into: Control group, rats which received MSCs only, rats which received MSCs vehicle only, HCC group induced by diethylnitroseamine (DENA and CCl4, rats which received MSCs after HCC induction, rats which received MSCs before HCC induction. Histopathological examination and gene expression of Wnt signaling target genes by real time, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR in rat liver tissue, in addition to serum levels of ALT, AST and alpha fetoprotein were performed in all groups. Results Histopathological examination of liver tissue from animals which received DENA-CCl4 only, revealed the presence of anaplastic carcinoma cells and macro-regenerative nodules type II with foci of large and small cell dysplasia. Administration of MSCs into rats after induction of experimental HCC improved the histopathological picture which showed minimal liver cell damage, reversible changes, areas of cell drop out filled with stem cells. Gene expression in rat liver tissue demonstrated that MSCs downregulated β-catenin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, cyclin D and survivin genes expression in liver tissues after HCC induction. Amelioration of the liver status after administration of MSCs has been inferred by the significant decrease of ALT, AST and Alpha fetoprotein serum levels. Administration of MSCs before HCC induction did not show any tumor suppressive or protective effect. Conclusions Administration of MSCs in chemically induced HCC has tumor suppressive effects as evidenced by down regulation of Wnt signaling target genes concerned with antiapoptosis, mitogenesis, cell

  2. TGF-β signaling plays an important role in resisting γ-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, You Sun; Kim, Mi-Ra [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiation and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Sook [Laboratory of Experimental Pathology, Korea Institute of Radiation and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sil [College of Pharmacy and Division of Life Science and Pharmaceuticals, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Eunkyung [Department of Genetic Engineering, College of Life Science, Kyung-Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jie-Young [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiation and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeeyong, E-mail: jeeyongl@gmail.com [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiation and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Jae Youn, E-mail: yjy_71@kcch.re.kr [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiation and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) regulates various biological processes, including differentiation, bone remodeling and angiogenesis, and is particularly important as a regulator of homeostasis and cell growth in normal tissue. Interestingly, some studies have reported that TGF-β1 induces apoptosis through induction of specific genes, whereas others suggest that TGF-β1 inhibits apoptosis and facilitates cell survival. Resolving these discrepancies, which may reflect differences in cellular context, is an important research priority. Here, using the parental mink lung epithelial cell line, Mv1Lu, and its derivatives, R1B and DR26, lacking TGF-β receptors, we investigated the involvement of TGF-β signaling in the effects of γ-irradiation. We found that canonical TGF-β signaling played an important role in protecting cells from γ-irradiation. Introduction of functional TGF-β receptors or constitutively active Smads into R1B and DR26 cell lines reduced DNA fragmentation, Caspase-3 cleavage and γ-H2AX foci formation in γ-irradiated cells. Notably, we also found that de novo protein synthesis was required for the radio-resistant effects of TGF-β1. Our data thus indicate that TGF-β1 protected against γ-irradiation, decreasing DNA damage and reducing apoptosis, and thereby enhanced cell survival. - Highlights: ► TGF-β1 pretreatment inhibits γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis. ► TGF-β signaling reduces γ-irradiation-induced γ-H2AX foci formation. ► de novo protein synthesis is necessary for TGF-β1-induced radio-resistance.

  3. The role of auxin and cytokinin signalling in specifying the root architecture of Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Muraro, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    Auxin and cytokinin are key hormonal signals that control the cellular architecture of the primary root and the initiation of new lateral root organs in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Both developmental processes are regulated by cross-talk between these hormones and their signalling pathways. In this paper, sub-cellular and multi-cellular mathematical models are developed to investigate how interactions between auxin and cytokinin influence the size and location of regions of division and differentiation within the primary root, and describe how their cross-regulation may cause periodic branching of lateral roots. We show how their joint activity may influence tissue-specific oscillations in gene expression, as shown in Moreno-Risueno et al. (2010) and commented upon in Traas and Vernoux (2010), and we propose mechanisms that may generate synchronisation of such periodic behaviours inside a cell and with its neighbours. Using a multi-cellular model, we also analyse the roles of cytokinin and auxin in specifying the three main regions of the primary root (elongation, transition and division zones), our simulation results being in good agreement with independent experimental observations. We then use our model to generate testable predictions concerning the effect of varying the concentrations of the auxin efflux transporters on the sizes of the different root regions. In particular, we predict that over-expression of the transporters will generate a longer root with a longer elongation zone and a smaller division zone than that of a wild type root. This root will contain fewer cells than its wild type counterpart. We conclude that our model can provide a useful tool for investigating the response of cell division and elongation to perturbations in hormonal signalling. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Role of TI-VAMP and CD82 in EGFR cell-surface dynamics and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danglot, Lydia; Chaineau, Mathilde; Dahan, Maxime; Gendron, Marie-Claude; Boggetto, Nicole; Perez, Franck; Galli, Thierry

    2010-03-01

    The v-SNARE TI-VAMP (VAMP7) mediates exocytosis during neuritogenesis, phagocytosis and lysosomal secretion. It localizes to endosomes and lysosomes but also to the trans-Golgi network. Here we show that depletion of TI-VAMP enhances the endocytosis of activated EGF receptor (EGFR) without affecting constitutive endocytosis of EGFR, or transferrin uptake. This increased EGFR internalization is mainly clathrin dependent. Searching for defects in EGFR regulators, we found that TI-VAMP depletion reduces the cell surface amount of CD82, a tetraspanin known to control EGFR localization in microdomains. We further show that TI-VAMP is required for secretion from the Golgi apparatus to the cell surface, and that TI-VAMP-positive vesicles transport CD82. Quantum dots video-microscopy indicates that depletion of TI-VAMP, or its cargo CD82, restrains EGFR diffusion and the area explored by EGFR at the cell surface. Both depletions also impair MAPK signaling and enhance endocytosis of activated EGFR by increased recruitment of AP-2. These results highlight the role of TI-VAMP in the secretory pathway of a tetraspanin, and support a model in which CD82 allows EGFR entry in microdomains that control its clathrin-dependent endocytosis and signaling.

  5. [Role of NO signal in ABA-induced phenolic acids accumulation in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lihong; Ren, Jiahui; Jin, Wenfang; Wang, Ruijie; Ni, Chunhong; Tong, Mengjiao; Liang, Zongsuo; Yang, Dongfeng

    2016-02-01

    To investigate roles of nitric oxide (NO) signal in accumulations of phenolic acids in abscisic.acid (ABA)-induced Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots, S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots were treated with different concentrations of sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-an exogenous NO donor, for 6 days, and contents of phenolic acids in the hairy roots are determined. Then with treatment of ABA and NO scavenger (2-(4-carboxy-2-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1- oxyl-3-oxide, c-PTIO) or NO synthase inhibitor (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, L-NAME), contents of phenolic acids and expression levels of three key genes involved in phenolic acids biosynthesis were detected. Phenolic acids production in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots was most significantly improved by 100 µmoL/L SNP. Contents of RA and salvianolic acid B increased by 3 and 4 folds. ABA significantly improved transcript levels of PAL (phenylalanine ammonia lyase), TAT (tyrosine aminotransferase) and RAS (rosmarinic acid synthase), and increased phenolic acids accumulations. However, with treatments of ABA+c-PTIO or ABA+L-NAME, accumulations of phenolic acids and expression levels of the three key genes were significantly inhibited. Both NO and ABA can increase accumulations of phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots. NO signal probably mediates the ABA-induced phenolic acids production.

  6. Endothelial Microparticle-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species: Role in Endothelial Signaling and Vascular Function

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    Dylan Burger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial microparticles are effectors of endothelial damage; however mechanisms involved are unclear. We examined the effects of eMPs on cultured endothelial cells (ECs and isolated vessels and investigated the role of eMP-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS and redox signaling in these processes. eMPs were isolated from EC media and their ability to directly produce ROS was assessed by lucigenin and liquid chromatography. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox subunits were probed by Western blot. ECs were treated with eMPs and effects on kinase signaling, superoxide anion (O2∙- generation, and nitric oxide (NO production were examined. Acetylcholine-mediated vasorelaxation was assessed by myography in eMP-treated mesenteric arteries. eMPs contained Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, p47phox, p67phox, and p22phox and they produced ROS which was inhibited by the Nox inhibitor, apocynin. eMPs increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Src, increased O2∙- production, and decreased A23187-induced NO production in ECs. Pretreatment of eMPs with apocynin diminished eMP-mediated effects on ROS and NO production but had no effect on eMP-mediated kinase activation or impairment in vasorelaxation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism whereby eMP-derived ROS contributes to MP bioactivity. These interactions may be important in conditions associated with vascular injury and increased eMP formation.

  7. Signaling Network of Environmental Sensing and Adaptation in Plants:. Key Roles of Calcium Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurusu, Takamitsu; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Considering the important issues concerning food, environment, and energy that humans are facing in the 21st century, humans mostly depend on plants. Unlike animals which move from an inappropriate environment, plants do not move, but rapidly sense diverse environmental changes or invasion by other organisms such as pathogens and insects in the place they root, and adapt themselves by changing their own bodies, through which they developed adaptability. Whole genetic information corresponding to the blueprints of many biological systems has recently been analyzed, and comparative genomic studies facilitated tracing strategies of each organism in their evolutional processes. Comparison of factors involved in intracellular signal transduction between animals and plants indicated diversification of different gene sets. Reversible binding of Ca2+ to sensor proteins play key roles as a molecular switch both in animals and plants. Molecular mechanisms for signaling network of environmental sensing and adaptation in plants will be discussed with special reference to Ca2+ as a key element in information processing.

  8. Roles of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in epithelial differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yajing; Sun, Zhaorui; Qiu, Xuefeng [Immunology and Reproductive Biology Laboratory, Medical College of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Nanjing 210093 (China); Li, Yan [Jiangsu Centers for Diseases Prevention and Control, Nanjing 210009 (China); Qin, Jizheng [Immunology and Reproductive Biology Laboratory, Medical College of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Nanjing 210093 (China); Han, Xiaodong, E-mail: hanxd@nju.edu.cn [Immunology and Reproductive Biology Laboratory, Medical College of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2009-12-25

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to be able to differentiate into epithelial lineage, but the precise mechanisms controlling this process are unclear. Our aim is to explore the roles of Wnt/{beta}-catenin in the epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Using indirect co-culture of rat MSCs with rat airway epithelial cells (RTE), MSCs expressed several airway epithelial markers (cytokeratin 18, tight junction protein occudin, cystic fibrosis transmembrance regulator). The protein levels of some important members in Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling were determined, suggested down-regulation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin with epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Furthermore, Wnt3{alpha} can inhibit the epithelial differentiation of MSCs. A loss of {beta}-catenin induced by Dickkopf-1 can enhance MSCs differentiation into epithelial cells. Lithium chloride transiently activated {beta}-catenin expression and subsequently decreased {beta}-catenin level and at last inhibited MSCs to differentiate into airway epithelium. Taken together, our study indicated that RTE cells can trigger epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Blocking Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling may promote MSCs to differentiate towards airway epithelial cells.

  9. Adult play fighting and potential role of tail signals in ringtailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagi, Elisabetta

    2009-02-01

    Adult strepsirrhines have been completely neglected in the study of animal play. I focused on adult play fighting and the role of tail-play as a signal in ringtailed lemurs (Lemur catta). Tail-play is performed during play fighting, when lemurs anoint or, more rarely, wave their tails toward the playmate. During the prereproductive period, male and female lemurs engaged in play fighting with comparable frequencies, as was expected to occur in monomorphic species such as L. catta. The dyads showing low aggression rates engaged most frequently in play fighting, and polyadic play was frequently performed. Signals seem to be important in avoiding escalation to real aggression, especially when the playfulness of performers can be misunderstood by recipients. Tail-play was most frequent (a) in the dyads with low grooming rates (low familiarity degree) and (b) during the most risky play sessions (polyadic ones). Thus, tail-play can be considered as a useful tool for play communication in ringtailed lemurs. Copyright 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Oxidant stress and skeletal muscle glucose transport: roles of insulin signaling and p38 MAPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, John S; Saengsirisuwan, Vitoon; Sloniger, Julie A; Teachey, Mary K; Henriksen, Erik J

    2006-09-01

    Oxidative stress can impact the regulation of glucose transport activity in a variety of cell lines. In the present study, we assessed the direct effects of an oxidant stress on the glucose transport system in intact mammalian skeletal muscle preparations. Type IIb (epitrochlearis) and type I (soleus) muscles from insulin-sensitive lean Zucker rats were incubated in 8 mM glucose for 2 h in the absence or presence of 100 mU/ml glucose oxidase to produce the oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) (60-90 microM). Glucose transport, glycogen synthase activity, and metabolic signaling factors were then assessed. H(2)O(2) significantly (p oxidant stress was prevented by the PI3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. The oxidant stress also significantly increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and 5'-AMP-dependent protein kinase. Interestingly, selective inhibition of p38 MAPK using A304000 substantially reduced the activation of glucose transport induced by the oxidant stress. These results support a direct role for oxidative stress in the activation of the glucose transport system in mammalian skeletal muscle and indicate that this process involves engagement of and possible interactions between the PI3-kinase-dependent signaling pathway and activation of p38 MAPK.

  11. Not just signal shutoff: the protective role of arrestin-1 in rod cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Martha E; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Heck, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The retinal rod cell is an exquisitely sensitive single-photon detector that primarily functions in dim light (e.g., moonlight). However, rod cells must routinely survive light intensities more than a billion times greater (e.g., bright daylight). One serious challenge to rod cell survival in daylight is the massive amount of all-trans-retinal that is released by Meta II, the light-activated form of the photoreceptor rhodopsin. All-trans-retinal is toxic, and its condensation products have been implicated in disease. Our recent work has developed the concept that rod arrestin (arrestin-1), which terminates Meta II signaling, has an additional role in protecting rod cells from the consequences of bright light by limiting free all-trans-retinal. In this chapter we will elaborate upon the molecular mechanisms by which arrestin-1 serves as both a single-photon response quencher as well as an instrument of rod cell survival in bright light. This discussion will take place within the framework of three distinct functional modules of vision: signal transduction, the retinoid cycle, and protein translocation.

  12. The role of phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway in regulating serotonin-induced oocyte maturation in Mercenaria mercenaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing; ZHANG Tao

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has been found to stimulate meiotic maturation of oocytes in many molluscs. During maturation, several signaling pathways are involved, especially the phosphatidylinositol and cAMP pathways. In order to examine the possible role of the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway in regulating oocyte maturation in Mercenaria mercenaria, the effects of the activator/inhibitor of phospholipase (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) on serotonin-induced maturation were studied. Results show that high-concentrations of neomycin (inhibitor of PLC) blocked oocyte maturation, while 9, 10-dimethyl- 1, 2-benzanthracene (DMBA, activator of PLC) promoted oocyte maturation in the presence of serotonin. It was also found that in the presence of serotonin, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA,activator of PKC) inhibited oocyte maturation, while sphingosine (inhibitor of PKC) stimulated oocyte maturation. These results indicate that serotonin-induced oocyte maturation requires the activation of the phosphatidylinositol pathway. Decrease of PLC inhibited serotonin-induced oocyte maturation, whereas a decrease of PKC stimulated the maturation. Thus, our study indicates that serotonin promotes maturation of M. mercenaria oocytes through PLC stimulated increase in calcium ion concentration via inositol-1,4, 5-trisphosphate (IP3) but not PKC.

  13. Diet in acne: further evidence for the role of nutrient signalling in acne pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2012-05-01

    Recent evidence underlines the role of Western diet in the pathogenesis of acne. Acne is absent in populations consuming Palaeolithic diets with low glycaemic load and no consumption of milk or dairy products. Two randomized controlled studies, one of which is presented in this issue of Acta Dermato-Venereologica, have provided evidence for the beneficial therapeutic effects of low glycaemic load diets in acne. Epidemiological evidence confirms that milk consumption has an acne-promoting or acne-aggravating effect. Recent progress in understanding the nutrient-sensitive kinase mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) allows a new view of nutrient signalling in acne by both high glycaemic load and increased insulin-, IGF-1-, and leucine signalling due to milk protein consumption. Acne should be regarded as an mTORC1-driven disease of civilization, like obesity, type 2 diabetes and cancer induced by Western diet. Early dietary counselling of teenage acne patients is thus a great opportunity for dermatology, which will not only help to improve acne but may reduce the long-term adverse effects of Western diet on more serious mTORC1-driven diseases of civilization.

  14. From Peripheral to Central: The Role of ERK Signaling Pathway in Acupuncture Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yeun; Park, Jongbae J.; Jeon, Songhee; Doo, Ah-Reum; Kim, Seung-Nam; Lee, Hyangsook; Chae, Younbyoung; Maixner, William; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Despite accumulating evidence of the clinical effectiveness of acupuncture, its mechanism remains largely unclear. We assume that molecular signaling around the acupuncture needled area is essential for initiating the effect of acupuncture. To determine possible bio-candidates involved in the mechanisms of acupuncture and investigate the role of such bio-candidates in the analgesic effects of acupuncture, we conducted 2 stepwise experiments. First, a genome-wide microarray of the isolated skin layer at the GB34-equivalent acupoint of C57BL/6 mice 1 hour after acupuncture found that a total of 236 genes had changed and that extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) activation was the most prominent bio-candidate. Second, in mouse pain models using formalin and complete Freund adjuvant, we found that acupuncture attenuated the nociceptive behavior and the mechanical allodynia; these effects were blocked when ERK cascade was interrupted by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor U0126 (.8 μg/μL). Based on these results, we suggest that ERK phosphorylation following acupuncture needling is a biochemical hallmark initiating the effect of acupuncture including analgesia. Perspective This article presents the novel evidence of the local molecular signaling in acupuncture analgesia by demonstrating that ERK activation in the skin layer contributes to the analgesic effect of acupuncture in a mouse pain model. This work improves our understanding of the scientific basis underlying acupuncture analgesia. PMID:24524846

  15. Opposing roles for interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3 and type I interferon signaling during plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami A Patel

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFN-I broadly control innate immunity and are typically transcriptionally induced by Interferon Regulatory Factors (IRFs following stimulation of pattern recognition receptors within the cytosol of host cells. For bacterial infection, IFN-I signaling can result in widely variant responses, in some cases contributing to the pathogenesis of disease while in others contributing to host defense. In this work, we addressed the role of type I IFN during Yersinia pestis infection in a murine model of septicemic plague. Transcription of IFN-β was induced in vitro and in vivo and contributed to pathogenesis. Mice lacking the IFN-I receptor, Ifnar, were less sensitive to disease and harbored more neutrophils in the later stage of infection which correlated with protection from lethality. In contrast, IRF-3, a transcription factor commonly involved in inducing IFN-β following bacterial infection, was not necessary for IFN production but instead contributed to host defense. In vitro, phagocytosis of Y. pestis by macrophages and neutrophils was more effective in the presence of IRF-3 and was not affected by IFN-β signaling. This activity correlated with limited bacterial growth in vivo in the presence of IRF-3. Together the data demonstrate that IRF-3 is able to activate pathways of innate immunity against bacterial infection that extend beyond regulation of IFN-β production.

  16. The role of IL-33/ST2L signals in the immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingli; Kang, Jian; Zhang, Chengliang; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2015-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 signals influence various immune cells during differentiation, immune responses and homeostasis. As discussed in this Review, IL-33 via TI/ST2L regulates the functions of immune cells including T cells, B cells, DCs, macrophages, mast cells, and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Stimulation with IL-33 is crucial for CD4+ T cell polarized into Th2 immunity and for the induction of Treg. CD8+ T cells can also express ST2L and IL-33 promotes features of effector CD8+ T cells. For macrophages and ILCs, ST2L presents on these cells and IL-33 induces Th2 cytokine production. IL-33 modulates adhesion, activation, maturation, and cytokine production by mast cells. ST2 is expressed in B1 and is important for differentiation of IL-10-producing B cells. Understanding the specific role of IL-33/ST2L in different immune cells will help to answer the remaining questions that are important for diseases pathologies and intervention strategies by targeting the IL-33/ST2L signals.

  17. Plasmodium falciparum Adhesins Play an Essential Role in Signalling and Activation of Invasion into Human Erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Hong Tham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The most severe form of malaria in humans is caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The invasive form of malaria parasites is termed a merozoite and it employs an array of parasite proteins that bind to the host cell to mediate invasion. In Plasmodium falciparum, the erythrocyte binding-like (EBL and reticulocyte binding-like (Rh protein families are responsible for binding to specific erythrocyte receptors for invasion and mediating signalling events that initiate active entry of the malaria parasite. Here we have addressed the role of the cytoplasmic tails of these proteins in activating merozoite invasion after receptor engagement. We show that the cytoplasmic domains of these type 1 membrane proteins are phosphorylated in vitro. Depletion of PfCK2, a kinase implicated to phosphorylate these cytoplasmic tails, blocks P. falciparum invasion of red blood cells. We identify the crucial residues within the PfRh4 cytoplasmic domain that are required for successful parasite invasion. Live cell imaging of merozoites from these transgenic mutants show they attach but do not penetrate erythrocytes implying the PfRh4 cytoplasmic tail conveys signals important for the successful completion of the invasion process.

  18. A central role for TOR signalling in a yeast model for juvenile CLN3 disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Bond

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts provide an excellent genetically tractable eukaryotic system for investigating the function of genes in their biological context, and are especially relevant for those conserved genes that cause disease. We study the role of btn1, the orthologue of a human gene that underlies an early onset neurodegenerative disease (juvenile CLN3 disease, neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCLs or Batten disease in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A global screen for genetic interactions with btn1 highlighted a conserved key signalling hub in which multiple components functionally relate to this conserved disease gene. This signalling hub includes two major mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades, and centers on the Tor kinase complexes TORC1 and TORC2. We confirmed that yeast cells modelling CLN3 disease exhibit features consistent with dysfunction in the TORC pathways, and showed that modulating TORC function leads to a comprehensive rescue of defects in this yeast disease model. The same pathways may be novel targets in the development of therapies for the NCLs and related diseases.

  19. Pgrmc1/BDNF Signaling Plays a Critical Role in Mediating Glia-Neuron Cross Talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fen; Nguyen, Trinh; Jin, Xin; Huang, Renqi; Chen, Zhenglan; Cunningham, Rebecca L; Singh, Meharvan; Su, Chang

    2016-05-01

    Progesterone (P4) exerts robust cytoprotection in brain slice cultures (containing both neurons and glia), yet such protection is not as evident in neuron-enriched cultures, suggesting that glia may play an indispensable role in P4's neuroprotection. We previously reported that a membrane-associated P4 receptor, P4 receptor membrane component 1, mediates P4-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release from glia. Here, we sought to determine whether glia are required for P4's neuroprotection and whether glia's roles are mediated, at least partially, via releasing soluble factors to act on neighboring neurons. Our data demonstrate that P4 increased the level of mature BDNF (neuroprotective) while decreasing pro-BDNF (potentially neurotoxic) in the conditioned media (CMs) of cultured C6 astrocytes. We examined the effects of CMs derived from P4-treated astrocytes (P4-CMs) on 2 neuronal models: 1) all-trans retinoid acid-differentiated SH-SY5Y cells and 2) mouse primary hippocampal neurons. P4-CM increased synaptic marker expression and promoted neuronal survival against H2O2. These effects were attenuated by Y1036 (an inhibitor of neurotrophin receptor [tropomysin-related kinase] signaling), as well as tropomysin-related kinase B-IgG (a more specific inhibitor to block BDNF signaling), which pointed to BDNF as the key protective component within P4-CM. These findings suggest that P4 may exert its maximal protection by triggering a glia-neuron cross talk, in which P4 promotes mature BDNF release from glia to enhance synaptogenesis as well as survival of neurons. This recognition of the importance of glia in mediating P4's neuroprotection may also inform the design of effective therapeutic methods for treating diseases wherein neuronal death and/or synaptic deficits are noted.

  20. Role of nitric oxide signaling in endothelial differentiation of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ngan F; Fleissner, Felix; Sun, John; Cooke, John P

    2010-10-01

    Signaling pathways that govern embryonic stem cell (ESCs) differentiation are not well characterized. Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent vasodilator that modulates other signaling pathways in part by activating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) to produce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Because of its importance in endothelial cell (EC) growth in the adult, we hypothesized that NO may play a critical role in EC development. Accordingly, we assessed the role of NO in ESC differentiation into ECs. Murine ESCs differentiated in the presence of NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) for up to 11 days were not significantly different from vehicle-treated cells in EC markers. However, by 14 days, L-NAME-treated cells manifested modest reduction in EC markers CD144, FLK1, and endothelial NOS. ESC-derived ECs generated in the presence of L-NAME exhibited reduced tube-like formation in Matrigel. To understand the discrepancy between early and late effects of L-NAME, we assessed the NOS machinery and observed low mRNA expression of NOS and sGC subunits in ESCs, compared to differentiating cells after 14 days. In response to NO donors or activation of NOS or sGC, cellular cGMP levels were undetectable in undifferentiated ESCs, at low levels on day 7, and robustly increased in day 14 cells. Production of cGMP upon NOS activation at day 14 was inhibited by L-NAME, confirming endogenous NO dependence. Our data suggest that NOS elements are present in ESCs but inactive until later stages of differentiation, during which period NOS inhibition reduces expression of EC markers and impairs angiogenic function.

  1. The LAT story: a tale of cooperativity, coordination, and choreography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Coussens, Nathan P; Sherman, Eilon; Samelson, Lawrence E; Sommers, Connie L

    2010-08-01

    The adapter molecule LAT is a nucleating site for multiprotein signaling complexes that are vital for the function and differentiation of T cells. Extensive investigation of LAT in multiple experimental systems has led to an integrated understanding of the formation, composition, regulation, dynamic movement, and function of LAT-nucleated signaling complexes. This review discusses interactions of signaling molecules that bind directly or indirectly to LAT and the role of cooperativity in stabilizing LAT-nucleated signaling complexes. In addition, it focuses on how imaging studies visualize signaling assemblies as signaling clusters and demonstrate their dynamic nature and cellular fate. Finally, this review explores the function of LAT based on the interpretation of mouse models using various LAT mutants.

  2. Purinergic signalling in autoimmunity: A role for the P2X7R in systemic lupus erythematosus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Di Virgilio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic signalling plays a crucial role in immunity and autoimmunity. Among purinergic receptors, the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R has an undisputed role as it is expressed to high level by immune cells, triggers cytokine release and modulates immune cell differentiation. In this review, we focus on evidence supporting a possible role of the P2X7R in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE.

  3. International cooperation Brazil-Cuba-Haiti: the role of community radios in strengthening social mobilization in the public health context in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Renata Machado Dos Santos; Oliveira, Valdir de Castro

    2015-01-01

    The present article investigates the role of Haitian community radios in strengthening social mobilization, with the aim of supporting the actions undertaken in the field of public health in Haiti, based on the development of the Workshop for community radios, as part of the Tripartite Cooperation Brazil-Cuba-Haiti. The qualitative methodology is justified because of the study content, an analysis of documents and direct observation, through a case study presented at the Workshop held in the department of Hinches, in Haiti. This meeting was held in the context of the Working Group on Tripartite Communication, under the responsibility of the Health Channel/Fiocruz, in partnership with the Department for Health Promotion and Environmental Prevention of the Ministry of Health and Population of Haiti (DPSPE/MSPP/Haiti), with a proposal to better structure a network of multipliers in health promotion.

  4. Cramer-Rao lower bounds for estimating carrier parameters of PSK signals in multi-antenna cooperative receivers%多天线协同接收PSK载波参数估计的CRLB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨珂; 万明康; 李鸥

    2012-01-01

    针对利用多个独立天线对同一信号进行协同接收的问题,推导了数据辅助(DA)和非数据辅助(NDA)方式BPSK/QPSK信号频率及相位估计的Cramer-Rao下界(CRLB),并与传统单个天线接收时的CRLB进行了比较.结果表明,在DA方式下,多天线协同接收PSK信号频率及相位估计的CRLB与传统单天线接收的CRLB相同;在NDA方式下,多天线协同接收的CRLB则要低于传统单天线接收的CRLB.%This paper investigates the PSK parameter estimation problem with multiple independent cooperative receivers, and derives the Cramer-Rao Lower Bounds (CRLBs) of BPSK/QPSK frequency and phase estimation based on either known or random data. Compared with the CRLBs in traditional single receiver, the results indicate that the CRLBs for Data-Aided(DA) carrier frequency and phase estimation of PSK signals in multi-antenna cooperative receivers are the same with the CRLBs in traditional single receiver, but the CRLBs for Non-Data-Aided(NDA) estimation for multi-antenna cooperative receivers are lower than the traditional ones.

  5. A novel role of sesamol in inhibiting NF-κB-mediated signaling in platelet activation

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    Chang Chao-Chien

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of coronary heart diseases. Our previous studies revealed that sesamol possesses potent antiplatelet activity through increasing cyclic AMP formation. Although platelets are anucleated cells, they also express the transcription factor, NF-κB, that may exert non-genomic functions in platelet activation. Therefore, we further investigated the inhibitory roles of sesamol in NF-κB-mediated platelet function. Methods Platelet aggregation, Fura 2-AM fluorescence, and immunoblotting analysis were used in this study. Results NF-κB signaling events, including IKKβ phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and p65 phosphorylation, were markedly activated by collagen (1 μg/ml in washed human platelets, and these signaling events were attenuated by sesamol (2.5~25 μM. Furthermore, SQ22536 and ODQ, inhibitors of adenylate cyclase and guanylate cyclase, respectively, strongly reversed the sesamol (25 μM-mediated inhibitory effects of IKKβ phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and p65 phosphorylation stimulated by collagen. The protein kinase A (PKA inhibitor, H89, also reversed sesamol-mediated inhibition of IκBα degradation. Moreover, BAY11-7082, an NF-κB inhibitor, abolished IκBα degradation, phospholipase C (PLCγ2 phosphorylation, protein kinase C (PKC activation, [Ca2+]i mobilization, and platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Preincubation of platelets with the inhibitors, SQ22536 and H89, both strongly reversed sesamol-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation and [Ca2+]i mobilization. Conclusions Sesamol activates cAMP-PKA signaling, followed by inhibition of the NF-κB-PLC-PKC cascade, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca2+]i mobilization and platelet aggregation. Because platelet activation is not only linked to hemostasis, but also has a relevant role in inflammation and metastasis, our data demonstrating that inhibition of NF-κB interferes with platelet function may

  6. Role of somatomedin-B-like domains on ENPP1 inhibition of insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimatteo, Claudia; Marucci, Antonella; Palazzo, Antonio; Cisternino, Carmela; Marsano, René Massimiliano; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Di Paola, Rosa

    2013-03-01

    The exact mechanism by which ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1) inhibits insulin signaling is not known. ENPP1 contains two somatomedin-B-like domains (i.e. SMB 1 and 2) involved in ENPP1 dimerization in animal cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate if these domains modulate ENPP1 inhibitory activity on insulin signaling in human insulin target cells (HepG2). ENPP1 (ENPP1-3'myc), ENPP1 deleted of SMB 1 (ENPP1-ΔI-3'myc) or of SMB 2 (ENPP1-ΔII-3'myc) domain were cloned in frame with myc tag in mammalian expression vector pRK5. Plasmids were transiently transfected in human liver HepG2 cells. ENPP1 inhibitory activity on insulin signaling, dimerization and protein-protein interaction with insulin receptor (IR), reported to mediate the modulation of ENPP1 inhibitory activity, were studied. As compared to untransfected cells, a progressive increase of ENPP1 inhibitory activity on insulin-induced IR β-subunit autophosphorylation and on Akt-S(473) phosphorylation was observed in ENPP1-3'myc, ENPP1-ΔI-3'myc and ENPP1-ΔII-3'myc cells. Under non reducing conditions a 260 kDa homodimer, indicating ENPP1 dimerization, was observed. The ratio of non reduced (260 kDa) to reduced (130 kDa) ENPP1 was significantly decreased by two thirds in ENPP1-ΔII-3'myc vs. ENPP1-3'myc but not in ENPP1-ΔI-3'myc. A similar ENPP1/IR interaction was detectable by co-immunoprecipitation in ENPP1-3'myc, ENPP1-ΔI-3'myc and ENPP1-ΔII-3'myc cells. In conclusion, SMB 1 and SMB 2 are negative modulators of ENPP1 inhibitory activity on insulin signaling. For SMB 2 such effect might be mediated by a positive role on protein dimerization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of aluminum sensing and signaling in plant aluminum resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiping Liu; Miguel A. Piñeros; Leon V. Kochian

    2014-01-01

    As researchers have gained a better understanding in recent years into the physiological, molecular, and genetic basis of how plants deal with aluminum (Al) toxicity in acid soils prevalent in the tropics and sub-tropics, it has become clear that an important component of these responses is the triggering and regulation of cellular pathways and processes by Al. In this review of plant Al signaling, we begin by summarizing the understanding of physiological mechanisms of Al resis-tance, which first led researchers to realize that Al stress induces gene expression and modifies protein function during the activation of Al resistance responses. Subsequently, an overview of Al resistance genes and their function provides verification that Al induction of gene expression plays a major role in Al resistance in many plant species. More recent research into the mechanistic basis for Al-induced transcrip-tional activation of resistance genes has led to the identifica-tion of several transcription factors as wel as cis-elements in the promoters of Al resistance genes that play a role in greater Al-induced gene expression as wel as higher constitutive expression of resistance genes in some plant species. Final y, the post-transcriptional and translational regulation of Al resistance proteins is addressed, where recent research has shown that Al can both directly bind to and alter activity of certain organic acid transporters, and also influence Al resistance proteins indirectly, via protein phosphorylation.

  8. Targeting PKC: a novel role for beta-catenin in ER stress and apoptotic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Marc S; Breitkreutz, Iris; Tonon, Giovanni; Zhang, Jing; Hayden, Patrick J; Nguyen, Thu; Fruehauf, Johannes H; Lin, Boris K; Chauhan, Dharminder; Hideshima, Teru; Munshi, Nikhil C; Anderson, Kenneth C; Podar, Klaus

    2009-02-12

    Targeting protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms by the small molecule inhibitor enzastaurin has shown promising preclinical activity in a wide range of tumor cells. We further delineated its mechanism of action in multiple myeloma (MM) cells and found a novel role of beta-catenin in regulating growth and survival of tumor cells. Specifically, inhibition of PKC leads to rapid accumulation of beta-catenin by preventing the phosphorylation required for its proteasomal degradation. Microarray analysis and small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing in MM cells revealed that accumulated beta-catenin activates early endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling via eIF2alpha, C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), and p21, leading to immediate growth inhibition. Furthermore, accumulated beta-catenin contributes to enzastaurin-induced cell death. Sequential knockdown of beta-catenin, c-Jun, and p73, as well as overexpression of beta-catenin or p73 confirmed that accumulated beta-catenin triggers c-Jun-dependent induction of p73, thereby conferring MM cell apoptosis. Our data reveal a novel role of beta-catenin in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated growth inhibition and a new proapoptotic mechanism triggered by beta-catenin on inhibition of PKC isoforms. Moreover, we identify p73 as a potential novel therapeutic target in MM. Based on these and previous data, enzastaurin is currently under clinical investigation in a variety of hematologic malignancies, including MM.

  9. Comparative Phosphoproteomics Reveals an Important Role of MKK2 in Banana (Musa spp.) Cold Signal Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Zhang, Sheng; He, Wei-Di; Shao, Xiu-Hong; Li, Chun-Yu; Wei, Yue-Rong; Deng, Gui-Ming; Kuang, Rui-Bin; Hu, Chun-Hua; Yi, Gan-Jun; Yang, Qiao-Song

    2017-01-01

    Low temperature is one of the key environmental stresses, which greatly affects global banana production. However, little is known about the global phosphoproteomes in Musa spp. and their regulatory roles in response to cold stress. In this study, we conducted a comparative phosphoproteomic profiling of cold-sensitive Cavendish Banana and relatively cold tolerant Dajiao under cold stress. Phosphopeptide abundances of five phosphoproteins involved in MKK2 interaction network, including MKK2, HY5, CaSR, STN7 and kinesin-like protein, show a remarkable difference between Cavendish Banana and Dajiao in response to cold stress. Western blotting of MKK2 protein and its T31 phosphorylated peptide verified the phosphoproteomic results of increased T31 phosphopeptide abundance with decreased MKK2 abundance in Daojiao for a time course of cold stress. Meanwhile increased expression of MKK2 with no detectable T31 phosphorylation was found in Cavendish Banana. These results suggest that the MKK2 pathway in Dajiao, along with other cold-specific phosphoproteins, appears to be associated with the molecular mechanisms of high tolerance to cold stress in Dajiao. The results also provide new evidence that the signaling pathway of cellular MKK2 phosphorylation plays an important role in abiotic stress tolerance that likely serves as a universal plant cold tolerance mechanism. PMID:28106078

  10. Role of cyclooxygenase-2 signaling pathway dysfunction in unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu; ZHAO Ai-min; LIN Qi-de

    2010-01-01

    Background Experimental evidence indicates that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays a critical role in blastocyst implantation; however, little is known of the role of COX-2 in unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion (URSA).Methods We evaluated the expression level and potential signaling pathway of COX-2 in 30 cases of URSA who were excluded the abnormality of chromosomes, anatomy, endocrine, infectious, autoimmune diseases and in 30 normal pregnancies.Results The mRNA and the protein expression level of COX-2 in the URSA group (-0.238±0.848, 0.368±0.089,respectively) were significantly lower than that in the control group (1.943±3.845, 1.046±0.108, respectively) (both, P<0.01). The expression of prostaglandins PGF2a, PGD2, PGE2, and PGI2, in the URSA group ((2326.0±295.6) pg/ml,(2164.0±240.5) pg/ml, (238.7±26.4) pg/ml, (2337.0±263.0) pg/ml, respectively) were significantly lower than that in the control group ((3450.0±421.7) pg/ml, (3174.0±415.6) pg/ml, (323.5±43.8) pg/ml, (3623.0±460.4) pg/ml, respectively) (P<0.05). The mRNA expression level of PPARβ and RXRa (0.859±0.653, -0.172±0.752, respectively) in URSA group was significantly lower than that in the control group (1.554±1.735, 0.777±2.482, respectively) (both P <0.05). The mRNA and protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in the URSA group (2.010±1.522, 0.35±0.46)was significantly lower than that in the control group (4.569±2.430, 0.750±0.350) (both P <0.05).Conclusions COX-2 and the COX-2-derived PGI2 signaling pathway possibly play an important role in successful embryo implantation, and their decreased expression may result in URSA. The decreased expression may influence the expression of VEGF-A which interferes with placental angiogenesis causing failure of embryo implantation, leading to spontaneous abortion.

  11. Activated AMPK boosts the Nrf2/HO-1 signaling axis—A role for the unfolded protein response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Kristin; Baldinger, Johannes; Mayerhofer, Barbara; Atanasov, Atanas G.; Dirsch, Verena M.; Heiss, Elke H.

    2015-01-01

    In light of the emerging interplay between redox and metabolic signaling pathways we investigated the potential cross talk between nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), central regulators of the cellular redox and energy balance, respectively. Making use of xanthohumol (XN) as an activator of both the AMPK and the Nrf2 signaling pathway we show that AMPK exerts a positive influence on Nrf2/heme oxygenase (HO)-1 signaling in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Genetic ablation and pharmacological inhibition of AMPK blunts Nrf2-dependent HO-1 expression by XN already at the mRNA level. XN leads to AMPK activation via interference with mitochondrial function and activation of liver kinase B1 as upstream AMPK kinase. The subsequent AMPK-mediated enhancement of the Nrf2/HO-1 response does not depend on inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin, inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β, or altered abundance of Nrf2 (total and nuclear). However, reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress was identified and elaborated as a step in the AMPK-augmented Nrf2/HO-1 response. Overall, we shed more light on the hitherto incompletely understood cross talk between the LKB1/AMPK and the Nrf2/HO-1 axis revealing for the first time involvement of the unfolded protein response as an additional player and suggesting tight cooperation between signaling pathways controlling cellular redox, energy, or protein homeostasis. PMID:25843659

  12. Property analysis of a HAPS communication scheme based on MIMO for signal' s cooperative reception%HAPS通信中基于MIMO的信号协作接收方案性能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍辰杰; 陈树新; 张衡阳

    2012-01-01

    分析了在HAPS中应用协作通信的需求。研究了HAPS通信信道在不同仰角区域的特性,在此基础上提出一种HAPS通信中基于MIMO的信号协作接收方案,并在不同仰角区域中对该协作接收方案进行性能仿真.仿真结果表明,在中、低仰角区域内使用该协作接收方案能够获得较大的组合分集增益,但是。对于高仰角区域此协作通信方案的性能改善不明显.最后,就上述2种现象产生的原因进行了分析。%First the demand of applying cooperative communication via HAPS is analyzed. Then the character of HAPS communication channel in different elevation angles is studied. This paper presents a HAPS communication scheme based on MIMO for signal's cooperative reception on the basis of two works mentioned above. And a property simulation towards the cooperative reception scheme in different elevation angles is made. The simulation results shows the following:The cooperative reception scheme can obtain a relatively large combining diversity gain in middle& low-elevation angle area. However, there is little property improvement in high-elevation angle by using this scheme. Finally, the reason why different results occur in different elevation angles is analyzed.

  13. Effect of nicotine on exocytotic pancreatic secretory response: role of calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhury Parimal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotine is a risk factor for pancreatitis resulting in loss of pancreatic enzyme secretion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanisms of nicotine-induced secretory response measured in primary pancreatic acinar cells isolated from Male Sprague Dawley rats. The study examines the role of calcium signaling in the mechanism of the enhanced secretory response observed with nicotine exposure. Methods Isolated and purified pancreatic acinar cells were subjected to a nicotine exposure at a dose of 100 μM for 6 minutes and then stimulated with cholecystokinin (CCK for 30 min. The cell’s secretory response was measured by the percent of amylase released from the cells in the incubation medium Calcium receptor antagonists, inositol trisphosphate (IP3 receptor blockers, mitogen activated protein kinase inhibitors and specific nicotinic receptor antagonists were used to confirm the involvement of calcium in this process. Results Nicotine exposure induced enhanced secretory response in primary cells. These responses remained unaffected by mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK’s inhibitors. The effects, however, have been completely abolished by nicotinic receptor antagonist, calcium channel receptor antagonists and inositol trisphosphate (IP3 receptor blockers. Conclusions The data suggest that calcium activated events regulating the exocytotic secretion are affected by nicotine as shown by enhanced functional response which is inhibited by specific antagonists… The results implicate the role of nicotine in the mobilization of both intra- and extracellular calcium in the regulation of stimulus-secretory response of enzyme secretion in this cell system. We conclude that nicotine plays an important role in promoting enhanced calcium levels inside the acinar cell.

  14. The NOTCH signaling pathway: role in the pathogenesis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and implication for therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL) is characterized by aberrant activation of NOTCH1 in over 60% of T-ALL cases. The high prevalence of activating NOTCH1 mutations highlights the critical role of NOTCH signaling in the pathogenesis of this disease and has prompted the development of therapeutic approaches targeting the NOTCH signaling pathway. Small molecule gamma secretase inhibitors (GSIs) can effectively inhibit oncogenic NOTCH1 and are in clinical testing for the treatme...

  15. Dual role for membrane localization in yeast MAP kinase cascade activation and its contribution to signaling fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamson, Rachel E; Takahashi, Satoe; Winters, Matthew J; Pryciak, Peter M

    2006-03-21

    Distinct MAP kinase pathways in yeast share several signaling components , including the PAK Ste20 and the MAPKKK Ste11, yet signaling is specific. Mating pheromones trigger an initial step in which Ste20 activates Ste11 , and this requires plasma membrane recruitment of the MAP kinase cascade scaffold protein, Ste5 . Here, we demonstrate an additional role for Ste5 membrane localization. Once Ste11 is activated, signaling through the mating pathway remains minimal but is substantially amplified when Ste5 is recruited to the membrane either by the Gbetagamma dimer or by direct membrane targeting, even to internal membranes. Ste11 signaling is also amplified by Ste5 oligomerization and by a hyperactivating mutation in the Ste7 binding region of Ste5. We suggest a model in which membrane recruitment of Ste5 concentrates its binding partners and thereby amplifies signaling through the kinase cascade. We find similar behavior in the osmotically responsive HOG pathway. Remarkably, while both pheromone and hyperosmotic stimuli amplify signaling from constitutively active Ste11, the resulting signaling output remains pathway specific. These findings suggest a common mode of regulation in which pathway stimuli both initiate and amplify MAP kinase cascade signaling. The regulation of rate-limiting steps that lie after a branchpoint from shared components helps ensure signaling specificity.

  16. Comparative analysis of regulatory roles of P38 signaling pathway in 8 types liver cell during liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianguang; Zhu, Lin; Zhao, Weiming; Shi, Yaohuang; He, Chuncui; Xu, Cunshuan

    2016-12-05

    P38MAPK signaling pathway was closely related to cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell differentiation, cell survival, cell death, and so on. However, the regulatory mechanism of P38MAPK signaling pathway in liver regeneration (LR) was unclear. In order to further reveal the roles of P38MAPK signaling pathway in rat liver regeneration, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software and related data sites were used to construct P38MAPK signaling pathway, and the pathway was confirmed by relevant documents literature. The expression changes of P38MAPK signaling pathway-related gene in eight type cells were further analyzed by Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array, and the results showed that 95 genes in P38MAPK signaling pathway had significant changes. H-cluster analysis showed that hepatocyte cell (HC), pit cell (PC), oval cell (OC) and biliary epithelial cell (BEC) are clustered together; and the same as Kupffer cell (KC), sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC), dendritic cell (DC) and hepatic stellate cell (HSC). IPA software and expression analysis systematic explorer (EASE) were applied to functional enrichment analysis, and the results showed that P38MAPK signaling pathway was mainly involved in apoptosis, cell death, cell proliferation, cell survival, cell viability, activation, cell cycle progression, necrosis, synthesis of DNA and other physical activity during LR. In conclusion, P38MAPK signaling pathway regulated various physiological activities of LR through multiple signaling pathways.

  17. ENHANCING COOPERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    China and Japan can cooperate on a wide scope of issues, such as the organization of the Beijing Olympic Games next year and aid to Africa,said Ide Keiji, Minister of Public Relations, Press, Culture, Education and Sports and Spokesperson of the Embassy

  18. The role of electrical signals in murine corneal wound re-epithelialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucerova, Romana; Walczysko, Petr; Reid, Brian; Ou, Jingxing; Leiper, Lucy J; Rajnicek, Ann M; McCaig, Colin D; Zhao, Min; Collinson, J Martin

    2011-06-01

    Ion flow from intact tissue into epithelial wound sites results in lateral electric currents that may represent a major driver of wound healing cell migration. Use of applied electric fields (EF) to promote wound healing is the basis of Medicare-approved electric stimulation therapy. This study investigated the roles for EFs in wound re-epithelialization, using the Pax6(+/-) mouse model of the human ocular surface abnormality aniridic keratopathy (in which wound healing and corneal epithelial cell migration are disrupted). Both wild-type (WT) and Pax6(+/-) corneal epithelial cells showed increased migration speeds in response to applied EFs in vitro. However, only Pax6(+/+) cells demonstrated consistent directional galvanotaxis towards the cathode, with activation of pSrc signaling, polarized to the leading edges of cells. In vivo, the epithelial wound site normally represents a cathode, but 43% of Pax6(+/-) corneas exhibited reversed endogenous wound-induced currents (the wound was an anode). These corneas healed at the same rate as WT. Surprisingly, epithelial migration did not correlate with direction or magnitude of endogenous currents for WT or mutant corneas. Furthermore, during healing in vivo, no polarization of pSrc was observed. We found little evidence that Src-dependent mechanisms of cell migration, observed in response to applied EFs in vitro, normally exist in vivo. It is concluded that endogenous EFs do not drive long-term directionality of sustained healing migration in this mouse corneal epithelial model. Ion flow from wounds may nevertheless represent an important component of wound signaling initiation.

  19. A role for bioelectric effects in the induction of bystander signals by ionizing radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, C; Moran, G; McNeill, F; Gow, M D; Denbeigh, J; Prestwich, W; Seymour, C B

    2007-04-03

    The induction of "bystander effects" i.e. effects in cells which have not received an ionizing radiation track, is now accepted but the mechanisms are not completely clear. Bystander effects following high and low LET radiation exposure are accepted but mechanisms are still not understood. There is some evidence for a physical component to the signal. This paper tests the hypothesis that bioelectric or biomagnetic phenomena are involved. Human immortalized skin keratinocytes and primary explants of mouse bladder and fish skin, were exposed directly to ionizing radiation or treated in a variety of bystander protocols. Exposure of cells was conducted by shielding one group of flasks using lead, to reduce the dose below the threshold of 2mGy (60)Cobalt gamma rays established for the bystander effect. The endpoint for the bystander effect in the reporter system used was reduction in cloning efficiency (RCE). The magnitude of the RCE was similar in shielded and unshielded flasks. When cells were placed in a Faraday cage the magnitude of the RCE was less but not eliminated. The results suggest that liquid media or cell-cell contact transmission of bystander factors may be only part of the bystander mechanism. Bioelectric or bio magnetic fields may have a role to play. To test this further, cells were placed in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine for 10 min using a typical head scan protocol. This treatment also induced a bystander response. Apart from the obvious clinical relevance, the MRI results further suggest that bystander effects may be produced by non-ionizing exposures. It is concluded that bioelectric or magnetic effects may be involved in producing bystander signaling cascades commonly seen following ionizing radiation exposure.

  20. Insulin signaling as a mechanism underlying developmental plasticity: the role of FOXO in a nutritional polyphenism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie C Snell-Rood

    Full Text Available We investigated whether insulin signaling, known to mediate physiological plasticity in response to changes in nutrition, also facilitates discrete phenotypic responses such as polyphenisms. We test the hypothesis that the gene FOXO--which regulates growth arrest under nutrient stress--mediates a nutritional polyphenism in the horned beetle, Onthophagus nigriventris. Male beetles in the genus Onthophagus vary their mating strategy with body size: large males express horns and fight for access to females while small males invest heavily in genitalia and sneak copulations with females. Given that body size and larval nutrition are linked, we predicted that 1 FOXO expression would differentially scale with body size (nutritional status between males and females, and 2 manipulation of FOXO expression would affect the nutritional polyphenism in horns and genitalia. First, we found that FOXO expression varied with body size in a tissue- and sex-specific manner, being more highly expressed in the abdominal tissue of large (horned males, in particular in regions associated with genitalia development. Second, we found that knockdown of FOXO through RNA-interference resulted in the growth of relatively larger copulatory organs compared to control-injected individuals and significant, albeit modest, increases in relative horn length. Our results support the hypothesis that FOXO expression in the abdominal tissue limits genitalia growth, and provides limited support for the hypothesis that FOXO regulates relative horn length through direct suppression of horn growth. Both results support the idea that tissue-specific FOXO expression may play a general role in regulating scaling relationships in nutritional polyphenisms by signaling traits to be relatively smaller.

  1. Chemical Biology of Hydropersulfides and Related Species: Possible Roles in Cellular Protection and Redox Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Lucía; Bianco, Christopher L; Toscano, John P; Lin, Joseph; Akaike, Takaaki; Fukuto, Jon M

    2017-10-01

    For >20 years, physiological signaling associated with the endogenous generation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been of significant interest. Despite its presumed importance, the biochemical mechanisms associated with its actions have not been elucidated. Recent Advances: Recently it has been found that H2S-related or derived species are highly prevalent in mammalian systems and that these species may be responsible for some, if not the majority, of the biological actions attributed to H2S. One of the most prevalent and intriguing species are hydropersulfides (RSSH), which can be present at significant levels. Indeed, it appears that H2S and RSSH are intimately linked in biological systems and likely to be mutually inclusive. The fact that H2S and polysulfides such as RSSH are present simultaneously means that the biological actions previously assigned to H2S can be instead because of the presence of RSSH (or other polysulfides). Thus, it remains possible that hydropersulfides are the biological effectors, and H2S serves, to a certain extent, as a marker for persulfides and polysulfides. Addressing this possibility will to a large extent be based on the chemistry of these species. Currently, it is known that persulfides possess unique and novel chemical properties that may explain their biological prevalence. However, significantly more work will be required to establish the possible physiological roles of these species. Moreover, an understanding of the regulation of their biosynthesis and degradation will become important topics in piecing together their biology. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  2. Role of CD137 signaling in dengue virus-mediated apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagila, Amar [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Netsawang, Janjuree [Faculty of Medical Technology, Rangsit University, Bangkok (Thailand); Srisawat, Chatchawan [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Noisakran, Sansanee [Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Research Unit, Office for Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Medical Biotechnology Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Bangkok (Thailand); Morchang, Atthapan; Yasamut, Umpa [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Puttikhunt, Chunya [Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Research Unit, Office for Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Medical Biotechnology Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Bangkok (Thailand); Kasinrerk, Watchara [Division of Clinical Immunology, Department of Medical Technology, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Biomedical Technology Research Center, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency at Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); and others

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} For the first time the role of CD137 in dengue virus (DENV) infection. {yields} Induction of DENV-mediated apoptosis by CD137 signaling. {yields} Sensitization to CD137-mediated apoptosis by dengue virus capsid protein (DENV C). {yields} Nuclear localization of DENV C is required for CD137-mediated apoptosis. -- Abstract: Hepatic dysfunction is a well recognized feature of dengue virus (DENV) infection. However, molecular mechanisms of hepatic injury are still poorly understood. A complex interaction between DENV and the host immune response contributes to DENV-mediated tissue injury. DENV capsid protein (DENV C) physically interacts with the human death domain-associated protein Daxx. A double substitution mutation in DENV C (R85A/K86A) abrogates Daxx interaction, nuclear localization and apoptosis. Therefore we compared the expression of cell death genes between HepG2 cells expressing DENV C and DENV C (R85A/K86A) using a real-time PCR array. Expression of CD137, which is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, increased significantly in HepG2 cells expressing DENV C compared to HepG2 cells expressing DENV C (R85A/K86A). In addition, CD137-mediated apoptotic activity in HepG2 cells expressing DENV C was significantly increased by anti-CD137 antibody compared to that of HepG2 cells expressing DENV C (R85A/K86A). In DENV-infected HepG2 cells, CD137 mRNA and CD137 positive cells significantly increased and CD137-mediated apoptotic activity was increased by anti-CD137 antibody. This work is the first to demonstrate the contribution of CD137 signaling to DENV-mediated apoptosis.

  3. Roles of CLR/RAMP Receptor Signaling in Reproduction and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia Lin; Hsu, Sheau Yu Teddy

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (ADM), calcitonin gene-related peptides (α- and β-CGRPs), and intermedin/adrenomedullin 2 (IMD/ADM2) are major regulators of vascular tone and cardiovascular development in vertebrates. Recent research into their functions in reproduction has illuminated the role of these peptides and their cognate receptors (calcitonin receptor-like receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein (CLR/RAMP) receptors) in fetal–maternal blood circulation, feto-placental development, female gamete development, and gamete movement in the oviduct. Although ADM family peptides function in a temporally and spatially specific manner in various reproductive processes, they appear to act via a similar set of second messengers, including nitric oxide, cyclic GMP, cyclic AMP, and calcium-activated potassium channels in different tissues. These discoveries supported the view that CLR/RAMP receptors were recruited to perform a variety of newly evolved reproductive functions during the evolution of internal reproduction in mammals. These advances also provided insight into how CLR/RAMP receptor signaling pathways coordinate with other physiological adaptions to accommodate the extra metabolic needs during pregnancy, and captured some important details as to how fetal–maternal vascular communications are generated in the first place. Furthermore, these findings have revealed novel, promising opportunities for the prevention and treatment of aberrant pregnancies such as pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, and tubal ectopic pregnancy. However, significant efforts are still needed to clarify the relationships between certain components of the CLR/RAMP signaling pathway and aberrant pregnancies before CLR/RAMP receptors can become targets for clinical management. With this understanding, this review summarizes recent progresses with particular focus on clinical implications. PMID:23745703

  4. Role of TGFβ signaling in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommy eVon Bernhardi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the main risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD; being associated with conspicuous changes on microglia activation. Aged microglia exhibit an increased expression of cytokines, exacerbated reactivity to various stimuli, oxidative stress, and reduced phagocytosis of Aβ. Whereas normal inflammation is protective, it becomes dysregulated in the presence of a persistent stimulus, or in the context of an inflammatory environment, as observed in aging. Thus, neuroinflammation can be a self-perpetuating deleterious response, becoming a source of additional injury to host cells in neurodegenerative diseases. In aged individuals, although TGFβ is upregulated, its canonical Smad3 signaling is greatly reduced and neuroinflammation persists. This age-related Smad3 impairment reduces protective activation while facilitating cytotoxic activation of microglia through several cellular mechanisms, potentiating microglia-mediated neurodegeneration. Here, we critically discuss the role of TGFβ-Smad signaling on the cytotoxic activation of microglia and its relevance in the pathogenesis of AD. Other protective functions, such as phagocytosis, although observed in aged animals, are not further induced by inflammatory stimuli and TGFβ1. Analysis in silico revealed that increased expression of receptor SR-A, involved in Aβ uptake and cell activation, by microglia exposed to TGFβ, through a Smad3-dependent mechanism could be mediated by transcriptional co-factors Smad2/3 over the MSR1 gene. We discuss that changes of TGFβ-mediated regulation could at least partially mediate age-associated microglia changes, and, together with other changes on inflammatory response, could result in the reduction of protective activation and the potentiation of cytotoxicity of microglia, resulting in the promotion of neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. A perspective on the role of class III semaphorin signaling in central nervous system trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasil eMecollari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injury of the central nervous system (CNS has severe impact on the patients’ quality of life and initiates many molecular and cellular changes at the site of insult. Traumatic CNS injury results in direct damage of the axons of CNS neurons, loss of myelin sheaths, destruction of the surrounding vascular architecture and initiation of an immune response. Class III semaphorins (SEMA3s are present in the neural scar and influence a wide range of molecules and cell types in and surrounding the injured tissue. SEMA3s and their receptors, neuropilins and plexins were initially studied because of their involvement in repulsive axon guidance. To date, SEMA3 signaling is recognized to be of crucial importance for re-vascularization, the immune response and remyelination. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss how SEMA3s modulate these processes that are all crucial components of the tissue response to injury. Most of the functions for SEMA3s are achieved through their binding partners Neuropilins, which are also co-receptors for a variety of other molecules implicated in the above processes. The most notable ligands are members of the vascular endothelial growth factor family and the transforming growth factor family. Therefore, a second aim is to highlight the overlapping or competing signaling pathways that are mediated through neuropilins in the same processes. In conclusion, we show that the role of SEMA3s goes beyond inhibiting axonal regeneration, since they are also critical modulators of re-vascularization, the immune response and re-myelination.

  6. Development of stratum intermedium and its role as a Sonic hedgehog-signaling structure during odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, E; Wu, C; Shimo, T; Iwamoto, M; Ohmori, T; Kurisu, K; Ookura, T; Bashir, M M; Abrams, W R; Tucker, T; Pacifici, M

    2001-10-01

    Stratum intermedium is a transient and subtle epithelial structure closely associated with inner dental epithelium in tooth germs. Little is known about its development and roles. To facilitate analysis, we used bovine tooth germs, predicting that they may contain a more conspicuous stratum intermedium. Indeed, early bell stage bovine tooth germs already displayed an obvious stratum intermedium with a typical multilayered organization and flanking the enamel knot. Strikingly, with further development, the cuspally located stratum intermedium underwent thinning and involution, whereas a multilayered stratum intermedium formed at successive sites along the cusp-to-cervix axis of odontogenesis. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed that stratum intermedium produces the signaling molecule Sonic hedgehog (Shh). Maximal Shh expression was invariably seen in its thickest multilayered portions. Shh was also produced by inner dental epithelium; expression was not constant but varied with development and cytodifferentiation of ameloblasts along the cusp-to-cervix axis. Interestingly, maximal Shh expression in inner dental epithelium did not coincide with that in stratum intermedium. Both stratum intermedium and inner dental epithelium expressed the Shh receptor Patched2 (Ptch2), an indication of autocrine signaling loops. Shh protein, but not RNA, was present in underlying dental mesenchyme, probably resulting from gradual diffusion from epithelial layers and reflecting paracrine loops of action. To analyze the regulation of Shh expression, epithelial and mesenchymal layers were separated and maintained in organ culture. Shh expression decreased over time, but was maintained in unoperated specimens. Our data show for the first time that stratum intermedium is a highly regulated and Shh-expressing structure. Given its dynamic and apparently interactive properties, stratum intermedium may help orchestrate progression of odontogenesis from cusp to cervix

  7. Role of Notch1/2 signaling pathway in the apoptosis process of SGC-7901 induced by Oxaliplatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Ling Tang; Ke-Quan Chen; Fan-Bao Yao; Hao Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the role of Notch1/2 signaling pathway in the apoptosis process of SGC-7901 induced by oxaliplatin.Methods:The cell viability was detected by CCK8 and the expression of Notch1/2 and Caspase9 was detected by Western Blotting before and after treatment of oxaliplatin.Results:Oxaliplatin medication decreased the viability of SCG-7901 and increased the Notch1/2 as well as Caspase9 expression. Notch signaling pathway inhibitor L685458 normalized those abnormalities greatly.Conclusion: Oxaliplatin promotes SGC-7901 apoptosis by activating Notch signaling pathway and up-regulating Caspase9 protein.

  8. The role of NF-κB signaling in the maintenance of pluripotency of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Takase

    Full Text Available NF-κB signaling plays an essential role in maintaining the undifferentiated state of embryonic stem (ES cells. However, opposing roles of NF-κB have been reported in mouse and human ES cells, and the role of NF-κB in human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells has not yet been clarified. Here, we report the role of NF-κB signaling in maintaining the undifferentiated state of human iPS cells. Compared with differentiated cells, undifferentiated human iPS cells showed an augmentation of NF-κB activity. During differentiation induced by the removal of feeder cells and FGF2, we observed a reduction in NF-κB activity, the expression of the undifferentiation markers Oct3/4 and Nanog, and the up-regulation of the differentiated markers WT-1 and Pax-2. The specific knockdown of NF-κB signaling using p65 siRNA also reduced the expression of Oct3/4 and Nanog and up-regulated WT-1 and Pax-2 but did not change the ES-like colony formation. Our results show that the augmentation of NF-κB signaling maintains the undifferentiated state of human iPS and suggest the importance of this signaling pathway in maintenance of human iPS cells.

  9. A tale of two proteins: differential roles and regulation of Smad2 and Smad3 in TGF-beta signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kimberly A; Pietenpol, Jennifer A; Moses, Harold L

    2007-05-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is an important growth inhibitor of epithelial cells, and insensitivity to this cytokine results in uncontrolled cell proliferation and can contribute to tumorigenesis. Smad2 and Smad3 are direct mediators of TGF-beta signaling, however little is known about the selective activation of Smad2 versus Smad3. The Smad2 and Smad3 knockout mouse phenotypes and studies comparing Smad2 and Smad3 activation of TGF-beta target genes, suggest that Smad2 and Smad3 have distinct roles in TGF-beta signaling. The observation that TGF-beta inhibits proliferation of Smad3-null mammary gland epithelial cells, whereas Smad3 deficient fibroblasts are only partially growth inhibited, suggests that Smad3 has a different role in epithelial cells and fibroblasts. Herein, the current understanding of Smad2 and Smad3-mediated TGF-beta signaling and their relative roles are discussed, in addition to potential mechanisms for the selective activation of Smad2 versus Smad3. Since alterations in the TGF-beta signaling pathway play an important role in promoting tumorigenesis and cancer progression, methods for therapeutic targeting of the TGF-beta signaling pathway are being pursued. Determining how Smad2 or Smad3 differentially regulate the TGF-beta response may translate into developing more effective strategies for cancer therapy.

  10. Signal amplification in biological and electrical engineering systems: universal role of cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubelnik, Vladimir; Dugonik, Bogdan; Osebik, Davorin; Marhl, Marko

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we compare the cascade mechanisms of signal amplification in biological and electrical engineering systems, and show that they share the capacity to considerably amplify signals, and respond to signal changes both quickly and completely, which effectively preserves the form of the input signal. For biological systems, these characteristics are crucial for efficient and reliable cellular signaling. We show that this highly-efficient biological mechanism of signal amplification that has naturally evolved is mathematically fully equivalent with some man-developed amplifiers, which indicates parallels between biological evolution and successful technology development.

  11. Jelektrojenergeticheskaja kooperacija v Baltijskom regione i rol' v nej Rossii [Electric energy cooperation in the Baltic Sea region and the role of Russia in it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zverev Yuri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines cooperation in the electric energy sector in the Baltic region. The author explores the existing undersea HVDC power exchange projects. It is emphasised that cooperation in the electric energy sector is concentrated largely in the EU member states despite earlier plans to establish the Baltic energy ring, which would also include Russia and Belarus. The author stresses that one of the most acute problems for the EU today is overcoming isolation of the energy systems of the Baltic States (Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia from that of the major part of the EU. This task has become especially relevant after the closing of the Ignalina NPP (Lithuania, which used to be the primary energy source for the three Baltic States. The article examines key projects of the construction of new international power transmission lines in the framework of the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan (BEMIP and the prospects of the Visaginas NPP (Lithuania in solving energy problems of the Baltic States. The author analyses Russia’s role in the electric energy market and focuses on a possible increase of the country’s energy market share following the construction of the Baltic NPP and the export of generated electric energy to Poland, Lithuania, Germany, and Sweden. The author concludes that the prospects of Russia’s energy export to the Baltic Sea region will be determined not only by technological, economic and market factors, but rather by the general state of relations between Russia and the EU. Moreover, a lot depends on Lithuania’s decision on the construction of the Visaginas NPP, as well as the way the EU and the Baltic States solve the problem of energy supply in case the NPP project is terminated.

  12. Protective role of licochalcone B against ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity through regulation of Erk signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao-peng; Qian, Dong-wei; Xie, Zhen; Hui, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Oxidative stress has been established as a key cause of alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity. Licochalcone B, an extract of licorice root, has shown antioxidative properties. This study was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of licochalcone B in ethanol-induced hepatic injury in an in vitro study. Materials and Methods: An in vitro model of Ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in BRL cells was used in this study. Cell injury was assessed using WST-1 assay and lactate dehydrogenase, alanine transaminase, and aspartate aminotransferase release assay. Cell apoptosis were quantified by flow cytometric analysis. The intracellular oxidative level was evaluated by reactive oxidative species, malondialdehyde and glutathione detection. Furthermore, the expression level of Erk, p-Erk, Nrf-2 were assessed using Western blot. Results: Treatment with ethanol induced marked cell injury and cell apoptosis in BRL cells. Licochalcone B significantly attenuated ethanol-induced cell injury, and inhibited cell apoptosis. Furthermore, licochalcone B significantly inhibited ethanol-induced intracellular oxidative level, upregulated the expression of p-Erk, and promoted nuclear localization of Nrf2. Additionally, this hepatoprotective role was significantly abolished by inhibition of Erk signaling. However, no apparent effects of Erk inhibition were observed on ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that licochalcone B protects hepatocyte from alcohol-induced cell injury, and this hepatoprotective role might be attributable to apoptosis reduction, inhibition of oxidative stress, and upregulation of Erk–Nrf2. Therefore, licochalcone B might possess potential as a novel therapeutic drug candidate for alcohol-related liver disorders.

  13. Compartmentalisation of cAMP-dependent signalling in blood platelets: The role of lipid rafts and actin polymerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raslan, Zaher; Naseem, Khalid M

    2015-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) inhibits blood platelets through the activation of membrane adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated signalling. However, the molecular mechanism controlling cAMP signalling in blood platelet remains unclear, and in particular how individual isoforms of AC and protein kinase A (PKA) are coordinated to target distinct substrates in order to modulate platelet activation. In this study, we demonstrate that lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton may play a key role in regulating platelet responses to cAMP downstream of PGI2. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD) increased platelet sensitivity to PGI2 and forskolin, a direct AC cyclase activator, resulting in greater inhibition of collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation. In contrast, platelet inhibition by the direct activator of PKA, 8-CPT-6-Phe-cAMP was unaffected by MβCD treatment. Consistent with the functional data, lipid raft disruption increased PGI2-stimulated cAMP formation and proximal PKA-mediated signalling events. Platelet inhibition, cAMP formation and phosphorylation of PKA substrates in response to PGI2 were also increased in the presence of cytochalasin D, indicating a role for actin cytoskeleton in signalling in response to PGI2. A potential role for lipid rafts in cAMP signalling is strengthened by our finding that a pool of ACV/VI and PKA was partitioned into lipid rafts. Our data demonstrate partial compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling machinery in platelets, where lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton regulate the inhibitory effects induced by PGI2. The increased platelet sensitivity to cAMP-elevating agents signalling upon raft and cytoskeleton disruption suggests that these compartments act to restrain basal cAMP signalling.

  14. Signals controlling un-differentiated states in embryonic stem and cancer cells: role of the phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskas, Daniel; Ling, Ling Sunny; Woodgett, James Robert

    2014-10-01

    The capacity of embryonic stem (ES) cells to differentiate into cell lineages comprising the three germ layers makes them powerful tools for studying mammalian early embryonic development in vitro. The human body consists of approximately 210 different somatic cell types, the majority of which have limited proliferative capacity. However, both stem cells and cancer cells bypass this replicative barrier and undergo symmetric division indefinitely when cultured under defined conditions. Several signal transduction pathways play important roles in regulating stem cell development, and aberrant expression of components of these pathways is linked to cancer. Among signaling systems, the critical role of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) coupled to the Jak/STAT3 (signal transduction and activation of transcription-3) pathway in maintaining stem cell self-renewal has been extensively reviewed. This pathway additionally plays multiple roles in tumorigenesis. Likewise, the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) pathway has been determined to play an important role in both stem cell maintenance and tumor development. This pathway is often induced in cancer with frequent mutational activation of the catalytic subunit of PI3K or loss of a primary PI3K antagonist, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN). This review focusses on roles of the PI3K signal transduction pathway components, with emphasis on functions in stem cell maintenance and cancer. Since the PI3K pathway impinges on and collaborates with other signaling pathways in regulating stem cell development and/or cancer, aspects of the canonical Wnt, Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and TGF-β signaling pathways are also discussed.

  15. The Potential Role of Cannabinoids in Modulating Serotonergic Signaling by Their Influence on Tryptophan Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar Fuchs

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Phytocannabinoids present in Cannabis plants are well known to exert potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Previously, we have demonstrated that the psychoactive D9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and the non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD modulate mitogen-induced Th1-type immune responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. The suppressive effect of both cannabinoids on mitogen-induced tryptophan degradation mediated by indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, suggests an additional mechanism by which antidepressive effects of cannabinoids might be linked to the serotonergic system. Here, we will review the role of tryptophan metabolism in the course of cell mediated immune responses and the relevance of cannabinoids in serotonergic signaling. We conclude that in particular the non-psychotropic CBD might be useful for the treatment of mood disorders in patients with inflammatory diseases, since this cannabinoid seems to be safe and its effects on activation-induced tryptophan degradation by CBD were more potent as compared to THC.

  16. Electromagnetic field effects on cells of the immune system: The role of calcium signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walleczek, J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-10-01

    During the past decade considerable evidence has accumulated demonstrating that nonthermal exposures of cells of the immune system to extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (< 300 Hz) can elicit cellular changes that might be relevant to in vivo immune activity. A similar responsiveness to nonionizing electromagnetic energy in this frequency range has also been documented for tissues of the neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal system. However, knowledge about the underlying biological mechanisms by which such fields can induce cellular changes is still very limited. It is generally believed that the cell membrane and Ca[sup 2+]-regulated activity is involved in bioactive ELF field coupling to living systems. This article begins with a short review of the current state of knowledge concerning the effects of nonthermal levels of ELF electromagnetic fields on the biochemistry and activity of immune cells and then closely examines new results that suggest a role for Ca[sup 2+] in the induction of these cellular field effects. Based on these findings it is proposed that membrane-mediated Ca[sup 2+] in the induction of these cellular field effects. Based on these findings it is proposed that membrane-mediated Ca[sup 2+] signaling processes are involved in the mediation of field effects on the immune system. 69 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. G protein coupled receptor 18: A potential role for endocannabinoid signaling in metabolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaraman, Gayathri; Simcocks, Anna; Hryciw, Deanne H; Hutchinson, Dana S; McAinch, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are products of dietary fatty acids that are modulated by an alteration in food intake levels. Overweight and obese individuals have substantially higher circulating levels of the arachidonic acid derived endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol, and show an altered pattern of cannabinoid receptor expression. These cannabinoid receptors are part of a large family of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs are major therapeutic targets for various diseases within the cardiovascular, neurological, gastrointestinal, and endocrine systems, as well as metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Obesity is considered a state of chronic low-grade inflammation elicited by an immunological response. Interestingly, the newly deorphanized GPCR (GPR18), which is considered to be a putative cannabinoid receptor, is proposed to have an immunological function. In this review, the current scientific knowledge on GPR18 is explored including its localization, signaling pathways, and pharmacology. Importantly, the involvement of nutritional factors and potential dietary regulation of GPR18 and its (patho)physiological roles are described. Further research on this receptor and its regulation will enable a better understanding of the complex mechanisms of GPR18 and its potential as a novel therapeutic target for treating metabolic disorders.

  18. Role of Nodal-PITX2C signaling pathway in glucose-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongmei; Jing, Sun; Guan, Lina; Li, Qian; Zhang, Huiling; Gao, Xiaobo; Ma, Xu

    2014-06-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have shown that cardiomyocytes, in response to high glucose (HG) stimuli, undergo hypertrophic growth. While much work still needs to be done to elucidate this important mechanism of hypertrophy, previous works have showed that some pathways or genes play important roles in hypertrophy. In this study, we showed that sublethal concentrations of glucose (25 mmol/L) could induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy with an increase in the cellular surface area and the upregulation of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene, a hypertrophic marker. High glucose (HG) treatments resulted in the upregulation of the Nodal gene, which is under-expressed in cardiomyocytes. We also determined that the knockdown of the Nodal gene resisted HG-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The overexpression of Nodal was able to induce hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes, which was associated with the upregulation of the PITX2C gene. We also showed that increases in the PITX2C expression, in response to Nodal, were mediated by the Smad4 signaling pathway. This study is highly relevant to the understanding of the effects of the Nodal-PITX2C pathway on HG-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, as well as the related molecular mechanisms.

  19. Signaling, Polyubiquitination, Trafficking, and Inclusions: Sequestosome 1/p62's Role in Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie W. Wooten

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggregated misfolded proteins are hallmarks of most neurodegenerative diseases. In a chronic disease state, including pathologic situations of oxidative stress, these proteins are sequestered into inclusions. Accumulation of aggregated proteins can be prevented by chaperones, or by targeting their degradation to the UPS. If the accumulation of these proteins exceeds their degradation, they may impair the function of the proteasome. Alternatively, the function of the proteasome may be preserved by directing aggregated proteins to the autophagy-lysosome pathway for degradation. Sequestosome 1/p62 has recently been shown to interact with polyubiquitinated proteins through its UBA domain and may direct proteins to either the UPS or autophagosome. P62 is present in neuronal inclusions of individuals with Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. Herein, we review p62's role in signaling, aggregation, and inclusion formation, and specifically as a possible contributor to Alzheimer's disease. The use of p62 as a potential target for the development of therapeutics and as a disease biomarker is also discussed.

  20. Electromagnetic field effects on cells of the immune system: The role of calcium signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walleczek, J.

    1991-07-01

    During the past decade considerable evidence has accumulated demonstrating the exposures of cells of the immune system to relatively weak extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (< 300 Hz) can elicit cellular changes which might be relevant to in-vivo immune activity. However, knowledge about the underlying biological mechanisms by which weak fields induce cellular changes is still very limited. It is generally believed that the cell membrane and Ca{sup 2+} regulated activity is involved in bioactive ELF field-coupling to living systems. This article begins with a short review of the current state of knowledge concerning the effects of nonthermal levels of ELF electromagnetic fields on the biochemistry and activity of immune cells, and then closely examines new results which suggest a role for Ca{sup 2+} in the induction of these cellular field effects. Based on these findings it is proposed that membrane-mediated Ca{sup 2+} signalling processes are involved in the mediation of field effects on the immune system. 64 refs., 2 tabs.