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Sample records for cooperative light-induced molecular

  1. The Molecular Geometric Phase and Light-Induced Conical Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Emil J.

    2017-06-01

    Potential energy surfaces for electronic states of molecules in strong electromagnetic fields can be described in the dressed-state formalism, which introduces light-induced potentials. A light-induced conical intersection (LICI) [1] appears when two electronic states intersect due to the presence of an external electric field and when the dipole coupling between the field and the molecule vanishes. There are several aspects of quantum dynamics near LICIs, which still require a thorough investigation. How do non-adiabatic effects manifest themselves in polyatomic molecules in strong electromagnetic fields? Are the natural conical-intersections (NCI) and the light-induced conical intersections identical in nature? Do topological effects (Berry phase) [2] influence the nuclear dynamics around NCIs and LICIs? To answer these questions, a computer code for time-propagation of the ro-vibronic wavefunction on multiple coupled potential energy surfaces has been developed. The time-independent zero-order basis is taken from the DUO suite [3], which solves the full ro-vibronic Schrödinger equation for diatomic molecules. Non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics near LICIs will be presented on the examples of NaH and CaF molecules, with a perspective for extension to polyatomics. G. J. Halász, A Vibók, M. Sindelka, N. Moiseyev, L. S. Cederbaum, 2011 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 44 175102 C. Wittig, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 6409-6432 S. N. Yurchenko, L. Lodi, J. Tennyson, A. V. Stolyarov, Comput. Phys. Commun., 202, 262, 2016

  2. Light-induced second-order nonlinear optical properties of molecular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, Celine

    1995-01-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of all-optical orientation. The work focusses more particularly on the realization of poled polymers for quadratic nonlinear optics. It is shown that the coherent superposition of two beams at fundamental and second harmonic frequencies results in the breaking of the former centro-symmetry of the material. The source is a Neodymium-YAG laser delivering 25 ps pulses at 1064 nm. The incident second-harmonic beam is obtained by frequency doubling in a KDP crystal. Using a phase conjugation configuration based on six-wave mixing interactions, we have Investigated in detail the mechanism of photo-induced second-harmonic generation in initially centrosymmetric materials. It is shown that the light-induced non-centro-symmetry is due to an orientational hole burning of the molecules. The process involves interference effects between one and two photon absorptions. Experiments are performed in various solutions of an azo-dye molecule (Disperse Red One). The possibility of inducing quasi-permanent second-order susceptibility in a PMMA polymer matrix doped with the azo-dye molecule of Disperse Red One is also demonstrated. The method of all-optical poling consists in a seeding type process with alternate writing and probing phases. Permanent orientation of the molecules can be described in terms of photo-isomerization processes. It leads to a poling of the molecules with a spatial modulation which is phase-matched for frequency doubling. Relevant parameters leading to an efficient polarisation of the sample are identified. A theoretical modelling of the different phenomena observed is proposed. Last part of the study is devoted to an enlarged study of the potentialities offered by this dual-frequency holography technique: orientation of octupolar molecules, polarisation of highly transparent materials. We also show that the new techniques developed during this work can also reveal to be complementary methods for nonlinear

  3. Light-Induced Conversion of Chemical Permeability to Enhance Electron and Molecular Transfer in Nanoscale Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balgley, Renata; de Ruiter, Graham; Evmenenko, Guennadi; Bendikov, Tatyana; Lahav, Michal; van der Boom, Milko E.

    2016-12-21

    In this paper, we demonstrate how photochemically enhancing the permeability of metal–organic assemblies results in a significant enhancement of the electrochemical activity of metal complexes located within the assembly. The molecular assemblies consist of different layers of redox-active metal complexes ([M(mbpy-py)3][PF6]2; M = Ru or Os) that are separated by redox-inactive spacers consisting of 1,4-bis[2-(4-pyridyl)ethenyl]benzene (BPEB) and PdCl2 of variable thicknesses (0–13.4 nm). UV-irradiation (λ = 254 nm) of our assemblies induces a photochemical reaction in the redox-inactive spacer increasing the permeability of the assembly. The observed increase was evident by trapping organic (nBu4NBF4) and inorganic (NiCl2) salts inside the assemblies, and by evaluating the electrochemical response of quinones absorbed inside the molecular assemblies before and after UV irradiation. The increase in permeability is reflected by higher currents and a change in the directionality of electron transfer, i.e., from mono- to bidirectional, between the redox-active metal complexes and the electrode surface. The supramolecular structure of the assemblies dominates the overall electron transfer properties and overrules possible electron transfer mediated by the extensive π-conjugation of its individual organic components.

  4. Duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    2012-02-01

    Molecular motors are found throughout the cells of the human body and have many different and important roles. These micromachines move along filament tracks and have the ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical work that powers cellular motility. Different types of motors are characterized by different duty ratios, which is the fraction of time that a motor is attached to its filament. In the case of myosin II (a nonprocessive molecular machine with a low duty ratio), cooperativity between several motors is essential to induce motion along its actin filament track. In this work we use statistical mechanical tools to calculate the duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors. The model suggests that the effective duty ratio of nonprocessive motors that work in cooperation is lower than the duty ratio of the individual motors. The origin of this effect is the elastic tension that develops in the filament which is relieved when motors detach from the track. © 2012 American Physical Society

  5. Evolution as a molecular cooperative phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela-Flores, J.

    1991-06-01

    We discuss an hypothesis according to which microscopic mechanisms due to cooperation, at the molecular level, may have been key factors in the evolution of life on Earth. We view our hypothesis as a natural extension to the molecular level of viewing cooperation (symbiosis) as an evolutionary driving force; this does not restrict the interpretation of the evolutionary process to be the result of slow accumulation of mutations in the DNA. Some evidence supporting this hypothesis is discussed: (a) The Salam enhancement factor. This molecular phenomenon was recently introduced in order to understand the bases of the first unifying principle of biochemistry, namely that transcription of all known genes in prokaryotes, protists, metazoan, and metaphytes are translated into L-amino acids, except for some bacterial membrane proteins. (b) The role that cooperative phenomena may have played in the origin of evolution itself, i.e., in the resolution of Sagan's ultraviolet paradox. (c) The relationship between evolution and the constraints imposed by embryonic development. This is considered from the point of view of molecular cooperative phenomena. (author). Refs

  6. Implications of molecular heterogeneity for the cooperativity of biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomatin, Sergey V; Greenfeld, Max; Herschlag, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Cooperativity, a universal property of biological macromolecules, is typically characterized by a Hill slope, which can provide fundamental information about binding sites and interactions. We demonstrate, through simulations and single-molecule FRET (smFRET) experiments, that molecular heterogeneity lowers bulk cooperativity from the intrinsic value for the individual molecules. As heterogeneity is common in smFRET experiments, appreciation of its influence on fundamental measures of cooperativity is critical for deriving accurate molecular models.

  7. Cooperative Learning in Introductory Cell and Molecular Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Herbert B.; Markstein, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses a pilot study conducted to determine whether cooperative learning had a beneficial effect on the academic performance of minority students and subsequent enrollments in the elective courses in biochemistry and molecular biology. Minority students average GPA increased from 2.13 (n=39) to 2.96 (n=17). Enrollment in aforementioned courses…

  8. Metal-Support Cooperative Catalysts for Environmentally Benign Molecular Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Kiyotomi; Mitsudome, Takato

    2017-01-01

    Metal-support cooperative catalysts have been developed for sustainable and environmentally benign molecular transformations. The active metal centers and supports in these catalysts could cooperatively activate substrates, resulting in high catalytic performance for liquid-phase reactions under mild conditions. These catalysts involved hydrotalcite-supported gold and silver nanoparticles with high catalytic activity for organic reactions such as aerobic oxidation, oxidative carbonylation, and chemoselective reduction of epoxides to alkenes and nitrostyrenes to aminostyrenes using alcohols and CO/H 2 O as reducing reagents. This high catalytic performance was due to cooperative catalysis between the metal nanoparticles and basic sites of the hydrotalcite support. To increase the metal-support cooperative effect, core-shell nanostructured catalysts consisting of gold or silver nanoparticles in the core and ceria supports in the shell were designed. These core-shell nanocomposite catalysts were effective for the chemoselective hydrogenation of nitrostyrenes to aminostyrenes, unsaturated aldehydes to allyl alcohols, and alkynes to alkenes using H 2 as a clean reductant. In addition, these solid catalysts could be recovered easily from the reaction mixture by simple filtration, and were reusable with high catalytic activity. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Molecular cooperativity and compatibility via full atomistic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan Yang, Kenny

    Civil engineering has customarily focused on problems from a large-scale perspective, encompassing structures such as bridges, dams, and infrastructure. However, present day challenges in conjunction with advances in nanotechnology have forced a re-focusing of expertise. The use of atomistic and molecular approaches to study material systems opens the door to significantly improve material properties. The understanding that material systems themselves are structures, where their assemblies can dictate design capacities and failure modes makes this problem well suited for those who possess expertise in structural engineering. At the same time, a focus has been given to the performance metrics of materials at the nanoscale, including strength, toughness, and transport properties (e.g., electrical, thermal). Little effort has been made in the systematic characterization of system compatibility -- e.g., how to make disparate material building blocks behave in unison. This research attempts to develop bottom-up molecular scale understanding of material behavior, with the global objective being the application of this understanding into material design/characterization at an ultimate functional scale. In particular, it addresses the subject of cooperativity at the nano-scale. This research aims to define the conditions which dictate when discrete molecules may behave as a single, functional unit, thereby facilitating homogenization and up-scaling approaches, setting bounds for assembly, and providing a transferable assessment tool across molecular systems. Following a macro-scale pattern where the compatibility of deformation plays a vital role in the structural design, novel geometrical cooperativity metrics based on the gyration tensor are derived with the intention to define nano-cooperativity in a generalized way. The metrics objectively describe the general size, shape and orientation of the structure. To validate the derived measures, a pair of ideal macromolecules

  10. Light-induced structural changes in a short light, oxygen, voltage (LOV protein revealed by molecular dynamics simulations – implications for the understanding of LOV photoactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eBocola

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The modularity of light, oxygen, voltage (LOV blue-light photoreceptors has recently been exploited for the design of LOV-based optogenetic tools, which allow the light-dependent control of biological functions. For the understanding of LOV sensory function and hence the optimal design of LOV-based optogentic tools it is essential to gain an in depth atomic-level understanding of the underlying photoactivation and intramolecular signal-relay mechanisms. To address this question we performed molecular dynamics simulations on both the dark- and light-adapted state of PpSB1-LOV, a short dimeric bacterial LOV-photoreceptor protein, recently crystallized under constant illumination. While LOV dimers remained globally stable during the light-state simulation with regard to the Jα coiled-coil, distinct conformational changes for a glutamine in the vicinity of the FMN chromophore are observed. In contrast, multiple Jα-helix conformations are sampled in the dark-state. These changes coincide with a displacement of the Iβ and Hβ strands relative to the light-state structure and result in a correlated rotation of both LOV core domains in the dimer. These global changes are most likely initiated by the reorientation of the conserved glutamine Q116, whose side chain flips between the Aβ (dark state and Hβ strand (light state, while maintaining two potential hydrogen bonds to FMN-N5 and FMN-O4, respectively. This local Q116-FMN reorientation impacts on an inter-subunit salt-bridge (K117-E96, which is stabilized in the light state, hence accounting for the observed decreased mobility. Based on these findings we propose an alternative mechanism for dimeric LOV photoactivation and intramolecular signal-relay, assigning a distinct structural role for the conserved flipping glutamine. The proposed mechanism is discussed in light of universal applicability and its implications for the understanding of LOV-based optogenetic tools.

  11. Green light induces shade avoidance symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Maruhnich, Stefanie A; Folta, Kevin M

    2011-11-01

    Light quality and quantity affect plant adaptation to changing light conditions. Certain wavelengths in the visible and near-visible spectrum are known to have discrete effects on plant growth and development, and the effects of red, far-red, blue, and ultraviolet light have been well described. In this report, an effect of green light on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rosette architecture is demonstrated using a narrow-bandwidth light-emitting diode-based lighting system. When green light was added to a background of constant red and blue light, plants exhibited elongation of petioles and upward leaf reorientation, symptoms consistent with those observed in a shaded light environment. The same green light-induced phenotypes were also observed in phytochrome (phy) and cryptochrome (cry) mutant backgrounds. To explore the molecular mechanism underlying the green light-induced response, the accumulation of shade-induced transcripts was measured in response to enriched green light environments. Transcripts that have been demonstrated to increase in abundance under far-red-induced shade avoidance conditions either decrease or exhibit no change when green light is added. However, normal far-red light-associated transcript accumulation patterns are observed in cryptochrome mutants grown with supplemental green light, indicating that the green-absorbing form of cryptochrome is the photoreceptor active in limiting the green light induction of shade-associated transcripts. These results indicate that shade symptoms can be induced by the addition of green light and that cryptochrome receptors and an unknown light sensor participate in acclimation to the enriched green environment.

  12. Prebiotic RNA Network Formation: A Taxonomy of Molecular Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Cole; Ramprasad, Sanjay N; Walker, Sara Imari; Lehman, Niles

    2017-10-16

    Cooperation is essential for evolution of biological complexity. Recent work has shown game theoretic arguments, commonly used to model biological cooperation, can also illuminate the dynamics of chemical systems. Here we investigate the types of cooperation possible in a real RNA system based on the Azoarcus ribozyme, by constructing a taxonomy of possible cooperative groups. We construct a computational model of this system to investigate the features of the real system promoting cooperation. We find triplet interactions among genotypes are intrinsically biased towards cooperation due to the particular distribution of catalytic rate constants measured empirically in the real system. For other distributions cooperation is less favored. We discuss implications for understanding cooperation as a driver of complexification in the origin of life.

  13. Light-Induced Switching of Tunable Single-Molecule Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Sendler, Torsten

    2015-04-16

    A major goal of molecular electronics is the development and implementation of devices such as single-molecular switches. Here, measurements are presented that show the controlled in situ switching of diarylethene molecules from their nonconductive to conductive state in contact to gold nanoelectrodes via controlled light irradiation. Both the conductance and the quantum yield for switching of these molecules are within a range making the molecules suitable for actual devices. The conductance of the molecular junctions in the opened and closed states is characterized and the molecular level E 0, which dominates the current transport in the closed state, and its level broadening Γ are identified. The obtained results show a clear light-induced ring forming isomerization of the single-molecule junctions. Electron withdrawing side-groups lead to a reduction of conductance, but do not influence the efficiency of the switching mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations of the light-induced switching processes correlate these observations with the fundamentally different low-lying electronic states of the opened and closed forms and their comparably small modification by electron-withdrawing substituents. This full characterization of a molecular switch operated in a molecular junction is an important step toward the development of real molecular electronics devices.

  14. Coarse-grained molecular simulations of allosteric cooperativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj; Portman, John J. [Department of Physics, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States)

    2016-03-14

    Interactions between a protein and a ligand are often accompanied by a redistribution of the population of thermally accessible conformations. This dynamic response of the protein’s functional energy landscape enables a protein to modulate binding affinities and control binding sensitivity to ligand concentration. In this paper, we investigate the structural origins of binding affinity and allosteric cooperativity of binding two Ca{sup 2+} ions to each domain of Calmodulin (CaM) through simulations of a simple coarse-grained model. In this model, the protein’s conformational transitions between open and closed conformational ensembles are simulated explicitly and ligand binding and unbinding are treated implicitly within the grand canonical ensemble. Ligand binding is cooperative because the binding sites are coupled through a shift in the dominant conformational ensemble upon binding. The classic Monod-Wyman-Changeux model of allostery with appropriate binding free energies to the open and closed ensembles accurately describes the simulated binding thermodynamics. The simulations predict that the two domains of CaM have distinct binding affinity and cooperativity. In particular, the C-terminal domain binds Ca{sup 2+} with higher affinity and greater cooperativity than the N-terminal domain. From a structural point of view, the affinity of an individual binding loop depends sensitively on the loop’s structural compatibility with the ligand in the bound ensemble, as well as the conformational flexibility of the binding site in the unbound ensemble.

  15. Cooperative Catalysis for Selective Alcohol Oxidation with Molecular Oxygen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, T.K.; Eisenberg, D.; van Noordenne, D.; Jungbacker, P.; Rothenberg, G.

    2016-01-01

    The activation of dioxygen for selective oxidation of organic molecules is a major catalytic challenge. Inspired by the activity of nitrogen-doped carbons in electrocatalytic oxygen reduction, we combined such a carbon with metal-oxide catalysts to yield cooperative catalysts. These simple materials

  16. UV Light Induces Dedoping of Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Kaitsuka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available UV (Ultra-Violet light-driven change in optical absorption of polyaniline (PANI is reported. Irradiation of UV light to PANI/camphor sulfonic acid prepared by electrochemical polymerization allows dedoping of the PANI. Especially, UV light irradiation in the presence of a radical trap agent effectively reduces (dedoping the PANI. The result in this study is quite simple; however, this may be a first report for light-induced dedoping (color change of a conductive polymer.

  17. Light induced drift: a possible mechanism of separation of isotopes by laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, D.J.; Nilaya, J.P.; Venkatramani, N.

    2003-02-01

    A comprehensive review of the literature on the effect of light induced drift and its exploitation in the separation of isotopes, both in atomic and molecular forms, is presented. An experimental scheme based on this effect to separate S 33 , with a natural abundance of ∼0.76%, from SF 6 has also been worked out. (author)

  18. Light-induced fluorescence for pulpal diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Arata; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.

    2001-04-01

    A direct non-histological means of pulpal diagnosis remains elusive to clinical practice. Clinical vitality testing remains limited to electric, thermal criteria, or laser Doppler flowmetry. The goal of these investigations was to determine the feasibility of using light-induced fluorescence as a non-invasive modality for pulpal evaluation. Such a capability would, for example, permit expanded use of pulpotomy/pulpectomy techniques. Clinically healthy and diseased human extirpated pulpal tissues were used in this study. After excision, they were rapidly frozen and standard cryosections prepared. Measurement of tissue excitation/emission characteristics was performed using spectrographic analysis. A low-light level fluorescence microscopy system was then used to image autofluorescence localization and intensity at optimal excitation/detection parameters. Excitation/detection parameters used in this study included 405/605, 405/635, 405/670, 440/550, and 440/635. Autofluorescence intensities in healthy tissues were significantly stronger than those in diseased tissues at optimal parameters. It is postulated that autofluorescence characteristics are related to pathology- related structural changes in the pulp. This work provides the basis for further investigation into the relation between autofluorescence, histology and clinical symptoms.

  19. Light induced electrical and macroscopic changes in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roca i Cabarrocas P.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on light-induced electrical and macroscopic changes in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H PIN solar cells. To explain the particular light-soaking behavior of such cells – namely an increase of the open circuit voltage (Voc and a rapid drop of the short circuit current density (Jsc – we correlate these effects to changes in hydrogen incorporation and structural properties in the layers of the cells. Numerous techniques such as current-voltage characteristics, infrared spectroscopy, hydrogen exodiffusion, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry are used to study the light-induced changes from microscopic to macroscopic scales (up to tens of microns. Such comprehensive use of complementary techniques lead us to suggest that light-soaking produces the diffusion of molecular hydrogen, hydrogen accumulation at p-layer/substrate interface and localized delamination of the interface. Based on these results we propose that light-induced degradation of PIN solar cells has to be addressed from not only as a material issue, but also a device point of view. In particular we bring experimental evidence that localized delamination at the interface between the p-layer and SnO2 substrate by light-induced hydrogen motion causes the rapid drop of Jsc.

  20. Microscopic theory of cooperative spin crossover: Interaction of molecular modes with phonons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palii, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.palii@uv.es, E-mail: klokishner@yahoo.com; Ostrovsky, Serghei; Reu, Oleg; Klokishner, Sophia, E-mail: andrew.palii@uv.es, E-mail: klokishner@yahoo.com [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Academy Str. 5, MD-2028 Kishinev (Moldova, Republic of); Tsukerblat, Boris [Department of Chemistry, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia [Departement für Chemie und Biochemie, Universität Bern, Freiestrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-08-28

    In this article, we present a new microscopic theoretical approach to the description of spin crossover in molecular crystals. The spin crossover crystals under consideration are composed of molecular fragments formed by the spin-crossover metal ion and its nearest ligand surrounding and exhibiting well defined localized (molecular) vibrations. As distinguished from the previous models of this phenomenon, the developed approach takes into account the interaction of spin-crossover ions not only with the phonons but also a strong coupling of the electronic shells with molecular modes. This leads to an effective coupling of the local modes with phonons which is shown to be responsible for the cooperative spin transition accompanied by the structural reorganization. The transition is characterized by the two order parameters representing the mean values of the products of electronic diagonal matrices and the coordinates of the local modes for the high- and low-spin states of the spin crossover complex. Finally, we demonstrate that the approach provides a reasonable explanation of the observed spin transition in the [Fe(ptz){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2} crystal. The theory well reproduces the observed abrupt low-spin → high-spin transition and the temperature dependence of the high-spin fraction in a wide temperature range as well as the pronounced hysteresis loop. At the same time within the limiting approximations adopted in the developed model, the evaluated high-spin fraction vs. T shows that the cooperative spin-lattice transition proves to be incomplete in the sense that the high-spin fraction does not reach its maximum value at high temperature.

  1. A Bethe ansatz solvable model for superpositions of Cooper pairs and condensed molecular bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibberd, K.E. [Centre for Mathematical Physics, University of Queensland, 4072 (Australia); Dunning, C. [Institute of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Kent (United Kingdom); Links, J. [Centre for Mathematical Physics, University of Queensland, 4072 (Australia)]. E-mail: jrl@maths.uq.edu.au

    2006-08-07

    We introduce a general Hamiltonian describing coherent superpositions of Cooper pairs and condensed molecular bosons. For particular choices of the coupling parameters, the model is integrable. One integrable manifold, as well as the Bethe ansatz solution, was found by Dukelsky et al. [J. Dukelsky, G.G. Dussel, C. Esebbag, S. Pittel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 050403]. Here we show that there is a second integrable manifold, established using the boundary quantum inverse scattering method. In this manner we obtain the exact solution by means of the algebraic Bethe ansatz. In the case where the Cooper pair energies are degenerate we examine the relationship between the spectrum of these integrable Hamiltonians and the quasi-exactly solvable spectrum of particular Schrodinger operators. For the solution we derive here the potential of the Schrodinger operator is given in terms of hyperbolic functions. For the solution derived by Dukelsky et al., loc. cit. the potential is sextic and the wavefunctions obey PT-symmetric boundary conditions. This latter case provides a novel example of an integrable Hermitian Hamiltonian acting on a Fock space whose states map into a Hilbert space of PT-symmetric wavefunctions defined on a contour in the complex plane.

  2. A Bethe ansatz solvable model for superpositions of Cooper pairs and condensed molecular bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibberd, K. E.; Dunning, C.; Links, J.

    2006-08-01

    We introduce a general Hamiltonian describing coherent superpositions of Cooper pairs and condensed molecular bosons. For particular choices of the coupling parameters, the model is integrable. One integrable manifold, as well as the Bethe ansatz solution, was found by Dukelsky et al. [J. Dukelsky, G.G. Dussel, C. Esebbag, S. Pittel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 050403]. Here we show that there is a second integrable manifold, established using the boundary quantum inverse scattering method. In this manner we obtain the exact solution by means of the algebraic Bethe ansatz. In the case where the Cooper pair energies are degenerate we examine the relationship between the spectrum of these integrable Hamiltonians and the quasi-exactly solvable spectrum of particular Schrödinger operators. For the solution we derive here the potential of the Schrödinger operator is given in terms of hyperbolic functions. For the solution derived by Dukelsky et al., loc. cit. the potential is sextic and the wavefunctions obey PT-symmetric boundary conditions. This latter case provides a novel example of an integrable Hermitian Hamiltonian acting on a Fock space whose states map into a Hilbert space of PT-symmetric wavefunctions defined on a contour in the complex plane.

  3. A Bethe ansatz solvable model for superpositions of Cooper pairs and condensed molecular bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibberd, K.E.; Dunning, C.; Links, J.

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a general Hamiltonian describing coherent superpositions of Cooper pairs and condensed molecular bosons. For particular choices of the coupling parameters, the model is integrable. One integrable manifold, as well as the Bethe ansatz solution, was found by Dukelsky et al. [J. Dukelsky, G.G. Dussel, C. Esebbag, S. Pittel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 050403]. Here we show that there is a second integrable manifold, established using the boundary quantum inverse scattering method. In this manner we obtain the exact solution by means of the algebraic Bethe ansatz. In the case where the Cooper pair energies are degenerate we examine the relationship between the spectrum of these integrable Hamiltonians and the quasi-exactly solvable spectrum of particular Schrodinger operators. For the solution we derive here the potential of the Schrodinger operator is given in terms of hyperbolic functions. For the solution derived by Dukelsky et al., loc. cit. the potential is sextic and the wavefunctions obey PT-symmetric boundary conditions. This latter case provides a novel example of an integrable Hermitian Hamiltonian acting on a Fock space whose states map into a Hilbert space of PT-symmetric wavefunctions defined on a contour in the complex plane

  4. The molecular mechanisms of signaling by cooperative assembly formation in innate immunity pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajjhala, Parimala R; Ve, Thomas; Bentham, Adam; Stacey, Katryn J; Kobe, Bostjan

    2017-06-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against infection and responses are initiated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that detect pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). PRRs also detect endogenous danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that are released by damaged or dying cells. The major PRRs include the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family members, the nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain, leucine-rich repeat containing (NLR) family, the PYHIN (ALR) family, the RIG-1-like receptors (RLRs), C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) and the oligoadenylate synthase (OAS)-like receptors and the related protein cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). The different PRRs activate specific signaling pathways to collectively elicit responses including the induction of cytokine expression, processing of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell-death responses. These responses control a pathogenic infection, initiate tissue repair and stimulate the adaptive immune system. A central theme of many innate immune signaling pathways is the clustering of activated PRRs followed by sequential recruitment and oligomerization of adaptors and downstream effector enzymes, to form higher-order arrangements that amplify the response and provide a scaffold for proximity-induced activation of the effector enzymes. Underlying the formation of these complexes are co-operative assembly mechanisms, whereby association of preceding components increases the affinity for downstream components. This ensures a rapid immune response to a low-level stimulus. Structural and biochemical studies have given key insights into the assembly of these complexes. Here we review the current understanding of assembly of immune signaling complexes, including inflammasomes initiated by NLR and PYHIN receptors, the myddosomes initiated by TLRs, and the MAVS CARD filament initiated by RIG-1. We highlight the co-operative assembly mechanisms during assembly of each of these complexes. Copyright

  5. Light-induced cross transport phenomena in a single-component gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chermyaninov, I. V.; Chernyak, V. G., E-mail: Vladimir.Chernyak@usu.ru [Ural Federal University (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15

    The cross transport processes that occur in a single-component gas in a capillary and are caused by resonance laser radiation and pressure and temperature gradients are studied. An expression for entropy production is derived using a system of kinetic Boltzmann equations in a linear approximation. The kinetic coefficients that determine the transport processes are shown to satisfy the Onsager reciprocal relations at any Knudsen numbers and any character of the elastic interaction of gas particles with the capillary surface. The light-induced baro- and thermoeffects that take place in a closed heat-insulated system in the field of resonance laser radiation are considered. Analytical expressions are obtained for the Onsager coefficients in an almost free-molecular regime. The light-induced pressure and temperature gradients that appear in a closed heat-insulated capillary under typical experimental conditions are numerically estimated.

  6. Light-induced immobilisation of biomolecules as an attractive alternative to microdroplet dispensing-based arraying technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crookshanks, Meg; Skovsen, Esben; Petersen, Maria Teresa Neves

    2007-01-01

    The present work shows how UV ‘light-induced molecular immobilisation' (LIMI) of biomolecules onto thiol reactive surfaces can be used to make biosensors, without the need for traditional microdispensing technologies. Using ‘LIMI,' arrays of biomolecules can be created with a high degree of repro...

  7. Light-induced reversible expansion of individual gold nanoplates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsheng Lu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Light-induced mechanical response of materials has been extensively investigated and widely utilized to convert light energy into mechanical energy directly. The metallic nanomaterials have excellent photothermal properties and show enormous potential in micromechanical actuators, etc. However, the photo-thermo-mechanical properties of individual metallic nanostructures have yet to be well investigated. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a way to realize light-induced reversible expansion of individual gold nanoplates on optical microfibers. The light-induced thermal expansion coefficient is obtained as 21.4 ± 4.6 ∼ 31.5 ± 4.2 μ·K-1 when the light-induced heating temperature of the gold nanoplates is 240 ∼ 490 °C. The photo-thermo-mechanical response time of the gold nanoplates is about 0.3 ± 0.1 s. This insight into the photo-thermo-mechanical properties of the gold nanoplates could deepen the understanding of the light-induced reversible expansion behavior in nanoscale and pave the way for applications based on this piezoelectric-like response, such as light-driven metallic micromotors.

  8. Mechanism of Cooperative Behavior in Systems of Slow and Fast Molecular Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Adam G.; Landahl, Eric C.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Two recent theoretical advances have described cargo transport by multiple identical motors and by multiple oppositely directed, but otherwise identical motors [1, 2]. Here we combine a similar theoretical approach with a simple experiment to describe the behavior of a system comprised of slow and fast molecular motors having the same directionality. We observed the movement of microtubules by mixtures of slow and fast kinesin motors attached to a glass coverslip in a classic sliding filament assay. The motors are identical, except that the slow ones contain five point mutations that collectively reduce their velocity ∼15-fold without compromising maximal ATPase activity. Our results indicate that a small fraction of fast motors are able to accelerate the dissociation of slow motors from microtubules. Because of this, a sharp, highly cooperative transition occurs from slow to fast microtubule movement as the relative number of fast motors in the assay is increased. Microtubules move at half-maximal velocity when only 15% of the motors in the assay are fast. Our model indicates that this behavior depends primarily on the relative motor velocities and the asymmetry between their forward and backward dissociation forces. It weakly depends on the number of motors and their processivity. We predict that movement of cargoes bound to two types of motors having very different velocities will be dominated by one or the other motor. Therefore, cargoes can potentially undergo abrupt changes in movement in response to regulatory mechanisms acting on only a small fraction of motors. PMID:19506764

  9. Ribosomal S6 Kinase Cooperates with Casein Kinase 2 to Modulate the Drosophila Circadian Molecular Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akten, Bikem; Tangredi, Michelle M.; Jauch, Eike; Roberts, Mary A.; Ng, Fanny; Raabe, Thomas; Jackson, F. Rob

    2009-01-01

    There is a universal requirement for post-translational regulatory mechanisms in circadian clock systems. Previous work in Drosophila has identified several kinases, phosphatases and an E3 ligase that are critical for determining the nuclear translocation and/or stability of clock proteins. The present study evaluated the function of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) in the Drosophila circadian system. In mammals, RSK1 is a light- and clock-regulated kinase known to be activated by the MAPK pathway, but there is no direct evidence that it functions as a component of the circadian system. Here, we show that Drosophila S6KII RNA displays rhythms in abundance, indicative of circadian control. Importantly, an S6KII null mutant exhibits a short-period circadian phenotype that can be rescued by expression of the wild-type gene in clock neurons, indicating a role for S6KII in the molecular oscillator. Peak PER clock protein expression is elevated in the mutant, indicative of enhanced stability, whereas per mRNA level is decreased, consistent with enhanced feedback repression. Gene reporter assays show that decreased S6KII is associated with increased PER repression. Surprisingly, we demonstrate a physical interaction between S6KII and the Casein Kinase 2 regulatory subunit (CK2β), suggesting a functional relationship between the two kinases. In support of such a relationship, there are genetic interactions between S6KII and CK2 mutations, in vivo, which indicate that CK2 activity is required for S6KII action. We propose that the two kinases cooperate within clock neurons to fine-tune circadian period, improving the precision of the clock mechanism. PMID:19144847

  10. Mechanism of cooperative behaviour in systems of slow and fast molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Adam G; Landahl, Eric C; Rice, Sarah E

    2009-06-28

    Two recent theoretical advances have described cargo transport by multiple identical motors and by multiple oppositely directed, but otherwise identical motors [M. J. Muller, S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2008, 105(12), 4609-4614; S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2005, 102(48), 17284-17289]. Here, we combine a similar theoretical approach with a simple experiment to describe the behaviour of a system comprised of slow and fast molecular motors having the same directionality. We observed the movement of microtubules by mixtures of slow and fast kinesin motors attached to a glass coverslip in a classic sliding filament assay. The motors are identical, except that the slow ones contain five point mutations that collectively reduce their velocity approximately 15-fold without compromising maximal ATPase activity. Our results indicate that a small fraction of fast motors are able to accelerate the dissociation of slow motors from microtubules. Because of this, a sharp, highly cooperative transition occurs from slow to fast microtubule movement as the relative number of fast motors in the assay is increased. Microtubules move at half-maximal velocity when only 15% of the motors in the assay are fast. Our model indicates that this behaviour depends primarily on the relative motor velocities and the asymmetry between their forward and backward dissociation forces. It weakly depends on the number of motors and their processivity. We predict that movement of cargoes bound to two types of motors having very different velocities will be dominated by one or the other motor. Therefore, cargoes can potentially undergo abrupt changes in movement in response to regulatory mechanisms acting on only a small fraction of motors.

  11. Isotope Enrichment of Lithium by Light-induced Drift

    OpenAIRE

    武山, 昭憲; 佐藤, 俊一

    2004-01-01

    Isotope enrichment of lithium by light-induced drift (LID) was studied. Lithium atoms collected on a Si substrate was evaluated by SIMS. The separation factor calculated from the SIMS depth profile was 1.02. The diffusion equation describing the distribution of lithium vapor caused by LID was solved numerically. The concentration maps of lithium vapor indicated the isotope ratio was strongly dependent on the position of the Si substrate.

  12. Molecular evolution between chemistry and biology : The interplay of competition, cooperation, and mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Peter

    2018-03-02

    Biological evolution is reduced to three fundamental processes in the spirit of a minimal model: (i) Competition caused by differential fitness, (ii) cooperation of competitors in the sense of symbiosis, and (iii) variation introduced by mutation understood as error-prone reproduction. The three combinations of two fundamental processes each, ([Formula: see text]) competition and mutation, ([Formula: see text]) cooperation and competition, and ([Formula: see text]) cooperation and mutation, are analyzed. Changes in population dynamics that are induced by bifurcations and threshold phenomena are discussed.

  13. Transcriptomic analyses reveal species-specific light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yan; Tang, Xingjiao; Huang, He; Zhang, Yuan; Dai, Silan

    2015-03-17

    The flower colour of agricultural products is very important for their commercial value, which is mainly attributed to the accumulation of anthocyanins. Light is one of the key environmental factors that affect the anthocyanin biosynthesis. However, the deep molecular mechanism remains elusive, and many problems regarding the phenotypic change and the corresponding gene regulation are still unclear. In the present study, Chrysanthemum × morifolium 'Purple Reagan', a light-responding pigmentation cultivar, was selected to investigate the mechanism of light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis using transcriptomic analyses. Only cyanidin derivatives were identified based on the analyses of the pigmentation in ray florets. Shading experiments revealed that the capitulum was the key organ and that its bud stage was the key phase responding to light. These results were used to design five libraries for transcriptomic analyses, including three capitulum developmental stages and two light conditions. RNA sequences were de novo assembled into 103,517 unigenes, of which 60,712 were annotated against four public protein databases. As many as 2,135 unigenes were differentially expressed between the light and dark libraries with 923 up-regulated and 1,212 down-regulated unigenes in response to shading. Next, interactive pathway analysis showed that the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway was the only complete metabolic pathway both modulated in response to light and related to capitulum development. Following the shading treatment, nearly all structural genes involved in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway were down-regulated. Moreover, three CmMYB genes and one CmbHLH gene were identified as key transcription factors that might participate in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis under light conditions based on clustering analysis and validation by RT-qPCR. Finally, a light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway in chrysanthemums was inferred. The pigmentation of the ray

  14. Synthesis and Light Induced Characteristics of Siloxane Substituted Azobenzene: An Application for Optical Storage Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Yuvaraj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The light induced behaviour of siloxane substituted azobenzene compounds in the presence of alkylene spacers is reported for the first time. Firstly, these photosensitive compounds were synthesized and elucidated the molecular structure by spectral analysis such as NMR, FTIR, and UV/Vis. Photoisomerization effect was evaluated in solution and also in nematic phase. The photosaturation occurred exactly at 29 seconds, whereas thermal back relaxation was observed ranging from 19.8 to 23.8 hours. Long duration of the thermal back relaxation is due to the presence of sterically hindered siloxane group substituted to the azobenzene molecules. Decrease in the duration of cis-trans isomerization was found when the number of alkylene spacers was increased. These siloxane based azobenzene derivatives are useful for the fabrication of optical storage device and molecular switches.

  15. Light-induced vitamin deficiency in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruins, B G; Scharloo, W; Thörig, G E

    1997-01-01

    Illumination by visible light (400 Ix) of cultures containing larvae of Drosophila melanogaster can reduce survival (Bruins et al., Insect Biochemistry 21:535-539, 1991). Here we show that the effect of light depends on the presence of propionic or acetic acid in the food medium. We also show that survival is far more affected by illumination of the yeast food media than by direct illumination of the eggs and developing larvae. It is shown that addition of antioxidants to the food prevents light induced mortality. The action of antioxidants suggests that free radicals are important in light induced mortality. We also showed that both yeast and riboflavin (vitamin B2) solutions illuminated with visible light (400 Ix) generate hydrogen peroxide. Other vitamin and amino acid solutions do not produce peroxide in measurable amounts. However, the concentration of photogenerated hydrogen peroxide is far too low to explain the death of eggs and developing larvae upon exposure to light. A 400 Ix light treatment destroys the capability of yeast food media to support survival of larvae. Addition of vitamin C, carotene, tryptophan, nipagin, uric acid, or sucrose to the light treated medium does not restore viability. It is restored when riboflavin is added to the photo-inactivated yeast. A high concentration of pyridoxine also produced an improvement in survival. When riboflavin is treated with light, it cannot support survival on synthetic food media nor can it restore survival on light treated yeast food media. These results show that riboflavin (or a derivative) is a major light sensitive compound of yeast, which can be degraded by light. Light induced loss of riboflavin leads to mortality, because this is an essential dietary vitamin. The vitamin degradation can be prevented by dietary antioxidants. A chromatographic analysis confirms this conclusion.

  16. Preventing light-induced degradation in multicrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindroos, J.; Boulfrad, Y.; Yli-Koski, M.; Savin, H.

    2014-01-01

    Multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) is currently dominating the silicon solar cell market due to low ingot costs, but its efficiency is limited by transition metals, extended defects, and light-induced degradation (LID). LID is traditionally associated with a boron-oxygen complex, but the origin of the degradation in the top of the commercial mc-Si brick is revealed to be interstitial copper. We demonstrate that both a large negative corona charge and an aluminum oxide thin film with a built-in negative charge decrease the interstitial copper concentration in the bulk, preventing LID in mc-Si

  17. Using Jigsaw-Style Spectroscopy Problem-Solving to Elucidate Molecular Structure through Online Cooperative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winschel, Grace A.; Everett, Renata K.; Coppola, Brian P.; Shultz, Ginger V.

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative learning was employed as an instructional approach to facilitate student development of spectroscopy problem solving skills. An interactive online environment was used as a framework to structure weekly discussions around spectroscopy problems outside of class. Weekly discussions consisted of modified jigsaw-style problem solving…

  18. The origin of the cooperativity in the streptavidin-biotin system: A computational investigation through molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengjiao; Zhang, John Z. H.; Mei, Ye

    2016-06-01

    Previous experimental study measuring the binding affinities of biotin to the wild type streptavidin (WT) and three mutants (S45A, D128A and S45A/D128A double mutant) has shown that the loss of binding affinity from the double mutation is larger than the direct sum of those from two single mutations. The origin of this cooperativity has been investigated in this work through molecular dynamics simulations and the end-state free energy method using the polarized protein-specific charge. The results show that this cooperativity comes from both the enthalpy and entropy contributions. The former contribution mainly comes from the alternations of solvation free energy. Decomposition analysis shows that the mutated residues nearly have no contributions to the cooperativity. Instead, N49 and S88, which are located at the entry of the binding pocket and interact with the carboxyl group of biotin, make the dominant contribution among all the residues in the first binding shell around biotin.

  19. Three-dimensional supercritical resolved light-induced magnetic holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Chenglong; Nie, Zhongquan; Ye, Huapeng; Li, Hao; Luo, Yang; Feng, Rui; Yu, Xia; Wen, Feng; Zhang, Ying; Yu, Changyuan; Teng, Jinghua; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2017-10-01

    In the era of big data, there exists a growing gap between data generated and storage capacity using two-dimensional (2D) magnetic storage technologies (for example, hard disk drives), because they have reached their performance saturation. 3D volumetric all-optical magnetic holography is emerging rapidly as a promising road map to realizing high-density capacity for its fast magnetization control and subwavelength magnetization volume. However, most of the reported light-induced magnetization confronts the problems of impurely longitudinal magnetization, diffraction-limited spot, and uncontrollable magnetization reversal. To overcome these challenges, we propose a novel 3D light-induced magnetic holography based on the conceptual supercritical design with multibeam combination in the 4π microscopic system. We theoretically demonstrate a 3D deep super-resolved [Formula: see text] purely longitudinal magnetization spot by focusing six coherent circularly polarized beams with two opposing high numerical aperture objectives, which allows 3D magnetic holography with a volumetric storage density of up to 1872 terabit per cubic inches. The number and locations of the super-resolved magnetization spots are controllable, and thus, desired magnetization arrays in 3D volume can be produced with properly designed phase filters. Moreover, flexible magnetization reversals are also demonstrated in multifocal arrays by using different illuminations with opposite light helicity. In addition to data storage, this magnetic holography may find applications in information security, such as identity verification for a credit card with magnetic stripe.

  20. Blue light-induced oxidative stress in live skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yuya; Ohta, Shigeo; Wolf, Alexander M

    2017-07-01

    Skin damage from exposure to sunlight induces aging-like changes in appearance and is attributed to the ultraviolet (UV) component of light. Photosensitized production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by UVA light is widely accepted to contribute to skin damage and carcinogenesis, but visible light is thought not to do so. Using mice expressing redox-sensitive GFP to detect ROS, blue light could produce oxidative stress in live skin. Blue light induced oxidative stress preferentially in mitochondria, but green, red, far red or infrared light did not. Blue light-induced oxidative stress was also detected in cultured human keratinocytes, but the per photon efficacy was only 25% of UVA in human keratinocyte mitochondria, compared to 68% of UVA in mouse skin. Skin autofluorescence was reduced by blue light, suggesting flavins are the photosensitizer. Exposing human skin to the blue light contained in sunlight depressed flavin autofluorescence, demonstrating that the visible component of sunlight has a physiologically significant effect on human skin. The ROS produced by blue light is probably superoxide, but not singlet oxygen. These results suggest that blue light contributes to skin aging similar to UVA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L.; Beaudoin, Jessica N.; Hanafin, William P.; DiLiberto, Stephen J.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Rex Gaskins, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition

  2. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L., E-mail: viadimer@illinois.edu [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Beaudoin, Jessica N. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hanafin, William P. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); DiLiberto, Stephen J. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kenis, Paul J.A. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rex Gaskins, H. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 S. Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  3. Comparative analyses of light-induced anthocyanin accumulation and gene expression between the ray florets and leaves in chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yan; Yang, Li-Wen; Li, Meng-Ling; Dai, Si-Lan

    2016-06-01

    Light is one of the key environmental factors that affect anthocyanin biosynthesis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear, and many problems regarding phenotypic change and corresponding gene regulation have not been solved. In the present study, comparative analyses of light-induced anthocyanin accumulation and gene expression between the ray florets and leaves were performed in Chrysanthemum × morifolium 'Purple Reagan'. After contrasting the variations in the flower color phenotype and relative pigment content, as well as expression patterns of structural and regulator genes responsible for anthocyanin biosynthesis and photoreceptor between different plant organs under light and dark conditions, we concluded that (1) both the capitulum and foliage are key organs responding to light for chrysanthemum coloration; (2) compared with flavones, shading makes a greater decrease on the anthocyanins accumulation; (3) most of the structural and regulatory genes in the light-induced anthocyanin pathway specifically express in the ray florets; and (4) CmCHS, CmF3H, CmF3'H, CmANS, CmDFR, Cm3GT, CmMYB5-1, CmMYB6, CmMYB7-1, CmbHLH24, CmCOP1 and CmHY5 are key genes for light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in chrysanthemum ray florets, while on the transcriptional level, the expressions of CmPHYA, CmPHYB, CmCRY1a, CmCRY1b and CmCRY2 are insignificantly changed. Moreover, the inferred comprehensive effect of multiple signals on the accumulation of anthocyanins and transmission channel of light signal that exist between the leaves and ray florets were further discussed. These results further our understanding of the relationship between the gene expression and light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis, and lay foundations for the promotion of the molecular breeding of novel flower colors in chrysanthemums. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Light-induced performance increase of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kobayashi, Eiji

    2016-10-11

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells consist of crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers coated with doped/intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) bilayers for passivating-contact formation. Here, we unambiguously demonstrate that carrier injection either due to light soaking or (dark) forward-voltage bias increases the open circuit voltage and fill factor of finished cells, leading to a conversion efficiency gain of up to 0.3% absolute. This phenomenon contrasts markedly with the light-induced degradation known for thin-film a-Si:H solar cells. We associate our performance gain with an increase in surface passivation, which we find is specific to doped a-Si:H/c-Si structures. Our experiments suggest that this improvement originates from a reduced density of recombination-active interface states. To understand the time dependence of the observed phenomena, a kinetic model is presented.

  5. Light-induced performance increase of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eiji; De Wolf, Stefaan; Levrat, Jacques; Christmann, Gabriel; Descoeudres, Antoine; Nicolay, Sylvain; Despeisse, Matthieu; Watabe, Yoshimi; Ballif, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells consist of crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers coated with doped/intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) bilayers for passivating-contact formation. Here, we unambiguously demonstrate that carrier injection either due to light soaking or (dark) forward-voltage bias increases the open circuit voltage and fill factor of finished cells, leading to a conversion efficiency gain of up to 0.3% absolute. This phenomenon contrasts markedly with the light-induced degradation known for thin-film a-Si:H solar cells. We associate our performance gain with an increase in surface passivation, which we find is specific to doped a-Si:H/c-Si structures. Our experiments suggest that this improvement originates from a reduced density of recombination-active interface states. To understand the time dependence of the observed phenomena, a kinetic model is presented.

  6. Light-induced effects in liquid crystals: recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, F.; Lucchetti, L.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we outline that light-induced effects in liquid crystals are still able to provide scientific and technological novelty in spite of a long time investigation started more than thirty years ago. Here we review some recent achievements related to new phenomena that have been studied in the past few years. In the first part of our report we discuss optical trapping of nematic colloids whose origin relies on the elastic properties of liquid crystals rather than on the field gradient that is on the basis of conventional optical tweezing. In the second part we present some recent results obtained in studying the self-phase modulation in bent core nematic liquid crystals, pointing out a peculiar two regimes behavior.

  7. Light-induced atomic desorption and related phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchianti, A; Bogi, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Moi, L [CNISM and Physics Department, University of Siena, 53100 Siena (Italy)], E-mail: burchianti@unisi.it

    2009-07-15

    We review some recent studies on light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD) from dielectric surfaces. Alkali-metal atoms adsorbed either on organic films or on porous glass are released into the vapor phase under illumination. The measurements were performed in Pyrex resonance cells either coated with siloxane films or containing a porous glass sample. In both cases, the experimental results show that LIAD can be used to produce atomic densities suitable for most atomic physics experiments. Moreover, we find that photoinduced effects, correlated with LIAD, produce reversible formation and evaporation of alkali-metal clusters in porous glass. These processes depend on the light frequency, making the porous glass transmittance controllable by light.

  8. Combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis constructs a new model for light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in eggplant (Solanum melongena L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Ren, Li; Gao, Zhen; Jiang, Mingmin; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Lu; He, Yongjun; Chen, Huoying

    2017-12-01

    Light is a key environmental factor affecting anthocyanin biosynthesis. Our previous study demonstrated that "Lanshan Hexian" is a light-sensitive eggplant cultivar, but its regulatory mechanism is unknown. Here, delphinidin-3-[4-(cis-p-coumaroyl)-rhamnosyl-glucopyranoside]-5-glucopyranoside and delphinidin-3-[4-(trans-p-coumaroyl)-rhamnosyl-glucopyranoside]-5-glucopyranoside were identified as the main anthocyanin components in Lanshan Hexian by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Three time points of anthocyanin accumulation, including the start point (0 day), fastest point (5 days), and highest point (12 day), were investigated by using ribonucleic acid sequencing and iTRAQ technology. The corresponding correlation coefficients of differentially expressed genes, and differentially expressed proteins were 0.6936, 0.2332, and 0.6672. Anthocyanin biosynthesis was a significantly enriched pathway, and CHI, F3H, 3GT, 5GT, and HY5 were regulated at both transcriptional and translational levels. Moreover, some transcription factors and photoreceptors may participate in light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis like the known transcription factors MYB113 and TT8. The transient expression assay indicated that SmMYB35, SmMYB44, and a SmMYB86 isoform might involve in the light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. Finally, a regulatory model for light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in eggplant was constructed. Our work provides a new direction for the study of the molecular mechanisms of light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in eggplant. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Green Light Induces Shade Avoidance Symptoms1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Maruhnich, Stefanie A.; Folta, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    Light quality and quantity affect plant adaptation to changing light conditions. Certain wavelengths in the visible and near-visible spectrum are known to have discrete effects on plant growth and development, and the effects of red, far-red, blue, and ultraviolet light have been well described. In this report, an effect of green light on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rosette architecture is demonstrated using a narrow-bandwidth light-emitting diode-based lighting system. When green light was added to a background of constant red and blue light, plants exhibited elongation of petioles and upward leaf reorientation, symptoms consistent with those observed in a shaded light environment. The same green light-induced phenotypes were also observed in phytochrome (phy) and cryptochrome (cry) mutant backgrounds. To explore the molecular mechanism underlying the green light-induced response, the accumulation of shade-induced transcripts was measured in response to enriched green light environments. Transcripts that have been demonstrated to increase in abundance under far-red-induced shade avoidance conditions either decrease or exhibit no change when green light is added. However, normal far-red light-associated transcript accumulation patterns are observed in cryptochrome mutants grown with supplemental green light, indicating that the green-absorbing form of cryptochrome is the photoreceptor active in limiting the green light induction of shade-associated transcripts. These results indicate that shade symptoms can be induced by the addition of green light and that cryptochrome receptors and an unknown light sensor participate in acclimation to the enriched green environment. PMID:21852417

  10. A plant gene for photolyase: an enzyme catalyzing the repair of UV-light-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batschauer, A.

    1993-01-01

    Photolyases are thought to be critical components of the defense of plants against damage to DNA by solar ultraviolet light, but nothing is known about their molecular or enzymatic nature. The molecular cloning of a photolyase from mustard (Sinapis alba) described here is intended to increase the knowledge about this important repair mechanism in plant species at a molecular level. The gene encodes a polypeptide of 501 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57 kDa. There is a strong sequence similarity to bacterial and yeast photolyases, with a close relationship to enzymes with a deazaflavin chromophor. The plant photolyase is shown to be functional in Escherichia coli which also indicates conservation of photolyases during evolution. It is demonstrated that photolyase expression in plants is light induced, thus providing good evidence for the adaptation of plants to their environment in order to diminish the harmful effects of sunlight. (author)

  11. Cooperativity in Molecular Dynamics Structural Models and the Dielectric Spectra of 1,2-Ethanediol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usacheva, T. M.

    2018-05-01

    Linear relationships are established between the experimental equilibrium correlation factor and the molecular dynamics (MD) mean value of the O-H···O bond angle and the longitudinal component of the unit vector of the mean statistical dipole moment of the cluster in liquid 1,2-ethanediol (12ED). The achievements of modern MD models in describing the experimental dispersion of the permittivity of 12ED by both continuous and discrete relaxation time spectra are analyzed. The advantage computer MD experiments have over dielectric spectroscopy for calculating relaxation time and determining the molecular diffusion mechanisms of the rearrangement of the network 12ED structure, which is more complex than water, is demonstrated.

  12. Mechanism of Cooperative Behavior in Systems of Slow and Fast Molecular Motors

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Adam G.; Landahl, Eric C.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Two recent theoretical advances have described cargo transport by multiple identical motors and by multiple oppositely directed, but otherwise identical motors [1, 2]. Here we combine a similar theoretical approach with a simple experiment to describe the behavior of a system comprised of slow and fast molecular motors having the same directionality. We observed the movement of microtubules by mixtures of slow and fast kinesin motors attached to a glass coverslip in a classic sliding filament...

  13. A remotely driven and controlled micro-gripper fabricated from light-induced deformation smart material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chaolei; Lv, Jiu-an; Tian, Xiaojun; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Jie; Yu, Yanlei

    2016-09-01

    Micro-gripper is an important tool to manipulate and assemble micro-scale objects. Generally, as micro-gripper is too small to be directly driven by general motors, it always needs special driving devices and suitable structure design. In this paper, two-finger micro-grippers are designed and fabricated, which utilize light-induced deformation smart material to make one of the two fingers. As the smart material is directly driven and controlled by remote lights instead of lines and motors, this light-driven mode simplifies the design of the two-finger micro-gripper and avoids special drivers and complex mechanical structure. In addition, a micro-manipulation experiment system is set up which is based on the light-driven micro-gripper. Experimental results show that this remotely light-driven micro-gripper has ability to manipulate and assemble micro-scale objects both in air and water. Furthermore, two micro-grippers can also work together for cooperation which can further enhance the assembly ability. On the other hand, this kind of remotely controllable micro-gripper that does not require on-board energy storage, can be used in mobile micro-robot as a manipulation hand.

  14. Using vibrational Cooper minima to determine strong-field molecular-dissociation pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severt, T.; Zohrabi, M.; Armstrong, G. S. J.; McKenna, J.; Gaire, B.; Kling, Nora G.; Ablikim, U.; Carnes, K. D.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the possibility of using vibrational ``Cooper minima'' (VCM) locations as a method to determine dissociation pathways of molecules in a strong laser field. As a test case, we study the laser-induced dissociation of an O2+ion beam by several wavelengths (λ = 800 , 400, and 266 nm) using a coincidence three-dimensional momentum imaging technique. Vibrational structure is observed in the kinetic energy release spectra, revealing a suppression of the dissociation of certain vibrational levels, which is a manifestation of the VCM effect. Previously, it has been shown in H2+that first-order time-dependent perturbation theory can be used to predict the locations of the VCM. We explore if the VCM locations predicted by perturbation theory can help uniquely identify dissociation pathways in O2+and consider its utility for other systems. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy. TS was partially supported by NSF-REU under Grant No. PHY-0851599.

  15. Light-induced protein nitration and degradation with HONO emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusel, Hannah; Elshorbany, Yasin; Kuhn, Uwe; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Reinmuth-Selzle, Kathrin; Kampf, Christopher J.; Li, Guo; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Lelieveld, Jos; Pöschl, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Su, Hang; Ammann, Markus; Cheng, Yafang

    2017-10-01

    Proteins can be nitrated by air pollutants (NO2), enhancing their allergenic potential. This work provides insight into protein nitration and subsequent decomposition in the presence of solar radiation. We also investigated light-induced formation of nitrous acid (HONO) from protein surfaces that were nitrated either online with instantaneous gas-phase exposure to NO2 or offline by an efficient nitration agent (tetranitromethane, TNM). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin (OVA) were used as model substances for proteins. Nitration degrees of about 1 % were derived applying NO2 concentrations of 100 ppb under VIS/UV illuminated conditions, while simultaneous decomposition of (nitrated) proteins was also found during long-term (20 h) irradiation exposure. Measurements of gas exchange on TNM-nitrated proteins revealed that HONO can be formed and released even without contribution of instantaneous heterogeneous NO2 conversion. NO2 exposure was found to increase HONO emissions substantially. In particular, a strong dependence of HONO emissions on light intensity, relative humidity, NO2 concentrations and the applied coating thickness was found. The 20 h long-term studies revealed sustained HONO formation, even when concentrations of the intact (nitrated) proteins were too low to be detected after the gas exchange measurements. A reaction mechanism for the NO2 conversion based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics is proposed.

  16. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanuel eMuindi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. Light can also exert a direct, circadian-independent effect on sleep. For example, acute exposure to light promotes sleep in nocturnal animals and wake in diurnal animals. The mechanisms whereby light directly influences sleep and arousal are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the direct effect of light on sleep at the level of the retina and hypothalamus in rodents. We review murine data from recent publications showing the roles of rod-, cone- and melanopsin-based photoreception on the initiation and maintenance of light-induced sleep. We also present hypotheses about hypothalamic mechanisms that have been advanced to explain the acute control of sleep by light. Specifically, we review recent studies assessing the roles of the ventrolateral preoptic area and the suprachiasmatic nucleus. We also discuss how light might differentially promote sleep and arousal in nocturnal and diurnal animals respectively. Lastly, we suggest new avenues for research on this topic which is still in its early stages.

  17. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ptacnik, Robert

    2016-07-11

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light.

  18. Role of copper in light induced minority-carrier lifetime degradation of silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Savin, Hele; Yli-Koski, Marko; Haarahiltunen, Antti

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the impact of copper on the light induced minority-carrier lifetime degradation in various crystalline silicon materials. We demonstrate here that the presence of neither boron nor oxygen is necessary for the degradation effect. In addition, our experiments reveal that copper contamination alone can cause the light induced minority-carrier lifetime degradation. Peer reviewed

  19. Light-Induced Alterations in Basil Ganglia Kynurenic Acid Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.; Orr, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolic synthesis, release and breakdown of several known CNS neurotransmitters have been shown to follow a circadian pattern entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle. The levels of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmitters such as glutamate, have been shown to vary with environmental lighting conditions. Kynurenic Acid (KA), an endogenous tryptophan metabolite and glutamate receptor antagonist, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects against EAA-induced excitotoxic cell damage. Changes in KA's activity within the mammalian basal ganglia has been proposed as being contributory to neurotoxicity in Huntington's Disease. It is not known whether CNS KA levels follow a circadian pattern or exhibit light-induced fluctuations. However, because the symptoms of certain degenerative motor disorders seem to fluctuate with daily 24 hour rhythm, we initiated studies to determine if basal ganglia KA were influenced by the daily light/dark cycle and could influence motor function. Therefore in this study, HPLC-EC was utilized to determine if basal ganglia KA levels in tissue extracts from adult male Long-Evans rats (200-250g) entrained to 24 and 48 hours constant light and dark conditions, respectively. Samples were taken one hour before the onset of the subjective day and one hour prior to the onset of the subjective night in order to detect possible phase differences in KA levels and to allow for accumulation of factors expressed in association with the light or dark phase. Data analysis revealed that KA levels in the basal ganglia vary with environmental lighting conditions; being elevated generally during the dark. Circadian phase differences in KA levels were also evident during the subjective night and subjective day, respectively. Results from these studies are discussed with respect to potential cyclic changes in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic damage during the daily 24 hour cycle and its possible relevance to future therapeutic approaches in

  20. Molecular recognition by a polymorphic cell surface receptor governs cooperative behaviors in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshankumar T Pathak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell-cell recognition is a fundamental process that allows cells to coordinate multicellular behaviors. Some microbes, such as myxobacteria, build multicellular fruiting bodies from free-living cells. However, how bacterial cells recognize each other by contact is poorly understood. Here we show that myxobacteria engage in recognition through interactions between TraA cell surface receptors, which leads to the fusion and exchange of outer membrane (OM components. OM exchange is shown to be selective among 17 environmental isolates, as exchange partners parsed into five major recognition groups. TraA is the determinant of molecular specificity because: (i exchange partners correlated with sequence conservation within its polymorphic PA14-like domain and (ii traA allele replacements predictably changed partner specificity. Swapping traA alleles also reprogrammed social interactions among strains, including the regulation of motility and conferred immunity from inter-strain killing. We suggest that TraA helps guide the transition of single cells into a coherent bacterial community, by a proposed mechanism that is analogous to mitochondrial fusion and fission cycling that mixes contents to establish a homogenous population. In evolutionary terms, traA functions as a rare greenbeard gene that recognizes others that bear the same allele to confer beneficial treatment.

  1. Light-Induced Structural Flexibility of Thylakoid Membranes - Investigated using Small-Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Aagaard, Thomas Helverskov

    2005-01-01

    Using small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering the light-induced structural changes in pea thylakoids have been investigated. It is shown that light-induced shinkage in the thylakoids is connected to photosynthetic electron transduction. Using small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering the light-induced structural changes in pea thylakoids have been investigated. It is shown that light-induced shinkage in the thylakoids is connected to photosynthetic electron transduction.

  2. Light-induced confinement of electrons in stacked distorted graphene layers - a (TD-)DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejniczak, A; Cichy, B; Radosinski, L; Strek, W

    2017-04-19

    Recently observed white-light emission from graphene ceramics cannot be explained by black body radiation theory because of a relatively low temperature of the sample. Furthermore the intensity of the emission stays at the same level even at temperatures as low as 10 K, indicating the purely electronic nature of the observed emission. In this work a model of light emission from locally interacting stacked graphene layers after intense continuous wave laser excitation is proposed. After a light-induced sp 2 to sp 3 change of the hybridization sp 2 -nanodomains surrounded by sp 3 carbon atoms could be created and the electrons can be confined. Using DFT and TD-DFT methods followed by a molecular-like approach we examine the electronic structure and the optical properties of graphene (sp 2 ,sp 3 )-clusters. We show the quantized and well separated energy levels of electrons from the domain's interior and the possibility of emission in the NIR/VIS/UV range.

  3. Characterization of Phototransduction Gene Knockouts Revealed Important Signaling Networks in the Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayalakshmi Krishnan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular pathways mediating neuronal function in retinas can be greatly facilitated by the identification of genes regulated in the retinas of different mutants under various light conditions. We attempted to conduct a gene chip analysis study on the genes regulated during rhodopsin kinase (Rhok-/- and arrestin (Sag-/- knockout and double knockouts in mice retina. Hence, mice were exposed to constant illumination of 450 lux or 6,000 lux on dilated pupils for indicated periods. The retinas were removed after the exposure and processed for microarray analysis. Double knockout was associated with immense changes in gene expression regulating a number of apoptosis inducing transcription factors. Subsequently, network analysis revealed that during early exposure the transcription factors, p53, c-MYC, c-FOS, JUN, and, in late phase, NF-B, appeared to be essential for the initiation of light-induced retinal rod loss, and some other classical pro- and antipoptotic genes appeared to be significantly important as well.

  4. Phototropin 2 is involved in blue light-induced anthocyanin accumulation in Fragaria x ananassa fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadomura-Ishikawa, Yasuko; Miyawaki, Katsuyuki; Noji, Sumihare; Takahashi, Akira

    2013-11-01

    Anthocyanins are widespread, essential secondary metabolites in higher plants during color development in certain flowers and fruits. In strawberries, anthocyanins are also key contributors to fruit antioxidant capacity and nutritional value. However, the effects of different light qualities on anthocyanin accumulation in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, cv. Sachinoka) fruits remain elusive. In the present study, we showed the most efficient increase in anthocyanin content occurred by blue light irradiation. Light sensing at the molecular level was investigated by isolation of two phototropin (FaPHOT1 and FaPHOT2), two cryptochrome (FaCRY1 and FaCRY2), and two phytochrome (FaPHYA and FaPHYB) homologs. Expression analysis revealed only FaPHOT2 transcripts markedly increased depending on fruit developmental stage, and a corresponding increase in anthocyanin content was detected. FaPHOT2 knockdown resulted in decreased anthocyanin content; however, overexpression increased anthocyanin content. These findings suggested blue light induced anthocyanin accumulation, and FaPHOT2 may play a role in sensing blue light, and mediating anthocyanin biosynthesis in strawberry fruits. This is the first report to find a relationship between visible light sensing, and color development in strawberry fruits.

  5. Nonlinear optics of light induced structural transitions in confined gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, Kevin Francis

    2002-01-01

    in the kW.cm -2 range induced reversible reflectivity changes with a magnitude of as much as several percent (in the vicinity of the phase transition temperatures) and a typical relaxation time of ∼0.5 μs. These various experiments have illustrated that the modification of gallium's transitional properties, brought about by confinement, facilitates the achievement of a large optical nonlinearity via light-induced structural transformations in the metal. The studies of UPLD interfaces have shown that bulk gallium's nonlinearity is exceptionally broadband, that its response time can be as short as a few picoseconds, and that its relaxation time is typically in the nano- to microsecond range. Furthermore, the data collected have enabled the development and quantitative testing of theories to describe the thermal and non-thermal metallization mechanisms underlying the nonlinearity. The nanoparticles' nonlinear response shares certain characteristics with that of the bulk interfaces but the experimental data suggest that, in contrast to the bulk nonlinearity, it is not derived from a structural transition involving gallium's α phase. (author)

  6. Light-induced degradation in copper-contaminated gallium-doped silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Lindroos, Jeanette; Yli-Koski, Marko; Haarahiltunen, Antti; Schubert, Martin C.; Savin, Hele

    2013-01-01

    To date, gallium-doped Czochralski (Cz) silicon has constituted a solar cell bulk material free of light-induced degradation. However, we measure light-induced degradation in gallium-doped Cz silicon in the presence of copper impurities. The measured degradation depends on the copper concentration and the material resistivity. Gallium-doped Cz silicon is found to be less sensitive to copper impurities than borondoped Cz silicon, emphasizing the role of boron in the formation of copper-related...

  7. The Involvement of the Oxidative Stress in Murine Blue LED Light-Induced Retinal Damage Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Maho; Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    The aim of study was to establish a mouse model of blue light emitting diode (LED) light-induced retinal damage and to evaluate the effects of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Mice were exposed to 400 or 800 lx blue LED light for 2 h, and were evaluated for retinal damage 5 d later by electroretinogram amplitude and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness. Additionally, we investigated the effect of blue LED light exposure on shorts-wave-sensitive opsin (S-opsin), and rhodopsin expression by immunohistochemistry. Blue LED light induced light intensity dependent retinal damage and led to collapse of S-opsin and altered rhodopsin localization from inner and outer segments to ONL. Conversely, NAC administered at 100 or 250 mg/kg intraperitoneally twice a day, before dark adaptation and before light exposure. NAC protected the blue LED light-induced retinal damage in a dose-dependent manner. Further, blue LED light-induced decreasing of S-opsin levels and altered rhodopsin localization, which were suppressed by NAC. We established a mouse model of blue LED light-induced retinal damage and these findings indicated that oxidative stress was partially involved in blue LED light-induced retinal damage.

  8. Flicker light-induced retinal vasodilation in diabetes and diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh T; Kawasaki, Ryo; Wang, Jie Jin; Kreis, Andreas J; Shaw, Jonathan; Vilser, Walthard; Wong, Tien Y

    2009-11-01

    Flicker light-induced retinal vasodilation may reflect endothelial function in the retinal circulation. We investigated flicker light-induced vasodilation in individuals with diabetes and diabetic retinopathy. Participants consisted of 224 individuals with diabetes and 103 nondiabetic control subjects. Flicker light-induced retinal vasodilation (percentage increase over baseline diameter) was measured using the Dynamic Vessel Analyzer. Diabetic retinopathy was graded from retinal photographs. Mean +/- SD age was 56.5 +/- 11.8 years for those with diabetes and 48.0 +/- 16.3 years for control subjects. Mean arteriolar and venular dilation after flicker light stimulation were reduced in participants with diabetes compared with those in control subjects (1.43 +/- 2.10 vs. 3.46 +/- 2.36%, P flicker light-induced vasodilation were more likely to have diabetes (odds ratio 19.7 [95% CI 6.5-59.1], P flicker light-induced vasodilation were more likely to have diabetic retinopathy (2.2 [1.2-4.0], P = 0.01 for arteriolar dilation and 2.5 [1.3-4.5], P = 0.004 for venular dilation). Reduced retinal vasodilation after flicker light stimulation is independently associated with diabetes status and, in individuals with diabetes, with diabetic retinopathy. Our findings may therefore support endothelial dysfunction as a pathophysiological mechanism underlying diabetes and its microvascular manifestations.

  9. Recombination processes and light-induced defect creation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morigaki, K. [Department of Electrical and Digital-System Engineering, Hiroshima Institute of Technology, Miyake, Saeki-ku (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    Recombination processes of electrons and holes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are reviewed in terms of our model. The long decay component of photoluminescence (PL) and the long decay of light-induced electron spin resonance (LESR) are compared, and it is concluded that radiative centres responsible for the long decay component of PL are not LESR centres that are nonradiative centres. This is consistent with our model. The mechanism of light-induced defect creation in a-Si:H and its kinetics is summarized in terms of our model. The related defects involved in the recombination processes and the light-induced defect creation in a-Si:H are discussed. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Challenges in Simulating Light-Induced Processes in DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Marquetand

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we give a perspective on the main challenges in performing theoretical simulations of photoinduced phenomena within DNA and its molecular building blocks. We distinguish the different tasks that should be involved in the simulation of a complete DNA strand subject to UV irradiation: (i stationary quantum chemical computations; (ii the explicit description of the initial excitation of DNA with light; (iii modeling the nonadiabatic excited state dynamics; (iv simulation of the detected experimental observable; and (v the subsequent analysis of the respective results. We succinctly describe the methods that are currently employed in each of these steps. While for each of them, there are different approaches with different degrees of accuracy, no feasible method exists to tackle all problems at once. Depending on the technique or combination of several ones, it can be problematic to describe the stacking of nucleobases, bond breaking and formation, quantum interferences and tunneling or even simply to characterize the involved wavefunctions. It is therefore argued that more method development and/or the combination of different techniques are urgently required. It is essential also to exercise these new developments in further studies on DNA and subsystems thereof, ideally comprising simulations of all of the different components that occur in the corresponding experiments.

  11. Visible Light Induced Organic Transformations Using Metal-Organic-Frameworks (MOFs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoyu; Li, Zhaohui; García, Hermenegildo

    2017-08-22

    With the aim of developing renewable energy based processes, researchers are paying increasing interest to light induced organic transformations. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a class of micro-/mesoporous hybrid materials, are recently emerging as a new type of photoactive materials for organic syntheses due to their unique structural characteristics. In this Review, we summarized the recent applications of MOFs as photocatalysts for light induced organic transformations, including (1) oxidation of alcohols, amines, alkene, alkanes and sulfides; (2) hydroxylation of aromatic compounds like benzene; (3) activation of the C-H bonds to construct new C-C or C-X bonds; (4) atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). This Review starts with general background information of using MOFs in photocatalysis, followed by a description of light induced organic transformations promoted by photoactive inorganic nodes and photocatalytic active ligands in MOFs, respectively. Thereafter, the use of MOFs as multifunctional catalysts for light induced organic transformations via an efficient merge of the metal/ligand/guest based catalysis where the photocatalytic activity of MOFs plays a key role are discussed. Finally, the limitations, challenges and the future perspective of the application of MOFs for light induced organic transformations were addressed. The objective of this Review is to serve as a starting point for other researchers to get into this largely unexplored field. It is also our goal to stimulate intensive research in this field for rational designing of MOF materials to overcome their current limitations in photocatalysis, which can lead to more creative visible-light-induced organic transformations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. MYB75 phosphorylation by MPK4 is required for light-induced anthocyanin accumulation in arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shengnan; Wang, Wenyi; Gao, Jinlan

    2016-01-01

    anthocyanin pigments is light dependent, and the R2R3 MYB transcription factor MYB75/PAP1 regulates anthocyanin accumulation. Here, we report that MYB75 interacts with and is phosphorylated by MAP KINASE4 (MPK4). Their interaction is dependent on MPK4 kinase activity and is required for full function of MYB75....... MPK4 can be activated in response to light and is involved in the light-induced accumulation of anthocyanins. We show that MPK4 phosphorylation of MYB75 increases its stability and is essential for light-induced anthocyanin accumulation. Our findings reveal an important role for a MAPK pathway...

  13. What goes down must come up: symmetry in light-induced migration behaviour of Daphnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gool, E.; Ringelberg, J.

    2003-01-01

    During a short period of the year, Daphnia may perform a phenotypically induced diel vertical migration. For this to happen, light-induced swimming reactions must be enhanced both at dawn and at dusk. Enhanced swimming in response to light intensity increase can be elicited by fish-associated

  14. Light-Induced Local Heating for Thermophoretic Manipulation of DNA in Polymer Micro- and Nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, Lasse Højlund; Larsen, Niels Bent; Kristensen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for making polymer chips with a narrow-band near-infrared absorber layer that enables light-induced local heating of liquids inside fluidic micro- and nanochannels fabricated by thermal imprint in polymethyl methacrylate. We have characterized the resulting liquid temperature...

  15. RECEPTOR POTENTIAL AND LIGHT-INDUCED MITOCHONDRIAL ACTIVATION IN BLOWFLY PHOTORECEPTOR MUTANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOJET, MH; TINBERGEN, J; STAVENGA, DG

    1991-01-01

    1. Simultaneous measurements of the receptor potential and the light-induced mitochondrial activation were performed in white-eyed blowflies Calliphora vicina, mutant chalky, and Lucilia cuprina, mutants w(F) and w'nss. The intensity dependence and the temporal dynamics were investigated. 2. The

  16. Visible lights induced polymerization reactions: interactions between rose bengal and iron aren complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burget, D.; Grotzinger, C.; Jacques, P.; Fouassier, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The present paper is devoted to an investigation of the interactions between Rose Bengal (RB) and an Iron aren (Irg(+)) complex that are usable in visible light induced polymerization reactions. Steady state and flash photolysis experiments were performed in order to elucidate the nature of the intermediates formed after light excitation. A complete scheme of evolution of the excited states is discussed

  17. Light-induced lattice expansion leads to high-efficiency and stable perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Hsinhan; Asadpour, Reza; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Durand, Oliver; Strzalka, Joseph W.; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Tretiak, Sergei; Even, Jacky; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.

    2018-04-05

    Hybrid-perovskite based high-performance optoelectronic devices and clues from their operation has led to the realization that light-induced structural dynamics play a vital role on their physical properties, device performance and stability. Here, we report that continuous light illumination leads to a uniform lattice expansion in hybrid perovskite thin-films, which is critical for obtaining high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. Correlated, in-situ structural and device characterizations reveal that light-induced lattice expansion significantly benefits the performances of a mixed-cation pure-halide planar device, boosting the power conversion efficiency from 18.5% to 20.5%. This is a direct consequence of the relaxation of local lattice strains during lattice expansion, which results in the reduction of the energetic barriers at the perovskite/contact interfaces in devices, thus improving the open circuit voltage and fill factor. The light-induced lattice expansion stabilizes these high-efficiency photovoltaic devices under continuous operation of full-spectrum 1-Sun illumination for over 1500 hours. One Sentence Summary: Light-induced lattice expansion improves crystallinity, relaxes lattice strain, which enhances photovoltaic performance in hybrid perovskite device.

  18. Cyanobacterial high-light-inducible proteins - Protectors of chlorophyll-protein synthesis and assembly

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komenda, Josef; Sobotka, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1857, č. 3 (2016), s. 288-295 ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1416; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/11/0377 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Chlorophyll * Cyanobacteria * High-light-inducible protein Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.932, year: 2016

  19. Light-induced space-charge fields for the structuration of dielectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggert, H.A.

    2006-11-01

    Light-induced space-charge fields in lithium-niobate crystals are used for patterning of dielectric materials. This includes tailored ferroelectric domains in the bulk of the crystal, different sorts of micro and nanoparticles on a crystal surface, as well as poling of electrooptic chromophores. A stochastical model is introduced, which can describe the spatial inhomogeneous domain inversion. (orig.)

  20. Local visible-light induced modification of the inside of glass and COC microfluidic channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, R.R.; Pujari, S.P.; Vrouwe, E.X.; Zuilhof, H.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to locally modify the inside of microfluidic channels with functional groups that allow coupling of biologically-relevant molecules is of ever-rising relevance. We report the first example of visible-light induced hydrosilylation on hydrogen-terminated silanized glass (H-?-Glass) and

  1. Synthesis of block copolymers by combination of atom transfer radical polymerization and visible light-induced free radical promoted cationic polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahveci, Muhammet U; Acik, Gokhan; Yagci, Yusuf

    2012-02-27

    A new synthetic approach for the preparation of block copolymers by mechanistic transformation from atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) to visible light-induced free radical promoted cationic polymerization is described. A series of halide end-functionalized polystyrenes with different molecular weights synthesized by ATRP were utilized as macro-coinitiators in dimanganese decacarbonyl [Mn(2) (CO)(10) ] mediated free radical promoted cationic photopolymerization of cyclohexene oxide or isobutyl vinyl ether. Precursor polymers and corresponding block copolymers were characterized by spectral, chromatographic, and thermal analyses. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The blue light-induced interaction of cryptochrome 1 with COP1 requires SPA proteins during Arabidopsis light signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkotte, Xu; Ponnu, Jathish; Ahmad, Margaret; Hoecker, Ute

    2017-10-01

    Plants constantly adjust their growth, development and metabolism to the ambient light environment. Blue light is sensed by the Arabidopsis photoreceptors CRY1 and CRY2 which subsequently initiate light signal transduction by repressing the COP1/SPA E3 ubiquitin ligase. While the interaction between cryptochromes and SPA is blue light-dependent, it was proposed that CRY1 interacts with COP1 constitutively, i.e. also in darkness. Here, our in vivo co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that CRY1 and CRY2 form a complex with COP1 only after seedlings were exposed to blue light. No association between COP1 and CRY1 or CRY2 was observed in dark-grown seedlings. Thus, our results suggest that cryptochromes bind the COP1/SPA complex after photoactivation by blue light. In a spa quadruple mutant that is devoid of all four SPA proteins, CRY1 and COP1 did not interact in vivo, neither in dark-grown nor in blue light-grown seedlings. Hence, SPA proteins are required for the high-affinity interaction between CRY1 and COP1 in blue light. Yeast three-hybrid experiments also show that SPA1 enhances the CRY1-COP1 interaction. The coiled-coil domain of SPA1 which is responsible for COP1-binding was necessary to mediate a CRY1-SPA1 interaction in vivo, implying that-in turn-COP1 may be necessary for a CRY1-SPA1 complex formation. Hence, SPA1 and COP1 may act cooperatively in recognizing and binding photoactivated CRY1. In contrast, the blue light-induced association between CRY2 and COP1 was not dependent on SPA proteins in vivo. Similarly, ΔCC-SPA1 interacted with CRY2, though with a much lower affinity than wild-type SPA1. In total, our results demonstrate that CRY1 and CRY2 strongly differ in their blue light-induced interaction with the COP1/SPA complex.

  3. Systematic investigation of negative Cooper-Frye contributions in heavy ion collisions using coarse-grained molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliinychenko, D.; Huovinen, P.; Petersen, H.

    2015-02-01

    In most heavy ion collision simulations involving relativistic hydrodynamics, the Cooper-Frye formula is applied to transform the hydrodynamical fields to particles. In this article the so-called negative contributions in the Cooper-Frye formula are studied using a coarse-grained transport approach. The magnitude of negative contributions is investigated as a function of hadron mass, collision energy in the range of Elab=5 -160 A GeV, collision centrality, and the energy density transition criterion defining the hypersurface. The microscopic results are compared to negative contributions expected from hydrodynamical treatment assuming local thermal equilibrium. The main conclusion is that the number of actual microscopic particles flying inward is smaller than the negative contribution one would expect in an equilibrated scenario. The largest impact of negative contributions is found to be on the pion rapidity distribution at midrapidity in central collisions. For this case negative contributions in equilibrium constitute 8-13% of positive contributions, depending on collision energy, but only 0.5-4% in cascade calculation. The dependence on the collision energy itself is found to be nonmonotonous with a maximum at 10 - 20 A GeV.

  4. Cooperative assembly of Co-Smad4 MH1 with R-Smad1/3 MH1 on DNA: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Smads, the homologs of Sma and MAD proteins, play a key role in gene expression regulation in the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β signaling pathway. Recent experimental studies have revealed that Smad4/R-Smad heterodimers bound on DNA are energetically more favorable than homodimeric R-Smad/R-Smad complexes bound on DNA, which indicates that Smad4 might act as binding vehicle to cooperatively assemble with activated R-Smads on DNA in the nucleus. However, the details of interaction mechanism for cooperative recruitment of Smad4 protein to R-Smad proteins on DNA, and allosteric communication between the Smad4-DNA and R-Smad-DNA interfaces via DNA mediating are not yet clear so far. METHODOLOGY: In the present work, we have constructed a series of Smadn+DNA+Smadn (n = 1, 3, 4 models and carried out molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations and DNA dynamics analysis for them to study the interaction properties of Smadn (n = 1, 3, 4 with DNA molecule. RESULTS: The results revealed that the binding of Smad4 protein to DNA molecule facilitates energetically the formation of the heteromeric Smad4+DNA+Smad1/3 complex by increasing the affinity of Smad1/3 with DNA molecule. Further investigations through the residue/base motion correlation and DNA dynamics analyses predicted that the binding of Smad4 protein to DNA molecule in the heteromeric Smad4+DNA+Smad1/3 model induces an allosteric communication from the Smad4-DNA interface to Smad1/Smad3-DNA interface via DNA base-pair helical motions, surface conformation changes and new hydrogen bond formations. The present work theoretically explains the mechanism of cooperative recruitment of Smad4 protein to Smad1/3 protein via DNA-mediated indirect readout mode in the nucleus.

  5. Molecular recognition of poly(A) by small ligands: an alternative method of analysis reveals nanomolar, cooperative and shape-selective binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinkol, Ozgül Persil; Hud, Nicholas V

    2009-02-01

    A few drug-like molecules have recently been found to bind poly(A) and induce a stable secondary structure (T(m) approximately 60 degrees C), even though this RNA homopolymer is single-stranded in the absence of a ligand. Here, we report results from experiments specifically designed to explore the association of small molecules with poly(A). We demonstrate that coralyne, the first small molecule discovered to bind poly(dA), binds with unexpectedly high affinity (K(a) >10(7) M(-1)), and that the crescent shape of coralyne appears necessary for poly(A) binding. We also show that the binding of similar ligands to poly(A) can be highly cooperative. For one particular ligand, at least six ligand molecules are required to stabilize the poly(A) self-structure at room temperature. This highly cooperative binding produces very sharp transitions between unstructured and structured poly(A) as a function of ligand concentration. Given the fact that junctions between Watson-Crick and A.A duplexes are tolerated, we propose that poly(A) sequence elements and appropriate ligands could be used to reversibly drive transitions in DNA and RNA-based molecular structures by simply diluting/concentrating a sample about the poly(A)-ligand 'critical concentration'. The ligands described here may also find biological or medicinal applications, owing to the 3'-polyadenylation of mRNA in living cells.

  6. Taurine reduces blue light-induced retinal neuronal cell apoptosis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayang, Wu; Dongbo, Pang

    2018-02-27

    The massive uptake of organic compatible osmolytes is a self-protective response to multiple stressors. This study aimed to determine the protective effects of the osmolyte taurine against blue light-induced apoptosis in retinal neuronal cells in vitro. Real-time PCR was used to measure osmolyte transport. Radioimmunoassays were performed to measure osmolyte uptake. Cell Counting Kit-8 assays were conducted to measure cellular viability. Flow cytometry analysis was used to measure apoptosis. Compared with normotonic stress, hypertonic stress-induced uptake of osmolytes, including betaine, myoinositol, and taurine, into the retinal neuronal cells. Blue light increased osmolyte transporter mRNA expression together with osmolyte uptake. Furthermore, taurine significantly suppressed blue light-induced retinal neuronal cell apoptosis. The compatible osmolyte taurine may have an important role in cell resistance to blue light and cell survival.

  7. Light-induced heat and mass transfer in a single-component gas in a capillary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chermyaninov, I. V.; Chernyak, V. G.; Vilisova, E. A.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of light-induced heat and mass transfer in a single-component gas in a capillary tube at arbitrary Knudsen numbers. Surface and collisional mechanisms of transfer are analyzed, due to differences in accommodation coefficient and collision cross section between excited-and ground-state particles, respectively. Analytical expressions for kinetic coefficients characterizing the gas drift and heat transfer in a capillary tube are obtained in the limits of low and high Knudsen numbers. Numerical computations are performed for intermediate Knudsen numbers. Both drift and heat fluxes are determined as functions of the light beam frequency. In the case of an inhomogeneously broadened absorption line, the light-induced fluxes are found to depend not only on the sign, but also on the amount, of light beam detuning from the absorption line center frequency

  8. Eliminating Light-Induced Degradation in Commercial p-Type Czochralski Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Hallam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses developments in the mitigation of light-induced degradation caused by boron-oxygen defects in boron-doped Czochralski grown silicon. Particular attention is paid to the fabrication of industrial silicon solar cells with treatments for sensitive materials using illuminated annealing. It highlights the importance and desirability of using hydrogen-containing dielectric layers and a subsequent firing process to inject hydrogen throughout the bulk of the silicon solar cell and subsequent illuminated annealing processes for the formation of the boron-oxygen defects and simultaneously manipulate the charge states of hydrogen to enable defect passivation. For the photovoltaic industry with a current capacity of approximately 100 GW peak, the mitigation of boron-oxygen related light-induced degradation is a necessity to use cost-effective B-doped silicon while benefitting from the high-efficiency potential of new solar cell concepts.

  9. Protective effect of taurine on the light-induced disruption of isolated frog rod outer segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasantes-Morales, H.; Ademe, R.M.; Quesada, O.

    1981-01-01

    Isolated frog rod outer segments (ROS) incubated in a Krebs-bicarbonate medium, and illuminated for 2 h, show a profound alteration in their structure. This is characterized by distention of discs, vesiculation, and a marked swelling. The light-induced ROS disruption requires the presence of bicarbonate and sodium chloride. Replacement of bicarbonate by TRIS or HEPES protects ROS structure. Also, substitution of sodium chloride by sucrose or choline chloride maintains unaltered the ROS structure. Deletion of calcium, magnesium, or phosphate does not modify the effect produced by illumination. An increased accumulation of labeled bicarbonate and tritiated water is observed in illuminated ROS, as compared with controls in the dark. The presence of taurine, GABA, or glycine, at concentrations of 5-25 mM, effectively counteracts the light-induced ROS disruption. Taurine (25 mM) reduces labeled bicarbonate and tritiated water levels to those observed in the dark incubated ROS

  10. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB Lessens Light-Induced Rod Photoreceptor Damage in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kei; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Izawa, Hiroshi; Inoue, Yuki; Kuse, Yoshiki; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-12-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB is known to have neuroprotective effects against various neurodegenerative disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine whether PDGF-BB can be neuroprotective against light-induced photoreceptor damage in mice. Mice were exposed to 8000-lux luminance for 3 hours to induce phototoxicity. Two hours before light exposure, the experimental mice were injected with PDGF-BB intravitreally, and the control mice were injected with phosphate-buffered saline. The light-exposed PDGF-BB-injected mice and saline-injected mice were evaluated electroretinographically and histologically. The site and expression levels of PDGFR-β and PDGF-BB were determined by immunostaining and Western blotting, respectively. The effect of PDGF-BB on light-induced cone and rod photoreceptor damage was also evaluated in vitro in 661W cells, a murine cone photoreceptor cell line, and in primary retinal cell cultures. An intravitreal injection of PDGF-BB significantly reduced the decrease in the amplitudes of the electroretinograms (ERGs) and the thinning of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) induced by the light exposure. It also reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the ONL. PDGFR-β was expressed in the rod outer segments (OSs) but not the cone OSs. The levels of PDGF-BB and PDGFR-β were decreased after light irradiation. In addition, PDGF-BB had protective effects against light-induced damage to cells of rod photoreceptors but had no effect on the 661W cells in vitro. These findings indicate that PDGF-BB reduces the degree of light-induced retinal damage by activating PDGFR-β in rod photoreceptors. These findings suggest that PDGF-BB could play a role in the prevention of degeneration in eyes susceptible to phototoxicity.

  11. Nanosecond dynamics of a gallium mirror's light-induced reflectivity change

    OpenAIRE

    Albanis, V.; Dhanjal, S.; Emelyanov, V. I.; Fedotov, V. A.; MacDonald, K. F.; Petropoulos, P.; Richardson, D. J.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2000-01-01

    Transient pump-probe optical reflectivity measurements of the nano/microsecond dynamics of a fully reversible, light-induced, surface-assisted metallization of gallium interfaced with silica are reported. The metallization leads to a considerable increase in the interface's reflectivity when solid a-gallium is on the verge of melting. The reflectivity change was found to be a cumulative effect that grows with light intensity and pulse duration. The reflectivity relaxes back to that of alpha-g...

  12. Effects of combined ketamine/xylazine anesthesia on light induced retinal degeneration in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Arango-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To explore the effect of ketamine-xylazine anesthesia on light-induced retinal degeneration in rats. METHODS: Rats were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine (100 and 5 mg, respectively for 1 h, followed by a recovery phase of 2 h before exposure to 16,000 lux of environmental illumination for 2 h. Functional assessment by electroretinography (ERG and morphological assessment by in vivo imaging (optical coherence tomography, histology (hematoxylin/eosin staining, TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry (GFAP and rhodopsin staining were performed at baseline (ERG, 36 h, 7 d and 14 d post-treatment. Non-anesthetized animals treated with light damage served as controls. RESULTS: Ketamine-xylazine pre-treatment preserved retinal function and protected against light-induced retinal degeneration. In vivo retinal imaging demonstrated a significant increase of outer nuclear layer (ONL thickness in the non-anesthetized group at 36 h (p0.05, indicating a stabilizing and/or protective effect with regard to phototoxicity. Histology confirmed light-induced photoreceptor cell death and Müller cells gliosis in non-anesthetized rats, especially in the superior hemiretina, while ketamine-xylazine treated rats showed reduced photoreceptor cell death (TUNEL staining: p<0.001 after 7 d, thicker ONL and longer IS/OS. Fourteen days after light damage, a reduction of standard flash induced a-wave amplitudes and a-wave slopes (p = 0.01 and significant alterations in parameters of the scotopic sensitivity function (e.g. Vmax of the Naka Rushton fit p = 0.03 were observed in non-treated vs. ketamine-xylazine treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that pre-treatment with ketamine-xylazine anesthesia protects retinas against light damage, reducing photoreceptor cell death. These data support the notion that anesthesia with ketamine-xylazine provides neuroprotective effects in light-induced cell damage.

  13. Identification of novel light-induced genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piontkivska Helen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transmission of information about the photic environment to the circadian clock involves a complex array of neurotransmitters, receptors, and second messenger systems. Exposure of an animal to light during the subjective night initiates rapid transcription of a number of immediate-early genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Some of these genes have known roles in entraining the circadian clock, while others have unknown functions. Using laser capture microscopy, microarray analysis, and quantitative real-time PCR, we performed a comprehensive screen for changes in gene expression immediately following a 30 minute light pulse in suprachiasmatic nucleus of mice. Results The results of the microarray screen successfully identified previously known light-induced genes as well as several novel genes that may be important in the circadian clock. Newly identified light-induced genes include early growth response 2, proviral integration site 3, growth-arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 beta, and TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose polymerase. Comparative analysis of promoter sequences revealed the presence of evolutionarily conserved CRE and associated TATA box elements in most of the light-induced genes, while other core clock genes generally lack this combination of promoter elements. Conclusion The photic signalling cascade in the suprachiasmatic nucleus activates an array of immediate-early genes, most of which have unknown functions in the circadian clock. Detected evolutionary conservation of CRE and TATA box elements in promoters of light-induced genes suggest that the functional role of these elements has likely remained the same over evolutionary time across mammalian orders.

  14. Light-induced degradation in multicrystalline silicon: The role of copper

    OpenAIRE

    Inglese, A.; Focareta, A.; Schindler, F.; Schön, J.; Lindroos, J.; Schubert, M.C.; Savin, H.

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, we provide an insight into the light-induced degradation of multicrystalline (mc-) silicon caused by copper contamination. Particularly we analyze the degradation kinetics of intentionally contaminated B- and Ga-doped mc-Si through spatially resolved photoluminescence (PL) imaging. Our results show that even small copper concentrations are capable of causing a strong LID effect in both B- and Ga-doped samples. Furthermore, the light intensity, the dopant and the grain qu...

  15. Formation kinetics of copper-related light-induced degradation in crystalline silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Lindroos, Jeanette; Savin, Hele

    2014-01-01

    Light-induced degradation (LID) is a deleterious effect in crystalline silicon, which is considered to originate from recombination-active boron-oxygen complexes and/or copper-related defects. Although LID in both cases appears as a fast initial decay followed by a second slower degradation, we show that the time constant of copper-related degradation increases with increasing boron concentration in contrast to boron-oxygen LID. Temperature-dependent analysis reveals that the defect formation...

  16. International cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter international cooperation of the Division for Radiation Safety, NPP Decommissioning and Radwaste Management of the VUJE, a. s. is presented. Very important is cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency. This cooperation has various forms - national and regional projects of technical cooperation, coordinated research activities, participation of our experts in preparation of the IAEA documentation etc.

  17. Synthesis of crystalline gels on a light-induced polymerization 3D printer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jin; Mao, Yuchen; Miyazaki, Takuya; Zhu, Meifang

    2017-04-01

    3D printing, also knows as Additive Manufacturing (AM), was first commercialized in 1986, and has been growing at breakneck speed since 2009 when Stratasys' key patent expired. Currently the 3D printing machines coming on the market can be broadly classified into three categories from the material state point of view: plastic filament printers, powder (or pellet) printers, film printers and liquid photopolymer printers. Much of the work in our laboratory revolves around the crystalline gels. We have succeeded in developing them with high toughness, high flexibility, particularly with many functions as shape memory, energy storage, freshness-retaining, water-absorbing, etc. These crystalline gels are synthesized by light-induced radical polymerization that involves light-reactive monomer having the property of curing with light of a sufficient energy to drive the reaction from liquid to solid. Note that the light-induced polymerized 3D printing uses the same principle. To open up the possibilities for broader application of our crystalline functional gels, we are interested in making them available for 3D printing. In this paper, we share the results of our latest research on the 3D printing of crystalline gels on light-induced 3D printers.

  18. Blue-light-induced rapid chloroplast de-anchoring in Vallisneria epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yuuki; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Harada, Akiko; Shimazaki, Ken-Ichiro; Takagi, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    In the outer periclinal cytoplasm of leaf epidermal cells of an aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria, blue light induces "chloroplast de-anchoring", a rapid decline in the resistance of chloroplasts against centrifugal force. Chloroplast de-anchoring is known induced within 1 min of irradiation with high-fluence-rate blue light specifically, preceding the commencement of chloroplasts migration toward the anticlinal cytoplasm. However, its regulatory mechanism has remained elusive, although pharmacological analysis suggested that a calcium release from intracellular calcium stores is necessary for the response. In search of the responsible photoreceptors, immunoblotting analysis using antibodies against phototropins demonstrated that cross-reactive polypeptides of 120-kDa exist in the plasma-membrane fraction prepared from the leaves. In vitro phosphorylation analysis revealed that 120-kDa polypeptides were phosphorylated by exposure to blue light in a fluence-dependent manner. The blue-light-induced phosphorylation activity was sensitive to a Ser/Thr kinase inhibitor, staurosporine, and unusually was retained at a high level for a long time in darkness. Furthermore, phototropin gene homologs (Vallisneria PHOTOTROPIN1 and PHOTOTROPIN2) expressed in leaves were isolated. We propose that calcium-regulated chloroplast de-anchoring, possibly mediated by phototropins, is an initial process of the blue-light-induced avoidance response of chloroplasts in Vallisneria. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  19. [Effect of melafen on expression of Elip1 and Elip2 genes encoding chloroplast light-induced stress proteins in barley].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipenkova, O V; Ermokhina, O V; Belkina, G G; Oleskina, Iu P; Fattakhov, S G; Iurina, N P

    2008-01-01

    The effect of melafen, a plant growth regulator of a new generation, on the growth, pigment composition, and expression of nuclear genes Elip1 and Elip2 encoding chloroplast light-stress proteins in barley (Hordeum vulgare L) seedlings was studied. It is shown that the height of seedlings treated with melafen at concentrations of 0.5 x 10(-10) and 0.5 x 10(-8) M increased by approximately 10 and 20%, respectively, as compared to the control. At high concentrations (10(-5) and 10(-3) M), melafen had no effect on the growth of seedlings. The content of chlorophylls and carotenoids in chloroplasts barely differed from the control at all melafen concentrations tested. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that melafen did not influence the expression of the nuclear gene encoding the low-molecular-weight plastid stress protein ELIP1. At the same time, the expression of the nuclear gene encoding the high-molecular-weight light-inducible stress protein ELIP2 in the plants treated with melafen at a concentration of 0.5 x 10(-8) M, increased by approximately 70 %. At higher concentrations, melafen suppressed the Elip2 gene expression. Thus, melafen affects the expression of the Elip2 gene, which is involved in the regulation of chlorophyll synthesis and chloroplast biogenesis, which, in turn, may lead to changes in the resistance of plants to light-induced stress.

  20. Inhibition by acrolein of light-induced stomatal opening through inhibition of inward-rectifying potassium channels in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Moshiul; Ye, Wenxiu; Matsushima, Daiki; Khokon, Md Atiqur Rahman; Munemasa, Shintaro; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Acrolein is a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde derived from lipid peroxides, which are produced in plants under a variety of stress. We investigated effects of acrolein on light-induced stomatal opening using Arabidopsis thaliana. Acrolein inhibited light-induced stomatal opening in a dose-dependent manner. Acrolein at 100 μM inhibited plasma membrane inward-rectifying potassium (Kin) channels in guard cells. Acrolein at 100 μM inhibited Kin channel KAT1 expressed in a heterologous system using Xenopus leaves oocytes. These results suggest that acrolein inhibits light-induced stomatal opening through inhibition of Kin channels in guard cells.

  1. Light-induced, GTP-binding protein mediated membrane currents of Xenopus oocytes injected with rhodopsin of cephalopods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, H; Seidou, M; Kito, Y

    1991-01-01

    Xenopus oocytes that were injected with rhabdomeric membranes of squid and octopus photoreceptors acquired light sensitivity. The injected oocytes showed a light-induced current having characteristics similar to other G-protein-mediated Cl- currents induced by the activation of other membrane receptors. Pretreatment of the oocytes with pertussis toxin before the injection suppressed the generation of the light-induced current, indicating an ability of cephalopod rhodopsin to cross-react with an endogenous G-protein of Xenopus oocytes.

  2. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, John Z; Mullen, Jack L; Correll, Melanie J; Hangarter, Roger P

    2003-03-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  3. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, John Z.; Mullen, Jack L.; Correll, Melanie J.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  4. Robust measurement of thin-film photovoltaic modules exhibiting light-induced transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deceglie, Michael G.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Marion, Bill; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-09-01

    Light-induced changes to the current-voltage characteristic of thin-film photovoltaic modules (i.e. light-soaking effects) frustrate the repeatable measurement of their operating power. We describe best practices for mitigating, or stabilizing, light-soaking effects for both CdTe and CIGS modules to enable robust, repeatable, and relevant power measurements. We motivate the practices by detailing how modules react to changes in different stabilization methods. We also describe and demonstrate a method for validating alternative stabilization procedures, such as those relying on forward bias in the dark. Reliable measurements of module power are critical for qualification testing, reliability testing, and power rating.

  5. Robust Measurement of Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules Exhibiting Light-Induced Transients: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deceglie, Michael, G.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Marion, Bill; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-09-09

    Light-induced changes to the current-voltage characteristic of thin-film photovoltaic modules (i.e. light-soaking effects) frustrate the repeatable measurement of their operating power. We describe best practices for mitigating, or stabilizing, light-soaking effects for both CdTe and CIGS modules to enable robust, repeatable, and relevant power measurements. We motivate the practices by detailing how modules react to changes in different stabilization methods. We also describe and demonstrate a method for validating alternative stabilization procedures, such as those relying on forward bias in the dark. Reliable measurements of module power are critical for qualification testing, reliability testing, and power rating.

  6. UV light induced photodegradation of organic dye by ZnO nanocatalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumesh, C. K.; Patel, Bhavin; Parekh, Kinnari

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet light induced photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanocatalyst prepared using a wet chemical precipitation route and mineralization of the methyl orange (MO) dye has been carried out in a photocatalytic reactor. The degradation of the MO was monitored spectrophotometrically and showed a decolorization efficiency of 92% after nine hours of irradiation in the MO-ZnO/UV light system. The blue shifting of maximum peak position of the MO and the formation of extra peak at 247 nm during irradiation time advances revealed that MO degrades in the form of intermediates during the photocatalytic process.

  7. Radioactive isotope and isomer separation with using light induced drift effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hradecny, C.; Slovak, J.; Tethal, T.; Ermolaev, I.M.; Shalagin, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The isotope separation with using light induced drift (LID) is discussed. The basic theoretical characteristics of the method are deduced: separation simultaneously with an arbitrary high enrichment and without significant losses; separation productivity up to 100 μg/h. These characteristics are sufficient and very convenient for separation of expensive radioactive isotopes and isomers which are applied in medicine and science. The first experimental separation of the radioactive isotopes ( 22,24 Na) by using the LID effect is reported. 13 refs.; 5 figs

  8. Directional sensing of protein adsorption on titanium with a light-induced periodic structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Penttinen, N.; Silvennoinen, M.; Hasoň, Stanislav; Silvennoinen, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 26 (2011), s. 12951-12959 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/10/2378; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200040651 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : light-induced periodic surface structure * polished titanium * diffractive optical element based sensor Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.805, year: 2011

  9. Microstructure, optical characterization and light induced degradation in a-Si:H deposited at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minani, E.; Sigcau, Z.; Adgebite, O.; Ramukosi, F.L.; Ntsoane, T.P.; Harindintwari, S.; Knoesen, D.; Comrie, C.M.; Britton, D.T.; Haerting, M.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure and optical properties of a series of hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers deposited on glass substrates at different temperature have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction techniques and optical spectroscopy. The radial distribution function of the as-deposited samples showed an increase in the bond angle and a decrease in the radial distance indicating a relaxation of the amorphous network with increasing the deposition temperature. Light induced degradation was studied using a simulated daylight spectrum. The changes in hydrogen bonding configuration, associated with the light soaking at different stages of illumination, was monitored via the transmission bands of the vibrational wag and stretch modes of the IR spectrum

  10. Light-induced phenomena in one-component gas: The transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chermyaninov, I. V.; Chernyak, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the theory of transport processes in a one-component gas located in the capillary under the action of resonant laser radiation and the temperature and pressure gradients. The expressions for the kinetic coefficients determining heat and mass transport in the gas are obtained on the basis of the modified Boltzmann equations for the excited and unexcited particles. The Onsager reciprocal relations for cross kinetic coefficients are proven for all Knudsen numbers and for any law interaction of gas particles with each other and boundary surface. Light-induced phenomena associated with the possible non-equilibrium stationary states of system are analyzed.

  11. The reversal of light-induced degradation in amorphous silicon solar cells by an electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, D.E.; Rajan, K. [Solarex, a Business Unit of Amoco/Enron Solar, Newtown, Pennsylvania 19840 (United States)

    1997-04-01

    A strong electric field has been shown to reverse the light-induced degradation of amorphous silicon solar cells while exposed to intense illumination at moderate temperatures. The rate of reversal increases with temperature, illumination intensity, and with the strength of the reverse bias field. The reversal process exhibits an activation energy on the order of 0.9 eV and can be increased by the trapping of either electrons or holes in the presence of a strong electric field. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Formation kinetics of copper-related light-induced degradation in crystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindroos, J.; Savin, H.

    2014-01-01

    Light-induced degradation (LID) is a deleterious effect in crystalline silicon, which is considered to originate from recombination-active boron-oxygen complexes and/or copper-related defects. Although LID in both cases appears as a fast initial decay followed by a second slower degradation, we show that the time constant of copper-related degradation increases with increasing boron concentration in contrast to boron-oxygen LID. Temperature-dependent analysis reveals that the defect formation is limited by copper diffusion. Finally, interface defect density measurements confirm that copper-related LID is dominated by recombination in the wafer bulk

  13. Blue and Green Light-Induced Phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana and Lactuca sativa L. Seedlings 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinitz, Benjamin; Ren, Zhangling; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure time-response curves for blue and green light-induced phototropic bending in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and Lactuca sativa L. seedlings are presented. These seedlings show significant phototropic sensitivity up to 540 to 550 nanometers. Since wave-lengths longer than 560 nanometers do not induce phototropic bending, it is suggested that the response to 510 to 550 nanometers light is mediated by the specific blue light photoreceptor of phototropism. We advise care in the use of green `safelights' for studies of phototropism. PMID:16664021

  14. Butyrate treatment reversed the UV light induced G1 checkpoint by increasing Histone H4 acetylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koprinarova, M.; Markovska, P.; Botev, P.; Russev, G.

    2010-01-01

    HeLa cells were synchronized at the G1/S boundary with mimosine and were irradiated with 15 J.m -2 UV-C light. The cells were then released from the block and cultured in fresh media in the presence, or in the absence of sodium butyrate for four hours. The rate of DNA synthesis was determined by measuring the 3 H thymidine incorporation in DNA. In parallel series of experiments the levels of histone H4 acetylation were determined by Western blotting. We found out that UV irradiation of G1/S phase cells blocked their progression into S phase and that this was accompanied by a decrease of histone H4 acetylation. Butyrate was able to restore the levels of histone H4 acetylation, which was accompanied with a partial restoration of DNA synthesis. A conclusion was drawn that the UV light induced G1 checkpoint was executed by deacetylation of histone H4 in chromatin regions containing sequences important for DNA replication. Butyrate, which is a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor, blocks this reaction, which leads to restoration of the histone H4 acetylation and abrogation of the UV light induced G1 phase arrest. (authors)

  15. Operating microscope light-induced phototoxic maculopathy after transscleral sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Eui Yong; Ahn, Min; Lee, Dong Wook; You, In Cheon; Kim, Min Jung; Cho, Nam Chun

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the features of operating microscope light-induced retinal phototoxic maculopathy after transscleral sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens (TSS PC-IOL) implantation. The charts of 118 patients who underwent TSS PC-IOL implantation surgery at Chonbuk National University Hospital (Jeonju, Korea) between March 1999 and February 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Fourteen patients underwent combined 3-port pars plana vitrectomy and TSS PC-IOL implantation (vitrectomy group), and 104 patients underwent TSS PC-IOL implantation only (nonvitrectomy group). All surgeries were performed under the same coaxial illuminated microscope. All diagnoses were confirmed through careful fundus examination and fluorescein angiography (FA). Diagnoses of retinal phototoxic maculopathy were established in 10 (8.47%) of 118 TSS PC-IOL implantation cases. Phototoxic maculopathy occurred more frequently in the vitrectomy group than in the nonvitrectomy group (6/14 versus 4/104, respectively; P microscope light-induced retinal phototoxic maculopathy can occur more frequently after TSS PC-IOL implantation than after casual cataract surgery, especially when TSS PC-IOL is combined with vitrectomy surgery. Surgeons should take precautions to prevent retinal phototoxicity after TSS PC-IOL implantation and vitrectomy.

  16. Impaired Mitochondrial Energy Production Causes Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration Independent of Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jaiswal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two insults often underlie a variety of eye diseases including glaucoma, optic atrophy, and retinal degeneration--defects in mitochondrial function and aberrant Rhodopsin trafficking. Although mitochondrial defects are often associated with oxidative stress, they have not been linked to Rhodopsin trafficking. In an unbiased forward genetic screen designed to isolate mutations that cause photoreceptor degeneration, we identified mutations in a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene, ppr, a homolog of human LRPPRC. We found that ppr is required for protection against light-induced degeneration. Its function is essential to maintain membrane depolarization of the photoreceptors upon repetitive light exposure, and an impaired phototransduction cascade in ppr mutants results in excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis. Moreover, loss of ppr results in a reduction in mitochondrial RNAs, reduced electron transport chain activity, and reduced ATP levels. Oxidative stress, however, is not induced. We propose that the reduced ATP level in ppr mutants underlies the phototransduction defect, leading to increased Rhodopsin1 endocytosis during light exposure, causing photoreceptor degeneration independent of oxidative stress. This hypothesis is bolstered by characterization of two other genes isolated in the screen, pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. Their loss also causes a light-induced degeneration, excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis and reduced ATP without concurrent oxidative stress, unlike many other mutations in mitochondrial genes that are associated with elevated oxidative stress and light-independent photoreceptor demise.

  17. Light-induced magnetoresistance in solution-processed planar hybrid devices measured under ambient conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreetama Banerjee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report light-induced negative organic magnetoresistance (OMAR measured in ambient atmosphere in solution-processed 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynylpentacene (TIPS-pentacene planar hybrid devices with two different device architectures. Hybrid electronic devices with trench-isolated electrodes (HED-TIE having a channel length of ca. 100 nm fabricated in this work and, for comparison, commercially available pre-structured organic field-effect transistor (OFET substrates with a channel length of 20 µm were used. The magnitude of the photocurrent as well as the magnetoresistance was found to be higher for the HED-TIE devices because of the much smaller channel length of these devices compared to the OFETs. We attribute the observed light-induced negative magnetoresistance in TIPS-pentacene to the presence of electron–hole pairs under illumination as the magnetoresistive effect scales with the photocurrent. The magnetoresistance effect was found to diminish over time under ambient conditions compared to a freshly prepared sample. We propose that the much faster degradation of the magnetoresistance effect as compared to the photocurrent was due to the incorporation of water molecules in the TIPS-pentacene film.

  18. Light-induced magnetoresistance in solution-processed planar hybrid devices measured under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sreetama; Bülz, Daniel; Reuter, Danny; Hiller, Karla; Zahn, Dietrich R T; Salvan, Georgeta

    2017-01-01

    We report light-induced negative organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) measured in ambient atmosphere in solution-processed 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene) planar hybrid devices with two different device architectures. Hybrid electronic devices with trench-isolated electrodes (HED-TIE) having a channel length of ca. 100 nm fabricated in this work and, for comparison, commercially available pre-structured organic field-effect transistor (OFET) substrates with a channel length of 20 µm were used. The magnitude of the photocurrent as well as the magnetoresistance was found to be higher for the HED-TIE devices because of the much smaller channel length of these devices compared to the OFETs. We attribute the observed light-induced negative magnetoresistance in TIPS-pentacene to the presence of electron-hole pairs under illumination as the magnetoresistive effect scales with the photocurrent. The magnetoresistance effect was found to diminish over time under ambient conditions compared to a freshly prepared sample. We propose that the much faster degradation of the magnetoresistance effect as compared to the photocurrent was due to the incorporation of water molecules in the TIPS-pentacene film.

  19. Light-induced electric field generated by photovoltaic substrates investigated through liquid crystal reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, L.; Kushnir, K.; Reshetnyak, V.; Ciciulla, F.; Zaltron, A.; Sada, C.; Simoni, F.

    2017-11-01

    Liquid crystal reorientation is exploited to analyze the electric field generated by light irradiation in iron-doped lithium niobate crystals. The evaluation of the strength of this light-induced field is based on the measurement of the phase shift induced in a probe light beam by a liquid crystal cell built with two z-cut iron-doped lithium niobate crystals as substrates. Then, the field profile has been determined starting from a Gaussian-like surface charge density following the model described in the text. The director profile corresponding to the modelled electric field is in good agreement with the director reorientation evaluated experimentally by means of the light-induced phase shift. This investigation gives a new approach to study the effects based on the photovoltaic response of lithium niobate crystals. Moreover, the characterization of the electric field optically generated inside the LC layer is highly desirable in view of the realization of new all-optical devices to be integrated in optofluidic platforms.

  20. Light-Induced Infrared Difference Spectroscopy in the Investigation of Light Harvesting Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Mezzetti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Light-induced infrared difference spectroscopy (IR-DS has been used, especially in the last decade, to investigate early photophysics, energy transfer and photoprotection mechanisms in isolated and membrane-bound light harvesting complexes (LHCs. The technique has the definite advantage to give information on how the pigments and the other constituents of the biological system (proteins, membranes, etc. evolve during a given photoreaction. Different static and time-resolved approaches have been used. Compared to the application of IR-DS to photosynthetic Reaction Centers (RCs, however, IR-DS applied to LHCs is still in an almost pioneering age: very often sophisticated techniques (step-scan FTIR, ultrafast IR or data analysis strategies (global analysis, target analysis, multivariate curve resolution are needed. In addition, band assignment is usually more complicated than in RCs. The results obtained on the studied systems (chromatophores and RC-LHC supercomplexes from purple bacteria; Peridinin-Chlorophyll-a-Proteins from dinoflagellates; isolated LHCII from plants; thylakoids; Orange Carotenoid Protein from cyanobacteria are summarized. A description of the different IR-DS techniques used is also provided, and the most stimulating perspectives are also described. Especially if used synergically with other biophysical techniques, light-induced IR-DS represents an important tool in the investigation of photophysical/photochemical reactions in LHCs and LHC-containing systems.

  1. Relationship between molecular stacking and optical properties of 9,10-bis((4-N,N-dialkylamino)styryl) anthracene crystals: the cooperation of excitonic and dipolar coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Gao, Na; Xu, Hai; Liu, Wei; Shang, Hui; Yang, Wenjun; Zhang, Ming

    2014-08-04

    Five 9,10-bis((4-N,N-dialkylamino)styryl) anthracene derivatives (DSA-C1-DSA-C7) with different length alkyl chains were synthesized. They showed the same color in dilute solutions but different colors in crystals. The absorption, photoluminescence, and fluorescence decay indicate that there exist both excitonic and dipolar coupling in crystals of DSA-C1-DSA-C7. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that all the crystals belong to the triclinic space group P1 with one molecule per unit cell and that the molecules in every crystal have the identical orientation. This offers ideal samples to investigate the impact of the molecular stacking on the optical properties of the crystals. For the first time, the cooperation of excitonic and dipolar coupling has been comprehensively studied, and the contribution to the spectral shift from the excitonic and dipolar couplings quantitatively obtained. The experiments of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) together with measurements of the quantum efficiency further confirmed this interpretation. The results suggest that the excitonic and dipolar couplings between the adjacent molecules are both important and jointly induce the spectral shifts of the crystals. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Rimonabant, a selective cannabinoid1 receptor antagonist, protects against light-induced retinal degeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tomoyo; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Yuki; Otsuka, Tomohiro; Ohno, Yuta; Ogami, Shiho; Yamane, Shinsaku; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-05-15

    The endocannabinoid system is involved in some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. An endogenous constellation of proteins related to cannabinoid 1 receptor signaling, including free fatty acids, diacylglycerol lipase, and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase, are localized in the murine retina. Moreover, the expression levels of endogenous agonists of cannabinoid receptors are changed in the vitreous fluid. However, the role of the endocannabinoid system in the retina, particularly in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration, remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated involvement of the cannabinoid 1 receptor in light-induced retinal degeneration using in vitro and in vivo models. To evaluate the effect of cannabinoid 1 receptors in light irradiation-induced cell death, the mouse retinal cone-cell line (661W) was treated with a cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant. Time-dependent changes of expression and localization of retinal cannabinoid 1 receptors were measured using Western blot and immunostaining. Retinal damage was induced in mice by exposure to light, followed by intravitreal injection of rimonabant. Electroretinograms and histologic analyses were performed. Rimonabant suppressed light-induced photoreceptor cell death. Cannabinoid 1 receptor expression was upregulated by light exposure. Treatment with rimonabant improved both a- and b-wave amplitudes and the thickness of the outer nuclear layer. These results suggest that the cannabinoid 1 receptor is involved in light-induced retinal degeneration and it may represent a therapeutic target in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Using Light-Induced Thermocleavage in a Roll-to-Roll Process for Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Norrman, Kion

    2010-01-01

    We report on the use of intense visible light with a narrow spectral distribution matched to the region where the conjugated polymer material absorbs to selectively heat the active material and induce thermocleavage. We show a full roll-to-roll process, leading to complete large-area polymer sola...... ion mass spectrometry, attenuated total reflectance infrared, and transmission/reflection UV−vis techniques....... cell modules using light-induced thermocleavage. The process employs full solution processing in air for all five layers in the device and does not employ indium−tin oxide or vacuum processing. The process steps were carefully analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary...

  4. Fiber-optic SERS microfluidic chip based on light-induced gold nano-particle aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haitao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Shaopeng; Chen, Luoyang; Zhou, Hongwen; Zhu, Jinsong; Zheng, Zheng

    2015-10-01

    A novel optofluidic surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) chip was specially designed and fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and embedded with normal silica multi-mode optical fibers. Unlike in a conventional Raman detection configuration where an angle of 90° is commonly adopted, here the orientations of the excitation fiber and the collection fiber was set at such an obtuse angle so that the light beam from the excitation fiber can illuminate the endface, but is not within the acceptance angle of the collection fiber. It was found that with the laser irradiating on the endface of the collection fiber in the sample solution, the Raman scattering intensity continued to grow and a level about 30-times than its initial intensity was observed, which was understood by light-induced gold nano-particle aggregation. The effects of fibers' coupling angles, positions and laser irradiation power on the aggregation were investigated.

  5. Light-induced depigmentation in planarians models the pathophysiology of acute porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenhaus, Bradford M; Dustin, John P; Neverett, Emily R; Beaudry, Megan S; Nadeau, Leanna E; Burk-McCoy, Ethan; He, Xinwen; Pearson, Bret J; Pellettieri, Jason

    2016-05-31

    Porphyrias are disorders of heme metabolism frequently characterized by extreme photosensitivity. This symptom results from accumulation of porphyrins, tetrapyrrole intermediates in heme biosynthesis that generate reactive oxygen species when exposed to light, in the skin of affected individuals. Here we report that in addition to producing an ommochrome body pigment, the planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea generates porphyrins in its subepithelial pigment cells under physiological conditions, and that this leads to pigment cell loss when animals are exposed to intense visible light. Remarkably, porphyrin biosynthesis and light-induced depigmentation are enhanced by starvation, recapitulating a common feature of some porphyrias - decreased nutrient intake precipitates an acute manifestation of the disease. Our results establish planarians as an experimentally tractable animal model for research into the pathophysiology of acute porphyrias, and potentially for the identification of novel pharmacological interventions capable of alleviating porphyrin-mediated photosensitivity or decoupling dieting and fasting from disease pathogenesis.

  6. Manipulation and light-induced agglomeration of carbon nanotubes through optical trapping of attached silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chao; Zhang Yi; Gu, Claire; Seballos, Leo; Zhang, Jin Z

    2008-01-01

    A simple experimental method has been demonstrated for manipulating multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bundles through the optical trapping of attached silver nanoparticles (SNPs). In our experiments, without the SNPs, the MWCNTs cannot be trapped due to their irregular shapes and large aspect ratio. However, when mixed with SNPs, the MWCNTs can be successfully trapped along with the SNPs using a TEM 00 mode laser at 532 nm. This is attributed to the optical trapping of the SNPs and attractive interaction or binding between the SNPs and MWCNTs due to electrostatic and van der Waals forces. Therefore, optical manipulation of MWCNT bundles is achieved through the manipulation of the attached silver nanoparticles/aggregates. In addition, we have observed the phenomenon of light-induced further agglomeration of SNPs/MWCNTs which could potentially be exploited for fabricating patterned MWCNT films for future nanoscale devices and other applications

  7. Repair of ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage in cholera bacteriophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palit, B.N.; Das, G.; Das, J. (Indian Inst. of Chemical Biology, Calcutta. Dept. of Biophysics)

    1983-08-01

    DNA repair-proficient and -deficient strains of Vibrio cholerae were used to examine host cell reactivation, Weigle reactivation and photoreactivation of u.v.-irradiated cholera bacteriophages. U.v. light-induced DNA damage in phages of different morphological and serological groups could be efficiently photoreactivated. Host cell reactivation of irradiated phages of different groups was different on the same indicator host. Phage phi149 was the most sensitive, and phi138 the most resistant to u.v. irradiation. While phi138 showed appreciable host cell reactivation, this was minimal for phi149. Attempts to demonstrate Weigle reactivation of u.v.-irradiated cholera phages were not successful, although u.v.-induced filamentation of host cells was observed.

  8. Light-induced changes in bottled white wine and underlying photochemical mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant-Preece, Paris; Barril, Celia; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Scollary, Geoffrey R; Clark, Andrew C

    2017-03-04

    Bottled white wine may be exposed to UV-visible light for considerable periods of time before it is consumed. Light exposure may induce an off-flavor known as "sunlight" flavor, bleach the color of the wine, and/or increase browning and deplete sulfur dioxide. The changes that occur in bottled white wine exposed to light depend on the wine composition, the irradiation conditions, and the light exposure time. The light-induced changes in the aroma, volatile composition, color, and concentrations of oxygen and sulfur dioxide in bottled white wine are reviewed. In addition, the photochemical reactions thought to have a role in these changes are described. These include the riboflavin-sensitized oxidation of methionine, resulting in the formation of methanethiol and dimethyl disulfide, and the photodegradation of iron(III) tartrate, which gives rise to glyoxylic acid, an aldehyde known to react with flavan-3-ols to form yellow xanthylium cation pigments.

  9. Repair of ultraviolet-light-induced DNA damage in Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, G.; Sil, K.; Das, J.

    1981-01-01

    Repair of ultraviolet-light-induced DNA damage in a highly pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, has been examined. All three strains of V. cholerae belonging to two serotypes, Inaba and Ogawa, are very sensitive to ultraviolet irradiation, having inactivation cross-sections ranging from 0.18 to 0.24 m 2 /J. Although these cells are proficient in repairing the DNA damage by a photoreactivation mechanism, they do not possess efficient dark repair systems. The mild toxinogenic strain 154 of classical Vibrios presumably lacks any excision repair mechanism and studies of irradiated cell DNA indicate that the ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers may not be excised. Ultraviolet-irradiated cells after saturation of dark repair can be further photoreactivated. (Auth.)

  10. Repair of ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage in cholera bacteriophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palit, B.N.; Das, G.; Das, J.

    1983-01-01

    DNA repair-proficient and -deficient strains of Vibrio cholerae were used to examine host cell reactivation, Weigle reactivation and photoreactivation of u.v.-irradiated cholera bacteriophages. U.v. light-induced DNA damage in phages of different morphological and serological groups could be efficiently photoreactivated. Host cell reactivation of irradiated phages of different groups was different on the same indicator host. Phage phi149 was the most sensitive, and phi138 the most resistant to u.v. irradiation. While phi138 showed appreciable host cell reactivation, this was minimal for phi149. Attempts to demonstrate Weigle reactivation of u.v.-irradiated cholera phages were not successful, although u.v.-induced filamentation of host cells was observed. (author)

  11. Visible-light-induced surface graft polymerization via camphorquinone impregnation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziani-Cherif, Houcine; Abe, Yusuke; Imachi, Kou; Matsuda, Takehisa

    2002-02-01

    A surface modification method that is particularly applicable to complexly shaped fabricated devices has long been awaited. In this article, we describe the visible-light-induced surface photograft polymerization technique by which an inner surface of the device is modified by visible-light irradiation through the external surface. Comphorquione, as a photoradical initiator, was impregnated on a segmented polyurethane surface by solvent soaking, followed by visible-light irradiation in the presence of monomers such as acrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate. The resultant surfaces were highly wettable with water, and surface chemical compositional analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the surface was graft-polymerized with these monomers. The simple and widespread applicability of this surface modification technique to biomedical devices is discussed. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 59: 386-389, 2002

  12. Light-induced antibacterial activity of electrospun chitosan-based material containing photosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severyukhina, A N; Petrova, N V; Yashchenok, A M; Bratashov, D N; Smuda, K; Mamonova, I A; Yurasov, N A; Puchinyan, D M; Georgieva, R; Bäumler, H; Lapanje, A; Gorin, D A

    2017-01-01

    Increasing antimicrobial resistance requires the development of novel materials and approaches for treatment of various infections. Utilization of photodynamic therapy represents an advanced alternative to antibiotics and metal-based agents. Here, we report the fabrication of electrospun material that possesses benefits of both topical antimicrobial and photodynamic therapies. This material combines chitosan, as a biocompatible polymer, and a second generation photosensitizer. The incorporation of photosensitizer doesn't affect the material morphology and its nearly uniform distribution in fibers structure was observed by confocal Raman microscopy. Owing to photosensitizer the prepared material exhibits the light-induced and spatially limited antimicrobial activity that was demonstrated against Staphylococcus aureus, an important etiological infectious agent. Such material can be potentially used in antibacterial therapy of chronic wounds, infections of diabetic ulcers, and burns, as well as rapidly spreading and intractable soft-tissue infections caused by resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Parameters affecting light-induced excess conductivity in amorphous silicon doping-modulated multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, F.C.; Levine, S.; Vanier, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    The phenomenon of light-induced excess conductivity (LEC) which occurs in a-Si:H npnp doping-modulated multilayers is found experimentally to be dependent on several different factors. The concentrations of the dopants in n-type and p-type layers affect the Fermi level position, the height of the barriers, and also the density of defects. These parameters are altered by different choices of inert gas diluent (Ar or He) and substrate temperature T. For a given set of deposition conditions, the LEC effect can be maximized by varying the layer thickness. When T/sub s/ was varied, a minimum in LEC was found near 200-250 0 C. The influence of internal field was examined by using nini, pipi and npnp multilayers. The internal field is a necessary factor to observe a large LEC effect. A compensated film shows a small LEC effect

  14. Effect of magnesium doping on the light-induced hydrophilicity of ZnO thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Huang; Jianguo, Lü; Li, Zhang; Zhen, Tang; Jiangying, Yu; Ping, Li; Feng, Liu

    2012-05-01

    Undoped and Mg-doped ZnO thin films were deposited on Si (111) and quartz substrates by using the sol-gel method. Microstructure, surface topography and water contact angle of the thin films have been measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD), an atomic force microscope (AFM) and water contact angle apparatus, respectively. The XRD results show that all the thin films are polycrystalline with a hexagonal structure and have a preferred orientation along the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate. With the increase of Mg concentration, the RMS roughness increases from 2.14 to 9.56 nm and the contact angle of the un-irradiated thin films decreases from 89° to 82°. The wetting behavior of the resulting films can be reversibly switched from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, through alternation of UV illumination and dark storage. The light-induced efficiency of the thin films increases with the increase of Mg concentration.

  15. Drosophila king tubby (ktub mediates light-induced rhodopsin endocytosis and retinal degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shu-Fen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background The tubby (tub and tubby-like protein (tulp genes encode a small family of proteins found in many organisms. Previous studies have shown that TUB and TULP genes in mammalian involve in obesity, neural development, and retinal degeneration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Drosophila king tubby (ktub in rhodopsin 1 (Rh1 endocytosis and retinal degeneration upon light stimulation. Results Drosophila ktub mutants were generated using imprecise excision. Wild type and mutant flies were raised in dark or constant light conditions. After a period of light stimulation, retinas were dissected, fixed and stained with anti-Rh1 antibody to reveal Rh1 endocytosis. Confocal and transmission electron microscope were used to examine the retinal degeneration. Immunocytochemical analysis shows that Ktub is expressed in the rhabdomere domain under dark conditions. When flies receive light stimulation, the Ktub translocates from the rhabdomere to the cytoplasm and the nucleus of the photoreceptor cells. Wild type photoreceptors form Rh1-immunopositive large vesicles (RLVs shortly after light stimulation. In light-induced ktub mutants, the majority of Rh1 remains at the rhabdomere, and only a few RLVs appear in the cytoplasm of photoreceptor cells. Mutation of norpA allele causes massive Rh1 endocytosis in light stimulation. In ktub and norpA double mutants, however, Rh1 endocytosis is blocked under light stimulation. This study also shows that ktub and norpA double mutants rescue the light-induced norpA retinal degeneration. Deletion constructs further demonstrate that the Tubby domain of the Ktub protein participates in an important role in Rh1 endocytosis. Conclusions The results in this study delimit the novel function of Ktub in Rh1 endocytosis and retinal degeneration.

  16. Visible light induced photoelectrochemical biosensing based on oxygen-sensitive quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenjing; Bao Lei; Lei Jianping; Tu Wenwen; Ju Huangxian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The near-infrared QDs are synthesized in an aqueous solution. ► QDs-based biosensor exhibits visible-light induced cathodic photocurrent. ► The oxygen dependency of the photocurrent is verified. ► A photoelectrochemical strategy is established by coupling with enzymatic reaction. ► Photoelectrochemical sensor shows high upper detection limit, acceptable stability and accuracy. - Abstract: A visible light induced photoelectrochemical biosensing platform based on oxygen-sensitive near-infrared quantum dots (NIR QDs) was developed for detection of glucose. The NIR QDs were synthesized in an aqueous solution, and characterized with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The as-prepared NIR QDs were employed to construct oxygen-sensitive photoelectrochemical biosensor on a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) electrode. The oxygen dependency of the photocurrent was investigated at as-prepared electrode, which demonstrated the signal of photocurrent is suppressed with the decreasing of oxygen. Coupling with the consumption of oxygen during enzymatic reaction, a photoelectrochemical strategy was proposed for the detection of substrate. Using glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model enzyme, that is, GOx was covalently attached to the surface of CdTe QDs, the resulting biosensor showed the sensitive response to glucose. Under the irradiation of visible light of a wavelength at 505 nm, the proposed photoelectrochemical method could detect glucose ranging from 0.1 mM to 11 mM with a detection limit of 0.04 mM. The photoelectrochemical biosensor showed a good performance with high upper detection limit, acceptable stability and accuracy, providing an alternative method for monitoring biomolecules and extending the application of near-infrared QDs.

  17. The effect of sodium ions on the light-induced 86Rb release from the isolated crayfish retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartung, K.; Stieve, H.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of low external Na + concentrations on the light-induced K + release from crayfish photoreceptor cells was tested by labelling intracellular K + with the isotope 86 Rb. The amount of isotope released per light, stimulus is roughly proportional to the external Na + concentration if the osmolarity is kept constant by replacing Na + with Tris, choline or sucrose. When sucrose is used to replace the depleted Na + the light-induced K + release is a linear function of the external Na + concentration and is reduced by approx. 95% at an external Na + concentration of 5 mmol/l. For choline and Tris substitutions the relationships are less clear but at Na + concentrations + release is smaller in a Tris solution and larger in a choline solution. It is suggested that the light-induced K + release is due mainly to an activation of voltage sensitive K + channels. (orig.)

  18. Cooperative design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Kjeld

    1998-01-01

    if concurrent engineering is to succeed. On the basis of ethnographic studies of cooperative design, the paper attempts to characterize cooperative work in the domain of design and to outline a set of crucial research problems to be addressed if CSCW is to help engineers and de-signers meet the challenges...

  19. On the light-induced enhancement in photovoltaic performance of PEDOT:PSS/Si organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianhui; Yang, Linlin; Ge, Kunpeng; Chen, Bingbing; Shen, Yanjiao; Guo, Jianxin; Liu, Haixu; Xu, Ying; Fan, Jiandong; Mai, Yaohua

    2017-10-01

    Light-induced degradation has been identified to be a critical issue for most silicon-based solar cell technologies. This study presents an observation of an opposite light-induced enhancement (LIE) effect in photovoltaic performance in poly(3,4-ethylthiophene):polystyrenesulfonate/n-Si organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells. The reduced density of interface states under light soaking (LS) is found to be responsible for the LIE of the hybrid solar cells. An increased minor carrier lifetime under LS and a switchable photoluminescence intensity while applying a voltage bias are observed, providing evidence for the underlying physical mechanism.

  20. Coupled effects of director orientations and boundary conditions on light induced bending of monodomain nematic liquid crystalline polymer plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Yue; Ding, Shurong; Huo, Yongzhong; Xu, Changwei

    2012-01-01

    A photo-chromic liquid crystal polymers (LCPs) is a smart material for large light-activated variation or bending to transfer luminous energy into mechanical energy. We study the light induced behavior by modeling planar and homeotropic nematic network polymer plates. We effectively illustrate some reported experimental outcomes and theoretically predict some possible bending patterns. This paper constructs an understanding between the bending behaviors and interactions among the alignments, aspect ratios and boundary conditions, etc. Our work provides information on optimizing light induced bending in the process of micro-opto-mechanical system (MOMS) design. (paper)

  1. SIMULATION OF THE LIGHT-INDUCED OSCILLATIONS OF THE MEMBRANE-POTENTIAL IN POTAMOGETON LEAF-CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MIEDEMA, H; PRINS, HBA

    An attempt has been made to simulate the light-induced oscillations of the membrane potential of Potamogeton lucens leaf cells in relation to the apoplastic pH changes. Previously it was demonstrated that the membrane potential of these cells can be described in terms of proton movements only. It is

  2. New aspects of light-induced charge transport in potassium tantalate crystals doped by copper and iron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badalyan, A. G.; Azzoni, C. B.; Galinetto, P.; Mozzati, M. C.; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Rosa, Jan; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Syrnikov, P. P.; Trepakov, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2007), s. 1368-1371 ISSN 1862-6351 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : potassium tantalate crystals * light-induced charge transport Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  3. Direct characterization of ultraviolet-light-induced refractive index structures by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Madsen, S.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    We have applied a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope to directly probe ultraviolet (UV)-light-induced refractive index structures in planar glass samples. This technique permits direct comparison between topography and refractive index changes (10(-5)-10(-3)) with submicrometer...

  4. Light-induced spatial separation of charges toward different crystal facets of square-like WO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Huihua; Ma, Ruirui; Mao, Fang; Liu, Kewei; Cao, Hongmei; Yan, Hongjian

    2016-09-29

    Light-induced preferential migration of electrons and holes to the minor (200) and (020) facets and the dominant (002) facets of square-like WO 3 , respectively, resulted in the square-like WO 3 nanoplates with Pt loaded mainly on dominant (002) facets shows higher photocatalytic activity than that Pt loaded on the minor facets.

  5. Hard-Mask-Through UV-Light-Induced Damage to Low-k Film during Plasma Process for Dual Damascene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriaki Matsunaga,; Hirokatsu Okumura,; Butsurin Jinnai,; Seiji Samukawa,

    2010-04-01

    Plasma irradiation impact on a SiO2-hardmask/SiOCH low-k film stacked structure was investigated in detail. The plasma irradiation induces damage to the low-k film although it is covered by a hard mask. The hard-mask-through UV-light-induced damage showed plasma source gas dependence. The damage is determined by the UV light wavelength and photon energy. It was also found that a high substrate temperature accelerates the hard-mask-through UV-light-induced damage. The hard-mask-through UV-light-induced damage was hardly seen for the hard masks thicker than 115 nm in the O2-irradiation experiment. Conversely, an actual SiO2 film deposition process by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD) induces damage during deposition. The PE-CVD process induces heavier damage to the low-k film than the O2-plasma experiment. Higher process temperature accelerates the hard-mask-through UV-light-induced damage in the hard mask SiO2 deposition process.

  6. Light-induced changes of cubic and uniaxial magnetic aniosotropy in a magnet doped by strongly anisotropic ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zaytseva, I.; Stupakiewicz, A.; Maziewski, A.; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.

    254-255, - (2003), s. 118-120 ISSN 0304-8853. [Soft Magnetic Material Conference ( SMM 15). Bilbao, 05.09.2001-07.09.2001] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : photomagnetic effects * light-induced anisotropy * garnets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.910, year: 2003

  7. Light-induced space-charge fields for the structuration of dielectric materials; Lichtinduzierte Raumladungsfelder zur Strukturierung dielektrischer Materialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, H.A.

    2006-11-15

    Light-induced space-charge fields in lithium-niobate crystals are used for patterning of dielectric materials. This includes tailored ferroelectric domains in the bulk of the crystal, different sorts of micro and nanoparticles on a crystal surface, as well as poling of electrooptic chromophores. A stochastical model is introduced, which can describe the spatial inhomogeneous domain inversion. (orig.)

  8. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways. PMID:28277539

  9. Iterative experiment design guides the characterization of a light-inducible gene expression circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruess, Jakob; Parise, Francesca; Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Khammash, Mustafa; Lygeros, John

    2015-06-30

    Systems biology rests on the idea that biological complexity can be better unraveled through the interplay of modeling and experimentation. However, the success of this approach depends critically on the informativeness of the chosen experiments, which is usually unknown a priori. Here, we propose a systematic scheme based on iterations of optimal experiment design, flow cytometry experiments, and Bayesian parameter inference to guide the discovery process in the case of stochastic biochemical reaction networks. To illustrate the benefit of our methodology, we apply it to the characterization of an engineered light-inducible gene expression circuit in yeast and compare the performance of the resulting model with models identified from nonoptimal experiments. In particular, we compare the parameter posterior distributions and the precision to which the outcome of future experiments can be predicted. Moreover, we illustrate how the identified stochastic model can be used to determine light induction patterns that make either the average amount of protein or the variability in a population of cells follow a desired profile. Our results show that optimal experiment design allows one to derive models that are accurate enough to precisely predict and regulate the protein expression in heterogeneous cell populations over extended periods of time.

  10. Biomimetic Water-Collecting Fabric with Light-Induced Superhydrophilic Bumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanfeng; Wang, Xiaowen; Lai, Chuilin; Hu, Huawen; Kong, Yeeyee; Fei, Bin; Xin, John H

    2016-02-10

    To develop an efficient water-collecting surface that integrates both fast water-capturing and easy drainage properties is of high current interest for addressing global water issues. In this work, a superhydrophobic surface was fabricated on cotton fabric via manipulation of both the surface roughness and surface energy. This was followed by a subsequent spray coating of TiO2 nanosol that created light-induced superhydrophilic bumps with a unique raised structure as a result of the interfacial tension of the TiO2 nanosol sprayed on the superhydrophobic fiber surface. These raised TiO2 bumps induce both a wettability gradient and a shape gradient, synergistically accelerating water coalescence and water collection. The in-depth study revealed that the quantity and the distribution of the TiO2 had a significant impact on the final water collection efficiency. This inexpensive and facilely fabricated fabric biomimicks the desert beetle's back and spider silk, which are capable of fog harvesting without additional energy consumption.

  11. Light-hormone interaction in the red-light-induced suppression of photomorphogenesis in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ansuman; Sahoo, Dinabandhu; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2016-03-01

    Red light perceived by the shoot bottom suppresses photomorphogenesis in rice seedlings mediated by phytochrome A. Shoots of these seedlings grown in red light having their shoot bottom exposed were deficient in chlorophyll and accumulated high concentration of trans-zeatin riboside. However, reduced presence of isopentynyl adenosine, dihydrozeatin riboside was observed in shoots of red-light-grown non-green seedlings in comparison to green seedling. The message abundance of cytokinin receptor (OsHK5), transporters (OsENT1, OsENT2), and response regulators (OsRR4, OsRR10) was downregulated in these red-light-grown non-green seedlings. Attenuation of greening process was reversed by application of exogenous cytokinin analogue, benzyladenine, or supplementing red light with blue light. In the same vein, the suppression of gene expression of cytokinin receptor, transporters, and type-A response regulators was reversed in red-light-grown seedlings treated with benzyladenine suggesting that the disarrayed cytokinin (CK) signaling cascade is responsible for non-greening of seedlings grown in red light. The reversal of red-light-induced suppression of photomorphogenesis by blue light and benzyladenine demonstrates the interaction of light and cytokinin signaling cascades in the regulation of photomorphogenesis. Partial reversal of greening process by exogenous application of benzyladenine suggests, apart from CKs perception, transportation and responsiveness, other factors are also involved in modulation of suppression of photomorphogenesis by red light.

  12. Pilot clinical study to assess caries lesion activity using quantitative light-induced fluorescence during dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masatoshi; Ferreira-Zandoná, Andrea G.; Eckert, George J.; Zero, Domenick T.; Stookey, George K.

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ability of quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) to assess caries lesion activity using visual examination (VE) as the gold standard. Twenty-four visible white spot lesions on buccal surfaces were examined from 23 children, ages 9 to 14 years. At baseline, the surface was hydrated with water, and thereafter, it was dehydrated with continuous compressed air during image acquisition. QLF images were acquired at 0 (baseline), 5, and 15 s. QLF variables [QLFV: fluorescence loss (ΔF), lesion size (S), ΔQ: ΔF×S] was recorded. Changes-in-QLFV per second (ΔQLFV) were determined: ΔQLFV=(QLFVN-QLF/N), where N indicates dehydration time. One experienced dentist conducted VE independently using a dental unit's light, compressed air, and explorer. QLFV and ΔQLFV of the active group (n=11) were compared with those of the inactive group (n=13) using two-sample t-tests. As the surface was dehydrated, S and ΔQ values of the active group increased, whereas QLFV of the inactive group showed only a small change. ΔQLFV of the active group were larger than those of the inactive group; however, the difference did not reach statistical significance (p>0.11). Within the limitations of this study, QLF data indicated increments for lesions designated as active and minimal change for lesions defined as inactive.

  13. Light-induced spatial control of pH-jump reaction at smart gel interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techawanitchai, Prapatsorn; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Idota, Naokazu; Aoyagi, Takao

    2012-11-01

    We proposed here a 'smart' control of an interface movement of proton diffusion in temperature- and pH-responsive hydrogels using a light-induced spatial pH-jump reaction. A photoinitiated proton-releasing reaction of o-nitrobenzaldehyde (NBA) was integrated into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-o-2-carboxyisopropylacrylamide) (P(NIPAAm-co-CIPAAm)) hydrogels. NBA-integrated hydrogels demonstrated quick release of proton upon UV irradiation, allowing the pH inside the gel to decrease below the pK(a) of P(NIPAAm-co-CIPAAm) within a minute. The NBA-integrated gel was shown to shrink rapidly upon UV irradiation without polymer "skin layer" formation due to a uniform decrease of pH inside the gel. Spatial control of gel shrinking was also created by irradiating UV light to a limited region of the gel through a photomask. The interface of proton diffusion ("active interface") gradually moved toward non-illuminated area. The apparent position of "active interface", however, did not change remarkably above the LCST, while protons continuously diffused outward direction. This is because the "active interface" also moved inward direction as gel shrank above the LCST. As a result, slow movement of the apparent interface was observed. The NBA-integrated gel was also successfully employed for the controlled release of an entrapped dextran in a light controlled manner. This system is highly promising as smart platforms for triggered and programmed transportation of drugs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Visible Light Induced Photocatalytic Degradation of Methyl Red with Codoped Titania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmitha Thota

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalysis using semiconductor oxides was being investigated extensively for the degradation of dyes in effluent water. This paper reports our findings on visible light induced photocatalytic degradation of azo dye, methyl red mediated nitrogen and manganese codoped nano-titanium dioxide (N/Mn-TiO2. The codoped samples with varying weight percentages were synthesized by sol-gel method and characterized by various analytical techniques. The X-ray diffraction data showed that the synthesized samples were in anatase phase with 2θ at 25.3°. UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectral analysis revealed that the presence of dopants in TiO2 caused a significant absorption shift towards visible region and their presence was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectral data. The release of hydroxyl radical (major active species in photocatalytic degradation by the photocatalyst in aqueous solution under visible light irradiation was quantitatively investigated by the photoluminiscent technique (PL. The effect of various experimental parameters like dopant concentration, pH, catalyst dosage, and initial dye concentrations was investigated and optimum conditions were established. The extent of mineralization of methyl red was studied by chemical oxygen demand (COD assays and the results showed complete mineralization of the dye.

  15. Basic study on isotope separation using light induced drift effects (Progress report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suto, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Hiromi; Suzuki, M. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works; Ishii, K.

    1999-03-01

    As a preliminary research on {sup 15}N-isotope separation on the basis of light induced drift (LID) effects in NH{sub 3}, the authors have confirmed the feasibility on {sup 13}C-isotope separation using LID effects in CH{sub 3}F for which all the necessary spectroscopic data are available and found that: (1) Concentration difference at the entrance and at the exit end of the drift tube {delta}n{sub a} (number/cm{sup 3}) was proportional to the energy density absorbed ({delta}W/cm{sup 2}), indicating the validity of theoretical LID equation. (2) Pressure dependence of {delta}n{sub a}/{delta}S was maximum at ca. 0.5 Torr. Lower {delta}n{sub a}/{delta}S values are due to power saturation effects at low pressures and due to absorption line broadening at high pressures. (3) Maximum isotopic selectivity was obtained at 0.5 Torr and to be 1.18. (4) Time needed for {delta}n{sub a} to attain the equilibrium increased with increasing pressure. They concluded that the possibility of {sup 15}N isotope separation using NH{sub 3}-LID effect was in principle confirmed. (S. Ohno)

  16. A Robust Metal-Organic Framework for Dynamic Light-Induced Swing Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiqing; Martinez, Marta Rubio; Perry, Zachary; Zhou, Hong-Cai; Falcaro, Paolo; Doblin, Christian; Lim, Seng; Hill, Anita J; Halstead, Barry; Hill, Matthew R

    2016-08-01

    Adsorbents for CO2 capture need to demonstrate efficient release. Light-induced swing adsorption (LISA) is an attractive new method to release captured CO2 that utilizes solar energy rather than electricity. MOFs, which can be tailored for use in LISA owing to their chemical functionality, are often unstable in moist atmospheres, precluding their use. A MOF is used that can release large quantities of CO2 via LISA and is resistant to moisture across a large pH range. PCN-250 undergoes LISA, with UV flux regulating the CO2 desorption capacity. Furthermore, under UV light, the azo residues within PCN-250 have constrained, local, structural flexibility. This is dynamic, rapidly switching back to the native state. Reusability tests demonstrate a 7.3 % and 4.9 % loss in both adsorption and LISA capacity after exposure to water for five cycles. These minimal changes confirm the structural robustness of PCN-250 and its great potential for triggered release applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Quantified light-induced fluorescence, review of a diagnostic tool in prevention of oral disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Josselin de Jong, Elbert; Higham, Susan M.; Smith, Philip W.; van Daelen, Catherina J.; van der Veen, Monique H.

    2009-05-01

    Diagnostic methods for the use in preventive dentistry are being developed continuously. Few of these find their way into general practice. Although the general trend in medicine is to focus on disease prevention and early diagnostics, in dentistry this is still not the case. Nevertheless, in dental research some of these methods seem to be promising for near future use by the general dental professional. In this paper an overview is given of a method called quantitative light-induced fluorescence or (QLF) in which visible and harmless light excites the teeth in the patient's mouth to produce fluorescent images, which can be stored on disk and computer analyzed. White spots (early dental caries) are detected and quantified as well as bacterial metabolites on and in the teeth. An overview of research to validate the technique and modeling to further the understanding of the technique by Monte Carlo simulation is given and it is shown that the fluorescence phenomena can be described by the simulation model in a qualitative way. A model describing the visibility of red fluorescence from within the dental tissue is added, as this was still lacking in current literature. An overview is given of the clinical images made with the system and of the extensive research which has been done. The QLF™ technology has been shown to be of importance when used in clinical trials with respect to the testing of toothpastes and preventive treatments. It is expected that the QLF™ technology will soon find its way into the general dental practice.

  18. A critical element of the light-induced quaternary structural changes in YtvA-LOV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rang; Gam, Jongsik; Moon, Jayoung; Lee, Seung-Goo; Suh, Young-Ger; Lee, Bong-Jin; Lee, Jeeyeon

    2015-12-01

    YtvA, a photosensory LOV (light-oxygen-voltage) protein from Bacillus subtilis, exists as a dimer that previously appeared to undergo surprisingly small structural changes after light illumination compared with other light-sensing proteins. However, we now report that light induces significant structural perturbations in a series of YtvA-LOV domain derivatives in which the Jα helix has been truncated or replaced. Results from native gel analysis showed significant mobility changes in these derivatives after light illumination; YtvA-LOV without the Jα helix dimerized in the dark state but existed as a monomer in the light state. The absence of the Jα helix also affected the dark regeneration kinetics and the stability of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) binding to its binding site. Our results demonstrate an alternative way of photo-induced signal propagation that leads to a bigger functional response through dimer/monomer conversions of the YtvA-LOV than the local disruption of Jα helix in the As-LOV domain. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  19. Quantification of Canine Dental Plaque Using Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Corrin; Gill, Yadvinder; Colyer, Alison; Davis, Ian; Allsopp, Judi; Komarov, Gleb; Higham, Susan; Harris, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF) as an alternative to the established Logan and Boyce method for determining plaque coverage of dogs' teeth. In a series of studies in conscious and anesthetized dogs, QLF showed good intra-photographer repeatability (coefficient of variation [CV] of 7.5% for undisclosed teeth) and inter-photographer reproducibility (CV of 3.2% for undisclosed teeth and 8.5% for disclosed teeth). The QLF software accurately identifies areas of plaque as demonstrated by comparison to the variability of 5 human scorers, manually marking plaque on QLF-acquired images (P = 0.1). There was good agreement with the modified Logan and Boyce method in the percentage reduction in plaque accumulation measured when dogs were fed an oral care chew versus no chew. To see a 15% difference in plaque accumulation, which is considered sufficient by the Veterinary Oral Health Council to differentiate between 2 treatments, a retrospective power analysis (90%) of the data established that only 7 dogs would be required, compared to 19 dogs for the modified Logan and Boyce method. QLF is a reliable method for measuring dental plaque in dogs with the added advantage that it is not subjective and requires fewer animals.

  20. Evaluation of Degradation in Nanofilled Adhesive Resins Using Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Young Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate degradation in commercial dental nanofilled adhesive resins using quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF. Three adhesives were selected: D/E resin (DR, Single Bond Plus (SB, and G-Bond (GB. The adhesives were mixed with porphyrin for the QLF analysis. Specimens were prepared by dispensing blended adhesives into a flexible mold and polymerizing. Then, the QLF analysis of the specimens was done and the porphyrin values (Simple Plaque Score and ΔR were measured. After thermocycling of the specimens (5000 cycles, 5 to 55°C for the degradation, the specimens were assayed by QLF again. The porphyrin values were analyzed using paired t-test at a 95% confidence level. A significant reduction in SPS was observed in all groups after thermocycling. The ΔR significantly decreased after thermocycling except area ΔR30 of SB group. Overall, porphyrin values decreased after thermocycling which indicates that the degradation of the adhesive resins may be measured by the change of porphyrin value. The QLF method could be used to evaluate the degradation of adhesive resin.

  1. Light-induced oxidative stress, N-formylkynurenine, and oxygenic photosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina M Dreaden Kasson

    Full Text Available Light stress in plants results in damage to the water oxidizing reaction center, photosystem II (PSII. Redox signaling, through oxidative modification of amino acid side chains, has been proposed to participate in this process, but the oxidative signals have not yet been identified. Previously, we described an oxidative modification, N-formylkynurenine (NFK, of W365 in the CP43 subunit. The yield of this modification increases under light stress conditions, in parallel with the decrease in oxygen evolving activity. In this work, we show that this modification, NFK365-CP43, is present in thylakoid membranes and may be formed by reactive oxygen species produced at the Mn(4CaO(5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex. NFK accumulation correlates with the extent of photoinhibition in PSII and thylakoid membranes. A modest increase in ionic strength inhibits NFK365-CP43 formation, and leads to accumulation of a new, light-induced NFK modification (NFK317 in the D1 polypeptide. Western analysis shows that D1 degradation and oligomerization occur under both sets of conditions. The NFK modifications in CP43 and D1 are found 17 and 14 Angstrom from the Mn(4CaO(5 cluster, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that NFK is an oxidative modification that signals for damage and repair in PSII. The data suggest a two pathway model for light stress responses. These pathways involve differential, specific, oxidative modification of the CP43 or D1 polypeptides.

  2. Light-induced protein nitration and degradation with HONO emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Meusel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Proteins can be nitrated by air pollutants (NO2, enhancing their allergenic potential. This work provides insight into protein nitration and subsequent decomposition in the presence of solar radiation. We also investigated light-induced formation of nitrous acid (HONO from protein surfaces that were nitrated either online with instantaneous gas-phase exposure to NO2 or offline by an efficient nitration agent (tetranitromethane, TNM. Bovine serum albumin (BSA and ovalbumin (OVA were used as model substances for proteins. Nitration degrees of about 1 % were derived applying NO2 concentrations of 100 ppb under VIS∕UV illuminated conditions, while simultaneous decomposition of (nitrated proteins was also found during long-term (20 h irradiation exposure. Measurements of gas exchange on TNM-nitrated proteins revealed that HONO can be formed and released even without contribution of instantaneous heterogeneous NO2 conversion. NO2 exposure was found to increase HONO emissions substantially. In particular, a strong dependence of HONO emissions on light intensity, relative humidity, NO2 concentrations and the applied coating thickness was found. The 20 h long-term studies revealed sustained HONO formation, even when concentrations of the intact (nitrated proteins were too low to be detected after the gas exchange measurements. A reaction mechanism for the NO2 conversion based on the Langmuir–Hinshelwood kinetics is proposed.

  3. Fluorescent light induces neurodegeneration in the rodent nigrostriatal system but near infrared LED light does not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Stefania; Vitale, Flora; Viaggi, Cristina; di Marco, Stefano; Aloisi, Gabriella; Fasciani, Irene; Pardini, Carla; Pietrantoni, Ilaria; Di Paolo, Mattia; Riccitelli, Serena; Maccarone, Rita; Mattei, Claudia; Capannolo, Marta; Rossi, Mario; Capozzo, Annamaria; Corsini, Giovanni U; Scarnati, Eugenio; Lozzi, Luca; Vaglini, Francesca; Maggio, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the effects of continuous artificial light exposure on the mouse substantia nigra (SN). A three month exposure of C57Bl/6J mice to white fluorescent light induced a 30% reduction in dopamine (DA) neurons in SN compared to controls, accompanied by a decrease of DA and its metabolites in the striatum. After six months of exposure, neurodegeneration progressed slightly, but the level of DA returned to the basal level, while the metabolites increased with respect to the control. Three month exposure to near infrared LED light (∼710nm) did not alter DA neurons in SN, nor did it decrease DA and its metabolites in the striatum. Furthermore mesencephalic cell viability, as tested by [ 3 H]DA uptake, did not change. Finally, we observed that 710nm LED light, locally conveyed in the rat SN, could modulate the firing activity of extracellular-recorded DA neurons. These data suggest that light can be detrimental or beneficial to DA neurons in SN, depending on the source and wavelength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of dental enamel caries assessment using Quantitative Light Induced Fluorescence and Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Ana Marly Araújo; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi; de L Campello, Sergio; Gomes, Anderson Stevens Leônidas; Karlsson, Lena

    2016-06-01

    An in vitro study of morphological alterations between sound dental structure and artificially induced white spot lesions in human teeth, was performed through the loss of fluorescence by Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF) and the alterations of the light attenuation coefficient by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). To analyze the OCT images using a commercially available system, a special algorithm was applied, whereas the QLF images were analyzed using the software available in the commercial system employed. When analyzing the sound region against white spot lesions region by QLF, a reduction in the fluorescence intensity was observed, whilst an increase of light attenuation by the OCT system occurred. Comparison of the percentage of alteration between optical properties of sound and artificial enamel caries regions showed that OCT processed images through the attenuation of light enhanced the tooth optical alterations more than fluorescence detected by QLF System. QLF versus OCT imaging of enamel caries: a photonics assessment. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Dataset of red light induced pupil constriction superimposed on post-illumination pupil response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobo Lei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We collected and analyzed pupil diameter data from of 7 visually normal participants to compare the maximum pupil constriction (MPC induced by “Red Only” vs. “Blue+Red” visual stimulation conditions.The “Red Only” condition consisted of red light (640±10 nm stimuli of variable intensity and duration presented to dark-adapted eyes with pupils at resting state. This condition stimulates the cone-driven activity of the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC. The “Blue+Red” condition consisted of the same red light stimulus presented during ongoing blue (470±17 nm light-induced post-illumination pupil response (PIPR, representing the cone-driven ipRGC activity superimposed on the melanopsin-driven intrinsic activity of the ipRGCs (“The Absence of Attenuating Effect of Red light Exposure on Pre-existing Melanopsin-Driven Post-illumination Pupil Response” Lei et al. (2016 [1].MPC induced by the “Red Only” condition was compared with the MPC induced by the “Blue+Red” condition by multiple paired sample t-tests with Bonferroni correction. Keywords: Pupil light reflex, Chromatic pupillometry, Melanopsin, Post-illumination pupil response

  6. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube-TiO2 Nanocomposite for Visible-Light-Induced Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Dai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotube- (MWCNT- TiO2 nanocomposite was synthesized via hydrothermal process and characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetry analysis, and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. Appropriate pretreatment on MWCNTs could generate oxygen-containing groups, which is beneficial for forming intimate contact between MWCNTs and TiO2 and leads to a higher thermal stability of MWCNT-TiO2 nanocomposite. Modification with MWCNTs can extend the visible-light absorption of TiO2. 5 wt% MWCNT-TiO2 derived from hydrothermal treatment at 140°C exhibiting the highest hydrogen generation rate of 15.1 μmol·h−1 under visible-light irradiation and a wide photoresponse range from 350 to 475 nm with moderate quantum efficiency (4.4% at 420 nm and 3.7% at 475 nm. The above experimental results indicate that the MWCNT-TiO2 nanocomposite is a promising photocatalyst with good stability and visible-light-induced photoactivity.

  7. Cooperative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oakley, D.J.; Jones, K.G.; Morrison, A.; Burdis, I.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing environmental constraints on the use of oil-based drilling fluids have prompted close cooperation between operators and service companies to maintain the technical performance of drilling fluids while reducing oil discharge. This paper describes how Amerada Hess Ltd. (AHL) and Intl. Drilling Fluids Ltd. (IDF) cooperated by extending laboratory developments into controlled field trials and how feedback from the field has allowed rapid progress toward performance and ecological goals. The authors developed a novel, oil-free, highly inhibitive water-based drilling fluid. The inhibition offered by this fluid approaches that offered by oil-based fluids. Second, the authors developed invert-emulsion and direct-emulsion fluids with low oil/water ratios for low oil-on-cuttings applications. The cooperative process improved the technical performance of these fluids demonstrably and reduced the oil on cuttings

  8. Japanese efforts in international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, M.; Uchida, T.; Yoshikawa, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Science and Technology Agency of the Japanese Governmentreviews the present status of cooperative activities. The International Atomic Energy Meetings are discussed, as well as the INTOR workshop, atomic and molecular data activities, and progress in international cooperation. Other functions of the International Energy Agency include the promotion of cooperation programs which involve transfer or joint utilization of hardware contributed by the participating organizations. Meetings and ducting magnets for fusion power, RandD on plasma-wall interactions in the TEXTOR, and RandD on radiation damage in fusion materials. A section on Japanese-U.S. cooperation is highlighted, and includes the personnel exchange program, the Japanese research project using Doublet-III, joint research for plasma physics, and promotion of joint planning. Cooperation with the USSR and other countries is discussed

  9. Conflictual cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axel, Erik

    2011-01-01

    , cooperation appeared as the continuous reworking of contradictions in the local arrangement of societal con- ditions. Subjects were distributed and distributed themselves according to social privileges, resources, and dilemmas in cooperation. Here, the subjects’ activities and understandings took form from...... each other, their dilemmas, and their previous experience. This meant that they had each their perspective on ongoing praxis. Three observations from the collaboration in the control room are presented, one on stabilizing the function of an object, another on standardizing a procedure, and one...

  10. Light-induced retinal degeneration causes a transient downregulation of melanopsin in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ayuso, Diego; Galindo-Romero, Caridad; Di Pierdomenico, Johnny; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Villegas Pérez, María P

    2017-08-01

    In this work we study the effects of an acute light-induced retinal degeneration on the population of melanopsin positive retinal ganglion cells (m + RGCs) and the expression of the melanopsin protein in the retina. The m + RGCs may be more resistant than other RGCs to lesion, but the effects of an acute light exposure in this population are unknown. Albino rats were exposed to white light (3000 lux) continuously for 48 h and processed 0, 3, 7 or 30 days after light exposure (ALE). Whole-mounted retinas were immunodetected with antibodies against melanopsin, Brn3a, and rhodopsin to study the populations of m + RGC, Brn3a + RGC and rods (which are the most abundant photoreceptors in the rat retina). Three days ALE there was substantial rod loss in an arciform area of the superior retina and with time this loss expanded in the form of rings all throughout the retina. Light exposure did not affect the number of Brn3a + RGCs but diminished the numbers of m + RGCs. Immediately ALE there was a significant decrease in the mean number of immunodetected m + RGCs that was more marked in the superior retina. Later, the number of m + RGCs increased progressively and reached normal values one month ALE. Western blot analysis showed that melanopsin expression down-regulates shortly ALE and recovers thereafter, in accordance with the anatomical data. This study demonstrates that there is a transient downregulation of melanopsin expression in the RGCs during the first month ALE. Further studies would be needed to clarify the long-term effect of light exposure on the m + RGC population. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Dietary supplement enriched in antioxidants and omega-3 protects from progressive light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaoula Ramchani-Ben Othman

    Full Text Available In the present study, we have evaluated one of the dietary supplements enriched with antioxidants and fish oil used in clinical care for patient with age-related macular degeneration. Rats were orally fed by a gastric canula daily with 0.2 ml of water or dietary supplement until they were sacrificed. After one week of treatment, animals were either sacrificed for lipid analysis in plasma and retina, or used for evaluation of rod-response recovery by electroretinography (ERG followed by their sacrifice to measure rhodopsin content, or used for progressive light-induced retinal degeneration (PLIRD. For PLIRD, animals were transferred to bright cyclic light for one week. Retinal damage was quantified by ERG, histology and detection of apoptotic nuclei. Animals kept in dim-cyclic-light were processed in parallel. PLIRD induced a thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a reduction of the b-wave amplitude of the ERG in the water group. Retinal structure and function were preserved in supplemented animals. Supplement induced a significant increase in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma by 168% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 142% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA and 19% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and a decrease in the omega-6 fatty acids, DPA by 28%. In the retina, supplement induced significant reduction of linolenic acid by 67% and an increase in EPA and DPA by 80% and 72%, respectively, associated with significant decrease in omega-6 DPA by 42%. Supplement did not affect rhodopsin content or rod-response recovery. The present data indicate that supplement rapidly modified the fatty acid content and induced an accumulation of EPA in the retina without affecting rhodopsin content or recovery. In addition, it protected the retina from oxidative stress induced by light. Therefore, this supplement might be beneficial to slow down progression of certain retinal degeneration.

  12. Dietary supplement enriched in antioxidants and omega-3 protects from progressive light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchani-Ben Othman, Khaoula; Cercy, Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Doly, Michel; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have evaluated one of the dietary supplements enriched with antioxidants and fish oil used in clinical care for patient with age-related macular degeneration. Rats were orally fed by a gastric canula daily with 0.2 ml of water or dietary supplement until they were sacrificed. After one week of treatment, animals were either sacrificed for lipid analysis in plasma and retina, or used for evaluation of rod-response recovery by electroretinography (ERG) followed by their sacrifice to measure rhodopsin content, or used for progressive light-induced retinal degeneration (PLIRD). For PLIRD, animals were transferred to bright cyclic light for one week. Retinal damage was quantified by ERG, histology and detection of apoptotic nuclei. Animals kept in dim-cyclic-light were processed in parallel. PLIRD induced a thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a reduction of the b-wave amplitude of the ERG in the water group. Retinal structure and function were preserved in supplemented animals. Supplement induced a significant increase in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma by 168% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 142% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and 19% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and a decrease in the omega-6 fatty acids, DPA by 28%. In the retina, supplement induced significant reduction of linolenic acid by 67% and an increase in EPA and DPA by 80% and 72%, respectively, associated with significant decrease in omega-6 DPA by 42%. Supplement did not affect rhodopsin content or rod-response recovery. The present data indicate that supplement rapidly modified the fatty acid content and induced an accumulation of EPA in the retina without affecting rhodopsin content or recovery. In addition, it protected the retina from oxidative stress induced by light. Therefore, this supplement might be beneficial to slow down progression of certain retinal degeneration.

  13. Detection and Analysis of Enamel Cracks by Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Mi-Kyoung; Ku, Hye-Min; Kim, Euiseong; Kim, Hee-Eun; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Baek-Il

    2016-03-01

    The ability to accurately detect tooth cracks and quantify their depth would allow the prediction of crack progression and treatment success. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the capabilities of quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) technology in the detection of enamel cracks. Ninety-six extracted human teeth were selected for examining naturally existing or suspected cracked teeth surfaces using a photocuring unit. QLF performed with a digital camera (QLF-D) images were used to assess the ability to detect enamel cracks based on the maximum fluorescence loss value (ΔFmax, %), which was then analyzed using the QLF-D software. A histologic evaluation was then performed in which the samples were sectioned and observed with the aid of a polarized light microscope. The relationship between ΔFmax and the histology findings was assessed based on the Spearman rank correlation. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated to evaluate the validity of using QLF-D to analyze enamel inner-half cracks and cracks extending to the dentin-enamel junction. There was a strong correlation between the results of histologic evaluations of enamel cracks and the ΔFmax value, with a correlation coefficient of 0.84. The diagnostic accuracy of QLF-D had a sensitivity of 0.87 and a specificity of 0.98 for enamel inner-half cracks and a sensitivity of 0.90 and a specificity of 1.0 for cracks extending to the dentin-enamel junction. These results indicate that QLF technology would be a useful clinical tool for diagnosing enamel cracks, especially given that this is a nondestructive method. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cooperating Internationally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Wayne

    1999-01-01

    A number of college and university consortia have embarked on international educational cooperation ventures, providing valuable experiences and benefits for faculty, students, alumni, and the community. For these programs to be effective, they must have high-level institutional support, equal opportunities to participate, effective marketing and…

  15. MYB75 Phosphorylation by MPK4 Is Required for Light-Induced Anthocyanin Accumulation in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengnan; Wang, Wenyi; Gao, Jinlan; Yin, Kangquan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Chengcheng; Mundy, John

    2016-01-01

    Light is a major environmental cue affecting various physiological and metabolic processes in plants. Although plant photoreceptors are well characterized, the mechanisms by which light regulates downstream responses are less clear. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the accumulation of photoprotective anthocyanin pigments is light dependent, and the R2R3 MYB transcription factor MYB75/PAP1 regulates anthocyanin accumulation. Here, we report that MYB75 interacts with and is phosphorylated by MAP KINASE4 (MPK4). Their interaction is dependent on MPK4 kinase activity and is required for full function of MYB75. MPK4 can be activated in response to light and is involved in the light-induced accumulation of anthocyanins. We show that MPK4 phosphorylation of MYB75 increases its stability and is essential for light-induced anthocyanin accumulation. Our findings reveal an important role for a MAPK pathway in light signal transduction. PMID:27811015

  16. A Thermal-, Water-, and Near-Infrared Light-Induced Shape Memory Composite Based on Polyvinyl Alcohol and Polyaniline Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yongkang; Zhang, Jiwen; Chen, Xin

    2018-04-16

    A multiresponsive shape memory composite was prepared by incorporating polyaniline (PAn) fibers into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), where in situ polymerization assisted by surfactant was used to homogeneously disperse PAn fibers in a PVA matrix. The PAn fibers not only increased physical cross-linking points in the system but also served as photothermal conversion reagents, resulting in excellent water-, thermal-, and near-infrared (NIR) light-induced shape memory properties of the composites, where their light-induced shape recovery ratio and speed could be enhanced via the increase of PAn loading percentage and light power density. Moreover, the composites possessed high mechanical properties with tensile strength over 83 MPa. On the basis of these dramatic mechanical properties and shape memory properties, the composites could show high recovery stress over 6.0 MPa, which increased with the increase of temperature and PAn loading percentage. This presented composite could be a great candidate as actuator element for various applications.

  17. Effects of harman and norharman on spontaneous and ultraviolet light-induced mutagenesis in cultured Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.C.; Castellazzi, M.; Glover, T.W.; Trosko, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    Nontoxic concentrations of harman and norharman were tested in cultured Chinese hamster cells for their effects on DNA repair and mutagenesis. The following effects of harman were observed: (a) the survival of ultraviolet light- or x-ray-damaged cells was reduced; (b) the ultraviolet light-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis was slightly inhibited; and (c) the frequency of spontaneous or ultraviolet light-induced ouabain-resistant (ouar) or 6-thioguanine-resistant (6-TGr) mutations was reduced. Furthermore, the effect of harman on survival and mutagenesis was greater than that of norharman and was detected primarily in treatments in which cells were exposed to harman immediately following ultraviolet light irradiation. Our data clearly indicate that harman decreases the capacity to repair DNA damage and fix mutations in Chinese hamster cells, possibly because of the intercalation properties of this compound

  18. Chemical Exacerbation of Light-induced Retinal Degeneration in F344/N Rats in National Toxicology Program Rodent Bioassays

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Haruhiro; Hoenerhoff, Mark J.; Peddada, Shyamal D.; Sills, Robert C.; Pandiri, Arun R.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal degeneration due to chronic ambient light exposure is a common spontaneous age-related finding in albino rats, but it can also be related to exposures associated with environmental chemicals and drugs. Typically, light induced retinal degeneration has a central/hemispherical localization where as chemical induced retinal degeneration has a diffuse localization. This study was conducted to identify National Toxicology Program (NTP) rodent bioassays with treatment-related retinal degene...

  19. Effects of RGD immobilization on light-induced cell sheet detachment from TiO{sub 2} nanodots films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Kui; Wang, Tiantian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yu, Mengliu [The Affiliated Stomatologic Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310003 (China); Wan, Hongping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Lin, Jun [The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310003 (China); Weng, Wenjian, E-mail: wengwj@zju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); The Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Wang, Huiming, E-mail: hmwang1960@hotmail.com [The Affiliated Stomatologic Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310003 (China)

    2016-06-01

    Light-induced cell detachment is reported to be a safe and effective cell sheet harvest method. In the present study, the effects of arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) immobilization on cell growth, cell sheet construction and cell harvest through light illumination are investigated. RGD was first immobilized on TiO{sub 2} nanodots films through simple physical adsorption, and then mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded on the films. It was found that RGD immobilization promoted cell adhesion and proliferation. It was also observed that cells cultured on RGD immobilized films showed relatively high level of pan-cadherin. Cells harvested with ultraviolet illumination (365 nm) showed good viability on both RGD immobilized and unmodified TiO{sub 2} nanodot films. Single cell detachment assay showed that cells detached more quickly on RGD immobilized TiO{sub 2} nanodot films. That could be ascribed to the RGD release after UV365 illumination. The current study demonstrated that RGD immobilization could effectively improve both the cellular responses and light-induced cell harvest. - Highlights: • RGD immobilization on TiO{sub 2} nanodots film favors light-induced cell sheet detachment. • Physically adsorbed RGD detaches from the film through ultraviolet illumination. • RGD detachment promotes cells and cell sheets detachment.

  20. Predicting the reaction coordinates of millisecond light-induced conformational changes in photoactive yellow protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreede, J.; Juraszek, J.; Bolhuis, P.G.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of large-scale conformational changes in proteins still poses a challenge for molecular simulations. We employ transition path sampling of explicit solvent molecular dynamics trajectories to obtain atomistic insight in the reaction network of the millisecond timescale

  1. Light induced heterogeneous ozone processing on the pesticides adsorbed on silica particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, J.; Désert, M.; Quivet, E.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.

    2013-12-01

    In France, in 2010, the sales of pesticides reached 1.8 billion euros for 61 900 tons of active ingredients, positioning France as a first European consumer of pesticides, as reported by the European Crop Protection Association. About 19 million hectares of crops are sprayed annually with pesticides, i.e., 35% of the total surface area of France. This corresponds to an average pesticide dose of 3.2 kg ha-1. The consumption of herbicide and fungicide is favoured in comparison to the use of insecticides in France and the other European countries, as well. The partitioning of pesticides between the gas and particulate phases influences the atmospheric fate of these compounds such as their photo-chemical degradation. There is much uncertainty concerning the behavior of the pesticides in the atmosphere. Especially, there is a gap of knowledge concerning the degradation of the pesticides induced by heterogeneous reactions in absence and especially in presence of solar light. Considering that most of the pesticides currently used are semi-volatile, it is of crucial importance to investigate the heterogeneous reactivity of particulate pesticides with light and with atmospheric oxidants such as ozone and OH radical. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the light induced heterogeneous ozonation of suspended pesticide particles. 8 pesticides (cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin and tetraconazole) were chosen for their physico-chemical properties and their concentration levels in the PACA (Région Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur) region, France. Silica particles with well-known properties were chosen as model particles of atmospheric relevance. Kinetic rate constants were determined to allow estimate the atmospheric lifetimes relating to ozone. The rate constants were determined as follows: k = (6.6 × 0.2) 10-19, (7.2 × 0.3) 10-19, (5.1 × 0.5) 10-19, (3.9 × 0.3) 10-19 [cm3 molecules-1 s-1] for Cyprodinil

  2. Preparation and controlled drug delivery applications of mesoporous silica polymer nanocomposites through the visible light induced surface-initiated ATRP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Long; Liu, Meiying; Mao, Liucheng; Xu, Dazhuang; Wan, Qing; Zeng, Guangjian; Shi, Yingge [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wen, Yuanqing, E-mail: m18600788382@163.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wei, Yen, E-mail: weiyen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and The Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Graphical abstract: A novel strategy for surface PEGylation of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was developed based on the light induced surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. - Highlights: • Surface modification of silica nanoparticles through light induced surface-initiated ATRP. • MSNs-NH{sub 2}-poly(IA-co-PEGMA) nanocomposites show high water dispersity. • MSNs-NH{sub 2}-poly(IA-co-PEGMA) nanocomposites are promising for biomedical applications. • The light induced ATRP possesses many advantages as compared with traditional ATRP. - Abstract: The mesoporous materials with large pore size, high specific surface area and high thermal stability have been widely utilized in a variety of fields ranging from environmental remediation to separation and biomedicine. However, surface modification of these silica nanomaterials is required to endow novel properties and achieve better performance for most of these applications. In this work, a new method has been established for surface modification of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that relied on the visible light induced atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). In the procedure, the copolymers composited with itaconic acid (IA) and poly(ethylene glycol)methyl acrylate (PEGMA) were grafted from MSNs using IA and PEGMA as the monomers and 10-Phenylphenothiazine(PTH) as the organic catalyst. The successful preparation of final polymer nanocomposites (named as MSNs-NH{sub 2}-poly(IA-co-PEGMA)) were evidenced by a series of characterization techniques. More importantly, the anticancer agent cisplatin can be effectively loaded on MSNs-NH{sub 2}-poly(IA-co-PEGMA) and controlled release it from the drug-loading composites with pH responsive behavior. As compared with conventional ATRP, the light induced surface-initiated ATRP could also be utilized for preparation of various silica polymer nanocomposites under rather benign conditions (e.g. absent of transition metal ions, low polymerization

  3. Cooperative design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Kjeld

    1998-01-01

    In the contemporary world, engineers and designers face huge challenges as they shift towards novel organizational concepts such as ‘concurrent engineering’ in order to manage increasing product diversity so as to satisfy customer demands while trying to accelerate the design process to deal...... with the competitive realities of a global market and decreasing product life cycles. In this environment, the coordination and integration of the myriads of interdependent and yet distributed and concurrent design activities becomes enormously complex. It thus seems as if CSCW technologies may be indispensable...... if concurrent engineering is to succeed. On the basis of ethnographic studies of cooperative design, the paper attempts to characterize cooperative work in the domain of design and to outline a set of crucial research problems to be addressed if CSCW is to help engineers and de-signers meet the challenges...

  4. Arabidopsis Pol II-Dependent in Vitro Transcription System Reveals Role of Chromatin for Light-Inducible rbcS Gene Transcription1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ido, Ayaka; Iwata, Shinya; Iwata, Yuka; Igarashi, Hisako; Hamada, Takahiro; Sonobe, Seiji; Sugiura, Masahiro; Yukawa, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    In vitro transcription is an essential tool to study the molecular mechanisms of transcription. For over a decade, we have developed an in vitro transcription system from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)-cultured cells (BY-2), and this system supported the basic activities of the three RNA polymerases (Pol I, Pol II, and Pol III). However, it was not suitable to study photosynthetic genes, because BY-2 cells have lost their photosynthetic activity. Therefore, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in vitro transcription systems were developed from green and etiolated suspension cells. Sufficient in vitro Pol II activity was detected after the minor modification of the nuclear soluble extracts preparation method; removal of vacuoles from protoplasts and L-ascorbic acid supplementation in the extraction buffer were particularly effective. Surprisingly, all four Arabidopsis Rubisco small subunit (rbcS-1A, rbcS-1B, rbcS-2B, and rbcS-3B) gene members were in vitro transcribed from the naked DNA templates without any light-dependent manner. However, clear light-inducible transcriptions were observed using chromatin template of rbcS-1A gene, which was prepared with a human nucleosome assembly protein 1 (hNAP1) and HeLa histones. This suggested that a key determinant of light-dependency through the rbcS gene transcription was a higher order of DNA structure (i.e. chromatin). PMID:26662274

  5. Cooperative strings and glassy interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salez, Thomas; Salez, Justin; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Raphaël, Elie; Forrest, James A

    2015-07-07

    We introduce a minimal theory of glass formation based on the ideas of molecular crowding and resultant string-like cooperative rearrangement, and address the effects of free interfaces. In the bulk case, we obtain a scaling expression for the number of particles taking part in cooperative strings, and we recover the Adam-Gibbs description of glassy dynamics. Then, by including thermal dilatation, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation is derived. Moreover, the random and string-like characters of the cooperative rearrangement allow us to predict a temperature-dependent expression for the cooperative length ξ of bulk relaxation. Finally, we explore the influence of sample boundaries when the system size becomes comparable to ξ. The theory is in agreement with measurements of the glass-transition temperature of thin polymer films, and allows quantification of the temperature-dependent thickness hm of the interfacial mobile layer.

  6. Enhancing the efficacy of AREDS antioxidants in light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Paul; Markey, M; Rapp, C M; Darrow, R M; Ziesel, A; Organisciak, D T

    2017-01-01

    Light-induced photoreceptor cell degeneration and disease progression in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) involve oxidative stress and visual cell loss, which can be prevented, or slowed, by antioxidants. Our goal was to test the protective efficacy of a traditional Age-related Eye Disease Study antioxidant formulation (AREDS) and AREDS combined with non-traditional antioxidants in a preclinical animal model of photooxidative retinal damage. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were reared in a low-intensity (20 lux) or high-intensity (200 lux) cyclic light environment for 6 weeks. Some animals received a daily dietary supplement consisting of a small cracker infused with an AREDS antioxidant mineral mixture, AREDS antioxidants minus zinc, or zinc oxide alone. Other rats received AREDS combined with a detergent extract of the common herb rosemary, AREDS plus carnosic acid, zinc oxide plus rosemary, or rosemary alone. Antioxidant efficacy was determined by measuring retinal DNA levels 2 weeks after 6 h of intense exposure to white light (9,000 lux). Western blotting was used to determine visual cell opsin and arrestin levels following intense light treatment. Rhodopsin regeneration was determined after 1 h of exposure to light. Gene array analysis was used to determine changes in the expression of retinal genes resulting from light rearing environment or from antioxidant supplementation. Chronic high-intensity cyclic light rearing resulted in lower levels of rod and cone opsins, retinal S-antigen (S-ag), and medium wavelength cone arrestin (mCAR) than found for rats maintained in low cyclic light. However, as determined by retinal DNA, and by residual opsin and arrestin levels, 2 weeks after acute photooxidative damage, visual cell loss was greater in rats reared in low cyclic light. Retinal damage decreased with AREDS plus rosemary, or with zinc oxide plus rosemary whereas AREDS alone and zinc oxide alone (at their daily recommended levels) were both ineffective. One

  7. Transboundary cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauber, D.

    2006-01-01

    The operation of nuclear power plants near national borders requires a close bilateral co-operation to cope with accidents having off-site radiological impacts. For example in 1978 such an agreement was signed by the German and Swiss government. The accident at the Chernobyl NPP changed the international co-operation in the framework of international consequence management. International conventions were agreed to insure a timely notification and international assistance in case of an accident with transboundary effects. In order to fulfill these conventions several procedures were introduced. In addition, bilateral agreements were signed also with countries which are not operating nuclear power plants near national borders. Since then no accident took place that would have required any notification. However, following the experience the expectations to these networks have changed considerably and hence sustainable development is required to cope with new challenges such as long term consequences management, new radiological threats, faster international assistance, media and public concerns, and technical evolution of communications systems. (author)

  8. A proposal to establish an international network in molecular microbiology and genetic engineering for scientific cooperation and prevention of misuse of biological sciences in the framework of science for peace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The conference on 'Science and Technology for Construction of Peace' which was organized by the Landau Network Coordination Center and A. Volta Center for Scientific Culture dealt with conversion of military and technological capacities into sustainable civilian application. The ideas regarding the conversion of nuclear warheads into nuclear energy for civilian-use led to the idea that the extension of this trend of thought to molecular biology and genetic engineering, will be a useful contribution to Science for Peace. This idea of developing a Cooperation Network in Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering that will function parallel to and with the Landau Network Coordination in the 'A. Volta' Center was discussed in the Second International Symposium on Science for Peace, Jerusalem, January 1997. It is the reason for the inclusion of the biological aspects in the deliberations of our Forum. It is hoped that the establishment of an international network in molecular biology and genetic engineering, similar to the Landau Network in physics, will support and achieve the decommissioning of biological weapons. Such a network in microbiology and genetic engineering will contribute to the elimination of biological weapons and to contributions to Science for Peace and to Culture of Peace activities of UNESCO. (author)

  9. Formation of indoor nitrous acid (HONO) by light-induced NO2 heterogeneous reactions with white wall paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomei, Vincent; Sörgel, Matthias; Gligorovski, Sasho; Alvarez, Elena Gómez; Gandolfo, Adrien; Strekowski, Rafal; Quivet, Etienne; Held, Andreas; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Wortham, Henri

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous nitrogen dioxide (NO2) represents an oxidant that is present in relatively high concentrations in various indoor settings. Remarkably increased NO2 levels up to 1.5 ppm are associated with homes using gas stoves. The heterogeneous reactions of NO2 with adsorbed water on surfaces lead to the generation of nitrous acid (HONO). Here, we present a HONO source induced by heterogeneous reactions of NO2 with selected indoor paint surfaces in the presence of light (300 nmpaint surfaces to generate HONO within indoor environments by light-induced NO2 heterogeneous reactions.

  10. Light-induced spin crossover observed for a Fe(II) complex embedded in a Nafion membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, H.; Rusanov, V.; McGarvey, J. J.; Toftlund, H.; Trautwein, A. X.; Wolny, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    Light-induced spin crossover has been observed for the first time by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy for a Fe(II) complex embedded in a Nafion membrane. The results obtained confirm other independent observations we have made, which point to the possibility of generating a long-lived HS state by means of laser irradiation of the same system (C. Brady, PhD thesis Queens University, Belfast 2002; J.A. Wolny, H. Toftlund, J.J. McGarvey, C. Brady, manuscript in preparation).

  11. Nonequilibrium emergent phenomena in organic molecular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrano, Matteo

    2015-07-15

    vibrational excitations, we then show the possibility of driving a superconducting phase transition by transiently perturbing those degrees of freedom that mediate the pairing interaction. We select the molecular solid K{sub 3}C{sub 60}, a well characterized superconductor at relatively high temperatures (T{sub c}=19.8 K) in which high-energy intramolecular vibrations are considered as key for the Cooper pairing. When driven with strong midinfrared fields resonantly tuned to infrared active intramolecular vibrations, we induce a short-lived transient state with striking superconducting-like optical properties above the equilibrium transition temperature and up to 100 K, five times the equilibrium T{sub c}. We explain the appearance of this superconducting-like behavior in terms of light-induced structural distortions capable to induce changes in the onsite Coulomb correlation and in the electron-phonon coupling.

  12. Imatinib discontinuation in chronic phase myeloid leukaemia patients in sustained complete molecular response : A randomised trial of the Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial for Haemato-Oncology (HOVON)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thielen, Noortje; van der Holt, Bronno; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Verhoef, Gregor E. G.; Gussinklo, Titia; Biemond, Bart J.; Daenen, Simon M. G.; Deenik, Wendy; Kooy, Rien van Marwijk; Petersen, Eefke; Smit, Willem M.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Janssen, Jeroen J. W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment in responding chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients is generally continued indefinitely. In this randomised phase II trial, we investigated whether CML patients in molecular response(4.5) (MR4.5, quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain

  13. Imatinib discontinuation in chronic phase myeloid leukaemia patients in sustained complete molecular response: A randomised trial of the Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial for Haemato-Oncology (HOVON)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thielen, Noortje; van der Holt, Bronno; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Verhoef, Gregor E. G.; Gussinklo, Titia; Biemond, Bart J.; Daenen, Simon M. G.; Deenik, Wendy; van Marwijk Kooy, Rien; Petersen, Eefke; Smit, Willem M.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Janssen, Jeroen J. W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment in responding chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients is generally continued indefinitely. In this randomised phase II trial, we investigated whether CML patients in molecular response(4.5) (MR(4.5), quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction

  14. A Single-Chain Photoswitchable CRISPR-Cas9 Architecture for Light-Inducible Gene Editing and Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin X; Zou, Xinzhi; Chung, Hokyung K; Gao, Yuchen; Liu, Yanxia; Qi, Lei S; Lin, Michael Z

    2018-02-16

    Optical control of CRISPR-Cas9-derived proteins would be useful for restricting gene editing or transcriptional regulation to desired times and places. Optical control of Cas9 functions has been achieved with photouncageable unnatural amino acids or by using light-induced protein interactions to reconstitute Cas9-mediated functions from two polypeptides. However, these methods have only been applied to one Cas9 species and have not been used for optical control of different perturbations at two genes. Here, we use photodissociable dimeric fluorescent protein domains to engineer single-chain photoswitchable Cas9 (ps-Cas9) proteins in which the DNA-binding cleft is occluded at baseline and opened upon illumination. This design successfully controlled different species and functional variants of Cas9, mediated transcriptional activation more robustly than previous optogenetic methods, and enabled light-induced transcription of one gene and editing of another in the same cells. Thus, a single-chain photoswitchable architecture provides a general method to control a variety of Cas9-mediated functions.

  15. Laminin-521 Promotes Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheet Formation on Light-Induced Cell Sheet Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell sheets (rBMSC sheets are attractive for cell-based tissue engineering. However, methods of culturing rBMSC sheets are critically limited. In order to obtain intact rBMSC sheets, a light-induced cell sheet method was used in this study. TiO2 nanodot films were coated with (TL or without (TN laminin-521. We investigated the effects of laminin-521 on rBMSCs during cell sheet culturing. The fabricated rBMSC sheets were subsequently assessed to study cell sheet viability, reattachment ability, cell sheet thickness, collagen type I deposition, and multilineage potential. The results showed that laminin-521 could promote the formation of rBMSC sheets with good viability under hyperconfluent conditions. Cell sheet thickness increased from an initial 26.7 ± 1.5 μm (day 5 up to 47.7 ± 3.0 μm (day 10. Moreover, rBMSC sheets maintained their potential of osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation. This study provides a new strategy to obtain rBMSC sheets using light-induced cell sheet technology.

  16. Light-induced retinal injury enhanced neurotrophins secretion and neurotrophic effect of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate neurotrophins expression and neurotrophic effect change in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs under different types of stimulation. METHODS: Rats were exposed in 10,000 lux white light to develop light-induced retinal injury. Supernatants of homogenized retina (SHR, either from normal or light-injured retina, were used to stimulate MSCs. Quantitative real time for polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were conducted for analysis the expression change in basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF in MSCs after stimulation. Conditioned medium from SHR-stimulated MSCs and control MSCs were collected for evaluation their effect on retinal explants. RESULTS: Supernatants of homogenized retina from light-injured rats significantly promoted neurotrophins secretion from MSCs (p<0.01. Conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells stimulated by light-injured SHR significantly reduced DNA fragmentation (p<0.01, up-regulated bcl-2 (p<0.01 and down-regulated bax (p<0.01 in retinal explants, displaying enhanced protective effect. CONCLUSIONS: Light-induced retinal injury is able to enhance neurotrophins secretion from mesenchymal stem cells and promote the neurotrophic effect of mesenchymal stem cells.

  17. Protective Effect of Proanthocyanidins from Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae Rhamnoides L. Seed against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dietary proanthocyanidins (PACs as health-protective agents have become an important area of human nutrition research because of their potent bioactivities. We investigated the retinoprotective effects of PACs from sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. seed against visible light-induced retinal degeneration in vivo. Pigmented rabbits were orally administered sea buckthorn seed PACs (50 and 100 mg/kg/day for 14 consecutive days of pre-illumination and seven consecutive days of post-illumination. Retinal function was quantified via electroretinography 7 days after light exposure. Retinal damage was evaluated by measuring the thickness of the full-thickness retina and outer nuclear layer 7 days after light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs significantly attenuated the destruction of electroretinograms and maintained the retinal structure. Increased retinal photooxidative damage was expressed by the depletion of glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, the decrease of total antioxidant capacity level and the increase of malondialdehyde level. Light exposure induced a significant increase of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 and angiogenesis (VEGF levels in retina. Light exposure upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase-3 and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. However, sea buckthorn seed PACs ameliorated these changes induced by light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs mediated the protective effect against light-induced retinal degeneration via antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic mechanisms.

  18. Preparation and controlled drug delivery applications of mesoporous silica polymer nanocomposites through the visible light induced surface-initiated ATRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Long; Liu, Meiying; Mao, Liucheng; Xu, Dazhuang; Wan, Qing; Zeng, Guangjian; Shi, Yingge; Wen, Yuanqing; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-08-01

    The mesoporous materials with large pore size, high specific surface area and high thermal stability have been widely utilized in a variety of fields ranging from environmental remediation to separation and biomedicine. However, surface modification of these silica nanomaterials is required to endow novel properties and achieve better performance for most of these applications. In this work, a new method has been established for surface modification of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that relied on the visible light induced atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). In the procedure, the copolymers composited with itaconic acid (IA) and poly(ethylene glycol)methyl acrylate (PEGMA) were grafted from MSNs using IA and PEGMA as the monomers and 10-Phenylphenothiazine(PTH) as the organic catalyst. The successful preparation of final polymer nanocomposites (named as MSNs-NH2-poly(IA-co-PEGMA)) were evidenced by a series of characterization techniques. More importantly, the anticancer agent cisplatin can be effectively loaded on MSNs-NH2-poly(IA-co-PEGMA) and controlled release it from the drug-loading composites with pH responsive behavior. As compared with conventional ATRP, the light induced surface-initiated ATRP could also be utilized for preparation of various silica polymer nanocomposites under rather benign conditions (e.g. absent of transition metal ions, low polymerization temperature and short polymerization time). Taken together, we have developed a rather promising strategy method for fabrication of multifunctional MSNs-NH2-poly(IA-co-PEGMA) with great potential for biomedical applications.

  19. Visible Light-Induced Lipid Peroxidation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids in the Retina and the Inhibitory Effects of Blueberry Polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yixiang; Zhang, Di; Hu, Jimei; Liu, Guangming; Chen, Jun; Sun, Lechang; Jiang, Zedong; Zhang, Xichun; Chen, Qingchou; Ji, Baoping

    2015-10-28

    The lipid peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) in the retina not only threatens visual cells but also affects the physiological health of the retina. In this work, the potential damages caused by daily visible light exposure on retinal UFAs were evaluated via a simulated in vitro model. At the same time, the benefits of dietary supplementation of blueberries to the eyes were also assessed. After prolonged light exposure, lipid peroxidation occurred for both docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids (DHA and AA, respectively). The oxidized UFAs presented obvious cytotoxicity and significantly inhibited cell growth in retinal pigment epithelium cells. Among the different blueberry polyphenol fractions, the flavonoid-rich fraction, in which quercetin was discovered as the main component, was considerably better in preventing visible light-induced DHA lipid peroxidation than the anthocyanin- and phenolic acid-rich fractions. Then the retinal protective activity of blueberry polyphenols against light-induced retinal injury was confirmed in vivo. On the basis of the above results, inhibiting lipid peroxidation of UFAs in the retina is proposed to be another important function mechanism for antioxidants to nourish eyes.

  20. Thermally and Light-Induced Changes in the Gap States of P-Doped a-Si:H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okushi, H.; Banerjee, R.; Tanaka, K.

    We describe a systematic study on thermally and light-induced changes in the gap states of P-doped a-Si:H using several variations of isothermal capacitance transient spectroscopy (ICTS). Two different features are found out in photo-induced changes; (1) gap states (NCT) were created in the range of 0.25-0.35 eV below the conduction band the EC, which are attributed to 31P-related-hyperfine-ESR centers, and (2) the conversion from deeper defect states located 1.0-1.2 eV below EC (*D-) to shallower defect located 0.4-0.6 eV below EC(D-). On the other hand, no suggestive changes in the density-of-states distribution at least in the energy range 0.25-1.5 eV below EC were observed after thermal quenching, although shallow states above Fermi level EF increased. It suggests that thermally and light-induced effects are independent of each other from the viewpoints of defect creation.

  1. Effect of LED photobiomodulation on fluorescent light induced changes in cellular ATPases and Cytochrome c oxidase activity in Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Ahamed Basha; C, Mathangi D; R, Shyamala

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescent light exposure at night alters cellular enzyme activities resulting in health defects. Studies have demonstrated that light emitting diode photobiomodulation enhances cellular enzyme activities. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effects of fluorescent light induced changes in cellular enzymes and to assess the protective role of pre exposure to 670 nm LED in rat model. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into 10 groups of 6 animals each based on duration of exposure (1, 15, and 30 days) and exposure regimen (cage control, exposure to fluorescent light [1800 lx], LED preexposure followed by fluorescent light exposure and only LED exposure). Na + -K + ATPase, Ca 2+ ATPase, and cytochrome c oxidase of the brain, heart, kidney, liver, and skeletal muscle were assayed. Animals of the fluorescent light exposure group showed a significant reduction in Na + -K + ATPase and Ca 2+ ATPase activities in 1 and 15 days and their increase in animals of 30-day group in most of the regions studied. Cytochrome c oxidase showed increase in their level at all the time points assessed in most of the tissues. LED light preexposure showed a significant enhancement in the degree of increase in the enzyme activities in almost all the tissues and at all the time points assessed. This study demonstrates the protective effect of 670 nm LED pre exposure on cellular enzymes against fluorescent light induced change.

  2. International cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barisich, A.

    1992-01-01

    Europe is certainly the part of the world where the largest number of international arrangements have been established for dealing with international cooperation in cases of major oil spills at sea. Let me list the most important of these multilateral arrangements: Bonn Agreement: covers the North Sea Contracting Parties: riparian states and the EEC Barcelona Convention: (protocol for emergency situations) covers the Mediterranean Sea Contracting Parties: riparian states and the EEC; Helsinki Convention: covers the Baltic Sea Contracting Parties: riparian states and (soon) the EEC; Lisbon Agreement: covers the NE Atlantic Contracting Parties: France, Spain, Portugal, Morocco and the EEC; Community Action Plan: covers the whole community waters; EEC; Members States participate in this plan. It should be underlined that, in addition to these large multilateral agreements a number of bilateral or trilateral arrangements have been set up, such as the Copenhagen Agreement, Denger Plan, Manche Plan, etc. The Commission involvement in these international frameworks is very important: as an example, it is presently chairing the Bonn Agreement Contracting Parties meeting. In addition, being the only contracting party to all these agreements, it is able to play a unique role of coordination and information to avoid duplications and contradictions. Having given this overview, I would now focus on the Community Action Plan

  3. Visible Light-Induced Electron Transfer from Di-mu-oxo Bridged Dinuclear Mn Complexes to Cr Centers in Silica Nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, Heinz; Weare, Walter W.; Pushkar, Yulia; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Frei, Heinz

    2008-06-03

    The compound (bpy)2MnIII(mu-O)2MnIV(bpy)2, a structural model relevant for the photosynthetic water oxidation complex, was coupled to single CrVI charge-transfer chromophores in the channels of the nanoporous oxide AlMCM-41. Mn K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy confirmed that the di-mu-oxo dinuclear Mn core of the complex is unaffected when loaded into the nanoscale pores. Observation of the 16-line EPR signal characteristic of MnIII(mu-O)2MnIV demonstrates that the majority of the loaded complexes retained their nascent oxidation state in the presence or absence of CrVI centers. The FT-Raman spectrum upon visible light excitation of the CrVI-OII --> CrV-OI ligand-to-metal charge-transfer reveals electron transfer from MnIII(mu-O)2MnIV (Mn-O stretch at 700 cm-1) to CrVI, resulting in the formation of CrV and MnIV(mu-O)2MnIV (Mn-O stretch at 645 cm-1). All initial and final states are directly observed by FT-Raman or EPR spectroscopy, and the assignments corroborated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements. The endoergic charge separation products (DELTA Eo = -0.6 V) remain after several minutes, which points to spatial separation of CrV and MnIV(mu-O)2MnIV as a consequence of hole (OI) hopping as a major contributing mechanism. This is the first observation of visible light-induced oxidation of a potential water oxidation complex by a metal charge-transfer pump in a nanoporous environment. These findings will allow for the assembly and photochemical characterization of well defined transition metal molecular units, with the ultimate goal of performing endothermic, multi-electron transformations that are coupled to visible light electron pumps in nanostructured scaffolds.

  4. Mechanism of light-induced translocation of arrestin and transducin in photoreceptors: interaction-restricted diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepak, Vladlen Z; Hurley, James B

    2008-01-01

    Many signaling proteins change their location within cells in response to external stimuli. In photoreceptors, this phenomenon is remarkably robust. The G protein of rod photoreceptors and rod transducin concentrates in the outer segments (OS) of these neurons in darkness. Within approximately 30 minutes after illumination, rod transducin redistributes throughout all of the outer and inner compartments of the cell. Visual arrestin concurrently relocalises from the inner compartments to become sequestered primarily within the OS. In the past several years, the question of whether these proteins are actively moved by molecular motors or whether they are redistributed by simple diffusion has been extensively debated. This review focuses on the most essential works in the area and concludes that the basic principle driving this protein movement is diffusion. The directionality and light dependence of this movement is achieved by the interactions of arrestin and transducin with their spatially restricted binding partners.

  5. Seven fundamental, unsolved questions in molecular biology. Cooperative storage and bi-directional transfer of biological information by nucleic acids and proteins: an alternative to "central dogma".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, J C

    2004-01-01

    The Human Genome Mapping Project provided us a large amount of sequence data. However our understanding of these data did not grow proportionally, because old dogmas still set the limits of our thinking. The gene-centric, reductionistical side of molecular biology is reviewed and seven problems are formulated, each indicating the insufficiency of the "central dogma". The following is concluded and suggested: 1. Genes are located and expressed on both DNA strands; 2. Introns are the source of important biological regulation and diversity; 3. Repeats are the frame of the chromatin structure and participate in the chromatin regulation; 4. The molecular accessibility of the canonical dsDNA structure is poor; 5. The genetic code is co-evolved with the amino acids and there is a stereochemical matching between the codes andamino acids; 6. The flow of information between nucleic acids and proteins is bi-directional and reverse translation might exist; 7. Complex genetic information is always carried and stored by nucleic acids and proteins together.

  6. Visible and near UV light-induced scattering of LiNbO3:Fe crystals and material characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellabban, Mostafa A.

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental study of reconstructing parasitic gratings that produce simultaneous wide-angle polarization-anisotropic and -isotropic light induced scattering. The gratings were recorded in lithium niobate crystals doped with iron (LiNbO3:Fe) using an ordinary-polarized pump beam in the visible and the near UV spectral ranges. The reconstruction was performed at different readout angles, wavelengths and linear polarization states. The main features of reconstructing the parasitic gratings at different readout conditions are qualitatively explained by a simple phenomenological model based on the Ewald sphere construction. The obtained results and the scattering pattern were applied to determine the birefringence, its sign and further to estimate the relative contribution of diffusion and bulk photovoltaic effect to the photorefractive effect, as well as the ratios of product of the Pockels and the photovoltaic tensors components that contribute to the readout of the gratings at different readout polarizations.

  7. Synthesis of surface oxygen-deficient BiPO{sub 4} nanocubes with enhanced visible light induced photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Bingtao; Yin, Haoyong; Li, Tao; Gong, Jianying; Lv, Shumei; Nie, Qiulin, E-mail: yhy@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials & Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou (China)

    2017-05-15

    The visible light driven BiPO{sub 4} nanocubes with sufficient surface oxygen deficiency were fabricated by a hydrothermal process and subsequently ultrasonic assistant Fe reduction process. The products were characterized by XRD, DRS, XPS, SEM and TEM which showed that the BiPO{sub 4} had cuboid-like shape with a smooth surface and clear edges and the oxygen vacancies were successfully introduced on the surface of the BiPO{sub 4} nanocubes. The as prepared oxygen-deficient BiPO{sub 4} nanocubes showed greatly enhanced visible light induced photocatalytic activity in degradation of Rhodamine B. The enhanced photocatalytic performance and expanded visible light response of BiPO{sub 4} may be due to the introduction of surface oxygen vacancies which can generate the oxygen vacancies mid-gap states lower to the conduction band of BiPO{sub 4}. (author)

  8. Overexpression of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in guard cells promotes light-induced stomatal opening and enhances plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin; Noguchi, Ko; Ono, Natsuko; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Terashima, Ichiro; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2014-01-07

    Stomatal pores surrounded by a pair of guard cells in the plant epidermis control gas exchange between plants and the atmosphere in response to light, CO2, and the plant hormone abscisic acid. Light-induced stomatal opening is mediated by at least three key components: the blue light receptor phototropin (phot1 and phot2), plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, and plasma membrane inward-rectifying K(+) channels. Very few attempts have been made to enhance stomatal opening with the goal of increasing photosynthesis and plant growth, even though stomatal resistance is thought to be the major limiting factor for CO2 uptake by plants. Here, we show that transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing H(+)-ATPase using the strong guard cell promoter GC1 showed enhanced light-induced stomatal opening, photosynthesis, and plant growth. The transgenic plants produced larger and increased numbers of rosette leaves, with ∼42-63% greater fresh and dry weights than the wild type in the first 25 d of growth. The dry weights of total flowering stems of 45-d-old transgenic plants, including seeds, siliques, and flowers, were ∼36-41% greater than those of the wild type. In addition, stomata in the transgenic plants closed normally in response to darkness and abscisic acid. In contrast, the overexpression of phototropin or inward-rectifying K(+) channels in guard cells had no effect on these phenotypes. These results demonstrate that stomatal aperture is a limiting factor in photosynthesis and plant growth, and that manipulation of stomatal opening by overexpressing H(+)-ATPase in guard cells is useful for the promotion of plant growth.

  9. Dynamic Blue Light-Inducible T7 RNA Polymerases (Opto-T7RNAPs) for Precise Spatiotemporal Gene Expression Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumschlager, Armin; Aoki, Stephanie K; Khammash, Mustafa

    2017-11-17

    Light has emerged as a control input for biological systems due to its precise spatiotemporal resolution. The limited toolset for light control in bacteria motivated us to develop a light-inducible transcription system that is independent from cellular regulation through the use of an orthogonal RNA polymerase. Here, we present our engineered blue light-responsive T7 RNA polymerases (Opto-T7RNAPs) that show properties such as low leakiness of gene expression in the dark state, high expression strength when induced with blue light, and an inducible range of more than 300-fold. Following optimization of the system to reduce expression variability, we created a variant that returns to the inactive dark state within minutes once the blue light is turned off. This allows for precise dynamic control of gene expression, which is a key aspect for most applications using optogenetic regulation. The regulators, which only require blue light from ordinary light-emitting diodes for induction, were developed and tested in the bacterium Escherichia coli, which is a crucial cell factory for biotechnology due to its fast and inexpensive cultivation and well understood physiology and genetics. Opto-T7RNAP, with minor alterations, should be extendable to other bacterial species as well as eukaryotes such as mammalian cells and yeast in which the T7 RNA polymerase and the light-inducible Vivid regulator have been shown to be functional. We anticipate that our approach will expand the applicability of using light as an inducer for gene expression independent from cellular regulation and allow for a more reliable dynamic control of synthetic and natural gene networks.

  10. UV light induced DNA damages and the radiation protection effects of Lingzi mushroom extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo Thi Thuong Lan; Dinh Ba Tuan; Ta Bich Thuan; Tran Bang Diep; Tran Minh Quynh

    2016-01-01

    UV light has strongly influenced on the growth of E. coli as well as caused DNA damages. Configurations of both genomic DNA and pUC 19 plasmids extracted from E. coli were significantly changed by the exposure to UV light of 254 nm and DLT, an extract of Ganoderma lucidum Lingzi mushroom. The results also revealed the radio-protective effects of DLT to UV radiation. By adding 2% DLT to its culturing suspension, the growth of E. coli was significantly decreased, whereas a low DLT amount of about 0.5% slightly improved its growth, indicated that the DLT extract can be used as a promising protective substance against UV radiation. At the molecular level, the radio-protective effects of DLT were observed for both UV treated DNA and protein. Thus, DLT can protect DNA in vivo, but not in vitro. This effect was also observed for Taq polymerase, suggested that the radioprotection effect of DLT may due to it accelerated the degradation of radicals or species that produced in the suspensions during UV exposure. (author)

  11. Cooperatives, Principles and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaars, Marvin A.

    A teaching aid and information source on activities, principles, and practices of cooperatives is presented. The following topics are included: (1) Basic Interests of People, (2) Legal Organization of Business in the United States, (3) What Is a Cooperative? (4) Procedure for Organizing Cooperatives, (5) How Cooperatives Are Run and Managed, (6)…

  12. The Role of Light-Induced Fluorescence in the Treatment of Smooth Surface Carious Lesions with Icon Infiltration and the Results After 1 Year

    OpenAIRE

    Kabaktchieva R.; Gateva N.; Peycheva K.

    2014-01-01

    Caries infiltration is a novel technique that brings out immediate esthetic improvement in the opacity of the white spot lesions. Light-induced fluorescence method is a modern caries diagnostic method. In this study SoproLife camera (Acteon, France) was applied for diagnosing and follow-up of the results. The aims of this in vivo study are to test the role of light-induced fluorescence method (SoploLife camera) in the diagnosis of non-cavitated smooth surfaces carious lesions (ICDAS codes 1 a...

  13. Shallow-trap-induced positive absorptive two-beam coupling 'gain' and light-induced transparency in nominally undoped barium titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, M. H.; Tayebati, P.; Chang, J. Y.; Jenssen, H. P.; Warde, C.

    1992-01-01

    The asymmetry of beam coupling with respect to the orientation of the polar axis in a nominally undoped barium titanate crystal is used to determine the electro-optic and absorptive 'gain' in the usual beam-coupling geometry. For small grating wave vectors, the electrooptic coupling vanishes but the absorptive coupling remains finite and positive. Positive absorptive coupling at small grating wave vectors is correlated with the light-induced transparency of the crystal described herein. The intensity and grating wave vector dependence of the electrooptic and absorptive coupling, and the light-induced transparency are consistent with a model incorporating deep and shallow levels.

  14. Sorting and sustaining cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikander, Nick

    2013-01-01

    can identify and then work with one another. Changes to parameters that would seem to make cooperation more attractive, such as an increase in the discount factor or the fraction of conditional cooperators, can reduce equilibrium cooperation if they decrease a selfish player's incentive to sort.......This paper looks at cooperation in teams where some people are selfish and others are conditional cooperators, and where lay-offs will occur at a fixed future date. I show that the best way to sustain cooperation prior to the lay-offs is often in a sorting equilibrium, where conditional cooperators...

  15. Cooperative interval games

    OpenAIRE

    Bok, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we study cooperative interval games, a generalized model of cooperative games in which worth of every coalition corresponds with a closed interval representing all possible outcomes of their cooperation. We give a brief introduction into classical cooperative games, interval analysis and finally introduction to cooperative interval games with focus on selections, that is on all possible outcomes of interval game with no additional uncertainty. We introduce new selection-based ...

  16. Transient currents in a molecular photo-diode

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, E. G.; Leonov, V. O.; May, V.; Hänggi, P.

    2012-01-01

    Light-induced charge transmission through a molecular junction (molecular diode) is studied in the framework of a HOMO-LUMO model and in using a kinetic description. Expressions are presented for the sequential (hopping) and direct (tunneling) transient current components together with kinetic equations governing the time-dependent populations of the neutral and charged molecular states which participate in the current formation. Resonant and off-resonant charge transmission processes are ana...

  17. The evaluation of a novel method comparing quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) with spectrophotometry to assess staining and bleaching of teeth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adeyemi, A.A.; Jarad, F.D.; de Josselin de Jong, E.; Pender, N.; Higham, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the development and evaluation of a novel method using quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF), which enables its use for quantifying and assessing whole tooth surface staining and tooth whitening. The method was compared with a spectrophotometer to assess reliability. Two

  18. A Study on Characterization of Light-Induced Electroless Plated Ni Seed Layer and Silicide Formation for Solar Cell Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaloo, Ashkan Vakilipour; Joo, Seung Ki; Es, Firat; Turan, Rasit; Lee, Doo Won

    2018-03-01

    Light-induced electroless plating (LIEP) is an easy and inexpensive method that has been widely used for seed layer deposition of Nickel/Copper (Ni/Cu)-based metallization in the solar cell. In this study, material characterization aspects of the Ni seed layer and Ni silicide formation at different bath conditions and annealing temperatures on the n-side of a silicon diode structure have been examined to achieve the optimum cell contacts. The effects of morphology and chemical composition of Ni film on its electrical conductivity were evaluated and described by a quantum mechanical model. It has been found that correlation exists between the theoretical and experimental conductivity of Ni film. Residual stress and phase transformation of Ni silicide as a function of annealing temperature were evaluated using Raman and XRD techniques. Finally, transmission line measurement (TLM) technique was employed to determine the contact resistance of Ni/Si stack after thermal treatment and to understand its correlation with the chemical-structural properties. Results indicated that low electrical resistive mono-silicide (NiSi) phase as low as 5 mΩ.cm2 was obtained.

  19. Treatment of silymarin, a plant flavonoid, prevents ultraviolet light-induced immune suppression and oxidative stress in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Santosh K

    2002-12-01

    It is well documented that ultraviolet (UV) light-induced immune suppression and oxidative stress play an important role in the induction of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of silymarin, a plant flavonoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum L. Gaertn.), to mouse skin prevents photocarcinogenesis, but the preventive mechanism of photocarcinogenesis in vivo animal system by silymarin is not well defined and understood. To define the mechanism of prevention, we employed immunostaining, analytical assays and ELISA which revealed that topical treatment of silymarin (1 mg/cm2 skin area) to C3H/HeN mice inhibits UVB (90 mJ/cm2)-induced suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response to contact sensitizer dinitrofluorobenzene. Prevention of UVB-induced suppression of CHS by silymarin was found to be associated with the inhibition of infiltrating leukocytes, particularly CD11b+ cell type, and myeloperoxidase activity (50-71%). Silymarin treatment also resulted in significant reduction of UVB-induced immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-10 producing cells and its production (58-72%, pskin cancer risk human population and ii) development of sunscreen containing silymarin as an antioxidant (chemopreventive agent) or silymarin can be supplemented in skin care products.

  20. Light-induced EPR study of charge transfer in P3HT/bis-PCBM bulk heterojunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor I. Krinichnyi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Radical pairs, polarons and fullerene anion radicals photoinduced by photons with energy of 1.98 – 2.73 eV in bulk heterojunctions formed by poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT with bis(1-[3-(methoxycarbonylpropyl]-1-phenyl-[6.6]C62 (bis-PCBM fullerene derivative have been studied by direct light-induced EPR (LEPR method in a wide temperature range. A part of photoinduced polarons are pinned in trap sites which number and depth are governed by an ordering of the polymer/fullerene system and energy of initiating photons. It was shown that dynamics and recombination of mobile polarons and counter fullerene anion radicals are governed by their exchange- and multi-trap assisted diffusion. Relaxation and dynamics parameters of both the charge carriers were determined separately by the steady-state saturation method. These parameters are governed by structure and conformation of the carriers’ microenvironment as well as by the energy of irradiating photons. Longitudinal diffusion of polarons was shown to depend on lattice phonons of crystalline domains embedded into an amorphous polymer matrix. The energy barrier required for polaron interchain hopping is higher than that its intrachain diffusion. Pseudorotation of fullerene derivatives in a polymer matrix was shown to follow the activation Pike model.

  1. Non-rigid contour-to-pixel registration of photographic and quantitative light-induced fluorescence imaging of decalcified teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Deserno, Thomas; Ehrlich, Eva E.; Fritz, Ulrike B.; Sirazitdinova, Ekaterina; Tatano, Rosalia

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) is widely used to assess the damage of a tooth due to decalcification. In digital photographs, decalcification appears as white spot lesions, i.e. white spots on the tooth surface. We propose a novel multimodal registration approach for the matching of digital photographs and QLF images of decalcified teeth. The registration is based on the idea of contour-to-pixel matching. Here, the curve, which represents the shape of the tooth, is extracted from the QLF image using a contour segmentation by binarization and morphological processing. This curve is aligned to the photo with a non-rigid variational registration approach. Thus, the registration problem is formulated as minimization problem with an objective function that consists of a data term and a regularizer for the deformation. To construct the data term, the photo is pointwise classified into tooth and non-tooth regions. Then, the signed distance function of the tooth region allows to measure the mismatch between curve and photo. As regularizer a higher order, linear elastic prior is used. The resulting minimization problem is solved numerically using bilinear Finite Elements for the spatial discretization and the Gauss-Newton algorithm. The evaluation is based on 150 image pairs, where an average of 5 teeth have been captured from 32 subjects. All registrations have been confirmed correctly by a dental expert. The contour-to-pixel methods can directly be used in 3D for surface-to-voxel tasks.

  2. UV light-induced survival response in a highly radiation-resistant isolate of the Moraxella-acinetobacter group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, L.C.; Thompson, T.L.; Maxcy, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    A highly radiation-resistant member of the Moraxella-Acinetobacter group, isolate 4, obtained from meat, was studied to determine the effect of preexposure to UV radiation on subsequent UV light resistance. Cultures that were preexposed to UV light and incubated for a short time in plate count broth exhibited increased survival of a UV light challenge dose. This response was inhibited in the presence of chloramphenicol. Frequencies of mutation to streptomycin, trimethoprim, and sulfanilamide resistance remained the same after the induction of this survival response and were not altered by treatment with mutagens, with the exception of mutation to streptomycin resistance after γ-irradiation or nitrosoguanidine or methyl methane sulfonate treatment. The results indicated that isolate 4 has a UV light-inducible UV light resistance mechanism which is not associated with increased mutagenesis. The characteristics of the radiation resistance response in this organism are similar to those of certain other common food contaminants. Therefore, considered as part of the total microflora of meat, isolate 4 and the other radiation-resistant Moraxella-Acinetobacter isolates should not pose unique problems in a proposed radappertizaton process

  3. Impact of background light induced shot noise in high-speed full-duplex indoor optical wireless communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Lim, Christina; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2011-10-24

    The use of infrared radiation to provide high speed indoor wireless communication has attracted considerable attention for over a decade. In previous studies we proposed a novel full-duplex indoor optical wireless communication system with high-speed data transmission and limited mobility can be provided to users. When it is incorporated with localization function, gigabit mobile communication can be provided over the entire room. In this paper we theoretically analyze the limiting factor of our proposed system - background light induced shot noise. A theoretical model that allows the receiver sensitivity and the corresponding power penalty is proposed and the model is validated by experiments. Experimental results show that for both down-link and up-link transmission the background light will result in several dB power penalty and it is more dominant in lower speed links. As the bit rate increases, the preamplifier induced noise becomes larger and eventually dominates the noise process. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  4. Colored lenses suppress blue light-emitting diode light-induced damage in photoreceptor-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiromoto, Kaho; Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Tadokoro, Nobuyuki; Kaneko, Nobuyuki; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in liquid crystal displays emit high levels of blue light, exposure to which is harmful to the retina. Here, we investigated the protective effects of colored lenses in blue LED light-induced damage to 661W photoreceptor-derived cells. We used eight kinds of colored lenses and one lens that reflects blue light. Moreover, we evaluated the relationship between the protective effects of the lens and the transmittance of lens at 464 nm. Lenses of six colors, except for the SY, PN, and reflective coating lenses, strongly decreased the reduction in cell damage induced by blue LED light exposure. The deep yellow lens showed the most protective effect from all the lenses, but the reflective coating lens and pink lens did not show any effects on photoreceptor-derived cell damage. Moreover, these results were correlated with the lens transmittance of blue LED light (464 nm). These results suggest that lenses of various colors, especially deep yellow lenses, may protect retinal photoreceptor cells from blue LED light in proportion to the transmittance for the wavelength of blue LED and the suppression of reactive oxygen species production and cell damage.

  5. Simultaneously and separately immobilizing incompatible dual-enzymes on polymer substrate via visible light induced graft polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xing; He, Bin; Zhao, Changwen; Ma, Yuhong; Yang, Wantai

    2018-04-01

    Developing facile and mild strategy to construct multi-enzymes immobilization system has attracted considerable attentions in recent years. Here a simple immobilization strategy called visible light induced graft polymerization that can simultaneously and separately encapsulate two kinds of enzymes on one polymer film was proposed. Two incompatible enzymes, trypsin and transglutaminase (TGase) were selected as model dual-enzymes system and simultaneously immobilized on two sides of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film. After immobilization, it was found that more than 90% of the enzymes can be embedded into dual-enzymes loaded film without leakage. And the activities of both separately immobilized enzymes were higher than the activities of mixed co-immobilized enzymes or the sequential immobilized ones. This dual-enzymes loaded film (DEL film) showed excellent recyclability and can retain >87% activities of both enzymes after 4 cycles of utilization. As an example, this DEL film was used to conjugate a prodrug of cytarabine with a target peptide. The successful preparation of expected product demonstrated that the separately immobilized two enzymes can worked well together to catalyze a two-step reaction.

  6. Scientific objectives of the primitive body sample return missions: An approach from the light-induced effect on water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Mikio

    1994-01-01

    Water is undoubtedly one of the most crucial components of the solar nebula for determining planetary composition: planets were formed from the accretion of the dust particles in the nebula, and the redox state of Fe in the particles can be determined by the reaction of Fe with water vapor diffused into the interior of the particle in the early stage of solar system formation. It has been discussed from various observations that the cores of Mercury, Venus, and the Earth might be metallic Fe, although the core of the Earth may be somewhat oxidized by the high pressure and temperature reaction of liquid Fe with perovskite at the boundary of the mantle and the core, whereas the core of Mars may be highly oxidized, as suggested by its low density. Isotopic anomalies of various elements have frequently been observed in the solar system (in planetary atmospheres and in meteorites) and some of them can be attributed to the injection of exotic particles formed in other stars into the solar nebula. Hydrogen and D anomalies in planetary atmospheres were frequently believed to correlate with the differential escape of H and D from the exospheres of Venus and Mars, although no one knows the primordial D/H ratios before thermal escape. This paper explains the decrease of the observed D/H ratios with distance from the sun by considering the light-induced drift effect to displace H2(16)O alone to the outside in the solar nebula.

  7. Flicker light-induced retinal vasodilation is unaffected by inhibition of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and prostaglandins in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Jonathan E; Dusting, Gregory J; Nguyen, Thanh T; Jenkins, Alicia J; Man, Ryan E K; Best, William J; Dias, Daniel A; Jayasinghe, Nirupama S; Roessner, Ute; Lamoureux, Ecosse L

    2014-10-08

    To investigate the role of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and prostaglandins (PGs) in retinal blood vessel calibers and vasodilation during flicker light stimulation in humans. Twelve healthy nonsmokers participated in a balanced crossover study. Oral fluconazole 400 mg and dispersible aspirin 600 mg were used to inhibit production of EETs and PGs, respectively. Retinal imaging was performed 1 hour after drug ingestion with the Dynamic Vessel Analyzer. Resting calibers of selected vessel segments were recorded in measurement units (MU). Maximum percentage dilations during flicker stimulation were calculated from baseline calibers. We then studied six participants each after fluconazole and aspirin ingestions at 30-minute intervals for 2 hours. Within-subject differences were assessed by ANOVA and Dunnett-adjusted pairwise comparisons with significance taken at P flicker stimulation. Mean (SD) resting arteriole and venule calibers on no-drug visits were 119.6 (10.6) MU and 145.7 (17.0) MU, respectively. Fluconazole reduced mean (±95% CI) resting venule calibers by 5.1 (4.3) MU. In repeated measures participants, neither drug affected vasodilations, but fluconazole reduced resting venule calibers over 2 hours (P flicker light-induced retinal vasodilation in humans. However, EETs may play a role in the regulation of retinal vascular tone and blood flow under resting physiological conditions. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  8. Differences in visible light-induced pigmentation according to wavelengths: a clinical and histological study in comparison with UVB exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duteil, Luc; Cardot-Leccia, Nathalie; Queille-Roussel, Catherine; Maubert, Yves; Harmelin, Yona; Boukari, Fériel; Ambrosetti, Damien; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Passeron, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    The visible light spectrum is wide, and it can be hypothesized that all the wavelengths between 400-700 nm do not induce the same photobiological effects on pigmentation. We assessed the potential pro-pigmenting effects of two single wavelengths located at both extremities of the visible spectrum: the blue/violet line (λ = 415 nm) and the red line (λ = 630 nm). We made colorimetric, clinical, and histological assessments with increasing doses of those lights on healthy volunteers. Then, we compared these irradiations to non-exposed and UVB-exposed skin. Colorimetric and clinical assessments showed a clear dose effect with the 415-nm irradiation, in both skin type III and IV subjects, whereas the 630 nm did not induce hyperpigmentation. When compared to UVB irradiation, the blue-violet light induced a significantly more pronounced hyperpigmentation that lasted up to 3 months. Histological examination showed a significant increase of keratinocyte necrosis and p53 with UVB, as compared to 415- and 630-nm exposures. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Computer Vision-Based Structural Displacement Measurement Robust to Light-Induced Image Degradation for In-Service Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhwa Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The displacement responses of a civil engineering structure can provide important information regarding structural behaviors that help in assessing safety and serviceability. A displacement measurement using conventional devices, such as the linear variable differential transformer (LVDT, is challenging owing to issues related to inconvenient sensor installation that often requires additional temporary structures. A promising alternative is offered by computer vision, which typically provides a low-cost and non-contact displacement measurement that converts the movement of an object, mostly an attached marker, in the captured images into structural displacement. However, there is limited research on addressing light-induced measurement error caused by the inevitable sunlight in field-testing conditions. This study presents a computer vision-based displacement measurement approach tailored to a field-testing environment with enhanced robustness to strong sunlight. An image-processing algorithm with an adaptive region-of-interest (ROI is proposed to reliably determine a marker’s location even when the marker is indistinct due to unfavorable light. The performance of the proposed system is experimentally validated in both laboratory-scale and field experiments.

  10. Preventive and therapeutic effects of SkQ1-containing Visomitin eye drops against light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Yu P; Gancharova, O S; Eichler, O V; Philippov, P P; Grigoryan, E N

    2014-10-01

    The human retina is constantly affected by light of varying intensity, this being especially true for photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium. Traditionally, photoinduced damages of the retina are induced by visible light of high intensity in albino rats using the LIRD (light-induced retinal degeneration) model. This model allows study of pathological processes in the retina and the search for retinoprotectors preventing retinal photodamage. In addition, the etiology and mechanisms of retina damage in the LIRD model have much in common with the mechanisms of the development of age-related retinal disorders, in particular, with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We have studied preventive and therapeutic effects of Visomitin eye drops (based on the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1) on albino rat retinas damaged by bright light. In the first series of experiments, rats receiving Visomitin for two weeks prior to illumination demonstrated significantly less expressed atrophic and degenerative changes in the retina compared to animals receiving similar drops with no SkQ1. In the second series, the illuminated rats were treated for two weeks with Visomitin or similar drops without SkQ1. The damaged retinas of the experimental animals were repaired much more effectively than those of the control animals. Therefore, we conclude that Visomitin SkQ1-containing eye drops have pronounced preventive and therapeutic effects on the photodamaged retina and might be recommended as a photoprotector and a pharmaceutical preparation for the treatment of AMD in combination with conventional medicines.

  11. Detection of proximal caries using quantitative light-induced fluorescence-digital and laser fluorescence: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung-In; Yoo, Min-Jeong; Park, Eun-Jin

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro validity of quantitative light-induced fluorescence-digital (QLF-D) and laser fluorescence (DIAGNOdent) for assessing proximal caries in extracted premolars, using digital radiography as reference method. A total of 102 extracted premolars with similar lengths and shapes were used. A single operator conducted all the examinations using three different detection methods (bitewing radiography, QLF-D, and DIAGNOdent). The bitewing x-ray scale, QLF-D fluorescence loss (ΔF), and DIAGNOdent peak readings were compared and statistically analyzed. Each method showed an excellent reliability. The correlation coefficient between bitewing radiography and QLF-D, DIAGNOdent were -0.644 and 0.448, respectively, while the value between QLF-D and DIAGNOdent was -0.382. The kappa statistics for bitewing radiography and QLF-D had a higher diagnosis consensus than those for bitewing radiography and DIAGNOdent. The QLF-D was moderately to highly accurate (AUC = 0.753 - 0.908), while DIAGNOdent was moderately to less accurate (AUC = 0.622 - 0.784). All detection methods showed statistically significant correlation and high correlation between the bitewing radiography and QLF-D. QLF-D was found to be a valid and reliable alternative diagnostic method to digital bitewing radiography for in vitro detection of proximal caries.

  12. UV light induces premature senescence in Akt1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts by increasing intracellular levels of ROS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jee, Hye Jin; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Ae Jeong; Bae, Yoe-Sik [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sun Sik [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jeanho, E-mail: yunj@dau.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-05

    Akt/PKB plays a pivotal role in cell survival and proliferation. Previously, we reported that UV-irradiation induces extensive cell death in Akt2{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) while Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs show cell cycle arrest. Here, we find that Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs exhibit phenotypic changes characteristics of senescence upon UV-irradiation. An enlarged and flattened morphology, a reduced cell proliferation and an increased senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA {beta}-gal) staining indicate that Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs undergo premature senescence after UV-irradiation. Restoring Akt1 expression in Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs suppressed SA {beta}-gal activity, indicating that UV-induced senescence is due to the absence of Akt1 function. Notably, levels of ROS were rapidly increased upon UV-irradiation and the ROS scavenger NAC inhibits UV-induced senescence of Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs, suggesting that UV light induces premature senescence in Akt1{sup -/-} MEFs by modulating intracellular levels of ROS. In conjunction with our previous work, this indicates that different isoforms of Akt have distinct function in response to UV-irradiation.

  13. Protective effect of light emitting diode phototherapy on fluorescent light induced retinal damage in Wistar strain albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed Basha, A; Mathangi, D C; Shyamala, R; Ramesh Rao, K

    2014-09-01

    Artificial light at night alters retinal physiology. Several studies have shown that light emitting diode phototherapy protects the retina from the damaging effects of acute light exposure. The aim of this study has been to elucidate the protective effects of 670 nm LED light on retinal damage induced by chronic fluorescent light in Wistar rats. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups: group 1 were control (CL), group 2, 3 and 4 were exposed to fluorescent light (FL), LED preexposure+fluorescent light exposure (LL) and only LED light exposure (OL) respectively. All animals were maintained in their specific exposure regime for 30 days. Fluorescent light of 1800 lx was exposed between 8 pm to 8 am. Rats were exposed to therapeutic LED light of 670 nm of 9 J/cm2 at 25 mW/cm2 for 6 min duration. Histopathological changes in the retina were studied. Animals of the FL group showed a significant reduction in the outer nuclear layer thickness and cell count in addition to the total thickness of the retina. LL group which were exposed to 670 nm LED prior to exposure to fluorescent light showed a significant decrease in the degree of damage. 670 nm LED light preexposure is protective to retinal cells against fluorescent light-induced damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Cu gettering by phosphorus-doped emitters in p-type silicon: Effect on light-induced degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglese, Alessandro; Laine, Hannu S.; Vähänissi, Ville; Savin, Hele

    2018-01-01

    The presence of copper (Cu) contamination is known to cause relevant light-induced degradation (Cu-LID) effects in p-type silicon. Due to its high diffusivity, Cu is generally regarded as a relatively benign impurity, which can be readily relocated during device fabrication from the wafer bulk, i.e. the region affected by Cu-LID, to the surface phosphorus-doped emitter. This contribution examines in detail the impact of gettering by industrially relevant phosphorus layers on the strength of Cu-LID effects. We find that phosphorus gettering does not always prevent the occurrence of Cu-LID. Specifically, air-cooling after an isothermal anneal at 800°C results in only weak impurity segregation to the phosphorus-doped layer, which turns out to be insufficient for effectively mitigating Cu-LID effects. Furthermore, we show that the gettering efficiency can be enhanced through the addition of a slow cooling ramp (-4°C/min) between 800°C and 600°C, resulting in the nearly complete disappearance of Cu-LID effects.

  15. Cu gettering by phosphorus-doped emitters in p-type silicon: Effect on light-induced degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Inglese

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of copper (Cu contamination is known to cause relevant light-induced degradation (Cu-LID effects in p-type silicon. Due to its high diffusivity, Cu is generally regarded as a relatively benign impurity, which can be readily relocated during device fabrication from the wafer bulk, i.e. the region affected by Cu-LID, to the surface phosphorus-doped emitter. This contribution examines in detail the impact of gettering by industrially relevant phosphorus layers on the strength of Cu-LID effects. We find that phosphorus gettering does not always prevent the occurrence of Cu-LID. Specifically, air-cooling after an isothermal anneal at 800°C results in only weak impurity segregation to the phosphorus-doped layer, which turns out to be insufficient for effectively mitigating Cu-LID effects. Furthermore, we show that the gettering efficiency can be enhanced through the addition of a slow cooling ramp (-4°C/min between 800°C and 600°C, resulting in the nearly complete disappearance of Cu-LID effects.

  16. Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC) began as the Cooperative Game Fish Tagging Program (GTP) at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) in 1954. The GTP was...

  17. Organizational cooperation in teleradiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aas, I H Monrad

    2005-01-01

    Teleradiology requires cooperation between participating parties, but it cannot be assumed that such cooperation will work well. A survey was carried out of 12 radiology departments in Norway which used picture archiving and communication systems in connection with teleradiology. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 26 out of 29 resource persons (response rate 90%). The respondents identified 17 issues of importance for cooperation in teleradiology. None of the problems with cooperation seem large enough to prevent effective teleradiology cooperation in future. For organizations planning teleradiology of a larger volume, the cooperation issue is important. It is recommended that managers lead change processes in their organizations where the different issues of importance to cooperation are treated and the right measures are taken to realize the full potential of teleradiology. For telemedicine, it is important that future research includes investigations on cooperation for the different applications.

  18. What is a cooperative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberly Zeuli

    2006-01-01

    Groups of individuals throughout time have worked together in pursuit of common goals. The earliest forms of hunting and agriculture required a great deal of cooperation among humans. Although the word "cooperative" can be applied to many different types of group activities, in this publication it refers to a formal business model. Cooperative businesses are...

  19. Designing for cooperation - cooperating in design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyng, Morten

    1991-01-01

    This article will discuss how to design computer applications that enhance the quality of work and products, and will relate the discussion to current themes in the field of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). Cooperation is a key element of computer use and work practice, yet here...... a specific "CSCW approach is not taken." Instead the focus is cooperation as an important aspect of work that should be integrated into most computer support efforts in order to develop successful computer support, however, other aspects such as power, conflict and control must also be considered....

  20. Fluoxetine normalizes disrupted light-induced entrainment, fragmented ultradian rhythms and altered hippocampal clock gene expression in an animal model of high trait anxiety- and depression-related behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaufler, Jörg; Ronovsky, Marianne; Savalli, Giorgia; Cabatic, Maureen; Sartori, Simone B; Singewald, Nicolas; Pollak, Daniela D

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of circadian rhythms are a key symptom of mood and anxiety disorders. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) - commonly used antidepressant drugs - also modulate aspects of circadian rhythmicity. However, their potential to restore circadian disturbances in depression remains to be investigated. The effects of the SSRI fluoxetine on genetically based, depression-related circadian disruptions at the behavioral and molecular level were examined using mice selectively bred for high anxiety-related and co-segregating depression-like behavior (HAB) and normal anxiety/depression behavior mice (NAB). The length of the circadian period was increased in fluoxetine-treated HAB as compared to NAB mice while the number of activity bouts and light-induced entrainment were comparable. No difference in hippocampal Cry2 expression, previously reported to be dysbalanced in untreated HAB mice, was observed, while Per2 and Per3 mRNA levels were higher in HAB mice under fluoxetine treatment. The present findings provide evidence that fluoxetine treatment normalizes disrupted circadian locomotor activity and clock gene expression in a genetic mouse model of high trait anxiety and depression. An interaction between the molecular mechanisms mediating the antidepressant response to fluoxetine and the endogenous regulation of circadian rhythms in genetically based mood and anxiety disorders is proposed.

  1. Cooperative strategies European perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Killing, J Peter

    1997-01-01

    Cooperative Strategies: European Perspectives is one of three geographically targeted volumes in which the contributors present the most current research on topics such as advances in theories of cooperative strategies, the formation of cooperative alliances, the dynamics of partner relationships, and the role of information and knowledge in cooperative alliances. Blending conceptual insights with empirical analyses, the contributors highlight commonalities and differences across national, cultural, and trade zones. The chapters in this volume are anchored in a wide set of theoretical approaches, conceptual frameworks, and models, illustrating how rich the area of cooperative strategies is for scholarly inquiry.

  2. Transport in Halobacterium Halobium: Light-Induced Cation-Gradients, Amino Acid Transport Kinetics, and Properties of Transport Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    Cell envelope vesicles prepared from H. halobium contain bacteriorhodopsin and upon illumination protons are ejected. Coupled to the proton motive force is the efflux of Na(+). Measurements of Na-22 flux, exterior pH change, and membrane potential, Delta(psi) (with the dye 3,3'-dipentyloxadicarbocyanine) indicate that the means of Na(+) transport is sodium/proton exchange. The kinetics of the pH changes and other evidence suggests that the antiport is electrogenic (H(+)/Na(++ greater than 1). The resulting large chemical gradient for Na(+) (outside much greater than inside), as well as the membrane potential, will drive the transport of 18 amino acids. The I9th, glutamate, is unique in that its accumulation is indifferent to Delta(psi): this amino acid is transported only when a chemical gradient for Na(+) is present. Thus, when more and more NaCl is included in the vesicles glutamate transport proceeds with longer and longer lags. After illumination the gradient of H+() collapses within 1 min, while the large Na(+) gradient and glutamate transporting activity persists for 10- 15 min, indicating that proton motive force is not necessary for transport. A chemical gradient of Na(+), arranged by suspending vesicles loaded with KCl in NaCl, drives glutamate transport in the dark without other sources of energy, with V(sub max) and K(sub m) comparable to light-induced transport. These and other lines of evidence suggest that the transport of glutamate is facilitated by symport with Na(+), in an electrically neutral fashion, so that only the chemical component of the Na(+) gradient is a driving force.

  3. An ancestral haplotype of the human PERIOD2 gene associates with reduced sensitivity to light-induced melatonin suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiho Akiyama

    Full Text Available Humans show various responses to the environmental stimulus in individual levels as "physiological variations." However, it has been unclear if these are caused by genetic variations. In this study, we examined the association between the physiological variation of response to light-stimulus and genetic polymorphisms. We collected physiological data from 43 subjects, including light-induced melatonin suppression, and performed haplotype analyses on the clock genes, PER2 and PER3, exhibiting geographical differentiation of allele frequencies. Among the haplotypes of PER3, no significant difference in light sensitivity was found. However, three common haplotypes of PER2 accounted for more than 96% of the chromosomes in subjects, and 1 of those 3 had a significantly low-sensitive response to light-stimulus (P < 0.05. The homozygote of the low-sensitive PER2 haplotype showed significantly lower percentages of melatonin suppression (P < 0.05, and the heterozygotes of the haplotypes varied their ratios, indicating that the physiological variation for light-sensitivity is evidently related to the PER2 polymorphism. Compared with global haplotype frequencies, the haplotype with a low-sensitive response was more frequent in Africans than in non-Africans, and came to the root in the phylogenetic tree, suggesting that the low light-sensitive haplotype is the ancestral type, whereas the other haplotypes with high sensitivity to light are the derived types. Hence, we speculate that the high light-sensitive haplotypes have spread throughout the world after the Out-of-Africa migration of modern humans.

  4. Assessment of dental plaque coverage by Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF) in domestic short-haired cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall-Jones, Zoe V; Wallis, Corrin V; Allsopp, Judi M; Colyer, Alison; Davis, Ian J; Holcombe, Lucy J

    2017-04-01

    Dietary means of reducing plaque and calculus deposits are frequently sought for the maintenance of oral health in cats and dogs. In the development of such products sensitive, reliable, reproducible methods of measuring plaque and calculus are key. The aim of this study was to assess Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF™) for the detection of dental plaque coverage in cats compared to the modified Logan and Boyce technique. The techniques were utilised in a crossover study, which compared two diets for their effect on plaque deposition in a cohort of 24 adult cats. Analysis of the effect of diet on plaque coverage by both the modified Logan and Boyce technique and QLF showed a significant effect of feeding regime (p=0.024 and p≤0.0001, respectively) with good agreement between the techniques in the percentage reduction of plaque accumulation. A within study assessment of QLF demonstrated excellent intra-operator repeatability (coefficient of variation 2.2%). Similarly, inter-operator reproducibility was also good (coefficient of variation 2.3%). A retrospective analysis, using the data to estimate the sample size required for at least 90% power to detect a 15% difference between treatments in a two-way crossover study, established that 10 cats would be sufficient for plaque measurement by QLF, while assessment by the modified Logan and Boyce method required over 30 cats. QLF was determined to be a reliable, reproducible method for the assessment of plaque deposition in cats and requires fewer subjects for the detection of differences between treatment effects compared to the modified Logan and Boyce method. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Validation of quantitative light-induced fluorescence-digital (QLF-D) for the detection of approximal caries in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hae-Youn; Kang, Si-Mook; Kim, Hee Eun; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Baek-Il

    2015-05-01

    Detection of approximal caries lesions can be difficult due to their anatomical position. This study aimed to assess the ability of the quantitative light-induced fluorescence-digital (QLF-D) in detecting approximal caries, and to compare the performance with those of the International Caries Detection and Assessment System II (ICDAS II) and digital radiography (DR). Extracted permanent teeth (n=100) were selected and mounted in pairs. The simulation pairs were assessed by one calibrated dentist using each detection method. After all the examinations, the teeth (n=95) were sectioned and examined histologically as gold standard. The modalities were compared in terms of sensitivity, specificity, areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) for enamel (D1) and dentine (D3) levels. The intra-examiner reliability was assessed for all modalities. At D1 threshold, the ICDAS II presented the highest sensitivity (0.80) while the DR showed the highest specificity (0.89); however, the methods with the greatest AUC values at D1 threshold were DR and QLF-D (0.80 and 0.80 respectively). At D3 threshold, the methods with the highest sensitivity were ICDAS II and QLF-D (0.64 and 0.64 respectively) while the method with the lowest sensitivity was DR (0.50). However, with regard to the AUC values at D3 threshold, the QLF-D presented the highest value (0.76). All modalities showed to have excellent intra-examiner reliability. The newly developed QLF-D was not only able to detect proximal caries, but also showed to have comparable performance to the visual inspection and radiography in detecting proximal caries. QLF-D has the potential to be a useful detection method for proximal caries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An in vitro comparison of quantitative light-induced fluorescence-digital and spectrophotometer on monitoring artificial white spot lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Eun; Kim, Baek-Il

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of quantitative light-induced fluorescence-digital (QLF-D) compared to a spectrophotometer in monitoring progression of enamel lesions. To generate artificial caries with various severities of lesion depths, twenty bovine specimens were immersed in demineralizing solution for 40 days. During the production of the lesions, repeat measurements of fluorescence loss (ΔF) and color change (ΔE) were performed in six distinct stages after the demineralization of the specimens: after 3, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 days of exposure to the demineralizing solution. Changes in the ΔF values in the lesions were analyzed using the QLF-D, and changes in the ΔE values in lesions were analyzed using a spectrophotometer. The repeated measures ANOVA of ΔF and ΔE values were used to determine whether there are significant differences at different exposure times in the demineralizing solution. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was analyzed between ΔF and ΔE. The ΔF values significantly decreased based on the demineralizing period (p<0.001). Relatively large changes in ΔF values were observed during the first 10 days. There were significant changes in L(*), a(*), b(*), and ΔE values in lesions with increasing demineralizing duration (p<0.001). A strong correlation was observed between ΔF and ΔE with p=-0.853 (p<0.001). The results support the efficacy of QLF-D in monitoring color changes. Our findings demonstrate that QLF-D are a more efficient and stable tool for early caries detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcriptome analysis of the exocarp of apple fruit identifies light-induced genes involved in red color pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Zheng, Danman; Han, Yuepeng; Khan, M Awais; Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena; Korban, Schuyler S

    2014-01-15

    Although the mechanism of light regulation of color pigmentation of apple fruit is not fully understood, it has been shown that light can regulate expression of genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway by inducing transcription factors (TFs). Moreover, expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in this pathway may be coordinately regulated by multiple TFs. In this study, fruits on trees of apple cv. Red Delicious were covered with paper bags during early stages of fruit development and then removed prior to maturation to analyze the transcriptome in the exocarp of apple fruit. Comparisons of gene expression profiles of fruit covered with paper bags (dark-grown treatment) and those subjected to 14 h light treatment, following removal of paper bags, were investigated using an apple microarray of 40,000 sequences. Expression profiles were investigated over three time points, at one week intervals, during fruit development. Overall, 736 genes with expression values greater than two-fold were found to be modulated by light treatment. Light-induced products were classified into 19 categories with highest scores in primary metabolism (17%) and transcription (12%). Based on the Arabidopsis gene ontology annotation, 18 genes were identified as TFs. To further confirm expression patterns of flavonoid-related genes, these were subjected to quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) using fruit of red-skinned apple cv. Red Delicious and yellow-skinned apple cv. Golden Delicious. Of these, two genes showed higher levels of expression in 'Red Delicious' than in 'Golden Delicious', and were likely involved in the regulation of fruit red color pigmentation. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. To cooperate or not to cooperate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessels, Josepha Ivanka

    To Cooperate or not to Cooperate...? discusses results of a research project to study the rehabilitation of 1500-year old water tunnels, so called "qanats", in Syria. Communities all over the world are using traditional technologies to extract drinkingwater, irrigate their lands and feed...... their livestock. But these often sustainable and ancient ways to make use of groundwater are in rapid decline worldwide. A research project started in 1999 to study the rehabilitation of 1500-year old water tunnels called "qanats"in Syria. To Cooperate or not to Cooperate...? discusses results and outcomes...... divers theoretical and conceptual frameworks to study collective action with a human ecosystem approach and develop one with a stronger anthropological reference....

  9. Sharing the sandbox: Evolutionary mechanisms that maintain bacterial cooperation [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Bruger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are now known to participate in an extensive repertoire of cooperative behaviors such as biofilm formation, production of extracellular public-goods, group motility, and higher-ordered multicellular structures. A fundamental question is how these cooperative tasks are maintained in the face of non-cooperating defector cells. Recently, a number of molecular mechanisms including facultative participation, spatial sorting, and policing have been discovered to stabilize cooperation. Often these different mechanisms work in concert to reinforce cooperation. In this review, we describe bacterial cooperation and the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that maintain it.

  10. Discussion of dosimetric dependencies of experimental light-induced melatonin suppression studies; Diskussion dosimetrischer Aspekte bei experimentellen Studien zur lichtinduzierten Melatoninreduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M.; Schulmeister, K. [ARC Seibersdorf Research (Austria). Akkreditierte Pruefstelle fuer Laser und Optische Strahlung

    2004-07-01

    Based on a literature review, dosimetric dependencies of light-induced melatonin suppression are discussed. The quantity of light used to suppress melatonin in study trials is often given in terms of illuminance at the cornea, as this is easy to measure. The use of the term illuminance for such studies is critically discussed. A more appropriate measure would be effective irradiance. In our work we present a simplified model to estimate the photobiological effective irradiance and the spot size of the retinal image. Important issues which should ideally be considered in melatonin suppression study trials are pointed out. Another aim of this work is to derive from the literature data, up to what time frame the dosedependent relationship between time and melatonin suppression is valid. An evaluation is made of the situation on the workplace with regard to light-induced melatonin suppression. (orig.)

  11. Modelling Cooperative Tumorigenesis in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The development of human metastatic cancer is a multistep process, involving the acquisition of several genetic mutations, tumour heterogeneity, and interactions with the surrounding microenvironment. Due to the complexity of cancer development in mammals, simpler model organisms, such as the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, are being utilized to provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms involved. In this review, we highlight recent advances in modelling tumorigenesis using the Drosophila model, focusing on the cooperation of oncogenes or tumour suppressors, and the interaction of mutant cells with the surrounding tissue in epithelial tumour initiation and progression. PMID:29693007

  12. Light-induced phase separation (LIPS) in [Fe(ptz)6](BF4)2 spin-crossover single crystals: Experimental data revisited through optical microscope investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varret, Francois; Chong, Christian; Boukheddaden, Kamel; Goujon, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the available experimental data for light-induced phase separation (LIPS) in the spin-crossover crystal [Fe(ptz) 6 ](BF 4 ) 2 . They are found in qualitative agreement with a spinodal instability process described by a macroscopic mean-field master equation. Sizable discrepancies with the model are discussed in terms of diffusion of light due to structural transformations of the crystal.

  13. Synchrotron radiation structure analyses of the light-induced radical pair of a hexaarylbiimidazolyl derivative. Origin of the spin-multiplicity change

    CERN Document Server

    Kawano, M; Matsubara, K; Imabayashi, H; Mitsumi, M; Toriumi, K; Ohashi, Y

    2002-01-01

    In situ synchrotron radiation structure analyses of a light-induced radical pair from o-Cl-HABI were performed by using an X-ray vacuum camera at 23-70K at the BL02B1 station of SPring-8. The combined results of X-ray analysis with theoretical calculation, IR, and UV-vis spectroscopy reveal that a slight conformational change of the radical pair causes the drastic spin-multiplicity change during 2-140K. (author)

  14. The erosive potential of commercially available mouthrinses on enamel as measured by Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretty, I A; Edgar, W M; Higham, S M

    2003-07-01

    Longitudinal in vitro. Previously extracted, caries free, human premolars were selected and prepared by gentle pumicing and coating in an acid-resistant nail-varnish save for an exposed enamel window on the buccal surface. Each was assigned to one of eight groups (six per group, 10 in positive control); positive control (citric acid, pH 2.7, F(-) 0 ppm), negative control (pH 7.0, F(-) 0 ppm) Listerine (pH 3.87, F(-) 0.021 ppm), Tesco Value (pH 6.05, F(-) 289.00 ppm), Tesco Total Care (pH 6.20, F(-) 313.84 ppm), Sainsbury's (pH 6.15, F(-) 365.75 ppm), Sensodyne (pH 6.12, F(-) 285.30 ppm) and Corsodyl (pH 5.65, F(-) 0 ppm). The titratable acid values (TAV) for each rinse were established using volume (ml) of 0.1 M NaOH to achieve pH 7. Fluoride values were obtained by ion selective electrode. The solutions were kept at 37 degrees C and gently agitated. Teeth were removed at hourly intervals for 15 h, air-dried and subjected to Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF) examination by a blinded examiner and DeltaQ values recorded. At the conclusion of the study each of the positive control teeth and one from each other group were sectioned through the eroded lesion, ground and polished to 100 micrometers and subjected to transverse microradiography and DeltaZ recorded for validation. TAVs were: Listerine 2.45 L > Sainsbury's 0.35 ml >Tesco Total Care 0.14 ml > Tesco Value 0.08 ml > Corsodyl 0.10 ml >Sensodyne 0.9 ml. DeltaQ increased over time for the positive control, (0 h 0.2, 10 h 95.2, 15 h 152.3). Negative controls remained stable. The increase in DeltaQ for each rinse after 15 h was Listerine (9.3(+/-7.2)), Corsodyl (1.5(+/-1.2)), Tesco Value (1.8(+/-1.2)), Tesco Total Care (1.4(+/-1.1)), Sainsbury's (3.4(+/-2.2)), Sensodyne (0.9(+/-1.6)). TMR confirmed the presence/absence of erosive lesions. QLF effectively monitored erosion in the positive controls and lack of erosion in the NC. Only one mouthrinse (Listerine) caused any erosion compared to the negative

  15. Light-induced fos expression in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in melanopsin knockout (opn4 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary E Pickard

    Full Text Available Retinal ganglion cells that express the photopigment melanopsin are intrinsically photosensitive (ipRGCs and exhibit robust synaptically driven ON-responses to light, yet they will continue to depolarize in response to light when all synaptic input from rod and cone photoreceptors is removed. The light-evoked increase in firing of classical ganglion cells is determined by synaptic input from ON-bipolar cells in the proximal sublamina of the inner plexiform layer. OFF-bipolar cells synapse with ganglion cell dendrites in the distal sublamina of the inner plexiform layer. Of the several types of ipRGC that have been described, M1 ipRGCs send dendrites exclusively into the OFF region of the inner plexiform layer where they stratify near the border of the inner nuclear layer. We tested whether M1 ipRGCs with dendrites restricted to the OFF sublamina of the inner plexiform layer receive synaptic ON-bipolar input by examining light-induced gene expression in vivo using melanopsin knockout mice. Mice in which both copies of the melanopsin gene (opn4 have been replaced with the tau-lacZ gene (homozygous tau-lacZ(+/+ knockin mice are melanopsin knockouts (opn4(-/- but M1 ipRGCs are specifically identified by their expression of beta-galactosidase. Approximately 60% of M1 ipRGCs in Opn4(-/- mice exposed to 3 hrs of light expressed c-Fos; no beta-galactosidase-positive RGCs expressed c-Fos in the dark. Intraocular application of L-AP4, a compound which blocks transmission of visual signals between photoreceptors and ON-bipolar cells significantly reduced light-evoked c-Fos expression in M1 ipRGCs compared to saline injected eyes (66% saline vs 27% L-AP4. The results are the first description of a light-evoked response in an ipRGC lacking melanopsin and provide in vivo confirmation of previous in vitro observations illustrating an unusual circuit in the retina in which ganglion cells sending dendrites to the OFF sublamina of the inner plexiform layer

  16. Nonlinear optical effects and third-harmonic generation in superconductors: Cooper pairs versus Higgs mode contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea, T.; Castellani, C.; Benfatto, L.

    2016-05-01

    The recent observation of a transmitted THz pulse oscillating at three times the frequency of the incident light paves the way to a powerful protocol to access resonant excitations in a superconductor. Here we show that this nonlinear optical process is dominated by light-induced excitation of Cooper pairs, while the collective amplitude (Higgs) fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter give in general a negligible contribution. We also predict a nontrivial dependence of the signal on the direction of the light polarization with respect to the lattice symmetry, which can be tested in systems such as, e.g., cuprate superconductors.

  17. Futures for energy cooperatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    A listing of Federal agencies and programs with potential funding for community-scale cooperatives using conservation measures and solar technologies is presented in Section 1. Section 2 presents profiles of existing community energy cooperatives describing their location, history, membership, services, sources of finance and technical assistance. A condensed summary from a recent conference on Energy Cooperatives featuring notes on co-op members' experiences, problems, and opportunities is presented in Section 3. Section 4 lists contacts for additional information. A National Consumer Cooperative Bank Load Application is shown in the appendix.

  18. Cooperative Station History Forms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Various forms, photographs and correspondence documenting the history of Cooperative station instrumentation, location changes, inspections, and...

  19. International co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinda, J.; Lieskovska, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Within the Union Nations (UN) framework, the Slovak Republic participated in following activities on environment protection co-operation: UN European Economic Commission, UN Industrial Development Organization, UN Development Programme, UN Human Habitat Organization, UN Environment Programme, and UN Commission on Sustainable Development. Relevant activities of the Slovak Republic in these co-operations as well as in European Union and OECD activities are reviewed. International conventions and other forms of multilateral co-operation, bilateral co-operation, and international programmes and projects in which the Slovak Republic took participate are presented

  20. Learning to cooperate for cooperative learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Sharan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Learning to learn cooperatively requires several changes for teachers and students: in their perception of learning, in their attitudes towards teaching and learning, and in their social and cognitive behaviors in class. This article presents some of the ways that decades of research and practice have developed to enable teachers and students to acquire and adjust to these changes. In the process of change teachers and students are interconnected and interdependent, and together carry out the steps needed to create an authentic cooperative classroom.

  1. Fragility and cooperativity concepts in hydrogen-bonded organic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpouve, N., E-mail: delpouve.nicolas@gmail.com [AMME-LECAP EA 4528 International Laboratory, University of Rouen, Avenue de l' Universite BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Vuillequez, A.; Saiter, A.; Youssef, B.; Saiter, J.M. [AMME-LECAP EA 4528 International Laboratory, University of Rouen, Avenue de l' Universite BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France)

    2012-09-01

    Molecular dynamics at the glass transition of three lactose/oil glassy systems have been investigated according to the cooperativity and fragility approaches. From Donth's approach, the cooperativity length is estimated by modulated temperature calorimetric measurements. Results reveal that modification of the disaccharide by oil leads to increase the disorder degree in the lactose, the size of the cooperative domains and the fragility index. These particular hydrogen-bonded organic glasses follow the general tendency observed on organic and inorganic polymers: the higher the cooperativity length, the higher the value of the fragility index at T{sub g}.

  2. Fragility and cooperativity concepts in hydrogen-bonded organic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpouve, N.; Vuillequez, A.; Saiter, A.; Youssef, B.; Saiter, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics at the glass transition of three lactose/oil glassy systems have been investigated according to the cooperativity and fragility approaches. From Donth's approach, the cooperativity length is estimated by modulated temperature calorimetric measurements. Results reveal that modification of the disaccharide by oil leads to increase the disorder degree in the lactose, the size of the cooperative domains and the fragility index. These particular hydrogen-bonded organic glasses follow the general tendency observed on organic and inorganic polymers: the higher the cooperativity length, the higher the value of the fragility index at T g .

  3. Cooperative Wideband OFDM Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, major attention is paid to cooperative diversity as an alternative way to achieve spatial diversity when the multiple antenna structure is not an option. By adopting the cooperative relay nodes to forward information, we can mitigate the fading effects, increase the capacity, lower

  4. Non-cooperative Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, E.E.C.

    2000-01-01

    Non-cooperative games are mathematical models of interactive strategic decision situations.In contrast to cooperative models, they build on the assumption that all possibilities for commitment and contract have been incorporated in the rules of the game.This contribution describes the main models

  5. Scandinavian Cooperative Advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Robert; Freeman, R. Edward

    2015-01-01

    . We conclude by endorsing the expression “Scandinavian cooperative advantage” in an effort to draw attention to the Scandinavian context and encourage the field of strategic management to shift its focus from achieving a competitive advantage toward achieving a cooperative advantage....

  6. Predisposed to cooperate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathryn Costello

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in Toronto and Geneva indicates that asylum seekers and refugees are predisposed to be cooperative with the refugee status determination system and other immigration procedures, and that the design of alternatives to detention can create, foster and support this cooperative predisposition – or can undermine or even demolish it.

  7. Nordic Energy Policy Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Birte Holst

    2016-01-01

    A common interest in developing a reliable, sustainable and affordable energy system was the main driver for the Nordic energy policy cooperation since the creation of the Nordic Council of Ministers. The diversity of the energy systems in the Nordic countries facilitated this cooperation, not le...

  8. Cooperating with machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Jacob W; Oudah, Mayada; Tennom; Ishowo-Oloko, Fatimah; Abdallah, Sherief; Bonnefon, Jean-François; Cebrian, Manuel; Shariff, Azim; Goodrich, Michael A; Rahwan, Iyad

    2018-01-16

    Since Alan Turing envisioned artificial intelligence, technical progress has often been measured by the ability to defeat humans in zero-sum encounters (e.g., Chess, Poker, or Go). Less attention has been given to scenarios in which human-machine cooperation is beneficial but non-trivial, such as scenarios in which human and machine preferences are neither fully aligned nor fully in conflict. Cooperation does not require sheer computational power, but instead is facilitated by intuition, cultural norms, emotions, signals, and pre-evolved dispositions. Here, we develop an algorithm that combines a state-of-the-art reinforcement-learning algorithm with mechanisms for signaling. We show that this algorithm can cooperate with people and other algorithms at levels that rival human cooperation in a variety of two-player repeated stochastic games. These results indicate that general human-machine cooperation is achievable using a non-trivial, but ultimately simple, set of algorithmic mechanisms.

  9. Efficiency in Microfinance Cooperatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARTARSKA, Valentina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recognition of cooperatives’ contribution to the socio-economic well-being of their participants, the United Nations has declared 2012 as the International Year of Cooperatives. Microfinance cooperatives make a large part of the microfinance industry. We study efficiency of microfinance cooperatives and provide estimates of the optimal size of such organizations. We employ the classical efficiency analysis consisting of estimating a system of equations and identify the optimal size of microfinance cooperatives in terms of their number of clients (outreach efficiency, as well as dollar value of lending and deposits (sustainability. We find that microfinance cooperatives have increasing returns to scale which means that the vast majority can lower cost if they become larger. We calculate that the optimal size is around $100 million in lending and half of that in deposits. We find less robust estimates in terms of reaching many clients with a range from 40,000 to 180,000 borrowers.

  10. The cooperative genome: organisms as social contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Kenneth M; Buchanan, Anne V

    2009-01-01

    A predominant theme in much of evolutionary biology is that organisms are the product of relentless and precise natural selection among them, and that life is about the competition of all-against-all for success. However, developmental genetics has rapidly been revealing a very different picture of the nature of life. The organizing principles by which organisms are made are thoroughly based on complex hierarchies of molecular interactions that require multiple factors to be relentlessly cooperating with each other. Reconciling these two points of view involves changing the scale of observation, and a different understanding of evolution, in which cooperation and tolerance are more important than competition and intolerance.

  11. Globalization and human cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Nancy R.; Grimalda, Gianluca; Wilson, Rick; Brewer, Marilynn; Fatas, Enrique; Foddy, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Globalization magnifies the problems that affect all people and that require large-scale human cooperation, for example, the overharvesting of natural resources and human-induced global warming. However, what does globalization imply for the cooperation needed to address such global social dilemmas? Two competing hypotheses are offered. One hypothesis is that globalization prompts reactionary movements that reinforce parochial distinctions among people. Large-scale cooperation then focuses on favoring one's own ethnic, racial, or language group. The alternative hypothesis suggests that globalization strengthens cosmopolitan attitudes by weakening the relevance of ethnicity, locality, or nationhood as sources of identification. In essence, globalization, the increasing interconnectedness of people worldwide, broadens the group boundaries within which individuals perceive they belong. We test these hypotheses by measuring globalization at both the country and individual levels and analyzing the relationship between globalization and individual cooperation with distal others in multilevel sequential cooperation experiments in which players can contribute to individual, local, and/or global accounts. Our samples were drawn from the general populations of the United States, Italy, Russia, Argentina, South Africa, and Iran. We find that as country and individual levels of globalization increase, so too does individual cooperation at the global level vis-à-vis the local level. In essence, “globalized” individuals draw broader group boundaries than others, eschewing parochial motivations in favor of cosmopolitan ones. Globalization may thus be fundamental in shaping contemporary large-scale cooperation and may be a positive force toward the provision of global public goods. PMID:19255433

  12. What drives cooperative breeding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter D Koenig

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative breeding, in which more than a pair of conspecifics cooperate to raise young at a single nest or brood, is widespread among vertebrates but highly variable in its geographic distribution. Particularly vexing has been identifying the ecological correlates of this phenomenon, which has been suggested to be favored in populations inhabiting both relatively stable, productive environments and in populations living under highly variable and unpredictable conditions. Griesser et al. provide a novel approach to this problem, performing a phylogenetic analysis indicating that family living is an intermediate step between nonsocial and cooperative breeding birds. They then examine the ecological and climatic conditions associated with these different social systems, concluding that cooperative breeding emerges when family living is favored in highly productive environments, followed secondarily by selection for cooperative breeding when environmental conditions deteriorate and within-year variability increases. Combined with recent work addressing the fitness consequences of cooperative breeding, Griesser et al.'s contribution stands to move the field forward by demonstrating that the evolution of complex adaptations such as cooperative breeding may only be understood when each of the steps leading to it are identified and carefully integrated.

  13. Simulation of light-induced degradation of μc-Si in a-Si/μc-Si tandem solar cells by the diode equivalent circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weicht, J. A.; Hamelmann, F. U.; Behrens, G.

    2016-02-01

    Silicon-based thin film tandem solar cells consist of one amorphous (a-Si) and one microcrystalline (μc-Si) silicon solar cell. The Staebler - Wronski effect describes the light- induced degradation and temperature-dependent healing of defects of silicon-based solar thin film cells. The solar cell degradation depends strongly on operation temperature. Until now, only the light-induced degradation (LID) of the amorphous layer was examined in a-Si/μc-Si solar cells. The LID is also observed in pc-Si single function solar cells. In our work we show the influence of the light-induced degradation of the μc-Si layer on the diode equivalent circuit. The current-voltage-curves (I-V-curves) for the initial state of a-Si/pc-Si modules are measured. Afterwards the cells are degraded under controlled conditions at constant temperature and constant irradiation. At fixed times the modules are measured at standard test conditions (STC) (AM1.5, 25°C cell temperature, 1000 W/m2) for controlling the status of LID. After the degradation the modules are annealed at dark conditions for several hours at 120°C. After the annealing the dangling bonds in the amorphous layer are healed, while the degradation of the pc-Si is still present, because the healing of defects in pc-Si solar cells needs longer time or higher temperatures. The solar cells are measured again at STC. With this laboratory measured I-V-curves we are able to separate the values of the diode model: series Rs and parallel resistance Rp, saturation current Is and diode factor n.

  14. Arabidopsis FHY3 and FAR1 Regulate Light-Induced myo-Inositol Biosynthesis and Oxidative Stress Responses by Transcriptional Activation of MIPS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lin; Tian, Tian; Lin, Rongcheng; Deng, Xing-Wang; Wang, Haiyang; Li, Gang

    2016-04-04

    myo-Inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS) catalyzes the limiting step of inositol biosynthesis and has crucial roles in plant growth and development. In response to stress, the transcription of MIPS1 is induced and the biosynthesis of inositol or inositol derivatives is promoted by unknown mechanisms. Here, we found that the light signaling protein FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL3 (FHY3) and its homolog FAR-RED IMPAIRED RESPONSE1 (FAR1) regulate light-induced inositol biosynthesis and oxidative stress responses by activating the transcription of MIPS1. Disruption of FHY3 and FAR1 caused light-induced cell death after dark-light transition, precocious leaf senescence, and increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Reduction of salicylic acid (SA) accumulation by overexpression of SALICYLIC ACID 3-HYDROXYLASE largely suppressed the cell death phenotype of fhy3 far1 mutant plants, suggesting that FHY3- and FAR1-mediated cell death is dependent on SA. Furthermore, comparative analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and microarray results revealed that FHY3 and FAR1 directly target both MIPS1 and MIPS2. The fhy3 far1 mutant plants showed severely decreased MIPS1/2 transcript levels and reduced inositol levels. Conversely, constitutive expression of MIPS1 partially rescued the inositol contents, caused reduced transcript levels of SA-biosynthesis genes, and prevented oxidative stress in fhy3 far1. Taken together, our results indicate that the light signaling proteins FHY3 and FAR1 directly bind the promoter of MIPS1 to activate its expression and thereby promote inositol biosynthesis to prevent light-induced oxidative stress and SA-dependent cell death. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cooperative Mobile Web Browsing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrucci, GP; Fitzek, FHP; Zhang, Qi

    2009-01-01

    This paper advocates a novel approach for mobile web browsing based on cooperation among wireless devices within close proximity operating in a cellular environment. In the actual state of the art, mobile phones can access the web using different cellular technologies. However, the supported data......-range links can then be used for cooperative mobile web browsing. By implementing the cooperative web browsing on commercial mobile phones, it will be shown that better performance is achieved in terms of increased data rate and therefore reduced access times, resulting in a significantly enhanced web...

  16. Cognitive Load and Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Felix Sebastian; Piovesan, Marco; Wengström, Erik Roland

    2017-01-01

    We study the effect of intuitive and reflective processes on cooperation using cognitive load. Compared with time constraint, which has been used in the previous literature, cognitive load is a more direct way to block reflective processes, and thus a more suitable way to study the link between...... intuition and cooperation. Using a repeated public goods game, we study the effect of different levels of cognitive load on contributions. We show that a higher cognitive load increases the initial level of cooperation. In particular, subjects are significantly less likely to fully free ride under high...... cognitive load....

  17. Light-Triggered Control of Plasmonic Refraction and Group Delay by Photochromic Molecular Switches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Großmann, Malte; Klick, Alwin; Lemke, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    An interface supporting plasmonic switching is prepared from a gold substrate coated with a polymerfilm doped with photochromic molecular switches. A reversible light-induced change in the surface plasmon polariton dispersion curve of the interface is experimentally demonstrated, evidencing rever...... complex functionalities based on surface plasmon refraction and group delay....

  18. Nuclear cooperation agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear cooperation agreements are reviewed in tabular form, especially agreements with developing countries. The reporting countries are the USA, the Federal Republic of Germany, Canada, Australia, Japan, and France. A separate EURATOM list is annexed

  19. On Cooper's Nonparametric Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeidler, James

    1978-01-01

    The basic assumption of Cooper's nonparametric test for trend (EJ 125 069) is questioned. It is contended that the proper assumption alters the distribution of the statistic and reduces its usefulness. (JKS)

  20. From cooperation to globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela UNGUREANU

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Globalization is seen as a consequence of cross-border business. This complex and irreversible process can be seen as an extension of capitalist relations of production or increased interdependence in the economic system. Globalization has given rise to more and more fields of activity worldwide. To meet the challenges of business globalization, many companies form strategic alliances, cooperate or merge with other companies. Cooperation is seen by many companies as an alternative path to success. In recent years joint international associations, licensing, co-production agreements, joint research programs, exploration of consortia and other cooperative relationships between two or more corporations with potential have increased. We notice a cooperation tendency among small-sized companies, especially among those from the developing countries.

  1. Globalization and economic cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Divar

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Economic globalization is nothing, really, that the universality of capitalism. Not globalized culture, and economic participation, and human rights, ... has only globalized market. We must react by substituting those materialistic values with cooperative economy.

  2. Cooperative Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly logs include a daily account of temperature extremes and precipitation, along with snow data at some locations. U.S. Cooperative Observer Program (COOP)...

  3. Mutual cooperation with Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orstein, Roberto M.

    1998-01-01

    The history of the nuclear cooperation between Brazil and Argentina is outlined in the framework of the changing political circumstances. Reference is made to the agreements between both countries and to its implementation

  4. Regional National Cooperative Observer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA publication dedicated to issues, news and recognition of observers in the National Weather Service Cooperative Observer program. Issues published regionally...

  5. Cooperative Hurricane Network Obs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations from the Cooperative Hurricane Reporting Network (CHURN), a special network of stations that provided observations when tropical cyclones approached the...

  6. From cooperation to globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela UNGUREANU

    2010-01-01

    Globalization is seen as a consequence of cross-border business. This complex and irreversible process can be seen as an extension of capitalist relations of production or increased interdependence in the economic system. Globalization has given rise to more and more fields of activity worldwide. To meet the challenges of business globalization, many companies form strategic alliances, cooperate or merge with other companies. Cooperation is seen by many companies as an alternative path to suc...

  7. Can War Foster Cooperation?

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Michal; Blattman, Christopher J.; Chytilová, Julie; Henrich, Joseph; Miguel, Edward; Mitts, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, nearly 20 studies have found a strong, persistent pattern in surveys and behavioral experiments from over 40 countries: individual exposure to war violence tends to increase social cooperation at the local level, including community participation and prosocial behavior. Thus while war has many negative legacies for individuals and societies, it appears to leave a positive legacy in terms of local cooperation and civic engagement. We discuss, synthesize and reanalyze the em...

  8. Attraction and cooperative behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Donja Darai; Silvia Grätz

    2012-01-01

    Being good-looking seems to generate substantial benefits in many social interactions, making the "beauty premium" a not to be underrated economic factor. This paper investigates how physical attractiveness enables people to generate these benefits in the case of cooperation, using field data from a modified one-shot prisoner's dilemma played in a high-stakes television game show. While attractive contestants are not more or less cooperative than less attractive ones, facial attractiveness pr...

  9. A Light-Induced Reaction with Oxygen Leads to Chromophore Decomposition and Irreversible Photobleaching in GFP-Type Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, Bella L; Nemukhin, Alexander V; Polyakov, Igor V; Khrenova, Maria G; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-04-30

    Photobleaching and photostability of proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are crucially important for practical applications of these widely used biomarkers. On the basis of simulations, we propose a mechanism for irreversible bleaching in GFP-type proteins under intense light illumination. The key feature of the mechanism is a photoinduced reaction of the chromophore with molecular oxygen (O2) inside the protein barrel leading to the chromophore's decomposition. Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) modeling we show that a model system comprising the protein-bound Chro(-) and O2 can be excited to an electronic state of the intermolecular charge-transfer (CT) character (Chro(•)···O2(-•)). Once in the CT state, the system undergoes a series of chemical reactions with low activation barriers resulting in the cleavage of the bridging bond between the phenolic and imidazolinone rings and disintegration of the chromophore.

  10. Capturing cooperative interactions with the PSI-MI format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roey, Kim; Orchard, Sandra; Kerrien, Samuel; Dumousseau, Marine; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Hermjakob, Henning; Gibson, Toby J

    2013-01-01

    The complex biological processes that control cellular function are mediated by intricate networks of molecular interactions. Accumulating evidence indicates that these interactions are often interdependent, thus acting cooperatively. Cooperative interactions are prevalent in and indispensible for reliable and robust control of cell regulation, as they underlie the conditional decision-making capability of large regulatory complexes. Despite an increased focus on experimental elucidation of the molecular details of cooperative binding events, as evidenced by their growing occurrence in literature, they are currently lacking from the main bioinformatics resources. One of the contributing factors to this deficiency is the lack of a computer-readable standard representation and exchange format for cooperative interaction data. To tackle this shortcoming, we added functionality to the widely used PSI-MI interchange format for molecular interaction data by defining new controlled vocabulary terms that allow annotation of different aspects of cooperativity without making structural changes to the underlying XML schema. As a result, we are able to capture cooperative interaction data in a structured format that is backward compatible with PSI-MI-based data and applications. This will facilitate the storage, exchange and analysis of cooperative interaction data, which in turn will advance experimental research on this fundamental principle in biology.

  11. Monitoring light-induced structural changes of Channelrhodopsin-2 by UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Eglof; Stehfest, Katja; Berndt, Andre; Hegemann, Peter; Bartl, Franz J

    2008-12-12

    Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) is a microbial type rhodopsin and a light-gated cation channel that controls phototaxis in Chlamydomonas. We expressed ChR2 in COS-cells, purified it, and subsequently investigated this unusual photoreceptor by flash photolysis and UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy. Several transient photoproducts of the wild type ChR2 were identified, and their kinetics and molecular properties were compared with those of the ChR2 mutant E90Q. Based on the spectroscopic data we developed a model of the photocycle comprising six distinguishable intermediates. This photocycle shows similarities to the photocycle of the ChR2-related Channelrhodopsin of Volvox but also displays significant differences. We show that molecular changes include retinal isomerization, changes in hydrogen bonding of carboxylic acids, and large alterations of the protein backbone structure. These alterations are stronger than those observed in the photocycle of other microbial rhodopsins like bacteriorhodopsin and are related to those occurring in animal rhodopsins. UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy revealed two late intermediates with different time constants of tau = 6 and 40 s that exist during the recovery of the dark state. The carboxylic side chain of Glu(90) is involved in the slow transition. The molecular changes during the ChR2 photocycle are discussed with respect to other members of the rhodopsin family.

  12. Deletion of epidermal Rac1 inhibits HPV-8 induced skin papilloma formation and facilitates HPV-8- and UV-light induced skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Pfister, Herbert; Haase, Ingo

    2016-09-06

    Overexpression and increased activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1 has been linked to squamous cell carcinoma of the epidermis and mucosa in humans. Targeted deletion of Rac1 or inhibition of Rac1 activity in epidermal keratinocytes reduced papilloma formation in a chemical skin carcinogenesis mouse model. However, a potential role of Rac1 in HPV- and UV-light induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far, solar UV radiation being an important carcinogen to the skin.To investigate this, we deleted Rac1 or modulated its activity in mice with transgenic expression of Human papilloma virus type-8 (HPV-8) in epidermal keratinocytes. Our data show that inhibition or deletion of Rac1 results in reduced papilloma formation upon UV-irradiation with a single dose, whereas constitutive activation of Rac1 strongly increases papilloma frequency in these mice. Surprisingly, we observed that, upon chronic UV-irradiation, the majority of mice with transgenic expression of HPV-8 and epidermis specific Rac1 deletion developed squamous cell carcinomas. Taken together, our data show that Rac1 exerts a dual role in skin carcinogenesis: its activation is, on one hand, required for HPV-8- and UV-light induced papilloma formation but, on the other, suppresses the development of squamous cell carcinomas.

  13. Protective Effect of Fucoxanthin Isolated from Laminaria japonica against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Damage Both in Vitro and in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yixiang; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Xichun; Chen, Qingchou; Chen, Haixiu; Sun, Lechang; Liu, Guangming

    2016-01-20

    With increasingly serious eye exposure to light stresses, such as light-emitting diodes, computers, and widescreen mobile phones, efficient natural compounds for preventing visible light-induced retinal damages are becoming compelling needs in the modern society. Fucoxanthin, as the main light absorption system in marine algae, may possess an outstanding bioactivity in vision protection because of its filtration of blue light and excellent antioxidative activity. In this work, both in vitro and in vivo simulated visible light-induced retinal damage models were employed. The in vitro results revealed that fucoxanthin exhibited better bioactivities than lutein, zeaxanthin, and blueberry anthocyanins in inhibiting overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor, resisting senescence, improving phagocytic function, and clearing intracellular reactive oxygen species in retinal pigment epithelium cells. The in vivo experiment also confirmed the superiority of fucoxanthin than lutein in protecting retina against photoinduced damage. This excellent bioactivity may be attributed to its unique structural features, including allenic, epoxide, and acetyl groups. Fucoxanthin is expected to be an important ocular nutrient in the future.

  14. Nitrogen and Fluorine Codoped, Colloidal TiO2Nanoparticle: Tunable Doping, Large Red-Shifted Band Edge, Visible Light Induced Photocatalysis, and Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Aritra; Chakraborty, Atanu; Jana, Nikhil R

    2018-01-17

    Visible light photocatalysis by TiO 2 requires efficient doping of other elements with red-shifted band edge to the visible region. However, preparation of such TiO 2 with tunable doping is challenging. Here we report a method of making nitrogen (N) and fluorine (F) codoped TiO 2 nanoparticle with tunable doping between 1 and 7 at. %. The preparation of N, F codoped TiO 2 nanoparticle involves reaction of colloidal TiO 2 nanorods with an ammonium fluoride-urea mixture at 300 °C, and the extent of N/F doping is tuned by varying the amount of ammonium fluoride-urea and the reaction time. Resultant colloidal N, F codoped TiO 2 nanoparticles show doping dependent shifting of the band edge from the UV to near-IR region, visible light induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and visible light photodegradation of bisphenol A. A colloidal form of doped TiO 2 nanoparticle offers labeling of cells, visible light induced ROS generation inside a cell, and successive cell death. This work shows the potential advantage of anisotropic nanoparticle precursor for tunable doping and colloidal form of N, F codoped TiO 2 nanoparticle as a visible light photocatalyst.

  15. The Role of Light-Induced Fluorescence in the Treatment of Smooth Surface Carious Lesions with Icon Infiltration and the Results After 1 Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabaktchieva R.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Caries infiltration is a novel technique that brings out immediate esthetic improvement in the opacity of the white spot lesions. Light-induced fluorescence method is a modern caries diagnostic method. In this study SoproLife camera (Acteon, France was applied for diagnosing and follow-up of the results. The aims of this in vivo study are to test the role of light-induced fluorescence method (SoploLife camera in the diagnosis of non-cavitated smooth surfaces carious lesions (ICDAS codes 1 and 2 of primary and permanent teeth and in the follow-up period immediately after application, 6 months and 1 year after applying ICON material (DMG. Teeth: n = 90; primary teeth: 6 kids; n = 40 teeth; permanent teeth: 6 patients; n = 50 teeth. Visual examination by ICDAS without probe, dry for 10 s with 3-in-1 syringe using lightening; SoproLife camera (450 nm, digital photos. LIF method applied with SoproLife camera (Diagnostic mode with day light and blue light is more accurate than visual examination only when applied for single tooth diagnose. Moreover, LIF method for single tooth is more accurate in following up the effect of non-operative treatment of smooth surfaces lesions than using digital images. ICON is a material that stops the progression of non-cavitated smooth surfaces carious lesions in both primary and permanent teeth and make the aesthetic result better up to 1 year following the procedure.

  16. Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence-Digital as an oral hygiene evaluation tool to assess plaque accumulation and enamel demineralization in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cara C; Burnside, Girvan; Higham, Susan M; Flannigan, Norah L

    2016-11-01

      To assess the use of Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence-Digital as an oral hygiene evaluation tool during orthodontic treatment.   In this prospective, randomized clinical trial, 33 patients undergoing fixed orthodontic appliance treatment were randomly allocated to receive oral hygiene reinforcement at four consecutive appointments using either white light (WL) or Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence-Digital (QLF) images, taken with a device, as visual aids. Oral hygiene was recorded assessing the QLF images for demineralization, by fluorescence loss (ΔF), and plaque coverage (ΔR30). A debriefing questionnaire ascertained patient perspectives.   There were no significant differences in demineralization (P  =  .56) or plaque accumulation (P  =  .82) between the WL and QLF groups from T0 to T4. There was no significant reduction in demineralization, ΔF, in the WL, or the QLF group from T0-T4 (P > .05); however, there was a significant reduction in ΔR30 plaque scores (P oral hygiene reinforcement for the full duration of treatment compared with 81% of the WL group (OR 2.3; P Oral hygiene reinforcement at consecutive appointments using WL or QLF images as visual aids is effective in reducing plaque coverage. In terms of clinical benefits, QLF and WL images are of similar effectiveness; however, patients preferred the QLF images.

  17. Role of AtPolζ, AtRev1, and AtPolη in UV light-induced mutagenesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Mayu; Takahashi, Shinya; Tanaka, Atsushi; Narumi, Issay; Sakamoto, Ayako N

    2011-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) is a DNA damage tolerance mechanism in which DNA lesions are bypassed by specific polymerases. To investigate the role of TLS activities in ultraviolet light-induced somatic mutations, we analyzed Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) disruptants of AtREV3, AtREV1, and/or AtPOLH genes that encode TLS-type polymerases. The mutation frequency in rev3-1 or rev1-1 mutants decreased compared with that in the wild type, suggesting that AtPolζ and AtRev1 perform mutagenic bypass events, whereas the mutation frequency in the polh-1 mutant increased, suggesting that AtPolη performs nonmutagenic bypass events with respect to ultraviolet light-induced lesions. The rev3-1 rev1-1 double mutant showed almost the same mutation frequency as the rev1-1 single mutant. The increased mutation frequency found in polh-1 was completely suppressed in the rev3-1 polh-1 double mutant, indicating that AtPolζ is responsible for the increased mutations found in polh-1. In summary, these results suggest that AtPolζ and AtRev1 are involved in the same (error-prone) TLS pathway that is independent from the other (error-free) TLS pathway mediated by AtPolη.

  18. Role of AtPolζ, AtRev1, and AtPolη in UV Light-Induced Mutagenesis in Arabidopsis1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Mayu; Takahashi, Shinya; Tanaka, Atsushi; Narumi, Issay; Sakamoto, Ayako N.

    2011-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) is a DNA damage tolerance mechanism in which DNA lesions are bypassed by specific polymerases. To investigate the role of TLS activities in ultraviolet light-induced somatic mutations, we analyzed Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) disruptants of AtREV3, AtREV1, and/or AtPOLH genes that encode TLS-type polymerases. The mutation frequency in rev3-1 or rev1-1 mutants decreased compared with that in the wild type, suggesting that AtPolζ and AtRev1 perform mutagenic bypass events, whereas the mutation frequency in the polh-1 mutant increased, suggesting that AtPolη performs nonmutagenic bypass events with respect to ultraviolet light-induced lesions. The rev3-1 rev1-1 double mutant showed almost the same mutation frequency as the rev1-1 single mutant. The increased mutation frequency found in polh-1 was completely suppressed in the rev3-1 polh-1 double mutant, indicating that AtPolζ is responsible for the increased mutations found in polh-1. In summary, these results suggest that AtPolζ and AtRev1 are involved in the same (error-prone) TLS pathway that is independent from the other (error-free) TLS pathway mediated by AtPolη. PMID:21030509

  19. Loss of Melanopsin Photoreception and Antagonism of the Histamine H3 Receptor by Ciproxifan Inhibit Light-Induced Sleep in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanuel Muindi

    Full Text Available Light has direct effects on sleep and wakefulness causing arousal in diurnal animals and sleep in nocturnal animals. In the present study, we assessed the modulation of light-induced sleep by melanopsin and the histaminergic system by exposing mice to millisecond light flashes and continuous light respectively. First, we show that the induction of sleep by millisecond light flashes is dose dependent as a function of light flash number. We found that exposure to 60 flashes of light occurring once every 60 seconds for 1-h (120-ms of total light over an hour induced a similar amount of sleep as a continuous bright light pulse. Secondly, the induction of sleep by millisecond light flashes was attenuated in the absence of melanopsin when animals were presented with flashes occurring every 60 seconds over a 3-h period beginning at ZT13. Lastly, the acute administration of a histamine H3 autoreceptor antagonist, ciproxifan, blocked the induction of sleep by a 1-h continuous light pulse during the dark period. Ciproxifan caused a decrease in NREMS delta power and an increase in theta activity during both sleep and wake periods respectively. The data suggest that some form of temporal integration occurs in response to millisecond light flashes, and that this process requires melanopsin photoreception. Furthermore, the pharmacological data suggest that the increase of histaminergic neurotransmission is sufficient to attenuate the light-induced sleep response during the dark period.

  20. Versatile spectrophotometer for photosynthesis (light-induced changes in absorbance and fluorescence yield, circular and linear dichroism) and other biophysical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Bacon; Breeze, Robert H.; Dolan, Edward; Vore, Duane

    1985-01-01

    The construction of a versatile, single-beam spectrophotometer expanded from a previously reported circular dichrometer utilizing an elasto-optic modulator (EOM) for producing circular polarization, is described. The new spectrophotometer is capable of measuring circular dichroism as well as linear dichroism and light-induced changes in absorbance and fluorescence yield, the latter being two of the most commonly measured properties in photosynthesis research. The use of an EOM, along with a phase-sensitive detector, affords high sensitivity and at the same time, in conjuction with a mechanical phosphoroscopic device, a high degree of immunity from artifacts in studies employing actinic light. A description is given of the generation and use of timing signals essential for control and signal processing. Its performance is illustrated by examples drawn from light-induced absorbance and fluorescence-yield changes associated with photosynthetic electron transport and changes in redox state of electron carriers. This photometer, with very little modification, may also be used to perform a host of other types of measurements.

  1. Cooperative games and network structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musegaas, Marieke

    2017-01-01

    This thesis covers various research topics involving cooperative game theory, a mathematical tool to analyze the cooperative behavior within a group of players. The focus is mainly on interrelations between operations research and cooperative game theory by analyzing specific types of cooperative

  2. THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES ON ECONOMIC COOPERATION

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Ciprian ANDRUSEAC; Iulian HERTUG

    2016-01-01

    Economic cooperation, the engine of relations of international economic cooperation, is an insufficiently defined, dynamic concept. The transformations of the international environment, globalization and the intensification of economic interdependencies render economic cooperation a must, and not just an option within international relations. Similar to the international environment, economic cooperation undergoes a process of redefinition, of adjustment to the new realities. This article aim...

  3. Does intuition cause cooperation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter P J L Verkoeijen

    Full Text Available Recently, researchers claimed that people are intuitively inclined to cooperate with reflection causing them to behave selfishly. Empirical support for this claim came from experiments using a 4-player public goods game with a marginal return of 0.5 showing that people contributed more money to a common project when they had to decide quickly (i.e., a decision based on intuition than when they were instructed to reflect and decide slowly. This intuitive-cooperation effect is of high scientific and practical importance because it argues against a central assumption of traditional economic and evolutionary models. The first experiment of present study was set up to examine the generality of the intuitive-cooperation effect and to further validate the experimental task producing the effect. In Experiment 1, we investigated Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT workers' contributions to a 4-player public goods game with a marginal return of 0.5 while we manipulated the knowledge about the other players' contribution to the public goods game (contribution known vs. contribution unknown, the identity of the other players (humans vs. computers randomly generating contributions and the time constraint (time pressure/intuition vs. forced delay/reflection. However, the results of Experiment 1 failed to reveal an intuitive-cooperation effect. Furthermore, four subsequent direct replications attempts with AMT workers (Experiments 2a, 2b, 2c and Experiment 3, which was conducted with naïve/inexperienced participants also failed to demonstrate intuitive-cooperation effects. Taken together, the results of the present study could not corroborate the idea that people are intuitively cooperative, hence suggesting that the theoretical relationship between intuition and cooperation should be further scrutinized.

  4. The story of technical cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yang Taek

    1989-09-01

    This book gives descriptions of technical cooperation, which is about why does technology transfer?, process of technology transfer with model, decisive cause and cooperation of technology transfer, cost and effect of technology transfer, historical experience of technology transfer, cases of technology transfer by field such as rubber tire, medicine and computer industry and automobile industry, technology transfer process and present condition of technical cooperation, and strategy for rising of technical cooperation : selection of technology for object of cooperation and development of human resources.

  5. Cooperation in Construction:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Peter; Storgaard, Kresten

    2016-01-01

    . The management logic of the main contractor is interpreted as based on a sociology-inspired understanding focusing on norms and social values rather than on contractual (law) and functional (engineering) logic, which had hitherto been prevalent in Danish construction management.......The study presents a building project executed by a major Danish construction company, where cooperation and its staging were essential for achieving high productivity and competitiveness. The form of this cooperation is the main theme for the article. The contractor actively changed...... the companies in the case can be understood as possessing a social capital which is enforced and united by initiatives of the main contractor. The social capital was built up and maintained through the actual constitution of cooperation already in the initial phase of bidding before the building process...

  6. Cooperative Prototyping Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Grønbæk, Kaj

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes experiments with a design technique that we denote cooperative prototyping. The experiments consider design of a patient case record system for municipal dental clinics in which we used HyperCard, an off the shelf programming environment for the Macintosh. In the ecperiments we...... tried to achieve a fluent work-like evaluation of prototypes where users envisioned future work with a computer tool, at the same time as we made on-line modifications of prototypes in cooperation with the users when breakdown occur in their work-like evaluation. The experiments showed...... that it was possible to make a number of direct manipulation changes of prototypes in cooperation with the users, in interplay with their fluent work-like evaluation of these. However, breakdown occurred in the prototyping process when we reached the limits of the direct manipulation support for modification. From...

  7. Synchrony and cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltermuth, Scott S; Heath, Chip

    2009-01-01

    Armies, churches, organizations, and communities often engage in activities-for example, marching, singing, and dancing-that lead group members to act in synchrony with each other. Anthropologists and sociologists have speculated that rituals involving synchronous activity may produce positive emotions that weaken the psychological boundaries between the self and the group. This article explores whether synchronous activity may serve as a partial solution to the free-rider problem facing groups that need to motivate their members to contribute toward the collective good. Across three experiments, people acting in synchrony with others cooperated more in subsequent group economic exercises, even in situations requiring personal sacrifice. Our results also showed that positive emotions need not be generated for synchrony to foster cooperation. In total, the results suggest that acting in synchrony with others can increase cooperation by strengthening social attachment among group members.

  8. Biotic Control of Surface pH and Evidence of Light-Induced H+ Pumping and Ca2+-H+ Exchange in a Tropical Crustose Coralline Alga.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie C Hofmann

    Full Text Available Presently, an incomplete mechanistic understanding of tropical reef macroalgae photosynthesis and calcification restricts predictions of how these important autotrophs will respond to global change. Therefore, we investigated the mechanistic link between inorganic carbon uptake pathways, photosynthesis and calcification in a tropical crustose coralline alga (CCA using microsensors. We measured pH, oxygen (O2, and calcium (Ca2+ dynamics and fluxes at the thallus surface under ambient (8.1 and low (7.8 seawater pH (pHSW and across a range of irradiances. Acetazolamide (AZ was used to inhibit extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CAext, which mediates hydrolysis of HCO3-, and 4,4' diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonate (DIDS that blocks direct HCO3- uptake by anion exchange transport. Both inhibited photosynthesis, suggesting both diffusive uptake of CO2 via HCO3- hydrolysis to CO2 and direct HCO3- ion transport are important in this CCA. Surface pH was raised approximately 0.3 units at saturating irradiance, but less when CAext was inhibited. Surface pH was lower at pHSW 7.8 than pHSW 8.1 in the dark, but not in the light. The Ca2+ fluxes were large, complex and temporally variable, but revealed net Ca2+ uptake under all conditions. The temporal variability in Ca2+ dynamics was potentially related to localized dissolution during epithallial cell sloughing, a strategy of CCA to remove epiphytes. Simultaneous Ca2+ and pH dynamics suggest the presence of Ca2+/H+ exchange. Rapid light-induced H+ surface dynamics that continued after inhibition of photosynthesis revealed the presence of a light-mediated, but photosynthesis-independent, proton pump. Thus, the study indicates metabolic control of surface pH can occur in CCA through photosynthesis and light-inducible H+ pumps. Our results suggest that complex light-induced ion pumps play an important role in biological processes related to inorganic carbon uptake and calcification in CCA.

  9. Membership in cooperative societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eba Gaminde Egia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we will analyze the practical application of one of the cooperative principles, «voluntary and free membership», referring to the entering of members in cooperative societies. We will first explain the meaning of this principle, and then bring up its normative regulation, with special emphasis on those aspects in which our autonomic laws differ, and ending with a brief reference to the economic aspect and the different ways to make contributions and their consequences.Received: 31 May 2017Accepted: 14 October 2017Published online: 22 December 2017

  10. Excited cooper pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Arrietea, M. G.; Solis, M. A.; De Llano, M. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F (Mexico)

    2001-02-01

    Excited cooper pairs formed in a many-fermion system are those with nonzero total center-of mass momentum (CMM). They are normally neglected in the standard Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity for being too few compared with zero CMM pairs. However, a Bose-Einstein condensation picture requires both zero and nonzero CMM pairs. Assuming a BCS model interaction between fermions we determine the populations for all CMM values of Cooper pairs by actually calculating the number of nonzero-CMM pairs relative to that of zero-CMM ones in both 2D and 3D. Although this ratio decreases rapidly with CMM, the number of Cooper pairs for any specific CMM less than the maximum (or breakup of the pair) momentum turns out to be typically larger than about 95% of those with zero-CMM at zero temperature T. Even at T {approx}100 K this fraction en 2D is still as large as about 70% for typical quasi-2D cuprate superconductor parameters. [Spanish] Los pares de cooper excitados formados en un sistema de muchos electrones, son aquellos con momentos de centro de masa (CMM) diferente de cero. Normalmente estos no son tomados en cuenta en la teoria estandar de la superconductividad de Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) al suponer que su numero es muy pequeno comparados con los pares de centro de masa igual a cero. Sin embargo, un esquema de condensacion Bose-Einstein requiere de ambos pares, con CMM cero y diferente de cero. Asumiendo una interaccion modelo BCS entre los fermiones, determinamos la poblacion de pares cooper con cada uno de todos los posibles valores del CMM calculando el numero de pares con momentos de centro de masa diferente de cero relativo a los pares de CMM igual a cero, en 2D y 3D. Aunque esta razon decrece rapidamente con el CMM, el numero de pares de cooper para cualquier CMM especifico menor que el momento maximo (o rompimiento de par) es tipicamente mas grande que el 95% de aquellos con CMM cero. Aun a T {approx}100 K esta fraccion en 2D es

  11. Introduction: cooperative learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Manuel Serrano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of this revision is the recognition of cooperative learning as a highly effective strategy for the accomplishment of the general goals in learning. The different investigations assessed validate the potential that a cooperative organization of the classroom could entail for academic achievement, self-esteem, interpersonal attraction or social support. The solidity of the existing research contributes to its external and internal validity and, thus, to conclude that the results are consistent and can be extrapolated to different cultures, ethnic groups or countries.

  12. Cooperatives between truth and validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Krueger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The current declaration of the International Cooperative Alliance on cooperative identity since its 1995 Centennial Conference (which was held in Manchester makes no distinction between cooperation and cooperative. The lack of distinction between cooperation and cooperative has caused the Decennial Cooperative Action Plan to define cooperatives as a form, while their materiality is regarded as managerial: a business (activity under a cooperative form. An identity that is close to us cannot be reduced to form, without this being a problem. Therefore, the value underlying this identity —cooperation— must have a substantial basis, even if it is idealised, if it is to affect us.Received: 27.03.2014Accepted: 12.05.2014

  13. Visible-light-induced, Ir-catalyzed reactions of N-methyl-N-((trimethylsilylmethylaniline with cyclic α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Lenhart

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available N-Methyl-N-((trimethylsilylmethylaniline was employed as reagent in visible-light-induced, iridium-catalyzed addition reactions to cyclic α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Typical reaction conditions included the use of one equivalent of the reaction substrate, 1.5 equivalents of the aniline and 2.5 mol % (in MeOH or 1.0 mol % (in CH2Cl2 [Ir(ppy2(dtbbpy]BF4 as the catalyst. Two major reaction products were obtained in combined yields of 30–67%. One product resulted from aminomethyl radical addition, the other product was a tricyclic compound, which is likely formed by attack of the intermediately formed α-carbonyl radical at the phenyl ring. For five-membered α,β-unsaturated lactone and lactam substrates, the latter products were the only products isolated. For the six-membered lactones and lactams and for cyclopentenone the simple addition products prevailed.

  14. In situ atomic force microscopy studies of reversible light-induced switching of surface roughness and adhesion in azobenzene-containing PMMA films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, Y.; Pakula, C.; Zaporojtchenko, V.; Strunskus, T.; Faupel, F.; Herges, R.; Zargarani, D.; Magnussen, O.M.

    2011-01-01

    Thin films in the range 40-80 nm of a blend of PMMA with an azobenzene derivative have been studied directly during UV and blue light irradiation by atomic force microscopy (AFM), revealing highly reversible changes in the surface roughness and the film adhesion. UV light induces an ∼80% increase in surface roughness, whereas illumination by blue light completely reverses these changes. Based on the observed surface topography and transition kinetics a reversible mass flow mechanisms is suggested, where the polarity changes upon switching trigger a wetting-dewetting transition in a surface segregation layer of the chromophore. Similar AFM measurements of the pull-off force indicate a decrease upon UV and an increase after blue light illumination with a complex kinetic behavior: a rapid initial change, attributed to the change in the cis isomer fraction of the azobenzene derivative, and a more gradual change, indicative of slow structural reorganization.

  15. Physiological crosstalk between the AC/PKA and PLC/PKC pathways modulates melatonin-mediated, monochromatic-light-induced proliferation of T-lymphocytes in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingyun; Wang, Zixu; Dong, Yulan; Cao, Jing; Chen, Yaoxing

    2017-09-01

    Previous study has demonstrated that melatonin plays a critical role in monochromatic-light-induced lymphocyte proliferation in response to T cell mitogen concanavalin A (ConA). However, its intracellular mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we investigate the intracellular signal pathways of melatonin receptor-mediated T-lymphocyte proliferation in the spleens of chicks exposed to different light wavelengths. Results showed that green light enhanced T-lymphocyte proliferation by 2.46-6.83% and increased splenic mRNA and protein expressions of melatonin receptor subtypes (Mel1a, Mel1b and Mel1c) by 16.05-40.43% compared with the white, red and blue light groups. However, pinealectomy resulted in a decrease in T-lymphocyte proliferation and melatonin receptor expression with no statistically significant differences between the different light groups. In vitro experiments showed that the Mel1b selective antagonist 4P-PDOT, the Mel1c selective antagonist prazosin and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1 (MEK-1) inhibitor PD98059 suppressed both melatonin-induced lymphocyte proliferation in response to ConA and melatonin- and ConA-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity but that the Mel1a/Mel1b non-selective antagonist luzindole did not. In addition, pretreatment with forskolin (FSK, the adenylyl cyclase activator), H89 (the PKA inhibitor), U73122 (the PLC inhibitor) or Go6983 (the broad spectrum PKC inhibitor) markedly attenuated melatonin- and ConA-stimulated T-lymphocyte proliferation and ERK1/2 activity. These results demonstrate that melatonin mediates green-light-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation via the Mel1b and Mel1c receptors by triggering crosstalk between the cAMP/PKA and PLC/PKC signal pathways followed by ERK1/2 activation.

  16. Apigenin-7-diglucuronide protects retinas against bright light-induced photoreceptor degeneration through the inhibition of retinal oxidative stress and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Minjuan; Zhang, Yong; Du, Xiaoye; Xu, Jing; Cui, Jingang; Gu, Jiangping; Zhu, Weiliang; Zhang, Teng; Chen, Yu

    2017-05-15

    Vision impairment in retinal degenerative diseases such as age-related macular degeneration is primarily associated with photoreceptor degeneration, in which oxidative stress and inflammatory responses are mechanistically involved as central players. Therapies with photoreceptor protective properties remain to be developed. Apigenin-7-diglucuronide (A7DG), a flavonoid glycoside, is present in an assortment of medicinal plants with anti-inflammatory or ant-oxidant activities. However, the pharmacological significance of A7DG remains unknown in vivo. The current study isolated A7DG from Glechoma longituba (Nakai) Kuprian and investigated the retinal protective effect A7DG in mice characterized by bright light-induced photoreceptor degeneration. The results showed that A7DG treatment led to remarkable photoreceptor protection in bright light-exposed BALB/c mice. Moreover, A7DG treatment alleviated photoreceptor apoptosis, mitigated oxidative stress, suppressed reactive gliosis and microglial activation and attenuated the expression of proinflammatory genes in bright light-exposed retinas. The results demonstrated for the first time remarkable photoreceptor protective activities of A7DG in vivo. Inhibition of bright light-induced retinal oxidative stress and retinal inflammatory responses was associated with the retinal protection conferred by A7DG. The work here warrants further evaluation of A7DG as a pharmacological candidate for the treatment of vision-threatening retinal degenerative disorders. Moreover, given the general implication of oxidative stress and inflammation in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration, A7DG could be further tested for the treatment of other neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Luc E. Cartron; Patricia L. Kennedy; Rob Yaksich; Scott H. Stoleson

    2010-01-01

    The Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) is intermediate in size between the Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) and the Sharp-shinned Hawk (A. striatus), northern North America's other two accipiters. The two sexes are almost alike in plumage, but as in both of the other species, the female is noticeably larger. According to Wheeler and Clark (1995), a...

  18. Innovation, Translation, and Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-03-01

    The 9th Wound Healing and Tissue Repair and Regeneration Annual Meeting of Chinese Tissue Repair Society was hold in Wuhan, China. This meeting was focused on the innovation, translation application, and cooperation in wound care both in China and other countries. More than 400 delegates took part in this meeting and communicated successfully. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Combat or Cooperation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Thomas F.; Copas, Randall L.

    2010-01-01

    The best intentioned efforts of adults are often sabotaged by coercive climates of bullying among peers and conflict with adults. The solution is to create cultures where youth cooperate with authority and treat one another with respect. In this article, the authors stress the task of the staff to create a condition in which students see more…

  20. Predicting Human Cooperation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Nay

    Full Text Available The Prisoner's Dilemma has been a subject of extensive research due to its importance in understanding the ever-present tension between individual self-interest and social benefit. A strictly dominant strategy in a Prisoner's Dilemma (defection, when played by both players, is mutually harmful. Repetition of the Prisoner's Dilemma can give rise to cooperation as an equilibrium, but defection is as well, and this ambiguity is difficult to resolve. The numerous behavioral experiments investigating the Prisoner's Dilemma highlight that players often cooperate, but the level of cooperation varies significantly with the specifics of the experimental predicament. We present the first computational model of human behavior in repeated Prisoner's Dilemma games that unifies the diversity of experimental observations in a systematic and quantitatively reliable manner. Our model relies on data we integrated from many experiments, comprising 168,386 individual decisions. The model is composed of two pieces: the first predicts the first-period action using solely the structural game parameters, while the second predicts dynamic actions using both game parameters and history of play. Our model is successful not merely at fitting the data, but in predicting behavior at multiple scales in experimental designs not used for calibration, using only information about the game structure. We demonstrate the power of our approach through a simulation analysis revealing how to best promote human cooperation.

  1. Supranational Cooperation in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Deugd, Nienke; Stamm, Katharina; Westerman, Wim

    The sovereign debt crisis and the euro crisis have prompted heads of state and government in Europe to intensify supranational cooperation. However, some political leaders and policy makers aim for more. They propose the introduction of a common European economic government that would prevent Europe

  2. Indian Ocean Rim Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wippel, Steffen

    Since the mid-1990s, the Indian Ocean has been experiencing increasing economic cooperation among its rim states. Middle Eastern countries, too, participate in the work of the Indian Ocean Rim Association, which received new impetus in the course of the current decade. Notably Oman is a very active...

  3. Designs for Cooperative Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Robin

    Educators are moving toward models of instruction that contain a myriad of interaction patterns among teachers and students. This shift from didactic teaching models to intensely involving designs is difficult for teachers, but is made easier if seen as a gradual change. This book provides an overview of 12 cooperative interaction designs for the…

  4. Non-Cooperative Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, E.E.C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe non-cooperative game models and discuss game theoretic solution concepts. Some applications are also noted. Conventional theory focuses on the question ‘how will rational players play?’, and has the Nash equilibrium at its core. We discuss this concept and its interpretations, as well as

  5. Robust Dynamic Cooperative Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauso, D.; Timmer, Judith B.

    2006-01-01

    Classical cooperative game theory is no longer a suitable tool for those situations where the values of coalitions are not known with certainty. Recent works address situations where the values of coalitions are modelled by random variables. In this work we still consider the values of coalitions as

  6. Does intuition cause cooperation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.J.L. Verkoeijen (Peter); S. Bouwmeester (Samantha)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRecently, researchers claimed that people are intuitively inclined to cooperate with reflection causing them to behave selfishly. Empirical support for this claim came from experiments using a 4-player public goods game with a marginal return of 0.5 showing that people contributed more

  7. Evolution, epigenetics and cooperation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Keywords. Cooperation; epigenetics; evolution; levels of selection ... The domain part of the email address of all email addresses used by the office of Indian Academy of Sciences, including those of the staff, the journals, various programmes, and Current Science, has changed from 'ias.ernet.in' (or ...

  8. Can war foster cooperation?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bauer, Michal; Blattman, C.; Chytilová, Julie; Henrich, J.; Miguel, E.; Mitts, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 3 (2016), s. 249-274 ISSN 0895-3309 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G130 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : war * conflict * cooperation Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 5.727, year: 2016

  9. Cooperative social capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Acera Manero

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Social capital consists of the contributions of members and associates, both mandatory and voluntary. From an accounting point of view, it is a liability figure that expresses the value of a portion of the equity of the cooperative. Its inclusion in the liability is not the fact that it is a debt but by its nature unenforceable.

  10. [Social cooperatives in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villotti, P; Zaniboni, S; Fraccaroli, F

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the role of social cooperatives in Italy as a type of economic, non-profit organization and their role in contributing to the economic and social growth of the country. The purpose of this paper is to learn more about the experience of the Italian social cooperatives in promoting the work integration process of disadvantaged workers, especially those suffering from mental disorders, from a theoretical and an empirical point of view. Social enterprise is the most popular and consolidated legal and organizational model for social enterprises in Italy, introduced by Law 381/91. Developed during the early 1980s, and formally recognized by law in the early 1990s, social cooperatives aim at pursuing the general interest of the community to promote the human needs and social inclusion of citizens. They are orientated towards aims that go beyond the interest of the business owners, the primary beneficiary of their activities is the community, or groups of disadvantaged people. In Italy, Law 381/91 distinguishes between two categories of social cooperatives, those producing goods of social utility, such as culture, welfare and educational services (A-type), and those providing economic activities for the integration of disadvantaged people into employment (B-type). The main purpose of B-type social cooperatives is to integrate disadvantaged people into the open labour market. This goal is reached after a period of training and working experience inside the firm, during which the staff works to improve both the social and professional abilities of disadvantaged people. During the years, B-type social co-ops acquired a particular relevance in the care of people with mental disorders by offering them with job opportunities. Having a job is central in the recovery process of people suffering from mental diseases, meaning that B-type social co-ops in Italy play an important rehabilitative and integrative role for this vulnerable population of workers. The

  11. Cooperation and cheating in microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the cooperative and competitive dynamics within and between species is a central challenge in evolutionary biology. Microbial model systems represent a unique opportunity to experimentally test fundamental theories regarding the evolution of cooperative behaviors. In this talk I will describe our experiments probing cooperation in microbes. In particular, I will compare the cooperative growth of yeast in sucrose and the cooperative inactivation of antibiotics by bacteria. In both cases we find that cheater strains---which don't contribute to the public welfare---are able to take advantage of the cooperator strains. However, this ability of cheaters to out-compete cooperators occurs only when cheaters are present at low frequency, thus leading to steady-state coexistence. These microbial experiments provide fresh insight into the evolutionary origin of cooperation.

  12. Cooperating for assisting intelligently operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezillon, P.; Cases, E.; CEA Centre d'Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, 30 - Marcoule

    1995-01-01

    We are in the process of an intelligent cooperative system in a nuclear plant application. The system must cooperate with an operator who accomplishes a task of supervision of a real-world process. We point out in the paper that a cooperation between a cooperative system and an operator has two modes: a waking state and a participating state. During the waking state, the system observes the operator's behavior and the consequences on the process. During the participation state, the cooperative system builds jointly with the user a solution to the problem. In our approach, the cooperation depends on the system capabilities to explain, to incrementally acquire knowledge and to make explicit the context of the cooperation. We develop these ideas in the framework of the design of the cooperative system in the nuclear plant. (authors). 22 refs., 1 fig

  13. CTBTO international cooperation workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The International Cooperation Workshop took place in Vienna, Austria, on 16 and 17 November 1998, with the participation of 104 policy/decision makers, Research and Development managers and diplomatic representatives from 58 States Signatories to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The Workshop attempted to develop Treaty stipulations to: promote cooperation to facilitate and participate in the fullest possible exchange relating to technologies used in the verification of the Treaty; enable member states to strengthen national implementation of verification measures, and to benefit from the application of such technologies for peaceful purposes. The potential benefits arising from the CTBT monitoring, analysis and data communication systems are multifaceted, and as yet unknown. This Workshop provided the opportunity to examine some of these possibilities. An overview of the CTBT verification regime on the general aspects of the four monitoring technologies (seismic, hydro-acoustic, infrasound and radionuclides), including some of the elements that are the subject of international cooperation, were presented and discussed. Questions were raised on the potential benefits that can be derived by participating in the CTBT regime and broad-based discussions took place. Several concrete proposals on ways and means to facilitate and promote cooperation among States Signatories were suggested. The main points discussed by the participants can be summarized as follows: the purpose of the CTBT Organization is to assist member states to monitor Treaty compliance; the CTBT can be a highly effective technological tool which can generate wide-ranging data, which can be used for peaceful purposes; there are differences in the levels of technology development in the member states that is why peaceful applications should be supported by the Prep Com for the benefit of all member states, whether developed or developing, training being a key element to optimize the CTBT

  14. International cooperation for operating safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.C.

    1989-03-01

    The international-cooperation organization in nuclear safety domain is discussed. The nuclear energy Direction Committee is helped by the Security Committee for Nuclear Power Plants in the cooperation between security organizations of member countries and in the safety and nuclear activity regulations. The importance of the cooperation between experts in human being and engine problems is underlined. The applied methods, exchange activities and activity analysis, and the cooperation of the Nuclear Energy Agency and international organizations is analysed [fr

  15. Cooperative arbitration under Spanish law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Martí Miravalls

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to analyze the cooperative arbitration as an alternative means of conflict resolution. The research could be divided into two blocks: the first controversial issues related to the figure of the cooperative arbitration are analyzed. In the second block the current legal regime of the cooperative arbitration, which is basically develops regional.

  16. Cooperative Learning: Developments in Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative learning is widely recognized as a pedagogical practice that promotes socialization and learning among students from kindergarten through to college level and across different subject areas. Cooperative learning involves students working together to achieve common goals or complete group tasks. Interest in cooperative learning has…

  17. Cooperative Learning in Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative learning refers to instructional methods in which students work in small groups to help each other learn. Although cooperative learning methods are used for different age groups, they are particularly popular in elementary (primary) schools. This article discusses methods and theoretical perspectives on cooperative learning for the…

  18. Forestry Cooperatives: Organization and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Donald M.; Scoville, Orlin J.

    1982-01-01

    This study describes organizational structure, functions, and facilities of forestry cooperatives in the United States. It evaluates their economic performance and explores current problem areas and potentials for future development. Cooperative organization provides woodland owners professional forestry assistance, in terms of forest management, marketing, and educational activities. Some cooperatives consistently provide these services at less than prevailing rates and obtain higher than av...

  19. Cooperative competition for future mobility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunen, E. van; Kwakkernaat, M.R.J.A.E.; Ploeg, J.; Netten, B.D.

    2012-01-01

    In May 2011, the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge (GCDC) was held, providing the possibility for teams to develop and compare their cooperative driving solutions in a competitive setting. The challenge was organized to further accelerate developments in the area of cooperative driving. Nine

  20. Enlightening Advantages of Cooperative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faryadi, Qais

    2007-01-01

    This appraisal discusses the notion that cooperative learning enhances learners' emotional and social performance. It also observes the perception that cooperative learning dramatically improves students' academic accomplishment. This review also examines the definition of cooperative learning and attempts to define it through the lens of renowned…

  1. Cooperative functions: meeting members' needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark G. Rickenbach

    2006-01-01

    Cooperatives are effective when they meet the needs of the members. In past and current offerings by cooperatives as a whole and forestry cooperatives in particular, four functional categories cover the typical services a forest landowner might gain access to through joining (Cobia 1989). The four categories - marketing, supply, service, and social - are defined and...

  2. Gender and Cooperation in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardenas, Juan-Camilo; Dreber, Anna; Essen, Emma von

    2014-01-01

    between Colombia and Sweden overall. However, Colombian girls cooperate less than Swedish girls. We also find indications that girls in Colombia are less cooperative than boys. Finally, there is also a tendency for children to be more cooperative with boys than with girls on average....

  3. Strategies of inducing cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, M.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the four experiments described in this paper are very consistent, and they can be summarized as follows: (1) The ''nonpunitive'' strategy was most effective in eliciting cooperative behavior from the subjects and, overall, resulted in the highest joint outcomes as well as the highest outcomes for the accomplice. (2) The effectiveness of the turn-the-other-cheek strategy was very much influenced by the competitiveness of the situation; the more competitive the incentives of the subjects, the more massively they exploited the accomplice who employed this strategy. (3) The punitive deterrent strategy elicited more agressive and self-protective, as well as less cooperative, behavior from the subjects than did the other strategies

  4. Junctionless Cooper pair transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arutyunov, K. Yu., E-mail: konstantin.yu.arutyunov@jyu.fi [National Research University Higher School of Economics , Moscow Institute of Electronics and Mathematics, 101000 Moscow (Russian Federation); P.L. Kapitza Institute for Physical Problems RAS , Moscow 119334 (Russian Federation); Lehtinen, J.S. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., Centre for Metrology MIKES, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Junctionless Cooper pair box. • Quantum phase slips. • Coulomb blockade and gate modulation of the Coulomb gap. - Abstract: Quantum phase slip (QPS) is the topological singularity of the complex order parameter of a quasi-one-dimensional superconductor: momentary zeroing of the modulus and simultaneous 'slip' of the phase by ±2π. The QPS event(s) are the dynamic equivalent of tunneling through a conventional Josephson junction containing static in space and time weak link(s). Here we demonstrate the operation of a superconducting single electron transistor (Cooper pair transistor) without any tunnel junctions. Instead a pair of thin superconducting titanium wires in QPS regime was used. The current–voltage characteristics demonstrate the clear Coulomb blockade with magnitude of the Coulomb gap modulated by the gate potential. The Coulomb blockade disappears above the critical temperature, and at low temperatures can be suppressed by strong magnetic field.

  5. Cooperative method development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittrich, Yvonne; Rönkkö, Kari; Eriksson, Jeanette

    2008-01-01

    The development of methods tools and process improvements is best to be based on the understanding of the development practice to be supported. Qualitative research has been proposed as a method for understanding the social and cooperative aspects of software development. However, qualitative...... research is not easily combined with the improvement orientation of an engineering discipline. During the last 6 years, we have applied an approach we call `cooperative method development', which combines qualitative social science fieldwork, with problem-oriented method, technique and process improvement....... The action research based approach focusing on shop floor software development practices allows an understanding of how contextual contingencies influence the deployment and applicability of methods, processes and techniques. This article summarizes the experiences and discusses the further development...

  6. Cooperative Learning i voksenundervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    Nationalt Center for Kompetenceudvikling har evalueret undervisningsmetoden Cooperative Learning i voksenundervisningen og dokumenteret positive effekter på oplevelsen af samarbejde og på lærere og kursisters engagement - men har ikke kunnet påvise systematiske positive effekter af metoden på...... kursisters frafald, fravær og karakterer. Projektet har afprøvet og videreudviklet den pædagogiske metode Cooperative Learning (CL) i en dansk virkelighed og mere specifikt i forhold til VUC'ernes nye kursistgrupper med det overordnede mål at øge gennemførslen markant og målbart ved at anvende og udvikle en...

  7. Cooperate or Free Ride?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per H.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I discuss the role of the three Scandinavian central banks in the establishment of the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) in 1930, and in the international lender of last resort operation towards Austria in 1931. I argue that small central banks were reluctant supporters...... in the establishment of the BIS and free riders in the Austrian crisis, even though there were marked differences in their attitude to international cooperation. These results run counter to the views of those International Political Economy (IPE) theorists who argue that small states should be in favour...... of international cooperation. On the other hand, the evidence seems to confirm Kindleberger's hypothesis that small countries were free riding during the international financial crisis of 1931, and that therefore there is a need for some coordinating mechanism, or a hegemon, in such crises....

  8. International cooperative information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Developing countries need mechanisms by which the information they generate themselves and development information from the rest of the world can be retrieved. The international cooperative information system is such a mechanism. Delegates to the Seminar on International Cooperative Information Systems were informed about various existing systems (INIS, AGRIS, INFOTERRA, TCDC/INRES, POPIN, DEVSIS, and INPADROC), some specialized information systems and services (CDS/ISIS and the Cassava Information Centre), and computer programs for information processing (INIS/AGRIS, CDS/ISIS, and MINISIS). The participants suggested some changes that should be made on both the national and the international levels to ensure that these systems meet the needs of developing countries more effectively. (LL)

  9. Enresa International Cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Beceiro, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, S.A. (ENRESA) was set up in 1984 with the mandate to undertake responsibility for radioactive waste management in Spain. From the very beginning, ENRESA was fully aware of the fact that international cooperation plays a very important role in the development of national programmes. Aspects such as the setting up of international databases, the development and validation of models or site characterization technique such enormous efforts and amounts of resources that they could hardly be undertaken individually. Furthermore, joint participation in research, development and demonstration projects reinforces the level of confidence, not only in the decision-making process but also in the technologies, techniques and practices used. ENRESA's participation in the international contexts is largely defined, on the one hand, by the needs arising from its technical programme, as reflected in the General Radioactive Waste Plan and in the Research and Development Plan, and on the other by the need to support spanish governmental institutions in their participation in inter-governmental institutions in their participation in inter-governmental forums. The formula for cooperation varies according to needs, this cooperation generally being accomplished by means of bilateral agreements with other institutions having similar competence or by participating in the programmes of inter-governmental organizations. In particular, ENRESA has reached cooperation agreements with most of the agencies with similar responsibilities in other countries and participates very actively in the programmes of the European Union, the Nuclear energy Agency (NEA/OECD) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (Author)

  10. Predicting Human Cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Nay, John J.; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy

    2016-01-01

    The Prisoner's Dilemma has been a subject of extensive research due to its importance in understanding the ever-present tension between individual self-interest and social benefit. A strictly dominant strategy in a Prisoner's Dilemma (defection), when played by both players, is mutually harmful. Repetition of the Prisoner's Dilemma can give rise to cooperation as an equilibrium, but defection is as well, and this ambiguity is difficult to resolve. The numerous behavioral experiments investiga...

  11. Tunable Gas Sensing Gels by Cooperative Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Abid; Semeano, Ana T S; Palma, Susana I C J; Pina, Ana S; Almeida, José; Medrado, Bárbara F; Pádua, Ana C C S; Carvalho, Ana L; Dionísio, Madalena; Li, Rosamaria W C; Gamboa, Hugo; Ulijn, Rein V; Gruber, Jonas; Roque, Ana C A

    2017-07-19

    The cooperative assembly of biopolymers and small molecules can yield functional materials with precisely tunable properties. Here, the fabrication, characterization, and use of multicomponent hybrid gels as selective gas sensors are reported. The gels are composed of liquid crystal droplets self-assembled in the presence of ionic liquids, which further coassemble with biopolymers to form stable matrices. Each individual component can be varied and acts cooperatively to tune gels' structure and function. The unique molecular environment in hybrid gels is explored for supramolecular recognition of volatile compounds. Gels with distinct compositions are used as optical and electrical gas sensors, yielding a combinatorial response conceptually mimicking olfactory biological systems, and tested to distinguish volatile organic compounds and to quantify ethanol in automotive fuel. The gel response is rapid, reversible, and reproducible. These robust, versatile, modular, pliant electro-optical soft materials possess new possibilities in sensing triggered by chemical and physical stimuli.

  12. Cooperative Mobile Web Browsing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Q

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper advocates a novel approach for mobile web browsing based on cooperation among wireless devices within close proximity operating in a cellular environment. In the actual state of the art, mobile phones can access the web using different cellular technologies. However, the supported data rates are not sufficient to cope with the ever increasing traffic requirements resulting from advanced and rich content services. Extending the state of the art, higher data rates can only be achieved by increasing complexity, cost, and energy consumption of mobile phones. In contrast to the linear extension of current technology, we propose a novel architecture where mobile phones are grouped together in clusters, using a short-range communication such as Bluetooth, sharing, and accumulating their cellular capacity. The accumulated data rate resulting from collaborative interactions over short-range links can then be used for cooperative mobile web browsing. By implementing the cooperative web browsing on commercial mobile phones, it will be shown that better performance is achieved in terms of increased data rate and therefore reduced access times, resulting in a significantly enhanced web browsing user experience on mobile phones.

  13. Cooperatively active sensing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Shigeoki; Kita, Nobuyuki; Kuniyoshi, Yasuo; Hara, Isao; Matsui, Toshihiro

    2000-01-01

    Aiming at development of a strong and flexible sensing system, a study on a sensing technology prepared with cooperativity, activity, and real time workability has been promoted. In the former period, together with preparation of plural moving robot group with real time processing capacity of a lot of sensor informations composing of platform, a parallel object direction language Eus Lisp effectively capable of describing and executing cooperative processing and action therewith was developed. And, it was also shown that capacity to adaptively act even at dynamic environment could be learnt experientially. And, on processing of individual sensor information, application of a photographing system with multiple resolution property similar to human visual sense property was attempted. In the latter period, together with intending of upgrading on adaptability of sensing function, by using moving robot group in center of a moving robot loaded with active visual sense, a cooperative active sensing prototype system was constructed to show effectiveness of this study through evaluation experiment of patrolling inspection at plant simulating environment. (G.K.)

  14. Protective effects of bilberry and lingonberry extracts against blue light-emitting diode light-induced retinal photoreceptor cell damage in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kenjirou; Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Saori; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2014-04-02

    Blue light is a high-energy or short-wavelength visible light, which induces retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) contain high amounts of polyphenols (anthocyanins, resveratrol, and proanthocyanidins) and thus confer health benefits. This study aimed to determine the protective effects and mechanism of action of bilberry extract (B-ext) and lingonberry extract (L-ext) and their active components against blue light-emitting diode (LED) light-induced retinal photoreceptor cell damage. Cultured murine photoreceptor (661 W) cells were exposed to blue LED light following treatment with B-ext, L-ext, or their constituents (cyanidin, delphinidin, malvidin, trans-resveratrol, and procyanidin B2). 661 W cell viability was assessed using a tetrazolium salt (WST-8) assay and Hoechst 33342 nuclear staining, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was determined using CM-H2DCFDA after blue LED light exposure. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and LC3, an ubiquitin-like protein that is necessary for the formation of autophagosomes, were analyzed using Western blotting. Caspase-3/7 activation caused by blue LED light exposure in 661 W cells was determined using a caspase-3/7 assay kit. B-ext, L-ext, NAC, and their active components improved the viability of 661 W cells and inhibited the generation of intracellular ROS induced by blue LED light irradiation. Furthermore, B-ext and L-ext inhibited the activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB induced by blue LED light exposure. Finally, B-ext, L-ext, and NAC inhibited caspase-3/7 activation and autophagy. These findings suggest that B-ext and L-ext containing high amounts of polyphenols exert protective effects against blue LED light-induced retinal photoreceptor cell damage mainly through inhibition of ROS production and activation of

  15. Protective effects of bilberry and lingonberry extracts against blue light-emitting diode light-induced retinal photoreceptor cell damage in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Blue light is a high-energy or short-wavelength visible light, which induces retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) contain high amounts of polyphenols (anthocyanins, resveratrol, and proanthocyanidins) and thus confer health benefits. This study aimed to determine the protective effects and mechanism of action of bilberry extract (B-ext) and lingonberry extract (L-ext) and their active components against blue light-emitting diode (LED) light-induced retinal photoreceptor cell damage. Methods Cultured murine photoreceptor (661 W) cells were exposed to blue LED light following treatment with B-ext, L-ext, or their constituents (cyanidin, delphinidin, malvidin, trans-resveratrol, and procyanidin B2). 661 W cell viability was assessed using a tetrazolium salt (WST-8) assay and Hoechst 33342 nuclear staining, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was determined using CM-H2DCFDA after blue LED light exposure. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and LC3, an ubiquitin-like protein that is necessary for the formation of autophagosomes, were analyzed using Western blotting. Caspase-3/7 activation caused by blue LED light exposure in 661 W cells was determined using a caspase-3/7 assay kit. Results B-ext, L-ext, NAC, and their active components improved the viability of 661 W cells and inhibited the generation of intracellular ROS induced by blue LED light irradiation. Furthermore, B-ext and L-ext inhibited the activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB induced by blue LED light exposure. Finally, B-ext, L-ext, and NAC inhibited caspase-3/7 activation and autophagy. Conclusions These findings suggest that B-ext and L-ext containing high amounts of polyphenols exert protective effects against blue LED light-induced retinal photoreceptor cell damage mainly through inhibition

  16. Role of fractalkine/CX3CR1 interaction in light-induced photoreceptor degeneration through regulating retinal microglial activation and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excessive exposure to light enhances the progression and severity of some human retinal degenerative diseases. While retinal microglia are likely to be important in neuron damage associated with these diseases, the relationship between photoreceptor damage and microglial activation remains poorly understood. Some recent studies have indicated that the chemokine fractalkine is involved in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was performed to investigate the cross-talk between injured photoreceptors and activated retinal microglia, focusing on the role of fractalkine and its receptor CX3CR1 in light-induced photoreceptor degeneration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both in vivo and in vitro experiments were involved in the research. In vivo, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to blue light for 24 hours. In vitro, the co-culture of primary retinal microglia and a photoreceptor cell line (661W cell was exposed to blue light for five hours. Some cultures were pretreated by the addition of anti-CX3CR1 neutralizing antibody or recombinant fractalkine. Expression of fractalkine/CX3CR1 and inflammatory cytokines was detected by immunofluorescence, real-time PCR, Western immunoblot analysis, and ELISA assay. TUNEL method was used to detect cell apoptosis. In addition, chemotaxis assay was performed to evaluate the impact of soluble fractalkine on microglial migration. Our results showed that the expression of fractalkine that was significantly upregulated after exposure to light, located mainly at the photoreceptors. The extent of photoreceptor degeneration and microglial migration paralleled the increased level of fractalkine/CX3CR1. Compared with the control, the expression of inflammatory cytokines was significantly downregulated in the anti-CX3CR1 neutralizing antibody-treated group, and the number of photoreceptors was also well preserved. The addition of recombinant full-length fractalkine or soluble

  17. Effect of Pt/C addition to TiO{sub 2} films on adhesion and rapid light-induced detachment of mammalian cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Kui; Wang, Xiaozhao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Weng, Wenjian, E-mail: wengwj@zju.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); The Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Lin, Jun; Wang, Huiming [The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China)

    2015-06-01

    Light-induced cell detachment on the substrate of TiO{sub 2} nanodots has been proved to be a safe and attractive method for cell harvesting in tissue engineering. In order to improve the cell release efficiency, bioinert platinum with excellent charge transport loading in biocompatible graphite was prepared. 20 wt.% Pt/C powder showing excellent electrical, chemical and bioactive properties was incorporated to a TiO{sub 2} system. We investigated the biocompatibility of Pt/C–TiO{sub 2} composite films with different amounts of Pt/C with C/tetrabutyl titanate molar ratio varying from 0 to 0.42. The adhesion and proliferation rates of pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells (mouse calvaria-derived) on the films prepared with the highest C/TiO{sub 2} molar ratio are higher than that of the pure TiO{sub 2} and other films, indicating a Pt/C dose-dependent effect. It is shown that the detachment efficiency of MC3T3-E1 cells depends on Pt/C amount and UV illumination time. Moreover, films prepared with C/tetrabutyl titanate molar ratio of 0.42 showed 93% cell detachment ratio within 5 min of UV illumination, while bare TiO{sub 2} films only reached 75%, indicating an improved cell release efficiency by the incorporation of Pt/C. However, an interesting phenomenon was found that longer illumination time showed lower detachment ratios to some extent, which is contrary to our previous work. It is believed that this work presents the improved cell detachment efficiency by the incorporation of Pt/C. - Highlights: • Sol–gel preparation of Pt/C–TiO{sub 2} composite films • A dose-dependent effect of Pt/C for cell adhesion and proliferation behaviors was found. • Pt/C incorporation improves the efficiency of light induced cell detachment on TiO{sub 2} films.

  18. Modeling the light-induced electric potential difference ΔΨ across the thylakoid membrane based on the transition state rate theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Hui; Lazár, Dušan

    2017-03-01

    In photosynthesis, electron transport-coupled proton movement initiates the formation of the light-induced electric potential difference, ΔΨ, across the thylakoid membrane (TM). Ions are transported across the TM to counterbalance the charge of protons accumulated in the lumen. The objective of this work is to construct range of mathematical models for simulation of ΔΨ, using the transition state rate theory (TSRT) for description of movement of ions through the channels. The TSRT considers either single-ion (TSRT-SI) or multi-ion occupancy (TSRT-MI) in the channels. Movement of ions through the channel pore is described by means of energy barriers and binding sites; ions move in and out of vacant sites with rate constants that depend on the barrier heights and well depths, as well as on the interionic repulsion in TSRT-MI model. Three energy motifs are used to describe the TSRT-SI model: two-barrier one-site (2B1S), three-barrier two-site (3B2S), and four-barrier three-site (4B3S). The 3B2S energy motif is used for the TSRT-MI model. The accumulation of cations due to the TM surface negative fixed charges is also taken into account. A model employing the electro-diffusion theory instead of the TSRT is constructed for comparison. The dual wavelength transmittance signal (ΔA515-560nm) measuring the electrochromic shift (ECS) provides a proxy for experimental light-induced ΔΨ. The simulated ΔΨ traces qualitatively agree with the measured ECS traces. The models can simulate different channel conducting regimes and assess their impact on ΔΨ. The ionic flux coupling in the TSRT-MI model suggests that an increase in the internal or external K + concentration may block the outward or the inward Mg 2+ current, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cooperative phenomena in flows; Poster abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loekseth, Trine (ed.)

    2011-05-15

    The objective of this 'Geilo School' was to bring together researchers with various interests and background including theoretical experimental physicists, material scientists and molecular biologists to identify and discuss areas where synergism between these disciplines may be most fruitfully applied to the study of various aspects of 'Cooperative phenomena in flows'. There were altogether 21 lecturers at the School with about 80 participants from 19 countries. This was the 21. Geilo School held biannually since the first one in I971. Reference to the earlier Geilo Schools 1971-2009 may be found here: http://www.ife.no/departments/physics/projects/geilo (Author)

  20. Light induces translocation of NF-κB p65 to the mitochondria and suppresses expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COX III) in the rat retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Hiroshi; Tabata, Kitako; Takahashi, Maki; Nishiyama, Fumiaki; Sugano, Eriko

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) plays various roles in cell survival, apoptosis, and inflammation. In the rat retina, NF-κB activity increases after exposure to damaging light, resulting in degeneration of photoreceptors. Here, we report that in dark-adapted rats exposed for 6 h to bright white light, the p65 subunit of retinal NF-κB translocates to the mitochondria, an event associated with a decrease in expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COX III). However, sustained exposure for 12 h depleted p65 from the mitochondria, and enhanced COX III expression. Treatment with the protective antioxidant PBN prior to light exposure prevents p65 depletion in the mitochondria and COX III upregulation during prolonged exposure, and apoptosis in photoreceptor cells. These results indicate that COX III expression is sensitive to the abundance of NF-κB p65 in the mitochondria, which, in turn, is affected by exposure to damaging light. - Highlights: • Damaging light exposure of the retina induces NF-κB p65 mitochondrial translocation. • NF-κB p65 mitochondrial translocation is associated with the decrease of COX III expression. • Prolonged light exposure depletes mitochondrial p65 resulting in the increase in COX III expression. • NF-κB p65 and COX III expression play an important role in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration.

  1. Preparation and visible light-induced photo-catalytic activity of H-PVA/TiO2 composite loaded on glass via sol-gel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuanqing; Zhang, Jianling; Yang, Haigang; Xu, Shoubin; Jiang, Long; Dan, Yi

    2014-02-01

    Sol-gel method was used to prepare polyvinyl alcohol/titanium dioxide (PVA/TiO2) composite films on glass slide, then the heat-treated polyvinyl alcohol/titanium dioxide (H-PVA/TiO2) composite loaded on glass and used as photo-catalyst was prepared by calcinating the precursor. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractionscopy (XRD), ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflection spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy (RAM) and fluorescence emission spectroscopy (FL) were used to characterize H-PVA/TiO2 composites. The visible light-induced photo-catalytic activities of the obtained composites prepared by different heat-treated temperature and different composition were examined through investigating the decolouration of rhodamine B (RhB) solution under visible light irradiation in the presence of the composites by means of UV-vis measurement. The results show that under the visible light irradiation, the H-PVA/TiO2 composite can make rhodamine B be degraded more efficiently than the PVA/TiO2 composite does, and the visible light photo-catalytic activity obviously depends on the heat-treated temperature and the composite composition. The 180 °C of heat-treated temperature and the 16.7 mass% of polymer content are beneficial for enhancing the efficiency of H-PVA/TiO2 of degrading RhB.

  2. Effect of Percent Relative Humidity, Moisture Content, and Compression Force on Light-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) Response as a Process Analytical Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ishan G; Stagner, William C

    2016-08-01

    The effect of percent relative humidity (16-84% RH), moisture content (4.2-6.5% w/w MC), and compression force (4.9-44.1 kN CF) on the light-induced fluorescence (LIF) response of 10% w/w active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) compacts is reported. The fluorescent response was evaluated using two separate central composite designs of experiments. The effect of % RH and CF on the LIF signal was highly significant with an adjusted R (2)  = 0.9436 and p relative humidity (p = 0.0022), CF (p < 0.0001), and % RH(2) (p = 0.0237) were statistically significant factors affecting the LIF response. The effects of MC and CF on LIF response were also statistically significant with a p value <0.0001 and adjusted R (2) value of 0.9874. The LIF response was highly impacted by MC (p < 0.0001), CF (p < 0.0001), and MC(2) (p = 0022). At 10% w/w API, increased % RH, MC, and CF led to a nonlinear decrease in LIF response. The derived quadratic model equations explained more than 94% of the data. Awareness of these effects on LIF response is critical when implementing LIF as a process analytical tool.

  3. Enhancing the vitamin B12 production and growth of Propionibacterium freudenreichii in tofu wastewater via a light-induced vitamin B12 riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Zhu, Xuan; Shen, Yubiao; Yao, Huanghong; Wang, Peiheng; Ye, Kun; Wang, Xiaofeng; Gu, Qing

    2015-12-01

    The vitamin B12-dependent riboswitch is a crucial factor that regulates gene transcription to mediate the growth of and vitamin B12 synthesis by Propionibacterium freudenreichii. In this study, the effect of various wavelengths of light on the growth rate and vitamin B12 synthesis was studied. Red, green, and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were selected, and a dark condition was used as the control. The microorganism growth rate was measured using a spectrophotometer and plate counting, while the vitamin B12 content was determined using an HPLC-based method. The optical density at 600 nm (OD600) values indicated that P. freudenreichii grew better under the continuous and discontinuous blue light conditions. Moreover, under the blue light condition, P. freudenreichii tended to have a higher growth rate (0.332 h(-1)) and vitamin B12 synthesis (ca. 10 μg/mL) in tofu wastewater than in dark conditions. HPLC analysis also showed that more methylcobalamin was produced under the blue light conditions than in the other conditions. The cbiB gene transcription results showed that blue light induced the synthesis of this vitamin B12 synthesis enzyme. Moreover, the results of inhibiting the expression of green fluorescent protein indicated that blue light removed the inhibition by the vitamin B12-dependent riboswitch. This method can be used to reduce fermentation time and produce more vitamin B12 in tofu wastewater.

  4. Out-of-Phase Electron Spin Echo Studies of Light-Induced Charge-Transfer States in P3HT/PCBM Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, Ekaterina A; Popov, Alexander A; Uvarov, Mikhail N; Kulik, Leonid V

    2015-10-29

    The light-induced charge-transfer (CT) state in the composite of the conductive polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and the fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) has been studied by electron spin echo (ESE) spectroscopy. The out-of-phase ESE signal corresponding to the spin-correlated radical pair P3HT(+)/PCBM(-) has been observed in this composite material. The time-domain ESE shape for different delays between the laser flash and the microwave pulse sequence has been analyzed. In order to explain the evolution of the out-of-phase ESE signal as a function of the delay between the microwave pulses, a model of the CT state is proposed. The hole is assumed to be delocalized on the P3HT chain over several thiophene subunits, while the point-dipole approximation is used to describe the interaction with the electron on PCBM. The distribution of distances between the positive and negative charges in the CT state has been evaluated.

  5. Light-induced Variation in Phenolic Compounds in Cabernet Sauvignon Grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) Involves Extensive Transcriptome Reprogramming of Biosynthetic Enzymes, Transcription Factors, and Phytohormonal Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Run-Ze; Cheng, Guo; Li, Qiang; He, Yan-Nan; Wang, Yu; Lan, Yi-Bin; Li, Si-Yu; Zhu, Yan-Rong; Song, Wen-Feng; Zhang, Xue; Cui, Xiao-Di; Chen, Wu; Wang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Light environments have long been known to influence grape ( Vitis vinifera L.) berry development and biosynthesis of phenolic compounds, and ultimately affect wine quality. Here, the accumulation and compositional changes of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) and flavonoids, as well as global gene expression were analyzed in Cabernet Sauvignon grape berries under sunlight exposure treatments at different phenological stages. Sunlight exposure did not consistently affect the accumulation of berry skin flavan-3-ol or anthocyanin among different seasons due to climatic variations, but increased HCA content significantly at véraison and harvest, and enhanced flavonol accumulation dramatically with its timing and severity degree trend. As in sunlight exposed berries, a highly significant correlation was observed between the expression of genes coding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, 4-coumarate: CoA ligase, flavanone 3-hydroxylase and flavonol synthase family members and corresponding metabolite accumulation in the phenolic biosynthesis pathway, which may positively or negatively be regulated by MYB, bHLH, WRKY, AP2/EREBP, C2C2, NAC, and C2H2 transcription factors (TFs). Furthermore, some candidate genes required for auxin, ethylene and abscisic acid signal transductions were also identified which are probably involved in berry development and flavonoid biosynthesis in response to enhanced sunlight irradiation. Taken together, this study provides a valuable overview of the light-induced phenolic metabolism and transcriptome changes, especially the dynamic responses of TFs and signaling components of phytohormones, and contributes to the further understanding of sunlight-responsive phenolic biosynthesis regulation in grape berries.

  6. Monitoring the maturation process of a dental microcosm biofilm using the Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence-Digital (QLF-D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Seok; Lee, Eun-Song; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Baek-Il

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence-Digital (QLF-D) could monitor the degree of maturation of dental microcosm biofilms by observing the red fluorescence emitted from the biofilms. Dental microcosm the biofilms were grown on bovine enamel discs. They were initiated from human saliva, and then grown in 0.5% sucrose growth media for 10 days. On days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 10 after the inoculation, fluorescence images of the biofilms were captured using the QLF-D and the red fluorescence intensity was quantified by calculating the red/green ratio (R/G value). Total and aciduric bacteria within the biofilms were counted, and the degree of demineralization was evaluated by measuring the percentage of surface microhardness change (ΔVHN) and lesion depth in the enamel. The R/G values of the biofilms assessed by the QLF-D increased significantly over time up to 7 days after inoculation (pbiofilm maturation and was significantly associated with the cariogenicity of the biofilm. Therefore, this device could be used to monitor the degree of biofilm maturation by observing the red fluorescence emitted from cariogenic biofilms. The QLF-D enables the detection of a mature dental plaque and monitoring of its cariogenic status by observing the plaque fluorescence non-destructively, in real time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between the cariogenicity of a dental microcosm biofilm and its red fluorescence detected by Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence-Digital (QLF-D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Song; Kang, Si-Mook; Ko, Hae-Youn; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Baek-Il

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated whether Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence-Digital (QLF-D) can detect the levels of cariogenicity of dental microcosm biofilms by assessing the red fluorescence intensity. Dental microcosm biofilms were initiated from human saliva on bovine enamel discs. Biofilms with various levels of cariogenicity were then grown in artificial saliva supplemented with sucrose at different concentrations (0.05%, 0.1%, 0.2%, and 0.5%) in 24-well microplates. After 10 days, fluorescence images of the biofilms were captured by the QLF-D to analyse the red fluorescence intensity, which was quantified as the red/green ratio (R/G value). The supernatant pH was also measured, as well as the total and aciduric bacteria counts of the collected biofilms. Mineral loss in enamel was also evaluated by calculating the percentage of surface microhardness changes (%SHC). The R/G values of the biofilms differed significantly with the sucrose concentration (pdental microcosm biofilms in vitro, which indicates that this device can be used to detect the levels of cariogenicity of a dental biofilm. The QLF-D is able to assess the cariogenic levels of dental plaque based on the intensity of red fluorescence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of few-layer 1T-MoSe{sub 2} and its superior performance in the visible-light induced hydrogen evolution reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Uttam; Naidu, B. S.; Maitra, Urmimala; Rao, C. N. R., E-mail: cnrrao@jncasr.ac.in [Chemistry and Physics Materials Unit, New Chemistry Unit and International Centre for Materials Science, Sheik Saqr Laboratory, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P. O., Bangalore 560064 (India); Singh, Anjali; Shirodkar, Sharmila N.; Waghmare, Umesh V. [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P. O., Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2014-09-01

    Based on earlier results on the photocatalytic properties of MoS{sub 2}, the 1T form of MoSe{sub 2}, prepared by lithium intercalation and exfoliation of bulk MoSe{sub 2}, has been employed for the visible-light induced generation of hydrogen. 1T-MoSe{sub 2} is found to be superior to both 2H and 1T MoS{sub 2} as well as 2H-MoSe{sub 2} in producing hydrogen from water, the yield being in the 60–75 mmol h{sup −1} g{sup −1} range with a turn over frequency of 15–19 h{sup −1}. First principles calculations reveal that 1T-MoSe{sub 2} has a lower work function than 2H-MoSe{sub 2} as well as 1T and 2H-MoS{sub 2}, making it easier to transfer an electron from 1T-MoSe{sub 2} for the production of H{sub 2}.

  9. Synthesis and visible-light-induced catalytic activity of Ag{sub 2}S-coupled TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Yi; Heo, Sung Hwan; Kim, Yong Nam; Yoo, Seung Hwa; Cho, Sung Oh, E-mail: socho@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 373-1 Guseong, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-08

    We present the synthesis and visible-light-induced catalytic activity of Ag{sub 2}S-coupled TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) and TiO{sub 2} nanowires (NWs). Through a simple wet chemical process from a mixture of peroxo titanic acid (PTA) solution, thiourea and AgAc, a composite of Ag{sub 2}S NPs and TiO{sub 2} NPs with sizes of less than 7 nm was formed. When the NP composite was further treated with NaOH solution followed by annealing at ambient conditions, a new nanocomposite material comprising Ag{sub 2}S NPs on TiO{sub 2} NWs was created. Due to the coupling with such a low bandgap material as Ag{sub 2}S, the TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites could have a visible-light absorption capability much higher than that of pure TiO{sub 2}. As a result, the synthesized Ag{sub 2}S/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites exhibited much higher catalytic efficiency for the decomposition of methyl orange than commercial TiO{sub 2} (Degussa P25, Germany) under visible light.

  10. Editor's Highlight: Periodic Exposure to Smartphone-Mimic Low-Luminance Blue Light Induces Retina Damage Through Bcl-2/BAX-Dependent Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Hui; Wu, Man-Ru; Li, Ching-Hao; Cheng, Hui-Wen; Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Tsai, Chi-Hao; Lin, Fan-Li; Ho, Jau-Der; Kang, Jaw-Jou; Hsiao, George; Cheng, Yu-Wen

    2017-05-01

    Blue light-induced phototoxicity plays an important role in retinal degeneration and might cause damage as a consequence of smartphone dependency. Here, we investigated the effects of periodic exposure to blue light-emitting diode in a cell model and a rat retinal damage model. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells were subjected to blue light in vitro and the effects of blue light on activation of key apoptotic pathways were examined by measuring the levels of Bcl-2, Bax, Fas ligand (FasL), Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD), and caspase-3 protein. Blue light treatment of RPE cells increased Bax, cleaved caspase-3, FasL, and FADD expression, inhibited Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL accumulation, and inhibited Bcl-2/Bax association. A rat model of retinal damage was developed with or without continuous or periodic exposure to blue light for 28 days. In this rat model of retinal damage, periodic blue light exposure caused fundus damage, decreased total retinal thickness, caused atrophy of photoreceptors, and injured neuron transduction in the retina. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Light-induced root hair formation in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Grand Rapids) roots at low pH is brought by chlorogenic acid synthesis and sugar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukawa, Megumi; Watanabe, Keiji; Inoue, Yasunori

    2010-11-01

    Previously, we reported that chlorogenic acid (CGA) facilitated root hair formation at pH 4.0 in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Grand Rapids). Light was essential for this process. In the present study, we determined relationships between CGA, light, and sugar during root hair formation in lettuce seedlings. The amount of CGA increased with white light in intact seedlings. Exogenously applied CGA restored root hair formation in dark-grown intact seedlings at pH 4.0. However, no root hair formation was induced in decapitated seedlings regardless of light exposure and CGA application. Application of sucrose or glucose induced both root hair formation and CGA synthesis in light-grown decapitated seedlings at pH 4.0. Blue light was the most effective for both root hair formation and CGA synthesis when supplied with sucrose to decapitated seedlings. Addition of sucrose and CGA together induced root hair formation at pH 4.0 in dark-grown decapitated seedlings. Results suggest that light induced CGA synthesis from sugar in the roots. Sugar was also required for root hair formation other than starting material of CGA synthesis. In addition, an unknown low pH-induced factor was essential for lettuce root hair formation.

  12. Light-induced electron paramagnetic resonance evidence of charge transfer in electrospun fibers containing conjugated polymer/fullerene and conjugated polymer/fullerene/carbon nanotube blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shames, Alexander I.; Bounioux, Celine; Katz, Eugene A.; Yerushalmi-Rozen, Rachel; Zussman, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Electrospun sub-micron fibers containing conjugated polymer (poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT) with a fullerene derivative, phenyl-C61-butyric acid methylester (PCBM) or a mixture of PCBM and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were studied by light-induced electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results provide experimental evidence of electron transfer between PCBM and P3HT components in both fiber systems and suggest that the presence of a dispersing block-copolymer, which acts via physical adsorption onto the PCBM and SWCNT moieties, does not prevent electron transfer at the P3HT-PCBM interface. These findings suggest a research perspective towards utilization of fibers of functional nanocomposites in fiber-based organic optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices. The latter can be developed in the textile-type large area photovoltaics or individual fiber-based solar cells that will broaden energy applications from macro-power tools to micro-nanoscale power conversion devices and smart textiles.

  13. Light induces translocation of NF-κB p65 to the mitochondria and suppresses expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COX III) in the rat retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Hiroshi, E-mail: htomita@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Soft-Path Engineering Research Center (SPERC), Faculty of Science and Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Clinical Research, Innovation and Education Center, Tohoku University Hospital, 1-1 Seiryo, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8574 (Japan); Tabata, Kitako, E-mail: ktabata@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Takahashi, Maki, E-mail: mqdelta@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Nishiyama, Fumiaki, E-mail: t2114018@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Sugano, Eriko, E-mail: sseriko@iwate-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Visual Neuroscience, Graduate Course in Biological Sciences, Iwate University Division of Science and Engineering, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Soft-Path Engineering Research Center (SPERC), Faculty of Science and Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) plays various roles in cell survival, apoptosis, and inflammation. In the rat retina, NF-κB activity increases after exposure to damaging light, resulting in degeneration of photoreceptors. Here, we report that in dark-adapted rats exposed for 6 h to bright white light, the p65 subunit of retinal NF-κB translocates to the mitochondria, an event associated with a decrease in expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COX III). However, sustained exposure for 12 h depleted p65 from the mitochondria, and enhanced COX III expression. Treatment with the protective antioxidant PBN prior to light exposure prevents p65 depletion in the mitochondria and COX III upregulation during prolonged exposure, and apoptosis in photoreceptor cells. These results indicate that COX III expression is sensitive to the abundance of NF-κB p65 in the mitochondria, which, in turn, is affected by exposure to damaging light. - Highlights: • Damaging light exposure of the retina induces NF-κB p65 mitochondrial translocation. • NF-κB p65 mitochondrial translocation is associated with the decrease of COX III expression. • Prolonged light exposure depletes mitochondrial p65 resulting in the increase in COX III expression. • NF-κB p65 and COX III expression play an important role in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration.

  14. Intracellular photoreceptive site for blue light-induced cell division in protonemata of the fern Adiantum [Pteridophyta]: Further analyses by polarized light irradiation and cell centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadota, A.; Fushimi, Y.; Wada, M.

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular localization of the photoreceptive site for blue light-induced cell division in single-celled protonemata of Adiantum capillus-veneris L. was investigated using polarized light irradiation and protonemal cell centrifugation. The response to irradiation with polarized blue light showed no dependence on the direction of light polarization. However, centrifugation of the protonemata followed by microbeam irradiation showed that the site of blue light perception could be displaced together with the nucleus. Centrifugal treatment changed the distribution of intracellular organelles at the time of light exposure and basipetally displaced the nucleus about 90μm. This treatment had no effect on the induction of cell division with blue light if the protonemata were centrifuged again acropetally after the light treatment. Microbeam (30×30 μm2) irradiation with blue light of the apical 45–75 βm region, the receptive site of blue light in non-centrifuged cell, did not induce cell division. However, cell division was induced by irradiation of the nucleus-containing region, indicating that the photoreceptive site was displaced together with the nucleus by the centrifugation. These results suggest that the blue light receptor regulating cell division in Adiantum protonemata is not likely to be located on the plasma membrane. (author)

  15. Effect of an oral health education program based on the use of quantitative light-induced fluorescence technology in Uzbekistan adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudanov, Bakhtinur; Jung, Hoi In; Kahharova, Dono; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Hamidov, Ilhom; Lee, Eun-Song; Kim, Baek-Il

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an oral health education program using a Qscan device based on quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) technology could improve the oral hygiene status and oral health literacy of adolescents. One hundred adolescents aged 14-16 years attending a school in Tashkent city were included in this study. The participants were assigned to the following two groups using permuted block randomization technique: (i) control group (traditional learning) and (ii) experimental group (Qscan device-based learning). The participants included in the experimental group received additional education and training on dental plaque removal using the Qscan device. The accumulated levels of plaque were assessed in all participants, who also completed questionnaires about their oral health status, oral health knowledge, attitude, and behavior during an 8-week period. There were statistically significant improvements in the experimental group compared to the control group in the plaque index (0.46 vs 0.07, p technology could be useful for improving the oral hygiene status and oral health literacy of adolescents in Uzbekistan. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Precompetitive cooperative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holton, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that in the current worldwide technology environment, it is essential for the U.S. microelectronics industry, and especially for the integrated circuit portion of that industry, that precompetitive cooperative research alliances be formed and funded at a level that enables them to be effective in rapidly advancing technology. It is important to realize that technology advances with or without our direct participation. If we do not aggressively participate we are quickly left behind. Increasing complexity and miniaturization have been the themes in semiconductor technology. Many are aware that what began in the early 60's with a few masking steps and minimum dimensions measured in mils, has now evolved to a level of sophistication requiring a 100 MIP workstation for IC design and the investment of nearly $400 million dollars in fab cost to produce today's microchips. The leading nations of the world have come to realize that their future well- being is closely tied to their ability to compete in this hi- tech environment. Industry coalitions have been formed to exploit the early ramifications of emerging technologies. Improvements in overseas manufacturing have been made and continue unabated with new products, new processes, and new services being introduced at an increasing rate. Many foreign governments are now actively involved in formulating and conducting industrial and technology policies to aid their hi-tech industry. To meet these challenges, U.S. firms, with U.S. government cooperation, must respond

  17. Metal-ligand cooperation by aromatization-dearomatization as a tool in single bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstein, David

    2015-03-13

    Metal-ligand cooperation (MLC) plays an important role in bond activation processes, enabling many chemical and biological catalytic reactions. A recent new mode of activation of chemical bonds involves ligand aromatization-dearomatization processes in pyridine-based pincer complexes in which chemical bonds are broken reversibly across the metal centre and the pincer-ligand arm, leading to new bond-making and -breaking processes, and new catalysis. In this short review, such processes are briefly exemplified in the activation of C-H, H-H, O-H, N-H and B-H bonds, and mechanistic insight is provided. This new bond activation mode has led to the development of various catalytic reactions, mainly based on alcohols and amines, and to a stepwise approach to thermal H2 and light-induced O2 liberation from water. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Teleworking through cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Minervini

    2006-07-01

    scheme is strictly connected to new technologies and cooperation is an important dimension of teleworking. In our study, cooperation is found performed both in social relations between employers and employees and in institutionalized relations between managers and unions. Although the two forms of cooperation, here called “social trustee cooperation” and “institutional cooperation”, are often thought as prerequisites of “best practices” of new working arrangements, our case studies demonstrate that cooperation has not always arisen that make possible to implement practices of teleworking. By focusing on cooperative relations, the results of different case studies in industry and in the service sector are discussed, thus intending to contribute to the development of sociological debate on telework.

  19. Models in cooperative game theory

    CERN Document Server

    Branzei, Rodica; Tijs, Stef

    2008-01-01

    This book investigates models in cooperative game theory in which the players have the possibility to cooperate partially. In a crisp game the agents are either fully involved or not involved at all in cooperation with some other agents, while in a fuzzy game players are allowed to cooperate with infinite many different participation levels, varying from non-cooperation to full cooperation. A multi-choice game describes the intermediate case in which each player may have a fixed number of activity levels. Different set and one-point solution concepts for these games are presented. The properties of these solution concepts and their interrelations on several classes of crisp, fuzzy, and multi-choice games are studied. Applications of the investigated models to many economic situations are indicated as well. The second edition is highly enlarged and contains new results and additional sections in the different chapters as well as one new chapter.

  20. ITDB Cooperation With International Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    IAEA illicit trafficking database cooperates with many international organizations. Among these organizations are Interpol, Universal Postal Union,and World Customs Organization. Other organizations are Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, UN Economic Commission for Europe, UN-Department of Disarmament Affairs and UN office for Drug and Crime. The cooperation with Interpol involves consultations on issues of training and technical assistance and other matters of common interest.

  1. The Professionalization of Intelligence Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Adam David Morgan

    "Providing an in-depth insight into the subject of intelligence cooperation (officially known as liason), this book explores the complexities of this process. Towards facilitating a general understanding of the professionalization of intelligence cooperation, Svendsen's analysis includes risk...... management and encourages the realisation of greater resilience. Svendsen discusses the controversial, mixed and uneven characterisations of the process of the professionalization of intelligence cooperation and argues for a degree of 'fashioning method out of mayhem' through greater operational...

  2. Light-induced olefin metathesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidavsky, Yuval

    2010-01-01

    Summary Light activation is a most desirable property for catalysis control. Among the many catalytic processes that may be activated by light, olefin metathesis stands out as both academically motivating and practically useful. Starting from early tungsten heterogeneous photoinitiated metathesis, up to modern ruthenium methods based on complex photoisomerisation or indirect photoactivation, this survey of the relevant literature summarises past and present developments in the use of light to expedite olefin ring-closing, ring-opening polymerisation and cross-metathesis reactions. PMID:21160912

  3. Light-induced olefin metathesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Vidavsky

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Light activation is a most desirable property for catalysis control. Among the many catalytic processes that may be activated by light, olefin metathesis stands out as both academically motivating and practically useful. Starting from early tungsten heterogeneous photoinitiated metathesis, up to modern ruthenium methods based on complex photoisomerisation or indirect photoactivation, this survey of the relevant literature summarises past and present developments in the use of light to expedite olefin ring-closing, ring-opening polymerisation and cross-metathesis reactions.

  4. Light-induced olefin metathesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yuval Vidavsky; N. Gabriel Lemcoff

    2010-01-01

    Summary Light activation is a most desirable property for catalysis control. Among the many catalytic processes that may be activated by light, olefin metathesis stands out as both academically motivating and practically useful. Starting from early tungsten heterogeneous photoinitiated metathesis, up to modern ruthenium methods based on complex photoisomerisation or indirect photoactivation, this survey of the relevant literature summarises past and present developments in the use of light to...

  5. Cooperative tumour cell membrane targeted phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heegon; Lee, Junsung; Oh, Chanhee; Park, Ji-Ho

    2017-06-01

    The targeted delivery of therapeutics using antibodies or nanomaterials has improved the precision and safety of cancer therapy. However, the paucity and heterogeneity of identified molecular targets within tumours have resulted in poor and uneven distribution of targeted agents, thus compromising treatment outcomes. Here, we construct a cooperative targeting system in which synthetic and biological nanocomponents participate together in the tumour cell membrane-selective localization of synthetic receptor-lipid conjugates (SR-lipids) to amplify the subsequent targeting of therapeutics. The SR-lipids are first delivered selectively to tumour cell membranes in the perivascular region using fusogenic liposomes. By hitchhiking with extracellular vesicles secreted by the cells, the SR-lipids are transferred to neighbouring cells and further spread throughout the tumour tissues where the molecular targets are limited. We show that this tumour cell membrane-targeted delivery of SR-lipids leads to uniform distribution and enhanced phototherapeutic efficacy of the targeted photosensitizer.

  6. Regional cooperation in transportation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    As Floridas urbanized areas grow and merge, : neighboring jurisdictions experience interrelated : problems and opportunities, and regional : cooperation becomes an imperative. In the : transportation sector, Floridas metropolitan : planning org...

  7. Social heuristics shape intuitive cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, David G; Peysakhovich, Alexander; Kraft-Todd, Gordon T; Newman, George E; Wurzbacher, Owen; Nowak, Martin A; Greene, Joshua D

    2014-04-22

    Cooperation is central to human societies. Yet relatively little is known about the cognitive underpinnings of cooperative decision making. Does cooperation require deliberate self-restraint? Or is spontaneous prosociality reined in by calculating self-interest? Here we present a theory of why (and for whom) intuition favors cooperation: cooperation is typically advantageous in everyday life, leading to the formation of generalized cooperative intuitions. Deliberation, by contrast, adjusts behaviour towards the optimum for a given situation. Thus, in one-shot anonymous interactions where selfishness is optimal, intuitive responses tend to be more cooperative than deliberative responses. We test this 'social heuristics hypothesis' by aggregating across every cooperation experiment using time pressure that we conducted over a 2-year period (15 studies and 6,910 decisions), as well as performing a novel time pressure experiment. Doing so demonstrates a positive average effect of time pressure on cooperation. We also find substantial variation in this effect, and show that this variation is partly explained by previous experience with one-shot lab experiments.

  8. Successful Industry/Academia Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The control literature is rich on impressive applications of advanced control, and within almost any industrial sector there are numerous examples of successful advanced control applications. Nevertheless, there is a widespread belief that there is still a wide potential for increased cooperation...... between academia and industry within this area. In this position paper, it is advocated that one of the enablers for successful cooperation between industry and academia within the control area is a proper framework for cooperation projects between companies and universities. Some suggestions...... by less complex but industrially feasible solutions. The proposed approach is illustrated by three case studies of successful industrial/academic cooperation....

  9. Cooperation--not confrontation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-06

    A brief summary is provided of several presentations at the Fifth Congress of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW), held 28 June to 1 July 1985 in Budapest. Former West German Chancellor Willy Brandt opened the meeting by reminding delegates that world peace is a fundamental human right, and that preserving it is the responsibility of all nations, not just the superpowers. The co-presidents of IPPNW, Dr. Eugene Chazov and Dr. Bernard Lown, outlined the dangers of nuclear warfare today and the role their organization is playing in alerting people to the realities of nuclear destruction and in encouraging dialogue between East and West. Dr. Halfdan Mahler, director-general of the World Health Organization, called for international cooperation in solving world health problems.

  10. The acute effects of light on murine sleep during the dark phase: importance of melanopsin for maintenance of light-induced sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muindi, Fanuel; Zeitzer, Jamie M; Colas, Damien; Heller, H Craig

    2013-06-01

    Light exerts a direct effect on sleep and wakefulness in nocturnal and diurnal animals, with a light pulse during the dark phase suppressing locomotor activity and promoting sleep in the former. In the present study, we investigated this direct effect of light on various sleep parameters by exposing mice to a broad range of illuminances (0.2-200 μW/cm(2) ; equivalent to 1-1000 lux) for 1 h during the dark phase (zeitgeber time 13-14). Fitting the data with a three-parameter log model indicated that ~0.1 μW/cm(2) can generate half the sleep response observed at 200 μW/cm(2). We observed decreases in total sleep time during the 1 h following the end of the light pulse. Light reduced the latency to sleep from ~30 min in darkness (baseline) to ~10 min at the highest intensity, although this effect was invariant across the light intensities used. We then assessed the role of melanopsin during the rapid transition from wakefulness to sleep at the onset of a light pulse and the maintenance of sleep with a 6-h 20 μW/cm(2) light pulse. Even though the melanopsin knockout mice had robust induction of sleep (~35 min) during the first hour of the pulse, it was not maintained. Total sleep decreased by almost 65% by the third hour in comparison with the first hour of the pulse in mice lacking melanopsin, whereas only an 8% decrease was observed in wild-type mice. Collectively, our findings highlight the selective effects of light on murine sleep, and suggest that melanopsin-based photoreception is primarily involved in sustaining light-induced sleep. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. A bipyridine-ligated zinc(II) complex with bridging flavonolate ligation: synthesis, characterization, and visible-light-induced CO release reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Shayne; Popova, Marina; Arif, Atta M; Berreau, Lisa M

    2017-09-01

    Metal-flavonolate compounds are of significant current interest as synthetic models for quercetinase enzymes and as bioactive compounds of importance to human health. Zinc-3-hydroxyflavonolate compounds, including those of quercetin, kampferol, and morin, generally exhibit bidentate coordination to a single Zn II center. The bipyridine-ligated zinc-flavonolate compound reported herein, namely bis(μ-4-oxo-2-phenyl-4H-chromen-3-olato)-κ 3 O 3 :O 3 ,O 4 ;κ 3 O 3 ,O 4 :O 3 -bis[(2,2'-bipyridine-κ 2 N,N')zinc(II)] bis(perchlorate), {[Zn 2 (C 15 H 9 O 3 ) 2 (C 10 H 8 N 2 ) 2 ](ClO 4 ) 2 } n , (1), provides an unusual example of bridging 3-hydroxyflavonolate ligation in a dinuclear metal complex. The symmetry-related Zn II centers of (1) exhibit a distorted octahedral geometry, with weak coordination of a perchlorate anion trans to the bridging deprotonated O atom of the flavonolate ligand. Variable-concentration conductivity measurements provide evidence that, when (1) is dissolved in CH 3 CN, the complex dissociates into monomers. 1 H NMR resonances for (1) dissolved in d 6 -DMSO were assigned via HMQC to the H atoms of the flavonolate and bipyridine ligands. In CH 3 CN, (1) undergoes quantitative visible-light-induced CO release with a quantum yield [0.004 (1)] similar to that exhibited by other mononuclear zinc-3-hydroxyflavonolate complexes. Mass spectroscopic identification of the [(bpy) 2 Zn(O-benzoylsalicylate)] + ion provides evidence of CO release from the flavonol and of ligand exchange at the Zn II center.

  12. Light-induced Variation in Phenolic Compounds in Cabernet Sauvignon Grapes (Vitis vinifera L. Involves Extensive Transcriptome Reprogramming of Biosynthetic Enzymes, Transcription Factors, and Phytohormonal Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Light environments have long been known to influence grape (Vitis vinifera L. berry development and biosynthesis of phenolic compounds, and ultimately affect wine quality. Here, the accumulation and compositional changes of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs and flavonoids, as well as global gene expression were analyzed in Cabernet Sauvignon grape berries under sunlight exposure treatments at different phenological stages. Sunlight exposure did not consistently affect the accumulation of berry skin flavan-3-ol or anthocyanin among different seasons due to climatic variations, but increased HCA content significantly at véraison and harvest, and enhanced flavonol accumulation dramatically with its timing and severity degree trend. As in sunlight exposed berries, a highly significant correlation was observed between the expression of genes coding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, 4-coumarate: CoA ligase, flavanone 3-hydroxylase and flavonol synthase family members and corresponding metabolite accumulation in the phenolic biosynthesis pathway, which may positively or negatively be regulated by MYB, bHLH, WRKY, AP2/EREBP, C2C2, NAC, and C2H2 transcription factors (TFs. Furthermore, some candidate genes required for auxin, ethylene and abscisic acid signal transductions were also identified which are probably involved in berry development and flavonoid biosynthesis in response to enhanced sunlight irradiation. Taken together, this study provides a valuable overview of the light-induced phenolic metabolism and transcriptome changes, especially the dynamic responses of TFs and signaling components of phytohormones, and contributes to the further understanding of sunlight-responsive phenolic biosynthesis regulation in grape berries.

  13. The effect of surface defects in early caries assessment using quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) and micro-digital-photography (MDP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meharry, M R; Dawson, D; Wefel, J S; Harless, J D; Kummet, C M; Xiao, X

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to consider the impact of surface defects on quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) and micro-digital-photography (MDP) measures, in relationship to lesion depth. Simulated enamel carious lesions were developed on 45 extracted human teeth. Images of each tooth were captured with both QLF and MDP. The teeth were sectioned and lesion depth was measured with polarized light microscopy (PLM). Pearson correlations were computed using data from the 27 lesions which did not have surface loss, and then separately based upon the 18 lesions which did display surface loss. MDP variables ΔR and ΔX measure reflected light, whereas QLF variables ΔF and ΔQ measure fluorescence. A strong correlation was identified between lesion depth and ΔF (r=-0.765, pMDP measures. QLF measures ΔF and ΔQ were strongly correlated with lesion depth in lab-simulated lesions with no surface loss, but not among lesions with surface defects. The two MDP-associated measures, ΔR and ΔX, could not be said to differ significantly when lesions with and without surface defects were compared with lesion depth. Because intact lesions can be remineralized, accurate assessment of their status is imperative for caries treatment. Dental caries is still widely prevalent today. We now know that with early stage detection, remineralization can be accomplished. Being able to identify dental caries in its reversible stage (before physical surface loss) is paramount for the clinician to be able to treat the disease non-invasively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Synergetics of molecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lupichev, Lev N; Kadantsev, Vasiliy N

    2014-01-01

    Synergetics is the quantitative study of multicomponent systems that exhibit nonlinear dynamics and cooperativity. This book specifically considers basic models of the nonlinear dynamics of molecular systems and discusses relevant applications in biological physics and the polymer sciences.Emphasis is placed on specific solutions to the dynamical equations that correspond to the coherent formation of spatial-temporal structures, such as solitons, kinks and breathers, in particular. The emergence of these patterns in molecular structures provides a variety of information on their structural pro

  15. Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy for studying the molecular mechanism of photosynthetic water oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-An eChu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The photosystem II reaction center mediates the light-induced transfer of electrons from water to plastoquinone, with concomitant production of O2. Water oxidation chemistry occurs in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC, which consists of an inorganic Mn4CaO5 cluster and its surrounding protein matrix. Light-induced Fourier transform infrared (FTIR difference spectroscopy has been successfully used to study the molecular mechanism of photosynthetic water oxidation. This powerful technique has enabled the characterization of the dynamic structural changes in active water molecules, the Mn4CaO5 cluster, and its surrounding protein matrix during the catalytic cycle. This mini-review presents an overview of recent important progress in FTIR studies of the OEC and implications for revealing the molecular mechanism of photosynthetic water oxidation.

  16. Marketing Cooperatives and Financial Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikse, G.W.J.; Veerman, C.P.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between the financial structure of marketing cooperatives and the requirement of the domination of control by the members of the cooperative is analysed with an emphasis on incomplete contracts and system complementarities. It is argued that the disappearance of shortage markets in

  17. Progress of international evaluation cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Keiichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    The international evaluation cooperation started to remove the differences among major nuclear data libraries such as JENDL, ENDF, and JEF. The results obtained from the cooperation have been used to improve the quality of the libraries. This paper describes the status of the ongoing projects and several remarkable results so far obtained from the projects already finished. (author)

  18. Does facial resemblance enhance cooperation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang Giang

    Full Text Available Facial self-resemblance has been proposed to serve as a kinship cue that facilitates cooperation between kin. In the present study, facial resemblance was manipulated by morphing stimulus faces with the participants' own faces or control faces (resulting in self-resemblant or other-resemblant composite faces. A norming study showed that the perceived degree of kinship was higher for the participants and the self-resemblant composite faces than for actual first-degree relatives. Effects of facial self-resemblance on trust and cooperation were tested in a paradigm that has proven to be sensitive to facial trustworthiness, facial likability, and facial expression. First, participants played a cooperation game in which the composite faces were shown. Then, likability ratings were assessed. In a source memory test, participants were required to identify old and new faces, and were asked to remember whether the faces belonged to cooperators or cheaters in the cooperation game. Old-new recognition was enhanced for self-resemblant faces in comparison to other-resemblant faces. However, facial self-resemblance had no effects on the degree of cooperation in the cooperation game, on the emotional evaluation of the faces as reflected in the likability judgments, and on the expectation that a face belonged to a cooperator rather than to a cheater. Therefore, the present results are clearly inconsistent with the assumption of an evolved kin recognition module built into the human face recognition system.

  19. Interinstitutional Cooperation Among Educational Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, J. Patrick

    1973-01-01

    Educational institutions deciding whether to carry on a cooperative venture with another educational institution (to reduce costs) must consider the tax consequences. This article discusses the tax considerations involved in such cooperative arrangements for the various organizational forms: principal-agent, co-ownership, partnership or joint…

  20. Generation Z, Meet Cooperative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igel, Charles; Urquhart, Vicki

    2012-01-01

    Today's Generation Z teens need to develop teamwork and social learning skills to be successful in the 21st century workplace. Teachers can help students develop these skills and enhance academic achievement by implementing cooperative learning strategies. Three key principles for successful cooperative learning are discussed. (Contains 1 figure.)

  1. Making Cooperative Learning Groups Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, James; De Jong, Cherie

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of cooperative-learning groups with middle school students. Describes cooperative-learning techniques, including group roles, peer evaluation, and observation and monitoring. Considers grouping options, including group size and configuration, dyads, the think-pair-share lecture, student teams achievement divisions, jigsaw groups,…

  2. Market Competition and Efficient Cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandts, J.; Riedl, Arno

    2016-01-01

    We find that in market-partners, market experience has adverse effects on the efficiency of cooperation on both market-winner and market-loser pairs. In market-strangers, pairs of market-winners manage to cooperate more efficiently. These results indicate that it is not market experience per se that

  3. Cooperative processes in image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, L. S.

    1982-01-01

    Research into the role of cooperative, or relaxation, processes in image segmentation is surveyed. Cooperative processes can be employed at several levels of the segmentation process as a preprocessing enhancement step, during supervised or unsupervised pixel classification and, finally, for the interpretation of image segments based on segment properties and relations.

  4. The early evolution of cooperation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czárán, T.; Aanen, Duur K.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of cooperation is difficult to understand, because cheaters-individuals who profit without cooperating themselves-have a benefit in interaction with cooperators. Cooperation among humans is even more difficult to understand, because cooperation occurs in large groups, making

  5. Molecular mechanisms controlling proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouch, Rosalie K.; Ebrey, Thomas G.

    2000-02-10

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is the simplest biological system for the transduction of light energy. Light energy is directly converted to transmembrane proton gradient by a single, small membrane protein. The extraordinary stability of bR makes it an outstanding subject for bioenergetic studies. This project has focused on the role of interactions between key residues of the pigment involved in light-induced proton transfer. Methods to estimate the strength of these interactions and their correlation with the rate and efficiency of proton transfer have been developed. The concept of the coupling of the protonation states of key groups has been applied to individual steps of the proton transfer with the ultimate goal of understanding on the molecular level the driving forces for proton transport and the pathway of the transported proton in bT. The mechanism of light-induced proton release, uptake and the mechanism of recovery of initial state of bT has been examined. The experiments were performed with genetically engineered, site-specific mutants of bR. This has enabled us to characterize the role of individual amino acid residues in bR. Time resolved and low temperature absorption spectroscopy and light-induced photocurrent measurements were used in order to study the photochemical cycle and proton transfer in mutant pigments. Chemical modification and crosslinking of both the specific amino acids to the chromophore or to other amino acids were used to elucidate the role of light-induced conformational changes in the photocycle and the structure of the protein in the ground state. The results of this project provided new knowledge on the architecture of the proton transfer pathways inside the protein, on the mechanism of proton release in bR, and on the role of specific amino acid residues in the structure and function of bR.

  6. Nuclear energy and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Keiichi

    1981-01-01

    There is no need to emphasize that nuclear energy cannot be developed without international cooperation at either the industrial or the academic level. In the meanwhile, there have been some marked political, economic and social changes in recent years which are posing constraints to the international cooperation in nuclear energy. The problems and constraints impeding nuclear power programs cannot be overcome by only one nation; international cooperation with common efforts to solve the problems is essential. Nuclear energy is different from fossil energy resources in that it is highly technology-intensive while others are resource-intensive. International cooperation in technology has an entirely different importance in the field of nuclear energy. Educational institutions will play a role in a new era of the international cooperation. (Mori, K.)

  7. Transparency in Cooperative Online Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Christian; Paulsen, Morten Flate

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the following question: What is the potential of social networking within cooperative online education? Social networking does not necessarily involve communication, dialogue, or collaboration. Instead, the authors argue that transparency is a unique...... feature of social networking services. Transparency gives students insight into each other’s actions. Cooperative learning seeks to develop virtual learning environments that allow students to have optimal individual freedom within online learning communities. This article demonstrates how cooperative...... learning can be supported by transparency. To illustrate this with current examples, the article presents NKI Distance Education’s surveys and experiences with cooperative learning. The article discusses by which means social networking and transparency may be utilized within cooperative online education...

  8. Non-cooperative game theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara-Greve, Takako

    2015-01-01

    This is a textbook for university juniors, seniors, and graduate students majoring in economics, applied mathematics, and related fields. Each chapter is structured so that a core concept of that chapter is presented with motivations, useful applications are given, and related advanced topics are discussed for future study. Many helpful exercises at various levels are provided at the end of each chapter. Therefore, this book is most suitable for readers who intend to study non-cooperative game theory rigorously for both theoretical studies and applications. Game theory consists of non-cooperative games and cooperative games. This book covers only non-cooperative games, which are major tools used in current economics and related areas. Non-cooperative game theory aims to provide a mathematical prediction of strategic choices by decision makers (players) in situations of conflicting interest. Through the logical analyses of strategic choices, we obtain a better understanding of social (economic, business) probl...

  9. Cross-border innovation cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjaltadóttir, Rannveig Edda; Makkonen, Teemu; Sørensen, Nils Karl

    2017-01-01

    of innovativeness increase the likelihood of cross-border innovation cooperation. Accordingly, geographical proximity to international borders is found to have a significant, positive effect on selecting partners within the European Union. The multivariate probit model shows that the decision of choosing a domestic......Finding a suitable partner is paramount for the success of innovation cooperation. Thus, this paper sets out to analyse the determinants of cross-border innovation cooperation in Denmark by focusing on partner selection. The aim of the article is to investigate determinants of partner selection...... cooperation patterns of Danish firms focusing on their choices of foreign innovation partners. The results indicate that firm size and research and development (R&D) intensity have a positive effect on firm’s propensity to cooperate on innovation and that having R&D activities abroad as well as high level...

  10. Formation of bioactive N-doped TiO2 on Ti with visible light-induced antibacterial activity using NaOH, hot water, and subsequent ammonia atmospheric heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashita, Masakazu; Endo, Naoko; Watanabe, Tomoaki; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Furuya, Maiko; Yokota, Kotoe; Abiko, Yuki; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Titanium (Ti) treated with NaOH and hot water, and heated in an ammmonia (NH3) gas atmosphere for 1 or 3h exhibited in vitro apatite formation within 7days when soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the treated Ti decomposed methylene blue and showed excellent bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli under visible light irradiation. The surface treatment resulted in the formation of a fine network of N-doped anatase-type titania (TiO2-xNx) on the Ti surface, which was responsible for both the apatite formation in SBF and the visible light-induced antibacterial activity. These preliminary results highlight the efficacy of our simple method for producing novel bioactive Ti with visible light-induced antibacterial activity, which could be applied to orthopaedic and dental implants without the risk of infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Disentangling overlapping high-field EPR spectra of organic radicals: Identification of light-induced polarons in the record fullerene-free solar cell blend PBDB-T:ITIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landeghem, Melissa; Maes, Wouter; Goovaerts, Etienne; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2018-03-01

    We present a combined high-field EPR and DFT study of light-induced radicals in the bulk heterojunction blend of PBDB-T:ITIC, currently one of the highest efficiency non-fullerene donor:acceptor combinations in organic photovoltaics. We demonstrate two different approaches for disentangling the strongly overlapping high-field EPR spectra of the positive and negative polarons after charge separation: (1) relaxation-filtered field-swept EPR based on the difference in T1 spin-relaxation times and (2) field-swept EDNMR-induced EPR by exploiting the presence of 14N hyperfine couplings in only one of the radical species, the small molecule acceptor radical. The approach is validated by light-induced EPR spectra on related blends and the spectral assignment is underpinned by DFT computations. The broader applicability of the spectral disentangling methods is discussed.

  12. The hard problem of cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Kimmo; Strimling, Pontus

    2012-01-01

    Based on individual variation in cooperative inclinations, we define the "hard problem of cooperation" as that of achieving high levels of cooperation in a group of non-cooperative types. Can the hard problem be solved by institutions with monitoring and sanctions? In a laboratory experiment we find that the answer is affirmative if the institution is imposed on the group but negative if development of the institution is left to the group to vote on. In the experiment, participants were divided into groups of either cooperative types or non-cooperative types depending on their behavior in a public goods game. In these homogeneous groups they repeatedly played a public goods game regulated by an institution that incorporated several of the key properties identified by Ostrom: operational rules, monitoring, rewards, punishments, and (in one condition) change of rules. When change of rules was not possible and punishments were set to be high, groups of both types generally abided by operational rules demanding high contributions to the common good, and thereby achieved high levels of payoffs. Under less severe rules, both types of groups did worse but non-cooperative types did worst. Thus, non-cooperative groups profited the most from being governed by an institution demanding high contributions and employing high punishments. Nevertheless, in a condition where change of rules through voting was made possible, development of the institution in this direction was more often voted down in groups of non-cooperative types. We discuss the relevance of the hard problem and fit our results into a bigger picture of institutional and individual determinants of cooperative behavior.

  13. The hard problem of cooperation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimmo Eriksson

    Full Text Available Based on individual variation in cooperative inclinations, we define the "hard problem of cooperation" as that of achieving high levels of cooperation in a group of non-cooperative types. Can the hard problem be solved by institutions with monitoring and sanctions? In a laboratory experiment we find that the answer is affirmative if the institution is imposed on the group but negative if development of the institution is left to the group to vote on. In the experiment, participants were divided into groups of either cooperative types or non-cooperative types depending on their behavior in a public goods game. In these homogeneous groups they repeatedly played a public goods game regulated by an institution that incorporated several of the key properties identified by Ostrom: operational rules, monitoring, rewards, punishments, and (in one condition change of rules. When change of rules was not possible and punishments were set to be high, groups of both types generally abided by operational rules demanding high contributions to the common good, and thereby achieved high levels of payoffs. Under less severe rules, both types of groups did worse but non-cooperative types did worst. Thus, non-cooperative groups profited the most from being governed by an institution demanding high contributions and employing high punishments. Nevertheless, in a condition where change of rules through voting was made possible, development of the institution in this direction was more often voted down in groups of non-cooperative types. We discuss the relevance of the hard problem and fit our results into a bigger picture of institutional and individual determinants of cooperative behavior.

  14. Development of Amorphous/Microcrystalline Silicon Tandem Thin-Film Solar Modules with Low Output Voltage, High Energy Yield, Low Light-Induced Degradation, and High Damp-Heat Reliability

    OpenAIRE

    Chin-Yi Tsai; Chin-Yao Tsai

    2014-01-01

    In this work, tandem amorphous/microcrystalline silicon thin-film solar modules with low output voltage, high energy yield, low light-induced degradation, and high damp-heat reliability were successfully designed and developed. Several key technologies of passivation, transparent-conducting-oxide films, and cell and segment laser scribing were researched, developed, and introduced into the production line to enhance the performance of these low-voltage modules. A 900 kWp photovoltaic system w...

  15. Structure of the light-induced metastable state SII in Na.sub.2./sub.[Fe(CN).sub.5./sub.NO].2H.sub.2./sub.O

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schaniel, D.; Woike, T.; Schefer, J.; Petříček, Václav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 17 (2005), 174112/1-174112/7 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/0430 Grant - others:DFG(DE) Wo618/5-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : neutron structure analysis * light-induced metastable state Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.185, year: 2005

  16. HUMAN MACHINE COOPERATIVE TELEROBOTICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William R. Hamel; Spivey Douglass; Sewoong Kim; Pamela Murray; Yang Shou; Sriram Sridharan; Ge Zhang; Scott Thayer; Rajiv V. Dubey

    2003-01-01

    research described as Human Machine Cooperative Telerobotics (HMCTR). The HMCTR combines the telerobot with robotic control techniques to improve the system efficiency and reliability in teleoperation mode. In this topical report, the control strategy, configuration and experimental results of Human Machines Cooperative Telerobotics (HMCTR), which modifies and limits the commands of human operator to follow the predefined constraints in the teleoperation mode, is described. The current implementation is a laboratory-scale system that will be incorporated into an engineering-scale system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the future

  17. HUMAN MACHINE COOPERATIVE TELEROBOTICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Hamel; Spivey Douglass; Sewoong Kim; Pamela Murray; Yang Shou; Sriram Sridharan; Ge Zhang; Scott Thayer; Rajiv V. Dubey

    2003-06-30

    described as Human Machine Cooperative Telerobotics (HMCTR). The HMCTR combines the telerobot with robotic control techniques to improve the system efficiency and reliability in teleoperation mode. In this topical report, the control strategy, configuration and experimental results of Human Machines Cooperative Telerobotics (HMCTR), which modifies and limits the commands of human operator to follow the predefined constraints in the teleoperation mode, is described. The current implementation is a laboratory-scale system that will be incorporated into an engineering-scale system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the future.

  18. Evolutionary routes to non-kin cooperative breeding in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Christina

    2013-12-07

    Cooperatively breeding animals live in social groups in which some individuals help to raise the offspring of others, often at the expense of their own reproduction. Kin selection--when individuals increase their inclusive fitness by aiding genetic relatives--is a powerful explanation for the evolution of cooperative breeding, particularly because most groups consist of family members. However, recent molecular studies have revealed that many cooperative groups also contain unrelated immigrants, and the processes responsible for the formation and maintenance of non-kin coalitions are receiving increasing attention. Here, I provide the first systematic review of group structure for all 213 species of cooperatively breeding birds for which data are available. Although the majority of species (55%) nest in nuclear family groups, cooperative breeding by unrelated individuals is more common than previously recognized: 30% nest in mixed groups of relatives and non-relatives, and 15% nest primarily with non-relatives. Obligate cooperative breeders are far more likely to breed with non-kin than are facultative cooperators, indicating that when constraints on independent breeding are sufficiently severe, the direct benefits of group membership can substitute for potential kin-selected benefits. I review three patterns of dispersal that give rise to social groups with low genetic relatedness, and I discuss the selective pressures that favour the formation of such groups. Although kin selection has undoubtedly been crucial to the origin of most avian social systems, direct benefits have subsequently come to play a predominant role in some societies, allowing cooperation to persist despite low genetic relatedness.

  19. Advisory and autonomous cooperative driving systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, T.H.A. van den; Ploeg, J.; Netten, B.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the traffic efficiency of an advisory cooperative driving system, Advisory Acceleration Control is examined and compared to the efficiency of an autonomous cooperative driving system, Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control. The algorithms and implementation thereof are explained. The

  20. Social Capital and Diversification of Cooperatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Deng (Wendong)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis contributes to two research streams of the literature regarding agricultural cooperatives, namely, social capital and product diversification of cooperatives. First, the thesis examines the nature of a marketing cooperative by considering both its economic

  1. 7 CFR 1000.18 - Cooperative association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL PROVISIONS OF FEDERAL MILK MARKETING ORDERS Definitions § 1000.18 Cooperative association. Cooperative association means any cooperative marketing...

  2. Social learning in cooperative dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamba, Shakti

    2014-07-22

    Helping is a cornerstone of social organization and commonplace in human societies. A major challenge for the evolutionary sciences is to explain how cooperation is maintained in large populations with high levels of migration, conditions under which cooperators can be exploited by selfish individuals. Cultural group selection models posit that such large-scale cooperation evolves via selection acting on populations among which behavioural variation is maintained by the cultural transmission of cooperative norms. These models assume that individuals acquire cooperative strategies via social learning. This assumption remains empirically untested. Here, I test this by investigating whether individuals employ conformist or payoff-biased learning in public goods games conducted in 14 villages of a forager-horticulturist society, the Pahari Korwa of India. Individuals did not show a clear tendency to conform or to be payoff-biased and are highly variable in their use of social learning. This variation is partly explained by both individual and village characteristics. The tendency to conform decreases and to be payoff-biased increases as the value of the modal contribution increases. These findings suggest that the use of social learning in cooperative dilemmas is contingent on individuals' circumstances and environments, and question the existence of stably transmitted cultural norms of cooperation. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Light-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of a Sunscreen Agent, 2-Phenylbenzimidazole in Salmonella typhimurium TA 102 and HaCaT Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Yu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available 2-Phenylbenzimidazole (PBI is an ingredient found in sunscreen agents. PBI can absorb the UV portion of the solar light and undergo a series of light-induced reactions to cause adverse effects in humans. Therefore, chemical and photochemical toxicity of PBI were investigated in the bacteria Salmonella typhimurium TA 102 and human skin keratinocyte cells. There is no appreciable bacteria death due to the exposure to PBI alone, indicating that PBI is not chemically toxic to the bacteria at a dose as high as 625μM. However, exposure to PBI and a solar simulator light (300-W Xe/Hg lamp, 30 min, 18.6 J/cm2, equivalent to 30 min outdoor sunlight causes significant bacteria death: 35% at 25μM and 55% at 625μM PBI. Exposure of the bacteria to light and PBI at doses 5-25μM causes the bacteria to revert, an indication of mutation. In the presence of PBI but without light irradiation, the number of revertant bacteria colonies is around 200 due to spontaneous mutation. Combination of light irradiation and PBI causes the number of revertant TA 102 colonies to increase in a dose dependent manner, reaching a maximum of around 1700 revertant colonies at 25 μM PBI. At higher PBI concentrations, the number of revertant colonies remains constant. This result clearly indicates that PBI is photomutagenic in TA 102. Exposure of the human skin HaCaT keratinocytes in aqueous solution in the presence of PBI causes the cell to lose its viability with or without light irradiation. There is no significant difference in cell viability for the light irradiated or non-irradiated groups, indication PBI is not photocytotoxic. However, exposure of the cells to both PBI and light irradiation causes cellular DNA damage, while exposure to PBI alone does not cause DNA damage.

  4. Regional cooperation on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, W.Y.; Chen, J.H.; Kim, D.H.; Simmons, R.B.V.; Surguri, S.

    1985-01-01

    A review has been conducted of a number of multi-national and bilateral arrangements between governments and between utility-sponsored organizations which provide the framework for international cooperation in the field of nuclear safety. These arrangements include the routine exchange operational data, experiences, technical reports and regulatory data, provision of special assistance when requested, collaboration in safety research, and the holding of international conferences and seminars. Areas which may be better suited for cooperation on a regional basis are identified. These areas include: exchange of operational data and experience, sharing of emergency planning information, and collaboration in safety research. Mechanisms to initiate regional cooperation in these areas are suggested

  5. Environment and cooperation: cooperative values as an assumption of sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo de Miranda

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to establishing an understanding of the meaning of environment, the work clarifies that the environmental damage resulting value gives the minimization of the man dedicated to nature. In this regard, bearing in mind the environmental crisis confrontation served humanity, the future is viewed with doubt. It also offers, the alternative cooperative established by the Declaration of Rio and cooperative values is presented as a precondition for sustainability.Received: 06.06.10Accepted: 25.06.10

  6. Regional Renewable Energy Cooperatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazendonk, P.; Brown, M. B.; Byrne, J. M.; Harrison, T.; Mueller, R.; Peacock, K.; Usher, J.; Yalamova, R.; Kroebel, R.; Larsen, J.; McNaughton, R.

    2014-12-01

    We are building a multidisciplinary research program linking researchers in agriculture, business, earth science, engineering, humanities and social science. Our goal is to match renewable energy supply and reformed energy demands. The program will be focused on (i) understanding and modifying energy demand, (ii) design and implementation of diverse renewable energy networks. Geomatics technology will be used to map existing energy and waste flows on a neighbourhood, municipal, and regional level. Optimal sites and combinations of sites for solar and wind electrical generation (ridges, rooftops, valley walls) will be identified. Geomatics based site and grid analyses will identify best locations for energy production based on efficient production and connectivity to regional grids and transportation. Design of networks for utilization of waste streams of heat, water, animal and human waste for energy production will be investigated. Agriculture, cities and industry produce many waste streams that are not well utilized. Therefore, establishing a renewable energy resource mapping and planning program for electrical generation, waste heat and energy recovery, biomass collection, and biochar, biodiesel and syngas production is critical to regional energy optimization. Electrical storage and demand management are two priorities that will be investigated. Regional scale cooperatives may use electric vehicle batteries and innovations such as pump storage and concentrated solar molten salt heat storage for steam turbine electrical generation. Energy demand management is poorly explored in Canada and elsewhere - our homes and businesses operate on an unrestricted demand. Simple monitoring and energy demand-ranking software can easily reduce peaks demands and move lower ranked uses to non-peak periods, thereby reducing the grid size needed to meet peak demands. Peak demand strains the current energy grid capacity and often requires demand balancing projects and

  7. Cross-border innovation cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjaltadóttir, Rannveig Edda; Makkonen, Teemu; Sørensen, Nils Karl

    2014-01-01

    of cross-border innovation cooperation. Accordingly, geographical proximity to international borders is found to have a significant, positive effect on choosing partners within EU. The multivariate probit model shows that the decision of choosing a domestic innovation partner is independent of the choice......Finding a suitable partner is paramount for the success of innovation cooperation. Thus, this paper sets out to analyse the determinants of cross-border innovation cooperation in Denmark focusing on partner selection. The aim of the article is to investigate determinants of partner selection taking...... the location of the partners into account. In particular, the discussion is tied to the notion of varying knowledge bases firms utilize in their innovation creation processes. Firm level data from the 2010 Community Innovation Survey in Denmark was used to analyse cross-border innovation cooperation patterns...

  8. Plainview Milk Cooperative Ingredient Recall

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This list includes products subject to recall in the United States since June 2009 related to products manufactured by Plainview Milk Products Cooperative.

  9. The Long Way Toward Cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Foth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To better understand why cooperation between health care professionals is still often problematic, we carried out 25 semistructured face-to-face expert interviews with physicians and nurses in different rural and urban areas in northern Germany. Using Mayring’s qualitative content analysis method to analyze the data collected, we found that doctors and nurses interpreted interprofessional conflicts differently. Nursing seems to be caught in a paradoxical situation: An increasing emphasis is placed on achieving interprofessional cooperation but the core areas of nursing practice are subject to increasing rationalization in the current climate of health care marketization. The subsequent and systematic devaluation of nursing work makes it difficult for physicians to acknowledge nurses’ expertise. We suggest that to ameliorate interprofessional cooperation, nursing must insist on its own logic of action thereby promoting its professionalization; interprofessional cooperation cannot take place until nursing work is valued by all members of the health care system.

  10. Pesticide Worker Safety Cooperative Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    The worker safety program cooperative agreements fund projects to educate pesticide applicators, handlers, and farmworkers on working safely with, and around, pesticides. Read about pesticide related grant opportunities and reports from previous grants.

  11. States, Social Capital and Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthony, Denise L.; Campbell, John L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reflects on Elinor Ostrom’s classic book, Governing the Commons, and much work in sociology, political science and organization studies that has appeared since its publication. We do so in order to expand our understanding of the conditions under which cooperation occurs resulting...... in the production of collective goods. We explore two issues that were underdeveloped in her book that have subsequently received much attention. First, we discuss how states can facilitate cooperative behavior short of coercively imposing it on actors. Second, we discuss how social capital can facilitate...... or undermine cooperative behavior. In both cases we focus on the important mechanisms by which each one contributes to the development of cooperative behavior and collective goods. We conclude by extending our arguments to a brief analysis of one of the world’s newest and largest collective goods...

  12. Environmental Security and Cooperation Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butts, Kent

    2004-01-01

    The United States Army in the Pacific (USARPAC), the Department of Defense (DUSD-I&E), and the United States Army War College conducted an Environmental Security Cooperation Workshop in Bangkok, Thailand from July 19-22, 2004...

  13. Danish-German Submarine Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sender, Johannes F.; Lucas, Edward R.

    Germany has invited the Royal Danish Navy to participate in training missions and exercises on board German submarines. This brief examines the benefits and challenges of this proposed cooperation for both Denmark and NATO more broadly.......Germany has invited the Royal Danish Navy to participate in training missions and exercises on board German submarines. This brief examines the benefits and challenges of this proposed cooperation for both Denmark and NATO more broadly....

  14. International cooperation in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanisms of international co-operations, co-ordinated by International Atomic Energy Agency, are presented. These co-operations are related to international safety standards, to the safety of the four hundred existing reactors in operation, to quick help and information in case of emergency, and to the already valid international conventions. The relation between atomic energy and environmental protection is also discussed briefly. (K.A.)

  15. Regional and Global Monetary Cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Lamberte; Peter J. Morgan

    2012-01-01

    The increasing occurrence of national, regional, and global financial crises, together with their rising costs and complexity, have increased calls for greater regional and global monetary cooperation. This is particularly necessary in light of volatile capital flow movements that can quickly transmit crisis developments in individual countries to other countries around the world. Global financial safety nets (GFSNs) are one important area for monetary cooperation. This paper reviews the c...

  16. Assessment of a cooperative workstation.

    OpenAIRE

    Beuscart, R. J.; Molenda, S.; Souf, N.; Foucher, C.; Beuscart-Zephir, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    Groupware and new Information Technologies have now made it possible for people in different places to work together in synchronous cooperation. Very often, designers of this new type of software are not provided with a model of the common workspace, which is prejudicial to software development and its acceptance by potential users. The authors take the example of a task of medical co-diagnosis, using a multi-media communication workstation. Synchronous cooperative work is made possible by us...

  17. INFORMATION SECURITY IN LOGISTICS COOPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Małkus

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cooperation of suppliers of raw materials, semi-finished products, finished products, wholesalers, retailers in the form of the supply chain, as well as outsourcing of specialized logistics service require ensuring adequate support of information. It concerns the use of appropriate computer tools. The security of information in such conditions of collaboration becomes the important problem for parties of contract. The objective of the paper is to characterize main issues relating to security of information in logistics cooperation.

  18. International cooperation on breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.E.; Kratzer, M.B.; Leslie, K.E.; Paige, H.W.; Shantzis, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    In March 1977, as the result of discussions which began in the fall of 1976, the Rockefeller Foundation requested International Energy Associates Limited (IEAL) to undertake a study of the role of international cooperation in the development and application of the breeder reactor. While there had been considerable international exchange in the development of breeder technology, the existence of at least seven major national breeder development programs raised a prima facie issue of the adequacy of international cooperation. The final product of the study was to be the identification of options for international cooperation which merited further consideration and which might become the subject of subsequent, more detailed analysis. During the course of the study, modifications in U.S. breeder policy led to an expansion of the analysis to embrace the pros and cons of the major breeder-related policy issues, as well as the respective views of national governments on those issues. The resulting examination of views and patterns of international collaboration emphasizes what was implicit from the outset: Options for international cooperation cannot be fashioned independently of national objectives, policies and programs. Moreover, while similarity of views can stimulate cooperation, this cannot of itself provide compelling justification for cooperative undertakings. Such undertakings are influenced by an array of other national factors, including technological development, industrial infrastructure, economic strength, existing international ties, and historic experience

  19. How feeling betrayed affects cooperation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouria Ramazi

    Full Text Available For a population of interacting self-interested agents, we study how the average cooperation level is affected by some individuals' feelings of being betrayed and guilt. We quantify these feelings as adjusted payoffs in asymmetric games, where for different emotions, the payoff matrix takes the structure of that of either a prisoner's dilemma or a snowdrift game. Then we analyze the evolution of cooperation in a well-mixed population of agents, each of whom is associated with such a payoff matrix. At each time-step, an agent is randomly chosen from the population to update her strategy based on the myopic best-response update rule. According to the simulations, decreasing the feeling of being betrayed in a portion of agents does not necessarily increase the level of cooperation in the population. However, this resistance of the population against low-betrayal-level agents is effective only up to some extend that is explicitly determined by the payoff matrices and the number of agents associated with these matrices. Two other models are also considered where the betrayal factor of an agent fluctuates as a function of the number of cooperators and defectors that she encounters. Unstable behaviors are observed for the level of cooperation in these cases; however, we show that one can tune the parameters in the function to make the whole population become cooperative or defective.

  20. Cooperation for a competitive position: The impact of hospital cooperation behavior on organizational performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchner, Vera Antonia; Hinz, Vera; Schreyögg, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Several public policy initiatives, particularly those involving managed care, aim to enhance cooperation between partners in the health care sector because it is expected that such cooperation will reduce costs and generate additional revenue. However, empirical evidence regarding the effects of cooperation on hospital performance is scarce, particularly with respect to creating a comprehensive measure of cooperation behavior. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of hospital cooperation behavior on organizational performance. We differentiate between horizontal and vertical cooperation using two alternative measures-cooperation depth and cooperation breadth-and include the interaction effects between both cooperation directions. Data are derived from a survey of German hospitals and combined with objective performance information from annual financial statements. Generalized linear regression models are used. The study findings provide insight into the nature of hospitals' cooperation behavior. In particular, we show that there are negative synergies between horizontal administrative cooperation behavior and vertical cooperation behavior. Whereas the depth and breadth of horizontal administrative cooperation positively affect financial performance (when there is no vertical cooperation), vertical cooperation positively affects financial performance (when there is no horizontal administrative cooperation) only when cooperation is broad (rather than deep). Horizontal cooperation is generally more effective than vertical cooperation at improving financial performance. Hospital managers should consider the negative interaction effect when making decisions about whether to recommend a cooperative relationship in a horizontal or vertical direction. In addition, managers should be aware of the limited financial benefit of cooperation behavior.

  1. Astronaut Gordon Cooper during flight tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper, prime pilot for the Mercury-Atlas 9 mission, relaxes while waiting for weight and balance tests to begin (03974); Cooper prior to entering the Mercury Spacecraft for a series of simulated flight tests. During these tests NASA doctors, engineers and technicians monitor Cooper's performance (03975); Cooper undergoing suit pressurization tests (03976).

  2. 10 CFR 745.114 - Cooperative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooperative research. 745.114 Section 745.114 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.114 Cooperative research. Cooperative research... of cooperative research projects, each institution is responsible for safeguarding the rights and...

  3. 28 CFR 46.114 - Cooperative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cooperative research. 46.114 Section 46... Cooperative research. Cooperative research projects are those projects covered by this policy which involve more than one institution. In the conduct of cooperative research projects, each institution is...

  4. 16 CFR 1028.114 - Cooperative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooperative research. 1028.114 Section 1028... § 1028.114 Cooperative research. Cooperative research projects are those projects covered by this policy which involve more than one institution. In the conduct of cooperative research projects, each...

  5. 38 CFR 16.114 - Cooperative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cooperative research. 16... OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 16.114 Cooperative research. Cooperative research projects are those projects covered by this policy which involve more than one institution. In the conduct of cooperative research...

  6. 14 CFR 1230.114 - Cooperative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooperative research. 1230.114 Section 1230... § 1230.114 Cooperative research. Cooperative research projects are those projects covered by this policy which involve more than one institution. In the conduct of cooperative research projects, each...

  7. 15 CFR 27.114 - Cooperative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooperative research. 27.114 Section... § 27.114 Cooperative research. Cooperative research projects are those projects covered by this policy which involve more than one institution. In the conduct of cooperative research projects, each...

  8. 45 CFR 690.114 - Cooperative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cooperative research. 690.114 Section 690.114... OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 690.114 Cooperative research. Cooperative research projects are those projects covered by this policy which involve more than one institution. In the conduct of cooperative research...

  9. 32 CFR 219.114 - Cooperative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cooperative research. 219.114 Section 219.114...) MISCELLANEOUS PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 219.114 Cooperative research. Cooperative research projects are... cooperative research projects, each institution is responsible for safeguarding the rights and welfare of...

  10. 36 CFR 212.3 - Cooperative work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cooperative work. 212.3... MANAGEMENT Administration of the Forest Transportation System § 212.3 Cooperative work. (a) Cooperative... for expenditure from the appropriation “Cooperative Work, Forest Service.” If a State, county or other...

  11. Culture and Cooperation during the Interwar Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anişoara Popa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the most important Publications of the International Institute for Intellectual Cooperation (1925-1946 we will explore the ideas concerning culture and personalities involved in the intellectual cooperation during the Interwar Period. Pointing out the role that the International Institute of Intellectual Cooperation had and the Romanian contribution to this cooperation is another purpose of this article.

  12. Department of Defense International Space Cooperation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    related activities and mission areas. The key purposes for this expanded international space cooperation and collaboration are...space security by "expanding our international space cooperation activities." 1 DoD’ s national security space- related international engagements... International Space Cooperation Strategy (U) The attached unclassified version of the DoD International Space Cooperation Strategy (ISCS) is

  13. International nuclear cooperation in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yong-Kyu

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear power project traditionally involve huge financial investment, highly sophisticated technology, and long lead time. Many countries, particularly developing ones, find it impossible to implement their nuclear power programs without technical cooperation and assistance from advanced countries. In this Asia and Pacific Region, seven countries have commercial nuclear power units in operation and/or under construction. Korea has six nuclear power units in operation, and three under construction. Active nuclear cooperation has been instrumental in implementing her abmitious nuclear power programs successfully. Nuclear cooperation is one of the widely recognized necessities, which is quite often talked about among the countries of the Asia and Pacific Region. But the differences in nuclear maturity and national interests among those in the region seem to be standing against it. Given the constraints, it is not easy to select appropriate areas for cooperation. There is no doubt, however, that they should include the nuclear policy, nuclear safety, radwaste management, radiological protection, and the management of nuclear units. In order to effectively promote nuclear cooperation in the Region, the scope of RCA activities must be expanded to include the nuclear power area. The Regional Nuclear Data Bank, the Regional Training Center and the Nuclear Emergency Response Center, for example, would be the effective tools for cooperation to meet the demands of the countries in the Region. In view of the technological gap between Japan and all others in the region, we cannot speak of a regional nuclear cooperation without heavily counting on Japan, the most advanced nuclear state in the region. For these reasons, Japan is expected to share an increasing portion of her nuclear technology with others. (author)

  14. Regional cooperation in nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.; Muntzing, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    In November 1985, PBNCC (the Pacific Basin Nuclear Cooperation Committee) was formally established. Currently six Pacific Basin members have been participating in PBNCC: Canada, Japan, South Korea, Mexico, Taiwan of Chian, and the United States of America. The People's Republic of China has sent observes to the PBNCC meetings. The technical contents of PBWCC working groups are as follows: 1. Regional cooperative for pooled spare parts of nuclear power plants and inventory management; 2. Regional cooperation in nuclear training; 3. Regional cooperation on nuclear safety; 4. Regional cooperation in Codes and Standards; 5. Regional Cooperation in public acceptance; 6. Regional cooperation on radwaste management. (Liu)

  15. The maintenance of cooperative and helping behaviours in cooperative groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, R M

    2000-03-01

    This study was a full-year investigation of whether children, who had previously been trained to cooperate and help each other, were able to use these behaviours in reconstituted groups without additional training one year later. (i) To examine whether children who have previously been trained to cooperate demonstrate more cooperative and helping behaviours in their groups than children who had no been trained and (ii) to determine the effect of prior training on children's learning. The study involved 144 Grade 2 children (mean age = 94.5 months; third year of schooling), from nine schools in a similar socio-demographic area of Brisbane, Australia. Sixty-four children, who had been trained in cooperative group behaviours in the previous year, were assigned to the Trained groups and 80 children, who had not received any training, were assigned to the Untrained groups. The children worked in four-person, mixed-ability (high-, medium-, and low-ability), gender-balanced groups (2 males, 2 females) for one six-week social studies unit of work each term for three school terms. Videotaping occurred in the 5-6 week of each work unit. Videotapes were coded for behaviour and verbal interactions. Learning outcomes data were also collected. The children in the trained groups exhibited more cooperative behaviour and they provided more explanations, both in response to explicit and implicit requests for help across the three periods of time. The children in the trained groups used higher level cognitive strategies such as providing specific concrete facts and reasons in their interactions and they also obtained higher scores on the learning outcomes questionnaire than their untrained peers. Young children who have been trained to cooperate and help each other are able to demonstrate these behaviours in reconstituted groups without additional training a year later.

  16. Hierarchy is Detrimental for Human Cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Cronin, Katherine A.; Acheson, Daniel J.; Hernández, Penélope; Sánchez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Studies of animal behavior consistently demonstrate that the social environment impacts cooperation, yet the effect of social dynamics has been largely excluded from studies of human cooperation. Here, we introduce a novel approach inspired by nonhuman primate research to address how social hierarchies impact human cooperation. Participants competed to earn hierarchy positions and then could cooperate with another individual in the hierarchy by investing in a common effort. Cooperation was ac...

  17. Cooperative conversations. The effect of cooperative learning on conversational interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K J

    1995-03-01

    An ongoing challenge for educators of deaf and hard-of-hearing students is to find opportunities for students to use their language skills in a functional way, that is, through conversation. This study was initiated to determine whether cooperative learning is a viable means of encouraging mainstreamed hard-of-hearing students to engage in conversational interaction with their hearing peers and teachers. A single-subject design utilizing three mainstreamed hard-of-hearing subjects attending middle school was used to examine this question. Results of the study indicated that cooperative learning positively influenced the conversational turns, initiations, moves, and mean length of turn in these hard-of-hearing subjects.

  18. Conoscopic evidence of the UV light-induced flexoelectric effect in homeotropic layers of nematic liquid crystal doped with azobenzene derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Y. G.; Hadjichristov, G. B.; Petrov, A. G.; Sridevi, S.; Hiremath, U. S.; Yelamaggad, C. V.; Prasad, S. K.

    2010-11-01

    A digitalized version of the standard method of conoscopy was employed to register the bend deformation of molecular orientation in homeotropic nematic layers caused by an in-plane applied DC electric field, and influenced by UV light illumination. Two guest-host systems prepared by mixing of a nematic liquid crystal and an azobenzene-containing photochromic liquid crystalline material featuring a longitudinal molecular asymmetry, were studied. Upon continuous UV irradiation, a photo-isomerization of the photochromic molecules occurs resulting in an enhanced flexoelectric response of the guest-host mixtures. The dependence of the photoflexoeffect on the field strength and UV light intensity was also examined.

  19. Conoscopic evidence of the UV light-induced flexoelectric effect in homeotropic layers of nematic liquid crystal doped with azobenzene derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinov, Y G; Hadjichristov, G B; Petrov, A G; Sridevi, S; Hiremath, U S; Yelamaggad, C V; Prasad, S K

    2010-01-01

    A digitalized version of the standard method of conoscopy was employed to register the bend deformation of molecular orientation in homeotropic nematic layers caused by an in-plane applied DC electric field, and influenced by UV light illumination. Two guest-host systems prepared by mixing of a nematic liquid crystal and an azobenzene-containing photochromic liquid crystalline material featuring a longitudinal molecular asymmetry, were studied. Upon continuous UV irradiation, a photo-isomerization of the photochromic molecules occurs resulting in an enhanced flexoelectric response of the guest-host mixtures. The dependence of the photoflexoeffect on the field strength and UV light intensity was also examined.

  20. Forskningsoversigt - Effekterne af Cooperative Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lea Lund

    Kan Cooperative Learning - en undervisningsform hvor lærerens tid ved tavlen mindskes og hvor de lærende samarbejder om stoffet - maksimere de lærendes indlæring og medvirke til en forbedring af deres interpersonelle og kommunikative kompetencer, samt øge deres motivation for læring? Den megen...... forskning fra USA viser, at Cooperative Learning øger lærerens bevidsthed om, hvilken adfærd, han er medvirkende til at skabe blandt de lærende. Og den øger lærerens bevidsthed omkring interaktioner i klasserummet, og giver god plads og taletid til hver enkelt lærende. Set i lyset heraf kan Cooperative......, at Cooperative Learning har lige så høj grad af positiv effekt, som den viser sig at have på grundskoleområdet. Det er sigtet med denne oversigt over den empiriske forskning. Til start præsenteres Cooperative Learning som metode, dens rødder og udvikling, dernæst skitseres den omfattende forskning omkring...

  1. The Globalization of Cooperative Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivieso, Manuel; Corn, Benjamin W; Dancey, Janet E; Wickerham, D Lawrence; Horvath, L Elise; Perez, Edith A; Urton, Alison; Cronin, Walter M; Field, Erica; Lackey, Evonne; Blanke, Charles D

    2015-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-supported adult cooperative oncology research groups (now officially Network groups) have a longstanding history of participating in international collaborations throughout the world. Most frequently, the US-based cooperative groups work reciprocally with the Canadian national adult cancer clinical trial group, NCIC CTG (previously the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group). Thus, Canada is the largest contributor to cooperative groups based in the United States, and vice versa. Although international collaborations have many benefits, they are most frequently utilized to enhance patient accrual to large phase III trials originating in the United States or Canada. Within the cooperative group setting, adequate attention has not been given to the study of cancers that are unique to countries outside the United States and Canada, such as those frequently associated with infections in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Global collaborations are limited by a number of barriers, some of which are unique to the countries involved, while others are related to financial support and to US policies that restrict drug distribution outside the United States. This article serves to detail the cooperative group experience in international research and describe how international collaboration in cancer clinical trials is a promising and important area that requires greater consideration in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Regional cooperation prospects in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Wan Ki

    2006-01-01

    The Republic of Korea follows a well-established nuclear nonproliferation policy and could consider regional cooperation as proposed by many nuclear experts over the years. Real problems exist in establishing cooperation, but as the nuclear industry continues to grow, the motivation increases. The US should be a partner in the regional cooperation also. This paper summarizes significant advances made by the NNCA in applying remote monitoring technologies to support international safeguards in the ROK, providing the technical foundation for the use of these technologies for transparency between partner countries. Concrete steps are proposed to form an institutional and then a governmental approach for transparency in the use of nuclear material and even, eventual establishment of a regional safeguards inspection regime. (author)

  3. Cooperation in research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueter, J.W.; Nentwich, D.

    1986-01-01

    In the past years, the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology has concluded government contracts worldwide about bilateral cooperation in research and development. This article raises the question of which contribution can be made by science to the frame conditions of exports. It also deals with the problem of if and how to use the confidence acquired by scientific cooperation in exports. The international offices of large research institutions are presented with reference to their goals, tasks, and possibilities of making a contribution to the coefficiency of publicy and privately financed research and technology development and the export efforts of national economy. Examples from the day-to-day activities within the framework of the bilateral contracts with Brazil, Indonesia and Egypt make the problems and challenges of this important field of international cooperation in research and technology clearer. (orit./UA) [de

  4. Industrial Buyer-Supplier Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rasmus Friis

    The dissertation considers industrial buyer-supplier cooperation from a systems and management perspective. The purpose is to discuss and elaborate on the buying company’s choice of cooperation strategy (governance mechanism). It is stated that no single governance mechanism will be the best in all...... of analytical dimensions used to analyse and describe the processes in the supply system have been identified and described. The processes in the supply system consist of the exchange process, adaptation processes, sociopolitical processes and internal processes. Response variables have been identified...... and described for each of these analytical dimensions.A supply management concept has been introduced to describe the overall framework for cooperating with the suppliers. A supply management concept consists of the response variables, the performance variables and the knowledge that a company have decided...

  5. Local Water Conflict and Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Roberto Rivas; Hooper, Catherine; Munk Ravnborg, Helle

    2011-01-01

    In 2007 the Danish Institute for International Studies (DIIS) launched the research programme “Competing for Water: Understanding conflict and cooperation in local water governance”. Along with partners in five developing countries (Bolivia, Mali, Nicaragua, Vietnam and Zambia), the programme aims...... to contribute to “sustainable local water governance in support of the rural poor and otherwise disadvantaged groups in developing countries by improving the knowledge among researchers and practitioners of the nature, extent and intensity of local water conflict and cooperation and their social, economic...... al, 2007; Nguyen, 2007; Mweemba, C.E. 2007). The purpose of these overviews was to position the research findings on the extent and nature of local-level water-related conflict and cooperation in the context of ongoing efforts to improve the policy, legal and administrative water governance framework...

  6. International cooperation for the environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engfeldt, Lars-Göran; Kjellén, Bo; Liefferink, Duncan

    2003-01-01

    global environmental conference, the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, was convened on 5 June 1972 in Stockholm. This day in June is now yearly celebrated as the World Environment Day. The motto of the Conference “Only One Earth,” was a revolutionary concept for its time, but is today...... well established as a starting point for international co-operation on the global scale. The 1972 conference led to the formation of the United Nations Environmental Programme, UNEP, and a series of other initiative on a national or regional level. One of them was the co-operation in the Baltic Sea......Pollution does not recognise borders. Many serious pollutants eventually pass national borders, are transboundary, and even spread globally. Protection of the environment therefore requires international cooperation. This was understood from the outset by the environmental movement. The first...

  7. Fashion, cooperation, and social interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Cao

    Full Text Available Fashion plays such a crucial rule in the evolution of culture and society that it is regarded as a second nature to the human being. Also, its impact on economy is quite nontrivial. On what is fashionable, interestingly, there are two viewpoints that are both extremely widespread but almost opposite: conformists think that what is popular is fashionable, while rebels believe that being different is the essence. Fashion color is fashionable in the first sense, and Lady Gaga in the second. We investigate a model where the population consists of the afore-mentioned two groups of people that are located on social networks (a spatial cellular automata network and small-world networks. This model captures two fundamental kinds of social interactions (coordination and anti-coordination simultaneously, and also has its own interest to game theory: it is a hybrid model of pure competition and pure cooperation. This is true because when a conformist meets a rebel, they play the zero sum matching pennies game, which is pure competition. When two conformists (rebels meet, they play the (anti- coordination game, which is pure cooperation. Simulation shows that simple social interactions greatly promote cooperation: in most cases people can reach an extraordinarily high level of cooperation, through a selfish, myopic, naive, and local interacting dynamic (the best response dynamic. We find that degree of synchronization also plays a critical role, but mostly on the negative side. Four indices, namely cooperation degree, average satisfaction degree, equilibrium ratio and complete ratio, are defined and applied to measure people's cooperation levels from various angles. Phase transition, as well as emergence of many interesting geographic patterns in the cellular automata network, is also observed.

  8. Fashion, Cooperation, and Social Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhigang; Gao, Haoyu; Qu, Xinglong; Yang, Mingmin; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2013-01-01

    Fashion plays such a crucial rule in the evolution of culture and society that it is regarded as a second nature to the human being. Also, its impact on economy is quite nontrivial. On what is fashionable, interestingly, there are two viewpoints that are both extremely widespread but almost opposite: conformists think that what is popular is fashionable, while rebels believe that being different is the essence. Fashion color is fashionable in the first sense, and Lady Gaga in the second. We investigate a model where the population consists of the afore-mentioned two groups of people that are located on social networks (a spatial cellular automata network and small-world networks). This model captures two fundamental kinds of social interactions (coordination and anti-coordination) simultaneously, and also has its own interest to game theory: it is a hybrid model of pure competition and pure cooperation. This is true because when a conformist meets a rebel, they play the zero sum matching pennies game, which is pure competition. When two conformists (rebels) meet, they play the (anti-) coordination game, which is pure cooperation. Simulation shows that simple social interactions greatly promote cooperation: in most cases people can reach an extraordinarily high level of cooperation, through a selfish, myopic, naive, and local interacting dynamic (the best response dynamic). We find that degree of synchronization also plays a critical role, but mostly on the negative side. Four indices, namely cooperation degree, average satisfaction degree, equilibrium ratio and complete ratio, are defined and applied to measure people’s cooperation levels from various angles. Phase transition, as well as emergence of many interesting geographic patterns in the cellular automata network, is also observed. PMID:23382799

  9. Cooperative Localization for Mobile Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Urup, Daniel Nygaard; Meyer, Florian

    2016-01-01

    We propose a hybrid message passing method for distributed cooperative localization and tracking of mobile agents. Belief propagation and mean field message passing are employed for, respectively, the motion-related and measurementrelated part of the factor graph. Using a Gaussian belief approxim......We propose a hybrid message passing method for distributed cooperative localization and tracking of mobile agents. Belief propagation and mean field message passing are employed for, respectively, the motion-related and measurementrelated part of the factor graph. Using a Gaussian belief...

  10. Cooperative and cognitive satellite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzinotas, Symeon; De Gaudenzi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative and Cognitive Satellite Systems provides a solid overview of the current research in the field of cooperative and cognitive satellite systems, helping users understand how to incorporate state-of-the-art communication techniques in innovative satellite network architectures to enable the next generation of satellite systems. The book is edited and written by top researchers and practitioners in the field, providing a comprehensive explanation of current research that allows users to discover future technologies and their applications, integrate satellite and terrestrial systems

  11. International cooperation workshop. Regional workshop for CTBTO international cooperation: Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    Pursuant to the 1999 programme of work, and following the International Cooperation Workshop held in Vienna, Austria, in 1998, the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) of the Preparatory Commission for the CTBTO (Prep Com) held a regional Workshop for CTBTO International Cooperation in Cairo. The purpose of the workshop was to identify how and by what means the Africa region can promote international cooperation in CTBT verification related technologies, and how the region can benefit from and contribute to Prep Com activity. PTS staff briefed the 40 participants from 22 African States who attended the Workshop on general aspects, including costs, of the establishment and operation of the CTBT verification system, including its four monitoring technologies. Participants were informed on opportunities for local institutions in the establishment of monitoring stations and on possible support for national and regional data centres. National experts presented their research and development activities and reviewed existing experiences on bi/multi-lateral cooperation. The main points of the discussion focused on the need to engage governments to advance signature/ratification, and further training opportunities for African states

  12. Let's Cooperate! Integrating Cooperative Learning Into a Lesson on Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineke, Patricia R

    2017-04-01

    Cooperative learning is an effective teaching strategy that promotes active participation in learning and can be used in academic, clinical practice, and professional development settings. This article describes that strategy and provides an example of its use in a lesson about ethics. J Contin Nurs Educ. 2017;48(4):154-156. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. The sound of cooperation: Musical influences on cooperative behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniffin, Kevin M; Yan, Jubo; Wansink, Brian; Schulze, William D

    2017-03-01

    Music as an environmental aspect of professional workplaces has been closely studied with respect to consumer behavior while sparse attention has been given to its relevance for employee behavior. In this article, we focus on the influence of music upon cooperative behavior within decision-making groups. Based on results from two extended 20-round public goods experiments, we find that happy music significantly and positively influences cooperative behavior. We also find a significant positive association between mood and cooperative behavior. Consequently, while our studies provide partial support for the relevance of affect in relation to cooperation within groups, we also show an independently important function of happy music that fits with a theory of synchronous and rhythmic activity as a social lubricant. More generally, our findings indicate that music and perhaps other atmospheric variables that are designed to prime consumer behavior might have comparably important effects for employees and consequently warrant closer investigation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors Journal of Organizational Behavior Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Accelerating cooperative systems' development through the Grand Cooperative Driving challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk Noordegraaf, D.; Malone, K.M.; Katwijk, R. van; Gerrits, A.

    2009-01-01

    Cooperative driving systems comprise an important research area. They are considered a promising solution for reducing traffic congestion, reducing environmental impact and improving traffic safety and driver comfort. The key to these systems is the communication and interaction between vehicles and

  15. Cooperation in wireless networks principles and applications : real egoistic behavior is to cooperate!

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzek, Frank HP

    2006-01-01

    Covers the underlying principles of cooperative techniques as well as several applications demonstrating the use of such techniques in practical systems. This book also summarizes the strength of cooperation for wireless communication systems, motivating the use of cooperative techniques.

  16. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-05-06

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Cooperation: New Players in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Hugon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the context of globalisation and the current global financial crisis, new players are emerging in cooperation in Africa. These partners loosen financial constraints and conditionalities, increase the room for manoeuvre and stimulate commodity markets. On the other hand, they also increase the risks of renewed indebtedness and potentially weaken the coordination of aid policies. Do these partnerships call the new cooperation practices of OECD countries into question? Do they justify the return to a realpolitik or are they repeating the earlier mistakes of industrial powers? Can these mistakes be corrected? The question also arises as to whether the global crisis, which has a profound effect on Africa, will lead to a withdrawal or to a passing of the baton on to new, emerging powers. This article highlights the new geopolitical issues concerning Africa in a multipolar world, then discusses the new players involved in cooperation in Africa, before going on to explore the horizons that are opening up for cooperation in Africa, in particular with regard to the global crisis.

  18. Fifty years of Technical Cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was established in Vienna in 1957. The Statute of the IAEA, approved by 81 nations, founded the organization on three pillars: nuclear verification; safety and security; and the transfer of technology. Today, these three pillars still remain at the heart of the organization's work. However, the way in which the IAEA carries out this work, particularly with regard to technology transfer, has changed greatly over the years. When the IAEA opened for business, nuclear science and technology were in their infancy. Many Member States had no nuclear capacity at all. The IAEA's 'technical assistance' programme, as it was then known, was modest. Early projects were small in scale and short lived, focusing mainly on building human capacities and creating institutions and facilities that would support the introduction of nuclear technology in a safe and effective manner. Today, the picture is more complex. Instead of merely offering assistance, the IAEA focuses on cooperation for sustainable socioeconomic development, building on the skills and infrastructure that Member States have acquired over the past five decades. Member States are full partners in the process, guiding the IAEA's technical cooperation activities, setting national and regional priorities, and offering training opportunities and technical support to the IAEA and to other Member States. Technical cooperation between developing countries is facilitated and supported through regional cooperative agreements. Regional centres of expertise play an important role in sharing the benefits of nuclear science and technology among Member States

  19. Prenatal temperature shocks reduce cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duchoslav, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Climate change has not only led to a sustained rise in mean global temperature over the past decades, but also increased the frequency of extreme weather events. This paper explores the effect of temperature shocks in utero on later-life taste for cooperation. Using historical climate data combined

  20. Communicating Cooperative Robots with Bluetooth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøler, Henrik; Son, L.T.; Madsen, Ole Brun

    2001-01-01

    A generic architecture for system of cooperating communicating mobile robots is presented. An overall structure is defined from a modularity viewpoint, where a number of generic modules are identified; low level communication interface, network layer services such as initial and adaptive network...

  1. Statistical physics of human cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perc, Matjaž; Jordan, Jillian J.; Rand, David G.; Wang, Zhen; Boccaletti, Stefano; Szolnoki, Attila

    2017-05-01

    Extensive cooperation among unrelated individuals is unique to humans, who often sacrifice personal benefits for the common good and work together to achieve what they are unable to execute alone. The evolutionary success of our species is indeed due, to a large degree, to our unparalleled other-regarding abilities. Yet, a comprehensive understanding of human cooperation remains a formidable challenge. Recent research in the social sciences indicates that it is important to focus on the collective behavior that emerges as the result of the interactions among individuals, groups, and even societies. Non-equilibrium statistical physics, in particular Monte Carlo methods and the theory of collective behavior of interacting particles near phase transition points, has proven to be very valuable for understanding counterintuitive evolutionary outcomes. By treating models of human cooperation as classical spin models, a physicist can draw on familiar settings from statistical physics. However, unlike pairwise interactions among particles that typically govern solid-state physics systems, interactions among humans often involve group interactions, and they also involve a larger number of possible states even for the most simplified description of reality. The complexity of solutions therefore often surpasses that observed in physical systems. Here we review experimental and theoretical research that advances our understanding of human cooperation, focusing on spatial pattern formation, on the spatiotemporal dynamics of observed solutions, and on self-organization that may either promote or hinder socially favorable states.

  2. The Arab Gulf Cooperation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    AD-A202 042,,, ’q AIR WAR CoLLEGE * RESEARCH REPORT THE ARAB GULF COOPEwATION COUNCIL COLONEL MOHAMMAD) F. ALBISUI ROYAL SAUDI AIR FORCE 1988...THE ARAB GULF COOPERATION COUNCIL by Mohammad F. Albishi Colonel, Royal Saudi Air Force A RESEARCH REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY in FULFILLMENT OF THE...4 Qatar........................................ 5 Saudi Arabia................................. 6 United Arab Emirates

  3. International Business : cooperation within networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anne van Delft

    2011-01-01

    Internationalisation is the expansion of a firms operations to foreign markets and includes not only import and export but also foreign direct investments and international cooperation. Today’s globalising economy has resulted in a growing number of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) undertaking

  4. The Rhetorical Arts of Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahnestock, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Human social evolution depends in part on using language persuasively to secure cooperation. Rhetoric emerged in the West over two thousand years ago as a deliberate cultural construction. Though often misunderstood today, rhetoric is fundamental in general education programs that teach students how knowledge is forged in agreement and applied.…

  5. Managing Diversity within Cooperative Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, D. Merrill; Rice, Jennifer A. King

    1994-01-01

    Six focus groups analyzed findings of a literature review on cultural diversity's effects on productivity and effectiveness. Action steps for Cooperative Extension were outlined: implementing affirmative action, valuing diversity, managing diversity, creating new management structures, and establishing a more supportive environment. (SK)

  6. Market competition and efficient cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandts, J.; Riedl, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    We use laboratory experiments to study the causal effects of favorable and unfavorable competitive market experience on cooperation in a subsequent social dilemma game. The issues we study are part of the broader topic of whether there are behavioral spillovers between different spheres of social

  7. Competitive Cooperation: The Iceberg Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Jerry L.

    Competitive athletes' scores on the Profile of Mood States (POMS) test create an iceberg-like pattern known as the "Iceberg Profile." Their scores for tension, depression, anger, fatigue, and confusion are low while their scores on vigor juts upward creating the "Iceberg Profile." Persons in a cooperative relationship are often…

  8. Cooperative learning and teacher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenman, S.A.M.; Benthum, N.M.M. van; Bootsma, T.G.; Dieren, J. van; Kemp, N. van der

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the implementation effects of a course on cooperative learning for student teachers are described. The course was conducted at two different teacher education colleges in The Netherlands. Based on pre- and post-course observations, a significant treatment effect was found for four of

  9. Risk Analysis for Agricultural Cooperatives

    OpenAIRE

    Kenkel, Philip L.; Parrish, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Grain/fertilizer volumes are major risks for grain/supply cooperatives followed by fertilizer and fuel margins. Operating losses force stock write downs (22% probability) and negative cashflow (15% probability). Decisions on cash and stock patronage, infrastructure investment, and equity retirement improve member returns but increase stock write downs and negative cashflow probability

  10. The Cooperative Satellite Learning Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caler, Michelle

    This document describes the Cooperative Satellite Learning Project (CSLP) which is designed to educate students in the areas of space science, engineering, and technology in a business-like atmosphere. The project is a partnership between the National Aeronautics and Space Association (NASA), Allied Signal Technical Services Corporation, and…

  11. Job scheduling, cooperation and control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calleja, P.; Estevez Fernandez, M.A.; Borm, P.; Hamers, H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies one machine job scheduling situations where clients can have more than one job to be processed and where a job can be of interest for different players. Corresponding cooperative games are introduced and a result on balancedness is provided. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  12. Competition, cooperation, and collective choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas; Reuben Paris, Ernesto Guillermo; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    The ability of groups to implement efficiency-enhancing institutions is emerging as a central theme of research in economics. This paper explores voting on a scheme of intergroup competition which facilitates cooperation in a social dilemma situation. Experimental results show that the competitiv...

  13. Competition, cooperation, and collective choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas; Reuben Paris, Ernesto Guillermo; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    2014-01-01

    The ability of groups to implement efficiency-enhancing institutions is emerging as a central theme of research in economics. This paper explores voting on a scheme of intergroup competition, which facilitates cooperation in a social dilemma situation. Experimental results show that the competiti...

  14. Marketing Cooperatives and Financial Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W.J. Hendrikse (George); C.P. Veerman (Cees)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe relationship between the financial structure of a marketing cooperative (MC) and the requirement of the domination of control by the members is analysed from a transaction costs perspective. A MC receives less favorable terms on outside equity than a conventional firm because the

  15. Cooperative effects in spherical spasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    A fully analytical semiclassical theory of cooperative optical processes which occur in an ensemble of molecules embedded in a spherical core-shell nanoparticle is developed from first principles. Both the plasmonic Dicke effect and spaser generation are investigated for the designs in which...

  16. Participatory Evaluation in Development Cooperation

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Knowledge Shared : Participatory Evaluation in Development Cooperation ... du développement, évaluation, études environnementales, travail social, développement communautaire, développement rural, santé publique internationale, sans oublier les autres disciplines reliées au développement durable et équitable.

  17. Competition, cooperation, and corporate culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosfeld, M.; von Siemens, F.A.

    2011-01-01

    Cooperation between workers can be of substantial value to a firm, yet its level often varies substantially between firms. We show that these differences can unfold in a competitive labor market if workers have heterogeneous social preferences and preferences are private information. In our model,

  18. Anti-apoptotic effects of Curcuma longa L. extract and its curcuminoids against blue light-induced cytotoxicity in A2E-laden human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Il; Lee, Eun Hye; Kim, So Ra; Jang, Young Pyo

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the protective effect of the Curcuma longa L. extract (CLE) and its curcuminoids against blue light-induced cytotoxicity in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells laded with A2E. A2E has been concerned in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To perform this study, A2E-accumulated ARPE-19 cells were exposed to blue light to induce cytotoxicity. The cytotoxicity and apoptotic gene expression levels were evaluated using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay and real-time PCR analysis, respectively. Curcuma longa L. extract was found to exert a protective effect in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 15 μm, curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin exerted significant protective effects against blue light-induced cytotoxicity. Treatment with CLE and curcuminoids meaningfully reduced the mRNA levels of c-Abl and p53, which was known to be augmented in apoptotic RPE cells. Demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin were found to inhibit p38 expression, which is increased in blue light-irradiated A2E-accumulated RPE cells. Curcuma longa L. extract and its curcuminoids provided significant protection against photooxidative damage and apoptosis in the RPE cells. Our results suggest that curcuminoids may show potential in the treatment of AMD. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  19. Cooperative Projects - Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubotz, Wiebke; Brücher, Tim; Vamborg, Freja

    2017-04-01

    Today's research in Germany is often organized in large projects and collaborations, so-called cooperative projects ("Verbundprojekte" in German). These projects are defined by a large number of members (more than 50) and participating institutes, e.g. institutes of research organizations such as the Max-Planck society and the Leibniz association, Helmholtz centres, and universities. For coordination purposes these projects usually have a general project manager or project coordinator close to the speaker of the project. Despite this overarching position, it is often challenging for the project manager to really overview the entire project as he is, for example, not involved in the individual institute's recruitment processes or research connections to other institutes via other projects. Additionally, there is neither a formal obligation for the principal investigators and project scientists to report changes within their sub-projects, nor any formal dependency between these sub-projects and the coordination office to ensure a contemporary update of changes and progress in their specific tasks of the project. Therefore, the idea of a coordinating position to oversee the entire cooperative project is sometimes difficult to reach. Furthermore, project managers usually have no formal connection to other project managers. This means that recurrent tasks, for which cooperation between project managers would be helpful, need to be reinvented for each project anew. Due to the lack of this more formalized cooperation between project managers, acquired expertise is often lost. We will illustrate the challenges of this kind of project management based on projects at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (Hamburg) and the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research (GEOMAR, Kiel), but also point out opportunities that arise within a large collaboration of partners. Moreover, we present an approach to coordinate management processes in order to overcome some of the aforementioned

  20. Defectors Can Create Conditions That Rescue Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Adam James; Cannistra, Caroline; Shou, Wenying

    2015-01-01

    Cooperation based on the production of costly common goods is observed throughout nature. This is puzzling, as cooperation is vulnerable to exploitation by defectors which enjoy a fitness advantage by consuming the common good without contributing fairly. Depletion of the common good can lead to population collapse and the destruction of cooperation. However, population collapse implies small population size, which, in a structured population, is known to favor cooperation. This happens because small population size increases variability in cooperator frequency across different locations. Since individuals in cooperator-dominated locations (which are most likely cooperators) will grow more than those in defector-dominated locations (which are most likely defectors), cooperators can outgrow defectors globally despite defectors outgrowing cooperators in each location. This raises the possibility that defectors can lead to conditions that sometimes rescue cooperation from defector-induced destruction. We demonstrate multiple mechanisms through which this can occur, using an individual-based approach to model stochastic birth, death, migration, and mutation events. First, during defector-induced population collapse, defectors occasionally go extinct before cooperators by chance, which allows cooperators to grow. Second, empty locations, either preexisting or created by defector-induced population extinction, can favor cooperation because they allow cooperator but not defector migrants to grow. These factors lead to the counterintuitive result that the initial presence of defectors sometimes allows better survival of cooperation compared to when defectors are initially absent. Finally, we find that resource limitation, inducible by defectors, can select for mutations adaptive to resource limitation. When these mutations are initially present at low levels or continuously generated at a moderate rate, they can favor cooperation by further reducing local population size