WorldWideScience

Sample records for cooler system flight

  1. Cryogenic characterization of the Planck sorption cooler system flight model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgante, G; Terenzi, L; Butler, C; Mandolesi, N [INAF - IASF Bologna, via P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Pearson, D; Wilson, P; Hernandez, B; Wade, L [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena California 91109 (United States); Melot, F; Stassi, P [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie 53 Avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Gregorio, A [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Trieste, via Valerio 2 - I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bersanelli, M, E-mail: morgante@iasfbo.inaf.i [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, - I20133 Milano (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Two continuous closed-cycle hydrogen Joule-Thomson (J-T) sorption coolers have been fabricated and assembled by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the European Space Agency (ESA) Planck mission. Each refrigerator has been designed to provide a total of {approx} 1W of cooling power at two instrument interfaces: they directly cool the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) around 20K while providing a pre-cooling stage for a 4 K J-T mechanical refrigerator for the High Frequency Instrument (HFI). After sub-system level validation at JPL, the cryocoolers have been delivered to ESA in 2005. In this paper we present the results of the cryogenic qualification and test campaigns of the Nominal Unit on the flight model spacecraft performed at the CSL (Centre Spatial de Liege) facilities in 2008. Test results in terms of input power, cooling power, temperature, and temperature fluctuations over the flight allowable ranges for these interfaces are reported and analyzed with respect to mission requirements.

  2. Cryogenic characterization of the Planck sorption cooler system flight model

    CERN Document Server

    Morgante, G; Melot, F; Stassi, P; Terenzi, L; Wilson, P; Hernandez, B; Wade, L; Gregorio, A; Bersanelli, M; Butler, C; Mandolesi, N; 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12016

    2009-01-01

    This paper is part of the Prelaunch status LFI papers published on JINST: http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=extra.proc5/1748-0221 Two continuous closed-cycle hydrogen Joule-Thomson (J-T) sorption coolers have been fabricated and assembled by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the European Space Agency (ESA) Planck mission. Each refrigerator has been designed to provide a total of ~ 1W of cooling power at two instrument interfaces: they directly cool the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) around 20K while providing a pre-cooling stage for a 4 K J-T mechanical refrigerator for the High Frequency Instrument (HFI). After sub-system level validation at JPL, the cryocoolers have been delivered to ESA in 2005. In this paper we present the results of the cryogenic qualification and test campaigns of the Nominal Unit on the flight model spacecraft performed at the CSL (Centre Spatial de Liege) facilities in 2008. Test results in terms of input power, cooling power, temperature, and temperature fluctuations o...

  3. Radiant coolers - Theory, flight histories, design comparisons and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, M. J.; Sherman, A.; Hickman, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    Radiant coolers have been developed for application to the cooling of infrared detectors aboard NASA earth observation systems and as part of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. The prime design constraints for these coolers are the location of the cooler aboard the satellite and the satellite orbit. Flight data from several coolers indicates that, in general, design temperatures are achieved. However, potential problems relative to the contamination of cold surfaces are also revealed by the data. A comparison among the various cooler designs and flight performances indicates design improvements that can minimize the contamination problem in the future.

  4. Evaluation of Stirling cooler system for cryogenic CO2 capture

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Chun Feng; Kitamura, Yutaka; Li, Shu Hong

    2012-01-01

    In previous research, a cryogenic system based on Stirling coolers has been developed. In this work, the novel system was applied on CO2 capture from post-combustion flue gas and different process parameters (i.e. flow rate of feed gas, temperature of Stirling cooler and operating condition) were investigated to obtain the optimal performance (CO2 recovery and energy consumption). From the extensive experiments, it was concluded that the cryogenic system could realize CO2 capture without solv...

  5. A digital energy control system for the LEAR electron cooler

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Fritz; Molinari, G; Ramos, U

    1993-01-01

    A feedback control system has been developed to correct any energy errors that may occur when operating the electron cooler on LEAR. Drifts and, above all, the space charge effects are the main sources of error. Error cancellation must be compatible with the pulsed mode of operation of the electron cooler so that the beam must be stabilized at the right energy before the end of the corresponding flat top is reached.

  6. Molecular absorption cryogenic cooler for liquid hydrogen propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, G. A.; Jones, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    A light weight, long life molecular absorption cryogenic cooler (MACC) system is described which can use low temperature waste heat to provide cooling for liquid hydrogen propellant tanks for interplanetary spacecraft. Detailed tradeoff studies were made to evaluate the refrigeration system component interactions in order to minimize the mass of the spacecraft cooler system. Based on this analysis a refrigerator system mass of 31 kg is required to provide the .48 watts of cooling required by a 2.3 meter diameter liquid hydrogen tank.

  7. Thermal Assessment of Landsat-7 ETM+ Radiative Cooler in Instrument and Spacecraft Thermal Vacuum Tests and in Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    1999-01-01

    During the radiative cooler cool-down phase of the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instrument thermal vacuum test #3, the coldest temperature that the Cold Focal Plane Array (CFPA) achieved was 89.5 K. The cold stage/CFPA temperature decreased from 315 K to 89.5 K in 80 hours. In the spacecraft and instrument integrated thermal vacuum test, the cold stage/CFPA temperature decreased from 315 K to 86.9 K in 80 hours, and was still decreasing at a rate of 0.08 K/hr when the cool-down was terminated. The cool-down was faster, and a colder CFPA temperature was obtained. In flight, the cooler cool- down was even faster, and colder. The cold stage/CFPA temperature decreased from 315 K to 89.7 K in 33 hours, and was still decreasing at a rate of 1 K/hr when cool- down was terminated at 89.7 K. The factors that affected the ETM+ cooler cool-down are the radiation heat sink temperature for the cold stage and intermediate stage, parasitic radiation heat load to the cooler, parasitic conduction heat load to the cooler, and cooler outgas time preceding cooler cool-down.

  8. Thermal Assessment of Landsat-7 ETM+ Radiative Cooler in Instrument and Spacecraft Thermal Vacuum Tests and in Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    1999-01-01

    During the radiative cooler cool-down phase of the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instrument thermal vacuum test #3, the coldest temperature that the Cold Focal Plane Array (CFPA) achieved was 89.5 K. The cold stage/CFPA temperature decreased from 315 K to 89.5 K in 80 hours. In the spacecraft and instrument integrated thermal vacuum test, the cold stage/CFPA temperature decreased from 315 K to 86.9 K in 80 hours, and was still decreasing at a rate of 0.08 K/hr when the cool-down was terminated. The cool-down was faster, and a colder CFPA temperature was obtained. In flight, the cooler cool- down was even faster, and colder. The cold stage/CFPA temperature decreased from 315 K to 89.7 K in 33 hours, and was still decreasing at a rate of 1 K/hr when cool- down was terminated at 89.7 K. The factors that affected the ETM+ cooler cool-down are the radiation heat sink temperature for the cold stage and intermediate stage, parasitic radiation heat load to the cooler, parasitic conduction heat load to the cooler, and cooler outgas time preceding cooler cool-down.

  9. Status of the JWST/MIRI Focal Plane System and Cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressler, Michael E.; Goodson, G. B.; Khorrami, M. A.; Larson, M. E.; Mahoney, J. C.; Sukhatme, K. G.

    2009-01-01

    The Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) is a multipurpose imager, coronagraph, and spectrometer for the James Webb Space Telescope. It provides wavelength coverage from 5 through 28 microns and is an integral contributor to all four of JWST's primary science themes. MIRI is being developed as a partnership between NASA and ESA, with JPL providing the Focal Plane System (FPS, consisting of the detectors, control electronics, and flight software) and the cooler, and a consortium of European astronomical institutes providing the optical bench and structure. The flight FPS is being prepared for delivery to the European Consortium for its integration into the optical bench, while the cooler is nearing its Critical Design Review. We describe the capabilities of the FPS and cooler, present test results and the predicted sensitivity performance of the FPS, and update the current status of each these systems. The research described in this poster was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. High-T{sub c} DC SQUID system cooled by pulse-tube cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, D.F.; Nakamura, M.; Yoshizawa, M

    2003-10-15

    We developed a high-T{sub c} DC SQUID system cooled by pulse-tube cooler. To avoid the influence of the wire resistance between SQUID and preamplifier, and to reduce the influence of the temperature fluctuation of pulse-tube cooler, DC coupling between SQUID chip and preamplifier was used and the flux locked loop worked in modulation mode. We also developed a temperature controller, using the DC SQUID as temperature sensor, to control and stabilize the operating temperature of the pulse-tube cooler. With the temperature controller, the DC SQUID system could remain locked for over 8 h.

  11. Low-energy run of Fermilab Electron Cooler's beam generation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, Lionel; Shemyakin, Alexander; /Fermilab; Fedotov, Alexei; Kewisch, Jorg; /Brookhaven

    2010-08-01

    As a part of a feasibility study of using the Fermilab Electron Cooler for a low-energy Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) run at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the cooler operation at 1.6 MeV electron beam energy was tested in a short beam line configuration. The main result of the study is that the cooler beam generation system is suitable for BNL needs. In a striking difference with running 4.3 MeV beam, no unprovoked beam recirculation interruptions were observed.

  12. Modeling of a regenerative indirect evaporative cooler for a desiccant cooling system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellemo, Lorenzo; Elmegaard, Brian; Reinholdt, Lars O.;

    This paper presents a numerical study of a regenerative indirect evaporative cooler, the so-called Dew Point Cooler (DPC), which is part of a Desiccant Cooling system that may both dehumidify and cool humid air. The DPC model is based on first principles using a 1D finite volume scheme and determ......This paper presents a numerical study of a regenerative indirect evaporative cooler, the so-called Dew Point Cooler (DPC), which is part of a Desiccant Cooling system that may both dehumidify and cool humid air. The DPC model is based on first principles using a 1D finite volume scheme...... and determines the steady state working conditions for the component. A sensitivity analysis of the DPC performance is carried out based on the air inlet conditions, air flow rate and recirculation fraction. A recirculation fraction around 0.3 maximizes the DPC net cooling capacity. The supply temperature...

  13. Flight Performance of the AKARI Cryogenic System

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, Takao; Hirabayashi, Masayuki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kii, Tsuneo; Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Masahide; Narasaki, Katsuhiro; Narita, Masanao; Ohnishi, Akira; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Yoshida, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    We describe the flight performance of the cryogenic system of the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI, which was successfully launched on 2006 February 21 (UT). AKARI carries a 68.5 cm telescope together with two focal plane instruments, Infrared Cameras (IRC) and Far Infrared Surveyor (FIS), all of which are cooled down to cryogenic temperature to achieve superior sensitivity. The AKARI cryogenic system is a unique hybrid system, which consists of cryogen (liquid helium) and mechanical coolers (2-stage Stirling coolers). With the help of the mechanical coolers, 179 L (26.0 kg) of super-fluid liquid helium can keep the instruments cryogenically cooled for more than 500 days. The on-orbit performance of the AKARI cryogenics is consistent with the design and pre-flight test, and the boil-off gas flow rate is as small as 0.32 mg/s. We observed the increase of the major axis of the AKARI orbit, which can be explained by the thrust due to thermal pressure of vented helium gas.

  14. Flight Systems Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project will develop the Flight System Monitor which will use non-intrusive electrical monitoring (NEMO). The electronic system health of...

  15. AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEM OF HEAT PUMP STATION GAS COOLER AT THE WIDE RANGE OF HEAT LOAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juravleov A.A.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available There is examined the structure the of control system of gas cooler of heat pump station, which uses the carbon dioxide as the working fluid in the transctitical thermodynamical cycle. It is analiyed the structure of the complex: heat pump station – district heating system.

  16. Mechanical cooler system for the next-generation infrared space telescope SPICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Keisuke; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Takao; Sato, Yoichi; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Yamawaki, Toshihiko; Mizutani, Tadahito; Matsuhara, Hideo; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Okabayashi, Akinobu; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Narasaki, Katsuhiro; Shibai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) is a pre-project of JAXA in collaboration with ESA to be launched in the 2020s. The SPICA mission is to be launched into a halo orbit around the second Lagrangian point in the Sun-Earth system, which allows us to use effective radiant cooling in combination with a mechanical cooling system in order to cool a 2.5m-class large IR telescope below 8K. Recently, a new system design in particular thermal structure of the payload module has been studied by considering the technical feasibility of a cryogenic cooled telescope within current constraints of the mission in the CDF (Concurrent Design Facility) study of ESA/ESTEC. Then, the thermal design of the mechanical cooler system, for which the Japanese side is responsible, has been examined based on the CDF study and the feasible solution giving a proper margin has been obtained. As a baseline, 4K / 1K-class Joule-Thomson coolers are used to cool the telescope and thermal interface for Focal Plane Instruments (FPIs). Additionally, two sets of double stirling coolers (2STs) are used to cool the Telescope shield. In this design, nominal operation of FPIs can be kept when one mechanical cooler is in failure.

  17. Parametric System Identification of Thermoelectric Cooler for Single Photon Avalanche Diode Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Izzati Samsuddin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to model the Thermoelectric Coolers (TEC by means of computational intelligence system identification. Thermoelectric coolers are widely used in cooling, maintaining and stabilizing the temperature of the Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD. SPAD is a temperature sensitive optoelectronic device, where even a slight variation in temperature can cause unstable performance in quantum efficiency, responsibility and dark counts. However, it is not a simple task to derive a mathematical model for TEC since it varies with the operating condition. In this study, Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO was used to identify the mathematical model of the multistage TEC (1639733 from Element 14, which encapsulates dynamics of the SPAD, heat sink and components of the cooling heat exchanger. The model was validated by correlation tests, percentage accuracy and also by comparing its time and frequency responses against that of the TEC. It was found that the obtained model has a good representation of the actual system.

  18. Optimization of a Localized Air Conditioning System Using Thermoelectric Coolers for Commercial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qiushi; Deng, Yadong; Su, Chuqi; Wang, Yiping

    2016-11-01

    To improve the thermal comfort and energy saving of commercial vehicles, an auxiliary air conditioning (AC) system has been constructed. Several distributed components using thermoelectric coolers were applied in a localized AC system to adjust the microclimate around the driver only. A computational fluid dynamics model of a commercial vehicle cabin with a driver was built, the temperature field of the cabin investigated, and the thermal comfort analyzed. Based on the results of the simulations, the temperature around the cold side of the thermoelectric coolers is discussed and optimized by means of the response surface methodology and a multiobjective genetic algorithm. To validate the simulation and optimization results, a bench test was carried out; the results obtained from the simulation showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  19. Optimisation of a desiccant cooling system design with indirect evaporative cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsworthy, M.; White, S. [CSIRO Energy Technology, 10 Murray Dwyer Cr., Mayfield, 2300 Newcastle (Australia)

    2011-01-15

    Solar desiccant-based air-conditioning has the potential to significantly reduce cost and/or greenhouse gas emissions associated with cooling of buildings. Parasitic energy consumption for the operation of supply fans has been identified as a major hindrance to achieving these savings. The cooling performance is governed by the trade-off between supplying larger flow-rates of cool air or lower flow-rates of cold air. The performance of a combined solid desiccant-indirect evaporative cooler system is analysed by solving the heat and mass transfer equations for both components simultaneously. Focus is placed on varying the desiccant wheel supply/regeneration and indirect cooler secondary/primary air-flow ratios. Results show that for an ambient reference condition, and 70 C regeneration temperature, a supply/regeneration flow ratio of 0.67 and an indirect cooler secondary/primary flow ratio of 0.3 gives the best performance with COP{sub e} > 20. The proposed cooling system thus has potential to achieve substantial energy and greenhouse gas emission savings. (author)

  20. Digital flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Vanlandingham, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    The design of stable feedback control laws for sampled-data systems with variable rate sampling was investigated. These types of sampled-data systems arise naturally in digital flight control systems which use digital actuators where it is desirable to decrease the number of control computer output commands in order to save wear and tear of the associated equipment. The design of aircraft control systems which are optimally tolerant of sensor and actuator failures was also studied. Detection of the failed sensor or actuator must be resolved and if the estimate of the state is used in the control law, then it is also desirable to have an estimator which will give the optimal state estimate even under the failed conditions.

  1. Space Shuttle flight control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinar, W. J.; Kubiak, E. T.; Peters, W. H.; Saldana, R. L.; Smith, E. E., Jr.; Stegall, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is a control stabilized vehicle with control provided by an all digital, fly-by-wire flight control system. This paper gives a description of the several modes of flight control which correspond to the Shuttle mission phases. These modes are ascent flight control (including open loop first stage steering, the use of four computers operating in parallel and inertial guidance sensors), on-orbit flight control (with a discussion of reaction control, phase plane switching logic, jet selection logic, state estimator logic and OMS thrust vector control), entry flight control and TAEM (terminal area energy management to landing). Also discussed are redundancy management and backup flight control.

  2. Shipboard electronics thermoacoustic cooler

    OpenAIRE

    Ballister, Stephen C.; McKelvey, Dennis J.

    1995-01-01

    A thermoacoustic refrigerator that was optimized for preservation of biological samples in space, was modified for use as a cooler for the CV-2095 shipboard radar electronics rack. The thermoacoustic cooler was tested in the laboratory and demonstrated at sea aboard USS DEYO (DD-989). In the laboratory, using a calibrated heat load, the data acquisition system was able to account for the total energy balance to within 4%. At the highest operating power aboard ship, 226.6 Watts of acoustic pow...

  3. Transverse Feedback System For The Cooler Synchrotron COSY-Jülich - First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Kamerdzhiev, V; Mohos, I

    2003-01-01

    The cooler synchrotron COSY delivers unpolarized and polarized protons and deuterons in the momentum range 300 MeV/c up to 3.65 GeV/c. Electron cooling at injection level and stochastic cooling covering the range from 1.5 GeV/c up to maximum momentum are available to prepare high precision beams for internal as well as for external experiments in hadron physics. In case of electron cooled beam the intensity is limited by transverse instabilities. The major losses are due to the vertical coherent beam oscillations. To damp these instabilities a transverse feedback system is under construction. First results with a simple feedback system are presented. Due to the feedback system operation the intensity and lifetime of the electron cooled proton beam at injection energy could be significantly increased. Measurements in frequency and time domain illustrate the performance of the system.

  4. Flight Standards Automation System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — FAVSIS supports Flight Standards Service (AFS) by maintaining their information on entities such as air carriers, air agencies, designated airmen, and check airmen....

  5. Improving the Efficiency of the Heat Pump Control System of Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump with Several Evaporators and Gas Coolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sit M.L.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of coordination of the values of the refrigerant flow through the evaporators and gas coolers of the heat pump for the simultaneous production of heat and cold is studied. The compensation of the variations of the total flow through the evaporators is implemented using the variation of the capacity of the compressor and a corresponding change in flow through the auxiliary gas cooler of the heat pump. Control system of this gas cooler is constructed using the invariance principle of the output value (outlet temperature of the heated agent with respect to perturbations on the control channel (the refrigerant flow through the gas cooler. Principle of dual-channel compensation of the disturbance and advancing signal on input of control valve of the refrigerant through the gas cooler is ensured. Due to proposed solution, the intensity of the disturbances on the flow of refrigerant is reduced. Due to proposed technical solution power consumed by the heat pump compressor drive under transients is decreased.

  6. In-Flight System Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1998-01-01

    A method is proposed and studied whereby the system identification cycle consisting of experiment design and data analysis can be repeatedly implemented aboard a test aircraft in real time. This adaptive in-flight system identification scheme has many advantages, including increased flight test efficiency, adaptability to dynamic characteristics that are imperfectly known a priori, in-flight improvement of data quality through iterative input design, and immediate feedback of the quality of flight test results. The technique uses equation error in the frequency domain with a recursive Fourier transform for the real time data analysis, and simple design methods employing square wave input forms to design the test inputs in flight. Simulation examples are used to demonstrate that the technique produces increasingly accurate model parameter estimates resulting from sequentially designed and implemented flight test maneuvers. The method has reasonable computational requirements, and could be implemented aboard an aircraft in real time.

  7. Refurbishment of the cryogenic coolers for the Skylab earth resources experiment package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, J. C.; Luksa, N. C.

    1975-01-01

    Skylab Earth Resources Experiment Package (EREP) experiments, S191 and S192, required a cold temperature reference for operation of a spectrometer. This cold temperature reference was provided by a subminiature Stirling cycle cooler. However, the failure of the cooler to pass the qualification test made it necessary for additional cooler development, refurbishment, and qualification. A description of the failures and the cause of these failures for each of the coolers is presented. The solutions to the various failure modes are discussed along with problems which arose during the refurbishment program. The rationale and results of various tests are presented. The successful completion of the cryogenic cooler refurbishment program resulted in four of these coolers being flown on Skylab. The system operation during the flight is presented.

  8. Parametric analysis of a novel cryogenic CO2 capture system based on Stirling coolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chun Feng; Kitamura, Yutaka; Li, Shu Hong; Jiang, Wei Zhong

    2012-11-20

    CO(2) capture and storage (CCS) is an important alternative to control greenhouse gas (GHG) effects. In previous work, a novel desublimation CO(2) capture process has been exploited making use of three free piston Stirling coolers (namely, SC-1, SC-2, and SC-3, respectively). Based on the developed system, moisture and CO(2) in the flue gas can condense and desublimate in the prefreezing and main-freezing towers, respectively. Meanwhile, the storage column is chilled by SC-3 to preserve the frosted CO(2), and permanent gas (such as N(2)) passes through the system without phase change. The whole process can be implemented at atmospheric pressure and reduce the energy penalty (e.g., solvent regeneration and pressure drop) in other technologies. In this work, the influence of process parameters has been investigated in detail. The optimal conditions for the system are as follows: idle operating time is 240 min, flow rate is 5 L/min, vacuum degree of the interlayer is 2.2 × 10(3) Pa, and temperatures of SC-1, -2, and -3 are -30, -120, and -120 °C, respectively. Under these conditions, the energy consumption of the system is around 0.5 MJ(electrical)/kg CO(2) with above 90% CO(2) recovery.

  9. Performance improvement of double-tube gas cooler in CO2 refrigeration system using nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Jahar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analyses of the double-tube gas cooler in transcritical carbon dioxide refrigeration cycle have been performed to study the performance improvement of gas cooler as well as CO2 cycle using Al2O3, TiO2, CuO and Cu nanofluids as coolants. Effects of various operating parameters (nanofluid inlet temperature and mass flow rate, CO2 pressure and particle volume fraction are studied as well. Use of nanofluid as coolant in double-tube gas cooler of CO2 cycle improves the gas cooler effectiveness, cooling capacity and COP without penalty of pumping power. The CO2 cycle yields best performance using Al2O3-H2O as a coolant in double-tube gas cooler followed by TiO2-H2O, CuO-H2O and Cu-H2O. The maximum cooling COP improvement of transcritical CO2 cycle for Al2O3-H2O is 25.4%, whereas that for TiO2-H2O is 23.8%, for CuO-H2O is 20.2% and for Cu-H2O is 16.2% for the given ranges of study. Study shows that the nanofluid may effectively use as coolant in double-tube gas cooler to improve the performance of transcritical CO2 refrigeration cycle.

  10. Feasibility of a solar-assisted winter air-conditioning system using evaporative air-coolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M. El-Awad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a winter air-conditioning system which is suitable for regions with mildly cold but dry winters. The system modifies the evaporative air-cooler that is commonly used for summer air-conditioning in such regions by adding a heating process after the humidification process. The paper describes a theoretical model that is used to estimate the system's water and energy consumption. It is shown that a 150-LPD solar heater is adequate for air-conditioning a 500 ft3/min (14.4 m3/min air flow rate for four hours of operation. The maximum air-flow rate that can be heated by a single solar water-heater for four hours of operation is about 900-cfm, unless a solar water heater large than a 250-LPD heater is used. For the 500 ft3/min air flow rate the paper shows that the 150, 200, 250 and 300 LPD solar water-heaters can provide air-conditioning for 4, 6, 8 and 10 hours, respectively, while consuming less energy than the equivalent refrigerated-type air-conditioner.

  11. Feasibility of a solar-assisted winter air-conditioning system using evaporative air-coolers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Awad, Mohamed M. [Mechanical Engineering Department, the University of Khartoum, P.O. Box 321 Khartoum (Sudan)

    2011-07-01

    The paper presents a winter air-conditioning system which is suitable for regions with mildly cold but dry winters. The system modifies the evaporative air-cooler that is commonly used for summer air-conditioning in such regions by adding a heating process after the humidification process. The paper describes a theoretical model that is used to estimate the system's water and energy consumption. It is shown that a 150-LPD solar heater is adequate for air-conditioning a 500 ft3/min (14.4 m3/min) air flow rate for four hours of operation. The maximum air-flow rate that can be heated by a single solar water-heater for four hours of operation is about 900-cfm, unless a solar water heater large than a 250-LPD heater is used. For the 500 ft3/min air flow rate the paper shows that the 150, 200, 250 and 300 LPD solar water-heaters can provide air-conditioning for 4, 6, 8 and 10 hours, respectively, while consuming less energy than the equivalent refrigerated-type air-conditioner.

  12. Flight Test of an Intelligent Flight-Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Ron; Bosworth, John T.; Jacobson, Steven R.; Thomson, Michael Pl; Jorgensen, Charles C.

    2003-01-01

    The F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) airplane (see figure) was the test bed for a flight test of an intelligent flight control system (IFCS). This IFCS utilizes a neural network to determine critical stability and control derivatives for a control law, the real-time gains of which are computed by an algorithm that solves the Riccati equation. These derivatives are also used to identify the parameters of a dynamic model of the airplane. The model is used in a model-following portion of the control law, in order to provide specific vehicle handling characteristics. The flight test of the IFCS marks the initiation of the Intelligent Flight Control System Advanced Concept Program (IFCS ACP), which is a collaboration between NASA and Boeing Phantom Works. The goals of the IFCS ACP are to (1) develop the concept of a flight-control system that uses neural-network technology to identify aircraft characteristics to provide optimal aircraft performance, (2) develop a self-training neural network to update estimates of aircraft properties in flight, and (3) demonstrate the aforementioned concepts on the F-15 ACTIVE airplane in flight. The activities of the initial IFCS ACP were divided into three Phases, each devoted to the attainment of a different objective. The objective of Phase I was to develop a pre-trained neural network to store and recall the wind-tunnel-based stability and control derivatives of the vehicle. The objective of Phase II was to develop a neural network that can learn how to adjust the stability and control derivatives to account for failures or modeling deficiencies. The objective of Phase III was to develop a flight control system that uses the neural network outputs as a basis for controlling the aircraft. The flight test of the IFCS was performed in stages. In the first stage, the Phase I version of the pre-trained neural network was flown in a passive mode. The neural network software was running using flight data

  13. Flight mechanics expert systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Rowland E.

    1991-01-01

    A method is established which can be used to solve any problem in equation-driven disciplines. This is accomplished by solving all applicable equations of the given discipline for all variables which occur in each of the equations. The system then provides logic tests to determine if enough information is available to calculate a new variable. By recording the order in which the equations are used, the machine can also supply a derivation of the answer to each problem.

  14. Impulse sales cooler. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Per Henrik (DTI, Taastrup (Denmark))

    2010-11-15

    In the past years, the use of impulse coolers has increased considerably and it is estimated that at least 30.000 are installed in shops in Denmark. In addition, there are many small barrel-shaped can coolers. Most impulse coolers are open, which results in a large consumption of energy, and the refrigeration systems are often quite inefficient. A typical impulse cooler uses app. 5 - 8 kWh/day corresponding to a consumption of energy in the magnitude of 60 GWh/year. For several years, the Danish company Vestfrost A/S has produced an impulse sales cooler in the high-efficiency end and the energy consumption of the cooler is measured to be 4.15 kWh/day. The POS72 cooler formed the baseline of this project. At the start-up meeting in 2008, several ideas were discussed with the objective to reduce energy consumption and to use natural refrigerants. Among the ideas were better air curtains, removable lids, better condensers, use of R600a refrigeration system and better insulation. Three generations of prototypes were built and tested in a climate chamber at Danish Technological Institute and the third generation showed very good performance: the energy consumption was measured to 2.215 kWh/day, which is a 47% reduction compared to the baseline. That was achieved by: 1) Improving the cold air cycling system including the air curtain. 2) Using the natural refrigerant R600a (isobutane) and the Danfoss NLE9KTK compressor, which has better efficiency compared to the compressor in the baseline product. 3) Using a box type condenser without fins (preventing dust build-up) and with a relatively high surface area. 4) Improving the insulation value of the plastic cabinet by reducing turbulence in the air gap between the plastic walls and improving the insulation value of the EPS moulded insulation surrounding the refrigeration system at the bottom of the cooler. 5) Preventing short-circuit of warm air around the condenser. 6) The improvements are cost efficient and will not add

  15. Vision based flight procedure stereo display system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Wan, Di; Ma, Lan; He, Yuncheng

    2008-03-01

    A virtual reality flight procedure vision system is introduced in this paper. The digital flight map database is established based on the Geographic Information System (GIS) and high definitions satellite remote sensing photos. The flight approaching area database is established through computer 3D modeling system and GIS. The area texture is generated from the remote sensing photos and aerial photographs in various level of detail. According to the flight approaching procedure, the flight navigation information is linked to the database. The flight approaching area vision can be dynamic displayed according to the designed flight procedure. The flight approaching area images are rendered in 2 channels, one for left eye images and the others for right eye images. Through the polarized stereoscopic projection system, the pilots and aircrew can get the vivid 3D vision of the flight destination approaching area. Take the use of this system in pilots preflight preparation procedure, the aircrew can get more vivid information along the flight destination approaching area. This system can improve the aviator's self-confidence before he carries out the flight mission, accordingly, the flight safety is improved. This system is also useful in validate the visual flight procedure design, and it helps to the flight procedure design.

  16. Flight Guidance System Requirements Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven P.; Tribble, Alan C.; Carlson, Timothy M.; Danielson, Eric J.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes a requirements specification written in the RSML-e language for the mode logic of a Flight Guidance System of a typical regional jet aircraft. This model was created as one of the first steps in a five-year project sponsored by the NASA Langley Research Center, Rockwell Collins Inc., and the Critical Systems Research Group of the University of Minnesota to develop new methods and tools to improve the safety of avionics designs. This model will be used to demonstrate the application of a variety of methods and techniques, including safety analysis of system and subsystem requirements, verification of key properties using theorem provers and model checkers, identification of potential sources mode confusion in system designs, partitioning of applications based on the criticality of system hazards, and autogeneration of avionics quality code. While this model is representative of the mode logic of a typical regional jet aircraft, it does not describe an actual or planned product. Several aspects of a full Flight Guidance System, such as recovery from failed sensors, have been omitted, and no claims are made regarding the accuracy or completeness of this specification.

  17. Flight Activity and Crew Tracking System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Flight Activity and Crew Tracking System (FACTS) is a Web-based application that provides an overall management and tracking tool of FAA Airmen performing Flight...

  18. System-level flight test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Eardley, D. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Happer, W. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; LeLevier, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Nierenberg, W. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Press, W. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Ruderman, M. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Sullivan, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; York, H. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1999-11-23

    System-level flight tests are an important part of the overall effort by the United States to maintain confidence in the reliability, safety, and performance of its nuclear deterrent forces. This study of activities by the Department of Energy in support of operational tests by the Department of Defense was originally suggested by Dr. Rick Wayne, Director, National Security Programs, Sandia National Laboratory/Livermore, and undertaken at the request of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs Division. It follows two 1997 studies by JASON that focused on the Department of Energy's Enhanced Surveillance Program for the physics package — i.e. the nuclear warhead.

  19. Evaporative cooler including one or more rotating cooler louvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, David W

    2015-02-03

    An evaporative cooler may include an evaporative cooler housing with a duct extending therethrough, a plurality of cooler louvers with respective porous evaporative cooler pads, and a working fluid source conduit. The cooler louvers are arranged within the duct and rotatably connected to the cooler housing along respective louver axes. The source conduit provides an evaporative cooler working fluid to the cooler pads during at least one mode of operation.

  20. Microsystem Cooler Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Wesolek, Danielle M.; Berhane, Bruk T.; Rebello, Keith J.

    2004-01-01

    A patented microsystem Stirling cooler is under development with potential application to electronics, sensors, optical and radio frequency (RF) systems, microarrays, and other microsystems. The microsystem Stirling cooler is most suited to volume-limited applications that require cooling below the ambient or sink temperature. Primary components of the planar device include: two diaphragm actuators that replace the pistons found in traditional-scale Stirling machines; and a micro-regenerator that stores and releases thermal energy to the working gas during the Stirling cycle. The use of diaphragms eliminates frictional losses and bypass leakage concerns associated with pistons, while permitting reversal of the hot and cold sides of the device during operation to allow precise temperature control. Three candidate microregenerators were custom fabricated for initial evaluation: two constructed of porous ceramic, and one made of multiple layers of nickel and photoresist in an offset grating pattern. An additional regenerator was prepared with a random stainless steel fiber matrix commonly used in existing Stirling machines for comparison to the custom fabricated regenerators. The candidate regenerators were tested in a piezoelectric-actuated test apparatus designed to simulate the Stirling refrigeration cycle. In parallel with the regenerator testing, electrostatically-driven comb-drive diaphragm actuators for the prototype device have been designed for deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) fabrication.

  1. Flight Projects Office Information Systems Testbed (FIST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggett, Patricia

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Flight Projects Office Information Systems Testbed (FIST) are presented. The goal is to perform technology evaluation and prototyping of information systems to support SFOC and JPL flight projects in order to reduce risk in the development of operational data systems for such projects.

  2. The Recycler Electron Cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemyakin, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Prost, L. R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-03-19

    The Recycler Electron cooler was the first (and so far, the only) cooler working at a relativistic energy (γ = 9.5). It was successfully developed in 1995-2004 and was in operation at Fermilab in 2005-2011, providing cooling of antiprotons in the Recycler ring. This paper describes the cooler, difficulties in achieving the required electron beam parameters and the ways to overcome them, cooling measurements, and details of operation.

  3. Thermosyphon Cooler Hybrid System for Water Savings in an Energy-Efficient HPC Data Center: Modeling and Installation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Thomas; Liu, Zan; Sickinger, David; Regimbal, Kevin; Martinez, David

    2017-02-01

    The Thermosyphon Cooler Hybrid System (TCHS) integrates the control of a dry heat rejection device, the thermosyphon cooler (TSC), with an open cooling tower. A combination of equipment and controls, this new heat rejection system embraces the 'smart use of water,' using evaporative cooling when it is most advantageous and then saving water and modulating toward increased dry sensible cooling as system operations and ambient weather conditions permit. Innovative fan control strategies ensure the most economical balance between water savings and parasitic fan energy. The unique low-pressure-drop design of the TSC allows water to be cooled directly by the TSC evaporator without risk of bursting tubes in subfreezing ambient conditions. Johnson Controls partnered with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories to deploy the TSC as a test bed at NREL's high-performance computing (HPC) data center in the first half of 2016. Located in NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), this HPC data center has achieved an annualized average power usage effectiveness rating of 1.06 or better since 2012. Warm-water liquid cooling is used to capture heat generated by computer systems direct to water; that waste heat is either reused as the primary heat source in the ESIF building or rejected using evaporative cooling. This data center is the single largest source of water and power demand on the NREL campus, using about 7,600 m3 (2.0 million gal) of water during the past year with an hourly average IT load of nearly 1 MW (3.4 million Btu/h) -- so dramatically reducing water use while continuing efficient data center operations is of significant interest. Because Sandia's climate is similar to NREL's, this new heat rejection system being deployed at NREL has gained interest at Sandia. Sandia's data centers utilize an hourly average of 8.5 MW (29 million Btu/h) and are also one of the largest consumers of

  4. Small high cooling power space cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T. V.; Raab, J.; Durand, D.; Tward, E. [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Redondo Beach, Ca, 90278 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    The small High Efficiency pulse tube Cooler (HEC) cooler, that has been produced and flown on a number of space infrared instruments, was originally designed to provide cooling of 10 W @ 95 K. It achieved its goal with >50% margin when limited by the 180 W output ac power of its flight electronics. It has also been produced in 2 stage configurations, typically for simultaneously cooling of focal planes to temperatures as low as 35 K and optics at higher temperatures. The need for even higher cooling power in such a low mass cryocooler is motivated by the advent of large focal plane arrays. With the current availability at NGAS of much larger power cryocooler flight electronics, reliable long term operation in space with much larger cooling powers is now possible with the flight proven 4 kg HEC mechanical cooler. Even though the single stage cooler design can be re-qualified for those larger input powers without design change, we redesigned both the linear and coaxial version passive pulse tube cold heads to re-optimize them for high power cooling at temperatures above 130 K while rejecting heat to 300 K. Small changes to the regenerator packing, the re-optimization of the tuned inertance and no change to the compressor resulted in the increased performance at 150 K. The cooler operating at 290 W input power achieves 35 W@ 150 K corresponding to a specific cooling power at 150 K of 8.25 W/W and a very high specific power of 72.5 W/Kg. At these powers the cooler still maintains large stroke, thermal and current margins. In this paper we will present the measured data and the changes to this flight proven cooler that were made to achieve this increased performance.

  5. Development of the Sandia Cooler.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Staats, Wayne Lawrence,; Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Leick, Michael Thomas.; Matthew, Ned Daniel; Zimmerman, Mark D.; Arienti, Marco; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Hecht, Ethan S.; Spencer, Nathan A.; Vanness, Justin William.; Gorman, Ryan

    2013-12-01

    This report describes an FY13 effort to develop the latest version of the Sandia Cooler, a breakthrough technology for air-cooled heat exchangers that was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The project was focused on fabrication, assembly and demonstration of ten prototype systems for the cooling of high power density electronics, specifically high performance desktop computers (CPUs). In addition, computational simulation and experimentation was carried out to fully understand the performance characteristics of each of the key design aspects. This work culminated in a parameter and scaling study that now provides a design framework, including a number of design and analysis tools, for Sandia Cooler development for applications beyond CPU cooling.

  6. Comparative study in LTC Combustion between a short HP EGR loop without cooler and a variable lift and duration system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bression, Guillaume; Pacaud, Pierre; Soleri, Dominique; Cessou, Jerome [IFP (France); Azoulay, David [Renault Powertrain Div. (France); Lawrence, David [Mechadyne (United Kingdom); Doradoux, Laurent; Guerrassi, Noureddine [Delphi Diesel Systems (France)

    2008-07-01

    In order to reach future Diesel emission standards such as Euro 6 or Tier 2 Bin 5, NO{sub x} emissions need to be dramatically reduced. Advanced technologies and engine settings such as higher EGR rates, reduced compression ratio, EGR cooler and low-pressure EGR loop - depending on vehicle application - may help to reach this target whilst maintaining low CO{sub 2} emissions and fuel consumption. However, the resulting low combustion temperatures and the low air-fuel ratios lead to a significant increase in HC and CO emissions, especially during the start-up phase prior to catalyst light-off. Moreover, high levels of EGR make transient operation even more difficult. So HC-CO emissions and EGR transient operation represent two key issues that could limit the extension of this alternative combustion mode. Consequently, an in-depth investigation of a variable lift and duration (VLD) system was performed to overcome these problems on a 4-cylinder engine, which was also equipped with a dual HP-LP EGR loop. The VLD system tested in this paper produces a variable camshaft-operated exhaust valve re-opening, which is controlled by a hydraulic rotary actuator, ensuring quick and accurate regulation of the internal gas recirculation (IGR). By increasing gas temperature in the combustion chamber, this advanced technology allows us to reduce HC-CO emissions by 50% under 3 bar BMEP. Although efficient, this technology has to be compared with other solutions from a cost-to-value point of view. The aim of this paper is firstly to compare the double lift exhaust system with a short route high-performance EGR loop without cooler by quantifying their respective gains on steady state points of the NEDC cycle, then by evaluating their potential performances during transient conditions. With the short-route EGR, the potential in HC-CO emission reduction remains significant on a large scale of engine temperatures representative of engine warm up. However, the VLD system allows us to

  7. CFD analysis of turboprop engine oil cooler duct for best rate of climb condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Saurabh; CA, Vinay; Hegde, Suresh M.

    2016-09-01

    Turboprop engines are widely used in commuter category airplanes. Aircraft Design bureaus routinely conduct the flight tests to confirm the performance of the system. The lubrication system of the engine is designed to provide a constant supply of clean lubrication oil to the engine bearings, the reduction gears, the torque-meter, the propeller and the accessory gearbox. The oil lubricates, cools and also conducts foreign material to the oil filter where it is removed from further circulation. Thus a means of cooling the engine oil must be provided and a suitable oil cooler (OC) and ducting system was selected and designed for this purpose. In this context, it is relevant to study and analyse behaviour of the engine oil cooler system before commencing actual flight tests. In this paper, the performance of the oil cooler duct with twin flush NACA inlet housed inside the nacelle has been studied for aircraft best rate of climb (ROC) condition using RANS based SST K-omega model by commercial software ANSYS Fluent 13.0. From the CFD analysis results, it is found that the mass flow rate captured and pressure drop across the oil cooler for the best ROC condition is meeting the oil cooler manufacturer requirements thus, the engine oil temperature is maintained within prescribed limits.

  8. Development of Two-Stage Stirling Cooler for ASTRO-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasaki, K.; Tsunematsu, S.; Ootsuka, K.; Kyoya, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Murakami, H.; Nakagawa, T.

    2004-06-01

    A two-stage small Stirling cooler has been developed and tested for the infrared astronomical satellite ASTRO-F that is planned to be launched by Japanese M-V rocket in 2005. ASTRO-F has a hybrid cryogenic system that is a combination of superfluid liquid helium (HeII) and two-stage Stirling coolers. The mechanical cooler has a two-stage displacer driven by a linear motor in a cold head and a new linear-ball-bearing system for the piston-supporting structure in a compressor. The linear-ball-bearing supporting system achieves the piston clearance seal, the long piston-stroke operation and the low frequency operation. The typical cooling power is 200 mW at 20 K and the total input power to the compressor and the cold head is below 90 W without driver electronics. The engineering, the prototype and the flight models of the cooler have been fabricated and evaluated to verify the capability for ASTRO-F. This paper describes the design of the cooler and the results from verification tests including cooler performance test, thermal vacuum test, vibration test and lifetime test.

  9. A 10 Kelvin 3 Tesla Magnet for Space Flight ADR Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael; Riall, Sara; Pourrahimi, Shahin

    2003-01-01

    Many future space flight missions are expected to use adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs) to reach detector operating temperatures well below one Kelvin. The goal is to operate each ADR with a mechanical cooler as its heat sink, thus avoiding the use of liquid cryogens. Although mechanical coolers are being developed to operate at temperatures of 6 Kelvin and below, there is a large efficiency cost associated with operating them at the bottom of their temperature range. For the multi-stage ADR system being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center, the goal is to operate with a 10 Kelvin mechanical cooler heat sink. With currently available paramagnetic materials, the highest temperature ADR stage in such a system will require a magnetic field of approximately three Tesla. Thus the goal is to develop a small, lightweight three Tesla superconducting magnet for operation at 10 Kelvin. It is important that this magnet have a low current/field ratio. Because traditional NbTi magnets do not operate safely above about six Kelvin, a magnet with a higher Tc is required. The primary focus has been on Nb3Sn magnets. Since standard Nb3Sn wire must be coated with thick insulation, wound on a magnet mandrel and then reacted, standard Nb,Sn magnets are quite heavy and require high currents Superconducting Systems developed a Nb3Sn wire which can be drawn down to small diameter, reacted, coated with thin insulation and then wound on a small diameter coil form. By using this smaller wire and operating closer to the wire s critical current, it should be possible to reduce the mass and operating current of 10 Kelvin magnets. Using this "react-then-wind" technology, Superconducting Systems has produced prototype 10 Kelvin magnets. This paper describes the development and testing of these magnets and discusses the outlook for including 10 Kelvin magnets on space-flight missions.

  10. Development trends in IR detector coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, M.; Rühlich, I.; Wiedmann, Th.; Rosenhagen, C.

    2009-05-01

    For different IR application specific cooler requirements are needed to achieve best performance on system level. Handheld applications require coolers with highest efficiency and lowest weight. For application with continuous operation, i.e. border surveillance or homeland security, a very high MTTF is mandatory. Space applications additionally require extremely high reliability. In other application like fighter aircraft sufficient cooling capacity even at extreme high reject temperatures has to be provided. Meeting all this requirements within one cooler design is technically not feasible. Therefore, different coolers designs like integral rotary, split rotary or split linear are being employed. The use of flexure bearings supporting the driving mechanism has generated a new sub-group for the linear coolers; also, the coolers may either use a motor with moving magnet or with moving coil. AIM has mainly focussed on long life linear cooler technology and therefore developed a series of moving magnet flexure bearing compressors which meets MTTF's exceeding 20,000h (up to 50,000h with a Pulse-Tube coldfinger). These compressors have a full flexure bearing support on both sides of the driving mechanism. Cooler designs are being compared in regard to characteristic figures as described above.

  11. When cooler is not better: Stochastic Resonance Phenomena in Quantum Many-Body Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Huelga, S; Huelga, Susana; Plenio, Martin

    2006-01-01

    We discuss stochastic resonance (SR) effects in weakly driven coupled quantum systems. We show that both dynamical and information theoretic measures of the system's response can be introduced that exhibit a non-monotonic behaviour as a function of the noise strength. We analyze the relation between lack of monotonicity in the response and the presence of quantum correlations, showing that there are parameter regimes where the breakdown of a linear response can be associated to the presence of entanglement. We also show that a chain of coupled spin systems can exhibit an array-enhanced response, where the sensitivity of a single resonator to a weak driving signal is enhanced as a result of the nearest-neighbour coupling. These results enlarge the domain where SR effects exist and should be observable in state-of-the-art arrays of superconducting qubits.

  12. Systems Design, Fabrication, and Testing of a High-Speed Miniature Motor for Cryogenic Cooler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipjyoti Acharya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term storage of liquid hydrogen for space missions is of considerable interest to NASA. To this end, the Reverse Turbo-Brayton Cryocooler (RTBC is considerably lighter than conventional designs and a potentially viable and attractive solution for NASA's long-term Zero-Boil-off (ZBO hydrogen storage system for future space missions. We present the systems design, fabrication, and performance evaluation of the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (PMSM powering a cryocooler capable of removing 20 W of heat at 18 K with a COP of 0.005 and driven by two 2-kW permanent magnet synchronous motors operating at 200 000 rpm and at room temperature and 77 K. Structural, thermal, and rotordynamic aspects of system design are considered.

  13. Li-ion battery thermal runaway suppression system using microchannel coolers and refrigerant injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandhauer, Todd M.; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-11-08

    A battery management system with thermally integrated fire suppression includes a multiplicity of individual battery cells in a housing; a multiplicity of cooling passages in the housing within or between the multiplicity of individual battery cells; a multiplicity of sensors operably connected to the individual battery cells, the sensors adapted to detect a thermal runaway event related to one or more of the multiplicity of individual battery cells; and a management system adapted to inject coolant into at least one of the multiplicity of cooling passages upon the detection of the thermal runaway event by the any one of the multiplicity of sensors, so that the thermal runaway event is rapidly quenched.

  14. Li-ion battery thermal runaway suppression system using microchannel coolers and refrigerant injections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandhauer, Todd M.; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-11-08

    A battery management system with thermally integrated fire suppression includes a multiplicity of individual battery cells in a housing; a multiplicity of cooling passages in the housing within or between the multiplicity of individual battery cells; a multiplicity of sensors operably connected to the individual battery cells, the sensors adapted to detect a thermal runaway event related to one or more of the multiplicity of individual battery cells; and a management system adapted to inject coolant into at least one of the multiplicity of cooling passages upon the detection of the thermal runaway event by the any one of the multiplicity of sensors, so that the thermal runaway event is rapidly quenched.

  15. Vacuum Camera Cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugen, Geoffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Acquiring cheap, moving video was impossible in a vacuum environment, due to camera overheating. This overheating is brought on by the lack of cooling media in vacuum. A water-jacketed camera cooler enclosure machined and assembled from copper plate and tube has been developed. The camera cooler (see figure) is cup-shaped and cooled by circulating water or nitrogen gas through copper tubing. The camera, a store-bought "spy type," is not designed to work in a vacuum. With some modifications the unit can be thermally connected when mounted in the cup portion of the camera cooler. The thermal conductivity is provided by copper tape between parts of the camera and the cooled enclosure. During initial testing of the demonstration unit, the camera cooler kept the CPU (central processing unit) of this video camera at operating temperature. This development allowed video recording of an in-progress test, within a vacuum environment.

  16. Flight Path Recovery System (FPRS) design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-09-01

    The study contained herein presents a design for a Flight Path Recovery System (FPPS) for use in the NURE Program which will be more accurate than systems presently used, provide position location data in digital form suitable for automatic data processing, and provide for flight path recovery in a more economic and operationally suitable manner. The design is based upon the use of presently available hardware and technoloy, and presents little, it any, development risk. In addition, a Flight Test Plan designed to test the FPRS design concept is presented.

  17. Integrated Neural Flight and Propulsion Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshige, John; Gundy-Burlet, Karen; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated neural flight and propulsion control system. which uses a neural network based approach for applying alternate sources of control power in the presence of damage or failures. Under normal operating conditions, the system utilizes conventional flight control surfaces. Neural networks are used to provide consistent handling qualities across flight conditions and for different aircraft configurations. Under damage or failure conditions, the system may utilize unconventional flight control surface allocations, along with integrated propulsion control, when additional control power is necessary for achieving desired flight control performance. In this case, neural networks are used to adapt to changes in aircraft dynamics and control allocation schemes. Of significant importance here is the fact that this system can operate without emergency or backup flight control mode operations. An additional advantage is that this system can utilize, but does not require, fault detection and isolation information or explicit parameter identification. Piloted simulation studies were performed on a commercial transport aircraft simulator. Subjects included both NASA test pilots and commercial airline crews. Results demonstrate the potential for improving handing qualities and significantly increasing survivability rates under various simulated failure conditions.

  18. Digital Flight Control System Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    Uperioust languages and formal progrmiag Logic (Such was the cae ina the formation of the Radio end design, hag resulted in the accelerated Technical...wee In defined , dM tin Osytm e all as wssLuete Ohe 0esig of these same- Isei to btop ues eM m defined . "UK""t fault coie am ep~es syste prior ft Mo... Softwre Cost etilstift, 131 Computer Society 17. ’Simulator Investigation Plan for Digital 1977, Pages 13-177. Flight Controls Validation Technology

  19. Space shuttle digital flight control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minott, G. M.; Peller, J. B.; Cox, K. J.

    1976-01-01

    The space shuttle digital, fly by wire, flight control system presents an interesting challenge in avionics system design. In residence in each of four redundant general purpose computers at lift off are the guidance, navigation, and control algorithms for the entire flight. The mission is divided into several flight segments: first stage ascent, second stage ascent; abort to launch site, abort once around; on orbit operations, entry, terminal area energy management; and approach and landing. The FCS is complicated in that it must perform the functions to fly the shuttle as a boost vehicle, as a spacecraft, as a reentry vehicle, and as a conventional aircraft. The crew is provided with both manual and automatic modes of operations in all flight phases including touchdown and rollout.

  20. Digital control of magnetic bearings in a cryogenic cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, J.; Law, A.; Lind, F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a digital control system for control of magnetic bearings used in a spaceborne cryogenic cooler. The cooler was developed by Philips Laboratories for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Six magnetic bearing assemblies are used to levitate the piston, displacer, and counter-balance of the cooler. The piston and displacer are driven by linear motors in accordance with Stirling cycle thermodynamic principles to produce the desired cooling effect. The counter-balance is driven by a third linear motor to cancel motion induced forces that would otherwise be transmitted to the spacecraft. An analog control system is currently used for bearing control. The purpose of this project is to investigate the possibilities for improved performance using digital control. Areas for potential improvement include transient and steady state control characteristics, robustness, reliability, adaptability, alternate control modes, size, weight, and cost. The present control system is targeted for the Intel 80196 microcontroller family. The eventual introduction of application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) technology to this problem may produce a unique and elegant solution both here and in related industrial problems.

  1. NASA develops new digital flight control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewhinney, Michael

    1994-01-01

    This news release reports on the development and testing of a new integrated flight and propulsion automated control system that aerospace engineers at NASA's Ames Research Center have been working on. The system is being tested in the V/STOL (Vertical/Short Takeoff and Landing) Systems Research Aircraft (VSRA).

  2. Description of the primary flight display and flight guidance system logic in the NASA B-737 transport systems research vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    A primary flight display format was integrated with the flight guidance and control system logic in support of various flight tests conducted with the NASA Transport Systems Research Vehicle B-737-100 airplane. The functional operation of the flight guidance mode control panel and the corresponding primary flight display formats are presented.

  3. LEIR electron cooler status

    CERN Document Server

    Tranquille, G; Parkhomchuk, V; Prieto, V; Sautier, R

    2006-01-01

    The electron cooler for LEIR is the first of a new generation of coolers being commissioned for fast phase space cooling of ion beams in storage rings. It is a stateof- the-art cooler incorporating all the recent developments in electron cooling technology (adiabatic expansion, electrostatic bend, variable density electron beam) and is designed to deliver up to 600 mA of electron current for the cooling and stacking of Pb54+ ions in the frame of the ions for LHC project. In this paper we present our experience with the commissioning of the new device as well as the first results of ion beam cooling with a high-intensity variable-density electron beam.

  4. Materials for syngas coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, R. A.; Morse, G.; Coons, W. C.

    1982-08-01

    A technical basis for materials selection and laboratory testing of practical boiler tube materials which will provide reliable long term service in syngas coolers for coal gasification combined cycle power plants is outlined. The resistance of low alloy steel, stainless steels, and aluminum rich coatings to attach by a high sulfur, medium Btu coal gasification atmosphere was evaluated at 300 to 500 deg C. The materials may have adequate resistance for long time service in radiant coolers operating up to 500 deg C on high sulfur medium Btu gas. Performance is analyzed for thermodynamic and kinetic properties and recommendations for long term tests and development of protective coatings are presented.

  5. Current and Future Flight Operating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudmore, Alan

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the current real time operating system (RTOS) type in use with current flight systems. A new RTOS model is described, i.e. the process model. Included is a review of the challenges of migrating from the classic RTOS to the Process Model type.

  6. Next Generation Flight Controller Trainer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Scott; Barry, Matthew R.; Benton, Isaac; Bishop, Michael M.; Evans, Steven; Harvey, Jason; King, Timothy; Martin, Jacob; Mercier, Al; Miller, Walt; Payne, Dan L.; Phu, Hanh; Thompson, James C.; Aadsen, Ron

    2008-01-01

    The Next Generation Flight Controller Trainer (NGFCT) is a relatively inexpensive system of hardware and software that provides high-fidelity training for spaceshuttle flight controllers. NGFCT provides simulations into which are integrated the behaviors of emulated space-shuttle vehicle onboard general-purpose computers (GPCs), mission-control center (MCC) displays, and space-shuttle systems as represented by high-fidelity shuttle mission simulator (SMS) mathematical models. The emulated GPC computers enable the execution of onboard binary flight-specific software. The SMS models include representations of system malfunctions that can be easily invoked. The NGFCT software has a flexible design that enables independent updating of its GPC, SMS, and MCC components.

  7. A plume spectroscopy system for flight applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makel, D. B.; Petersen, T. V.; Duncan, D. B.; Madzsar, G. C.

    1993-06-01

    An operational plume spectroscopy system will be an important element of any rocket engine health management system (HMS). The flight capable FPI spectrometer will enable prognosis and response to incipient rocket engine failures as well as diagnosis of wear and degradation for on-condition maintenance. Spectrometer application to development programs, such as the Space Lifter, NASP, and SSTO, will reduce program risks, allow better adherence to schedules and save money by reducing or eliminating redesign and test costs. The diagnostic capability of a proven, calibrated spectrometer will enhance post-burn certification of high value, reusable engines, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), where life and reliability are key cost drivers. This paper describes a prototype FPI spectrometer for demonstration and validation testing on NASA's Technology Test Bed Engine (TTBE) at Marshall Space Flight Center. The TTBE test unit is designed with flight prototype optics and a commercial off-the-shelf data processing system.

  8. System design specification Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Flight System (FS), and Ground Demonstration System (GDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-06-14

    The system design specification for ground demonstration, development, and flight qualification of a Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) is presented. The requirements for both a BIPS conceptual Flight System (FS) and a Ground Demonstration System (GDS) are defined.

  9. Engines-only flight control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Frank W. (Inventor); Gilyard, Glenn B (Inventor); Conley, Joseph L. (Inventor); Stewart, James F. (Inventor); Fullerton, Charles G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A backup flight control system for controlling the flightpath of a multi-engine airplane using the main drive engines is introduced. The backup flight control system comprises an input device for generating a control command indicative of a desired flightpath, a feedback sensor for generating a feedback signal indicative of at least one of pitch rate, pitch attitude, roll rate and roll attitude, and a control device for changing the output power of at least one of the main drive engines on each side of the airplane in response to the control command and the feedback signal.

  10. Cooler-Lower Down

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeson, Eric

    1971-01-01

    Reports a verification that hot water begins to freeze sooner than cooler water. Includes the investigations that lead to the conclusions that convection is a major influence, water content may have some effect, and the melting of the ice under the container makes no difference on the experimental results. (DS)

  11. Space and Missile Systems Center Standard: Space Flight Pressurized Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-28

    pressure and vehicle structural loads. The main propellant tank of a launch vehicle is a typical example. Pressurized System: A system that...SPACE AND MISSILE SYSTEMS CENTER STANDARD SPACE FLIGHT PRESSURIZED SYSTEMS APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE...Space Flight Pressurized Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  12. The stack induced draft aerial cooler (SIDAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hircock, N.C. [NC Hircock Process Consulting Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Patching Associates Acoustical Engineering Ltd. Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    The oil and gas industry uses stack induced draft aerial coolers (SIDAC) for process cooling in noise sensitive areas or in areas where no electrical power is available. The technology produces zero noise, zero operating costs and zero emissions. This paper examined the use, operation and economics of fanless, noiseless aerial coolers. Although retrofitting to convert from fin-fan to SIDAC is not viable, this paper illustrated one common application where the installation of a tapered stack over a cooler could work together with variable speed fan drives to enhance the noise suppression achieved by variable speed fan drives. A stack assisted draft air cooler (SADAC) was installed over a conventional engine cooler enclosing the engine exhaust and muffler. The exhaust stack was also acoustically lined to augment the noise suppression of the engine silencer itself. The waste heat of the engine exhaust, combined with the heat from the cooler discharge, was used to create a negative pressure behind the cooler fan. Therefore, at night the fan could back off in speed. Since fan noise is proportional to speed to the exponent 5, even a 20 per cent reduction of fan speed generates a noticeable noise reduction. The noise directive of the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board is for lower noise levels at night rather than daytime. Therefore, this innovation allows plant operators to run coolers at full capacity in the day while backing off fan speed at night. It was concluded that substantial benefits can be achieved by SIDAC and SADAC technology in the areas of noise control, process improvements and emission reductions. The capital costs of using these devices are comparable with conventional systems, and operating costs are reduced.

  13. Integrated Flight Path Planning System and Flight Control System for Unmanned Helicopters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsiang Lin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the design of an integrated navigation and guidance system for unmanned helicopters. The integrated navigation system comprises two systems: the Flight Path Planning System (FPPS and the Flight Control System (FCS. The FPPS finds the shortest flight path by the A-Star (A* algorithm in an adaptive manner for different flight conditions, and the FPPS can add a forbidden zone to stop the unmanned helicopter from crossing over into dangerous areas. In this paper, the FPPS computation time is reduced by the multi-resolution scheme, and the flight path quality is improved by the path smoothing methods. Meanwhile, the FCS includes the fuzzy inference systems (FISs based on the fuzzy logic. By using expert knowledge and experience to train the FIS, the controller can operate the unmanned helicopter without dynamic models. The integrated system of the FPPS and the FCS is aimed at providing navigation and guidance to the mission destination and it is implemented by coupling the flight simulation software, X-Plane, and the computing software, MATLAB. Simulations are performed and shown in real time three-dimensional animations. Finally, the integrated system is demonstrated to work successfully in controlling the unmanned helicopter to operate in various terrains of a digital elevation model (DEM.

  14. Superfluid Vortex Cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaeva, I. A.; Lindemann, U.; Jiang, N.; de Waele, A. T. A. M.; Thummes, G.

    2004-06-01

    A superfluid vortex cooler (SVC) is a combination of a fountain pump and a vortex cooler. The working fluid in the SVC is 4He at a temperature below the lambda line. The cooler has no moving parts, is gravity independent, and hardly requires any additional infrastructure. At saturated vapour pressure the SVC is capable of reaching a temperature as low as 0.75 K. At pressures close to the melting pressure the temperature can be brought down to 0.65 K. As the SVC operates only below the lambda line, it has to be precooled e.g. by a liquid-helium bath or a cryocooler. As a first step of our research we have carried out a number of experiments, using a liquid-helium bath as a precooler for the SVC. In this arrangement we have reached temperatures below 1 K with 3.5 mW heating power supplied to the fountain part of the SVC at 1.4 K. The next step was combining the SVC with a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR), developed at the University of Giessen. It is a two-stage G-M type refrigerator with 3He as a working fluid that reached a lowest temperature of 1.27 K. In this contribution we report on the results of the SVC tests in liquid helium and the progress in the integration of the SVC with the PTR.

  15. SAAB IRST: the system and flight trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ingmar A.; Haglund, Leif

    2003-01-01

    Saab Bofors Dynamics has developed an IRST-system (Infra Red Search and Track) named IR-OTIS (Optical Tracking and Identification System) and flight trials have been carried out with the system mounted on a Saab JA37 Viggen fighter aircraft. This paper consists of three major parts. First an overview of Saab's IRST-programs. The second part describes the system ( IR-OTIS(Viggen) ) that made flight trials during 1998 and 1999 and finally a report from the flight trials. IR-OTIS has mainly three operating modes: 1) IRST-mode where the system covers several different FOS (Field Of Search). 2) FLIR-mode (Forward Looking IR) where the systems LOS (Line Of Sight) is directed from the aircraft. 3) Track-mode where the built-in-tracker controls the LOS. It is also possible to switch from IRST-mode to track-mode automatically. Physically the IR-OTIS(Viggen) consists of the SU (Sensor Unit) and the SPU (Signal Processing Unit). The SU is operating in the longwave IR-band with a 288*4 detector. In all modes the Sensor Unit generates images in 25 Hz and it is also possible to choose one of three FOV. The SPU consists of a Saab designed image processing hardware and several DSPs. Functions in the SPU includes a scene-based NUC (Non Uniformity Correction), anti-Narcissus, a point-target detector including estimation of SNR and a clutter classifier for CFAR, target association, a correlation target tracker and an AGC for image presentation. We carried out over 50 flight trials during 1998 and 1999 in three different rounds. The functionality of the system has increased during the rounds and at the end of the trials all major goals were achieved.

  16. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) software description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, David A.; Dickson, Richard W.; Clinedinst, Winston C.; Slominski, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    The flight software developed for the Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) MicroVAX computer used on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle for Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) research is described. The FM/FC software computes navigation position estimates, guidance commands, and those commands issued to the control surfaces to direct the aircraft in flight. Various modes of flight are provided for, ranging from computer assisted manual modes to fully automatic modes including automatic landing. A high-level system overview as well as a description of each software module comprising the system is provided. Digital systems diagrams are included for each major flight control component and selected flight management functions.

  17. Kilowatt isotope power system phase II plan. Volume II: flight System Conceptual Design (FSCD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    The Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) Flight System Conceptual Design (FSCD) is described. Included are a background, a description of the flight system conceptual design, configuration of components, flight system performance, Ground Demonstration System test results, and advanced development tests.

  18. 14 CFR 121.127 - Flight following system; requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight following system; requirements. 121... Supplemental Operations § 121.127 Flight following system; requirements. (a) Each certificate holder conducting supplemental operations using a flight following system must show that— (1) The system has adequate...

  19. A neural based intelligent flight control system for the NASA F-15 flight research aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urnes, James M.; Hoy, Stephen E.; Ladage, Robert N.; Stewart, James

    1993-01-01

    A flight control concept that can identify aircraft stability properties and continually optimize the aircraft flying qualities has been developed by McDonnell Aircraft Company under a contract with the NASA-Dryden Flight Research Facility. This flight concept, termed the Intelligent Flight Control System, utilizes Neural Network technology to identify the host aircraft stability and control properties during flight, and use this information to design on-line the control system feedback gains to provide continuous optimum flight response. This self-repairing capability can provide high performance flight maneuvering response throughout large flight envelopes, such as needed for the National Aerospace Plane. Moreover, achieving this response early in the vehicle's development schedule will save cost.

  20. Tests of Four PT-415 Coolers Installed in the Drop-in Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A.; Wang, S.T.

    2008-07-08

    The superconducting magnets and absorbers for MICE will be cooled using PT415 pulse tube coolers. The cooler 2nd stage will be connected to magnets and the absorbers through a helium or hydrogen re-condensing system. It was proposed that the coolers be connected to the magnets in such a way that the cooler can be easily installed and removed, which permits the magnets to be shipped without the coolers. The drop-in mode requires that the cooler 1st stage be well connected to the magnet shields and leads through a low temperature drop demountable connection. The results of the PT415 drop-in cooler tests are presented.

  1. Variable acuity remote viewing system flight demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Variable Acuity Remote Viewing System (VARVS), originally developed under contract to the Navy (ONR) as a laboratory brassboard, was modified for flight demonstration. The VARVS system was originally conceived as a technique which could circumvent the acuity/field of view/bandwidth tradeoffs that exists in remote viewing to provide a nearly eye limited display in both field of view (160 deg) and resolution (2 min arc) while utilizing conventional TV sensing, transmission, and display equipment. The modifications for flight demonstration consisted of modifying the sensor so it could be installed and flow in a Piper PA20 aircraft, equipped for remote control and modifying the display equipment so it could be integrated with the NASA Research RPB (RPRV) remote control cockpit.

  2. Advanced transport operating system software upgrade: Flight management/flight controls software description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinedinst, Winston C.; Debure, Kelly R.; Dickson, Richard W.; Heaphy, William J.; Parks, Mark A.; Slominski, Christopher J.; Wolverton, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) software for the Norden 2 (PDP-11/70M) computer installed on the NASA 737 aircraft is described. The software computes the navigation position estimates, guidance commands, those commands to be issued to the control surfaces to direct the aircraft in flight based on the modes selected on the Advanced Guidance Control System (AGSC) mode panel, and the flight path selected via the Navigation Control/Display Unit (NCDU).

  3. Design of All Digital Flight Program Training Desktop Application System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available All digital flight program training desktop application system operating conditions are simple. Can make the aircraft aircrew learning theory and operation training closely. Improve the training efficiency and effectiveness. This paper studies the application field and design requirements of flight program training system. Based on the WINDOWS operating system desktop application, the design idea and system architecture of the all digital flight program training system are put forward. Flight characteristics, key airborne systems and aircraft cockpit are simulated. Finally, By comparing flight training simulator and the specific script program training system, The characteristics and advantages of the training system are analyzed in this paper.

  4. Flight-determined benefits of integrated flight-propulsion control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James F.; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Gatlin, Donald H.

    1992-01-01

    Over the last two decades, NASA has conducted several experiments in integrated flight-propulsion control. Benefits have included improved maneuverability; increased thrust, range, and survivability; reduced fuel consumption; and reduced maintenance. This paper presents the basic concepts for control integration, examples of implementation, and benefits. The F-111E experiment integrated the engine and inlet control systems. The YF-12C incorporated an integral control system involving the inlet, autopilot, autothrottle, airdata, navigation, and stability augmentation systems. The F-15 research involved integration of the engine, flight, and inlet control systems. Further extension of the integration included real-time, onboard optimization of engine, inlet, and flight control variables; a self-repairing flight control system; and an engines-only control concept for emergency control. The F-18A aircraft incorporated thrust vectoring integrated with the flight control system to provide enhanced maneuvering at high angles of attack. The flight research programs and the resulting benefits of each program are described.

  5. Application of Nonlinear Systems Inverses to Automatic Flight Control Design: System Concepts and Flight Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, G.; Cicolani, L.

    1981-01-01

    A practical method for the design of automatic flight control systems for aircraft with complex characteristics and operational requirements, such as the powered lift STOL and V/STOL configurations, is presented. The method is effective for a large class of dynamic systems requiring multi-axis control which have highly coupled nonlinearities, redundant controls, and complex multidimensional operational envelopes. It exploits the concept of inverse dynamic systems, and an algorithm for the construction of inverse is given. A hierarchic structure for the total control logic with inverses is presented. The method is illustrated with an application to the Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Aircraft equipped with a digital flight control system. Results of flight evaluation of the control concept on this aircraft are presented.

  6. Study of a coaxial thermoacoustic-Stirling cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijani, M. E. H.; Spoelstra, S.

    2008-01-01

    A coaxial thermoacoustic-Stirling cooler is built and performance measurements are performed. The cooler uses the acoustic power produced by a linear motor to pump heat through a regenerator from a cold heat exchanger to an ambient one. The cooler incorporates a compact acoustic network to create the traveling-wave phasing necessary for the operation in a Stirling cycle. The network has a coaxial geometry instead of the toroidal one usually used in such systems. The design, construction and performance measurements of the cooler are presented. A measured coefficient of performance relative to Carnot of 25% and a low temperature of -54 °C are achieved by the cooler. This efficiency surpasses the performance of the most efficient standing-wave cooler by almost a factor of two.

  7. Study of a coaxial thermoacoustic-Stirling cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoelstra, S.; Tijani, M.E.H. [ECN Energy Efficiency in the Industry, Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-05-15

    A coaxial thermoacoustic-Stirling cooler is built and performance measurements are performed. The cooler uses the acoustic power produced by a linear motor to pump heat through a regenerator from a cold heat exchanger to an ambient one. The cooler incorporates a compact acoustic network to create the traveling-wave phasing necessary for the operation in a Stirling cycle. The network has a coaxial geometry instead of the toroidal one usually used in such systems. The design, construction and performance measurements of the cooler are presented. A measured coefficient of performance relative to Carnot of 25% and a low temperature of -54 degrees C are achieved by the cooler. This efficiency surpasses the performance of the most efficient standing-wave cooler by almost a factor of two.

  8. cFE/CFS (Core Flight Executive/Core Flight System)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildermann, Charles P.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes in detail the requirements and goals of the Core Flight Executive (cFE) and the Core Flight System (CFS). The Core Flight Software System is a mission independent, platform-independent, Flight Software (FSW) environment integrating a reusable core flight executive (cFE). The CFS goals include: 1) Reduce time to deploy high quality flight software; 2) Reduce project schedule and cost uncertainty; 3) Directly facilitate formalized software reuse; 4) Enable collaboration across organizations; 5) Simplify sustaining engineering (AKA. FSW maintenance); 6) Scale from small instruments to System of Systems; 7) Platform for advanced concepts and prototyping; and 7) Common standards and tools across the branch and NASA wide.

  9. Automated Flight Safety Inference Engine (AFSIE) System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop an innovative Autonomous Flight Safety Inference Engine (AFSIE) system to autonomously and reliably terminate the flight of an errant launch...

  10. Novel Real-Time Flight Envelope Monitoring System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is an aircraft flight envelope monitoring system that will provide real-time in-cockpit estimations of aircraft flight envelope boundaries,...

  11. Novel Real-Time Flight Envelope Monitoring System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is an aircraft flight envelope monitoring system that will provide real-time in-cockpit estimations of aircraft flight envelope boundaries....

  12. Reactive In-flight Multisensor Security System (RIMSS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The need for in-flight event detection and monitoring systems is clear. To address this and other safety and security needs, IEM proposed the Reactive In-flight...

  13. Merging Autopilot/Flight Control and Navigation-Flight Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaleel Qutbodin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this abstract the following commercial aircraft 3 avionics systems will be merged together: (1 Autopilot Flight Director System (APFDS, (2 Flight Control System (FCS and (3 Flight Management Systems (FMS. Problem statement: These systems perform functions that are dependant and related to each other, also they consists of similar hardware components. Each of these systems consists of at least one computer, control panel and displays that place on view the selection and aircraft response. They receive several similar sensor inputs, or outputs of one system are fed as input to the other system. By combining the three systems, repeated and related functions are reduced. Since these systems perform related functions, designers and programmers verify that conflict between these systems is not present. Combining the three systems will eliminate such possibility. Also used space, weight, wires and connections are decreased, consequently electrical consumption is reduced. To keep redundancy, the new system can be made of multiple channels. Approach: The new system (called Autopilot Navigation Management System, APNMS is more efficient and resolves the above mention drawbacks. Results: The APFDS system functions (as attitude-hold or heading-hold are merged with the FCS system main function which is controlling flight control surfaces as well as other functions as flight protection, Turn coordination and flight stability augmentation. Also the Flight Management system functions (as flight planning, aircraft flight performance/engine thrust management are merged in the new system. All this is done through combining all 3 systems logic software’s. Conclusion/Recommendations: The new APNMS system can be installed and tested on prototype aircraft in order to verify its benefits and fruits to the aviation industry.

  14. Micro cryogenic coolers for IR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ryan; Wang, Yunda; Cooper, Jill; Lin, Martin M.; Bright, Victor M.; Lee, Y. C.; Bradley, Peter E.; Radebaugh, Ray; Huber, Marcia L.

    2011-06-01

    Joule-Thomson micro cryogenic coolers (MCCs) are a preferred approach for small and low power cryocoolers. With the same heat lift, MCC's power input can be only 1/10 of a thermoelectric cooler's input, and MCC's size can be only 1/10 of a Stirling cooler's size. With futuristic planar MCC and with high frequency MEMS compressors to be developed, its size can be reduced another order of magnitude. Such "invisible" cryocoolers may revolutionize future IR imaging systems. We will review our studies on the feasibility of MCC with an emphasis on: 1) high thermal isolation levels reaching 89,000 K/W; 2) custom-designed gas mixtures with refrigeration capabilities increased by 10X and pressure ratio reduced to only 4:1; 3) compressors with low pressure ratios; and 4) excellent scalability for further size reduction.

  15. Micropropulsion Systems for Precision Controlled Space Flight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jack

    . This project is thus concentrating on developing a method by which an entire, ecient, control system compensating for the disturbances from the space environment and thereby enabling precision formation flight can be realized. The space environment is initially studied and the knowledge gained is used...... to deduce the requirements for a propulsion system consituting the actuator part of a control system eliminating the disturbances from the space environment. Due to the minute magnitudes of the forces to be delivered, this type of propulsion has been denoted Micropropulsion. Initially a theoretical study...... of the disturbance forces and their influence on a precision controlled spacecraft, is used to deduce the requirements for a micropropulsion system compensating for these. Following this an LTCC based resistojet microthruster is developed and fabricated, utilizing water as fuel. Towards the end of the project...

  16. Telemetry Computer System at Wallops Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, H.; Strock, J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the Telemetry Computer System in operation at NASA's Wallops Flight Center for real-time or off-line processing, storage, and display of telemetry data from rockets and aircraft. The system accepts one or two PCM data streams and one FM multiplex, converting each type of data into computer format and merging time-of-day information. A data compressor merges the active streams, and removes redundant data if desired. Dual minicomputers process data for display, while storing information on computer tape for further processing. Real-time displays are located at the station, at the rocket launch control center, and in the aircraft control tower. The system is set up and run by standard telemetry software under control of engineers and technicians. Expansion capability is built into the system to take care of possible future requirements.

  17. Microsystem Cooler Concept Developed and Being Fabricated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2005-01-01

    A patented microsystem cooler concept has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center. It incorporates diaphragm actuators to produce the Stirling refrigeration cycle within a planar configuration compatible with the thermal management of electronics, sensors, optical and radiofrequency systems, microarrays, and other microsystems. The microsystem cooler is most suited to volume-limited applications that require cooling below the ambient or sink temperature. Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory is conducting development testing and fabrication of a prototype under a grant from Glenn.

  18. [Review of visual display system in flight simulator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guang-hui; Wei, Shao-ning

    2003-06-01

    Visual display system is the key part and plays a very important role in flight simulators and flight training devices. The developing history of visual display system is recalled and the principle and characters of some visual display systems including collimated display systems and back-projected collimated display systems are described. The future directions of visual display systems are analyzed.

  19. Human System Risk Management for Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This brief abstract reviews the development of the current day approach to human system risk management for space flight and the development of the critical components of this process over the past few years. The human system risk management process now provides a comprehensive assessment of each human system risk by design reference mission (DRM) and is evaluated not only for mission success but also for long-term health impacts for the astronauts. The discipline of bioastronautics is the study of the biological and medical effects of space flight on humans. In 1997, the Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) initiated the Bioastronautics Roadmap (Roadmap) as the "Critical Path Roadmap", and in 1998 participation in the roadmap was expanded to include the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) and the external community. A total of 55 risks and 250 questions were identified and prioritized and in 2000, the Roadmap was base-lined and put under configuration control. The Roadmap took into account several major advisory committee reviews including the Institute of Medicine (IOM) "Safe Passage: Astronaut care for Exploration Missions", 2001. Subsequently, three collaborating organizations at NASA HQ (Chief Health and Medical Officer, Office of Space Flight and Office of Biological & Physical Research), published the Bioastronautics Strategy in 2003, that identified the human as a "critical subsystem of space flight" and noted that "tolerance limits and safe operating bands must be established" to enable human space flight. These offices also requested a review by the IOM of the Roadmap and that review was published in October 2005 as "A Risk Reduction Strategy for Human Exploration of Space: A Review of NASA's Bioastronautics Roadmap", that noted several strengths and weaknesses of the Roadmap and made several recommendations. In parallel with the development of the Roadmap, the Office of the Chief Health and Medical Officer (OCHMO) began a process in

  20. Design of Flight Vehicle Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, George; Aiken, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    As the operation of large systems becomes ever more dependent on extensive automation, the need for an effective solution to the problem of design and validation of the underlying software becomes more critical. Large systems possess much detailed structure, typically hierarchical, and they are hybrid. Information processing at the top of the hierarchy is by means of formal logic and sentences; on the bottom it is by means of simple scalar differential equations and functions of time; and in the middle it is by an interacting mix of nonlinear multi-axis differential equations and automata, and functions of time and discrete events. The lecture will address the overall problem as it relates to flight vehicle management, describe the middle level, and offer a design approach that is based on Differential Geometry and Discrete Event Dynamic Systems Theory.

  1. Design of energy-based terrain following flight control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Aijun; Xie, Yanwu; Tan, Jian

    2006-11-01

    Historically, aircraft longitudinal control has been realized by means of two loops: flight path (the control variable is elevator displacement) and speed control (the control variable is propulsive thrust or engine power). Both the elevator and throttle control cause coupled altitude and speed response, which exerts negative effects on longitudinal flight performance of aircraft, especially for Terrain Following(TF) flight. Energy-based method can resolve coupled problem between flight speed and path by controlling total energy rate and energy distribution rate between elevator and throttle. In this paper, energy-based control method is applied to design a TF flight control system for controlling flight altitude directly. An error control method of airspeed and altitude is adopted to eliminate the stable error of the total energy control system when decoupling control. Pitch loop and pitch rate feedback loop are designed for the system to damp the oscillatory response produced by TF system. The TF flight control system structure diagram and an aircraft point-mass energy motion model including basic control loops are given and used to simulate decoupling performance of the TF fight control system. Simulation results show that the energy-based TF flight control system can decouple flight velocity and flight path angle, exactly follow planned flight path, and greatly reduce altitude error, which is between +10m and -8m.

  2. Flight envelope protection system for unmanned aerial vehicles

    KAUST Repository

    Claudel, Christian G.

    2016-04-28

    Systems and methods to protect the flight envelope in both manual flight and flight by a commercial autopilot are provided. A system can comprise: an inertial measurement unit (IMU); a computing device in data communication with the IMU; an application executable by the computing device comprising: logic that estimates an angle of attack; a slip angle; and a speed of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) based at least in part on data received from the UAV. A method can comprise estimating, via a computing device, flight data of a UAV based at least in part on data received from an IMU; comparing the estimated flight data with measured flight data; and triggering an error indication in response to a determination that the measured flight data exceeds a predefined deviation of the estimated flight data. The estimated speed can comprise an estimated airspeed, vertical speed and/or ground velocity.

  3. Ion beam cooler-buncher at the IGISOL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieminen, A.; Hakala, J.; Huikari, J.; Kolhinen, V.S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Szerypo, J. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Billowes, J.; Campbell, P.; Moore, I.D.; Moore, R. [Schuster Lab., Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Forest, D.H.; Thayer, H.L.; Tungate, G. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Birmingham, Edgbaston (United Kingdom); Jokinen, A.; Aeystoe, J. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)]|[CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    An ion beam cooler-buncher for manipulating low-energy radioactive ion beams at the IGISOL facility is described. The cooler-buncher serves as a source of cooled ion bunches for collinear laser spectroscopy and it will be used for preparation of ion bunches for injection into a Penning trap system. (orig.)

  4. Movable Ground Based Recovery System for Reuseable Space Flight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, George L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A reusable space flight launch system is configured to eliminate complex descent and landing systems from the space flight hardware and move them to maneuverable ground based systems. Precision landing of the reusable space flight hardware is enabled using a simple, light weight aerodynamic device on board the flight hardware such as a parachute, and one or more translating ground based vehicles such as a hovercraft that include active speed, orientation and directional control. The ground based vehicle maneuvers itself into position beneath the descending flight hardware, matching its speed and direction and captures the flight hardware. The ground based vehicle will contain propulsion, command and GN&C functionality as well as space flight hardware landing cushioning and retaining hardware. The ground based vehicle propulsion system enables longitudinal and transverse maneuverability independent of its physical heading.

  5. Flight evaluation of a computer aided low-altitude helicopter flight guidance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Harry N.; Jones, Raymond D.; Clark, Raymond

    1993-01-01

    The Flight Systems Development branch of the U.S. Army's Avionics Research and Development Activity (AVRADA) and NASA Ames Research Center have developed for flight testing a Computer Aided Low-Altitude Helicopter Flight (CALAHF) guidance system. The system includes a trajectory-generation algorithm which uses dynamic programming and a helmet-mounted display (HMD) presentation of a pathway-in-the-sky, a phantom aircraft, and flight-path vector/predictor guidance symbology. The trajectory-generation algorithm uses knowledge of the global mission requirements, a digital terrain map, aircraft performance capabilities, and precision navigation information to determine a trajectory between mission way points that seeks valleys to minimize threat exposure. This system was developed and evaluated through extensive use of piloted simulation and has demonstrated a 'pilot centered' concept of automated and integrated navigation and terrain mission planning flight guidance. This system has shown a significant improvement in pilot situational awareness, and mission effectiveness as well as a decrease in training and proficiency time required for a near terrain, nighttime, adverse weather system. AVRADA's NUH-60A STAR (Systems Testbed for Avionics Research) helicopter was specially modified, in house, for the flight evaluation of the CALAHF system. The near terrain trajectory generation algorithm runs on a multiprocessor flight computer. Global Positioning System (GPS) data are integrated with Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) data in the flight computer to provide a precise navigation solution. The near-terrain trajectory and the aircraft state information are passed to a Silicon Graphics computer to provide the graphical 'pilot centered' guidance, presented on a Honeywell Integrated Helmet And Display Sighting System (IHADSS). The system design, piloted simulation, and initial flight test results are presented.

  6. Building A Flight Control System For A Modelled Aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Garratt, Paul William; Rushton, Andrew; Yilmaz, Esat

    2004-01-01

    Abstract. We modelled an aircraft based on the Airbus A320 and constructed a synthesisable flight control system. The novel feature was the use of C and VHDL, Very High Speed Inte-grated Circuit Design Language, to allow the flight control system to reside in a Field Pro-grammable Gate Array in a model aircraft or an Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle. The simulator models axial, normal, transverse, pitch, roll and yaw movements. The flight control system has automatic manoeuvre envelope protection a...

  7. 46 CFR 128.430 - Non-integral keel cooler installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-integral keel cooler installations. 128.430 Section... MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Design Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.430 Non-integral keel cooler installations. (a) Each hull penetration for a non-integral keel cooler installation must...

  8. Integrated assurance assessment of a reconfigurable digital flight control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, W. G.; Davis, R. M.; Benson, J. W.; Smith, M. K.; Eldredge, D.

    1983-01-01

    The integrated application of reliability, failure effects and system simulator methods in establishing the airworthiness of a flight critical digital flight control system (DFCS) is demonstrated. The emphasis was on the mutual reinforcement of the methods in demonstrating the system safety.

  9. Assessment of Drinking Water Quality from Bottled Water Coolers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Farhadkhani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Drinking water quality can be deteriorated by microbial and toxic chemicals during transport, storage and handling before using by the consumer. This study was conducted to evaluate the microbial and physicochemical quality of drinking water from bottled water coolers.A total of 64 water samples, over a 5-month period in 2012-2013, were collected from free standing bottled water coolers and water taps in Isfahan. Water samples were analyzed for heterotrophic plate count (HPC, temperature, pH, residual chlorine, turbidity, electrical conductivity (EC and total organic carbon (TOC. Identification of predominant bacteria was also performed by sequence analysis of 16S rDNA.The mean HPC of water coolers was determined at 38864 CFU/ml which exceeded the acceptable level for drinking water in 62% of analyzed samples. The HPC from the water coolers was also found to be significantly (P < 0.05 higher than that of the tap waters. The statistical analysis showed no significant difference between the values of pH, EC, turbidity and TOC in water coolers and tap waters. According to sequence analysis eleven species of bacteria were identified.A high HPC is indicative of microbial water quality deterioration in water coolers. The presence of some opportunistic pathogens in water coolers, furthermore, is a concern from a public health point of view. The results highlight the importance of a periodic disinfection procedure and monitoring system for water coolers in order to keep the level of microbial contamination under control.

  10. Haptic-Multimodal Flight Control System Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Schutte, Paul C.; Williams, Ralph A.

    2011-01-01

    The rapidly advancing capabilities of autonomous aircraft suggest a future where many of the responsibilities of today s pilot transition to the vehicle, transforming the pilot s job into something akin to driving a car or simply being a passenger. Notionally, this transition will reduce the specialized skills, training, and attention required of the human user while improving safety and performance. However, our experience with highly automated aircraft highlights many challenges to this transition including: lack of automation resilience; adverse human-automation interaction under stress; and the difficulty of developing certification standards and methods of compliance for complex systems performing critical functions traditionally performed by the pilot (e.g., sense and avoid vs. see and avoid). Recognizing these opportunities and realities, researchers at NASA Langley are developing a haptic-multimodal flight control (HFC) system concept that can serve as a bridge between today s state of the art aircraft that are highly automated but have little autonomy and can only be operated safely by highly trained experts (i.e., pilots) to a future in which non-experts (e.g., drivers) can safely and reliably use autonomous aircraft to perform a variety of missions. This paper reviews the motivation and theoretical basis of the HFC system, describes its current state of development, and presents results from two pilot-in-the-loop simulation studies. These preliminary studies suggest the HFC reshapes human-automation interaction in a way well-suited to revolutionary ease-of-use.

  11. Design and Implementation of Flight Visual Simulation System

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Feng; Chai, Wenjian; Wang, Chuanyun; Sun, Xiaoping

    2012-01-01

    The design requirement for flight visual simulation system is studied and the overall structure and development process are proposed in this paper. Through the construction of 3D scene model library and aircraft model, the rendering and interaction of visual scene are implemented. The changes of aircraft flight attitude in visual system are controlled by real-time calculation of aircraft aerodynamic and dynamic equations and flight simulation effect is enhanced by this kind of control. Severa...

  12. ENERGY STAR Certified Water Coolers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Water Coolers that are effective as of February...

  13. Design and Manufacturing of Extremely Low Mass Flight Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Extremely small flight systems pose some unusual design and manufacturing challenges. The small size of the components that make up the system generally must be built with extremely tight tolerances to maintain the functionality of the assembled item. Additionally, the total mass of the system is extremely sensitive to what would be considered small perturbations in a larger flight system. The MUSES C mission, designed, built, and operated by Japan, has a small rover provided by NASA that falls into this small flight system category. This NASA-provided rover is used as a case study of an extremely small flight system design. The issues that were encountered with the rover portion of the MUSES C program are discussed and conclusions about the recommended mass margins at different stages of a small flight system project are presented.

  14. Flight Guidance System Validation Using SPIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naydich, Dimitri; Nowakowski, John

    1998-01-01

    To verify the requirements for the mode control logic of a Flight Guidance System (FGS) we applied SPIN, a widely used software package that supports the formal verification of distributed systems. These requirements, collectively called the FGS specification, were developed at Rockwell Avionics & Communications and expressed in terms of the Consortium Requirements Engineering (CoRE) method. The properties to be verified are the invariants formulated in the FGS specification, along with the standard properties of consistency and completeness. The project had two stages. First, the FGS specification and the properties to be verified were reformulated in PROMELA, the input language of SPIN. This involved a semantics issue, as some constructs of the FGS specification do not have well-defined semantics in CoRE. Then we attempted to verify the requirements' properties using the automatic model checking facilities of SPIN. Due to the large size of the state space of the FGS specification an exhaustive state space analysis with SPIN turned out to be impossible. So we used the supertrace model checking procedure of SPIN that provides for a partial analysis of the state space. During this process, we found some subtle errors in the FGS specification.

  15. An alternative flight control system for an unmanned aircraft whose flight control system fails during a longitudinal flight with constant forward velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Balint, Agneta M.; Ştefan BALINT

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we build up a flight control system for an unmanned aircraft whose flightcontrol system fails during a longitudinal flight with constant forward velocity. This task isaccomplished using only the system of differential equations, which governs the movement of theaircraft around its center of mass. Numerical simulation is given.

  16. Orion Exploration Flight Test Reaction Control System Jet Interaction Heating Environment from Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Molly E.; Hyatt, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Reaction Control System (RCS) is critical to guide the vehicle along the desired trajectory during re-­-entry. However, this system has a significant impact on the convective heating environment to the spacecraft. Heating augmentation from the jet interaction (JI) drives thermal protection system (TPS) material selection and thickness requirements for the spacecraft. This paper describes the heating environment from the RCS on the afterbody of the Orion MPCV during Orion's first flight test, Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1). These jet plumes interact with the wake of the crew capsule and cause an increase in the convective heating environment. Not only is there widespread influence from the jet banks, there may also be very localized effects. The firing history during EFT-1 will be summarized to assess which jet bank interaction was measured during flight. Heating augmentation factors derived from the reconstructed flight data will be presented. Furthermore, flight instrumentation across the afterbody provides the highest spatial resolution of the region of influence of the individual jet banks of any spacecraft yet flown. This distribution of heating augmentation across the afterbody will be derived from the flight data. Additionally, trends with possible correlating parameters will be investigated to assist future designs and ground testing programs. Finally, the challenges of measuring JI, applying this data to future flights and lessons learned will be discussed.

  17. Innovative use of global navigation satellite systems for flight inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eui-Ho

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) mandates flight inspection in every country to provide safety during flight operations. Among many criteria of flight inspection, airborne inspection of Instrument Landing Systems (ILS) is very important because the ILS is the primary landing guidance system worldwide. During flight inspection of the ILS, accuracy in ILS landing guidance is checked by using a Flight Inspection System (FIS). Therefore, a flight inspection system must have high accuracy in its positioning capability to detect any deviation so that accurate guidance of the ILS can be maintained. Currently, there are two Automated Flight Inspection Systems (AFIS). One is called Inertial-based AFIS, and the other one is called Differential GPS-based (DGPS-based) AFIS. The Inertial-based AFIS enables efficient flight inspection procedures, but its drawback is high cost because it requires a navigation-grade Inertial Navigation System (INS). On the other hand, the DGPS-based AFIS has relatively low cost, but flight inspection procedures require landing and setting up a reference receiver. Most countries use either one of the systems based on their own preferences. There are around 1200 ILS in the U.S., and each ILS must be inspected every 6 to 9 months. Therefore, it is important to manage the airborne inspection of the ILS in a very efficient manner. For this reason, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) mainly uses the Inertial-based AFIS, which has better efficiency than the DGPS-based AFIS in spite of its high cost. Obviously, the FAA spends tremendous resources on flight inspection. This thesis investigates the value of GPS and the FAA's augmentation to GPS for civil aviation called the Wide Area Augmentation System (or WAAS) for flight inspection. Because standard GPS or WAAS position outputs cannot meet the required accuracy for flight inspection, in this thesis, various algorithms are developed to improve the positioning ability of Flight

  18. Analisis Laju Pendinginan pada Kulkas Thermoelektrik Super Cooler Dibandingkan Sistem Pendingin Konvensional Menggunakan Gas Freon

    OpenAIRE

    Banjarnahor, Hendri Pronoto

    2016-01-01

    It has been designed and analyzed by using a cooling device which was have a Peltier cooler hot side and a cold side using a principle works of Peltier effect . These study analyze and compare the rate-based thermoelectric cooling refrigerator cooler than conventional cooling systems using freon gas. These study also focused on utilizing conventional refrigerator (Air Freon) that have been damaged as the peltier coolers. By using the DC fan on the cooler side to accelerate c...

  19. F-16XL ship #1 (#849) takes off for first flight of the Digital Flight Control System (DFCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The F-16XL #1 (NASA 849) takes off for the first flight of the Digital Flight Control System (DFCS) on December 16, 1997. Like most first flight, the DFCS required months of preparations. During July 1997, crews worked on the engine, cockpit, canopy, seat, and instrumentation. By late August, the aircraft began combined systems tests and a flight readiness review. Although the Air Force Safety Review Board (AFSRB)- a group that provided double checks on all flight operations - approved the program in late November 1997, a problem with the aircraft flight computer delayed the functional check flight until mid-December.

  20. Development of a hybrid cooler; Udvikling af hybridkoeler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, P.; Toftegaard, R.; Weinkauff Kristoffersen, J. [Teknologisk Institut, Aarhus (Denmark); Juel Skovrup, M. [IPU, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Ibsen, C. [VP Industries, Lem (Denmark)

    2013-04-15

    The project aims to develop a hybrid cooler which acts as a dry cooler in the winter and as cooling tower in summer. Energy consumption for cooling systems with a dry cooler and a cooling tower, respectively, is comparable in the winter months. This phase 1 of the project shows that improvements of 50-100% on the performance of a hybrid cooler can be achieved as compared to a dry cooler. The improvement is achieved by humidifying the air with recirculated water through nozzles so that the air temperature decreases from the dry temperature to the wet temperature, and that the dry cooler surface is humidified with a film of water, which increases the heat transfer coefficient considerably compared to a dry surface. The experiments showed that a humidifier system cannot be used without further action. At face velocities less than 5 m/s the humidification does not yield any improvement, and in some cases the heat transfer in a standard dry cooler is decreased. This is due to entrainment of not fully vaporized droplets which are deposited between the dry cooler fins and form bridges that block parts of the cooler. By modifying the surface characteristics with a coating, it will be possible to drain the water away so that no bridges are formed. The company Accoat, which makes special surfaces, will therefore be associated to phase 2 of the project. Another aspect that was evident in the tests, is the formation of biofilm on the heat exchanger surface, which can reduce performance by up to 25%. Biofilm can be prevented by treating the feed water, and therefore Danish Clean Water A/S associated to phase 2 of the project, as they produce water purification systems for biofouling decomposition. (LN)

  1. Phased array ultrasonic technology (PAUT) contribution to detection and sizing of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of service water systems and shutdown coolers heat exchangers in OPG CANDU stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciorau, P.; Pullia, L.; Hazelton, T., E-mail: peter.ciorau@opg.com, E-mail: lou.pullia@opg.com, E-mail: trek.hazelton@opg.com [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Daks, W. [CAD WIRE, Markham, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Three PAUT techniques [linear scan - longitudinal waves, sector scan -longitudinal waves and sector scan-transverse waves] were developed and validated to assess the MIC attack in service water systems (SWS) and shutdown coolers heat-exchangers (SDC-HX) of Darlington and Pickering CANDU stations. PAUT employs linear array probes with a frequency between 4-12 MHz, depending on surface conditions, component geometry and MIC size/category to be detected. Examples from lab validation and field trials are presented. Based on field trials results, the techniques were optimized and new cal blocks were manufactured. It was demonstrated for mid-length pipes and for SDC-HX, the PAUT is the best technique compared with D-meter conventional UT and with guided waves. The expected field accuracy is about 0.5 mm (0.020{sup )} for large MIC attack. The ligament evaluation is technically achievable for colonies / pin holes located 2 mm under the outer surface. Improvements were identified and implemented for the next outages. (author)

  2. Flight tests of the total automatic flight control system (Tafcos) concept on a DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrend, W. R., Jr.; Meyer, G.

    1980-01-01

    Flight control systems capable of handling the complex operational requirements of the STOL and VTOL aircraft designs as well as designs using active control concepts are considered. Emphasis is placed on the total automatic flight control system (TACOS) (TAFCOS). Flight test results which verified the performance of the system concept are presented.

  3. Knowledge-based system for flight information management. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Wendell R.

    1990-01-01

    The use of knowledge-based system (KBS) architectures to manage information on the primary flight display (PFD) of commercial aircraft is described. The PFD information management strategy used tailored the information on the PFD to the tasks the pilot performed. The KBS design and implementation of the task-tailored PFD information management application is described. The knowledge acquisition and subsequent system design of a flight-phase-detection KBS is also described. The flight-phase output of this KBS was used as input to the task-tailored PFD information management KBS. The implementation and integration of this KBS with existing aircraft systems and the other KBS is described. The flight tests are examined of both KBS's, collectively called the Task-Tailored Flight Information Manager (TTFIM), which verified their implementation and integration, and validated the software engineering advantages of the KBS approach in an operational environment.

  4. A system look at electromechanical actuation for primary flight control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lomonova, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    An overview is presented of the emergence of the ALL Electric flight control system (FCS) or power-by-wire (PBW) concept. The concept of fly-by-power refers to the actuator using electrical rather than hydraulic power. The development of the primary flight control Electromechanical Actuators (EMAs)

  5. Flight Control of the High Altitude Wind Power System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podgaets, A.R.; Ockels, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Closed loop Laddermill flight control problem is considered in this paper. Laddermill is a high altitude kites system for energy production. The kites have been simulated as rigid bodies and the cable as a thin elastic line. Euler angles and cable speed are controls. Flight control is written as a f

  6. A system look at electromechanical actuation for primary flight control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lomonova, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    An overview is presented of the emergence of the ALL Electric flight control system (FCS) or power-by-wire (PBW) concept. The concept of fly-by-power refers to the actuator using electrical rather than hydraulic power. The development of the primary flight control Electromechanical Actuators (EMAs)

  7. Visual Advantage of Enhanced Flight Vision System During NextGen Flight Test Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Harrison, Stephanie J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Ellis, Kyle K.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic Vision Systems and Enhanced Flight Vision System (SVS/EFVS) technologies have the potential to provide additional margins of safety for aircrew performance and enable operational improvements for low visibility operations in the terminal area environment. Simulation and flight tests were jointly sponsored by NASA's Aviation Safety Program, Vehicle Systems Safety Technology project and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to evaluate potential safety and operational benefits of SVS/EFVS technologies in low visibility Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) operations. The flight tests were conducted by a team of Honeywell, Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation and NASA personnel with the goal of obtaining pilot-in-the-loop test data for flight validation, verification, and demonstration of selected SVS/EFVS operational and system-level performance capabilities. Nine test flights were flown in Gulfstream's G450 flight test aircraft outfitted with the SVS/EFVS technologies under low visibility instrument meteorological conditions. Evaluation pilots flew 108 approaches in low visibility weather conditions (600 feet to 3600 feet reported visibility) under different obscurants (mist, fog, drizzle fog, frozen fog) and sky cover (broken, overcast). Flight test videos were evaluated at three different altitudes (decision altitude, 100 feet radar altitude, and touchdown) to determine the visual advantage afforded to the pilot using the EFVS/Forward-Looking InfraRed (FLIR) imagery compared to natural vision. Results indicate the EFVS provided a visual advantage of two to three times over that of the out-the-window (OTW) view. The EFVS allowed pilots to view the runway environment, specifically runway lights, before they would be able to OTW with natural vision.

  8. GPS Based Autonomous Flight Control System for an Unmanned Airship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu G Nair,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An unmanned airship, also known as a Unmanned aircraft System (UAS or a remotely piloted aircraft is a machine which functions either by the remote control of a navigator or pilot. The unmanned airship uses the autonomous flight, navigation and guidance based on the telemetry command of ground station. The Autonomous Flight Control System (AFCS [1] plays a key role in achieving the given requirements and missions. This paper introduces the overall design architecture of the hardware and software of the flight control systems in a 50m long unmanned airship

  9. Measurements of Flat-Plate Milk Coolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlastimil Nejtek

    2014-01-01

    use of flat-plate coolers under specific conditions results in cost reduction and improved milk cooling process. The measurement was performed in several cycles. The first measurement took place in the existing system without the use of the flat-plate cooler. The volume of drawn milk was monitored throughout the milking process along with its temperature, temperature in the tank and electricity consumption of the cooling system. At the second stage, the flat-plate cooler was introduced into the cooling process, which was followed by monitoring the milk and cooling water volume, their temperature, temperature in the tank and electricity consumption of the cooling system. The measured data indicate considerable power cost reduction if upstream flat-plate coolers are applied.

  10. The 747 primary flight control systems reliability and maintenance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The major operational characteristics of the 747 Primary Flight Control Systems (PFCS) are described. Results of reliability analysis for separate control functions are presented. The analysis makes use of a NASA computer program which calculates reliability of redundant systems. Costs for maintaining the 747 PFCS in airline service are assessed. The reliabilities and cost will provide a baseline for use in trade studies of future flight control system design.

  11. The endocrine system in space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, C. S.; Johnson, P. C.; Cintron, N. M.

    Hormones are important effectors of the body's response to microgravity in the areas of fluid and electrolyte metabolism, erythropoiesis, and calcium metabolism. For many years antidiuretic hormone, cortisol and aldosterone have been considered the hormones most important for regulation of body fluid volume and blood levels of electrolytes, but they cannot account totally for losses of fluid and electrolytes during space flight. We have now measured atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), a hormone recently shown to regulate sodium and water excretion, in blood specimens obtained during flight. After 30 or 42 h of weightlessness, mean ANF was elevated. After 175 or 180 h, ANF had decreased by 59%, and it changed little between that time and soon after landing. There is probably an increase in ANF early inflight associated with the fluid shift, followed by a compensatory decrease in blood volume. Increased renal blood flow may cause the later ANF decrease. Erythropoietin (Ep), a hormone involved in the control of red blood cell production, was measured in blood samples taken during the first Spacelab mission and was significantly decreased on the second day of flight, suggesting also an increase in renal blood flow. Spacelab-2 investigators report that the active vitamin D metabolite 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 increased early in the flight, indicating that a stimulus for increased bone resorption occurs by 30 h after launch.

  12. The LEBIT ion cooler and buncher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, S. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, MSU, East Lansing, MI (United States); Bollen, G. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, MSU, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, MSU, East Lansing, MI (United States); Ringle, R. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, MSU, East Lansing, MI (United States); Savory, J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States); Schury, P. [University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

    2016-04-21

    This paper presents a detailed description of the ion cooler and buncher, installed at the Low Energy Beam and Ion Trap Facility (LEBIT) at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). NSCL uses gas stopping to provide rare isotopes from projectile fragmentation for its low-energy physics program and to the re-accelerator ReA. The LEBIT ion buncher converts the continuous rare-isotope beam, delivered from the gas stopping cell, into short, low-emittance ion pulses, required for high-precision mass measurements with a 9.4 T Penning trap mass spectrometer. Operation at cryogenic temperatures, a simplified electrode structure and dedicated rugged electronics contribute to the high performance and reliability of the device, which have been essential to the successful LEBIT physics program since 2005. - Highlights: • High-performance ion cooler/buncher for rare-isotope Penning trap mass spectrometry. • Cryogenic operation lowers emittance; observed effect scales with temperature. • Optimized ion extraction schemes allow for time-of-flight based mass selection. • Observation and characterization of RF-phase dependent ion-pulse profiles.

  13. Orion Launch Abort System Performance During Exploration Flight Test 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Rachel; Davidson, John; Gonzalez, Guillo

    2015-01-01

    The Orion Launch Abort System Office is taking part in flight testing to enable certification that the system is capable of delivering the astronauts aboard the Orion Crew Module to a safe environment during both nominal and abort conditions. Orion is a NASA program, Exploration Flight Test 1 is managed and led by the Orion prime contractor, Lockheed Martin, and launched on a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. Although the Launch Abort System Office has tested the critical systems to the Launch Abort System jettison event on the ground, the launch environment cannot be replicated completely on Earth. During Exploration Flight Test 1, the Launch Abort System was to verify the function of the jettison motor to separate the Launch Abort System from the crew module so it can continue on with the mission. Exploration Flight Test 1 was successfully flown on December 5, 2014 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Space Launch Complex 37. This was the first flight test of the Launch Abort System preforming Orion nominal flight mission critical objectives. The abort motor and attitude control motors were inert for Exploration Flight Test 1, since the mission did not require abort capabilities. Exploration Flight Test 1 provides critical data that enable engineering to improve Orion's design and reduce risk for the astronauts it will protect as NASA continues to move forward on its human journey to Mars. The Exploration Flight Test 1 separation event occurred at six minutes and twenty seconds after liftoff. The separation of the Launch Abort System jettison occurs once Orion is safely through the most dynamic portion of the launch. This paper will present a brief overview of the objectives of the Launch Abort System during a nominal Orion flight. Secondly, the paper will present the performance of the Launch Abort System at it fulfilled those objectives. The lessons learned from Exploration Flight Test 1 and the other Flight Test Vehicles will certainly

  14. A mechanical cooler for dual-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gully, W.; Carrington, H.; Kiehl, W.; Byrne, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    Ball Aerospace has been developing Stirling cycle mechanical cryocoolers specifically for space applications. These coolers are special in that they are designed from the beginning for power efficiency, high reliability, and compatibility with sensitive instruments. We have delivered several of these coolers to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and are currently assembling one for the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) program. In our current research effort, funded by the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO), we are tailoring our basic design to new requirements from the Air Force Research Laboratory and its customers. We describe our success in optimizing a cooler to efficiently provide refrigeration at two different temperatures simultaneously. This two-temperature application requires 0.4 W of cooling at 35 K, and 0.6 W of cooling at 60 K. We have met these requirements with an input power of approximately 70 W from a dc source with a breadboard version of the cooler. We expect to deliver the protoflight version of this cooler to the Air Force Research Laboratory in January 1998.

  15. The Max Launch Abort System - Concept, Flight Test, and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) is an independent engineering analysis and test organization providing support across the range of NASA programs. In 2007 NASA was developing the launch escape system for the Orion spacecraft that was evolved from the traditional tower-configuration escape systems used for the historic Mercury and Apollo spacecraft. The NESC was tasked, as a programmatic risk-reduction effort to develop and flight test an alternative to the Orion baseline escape system concept. This project became known as the Max Launch Abort System (MLAS), named in honor of Maxime Faget, the developer of the original Mercury escape system. Over the course of approximately two years the NESC performed conceptual and tradeoff analyses, designed and built full-scale flight test hardware, and conducted a flight test demonstration in July 2009. Since the flight test, the NESC has continued to further develop and refine the MLAS concept.

  16. Formation Flight Control System for In-Flight Sweet Spot Estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brodecki, M.; Subbarao, K.; Chu, Q.P.

    2013-01-01

    A formation flight control system has been designed that addresses the unique environment encountered by aircraft flying in formation and in the upwash of the leading aircraft. In order to test the control system a simulation environment has been created that adequately represents the aerodynamic co

  17. Formation Flight Control System for In-Flight Sweet Spot Estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brodecki, M.; Subbarao, K.; Chu, Q.P.

    2013-01-01

    A formation flight control system has been designed that addresses the unique environment encountered by aircraft flying in formation and in the upwash of the leading aircraft. In order to test the control system a simulation environment has been created that adequately represents the aerodynamic co

  18. Geophysical flight line flying and flight path recovery utilizing the Litton LTN-76 inertial navigation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitkus, A.F.; Cater, D.; Farmer, P.F.; Gay, S.P. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    The Litton LTN-76 Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) with Inertial Track guidance System (ITGS) software is geared toward the airborne survey industry. This report is a summary of tests performed with the LTN-76 designed to fly an airborne geophysical survey as well as to recover the subsequent flight path utilizing INS derived coordinates.

  19. 76 FR 31456 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System: Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ...; Electronic Flight Control System: Control Surface Position Awareness AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... design features include an electronic flight control system. The applicable airworthiness regulations do... an electronic flight control system and no direct coupling from the cockpit controller to the...

  20. Integration of optical measurement methods with flight parameter measurement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopecki, Grzegorz; Rzucidlo, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    During the AIM (advanced in-flight measurement techniques) and AIM2 projects, innovative modern techniques were developed. The purpose of the AIM project was to develop optical measurement techniques dedicated for flight tests. Such methods give information about aircraft elements deformation, thermal loads or pressure distribution, etc. In AIM2 the development of optical methods for flight testing was continued. In particular, this project aimed at the development of methods that could be easily applied in flight tests in an industrial setting. Another equally important task was to guarantee the synchronization of the classical measuring system with cameras. The PW-6U glider used in flight tests was provided by the Rzeszów University of Technology. The glider had all the equipment necessary for testing the IPCT (image pattern correlation technique) and IRT (infrared thermometry) methods. Additionally, equipment adequate for the measurement of typical flight parameters, registration and analysis has been developed. This article describes the designed system, as well as presenting the system’s application during flight tests. Additionally, the results obtained in flight tests show certain limitations of the IRT method as applied.

  1. Biomechanics and biomimetics in insect-inspired flight systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Ravi, Sridhar; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Tanaka, Hiroto

    2016-09-26

    Insect- and bird-size drones-micro air vehicles (MAV) that can perform autonomous flight in natural and man-made environments are now an active and well-integrated research area. MAVs normally operate at a low speed in a Reynolds number regime of 10(4)-10(5) or lower, in which most flying animals of insects, birds and bats fly, and encounter unconventional challenges in generating sufficient aerodynamic forces to stay airborne and in controlling flight autonomy to achieve complex manoeuvres. Flying insects that power and control flight by flapping wings are capable of sophisticated aerodynamic force production and precise, agile manoeuvring, through an integrated system consisting of wings to generate aerodynamic force, muscles to move the wings and a control system to modulate power output from the muscles. In this article, we give a selective review on the state of the art of biomechanics in bioinspired flight systems in terms of flapping and flexible wing aerodynamics, flight dynamics and stability, passive and active mechanisms in stabilization and control, as well as flapping flight in unsteady environments. We further highlight recent advances in biomimetics of flapping-wing MAVs with a specific focus on insect-inspired wing design and fabrication, as well as sensing systems.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'.

  2. Effects of the space flight environment on the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Butel, Janet S.; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Space flight conditions have a dramatic effect on a variety of physiologic functions of mammals, including muscle, bone, and neurovestibular function. Among the physiological functions that are affected when humans or animals are exposed to space flight conditions is the immune response. The focus of this review is on the function of the immune system in space flight conditions during actual space flights, as well as in models of space flight conditions on the earth. The experiments were carried out in tissue culture systems, in animal models, and in human subjects. The results indicate that space flight conditions alter cell-mediated immune responses, including lymphocyte proliferation and subset distribution, and cytokine production. The mechanism(s) of space flight-induced alterations in immune system function remain(s) to be established. It is likely, however, that multiple factors, including microgravity, stress, neuroendocrine factors, sleep disruption, and nutritional factors, are involved in altering certain functions of the immune system. Such alterations could lead to compromised defenses against infections and tumors.

  3. F-16XL ship #1 (#849) with Digital Flight Control System (DFCS) in flight over desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    An image of the F-16XL #1 during its functional flight check of the Digital Flight Control System (DFCS) on December 16, 1997. The mission was flown by NASA research pilot Dana Purifoy, and lasted 1 hour and 25 minutes. The tests included pilot familiarly, functional check, and handling qualities evaluation maneuvers to a speed of Mach 0.6 and 300 knots. Purifoy completed all the briefed data points with no problems, and reported that the DFCS handled as well, if not better than the analog computer system that it replaced.

  4. Reduction of Flight Control System/Structural Mode Interaction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel approach is proposed for reducing the degree of interaction of a high gain flight control system with the airframe structural vibration modes, representing a...

  5. The endocrine system in space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, C. S.; Johnson, P. C.; Cintron, N. M.

    1988-01-01

    A trial natriuretic factor (ANF), a hormone recently shown to regulate sodium and water excretion, has been measured in blood specimens obtained during flight. After 30 or 42 h of weightlessness, mean ANF was elevated. After 175 or 180 h, ANF has increased by 59 percent, and it changed little between that time and soon after landing. There is probably an increase in ANF early inflight associated with the fluid shift, followed by a compensatory decrease in blood volume. Increased renal blood flow may cause the later ANF decrease. Erythropoietin (Ep), a hormone involved in the control of red blood cell proudction, was measured in blood samples taken during the first Spacelab mission and was significantly decreased on the second day of flight, suggesting also an increase in renal blood flow. Spacelab-2 investigators report that the active vitamin D metabolite 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D-3 increased early in the flight, indicating that a stimulus for increased bone resorption occurs by 30 h after launch.

  6. Performance study on primary gas coolers with horizontal tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, E.L.; Lekhter, V.I.; Gostev, Yu.A. [and others

    1992-12-31

    No. 1-bis coke-oven battery system at the Mariupol C&CW was equipped with primary gas coolers of horizontal-tube type. They consisted of three sections, with working surface areas in m{sup 2} of: I (bottom) 800 (middle) 800 and III (top) 600 respectively. The nominal water flow rate through each cooler was 600-720 m. The coolers were constantly irrigated with tar/water emulsions to remove scale deposits in the inter-tube space. The circulating water from the primary gas coolers is cooled in a e-section cooling tower (type 2VG) equipped with spray nozzles designed by the Dnepropetrovsk Chemical Technology Institute (nominal water throughput 3000 m{sup 3}/h). 1 tab.

  7. An introduction to closed cycle cryogenic coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellis, F. F.

    1980-01-01

    Closed cycle cryogenic coolers are used extensively for cooling infrared detectors and other specialized electronic devices. Because of the special requirements of each electro-optical system it is generally necessary to custom design the cryocooler to fit the requirements. Early and close cooperation between the electro-optical systems designer and the cryocooler manufacturer is important to the successful marriage of the cryocooler with the total electro-optical system. Limitations of various cryocooling techniques are presented, and consideration for cryocooling integration are addressed.

  8. Performance evaluation and design of flight vehicle control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Falangas, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    This book will help students, control engineers and flight dynamics analysts to model and conduct sophisticated and systemic analyses of early flight vehicle designs controlled with multiple types of effectors and to design and evaluate new vehicle concepts in terms of satisfying mission and performance goals. Performance Evaluation and Design of Flight Vehicle Control Systems begins by creating a dynamic model of a generic flight vehicle that includes a range of elements from airplanes and launch vehicles to re-entry vehicles and spacecraft. The models may include dynamic effects dealing with structural flexibility, as well as dynamic coupling between structures and actuators, propellant sloshing, and aeroelasticity, and they are typically used for control analysis and design. The book shows how to efficiently combine different types of effectors together, such as aero-surfaces, TVC, throttling engines and RCS, to operate as a system by developing a mixing logic atrix. Methods of trimming a vehicle controll...

  9. New experimental approaches to the biology of flight control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Graham K; Bacic, Marko; Bomphrey, Richard J; Carruthers, Anna C; Gillies, James; Walker, Simon M; Thomas, Adrian L R

    2008-01-01

    Here we consider how new experimental approaches in biomechanics can be used to attain a systems-level understanding of the dynamics of animal flight control. Our aim in this paper is not to provide detailed results and analysis, but rather to tackle several conceptual and methodological issues that have stood in the way of experimentalists in achieving this goal, and to offer tools for overcoming these. We begin by discussing the interplay between analytical and empirical methods, emphasizing that the structure of the models we use to analyse flight control dictates the empirical measurements we must make in order to parameterize them. We then provide a conceptual overview of tethered-flight paradigms, comparing classical ;open-loop' and ;closed-loop' setups, and describe a flight simulator that we have recently developed for making flight dynamics measurements on tethered insects. Next, we provide a conceptual overview of free-flight paradigms, focusing on the need to use system identification techniques in order to analyse the data they provide, and describe two new techniques that we have developed for making flight dynamics measurements on freely flying birds. First, we describe a technique for obtaining inertial measurements of the orientation, angular velocity and acceleration of a steppe eagle Aquila nipalensis in wide-ranging free flight, together with synchronized measurements of wing and tail kinematics using onboard instrumentation and video cameras. Second, we describe a photogrammetric method to measure the 3D wing kinematics of the eagle during take-off and landing. In each case, we provide demonstration data to illustrate the kinds of information available from each method. We conclude by discussing the prospects for systems-level analyses of flight control using these techniques and others like them.

  10. Flight Test Results for the F-16XL With a Digital Flight Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Susan J.; Bosworth, John T.

    2004-01-01

    In the early 1980s, two F-16 airplanes were modified to extend the fuselage length and incorporate a large area delta wing planform. These two airplanes, designated the F-16XL, were designed by the General Dynamics Corporation (now Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems) (Fort Worth, Texas) and were prototypes for a derivative fighter evaluation program conducted by the United States Air Force. Although the concept was never put into production, the F-16XL prototypes provided a unique planform for testing concepts in support of future high-speed supersonic transport aircraft. To extend the capabilities of this testbed vehicle the F-16XL ship 1 aircraft was upgraded with a digital flight control system. The added flexibility of a digital flight control system increases the versatility of this airplane as a testbed for aerodynamic research and investigation of advanced technologies. This report presents the handling qualities flight test results covering the envelope expansion of the F-16XL with the digital flight control system.

  11. Cosmonauts' haemostasis system status before and after space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzichkin, Dmitry; Markin, Andrey; Morukov, Boris

    Introduction. It is known that cosmonauts expose themselves to psychophysical effort in different phases of space flights as well as in pre- and post-flight period. Stress affects different body systems functioning changes including haemostasis system. It is shown that adrenalin directly activates XII coagulation cascade factor [McKay D. G., Latour I. G., Parrish M. N.,1970], initiating intrinsic clotting pathway and affects fibrinogen concentration increase in plasma [Zubairov D. M., 1978]. A post-flight increase in the fibrinogen concentration was revealed with its drop up to the pre-flight level within rehabilitation period [T. Peter Stein, Margaret D., 2006]. Stress agents influence on haemostasis system is physiologically determined and directed to body preparation before probable blood loss. One can consider this process as a function of intrinsic clotting pathway. But in case of blood loss absence the preliminary permanent coagulation activation can lead to appearance of thrombosis risk. Purpose. The purpose was to study haemostasis system main components functional activity features before and after space flights. Methods. In the citrated plasma of astronauts who performed short-term (10 to 11 days) or long-term (196 to 199 days) the following values were determined: activated partial thrombin time (APTT); prothrombin time; prothrombin index; international normalized ratio; thrombin time (TT); activity of enzymes influencing the function of proteins involved in the formation and lysis of a clot such as antithrombin III, protein C, plasminogen, antiplasmin; content of fibrinogen, as well as intermediate products of formation and degradation of fibrin such as D-dimer, soluble fibrin-monomer complexes (SFMC). Sampling of biomaterial was perfomed 30 to 45 days prior to the flight, during the 1st day of the post flight period (all the examined persons), and in the 7th and 14th day (long-term flights member only) Results. In pre-flight period cosmonauts’ APTT

  12. Biomechanics and biomimetics in insect-inspired flight systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Ravi, Sridhar; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Tanaka, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Insect- and bird-size drones—micro air vehicles (MAV) that can perform autonomous flight in natural and man-made environments are now an active and well-integrated research area. MAVs normally operate at a low speed in a Reynolds number regime of 104–105 or lower, in which most flying animals of insects, birds and bats fly, and encounter unconventional challenges in generating sufficient aerodynamic forces to stay airborne and in controlling flight autonomy to achieve complex manoeuvres. Flying insects that power and control flight by flapping wings are capable of sophisticated aerodynamic force production and precise, agile manoeuvring, through an integrated system consisting of wings to generate aerodynamic force, muscles to move the wings and a control system to modulate power output from the muscles. In this article, we give a selective review on the state of the art of biomechanics in bioinspired flight systems in terms of flapping and flexible wing aerodynamics, flight dynamics and stability, passive and active mechanisms in stabilization and control, as well as flapping flight in unsteady environments. We further highlight recent advances in biomimetics of flapping-wing MAVs with a specific focus on insect-inspired wing design and fabrication, as well as sensing systems. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight’. PMID:27528780

  13. Armstrong Flight Research Center Flight Test Capabilities and Opportunities for the Applications of Wireless Data Acquisition Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will overview NASA Armstrong Flight Research Centers flight test capabilities, which can provide various means for flight testing of passive and active wireless sensor systems, also, it will address the needs of the wireless data acquisition solutions for the centers flight instrumentation issues such as additional weight caused by added instrumentation wire bundles, connectors, wire cables routing, moving components, etc., that the Passive Wireless Sensor Technology Workshop may help. The presentation shows the constraints and requirements that the wireless sensor systems will face in the flight test applications.

  14. The development and flight test of an electronic integrated propulsion control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, H. J.; Painter, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Advanced technical features of the electronic integrated propulsion control system (IPCS) and flight evaluation tests of IPCS (F-111E with TF30-P-9 engines as test vehicle) are described. Nine baseline flight tests and 15 IPCS flight tests were conducted. Instrumentation, data acquisition and data processing systems, software maintenance procedures, flight test procedures, flight safety criteria, flight test results, and ground and flight testing of the aircraft system are described. Advantages conferred by IPCS include: faster accelerations (both gas generator and afterburner performance), better thrust and flight control, reduced flight idle thrust, reduced engine ground trim, extended service ceiling, automatic stall detection, and stall recovery detection.

  15. Investigation of a Simple Visual System for Flight Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    wings or ocelli Mizunami, The diversity of insect ocellar systems, 1994 Fleas lice proturans Dragonflies and damselflies mayflies 7 Identifying...and some do not). – Dragonflies vs. nearctic owlflies •Same sensor suites different behaviors – Very different flight, but all have the same sensor...Flight setup, by David Forester. Network 13 Similar behaving insects, different sensors. \\.J ••• • AFR .!;l 14 Dragonfly in field \\.J ••• • , AFR

  16. Development and Flight Testing of a Neural Network Based Flight Control System on the NF-15B Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomben, Craig R.; Smolka, James W.; Bosworth, John T.; Silliams-Hayes, Peggy S.; Burken, John J.; Larson, Richard R.; Buschbacher, Mark J.; Maliska, Heather A.

    2006-01-01

    The Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) project at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards AFB, CA, has been investigating the use of neural network based adaptive control on a unique NF-15B test aircraft. The IFCS neural network is a software processor that stores measured aircraft response information to dynamically alter flight control gains. In 2006, the neural network was engaged and allowed to learn in real time to dynamically alter the aircraft handling qualities characteristics in the presence of actual aerodynamic failure conditions injected into the aircraft through the flight control system. The use of neural network and similar adaptive technologies in the design of highly fault and damage tolerant flight control systems shows promise in making future aircraft far more survivable than current technology allows. This paper will present the results of the IFCS flight test program conducted at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in 2006, with emphasis on challenges encountered and lessons learned.

  17. Flexible Digital Control & Driving Electronics For Cryo-Coolers Application To Sentinel-3 SLSTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chico, J. C.; Caballero, G.; Gonzalez, D.; Fernandez, A.; Romero, V.; Bataller, E.

    2011-10-01

    The digital control as well as the power electronic implemented in the "Cryo-Cooler Driver Electronics" CDE units have evolved along these last years to new concepts allowing an easier management of the Cryo- coolers in flight programs, at the same time that the performances have been improved. A good example of this evolution in the CDE equipments is the one developed by Astrium Crisa for the Stirling Cooler of Astrium UK of the Sea & Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) instrument, which will be boarded in Sentinel-3. A new concept of CDE has been developed not only to satisfy the specific requirements of the SLSTR Stirling Cooler, but also to get a very modular and scalable architecture that can be adapted easily to different configurations of coolers. This paper describes the SLSTR CDE architecture, showing the problems found during the development of the unit as well as the latest performances achieved during the testing of the EM.

  18. Can Cooler Heads Prevail?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The significant correlation between dropping temperatures throughout the Pliocene and the concomitant explosive expansion of the Hominid brain has led a number of workers to postulate climate change drove human evolution. Our brain (that of Homo sapiens), comprises 1-2 percent of our body weight but consumes 20 -25 percent of the body's caloric intake. We are "hotheads". Brains are extremely sensitive to overheating but we are endowed with unparalleled thermal regulation, much of it given over to protecting the Central Nervous System (CNS). Will there be reversed trends with global warming? The human brain has been shrinking since the end of the Ice Ages, losing about 150cc over the past 10,000 years. Polar bear skulls have been downsizing as well. Almost all mass extinctions or evolutionary upheavals are attributed to global warming: e.g. the Permian/Triassic (P/T) event, i.e., "The Great Dying", 250 million years ago (~90% of all life forms wiped out); the Paleocene/ Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) 55 million years ago. They may be analogs for what might await us. Large creatures, whose body size inhibits cooling, melted away during the PETM. Horses, initially the size of dogs then, reduced to the size of cats. An unanticipated hazard for humans that may attend extreme global warming is dumbing down or needing to retreat to the Poles as did those creatures that survived the P/T event (some references: http://johnhawks.net/research/hawks-2011-brain-size-selection-holocene; Kandel, E. et al Principles of Neural Science 4th ed. New York (US): McGraw-Hill, 2000; Selective Brain Cooling in Early Hominids:phylogenetic and evolutionary implications, Reeser, H., reeser@flmnh.ufl.edu; How the body controls brain temperature; the temperature shielding effect of cerebral blood flow, Mingming Z. et al. J Appl Physiol. 2006 November; 101(5): 1481-1488; news.nationalgeographic.com/ news/2014/03/140327-climate-change-shrinks-salamanders-global-warming-science/; Heat illness and

  19. Interim cryo-cooler/detector report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufeld, K.; Ruhter, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Anderson, E. [CSA Engineering, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-04-19

    This report describes development of an electronic system designed to reduce vibration generated by a cryocooler. The diminished vibration makes it practical to use the active cooler to extract heat from a portable gamma ray detector instrument. The system was developed for a Sunpower cryocooler with an integrated counterbalance mass. The overall momentum cancellation approach is also applicable to other similar cryocoolers. The cancellation system is an assembly of several components tailored to accomplish the required vibration reduction with minimum power consumption and volume. It is designed to be powered by a 18--32 Volt battery. Up to ten harmonics of the 58.65 Hz drive frequency are controlled. In addition to the vibration cancellation, the electronic system produces the drive signal for the cryocooler and regulates the cooler temperature. The system employs a sinusoidal drive to reduce the amount of higher harmonic vibration. A digital signal processor (DSP) is used to perform the high speed vibration control. The Texas Instruments TMS320C31 processor is housed on a third-party board. A second board has analog-to-digital (A/D) and digital-to-analog (D/A) converters. The DSP was programmed in C. The physical system consists of two sets of electronics. The first is housed in a case that is separate from the detector unit.

  20. MEMS Stirling Cooler Development Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Wesolek, Danielle

    2003-01-01

    This presentation provides an update on the effort to build and test a prototype unit of the patented MEMS Stirling cooler concept. A micro-scale regenerator has been fabricated by Polar Thermal Technologies and is currently being integrated into a Stirling cycle simulator at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. A discussion of the analysis, design, assembly, and test plans for the prototype will be presented.

  1. Orion Launch Abort System Performance on Exploration Flight Test 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, R.; Davidson, J.; Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    This paper will present an overview of the flight test objectives and performance of the Orion Launch Abort System during Exploration Flight Test-1. Exploration Flight Test-1, the first flight test of the Orion spacecraft, was managed and led by the Orion prime contractor, Lockheed Martin, and launched atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. This flight test was a two-orbit, high-apogee, high-energy entry, low-inclination test mission used to validate and test systems critical to crew safety. This test included the first flight test of the Launch Abort System preforming Orion nominal flight mission critical objectives. NASA is currently designing and testing the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Orion will serve as NASA's new exploration vehicle to carry astronauts to deep space destinations and safely return them to earth. The Orion spacecraft is composed of four main elements: the Launch Abort System, the Crew Module, the Service Module, and the Spacecraft Adapter (Fig. 1). The Launch Abort System (LAS) provides two functions; during nominal launches, the LAS provides protection for the Crew Module from atmospheric loads and heating during first stage flight and during emergencies provides a reliable abort capability for aborts that occur within the atmosphere. The Orion Launch Abort System (LAS) consists of an Abort Motor to provide the abort separation from the Launch Vehicle, an Attitude Control Motor to provide attitude and rate control, and a Jettison Motor for crew module to LAS separation (Fig. 2). The jettison motor is used during a nominal launch to separate the LAS from the Launch Vehicle (LV) early in the flight of the second stage when it is no longer needed for aborts and at the end of an LAS abort sequence to enable deployment of the crew module's Landing Recovery System. The LAS also provides a Boost Protective Cover fairing that shields the crew module from debris and the aero-thermal environment during ascent. Although the

  2. Cooler Rings and their Applications - Proceedings of the 19th Ins Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, T.; Noda, A.

    1991-08-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Organizing Committee * Preface * Opening Address * I. STATUS REPORT * I-1 The IUCF Cooler after Three Years * I-2 The Heidelberg Heavy Ion Cooler Ring TSR * I-3 Storage and Cooling of Heavy Ions in the ESR up to 200 MeV/u * I-4 Present Status of CELSIUS * I-5 Cooler Synchrotron TARN II, Present and Future * I-6 SATURNE II and MIMAS Status Report * I-7 CRYRING - a Low Energy Heavy Ion Facility * I-8 The Ukrainian (INR, Kiev's) Storage Ring * I-9 Status of the COSY-Jülich Project * II. BEAM COOLING * II-1 In Memory of Dr. Helmut Poth * II-2 Performance of the IUCF Electron Cooling System * II-3 Electron Cooling at TARN II * II-4 Status of the ESR-Electron Cooler and First Results * II-5 Physics with Stored Lithium Ions: Intrabeam Relaxation, Laser Cooling, and Observation of a Cold and Long Lived Ion Beam * II-6 Laser Cooling and Beam Crystallization * II-7 Cyclotron Maser Cooling of Electron and Ion Beams * III. ION TRAP * III-1 Penning Trap Experiments at the University of Washington and at NIST in Boulder * III-2 The HITRAP Project at GSI * III-3 Electron Cooling of Trapped Antiprotons * III-4 Some Results of an RF Ion Trap at NRLM * III-5 Preliminary Results of Laser Cooling of Stored Be Ions in a Penning Trap * III-6 Construction of an RF Ion-Trap for Nuclear Laser Spectroscopy * IV. NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE PHYSICS * IV-1 High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Deeply-Bound Pionic Atoms in Heavy Nuclei by Pion-Transfer Reactions of Inverse Kinematics Using the GSI Cooler Ring ESR * IV-2 Study of Exotic Nuclei Using a Storage Ring * IV-3 Nuclear Physics with the Indiana Cooler * IV-4 The Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the Muon * IV-5 Particle Physics at CELSIUS * IV-6 ϕ0-Factory using TARN II Accelerator * IV-7 Measurement of Energy Dependent Phenomena with Intenal (Polarized) Targets in TARN II * V. ACCELERATOR * V-1 Advanced Stacking Methods Using Electron Cooling at the TSR Heidelberg * V-2 Ultra High Vacuum

  3. The integrated manual and automatic control of complex flight systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, David K.

    1991-01-01

    Research dealt with the general area of optimal flight control synthesis for manned flight vehicles. The work was generic; no specific vehicle was the focus of study. However, the class of vehicles generally considered were those for which high authority, multivariable control systems might be considered, for the purpose of stabilization and the achievement of optimal handling characteristics. Within this scope, the topics of study included several optimal control synthesis techniques, control-theoretic modeling of the human operator in flight control tasks, and the development of possible handling qualities metrics and/or measures of merit. Basic contributions were made in all these topics, including human operator (pilot) models for multi-loop tasks, optimal output feedback flight control synthesis techniques; experimental validations of the methods developed, and fundamental modeling studies of the air-to-air tracking and flared landing tasks.

  4. Pilot control through the TAFCOS automatic flight control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrend, W. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The set of flight control logic used in a recently completed flight test program to evaluate the total automatic flight control system (TAFCOS) with the controller operating in a fully automatic mode, was used to perform an unmanned simulation on an IBM 360 computer in which the TAFCOS concept was extended to provide a multilevel pilot interface. A pilot TAFCOS interface for direct pilot control by use of a velocity-control-wheel-steering mode was defined as well as a means for calling up conventional autopilot modes. It is concluded that the TAFCOS structure is easily adaptable to the addition of a pilot control through a stick-wheel-throttle control similar to conventional airplane controls. Conventional autopilot modes, such as airspeed-hold, altitude-hold, heading-hold, and flight path angle-hold, can also be included.

  5. 环冷机余热回收与利用系统的能量分析%Energy analysis of waste heat recovery and utilization system for ring cooler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘传鹏; 李国俊; 林文佺; 李明浩; 许渡姜; 郁鸿凌

    2015-01-01

    Based on the process of waste heat recovery from sintering and utilization system for ring cooler,the energy flow diagram and the energy flow diagram were draw,the relevant energy evaluation was established. The thermal bal-ance method and exergy analysis were applied to study waste heat utilization in a ring cooler,such as heat loss,energy loss,thermal efficiency and energy efficiency during the process of the conversion and utilization for waste heat resourc-es. The results show that,the thermal efficiency of ring cooler and waste heat boiler were 26.78%and 45.60%,respective-ly,the corresponding energy efficiencies were 22.88%and 45.08%,respectively,hence,ring cooler was the weak link during the recovery and utilization of waste heat system. The main factors affecting the recovery and utilization of waste heat were the air leakage of ring cooler,Un-utilization of sensible heat of the third cooling gas and the process of gas-sol-id heat transfer in sintering bed.%根据某钢厂的环冷机系统回收与利用烧结矿显热的工艺流程,绘制了能流图、(火用)流图,并建立相关能量评价指标,采用热平衡方法和(火用)分析方法对环冷机的余热回收利用状况进行研究,分析了余热资源在回收与利用过程中的热量损失、(火用)量损失、热效率与(火用)效率.结果表明:环冷机、余热锅炉2个环节的热效率分别为26.78%和45.60%,(火用)利用效率分别为22.88%和45.08%,环冷机是余热回收与利用的薄弱环节;目前影响余热回收与利用的主要因素是环冷机取热段的漏风问题、第三段冷却废气所携带的显热尚未被利用以及烧结矿层的气固换热过程.

  6. 75 FR 77569 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System Mode...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ...; Electronic Flight Control System Mode Annunciation AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... design features include an electronic flight control system. The applicable airworthiness regulations do... system. This system provides an electronic interface between the pilot's flight controls and ] the flight...

  7. Exergoeconomic, enviroeconomic and sustainability analyses of a novel air cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caliskan, Hakan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ege University (Turkey)], email: hakan.caliskan@ege.edu.tr; Dincer, Ibrahim [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (Canada)], email: Ibrahim.Dincer@uoit.ca; Hepbasli, Arif [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Saud University (Saudi Arabia)], email: ahepbasli.c@ksu.edu.sa

    2011-07-01

    With the energy crisis and the rising concerns about the environment, energy-saving measures are urgently needed. In the building sector, air conditioning systems consume important amounts of energy and a new evaporative air cooler system has been developed. This system is based on the Maisotsenko cycle and aims at providing comfortable indoor conditions for low energy consumption and with high efficiency. The objective of this paper is to present the analysis of the energy, exergy, environmental, exergoeconomic, enviroeconomic and sustainability performances of this novel air cooler. The different analyses were carried out for 9 dead state temperatures from 0 to 37.77 degree celsius. Results of all the different analyses performed are provided herein. This study provided useful information on the performance of the Maisotsenko cycle-based air cooler system and showed the originality of the system.

  8. Design and Analysis of Morpheus Lander Flight Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Yang, Lee; Fritz, Mathew; Nguyen, Louis H.; Johnson, Wyatt R.; Hart, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    The Morpheus Lander is a vertical takeoff and landing test bed vehicle developed to demonstrate the system performance of the Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) system capability for the integrated autonomous landing and hazard avoidance system hardware and software. The Morpheus flight control system design must be robust to various mission profiles. This paper presents a design methodology for employing numerical optimization to develop the Morpheus flight control system. The design objectives include attitude tracking accuracy and robust stability with respect to rigid body dynamics and propellant slosh. Under the assumption that the Morpheus time-varying dynamics and control system can be frozen over a short period of time, the flight controllers are designed to stabilize all selected frozen-time control systems in the presence of parametric uncertainty. Both control gains in the inner attitude control loop and guidance gains in the outer position control loop are designed to maximize the vehicle performance while ensuring robustness. The flight control system designs provided herein have been demonstrated to provide stable control systems in both Draper Ares Stability Analysis Tool (ASAT) and the NASA/JSC Trick-based Morpheus time domain simulation.

  9. Integrated testing of the Thales LPT9510 pulse tube cooler and the iris LCCE electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dean L.; Rodriguez, Jose I.; Carroll, Brian A.; Bustamante, John G.; Kirkconnell, Carl S.; Luong, Thomas T.; Murphy, J. B.; Haley, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has identified the Thales LPT9510 pulse tube cryocooler as a candidate low cost cryocooler to provide active cooling on future cost-capped scientific missions. The commercially available cooler can provide refrigeration in excess of 2 W at 100K for 60W of power. JPL purchased the LPT9510 cooler for thermal and dynamic performance characterization, and has initiated the flight qualification of the existing cooler design to satisfy near-term JPL needs for this cooler. The LPT9510 has been thermally tested over the heat reject temperature range of 0C to +40C during characterization testing. The cooler was placed on a force dynamometer to measure the selfgenerated vibration of the cooler. Iris Technology has provided JPL with a brass board version of the Low Cost Cryocooler Electronics (LCCE) to drive the Thales cooler during characterization testing. The LCCE provides precision closed-loop temperature control and embodies extensive protection circuitry for handling and operational robustness; other features such as exported vibration mitigation and low frequency input current filtering are envisioned as options that future flight versions may or may not include based upon the mission requirements. JPL has also chosen to partner with Iris Technology for the development of electronics suitable for future flight applications. Iris Technology is building a set of radiation-hard, flight-design electronics to deliver to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Test results of the thermal, dynamic and EMC testing of the integrated Thales LPT9510 cooler and Iris LCCE electronics is presented here.

  10. Integrated testing of the Thales LPT9510 pulse tube cooler and the iris LCCE electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Dean L.; Rodriguez, Jose I.; Carroll, Brian A. [The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bustamante, John G. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Kirkconnell, Carl S.; Luong, Thomas T.; Murphy, J. B.; Haley, Michael F. [Iris Technology, Irvine, CA 92616 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has identified the Thales LPT9510 pulse tube cryocooler as a candidate low cost cryocooler to provide active cooling on future cost-capped scientific missions. The commercially available cooler can provide refrigeration in excess of 2 W at 100K for 60W of power. JPL purchased the LPT9510 cooler for thermal and dynamic performance characterization, and has initiated the flight qualification of the existing cooler design to satisfy near-term JPL needs for this cooler. The LPT9510 has been thermally tested over the heat reject temperature range of 0C to +40C during characterization testing. The cooler was placed on a force dynamometer to measure the selfgenerated vibration of the cooler. Iris Technology has provided JPL with a brass board version of the Low Cost Cryocooler Electronics (LCCE) to drive the Thales cooler during characterization testing. The LCCE provides precision closed-loop temperature control and embodies extensive protection circuitry for handling and operational robustness; other features such as exported vibration mitigation and low frequency input current filtering are envisioned as options that future flight versions may or may not include based upon the mission requirements. JPL has also chosen to partner with Iris Technology for the development of electronics suitable for future flight applications. Iris Technology is building a set of radiation-hard, flight-design electronics to deliver to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Test results of the thermal, dynamic and EMC testing of the integrated Thales LPT9510 cooler and Iris LCCE electronics is presented here.

  11. CSI Flight Computer System and experimental test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Peri, F., Jr.; Schuler, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the CSI Computer System (CCS) and the experimental tests performed to validate its functionality. This system is comprised of two major components: the space flight qualified Excitation and Damping Subsystem (EDS) which performs controls calculations; and the Remote Interface Unit (RIU) which is used for data acquisition, transmission, and filtering. The flight-like RIU is the interface between the EDS and the sensors and actuators positioned on the particular structure under control. The EDS and RIU communicate over the MIL-STD-1553B, a space flight qualified bus. To test the CCS under realistic conditions, it was connected to the Phase-0 CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) at NASA Langley Research Center. The following schematic shows how the CCS is connected to the CEM. Various tests were performed which validated the ability of the system to perform control/structures experiments.

  12. Modern digital flight control system design for VTOL aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, J. R.; Berry, P. W.; Stengel, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Methods for and results from the design and evaluation of a digital flight control system (DFCS) for a CH-47B helicopter are presented. The DFCS employed proportional-integral control logic to provide rapid, precise response to automatic or manual guidance commands while following conventional or spiral-descent approach paths. It contained altitude- and velocity-command modes, and it adapted to varying flight conditions through gain scheduling. Extensive use was made of linear systems analysis techniques. The DFCS was designed, using linear-optimal estimation and control theory, and the effects of gain scheduling are assessed by examination of closed-loop eigenvalues and time responses.

  13. Artificial intelligence and expert systems in-flight software testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demasie, M. P.; Muratore, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    The authors discuss the introduction of advanced information systems technologies such as artificial intelligence, expert systems, and advanced human-computer interfaces directly into Space Shuttle software engineering. The reconfiguration automation project (RAP) was initiated to coordinate this move towards 1990s software technology. The idea behind RAP is to automate several phases of the flight software testing procedure and to introduce AI and ES into space shuttle flight software testing. In the first phase of RAP, conventional tools to automate regression testing have already been developed or acquired. There are currently three tools in use.

  14. Characterization of a Recoverable Flight Control Computer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar; Torres, Wilfredo

    1999-01-01

    The design and development of a Closed-Loop System to study and evaluate the performance of the Honeywell Recoverable Computer System (RCS) in electromagnetic environments (EME) is presented. The development of a Windows-based software package to handle the time-critical communication of data and commands between the RCS and flight simulation code in real-time while meeting the stringent hard deadlines is also submitted. The performance results of the RCS and characteristics of its upset recovery scheme while exercising flight control laws under ideal conditions as well as in the presence of electromagnetic fields are also discussed.

  15. Artificial intelligence and expert systems in-flight software testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demasie, M. P.; Muratore, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    The authors discuss the introduction of advanced information systems technologies such as artificial intelligence, expert systems, and advanced human-computer interfaces directly into Space Shuttle software engineering. The reconfiguration automation project (RAP) was initiated to coordinate this move towards 1990s software technology. The idea behind RAP is to automate several phases of the flight software testing procedure and to introduce AI and ES into space shuttle flight software testing. In the first phase of RAP, conventional tools to automate regression testing have already been developed or acquired. There are currently three tools in use.

  16. Test of a Sub-4K Mechanical Cooler for IXO and Other Space Based Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petach, Michael B.; Casement, L.; Michaelian, M.; Nguyen, T.; Raab, J.; Tward, E.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer Sensors on missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) require cooling to temperatures around 50mK to achieve the required sensitivity in the 0.6-10 keV band. Cooling an X-ray Sensor such as a Transition Edge Sensor (TES) to 50mK without the limitations on lifetime, mass, volume and reliability penalties of stored cryogen systems can be achieved with a multiple stage mechanical cryocooler. While no single cryocooler technology is appropriate for all of the stages, a hybrid cryocooler can be used. Fortunately, three cooler technologies that are each optimized for efficiency over the appropriate parts of the temperature range are rapidly maturing. For the lowest temperature stage, an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR) efficiently cools between 50mK and 2K to 4K. Next, a helium Joule Thomson cooler can efficiently pump the heat to 14K. Finally, a multistage pulse tube cooler efficiently pumps the heat from 14K to 300K. An existing ADR cooler, such as that demonstrated by NASA Goddard to TRL 5, can be cooled by a hybrid JT and pulse tube cooler similar to the cooler that NGST is building for the JWST/MIRI instrument, if its temperature is lowered from 6K to below 4K. The MIRI cooler leverages extensive NGST cooler heritage with >60 years of on-orbit performance with 11 pulse tube coolers currently operating continuously in orbit without failure. In this poster we present test results of a laboratory demonstration JT cooler stage with the sub-4K temperatures needed by the ADR cooler. By basing the test on the 6 K cooler technologies developed for the JWST MIRI program, the current development program provides the next step to reach the goal of TRL6 in time to support the IXO mission. This successful test provides demonstration of TRL 4 for the missing components required for an IXO cooler.

  17. Validation of Flight Critical Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    resonances , electromagnetic shielding/interference effects, power transients, cooling system performance, and other elements which are sensitive to the... Magnetic Capability *Electro Magnectic Itnterference -Lightning Protection - lectrical Girouinds - lectrica I Bondinog ( beiiical - Biological I -n vi...ments, the funtional specification, the design specification, the implementation and prototype, the pro- totye aircraft, and the production system

  18. Unique Aspects of Flight Testing Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    High Altitude Endurance HCI Human Computer Interface INS Inertial Navigation System IR Infrared JITC Joint Interoperability Testing Command...highlighting some of the unique aspects of flight testing unmanned air vehicle systems. It is intended to provide a practical set of guidelines in support of...of unmanned aviation systems, it is especially important that even minor changes to the baseline code be carefully reviewed, and that regression

  19. Overview of Sumitomo coolers and Dewars for space use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanao, Kenichi; Narasaki, Katsuhiro; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Ootsuka, Kiyomi; Okabayashi, Akinobu; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Sato, Ryota; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yoichi; Murakami, Masahide

    2016-05-01

    Sumitomo Heavy Industries, ltd. (SHI) has been developing cooler and Dewar technology for space application with Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. SHI has four types of coolers to cover temperature range from 1.7K to 80K or more. Those are Single stage Stirling coolers for 80K, two-stage Stirling coolers for 20K, 4K-class cooler and 1K-class cooler. 4K and 1K class coolers consist of a Joule-Thomson cooler and a two-stage Stirling as a pre-cooler. SHI also provided Dewars. In this paper, SHI's cooler and Dewar technology are described.

  20. Flight-testing of the self-repairing flight control system using the F-15 highly integrated digital electronic control flight research facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James F.; Shuck, Thomas L.

    1990-01-01

    Flight tests conducted with the self-repairing flight control system (SRFCS) installed on the NASA F-15 highly integrated digital electronic control aircraft are described. The development leading to the current SRFCS configuration is highlighted. Key objectives of the program are outlined: (1) to flight-evaluate a control reconfiguration strategy with three types of control surface failure; (2) to evaluate a cockpit display that will inform the pilot of the maneuvering capacity of the damage aircraft; and (3) to flight-evaluate the onboard expert system maintenance diagnostics process using representative faults set to occur only under maneuvering conditions. Preliminary flight results addressing the operation of the overall system, as well as the individual technologies, are included.

  1. Study of a thermoacoustic Stirling cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoelstra, S.; Tijani, M.E.H. [ECN Energy Efficiency in the Industry, Petten (Netherlands)

    2007-05-15

    A thermoacoustic-Stirling cooler is built and performance measurements are carried out. The cooler uses the acoustic power produced by a linear motor to pump heat through a regenerator from a cold heat exchanger to an ambient one. The cooler incorporates a compact acoustic network to create the traveling-wave phasing necessary to operate in a Stirling cycle. The network has a coaxial topology instead of the toroidal one usually applied. The design, construction and performance measurements of the cooler are presented. A measured coefficient of performance relative to Carnot of 25% and a low temperature of -54C are achieved by the cooler. This efficiency surpasses the performance of the most efficient standing wave cooler by almost a factor of two.

  2. Dawn Spacecraft Reaction Control System Flight Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Nakazono, Barry

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Dawn spacecraft mission is studying conditions and processes of the solar system's earliest epoch by investigating two protoplanets remaining intact since their formations, Ceres and Vesta. Launch was in 2007. Ion propulsion is used to fly to and enter orbit around Vesta, depart Vesta and fly to Ceres, and enter orbit around Ceres. A conventional blowdown hydrazine reaction control system (RCS) is used to provide external torques for attitude control. Reaction wheel assemblies were intended to provide attitude control in most cases. However, the spacecraft experienced one, then two apparent failures of reaction wheels. Also, similar thrusters experienced degradation in a long life application on another spacecraft. Those factors led to RCS being operated in ways completely different than anticipated prior to launch. Numerous mitigations and developments needed to be implemented. The Vesta mission was fully successful. Even with the compromises necessary due to those anomalies, the Ceres mission is also projected to be feasible.

  3. Characteristics of Flight Simulator Visual Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    d’Eclairage CGI computer- geerated imagery CM modulation contrast -B B2 CRT cathode-ray tube d diameter of aperture, m D luminance transition...photopic vision (for a 20 field) V’(;,) spectral luminosity coefficient for scotopic vision I,2 standardized primry colors in the CIE system X,Y, Z ...transitions should not vary with range to natural features, but should vary with illumina- Z WOODED tion and visibility. Naturally, for a perfectly uni- 2

  4. System identification methods for aircraft flight control development and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Mark B.

    1995-01-01

    System-identification methods compose a mathematical model, or series of models, from measurements of inputs and outputs of dynamic systems. The extracted models allow the characterization of the response of the overall aircraft or component subsystem behavior, such as actuators and on-board signal processing algorithms. This paper discusses the use of frequency-domain system-identification methods for the development and integration of aircraft flight-control systems. The extraction and analysis of models of varying complexity from nonparametric frequency-responses to transfer-functions and high-order state-space representations is illustrated using the Comprehensive Identification from FrEquency Responses (CIFER) system-identification facility. Results are presented for test data of numerous flight and simulation programs at the Ames Research Center including rotorcraft, fixed-wing aircraft, advanced short takeoff and vertical landing (ASTOVL), vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL), tiltrotor aircraft, and rotor experiments in the wind tunnel. Excellent system characterization and dynamic response prediction is achieved for this wide class of systems. Examples illustrate the role of system-identification technology in providing an integrated flow of dynamic response data around the entire life-cycle of aircraft development from initial specifications, through simulation and bench testing, and into flight-test optimization.

  5. Post-Flight Assessment of Avcoat Thermal Protection System for the Exploration Flight Test-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Deepak; Santos, Jose; Rodriguez, Erika; Mahzari, Milad; Remark, Brian; Muppidi, Suman

    2016-01-01

    On December 5, 2014 NASA conducted the first flight test of its next generation human-class Orion spacecraft. The flight was called the Exploration Flight Test -1 (EFT-1) which lasted for 4 hours and culminated into a re-entry trajectory at 9 km/s. This flight test of the 5-meter Orion Crew Module demonstrated various sub-systems including the Avcoat ablative thermal protection system (TPS) on the heat shield. The Avcoat TPS had been developed from the Apollo-era recipe with a few key modifications. The engineering for thermal sizing was supported by modeling, analysis, and ground tests in arc jet facilities. This paper will describe a postlfight analysis plan and present results from post-recovery inspections, data analysis from embedded sensors, TPS sample extraction and characterization in the laboratory. After the recovery of the vehicle, a full photographic survey and surface scans of the TPS were performed. The recovered vehicle showed physical evidence of flow disturbances, varying degrees of surface roughness, and excessive recession downstream of compression pads. The TPS recession was measured at more than 200 locations of interest on the Avcoat surface. The heat shield was then processed for sample extraction prior to TPS removal using the 7-Axis Milling machine at Marshall Space Flight Center. Around 182 rectangular TPS samples were extracted for subsequent analysis and investigation. The final paper will also present results of sample analysis. The planned investigation includes sidewall imaging, followed by image analysis to characterize TPS response by quantifying different layers in the char and pyrolysis zones. A full postmortem of the instrumentation and sensor ports will also be performed to confirm no adverse effects due to the sensors themselves. A subset of the samples will undergo structural testing and perform detailed characterization of any cracks and integrity of gore seams. Finally, the material will be characterized with layer

  6. 废液处理系统冷却器热工水力计算研究%The Research of Thermal-hydraulic Calculation for Waste Processing System Cooler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙圣权; 刘宇昊; 高峰; 马贞钦; 陈先林; 徐江

    2016-01-01

    As one of the key equipment is cooler radioactive in waste processing system,which will determine whether the system is capable of stable operation. In this paper, a mathematical model based on thermal-hydraulic calculation,by calculation and verification,to ensure that the system can meet the key equipment cooler design and use requirements,this method is similar to the equipment design and testing provided useful experience.%冷却器作为放射性废液处理系统中的关键设备之一,直接决定了系统是否能够稳定运行,本文建立基于热工水力计算的数学模型,通过计算与校核,确保系统关键设备冷却器能够满足设计和使用要求,该方法为类似设备的设计和试验提供了可借鉴的经验。

  7. Qualification and issues with space flight laser systems and components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Coyle, D. B.; Canham, John S.; Leidecker, Henning W., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    The art of flight quality solid-state laser development is still relatively young, and much is still unknown regarding the best procedures, components, and packaging required for achieving the maximum possible lifetime and reliability when deployed in the harsh space environment. One of the most important issues is the limited and unstable supply of quality, high power diode arrays with significant technological heritage and market lifetime. Since Spectra Diode Labs Inc. ended their involvement in the pulsed array business in the late 1990's, there has been a flurry of activity from other manufacturers, but little effort focused on flight quality production. This forces NASA, inevitably, to examine the use of commercial parts to enable space flight laser designs. System-level issues such as power cycling, operational derating, duty cycle, and contamination risks to other laser components are some of the more significant unknown, if unquantifiable, parameters that directly effect transmitter reliability. Designs and processes can be formulated for the system and the components (including thorough modeling) to mitigate risk based on the known failures modes as well as lessons learned that GSFC has collected over the past ten years of space flight operation of lasers. In addition, knowledge of the potential failure modes related to the system and the components themselves can allow the qualification testing to be done in an efficient yet, effective manner. Careful test plan development coupled with physics of failure knowledge will enable cost effect qualification of commercial technology. Presented here will be lessons learned from space flight experience, brief synopsis of known potential failure modes, mitigation techniques, and options for testing from the system level to the component level.

  8. Integration of Fire Control, Flight Control and Propulsion Control Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    system, the answer was by a comprehensive programme of simulation and rig testing. ix In the only paper in the programme deailing with systems for civil ...be used otherwise. At one time there was an explosive growth in the application of automatic flight control to civil transport aircraft, culminating in...nombre at l’ampleur des 6quipesenta de maintenance extgrieurs a lavion, 11 faut s’efforcer I ce qua 1. mayan privil~gif pareattant lea 6changss

  9. Artificial Immune System for Flight Envelope Estimation and Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-31

    Figure 1.7. AIS-Based ACM Process 31 Figure 1.8. AIS-Based ACM System Design 32 Figure 1.9. On-Line AC Detection... ACM ) based on the AIS paradigm can be considered to include three main components functionally connected in a closed loop as shown in Figure 1.7...off-line ACM system design and implementation  on-line AC detection, identification, evaluation, and accommodation  post-processing of flight data

  10. System security in the space flight operations center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Flight Operations Center is a networked system of workstation-class computers that will provide ground support for NASA's next generation of deep-space missions. The author recounts the development of the SFOC system security policy and discusses the various management and technology issues involved. Particular attention is given to risk assessment, security plan development, security implications of design requirements, automatic safeguards, and procedural safeguards.

  11. A formal structure for advanced automatic flight-control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, G.; Cicolani, L. S.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques were developed for the unified design of multimode, variable authority automatic flight-control systems for powered-lift STOL and VTOL aircraft. A structure for such systems is developed to deal with the strong nonlinearities inherent in this class of aircraft, to admit automatic coupling with advanced air traffic control, and to admit a variety of active control tasks. The aircraft being considered is the augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft.

  12. CCSDS telemetry systems experience at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carper, Richard D.; Stallings, William H., III

    1990-09-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) designs, builds, manages, and operates science and applications spacecraft in near-earth orbit, and provides data capture, data processing, and flight control services for these spacecraft. In addition, GSFC has the responsibility of providing space-ground and ground-ground communications for near-earth orbiting spacecraft, including those of the manned spaceflight programs. The goal of reducing both the developmental and operating costs of the end-to-end information system has led the GSFC to support and participate in the standardization activities of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS), including those for packet telemetry. The environment in which such systems function is described, and the GSFC experience with CCSDS packet telemetry in the context of the Gamma-Ray Observatory project is discussed.

  13. A new flight control and management system architecture and configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fan-e.; Chen, Zongji

    2006-11-01

    The advanced fighter should possess the performance such as super-sound cruising, stealth, agility, STOVL(Short Take-Off Vertical Landing),powerful communication and information processing. For this purpose, it is not enough only to improve the aerodynamic and propulsion system. More importantly, it is necessary to enhance the control system. A complete flight control system provides not only autopilot, auto-throttle and control augmentation, but also the given mission management. F-22 and JSF possess considerably outstanding flight control system on the basis of pave pillar and pave pace avionics architecture. But their control architecture is not enough integrated. The main purpose of this paper is to build a novel fighter control system architecture. The control system constructed on this architecture should be enough integrated, inexpensive, fault-tolerant, high safe, reliable and effective. And it will take charge of both the flight control and mission management. Starting from this purpose, this paper finishes the work as follows: First, based on the human nervous control, a three-leveled hierarchical control architecture is proposed. At the top of the architecture, decision level is in charge of decision-making works. In the middle, organization & coordination level will schedule resources, monitor the states of the fighter and switch the control modes etc. And the bottom is execution level which holds the concrete drive and measurement; then, according to their function and resources all the tasks involving flight control and mission management are sorted to individual level; at last, in order to validate the three-leveled architecture, a physical configuration is also showed. The configuration is distributed and applies some new advancement in information technology industry such line replaced module and cluster technology.

  14. Aircraft automatic flight control system with model inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. A.; Meyer, George

    1990-01-01

    A simulator study was conducted to verify the advantages of a Newton-Raphson model-inversion technique as a design basis for an automatic trajectory control system in an aircraft with highly nonlinear characteristics. The simulation employed a detailed mathematical model of the aerodynamic and propulsion system performance characteristics of a vertical-attitude takeoff and landing tactical aircraft. The results obtained confirm satisfactory control system performance over a large portion of the flight envelope. System response to wind gusts was satisfactory for various plausible combinations of wind magnitude and direction.

  15. Aircraft automatic flight control system with model inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. A.; Meyer, George

    1990-01-01

    A simulator study was conducted to verify the advantages of a Newton-Raphson model-inversion technique as a design basis for an automatic trajectory control system in an aircraft with highly nonlinear characteristics. The simulation employed a detailed mathematical model of the aerodynamic and propulsion system performance characteristics of a vertical-attitude takeoff and landing tactical aircraft. The results obtained confirm satisfactory control system performance over a large portion of the flight envelope. System response to wind gusts was satisfactory for various plausible combinations of wind magnitude and direction.

  16. Flight results of a low-cost attitude determination system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springmann, John C.; Cutler, James W.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents flight results of the attitude determination system (ADS) flown on the Radio Aurora Explorer (RAX) satellites, RAX-1 and RAX-2, which are CubeSats developed to study space weather. The ADS sensors include commercial-off-the-shelf magnetometers, coarse sun sensors (photodiodes), and a MEMs rate gyroscope. A multiplicative extended Kalman filter is used for attitude estimation. On-orbit calibration was developed and applied to compensate for sensor and alignment errors, and attitude determination accuracies of 0.5° 1-σ have been demonstrated on-orbit. The approach of using low-cost sensors in conjunction with on-orbit calibration, which mitigates the need for pre-flight calibration and high-tolerance alignment during spacecraft assembly, reduces the time and cost associated with the subsystem development, and provides a low-cost solution for modest attitude determination requirements. Although the flight results presented in this paper are from a specific mission, the methods used and lessons learned can be used to maximize the performance of the ADS of any vehicle while minimizing the pre-flight calibration and alignment requirements.

  17. Certification of COTS Software in NASA Human Rated Flight Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products in safety critical systems has been seen as a promising acquisition strategy to improve mission affordability and, yet, has come with significant barriers and challenges. Attempts to integrate COTS software components into NASA human rated flight systems have been, for the most part, complicated by verification and validation (V&V) requirements necessary for flight certification per NASA s own standards. For software that is from COTS sources, and, in general from 3rd party sources, either commercial, government, modified or open source, the expectation is that it meets the same certification criteria as those used for in-house and that it does so as if it were built in-house. The latter is a critical and hidden issue. This paper examines the longstanding barriers and challenges in the use of 3rd party software in safety critical systems and cover recent efforts to use COTS software in NASA s Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) project. It identifies some core artifacts that without them, the use of COTS and 3rd party software is, for all practical purposes, a nonstarter for affordable and timely insertion into flight critical systems. The paper covers the first use in a flight critical system by NASA of COTS software that has prior FAA certification heritage, which was shown to meet the RTCA-DO-178B standard, and how this certification may, in some cases, be leveraged to allow the use of analysis in lieu of testing. Finally, the paper proposes the establishment of an open source forum for development of safety critical 3rd party software.

  18. Quantifying Pilot Contribution to Flight Safety during Hydraulic Systems Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Etherington, Timothy J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Kennedy, Kellie D.

    2017-01-01

    Accident statistics cite the flight crew as a causal factor in over 60% of large transport aircraft fatal accidents. Yet, a well-trained and well-qualified pilot is acknowledged as the critical center point of aircraft systems safety and an integral safety component of the entire commercial aviation system. The latter statement, while generally accepted, cannot be verified because little or no quantitative data exists on how and how many accidents/incidents are averted by crew actions. A joint NASA/FAA high-fidelity motion-base human-in-the-loop test was conducted using a Level D certified Boeing 737-800 simulator to evaluate the pilot's contribution to safety-of-flight during routine air carrier flight operations and in response to aircraft system failures. To quantify the human's contribution, crew complement (two-crew, reduced crew, single pilot) was used as the independent variable in a between-subjects design. This paper details the crew's actions, including decision-making, and responses while dealing with a hydraulic systems leak - one of 6 total non-normal events that were simulated in this experiment.

  19. Dynamic Performances of the Automatic Flight Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela STROE

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains why the combination of programming codes represents a true engineering tool in aircraft systems investigating. Flight safety and flying quality are extremely important to modern aviation industry. The aircraft responses, which are measured during real flight, are compared to the responses that are obtained from the simulations. Typically, aircraft problems consist in finding the solutions for basic work in all kind of areas, using knowledge from fields of science such as physics, mathematics and computer science. The purpose is to present such problems solved by computer simulations. Some of the advantages of performing numerical simulations are the low risk and low cost involved as compared to performing aircraft experiments. Another major advantage is the physical insight which one can gain in the behavior of the system subjected to different conditions and different values of the characteristic parameters of the aircraft's dynamic performances.

  20. Space Flight Software Development Software for Intelligent System Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Luis C.; Crumbley, Tim

    2004-01-01

    The slide presentation examines the Marshall Space Flight Center Flight Software Branch, including software development projects, mission critical space flight software development, software technical insight, advanced software development technologies, and continuous improvement in the software development processes and methods.

  1. Digital system identification and its application to digital flight control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotob, S.; Kaufman, H.

    1974-01-01

    On-line system identification of linear discrete systems for implementation in a digital adaptive flight controller is considered by the conventional extended Kalman filter and a decoupling process in which the linear state estimation problem and the linear parameter identification problem are each treated separately and alternately. Input requirements for parameter identifiability are established using the standard conditions of observability for a time variant system. Experimental results for simulated linearized lateral aircraft motion are included along with the effect of different initialization and updating procedures for the priming trajectory used by the filter.

  2. Optimal digital control of a Stirling cycle cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, J.; Feeley, P.; Langford, G.

    1990-01-01

    This short paper describes work in progress on the conceptual design of a control system for a cryogenic cooler intended for use aboard spacecraft. The cooler will produce 5 watts of cooling at 65 K and will be used to support experiments associated with the following: earth observation; atmospheric measurements; infrared, x-ray, and gamma-ray astronomy; and magnetic field characterization. The cooler has been designed and constructed for NASA/GSFC by Philips Laboratories and is described in detail. The cooler has a number of unique design features intended to enhance long life and maintenance free operation in space including use of the high efficiency Stirling thermodynamic refrigeration cycle, linear magnetic motors, clearance-seals, and magnetic bearings. The proposed control system design is based on optimal control theory and is targeted for custom integrated circuit implementation. The resulting control system will meet the following mission requirements: efficiency, reliability, optimal thermodynamic, electrical, and mechanical performance; freedom from operator intervention; light weight; and small size.

  3. Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Flight System Integration at Its Best

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, T. David; Kanner, Howard S.; Freeland, Donna M.; Olson, Derek T.

    2011-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) element integrates all the subsystems needed for ascent flight, entry, and recovery of the combined Booster and Motor system. These include the structures, avionics, thrust vector control, pyrotechnic, range safety, deceleration, thermal protection, and retrieval systems. This represents the only human-rated, recoverable and refurbishable solid rocket ever developed and flown. Challenges included subsystem integration, thermal environments and severe loads (including water impact), sometimes resulting in hardware attrition. Several of the subsystems evolved during the program through design changes. These included the thermal protection system, range safety system, parachute/recovery system, and others. Because the system was recovered, the SRB was ideal for data and imagery acquisition, which proved essential for understanding loads, environments and system response. The three main parachutes that lower the SRBs to the ocean are the largest parachutes ever designed, and the SRBs are the largest structures ever to be lowered by parachutes. SRB recovery from the ocean was a unique process and represented a significant operational challenge; requiring personnel, facilities, transportation, and ground support equipment. The SRB element achieved reliability via extensive system testing and checkout, redundancy management, and a thorough postflight assessment process. However, the in-flight data and postflight assessment process revealed the hardware was affected much more strongly than originally anticipated. Assembly and integration of the booster subsystems required acceptance testing of reused hardware components for each build. Extensive testing was done to assure hardware functionality at each level of stage integration. Because the booster element is recoverable, subsystems were available for inspection and testing postflight, unique to the Shuttle launch vehicle. Problems were noted and corrective actions were implemented as needed

  4. 76 FR 9265 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System: Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System: Control Surface Position Awareness AGENCY: Federal... transport category airplanes. These design features include an electronic flight control system. The... The GVI has an electronic flight control system and no direct coupling from the cockpit controller to...

  5. 76 FR 14795 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System Mode...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ...; Electronic Flight Control System Mode Annunciation. AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... electronic flight control system. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or...). Novel or Unusual Design Features The GVI will have a fly-by-wire electronic flight control system. This...

  6. Human capital flight challenges within an equitable health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udonwa, N E

    2007-01-01

    The issue of human capital flight has been discussed at different forums with a consensus opinion that it has its merits and demerits to equitable health system. Most often one nation becomes a substantial net exporter of talent, leaving the provider nation at risk of depleting its natural supply of talent. This paper looks into the historical perspective of human capital flight or "brain drain", and its burden. It attempts to elucidate the various causes and suggested solutions. The paper's objective is to educate colleagues on the conceptual and contextual imperatives of the issue. Using a convenient sample of key informants who were medical colleagues in Nigeria relevant information was sourced from these colleagues, documents from the postgraduate medical college of Nigeria and the internet on maters relating to human capital flight and brain drain. Every year, thousands of qualified doctors, and other professionals leave Nigeria tempted by significantly higher wages, brighter prospects for employment and education, stability, food security. It appears that the potential exposure to different working conditions, resources and professional environments can be of advantage to the country, should Nigeria be able to recall these professionals. It also appears that necessary economic reforms that make staying at home rewarding, that is--good leadership, and policy planning that seriously looks into rural development, among other issues, are keys ingredients to reversing the trend in order to ensure a more equitable health system.

  7. Shuttle Orbiter Environmental Control and Life Support System - Flight experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the overall design of the Shuttle Orbiter Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). The Orbiter ECLSS consists of six major subsystems which accomplish the functions of providing a habitable pressurized cabin atmosphere and removing gaseous contaminants, controlling the temperature of the cabin and vehicle components within acceptable ranges, providing fire detection and suppression capability, maintaining a supply of potable water, collecting and removing metabolic waste materials, and providing utilities and access for extravehicular activity. The operational experience is summarized for the 45 space flights accomplished to date during which the Orbiter ECLSS has been demonstrated to perform reliably, and has proved to have the flexibility to meet a variety of mission needs. Significant flight problems are described, along with the design or procedure changes which were implemented to resolve the problems.

  8. Human habitat positioning system for NASA's space flight environmental simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.; Keas, P.

    1998-01-01

    Artificial gravity by centrifugation offers an effective countermeasure to the physiologic deconditioning of chronic exposure to microgravity; however, the system requirements of rotational velocity, radius of rotation, and resultant centrifugal acceleration require thorough investigation to ascertain the ideal human-use centrifuge configuration. NASA's Space Flight Environmental Simulator (SFES), a 16-meter (52-foot) diameter, animal-use centrifuge, was recently modified to accommodate human occupancy. This paper describes the SFES Human Habitat Positioning System, the mechanism that facilitates radius of rotation variability and alignment of the centrifuge occupants with the artificial gravity vector.

  9. Near-space flight of a correlated photon system

    CERN Document Server

    Zhongkan, Tang; Sean, Yau Yong; Cheng, Cliff; Wildfeuer, Christoph; Ling, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We report the successful test flight of a device for generating and monitoring correlated photon pairs under near-space conditions up to 35.5km altitude. Data from ground based qualification tests and the high altitude experiment demonstrate that the device continues to operate even under harsh environmental conditions. The design of the rugged, compact and power-efficient photon pair system is presented. This design enables autonomous photon pair systems to be deployed on low-resource platforms such as nanosatellites hosting remote nodes of a quantum key distribution network. These results pave the way for tests of entangled photon technology in low earth orbit.

  10. The effects of lightning on digital flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumer, J. A.; Malloy, W. A.; Craft, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Present practices in lightning protection of aircraft deal primarily with the direct effects of lightning, such as structural damage and ignition of fuel vapors. There is increasing evidence of troublesome electromagnetic effects, however, in aircraft employing solid-state microelectronics in critical navigation, instrumentation and control functions. The potential impact of these indirect effects on critical systems such as digital fly by wire (DFBW) flight controls was studied. The results indicate a need for positive steps to be taken during the design of future fly by wire systems to minimize the possibility of hazardous effects from lightning.

  11. Reliability Block Diagram (RBD) Analysis of NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) Flight Termination System and Power Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morehouse, Dennis V.

    2006-01-01

    In order to perform public risk analyses for vehicles containing Flight Termination Systems (FTS), it is necessary for the analyst to know the reliability of each of the components of the FTS. These systems are typically divided into two segments; a transmitter system and associated equipment, typically in a ground station or on a support aircraft, and a receiver system and associated equipment on the target vehicle. This analysis attempts to analyze the reliability of the NASA DFRC flight termination system ground transmitter segment for use in the larger risk analysis and to compare the results against two established Department of Defense availability standards for such equipment.

  12. Flight Performance Feasibility Studies for the Max Launch Abort System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarabini, Paul V.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Beaty, James R.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) initiated the Max Launch Abort System Project to explore crew escape system concepts designed to be fully encapsulated within an aerodynamic fairing and smoothly integrated onto a launch vehicle. One objective of this design was to develop a more compact launch escape vehicle that eliminated the need for an escape tower, as was used in the Mercury and Apollo escape systems and what is planned for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). The benefits for the launch vehicle of eliminating a tower from the escape vehicle design include lower structural weights, reduced bending moments during atmospheric flight, and a decrease in induced aero-acoustic loads. This paper discusses the development of encapsulated, towerless launch escape vehicle concepts, especially as it pertains to the flight performance and systems analysis trade studies conducted to establish mission feasibility and assess system-level performance. Two different towerless escape vehicle designs are discussed in depth: one with allpropulsive control using liquid attitude control thrusters, and a second employing deployable aft swept grid fins to provide passive stability during coast. Simulation results are presented for a range of nominal and off-nominal escape conditions.

  13. Status of the IUCF Cooler Injector Synchrotron Construction Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesel, D. L.; Lee, S. Y.

    1997-05-01

    Construction of a 2.24 T-m, rapid-cycling booster synchrotron is nearing completion at IUCF. The synchrotron is designed to accelerate protons to 220 MeV and will replace the IUCF isochronous cyclotrons as an injector of polarized light ion beams into the 3.6 T-m electron-cooled storage ring. CIS (Cooler Injector Synchrotron), with a circumference of 1/5th the Cooler ring, will fill the Cooler to about 10^11 protons via ``boxcar" stacking in a few seconds for research. The compact booster design, which can accelerate protons to energies between 60 and 220 MeV, is also well suited for use in proton therapy applications. At 28 months into the construction program, all major ring elements (dipoles, quads, injector linac, RF system) are fabricated, assembled, installed and in some cases, commissioned. Ring beam injection and ramping studies are scheduled to start in May, 1997 and Cooler injection studies are planned for late 1997. The booster design properties, component commissioning results and construction completion schedule will be summarized.

  14. A knowledge-based system design/information tool for aircraft flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackall, Dale A.; Allen, James G.

    1991-01-01

    Research aircraft have become increasingly dependent on advanced electronic control systems to accomplish program goals. These aircraft are integrating multiple disciplines to improve performance and satisfy research objective. This integration is being accomplished through electronic control systems. Systems design methods and information management have become essential to program success. The primary objective of the system design/information tool for aircraft flight control is to help transfer flight control system design knowledge to the flight test community. By providing all of the design information and covering multiple disciplines in a structured, graphical manner, flight control systems can more easily be understood by the test engineers. This will provide the engineers with the information needed to thoroughly ground test the system and thereby reduce the likelihood of serious design errors surfacing in flight. The secondary object is to apply structured design techniques to all of the design domains. By using the techniques in the top level system design down through the detailed hardware and software designs, it is hoped that fewer design anomalies will result. The flight test experiences are reviewed of three highly complex, integrated aircraft programs: the X-29 forward swept wing; the advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI) F-16; and the highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) program. Significant operating technologies, and the design errors which cause them, is examined to help identify what functions a system design/informatin tool should provide to assist designers in avoiding errors.

  15. In-Flight Validation of a Pilot Rating Scale for Evaluating Failure Transients in Electronic Flight Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Kevin F.; Tucker, George E.; Moralez, Ernesto, III

    2006-01-01

    Engineering development and qualification of a Research Flight Control System (RFCS) for the Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) JUH-60A has motivated the development of a pilot rating scale for evaluating failure transients in fly-by-wire flight control systems. The RASCAL RFCS includes a highly-reliable, dual-channel Servo Control Unit (SCU) to command and monitor the performance of the fly-by-wire actuators and protect against the effects of erroneous commands from the flexible, but single-thread Flight Control Computer. During the design phase of the RFCS, two piloted simulations were conducted on the Ames Research Center Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) to help define the required performance characteristics of the safety monitoring algorithms in the SCU. Simulated failures, including hard-over and slow-over commands, were injected into the command path, and the aircraft response and safety monitor performance were evaluated. A subjective Failure/Recovery Rating (F/RR) scale was developed as a means of quantifying the effects of the injected failures on the aircraft state and the degree of pilot effort required to safely recover the aircraft. A brief evaluation of the rating scale was also conducted on the Army/NASA CH-47B variable stability helicopter to confirm that the rating scale was likely to be equally applicable to in-flight evaluations. Following the initial research flight qualification of the RFCS in 2002, a flight test effort was begun to validate the performance of the safety monitors and to validate their design for the safe conduct of research flight testing. Simulated failures were injected into the SCU, and the F/RR scale was applied to assess the results. The results validate the performance of the monitors, and indicate that the Failure/Recovery Rating scale is a very useful tool for evaluating failure transients in fly-by-wire flight control systems.

  16. 76 FR 8278 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Enhanced Flight Vision System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... Flight Vision System AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final special conditions..., Airplane and Flight Crew Interface Branch, ANM-111, Transport Standards Staff, Transport Airplane... Design Features The enhanced flight vision system (EFVS) is a novel or unusual design feature because...

  17. Evaluation of the Influence of Conventional Water Coolers on Drinking Water Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nikaeen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Drinking water quality after treatment and before reaching  the consumer could be affected by distribution pipes, service lines and Home devices. The structure of water coolers, a home device that are widely used in warm months of the year, could potentially affect the quality of drinking water. The aim of this study was to assess the microbial and chemical quality of water from conventional water coolers."nMaterials and Methods : Water samples were collected from 29 water cooler systems at the Isfahan  university of medical sciences. 29 control samples also obtained from the nearest drinking water taps. All samples were examined for total heterotrophic bacteria and physicochemical parameters including temperature, ph, turbidity and heavy metals."nResults: All samples from the water cooler systems complied with the EPA guidelines for total heterotrophic bacteria count. There were no significant differences between the levels of heavy metals in water samples from the water cooler systems and taps. There was only a significant difference between the level of Cu in the water samples from cooler systems and taps "nConclusion: The overall results of this study indicated that the use of water cooler systems from hygienic point of view could not cause any problems for consumers

  18. Flight Control System Design with Rate Saturating Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R. A.; Snell, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    Actuator rate saturation is an important factor adversely affecting the stability and performance of aircraft flight control systems. It has been identified as a catalyst in pilot-induced oscillations, some of which have been catastrophic. A simple design technique is described that utilizes software rate limiters to improve the performance of control systems operating in the presence of actuator rate saturation. As described, the technique requires control effectors to be ganged such that any effector is driven by only a single compensated error signal. Using an analysis of the steady-state behavior of the system, requirements are placed upon the type of the loop transmissions and compensators in the proposed technique. Application of the technique to the design of a multi-input/multi-output, lateral-directional control system for a simple model of a high-performance fighter is demonstrated as are the stability and performance improvements that can accrue with the technique.

  19. Design Considerations for a Launch Vehicle Development Flight Instrumentation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Martin L.; Crawford, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    When embarking into the design of a new launch vehicle, engineering models of expected vehicle performance are always generated. While many models are well established and understood, some models contain design features that are only marginally known. Unfortunately, these analytical models produce uncertainties in design margins. The best way to answer these analytical issues is with vehicle level testing. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration respond to these uncertainties by using a vehicle level system called the Development Flight Instrumentation, or DFI. This DFI system can be simple to implement, with only a few measurements, or it may be a sophisticated system with hundreds of measurement and video, without a recording capability. From experience with DFI systems, DFI never goes away. The system is renamed and allowed to continue, in most cases. Proper system design can aid the transition to future data requirements. This paper will discuss design features that need to be considered when developing a DFI system for a launch vehicle. It will briefly review the data acquisition units, sensors, multiplexers and recorders, telemetry components and harnessing. It will present a reasonable set of requirements which should be implemented in the beginning of the program in order to start the design. It will discuss a simplistic DFI architecture that could be the basis for the next NASA launch vehicle. This will be followed by a discussion of the "experiences gained" from a past DFI system implementation, such as the very successful Ares I-X test flight. Application of these design considerations may not work for every situation, but they may direct a path toward success or at least make one pause and ask the right questions.

  20. The ALICE Time of Flight Readout System AFRO

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, A

    1999-01-01

    The ALICE Time of Flight Detector system comprises more than 100.000 channels and covers an area of more than 100 m2. The timing resolution should be better than 150 ps. This combination of requirements poses a major challenge to the readout system. All detector timing measurements are referenced to a unique start signal t0. This signal is generated at the time an event occurs. Timing measurements are performed using a multichannel TDC chip which requires a 40 MHz reference clock signal. The general concept of the readout system is based on a modular architecture. Detector cells are combined to modules of 1024 channels. Each of these modules can be read out and calibrated independently from each other. By distributing a reference signal, a timing relationship between the modules is established. This reference signal can either be the start signal t0 or the TDC-reference clock. The readout architecture is divided into three steps; the TDC controller, the module controller, and the time of flight controller. Th...

  1. Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockelie, Michael J. [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-06-29

    This Final Report summarizes research performed to develop a technology to mitigate the plugging and fouling that occurs in the syngas cooler used in many Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. The syngas cooler is a firetube heat exchanger located downstream of the gasifier. It offers high thermal efficiency, but its’ reliability has generally been lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The buildup of ash deposits that form on the fireside surfaces in the syngas cooler (i.e., fouling) lead to reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs. Our approach to address this problem is that fouling of the syngas cooler cannot be eliminated, but it can be better managed. The research program was funded by DOE using two budget periods: Budget Period 1 (BP1) and Budget Period 2 (BP2). The project used a combination of laboratory scale experiments, analysis of syngas cooler deposits, modeling and guidance from industry to develop a better understanding of fouling mechanisms and to develop and evaluate strategies to mitigate syngas cooler fouling and thereby improve syngas cooler performance. The work effort in BP 1 and BP 2 focused on developing a better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to syngas cooler plugging and fouling and investigating promising concepts to mitigate syngas cooler plugging and fouling. The work effort focused on the following: • analysis of syngas cooler deposits and fuels provided by an IGCC plant collaborating with this project; • performing Jet cleaning tests in the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor to determine the bond strength between an ash deposit to a metal plate, as well as implementing planned equipment modifications to the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor and the one ton per day, pressurized Pilot Scale Gasifier; • performing Computational Fluid Dynamic modeling of industrially relevant syngas cooler configurations to develop a better

  2. Towards a Decision Support System for Space Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Leila; Hogle, Charles; Ruszkowski, James

    2013-01-01

    The Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) has put in place a Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) technological framework for the development and execution of the Flight Production Process (FPP). This framework has provided much added value and return on investment to date. This paper describes a vision for a model based Decision Support System (DSS) for the development and execution of the FPP and its design and development process. The envisioned system extends the existing MBSE methodology and technological framework which is currently in use. The MBSE technological framework currently in place enables the systematic collection and integration of data required for building an FPP model for a diverse set of missions. This framework includes the technology, people and processes required for rapid development of architectural artifacts. It is used to build a feasible FPP model for the first flight of spacecraft and for recurrent flights throughout the life of the program. This model greatly enhances our ability to effectively engage with a new customer. It provides a preliminary work breakdown structure, data flow information and a master schedule based on its existing knowledge base. These artifacts are then refined and iterated upon with the customer for the development of a robust end-to-end, high-level integrated master schedule and its associated dependencies. The vision is to enhance this framework to enable its application for uncertainty management, decision support and optimization of the design and execution of the FPP by the program. Furthermore, this enhanced framework will enable the agile response and redesign of the FPP based on observed system behavior. The discrepancy of the anticipated system behavior and the observed behavior may be due to the processing of tasks internally, or due to external factors such as changes in program requirements or conditions associated with other organizations that are outside of

  3. Simulation results of automatic restructurable flight control system concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J. L.; Looze, D. P.; Eterno, J. S.; Ostroff, A.

    1986-01-01

    The restructurable flight control system (RFCS) described by Weiss et al. (1986) is reviewed, and several results of an extensive six degrees of freedom nonlinear simulation of several aspects of this system are reported. It is concluded that the nontraditional use of standard control surfaces in a nominal feedback control system to spread control authority among many redundant control elements provides a significant amount of fault tolerance without any use of restructuring techniques. The use of new feedback gains alone following a failure can provide significantly improved recovery as long as the control elements remain within their travel limits and as long as uncertainty about the failure identity is properly handled. The use of the feed-forward trim solution in conjunction with redesigned feedback gains allows recovery to take place even when significant control saturation occurs.

  4. Simulation results of automatic restructurable flight control system concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J. L.; Looze, D. P.; Eterno, J. S.; Ostroff, A.

    1986-01-01

    The restructurable flight control system (RFCS) described by Weiss et al. (1986) is reviewed, and several results of an extensive six degrees of freedom nonlinear simulation of several aspects of this system are reported. It is concluded that the nontraditional use of standard control surfaces in a nominal feedback control system to spread control authority among many redundant control elements provides a significant amount of fault tolerance without any use of restructuring techniques. The use of new feedback gains alone following a failure can provide significantly improved recovery as long as the control elements remain within their travel limits and as long as uncertainty about the failure identity is properly handled. The use of the feed-forward trim solution in conjunction with redesigned feedback gains allows recovery to take place even when significant control saturation occurs.

  5. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems cryocooler overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, J.; Tward, E.

    2010-09-01

    Mechanical long life cryocoolers are an enabling technology used to cool a wide variety of detectors in space applications. These coolers provide cooling over a range of temperatures from 2 K to 200 K, cooling powers from tens of mW to tens of watts. Typical applications are missile warning, Earth and climate sciences, astronomy and cryogenic propellant management. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) has delivered many of the US flight cooler systems and has 12 long life pulse tube and Stirling coolers on orbit with two having over 11 years of continuous operation. This paper will provide an overview of the NGAS cryocooler capabilities.

  6. Automated Flight Test and System Identification for Rotary Wing Small Aerial Platform using Frequency Responses Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Adiprawita, Widyawardana; Semibiring, Jaka

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes an autopilot system that can be used to control the small scale rotorcraft during the flight test for linear-frequency-domain system identification. The input frequency swept is generated automatically as part of the autopilot control command. Therefore the bandwidth coverage and consistency of the frequency swept is guaranteed to produce high quality data for system identification. Beside that we can set the safety parameter during the flight test (maximum roll or pitch value, minimum altitude, etc) so the safety of the whole flight test is guaranteed. This autopilot for automated flight test will be tested using hardware in the loop simulator for hover flight condition.

  7. Parachute-Payload System Flight Dynamics and Trajectory Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Guglieri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The work traces a general procedure for the design of a flight simulation tool still representative of the major flight physics of a parachute-payload system along decelerated trajectories. An example of limited complexity simulation models for a payload decelerated by one or more parachutes is given, including details and implementation features usually omitted as the focus of the research in this field is typically on the investigation of mission design issues, rather than addressing general implementation guidelines for the development of a reconfigurable simulation tool. The dynamics of the system are modeled through a simple multibody model that represents the expected behavior of an entry vehicle during the terminal deceleration phase. The simulators are designed according to a comprehensive vision that enforces the simplification of the coupling mechanism between the payload and the parachute, with an adequate level of physical insight still available. The results presented for a realistic case study define the sensitivity of the simulation outputs to the functional complexity of the mathematical model. Far from being an absolute address for the software designer, this paper tries to contribute to the area of interest with some technical considerations and clarifications.

  8. H/OZ: PFD and Collaborative Flight Control System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Researchers at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition invented OZ, a primary flight display that provides a single, unified graphic display of critical flight...

  9. Improving System Engineering Excellence at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Pamela Wallace; Newton, Steve; Gholston, Sampson; Thomas, Dale (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) management feels that sound system engineering practices are essential for successful project management, NASA studies have concluded that recent project failures could be attributed in part to inadequate systems engineering. A recent survey of MSFC project managers and system engineers' resulted in the recognition of a need for training in Systems Engineering Practices, particularly as they relate to MSFC projects. In response to this survey, an internal pilot short-course was developed to reinforce accepted practices for system engineering at MSFC. The desire of the MSFC management is to begin with in-house training and offer additional educational opportunities to reinforce sound system engineering principles to the more than 800 professionals who are involved with system engineering and project management. A Systems Engineering Development Plan (SEDP) has been developed to address the longer-term systems engineering development needs of MSFC. This paper describes the survey conducted and the training course that was developed in response to that survey.

  10. Orion Launch Abort System Jettison Motor Performance During Exploration Flight Test 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Rachel J.; Davidson, John B.; Winski, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the flight test objectives and performance of the Orion Launch Abort System during Exploration Flight Test-1. Exploration Flight Test-1, the first flight test of the Orion spacecraft, was managed and led by the Orion prime contractor, Lockheed Martin, and launched atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. This flight test was a two-orbit, high-apogee, high-energy entry, low-inclination test mission used to validate and test systems critical to crew safety. This test included the first flight test of the Launch Abort System performing Orion nominal flight mission critical objectives. Although the Orion Program has tested a number of the critical systems of the Orion spacecraft on the ground, the launch environment cannot be replicated completely on Earth. Data from this flight will be used to verify the function of the jettison motor to separate the Launch Abort System from the crew module so it can continue on with the mission. Selected Launch Abort System flight test data is presented and discussed in the paper. Through flight test data, Launch Abort System performance trends have been derived that will prove valuable to future flights as well as the manned space program.

  11. Microgravity Active Vibration Isolation System on Parabolic Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenbo; Pletser, Vladimir; Yang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    The Microgravity Active Vibration Isolation System (MAIS) aims at reducing on-orbit vibrations, providing a better controlled lower gravity environment for microgravity physical science experiments. The MAIS will be launched on Tianzhou-1, the first cargo ship of the China Manned Space Program. The principle of the MAIS is to suspend with electro-magnetic actuators a scientific payload, isolating it from the vibrating stator. The MAIS's vibration isolation capability is frequency-dependent and a decrease of vibration of about 40dB can be attained. The MAIS can accommodate 20kg of scientific payload or sample unit, and provide 30W of power and 1Mbps of data transmission. The MAIS is developed to support microgravity scientific experiments on manned platforms in low earth orbit, in order to meet the scientific requirements for fluid physics, materials science, and fundamental physics investigations, which usually need a very quiet environment, increasing their chances of success and their scientific outcomes. The results of scientific experiments and technology tests obtained with the MAIS will be used to improve future space based research. As the suspension force acting on the payload is very small, the MAIS can only be operative and tested in a weightless environment. The 'Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.' (DLR, German Aerospace Centre) granted a flight opportunity to the MAIS experiment to be tested during its 27th parabolic flight campaign of September 2015 performed on the A310 ZERO-G aircraft managed by the French company Novespace, a subsidiary of the 'Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales' (CNES, French Space Agency). The experiment results confirmed that the 6 degrees of freedom motion control technique was effective, and that the vibration isolation performance fulfilled perfectly the expectations based on theoretical analyses and simulations. This paper will present the design of the MAIS and the experiment results obtained during the

  12. Initial Evaluation of a New Electromechanical Cooler for Safeguards Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, RL

    2002-10-21

    The use of liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) constitutes the current state of the art in cryogenic cooling for high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, which are widely used for {gamma}-ray and characteristic X-ray spectroscopy because of their excellent energy discrimination. Use of LN{sub 2} requires a liquid nitrogen supply, cumbersome storage tanks and plumbing, and the frequent attention of personnel to be sure that nitrogen levels are sufficient to maintain the detectors at a sufficiently low operating temperature. Safety hazards also are associated with the use of LN{sub 2}, both because of the potential for severe frostbite on exposure to skin and because it displaces ambient oxygen when it evaporates in closed spaces. Existing electromechanical coolers have, until now, been more expensive to procure and maintain than LN{sub 2} systems. Performance and reliability have also been serious issues because of microphonic degradation of photon energy peak resolution and cooler failures due to compressor oil becoming entrained in the refrigerant. This report describes the results of tests of a new HPGe detector cooling technology, the PerkinElmer ORTEC{reg_sign} Products X-Cooler{trademark} that, according to the manufacturer, significantly reduces the lifetime cost of the cooling system without degradation of the output signal. The manufacturer claims to have overcome cost, performance and reliability problems of older-generation electromechanical coolers, but the product has no significant history of use, and this project is the first independent evaluation of its performance for Total cost savings for the DOE and other agencies that use HPGe systems extensively for safeguards monitoring is expected to be quite significant if the new electromechanical cooler technology is shown to be reliable and if performance characteristics indicate its usefulness for this application. The technology also promises to make HPGe monitoring, characterization and detection available for

  13. Detection and Ranging System of Flight Aid Lights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhi-jing; WANG Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic detection based on optics sensors and ranging radars is a new method to detect the luminous intensity of flight aid lights. The optics sensors can get the illumination information of each light, the ranging radar gets the distance information, and then data amalgamation technology is used to compute the luminous intensity of each light. A method to modify the errors of this dynamic detection system is presented. It avoids the accumulation error and measurement carrier's excursion error by using peak value detection based on optics sensors to estimate the accurate position of each light, then to modify the lights' lengthways distance information and transverse position information. The performance of the detection and ranging system is validated by some experiments and shown in pictures.

  14. Flight experiment of thermal energy storage. [for spacecraft power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkoong, David

    1989-01-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) enables a solar dynamic system to deliver constant electric power through periods of sun and shade. Brayton and Stirling power systems under current considerations for missions in the near future require working fluid temperatures in the 1100 to 1300+ K range. TES materials that meet these requirements fall into the fluoride family of salts. Salts shrink as they solidify, a change reaching 30 percent for some salts. Hot spots can develop in the TES container or the container can become distorted if the melting salt cannot expand elsewhere. Analysis of the transient, two-phase phenomenon is being incorporated into a three-dimensional computer code. The objective of the flight program is to verify the predictions of the code, particularly of the void location and its effect on containment temperature. The four experimental packages comprising the program will be the first tests of melting and freezing conducted under microgravity.

  15. Implementing Improved Security and Encryption for Balloon Flight Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Andrew; Stilwell, Bryan D.

    The Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility uses a broad array of communication techniques be-tween its balloon-borne flight systems and ground command and control systems. These com-munication mediums vary from commercially available routing such as e-mail and IP based TCP/UDP protocols to military grade proprietary line-of-sight configurations; each with their own unique benefits and shortfalls. While each new advancement in technology improves secu-rity in some capacity, it does not always address the limitation of older, less advanced security or encryption capabilities. As the proliferation of newer, more commercially viable technologies become common place, safeguarding mission critical applications from unauthorized access and improve data integrity in the process becomes ever more necessary. Therefore, this paper will evaluate several security measures and methods of data encryption; including formalizing a standardized security philosophy that improves and addresses the mixture of established and emerging technologies.

  16. Numerical simulation of a semi-indirect evaporative cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R. Herrero [Departamento de Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, C/Dr. Fleming, s/n (Campus Muralla), 30202 Cartagena, Murcia (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    This paper presents the experimental study and numerical simulation of a semi-indirect evaporative cooler (SIEC), which acts as an energy recovery device in air conditioning systems. The numerical simulation was conducted by applying the CFD software FLUENT implementing a UDF to model evaporation/condensation. The numerical model was validated by comparing the simulation results with experimental data. Experimental data and numerical results agree for the lower relative humidity series but not for higher relative humidity values. (author)

  17. Beam accumulation with the SIS electron cooler

    CERN Document Server

    Steck, Markus; Blasche, K; Franczak, B J; Franzke, B; Winkler, T; Parkhomchuk, V V

    2000-01-01

    An electron cooling system has started operation in the heavy ion synchrotron SIS which is used to increase the intensity for highly charged ions. Fast transverse cooling of the hot ion beam after horizontal multiturn injection allows beam accumulation at the injection energy. After optimization of the accumulation process an intensity increase in a synchrotron pulse by more than one order of magnitude has been achieved. For highly charged ions the maximum number of particles has been increased from 1x10 sup 8 to 1x10 sup 9. For lighter ions intensity limitations have been encountered which are caused by the high phase space density of the cooled ion beam. Momentum spreads in the 10 sup - sup 4 range and emittances well below 10 pi mm mrad have been demonstrated. Recombination losses both in the residual gas and with the free cooler electrons determine the maximum intensity for highly charged ions. Systematic measurements of the recombination rates have been performed providing data for an optimum choice of t...

  18. Orion Flight Test-1 Thermal Protection System Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, T. John

    2011-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) was originally under development to provide crew transport to the International Space Station after the retirement of the Space Shuttle, and to provide a means for the eventual return of astronauts to the Moon. With the current changes in the future direction of the United States human exploration programs, the focus of the Orion project has shifted to the project s first orbital flight test, designated Orion Flight Test 1 (OFT-1). The OFT-1 is currently planned for launch in July 2013 and will demonstrate the Orion vehicle s capability for performing missions in low Earth orbit (LEO), as well as extensibility beyond LEO for select, critical areas. Among the key flight test objectives are those related to validation of the re-entry aerodynamic and aerothermal environments, and the performance of the thermal protection system (TPS) when exposed to these environments. A specific flight test trajectory has been selected to provide a high energy entry beyond that which would be experienced during a typical low Earth orbit return, given the constraints imposed by the possible launch vehicles. This trajectory resulted from a trade study that considered the relative benefit of conflicting objectives from multiple subsystems, and sought to provide the maximum integrated benefit to the re-entry state-of-the-art. In particular, the trajectory was designed to provide: a significant, measureable radiative heat flux to the windward surface; data on boundary transition from laminar to turbulent flow; and data on catalytic heating overshoot on non-ablating TPS. In order to obtain the necessary flight test data during OFT-1, the vehicle will need to have an adequate quantity of instrumentation. A collection of instrumentation is being developed for integration in the OFT-1 TPS. In part, this instrumentation builds upon the work performed for the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing Instrument (MEDLI) suite to instrument the

  19. Similarity measure application to fault detection of flight system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIM J H; LEE S H; WANG Hong-mei

    2009-01-01

    Fault detection technique is introduced with similarity measure. The characteristics of conventional similarity measure based on fuzzy number are discussed. With the help of distance measure, similarity measure is constructed explicitly. The designed distance-based similarity measure is applicable to general fuzzy membership functions including non-convex fuzzy membership function, whereas fuzzy number-based similarity measure has limitation to calculate the similarity of general fuzzy membership functions. The applicability of the proposed similarity measure to general fuzzy membership structures is proven by identifying the definition. To decide fault detection of flight system, the experimental data (pitching moment coefficients and lift coefficients) are transformed into fuzzy membership functions. Distance-based similarity measure is applied to the obtained fuzzy membership functions, and similarity computation and analysis are obtained with the fault and normal operation coefficients.

  20. Three-Axis Fluidic/Electronic Automatic Flight Control System Flight Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-01

    sustained vertical bounce which could be due tc the location of the rate vortex sensor being in the cockpit rather than under the transmission. 3...29,000 lbs vs U7,000 lbs). A very minor reduction in dampening was incorporater"—but the response of the SAS to vertical bounce was critical in a...Sensitivity to vertical bounce in hover flight was increased with SAS on or off over that experience on the previous flight. Aircraft buzz and

  1. Dry coolers and air-condensing units (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, O. O.; Anan'ev, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of factors affecting the growth of shortage of freshwater is performed. The state and dynamics of the global market of dry coolers used at electric power plants are investigated. Substantial increase in number and maximum capacity of air-cooled condensers, which have been put into operation in the world in recent years, are noted. The key reasons facilitating the choice of developers of the dry coolers, in particular the independence of the location of thermal power plant from water sources, are enumerated. The main steam turbine heat removal schemes using air cooling are considered, their comparison of thermal efficiency is assessed, and the change of three important parameters, such as surface area of heat transfer, condensate pump flow, and pressure losses in the steam exhaust system, are estimated. It is shown that the most effective is the scheme of direct steam condensation in the heat-exchange tubes, but other schemes also have certain advantages. The air-cooling efficiency may be enhanced much more by using an air-cooling hybrid system: a combination of dry and wet cooling. The basic applied constructive solutions are shown: the arrangement of heat-exchange modules and the types of fans. The optimal mounting design of a fully shopassembled cooling system for heat-exchange modules is represented. Different types of heat-exchange tubes ribbing that take into account the operational features of cooling systems are shown. Heat transfer coefficients of the plants from different manufacturers are compared, and the main reasons for its decline are named. When using evaporative air cooling, it is possible to improve the efficiency of air-cooling units. The factors affecting the faultless performance of dry coolers (DC) and air-condensing units (ACU) and the ways of their elimination are described. A high velocity wind forcing reduces the efficiency of cooling systems and creates preconditions for the development of wind-driven devices. It is noted that

  2. NASA Radioisotope Power System Program - Technology and Flight Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA sometimes conducts robotic science missions to solar system destinations for which the most appropriate power source is derived from thermal-to-electrical energy conversion of nuclear decay of radioactive isotopes. Typically the use of a radioisotope power system (RPS) has been limited to medium and large-scale missions, with 26 U,S, missions having used radioisotope power since 1961. A research portfolio of ten selected technologies selected in 2003 has progressed to a point of maturity, such that one particular technology may he considered for future mission use: the Advanced Stirling Converter. The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator is a new power system in development based on this Stirling cycle dynamic power conversion technology. This system may be made available for smaller, Discovery-class NASA science missions. To assess possible uses of this new capability, NASA solicited and funded nine study teams to investigate unique opportunities for exploration of potential destinations for small Discovery-class missions. The influence of the results of these studies and the ongoing development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator system are discussed in the context of an integrated Radioisotope Power System program. Discussion of other and future technology investments and program opportunities are provided.

  3. Automated Flight Test and System Identification for Rotary Wing Small Aerial Platform Using Frequency Responses Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Widyawardana Adiprawita; Adang Suwandi Ahmad; Jaka Sembiring

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes an autopilot system that can be used to control the small scale rotorcraft during the flight test for linear-frequency-domain system identification. The input frequency-sweep is generated automatically as part of the autopilot control command. Therefore the bandwidth coverage and consistency of the frequency-sweep are guaranteed to produce high quality data for system identification. Beside that, we can set the safety parameters during the flight test (maximum roll/pitch value, minimum altitude, etc.) so the safety of the whole flight test is guaranteed. This autopilot system is validated using hardware in the loop simulator for hover flight condition.

  4. H/OZ: PFD and Collaborative Flight Control System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — With aircraft automation increasingly able to control flight autonomously, situational awareness and engagement of the crew can suffer. To improve aviation safety...

  5. Vitamin D endocrine system after short-term space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoten, William B. (Principal Investigator); Sergeev, Igor N. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The exposure of the body to microgravity during space flight causes a series of well-documented changes in Ca(2+) metabolism, yet the cellular/molecular mechanisms leading to these changes are poorly understood. There is some evidence for microgravity-induced alterations in the vitamin D endocrine system, which is known to be primarily involved in the regulation of Ca(2+) metabolism. Vitamin D-dependent Ca(2+) binding proteins, or calbindins, are believed to have a significant role in maintaining cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. We used immunocytochemical, biochemical and molecular approaches to analyze the expression of calbindin-D(sub 28k) and calbindin-D(sub 9k) in kidneys and intestines of rats flown for 9 days aboard the Spacelab 3 mission. The effects of microgravity on calbindins in rats in space vs. 'grounded' animals (synchronous Animal Enclosure Module controls and tail suspension controls) were compared. Exposure to microgravity resulted in a significant decrease in calbindin-D(sub 28k) content in kidneys and calbindin-D(sub 9k) in the intestine of flight and suspended animals, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Immunocytochemistry (ICC) in combination with quantitative computer image analysis was used to measure in situ the expression of calbindins in kidneys and intestine, and insulin in pancreas. There was a large decrease in the distal tubular cell-associated calbindin-D(sub 28k) and absorptive cell-associated calbindin-D(sub 9k) immunoreactivity in the space and suspension kidneys and intestine, as compared with matched ground controls. No consistent differences in pancreatic insulin immunoreactivity between space, suspension and ground controls was observed. There were significant correlations between results by quantitative ICC and ELISA. Western blot analysis showed no consistent changes in the low levels of intestinal and renal vitamin D receptors. These findings suggest that a decreased expression of calbindins after a short

  6. NASA Langley's AirSTAR Testbed: A Subscale Flight Test Capability for Flight Dynamics and Control System Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas L.; Bailey, Roger M.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) project, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed a subscaled flying testbed in order to conduct research experiments in support of the goals of NASA s Aviation Safety Program. This research capability consists of three distinct components. The first of these is the research aircraft, of which there are several in the AirSTAR stable. These aircraft range from a dynamically-scaled, twin turbine vehicle to a propeller driven, off-the-shelf airframe. Each of these airframes carves out its own niche in the research test program. All of the airplanes have sophisticated on-board data acquisition and actuation systems, recording, telemetering, processing, and/or receiving data from research control systems. The second piece of the testbed is the ground facilities, which encompass the hardware and software infrastructure necessary to provide comprehensive support services for conducting flight research using the subscale aircraft, including: subsystem development, integrated testing, remote piloting of the subscale aircraft, telemetry processing, experimental flight control law implementation and evaluation, flight simulation, data recording/archiving, and communications. The ground facilities are comprised of two major components: (1) The Base Research Station (BRS), a LaRC laboratory facility for system development, testing and data analysis, and (2) The Mobile Operations Station (MOS), a self-contained, motorized vehicle serving as a mobile research command/operations center, functionally equivalent to the BRS, capable of deployment to remote sites for supporting flight tests. The third piece of the testbed is the test facility itself. Research flights carried out by the AirSTAR team are conducted at NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The UAV Island runway is a 50 x 1500 paved runway that lies within restricted airspace at Wallops Flight Facility. The

  7. Earth Observation System Flight Dynamics System Covariance Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Waqar H.; Tracewell, David

    2016-01-01

    This presentation applies a covariance realism technique to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observation System (EOS) Aqua and Aura spacecraft based on inferential statistics. The technique consists of three parts: collection calculation of definitive state estimates through orbit determination, calculation of covariance realism test statistics at each covariance propagation point, and proper assessment of those test statistics.

  8. Effects of temperature conditions in a gas collector on operation of primary and secondary gas coolers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuishchev, V.M.; Selivanova, Z.G.; Vasyuta, V.I.

    1988-04-01

    Discusses composition of coal gas leaving coke ovens and temperature effects on its composition in a gas collector and cooling systems. Effects of coal gas temperature ranging from 78 to 90 C on operation of cooling systems are analyzed: cooling intensity, naphthalene buildup, etc. Analyses show that coal gas temperature fluctuations from 80 to 90 C do not influence gas collector operation, whereas operation of primary gas coolers is influenced by gas collector operation. When coal gas temperature is reduced from 88 to 80 C intensity of coal tar accumulation increases 2 times and that of naphthalene increases 5 to 6 times. Temperature of coal gas leaving the primary coolers ranges from 35 to 40 C. Types of primary coal gas coolers, their operation and performance are comparatively evaluated. Effects of gas cooler design on efficiency of coal tar separation from coal gas are discussed. 5 refs.

  9. Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) Applications at Solar System Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G.; Sen, B.; Polidan, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    Introduction: Northrop Grumman and L'Garde have continued the development of a hypersonic entry, maneuverable platform capable of performing long-duration (months to a year) in situ and remote measurements at any solar system body that possesses an atmosphere. The Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) family of vehicles achieve this capability by using a semi-buoyant, ultra-low ballistic coefficient vehicle whose lifting entry allows it to enter the atmosphere without an aeroshell. In this presentation, we discuss the application of the LEAF system at various solar system bodies: Venus, Titan, Mars, and Earth. We present the key differences in platform design as well as operational differences required by the various target environments. The Venus implementation includes propulsive capability to reach higher altitudes during the day and achieves full buoyancy in the "habitable layers" of Venus' atmosphere at night. Titan also offers an attractive operating environment, allowing LEAF designs that can target low, medium, or high altitude operations, also with propulsive capabilities to roam within each altitude regime. The Mars version is a glider that descends gradually, allowing targeted delivery of payloads to the surface. Finally, an Earth version could remain in orbit in a stowed state until activated, allowing rapid response type deployments to any region of the globe.

  10. Cross-Compiler for Modeling Space-Flight Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Ripples is a computer program that makes it possible to specify arbitrarily complex space-flight systems in an easy-to-learn, high-level programming language and to have the specification automatically translated into LibSim, which is a text-based computing language in which such simulations are implemented. LibSim is a very powerful simulation language, but learning it takes considerable time, and it requires that models of systems and their components be described at a very low level of abstraction. To construct a model in LibSim, it is necessary to go through a time-consuming process that includes modeling each subsystem, including defining its fault-injection states, input and output conditions, and the topology of its connections to other subsystems. Ripples makes it possible to describe the same models at a much higher level of abstraction, thereby enabling the user to build models faster and with fewer errors. Ripples can be executed in a variety of computers and operating systems, and can be supplied in either source code or binary form. It must be run in conjunction with a Lisp compiler.

  11. A pilot rating scale for evaluating failure transients in electronic flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindson, William S.; Schroeder, Jeffery A.; Eshow, Michelle M.

    1990-01-01

    A pilot rating scale was developed to describe the effects of transients in helicopter flight-control systems on safety-of-flight and on pilot recovery action. The scale was applied to the evaluation of hardovers that could potentially occur in the digital flight-control system being designed for a variable-stability UH-60A research helicopter. Tests were conducted in a large moving-base simulator and in flight. The results of the investigation were combined with existing airworthiness criteria to determine quantitative reliability design goals for the control system.

  12. Modeling and software implementation of flight system for simulator of a new fighter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Cheng-cheng; YANG Yong-tian; JIA Rong-zhen

    2004-01-01

    Real-time modeling and simulation of flight system are the key parts of simulator. After describing the architecture of simulator for a newer fighter, author presents the composition of flight system and its mathematic models. In this paper, aircraft is regarded as an elastic flight body. And a new integrated algorithm which can remedy the shortcoming of Euler method and four-element method is used to calculate the Eulerian angles of aircraft. Finally, the software implementation of the flight system is given in the paper.

  13. The B-747 flight control system maintenance and reliability data base for cost effectiveness tradeoff studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Primary and automatic flight controls are combined for a total flight control reliability and maintenance cost data base using information from two previous reports and additional cost data gathered from a major airline. A comparison of the current B-747 flight control system effects on reliability and operating cost with that of a B-747 designed for an active control wing load alleviation system is provided.

  14. Coalition Warfare Program Tactile Situation Awareness System for Aviation Applications: Simulator Flight Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    USAARL Report No. 2016-07 Coalition Warfare Program Tactile Situation Awareness System for Aviation Applications: Simulator Flight Test By...pilot evaluation of The Tactile Situation Awareness System (TSAS) during simulated flight . The objective was to evaluate the ability of TSAS to improve...summarizes recent findings obtained during a simulated helicopter flight employing TSAS. The objective was to evaluate the ability of TSAS to improve a

  15. Six Sigma methods applied to cryogenic coolers assembly line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventre, Jean-Marc; Germain-Lacour, Michel; Martin, Jean-Yves; Cauquil, Jean-Marc; Benschop, Tonny; Griot, René

    2009-05-01

    Six Sigma method have been applied to manufacturing process of a rotary Stirling cooler: RM2. Name of the project is NoVa as main goal of the Six Sigma approach is to reduce variability (No Variability). Project has been based on the DMAIC guideline following five stages: Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve, Control. Objective has been set on the rate of coolers succeeding performance at first attempt with a goal value of 95%. A team has been gathered involving people and skills acting on the RM2 manufacturing line. Measurement System Analysis (MSA) has been applied to test bench and results after R&R gage show that measurement is one of the root cause for variability in RM2 process. Two more root causes have been identified by the team after process mapping analysis: regenerator filling factor and cleaning procedure. Causes for measurement variability have been identified and eradicated as shown by new results from R&R gage. Experimental results show that regenerator filling factor impacts process variability and affects yield. Improved process haven been set after new calibration process for test bench, new filling procedure for regenerator and an additional cleaning stage have been implemented. The objective for 95% coolers succeeding performance test at first attempt has been reached and kept for a significant period. RM2 manufacturing process is now managed according to Statistical Process Control based on control charts. Improvement in process capability have enabled introduction of sample testing procedure before delivery.

  16. Frequency stability of a tunable diode laser mounted in a compact Stirling cycle cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durso, Santo S.; May, R. D.; Tuchscherer, M. A.; Webster, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    A tunable diode laser (TDL) has been operated with a compact lightweight closed-cycle Stirling cooler. The laser linewidth has been measured near 80 K and found to be about half of that when using more massive closed-cycle coolers. Novel applications include balloon-borne and aircraft-adapted instruments, where size, weight, and power requirements place stringent demands on necessary TDL cooling systems.

  17. MEMS-Based Low-Cost Flight Control System for Small UAVs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xu; ZHOU Zhaoying; XIONG Wei; GUO Qi

    2008-01-01

    Small unmanned air vehicles(UAVs)can be used for vanous kinds of surveillance and data collection missions.The UAV flight control system is the key to a successful mission.This paper describes a low-cost micro-electro mechanical system-based flight control system for small UAVs.The integrated hardware flight control system weighs only 24 g.The system includes a highly-integrated wireless transmission link,which is lighter than traditional links.The flight control provides altitude hold control and global positioning system navigation based on gain scheduling proportional-integral-derivative control.Flight tests to survey the grass quality of a large lawn show that the small UAV can fly autonomously according to a series of pre-arranged waypoints with a controlled altitude while the wireless video system transmits images of the surveillance target to a ground control station.

  18. Microwave power transmission system studies. Volume 3, section 8: Mechanical systems and flight operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, O. E.; Brown, W. C.; Edwards, A.; Haley, J. T.; Meltz, G.; Howell, J. M.; Nathan, A.

    1975-01-01

    The efforts and recommendations associated with preliminary design and concept definition for mechanical systems and flight operations are presented. Technical discussion in the areas of mission analysis, antenna structural concept, configuration analysis, assembly and packaging with associated costs are presented. Technology issues for the control system, structural system, thermal system and assembly including cost and man's role in assembly and maintenance are identified. Background and desired outputs for future efforts are discussed.

  19. TNO : your partner in air cooler development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, J.G.B.

    2002-01-01

    At TNO we know that manufacturing air coolers is a highty competitive business. With TNO’s trusted expertise solidly behind you, your company can focus on reaching your target market with supporting product development through TNO’s research, consultancy and independent test data in conformity with

  20. System applications of high-Tc superconductor sampler cooled y a cryo-cooler; Reitoki reikyaku koon chodendo sanpura no shisutemu oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, M.; Sato, T.; Tahara, S. [NEC Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Fundamental Research Laboratories

    1999-11-10

    It is possible to require these currents from the voltage measurement using the semiconductor sampler, if the impedance is known. However, the measurement was not possible for the current in LSI with the complicated layer structure, since the impedance is generally unknown. We develop 'the current measurement system' using characteristics of the high-temperature superconductivity sampler in order to solve this. In this system, the sampler chip is cooled to near 40K using the refrigerating machine. (NEDO)

  1. Adaptive and Resilient Flight Control System for a Small Unmanned Aerial System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to develop an onboard adaptive and robust flight control system that improves control, stability, and survivability of a small unmanned aerial system in off-nominal or out-of-envelope conditions. The aerodynamics of aircraft associated with hazardous and adverse onboard conditions is inherently nonlinear and unsteady. The presented flight control system improves functionalities required to adapt the flight control in the presence of aircraft model uncertainties. The fault tolerant inner loop is enhanced by an adaptive real-time artificial neural network parameter identification to monitor important changes in the aircraft’s dynamics due to nonlinear and unsteady aerodynamics. The real-time artificial neural network parameter identification is done using the sliding mode learning concept and a modified version of the self-adaptive Levenberg algorithm. Numerically estimated stability and control derivatives are obtained by delta-based methods. New nonlinear guidance logic, stable in Lyapunov sense, is developed to guide the aircraft. The designed flight control system has better performance compared to a commercial off-the-shelf autopilot system in guiding and controlling an unmanned air system during a trajectory following.

  2. Software Safety Analysis of a Flight Guidance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ricky W. (Technical Monitor); Tribble, Alan C.; Miller, Steven P.; Lempia, David L.

    2004-01-01

    This document summarizes the safety analysis performed on a Flight Guidance System (FGS) requirements model. In particular, the safety properties desired of the FGS model are identified and the presence of the safety properties in the model is formally verified. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the entire project, while Chapter 2 gives a brief overview of the problem domain, the nature of accidents, model based development, and the four-variable model. Chapter 3 outlines the approach. Chapter 4 presents the results of the traditional safety analysis techniques and illustrates how the hazardous conditions associated with the system trace into specific safety properties. Chapter 5 presents the results of the formal methods analysis technique model checking that was used to verify the presence of the safety properties in the requirements model. Finally, Chapter 6 summarizes the main conclusions of the study, first and foremost that model checking is a very effective verification technique to use on discrete models with reasonable state spaces. Additional supporting details are provided in the appendices.

  3. 150K - 200K miniature pulse tube cooler for micro satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassaing, Clément; Butterworth, James; Aigouy, Gérald [Air Liquide Advanced Technologies (AL-AT) - 38360 Sassenage (France); Daniel, Christophe [Centre National D' Etudes Spatiales (CNES) - 31401 Toulouse (France); Crespin, Maurice; Duvivier, Eric [STEEL électronique - 31220 Martres Tolosane (France)

    2014-01-29

    Air Liquide is working with the CNES and Steel électronique in 2013 to design, manufacture and test a Miniature Pulse Tube Cooler (MPTC) to cool infrared detectors for micro-satellite missions. The cooler will be particularly adapted to the needs of the CNES MICROCARB mission to study atmospheric Carbon Dioxide which presents absorption lines in the thermal near infrared, at 1.6 μm and 2.0 μm. The required cooler temperature is from 150 to 200K with cooling power between 1 and 3 watts. The overall electrical power budget including electronics is less than 20W with a 288-300K rejection temperature. Particular attention is therefore paid to optimizing overall system efficiency. The active micro vibration reduction system and thermal control systems already developed for the Air Liquide Large Pulse Tube Cooler (LPTC) are currently being implemented into a new high efficiency electronic architecture. The presented work concerns the new cold finger and electronic design. The cooler uses the compressor already developed for the 80K Miniature Pulse Tube Cryocooler. This Pulse Tube Cooler addresses the requirements of space missions where extended continuous operating life time (>5 years), low mass and low micro vibration levels are critical.

  4. Performance investigation of capillary tubes for machine tool coolers retrofitted with HFC-407C refrigerant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fujen; Chang, Tongbou; Chiang, Weiming; Lee, Haochung

    2012-09-01

    The machine tool coolers are the best managers of coolant temperature in avoiding the deviation of spindle centerline for machine tools. However, the machine coolers are facing the compressed schedule to phase out the HCFC (hydro-chloro-floro-carbon) refrigerant and little attention has been paid to comparative study on sizing capillary tube for retrofitted HFC (hydro-floro-carbon) refrigerant. In this paper, the adiabatic flow in capillary tube is analyzed and modeled for retrofitting of HFC-407C refrigerant in a machine tool cooler system. A computer code including determining the length of sub-cooled flow region and the two phase region of capillary tube is developed. Comparative study of HCFC-22 and HFC-407C in a capillary tube is derived and conducted to simplify the traditional trial-and-error method of predicting the length of capillary tubes. Besides, experimental investigation is carried out by field tests to verify the simulation model and cooling performance of the machine tool cooler system. The results from the experiments reveal that the numerical model provides an effective approach to determine the performance data of capillary tube specific for retrofitting a HFC-407C machine tool cooler. The developed machine tool cooler system is not only directly compatible with new HFC-407C refrigerant, but can also perform a cost-effective temperature control specific for industrial machines.

  5. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 417 - Flight Termination Systems, Components, Installation, and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., transistor, or diode must satisfy all its performance specifications when subjected to: (i) The sum of ten... single fault tolerant against inadvertent transmission of a safing command under § 417.303(d). D417... each flight termination system battery; (6) Current for each flight termination system battery;...

  6. Application of automatic inspection system to nondestructive test of heat transfer tubes of primary pressurized water cooler in the high temperature engineering test reactor. Joint research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Furusawa, Takayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Miyamoto, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Power Company, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Heat transfer tubes of a primary pressurized water cooled (PPWC) in the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) form the reactor pressure boundary of the primary coolant, therefore are important from the viewpoint of safety. To establish inspection techniques for the heat transfer tubes of the PPWC, an automatic inspection system was developed. The system employs a bobbin coil probe, a rotating probe for eddy current testing (ECT) and a rotating probe for ultrasonic testing (UT). Nondestructive test of a half of the heat transfer tubes of the PPWC was carried out by the automatic inspection system during reactor shutdown period of the HTTR (about 55% in the maximum reactor power in this paper). The nondestructive test results showed that the maximum signal-to-noise ratio was 1.8 in ECT. Pattern and phase of Lissajous wave, which were obtained for the heat transfer tube of the PPWC, were different from those obtained for the artificially defected tube. In UT echo amplitude of the PPWC tubes inspected was lower than 20% of distance-amplitude calibration curve. Thus, it was confirmed that there was no defect in depth, which was more than the detecting standard of the probes, on the outer surface of the heat transfer tubes of the PPWC inspected. (author)

  7. Piloted simulator investigation of helicopter control systems effects on handling qualities during instrument flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, R. D.; Chen, R. T. N.; Gerdes, R. M.; Alderete, T. S.; Gee, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    An exploratory piloted simulation was conducted to investigate the effects of the characteristics of helicopter flight control systems on instrument flight handling qualities. This joint FAA/NASA study was motivated by the need to improve instrument flight capability. A near-term objective is to assist in updating the airworthiness criteria for helicopter instrument flight. The experiment consisted of variations of single-rotor helicopter types and levels of stability and control augmentation systems (SCAS). These configurations were evaluated during an omnirange approach task under visual and instrument flight conditions. The levels of SCAS design included a simple rate damping system, collective decoupling plus rate damping, and an attitude command system with collective decoupling. A limited evaluation of stick force versus airspeed stability was accomplished. Some problems were experienced with control system mechanization which had a detrimental effect on longitudinal stability. Pilot ratings, pilot commentary, and performance data related to the task are presented.

  8. Information distribution in distributed microprocessor based flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, R. C.; Lee, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal control theory that accounts for variable time intervals in the information distribution to control effectors in a distributed microprocessor based flight control system. The theory is developed using a linear process model for the aircraft dynamics and the information distribution process is modeled as a variable time increment process where, at the time that information is supplied to the control effectors, the control effectors know the time of the next information update only in a stochastic sense. An optimal control problem is formulated and solved that provides the control law that minimizes the expected value of a quadratic cost function. An example is presented where the theory is applied to the control of the longitudinal motions of the F8-DFBW aircraft. Theoretical and simulation results indicate that, for the example problem, the optimal cost obtained using a variable time increment Markov information update process where the control effectors know only the past information update intervals and the Markov transition mechanism is almost identical to that obtained using a known uniform information update interval.

  9. Integrated thermal simulation of buildings and regenerative evaporative coolers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, P.G.; Mathews, E.H.; Grobler, L.J. (Pretoria Univ. (South Africa). Centre for Experimental and Numerical Thermoflow)

    1994-01-01

    The thermal environment inside a building, fitted with a regenerative evaporative cooler, is influenced by the performance of the cooler. However, this performance is again influenced by the indoor air conditions. It means that the thermal performance of the building and the performance of the cooler cannot be separated. This paper proposes an innovative model for simulating the integrated thermal performance of buildings and regenerative evaporative coolers. The cooler model employs a standard single equation to characterize the performance of a cooler. Only the coefficients of this equation differs for different coolers. These coefficients are found from empirical performance data available from suppliers. The model was integrated with a comprehensive building thermal analysis program and verified successfully. This model now enables the designer to simulate any regenerative evaporative cooler connected to any building in any climatic region. The control strategy best suited for different off-design conditions can now also be investigated. (Author)

  10. 46 CFR 56.50-96 - Keel cooler installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ship's hull such that the cooler tubes are welded directly to the hull of the vessel with the hull forming part of the tube and satisfies all of the following: (i) The cooler structure is fabricated...

  11. Design of a Mission Data Storage and Retrieval System for NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Jessica; Downing, Bob; Sheldon, Jack

    2007-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) employs the WATR Integrated Next Generation System (WINGS) for the processing and display of aeronautical flight data. This report discusses the post-mission segment of the WINGS architecture. A team designed and implemented a system for the near- and long-term storage and distribution of mission data for flight projects at DFRC, providing the user with intelligent access to data. Discussed are the legacy system, an industry survey, system operational concept, high-level system features, and initial design efforts.

  12. Intelligent Agent based Flight Search and Booking System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floyd Garvey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The world globalization is widely used, and there are several definitions that may fit this one word. However the reality remains that globalization has impacted and is impacting each individual on this planet. It is defined to be greater movement of people, goods, capital and ideas due to increased economic integration, which in turn is propelled, by increased trade and investment. It is like moving towards living in a borderless world. With the reality of globalization, the travel industry has benefited significantly. It could be said that globalization is benefiting from the flight industry. Regardless of the way one looks at it, more persons are traveling each day and are exploring several places that were distant places on a map. Equally, technology has been growing at an increasingly rapid pace and is being utilized by several persons all over the world. With the combination of globalization and the increase in technology and the frequency in travel there is a need to provide an intelligent application that is capable to meeting the needs of travelers that utilize mobile phones all over. It is a solution that fits in perfectly to a user’s busy lifestyle, offers ease of use and enough intelligence that makes a user’s experience worthwhile. Having recognized this need, the Agent based Mobile Airline Search and Booking System is been developed that is built to work on the Android to perform Airline Search and booking using Biometric. The system also possess agent learning capability to perform the search of Airlines based on some previous search pattern .The development been carried out using JADE-LEAP Agent development kit on Android.

  13. Flight Experiments on Swept-Wing Roughness Receptivity: Validation Data for Modeling and Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    Photodetector which is cooled to 70 K with an onboard Stirling motor cooler . The camera has a sensitivity of 0.02 C at a temperature of 30 C...a Kemo VBF44 bandpass filter12. A new coordinate system was developed for studying this unconventional, vertically-mounted airfoil. The aircraft...psid, 16-bit, Pressure Systems scanner. The scanner was imbedded inside the model to reduce pressure lag time within the tubing. For all Cp flights

  14. Ion beam coolers in nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Äystö, J

    2003-01-01

    Cooling techniques for low-energy radioactive ion beams are reviewed together with applications on high-precision measurements of ground state properties of exotic nuclei. The emphasis in the presentation is on cooling, bunching and improving the overall characteristics of ion beams by RFQ-driven buffer gas cooling devices. Application of cooled and bunched beams in collinear laser spectroscopy to extract isotope shifts and hyperfine structure are presented with examples on radioactive Ti, Zr and Hf isotopes. The impact of the new-generation coolers on mass measurements of short-lived nuclei is discussed with examples on precision measurements of masses of super-allowed beta emitters. As a new concept, decay spectroscopy of radioactive ions trapped in a cooler Penning trap is presented.

  15. System-Level Validation through Post-Flight Reconstruction and Anchoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-30

    Level Post-Flight Reconstruction and Anchoring Definitions -System-Level Post-Flight Reconstruction ( PFR ): » Manually recreate and run a past...cause analysis of the system-level anomalies found in the PFR ; generate, test and implement M&S improvements to address anomalies Approved for Public...08-MDA-4058 (30 DEC 08) 5 Foundation of System PFR ystem alidation System-Level Validation is built on individual Element Validation Approved for

  16. Status of a digital integrated propulsion/flight control system for the YF-12 airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reukauf, P. J.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Holzman, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA Flight Research Center is engaged in a program with the YF-12 airplane to study the control of interactions between the airplane and the propulsion system. The existing analog air data computer, autothrottle, autopilot, and inlet control system are to be converted to digital systems by using a general purpose airborne computer and interface unit. First, the existing control laws will be programmed in the digital computer and flight tested. Then new control laws are to be derived from a dynamic propulsion model and a total force and moment aerodynamic model to integrate the systems. These control laws are to be verified in a real time simulation and flight tested.

  17. Using wide area differential GPS to improve total system error for precision flight operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Keith Warren

    Total System Error (TSE) refers to an aircraft's total deviation from the desired flight path. TSE can be divided into Navigational System Error (NSE), the error attributable to the aircraft's navigation system, and Flight Technical Error (FTE), the error attributable to pilot or autopilot control. Improvement in either NSE or FTE reduces TSE and leads to the capability to fly more precise flight trajectories. The Federal Aviation Administration's Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) became operational for non-safety critical applications in 2000 and will become operational for safety critical applications in 2002. This navigation service will provide precise 3-D positioning (demonstrated to better than 5 meters horizontal and vertical accuracy) for civil aircraft in the United States. Perhaps more importantly, this navigation system, which provides continuous operation across large regions, enables new flight instrumentation concepts which allow pilots to fly aircraft significantly more precisely, both for straight and curved flight paths. This research investigates the capabilities of some of these new concepts, including the Highway-In-The Sky (HITS) display, which not only improves FTE but also reduces pilot workload when compared to conventional flight instrumentation. Augmentation to the HITS display, including perspective terrain and terrain alerting, improves pilot situational awareness. Flight test results from demonstrations in Juneau, AK, and Lake Tahoe, CA, provide evidence of the overall feasibility of integrated, low-cost flight navigation systems based on these concepts. These systems, requiring no more computational power than current-generation low-end desktop computers, have immediate applicability to general aviation flight from Cessnas to business jets and can support safer and ultimately more economical flight operations. Commercial airlines may also, over time, benefit from these new technologies.

  18. Flight Testing of Guidance, Navigation and Control Systems on the Mighty Eagle Robotic Lander Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Mike; Rickman, Doug; Chavers, Greg; Adam, Jason; Becker, Chris; Eliser, Joshua; Gunter, Dan; Kennedy, Logan; O'Leary, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    During 2011 a series of progressively more challenging flight tests of the Mighty Eagle autonomous terrestrial lander testbed were conducted primarily to validate the GNC system for a proposed lunar lander. With the successful completion of this GNC validation objective the opportunity existed to utilize the Mighty Eagle as a flying testbed for a variety of technologies. In 2012 an Autonomous Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) algorithm was implemented in flight software and demonstrated in a series of flight tests. In 2012 a hazard avoidance system was developed and flight tested on the Mighty Eagle. Additionally, GNC algorithms from Moon Express and a MEMs IMU were tested in 2012. All of the testing described herein was above and beyond the original charter for the Mighty Eagle. In addition to being an excellent testbed for a wide variety of systems the Mighty Eagle also provided a great learning opportunity for many engineers and technicians to work a flight program.

  19. In-Flight performance of MESSENGER's Mercury dual imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, S.E.; Murchie, S.L.; Becker, K.J.; Selby, C.M.; Turner, F.S.; Noble, M.W.; Chabot, N.L.; Choo, T.H.; Darlington, E.H.; Denevi, B.W.; Domingue, D.L.; Ernst, C.M.; Holsclaw, G.M.; Laslo, N.R.; Mcclintock, W.E.; Prockter, L.M.; Robinson, M.S.; Solomon, S.C.; Sterner, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Mercury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 and planned for insertion into orbit around Mercury in 2011, has already completed two flybys of the innermost planet. The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) acquired nearly 2500 images from the first two flybys and viewed portions of Mercury's surface not viewed by Mariner 10 in 1974-1975. Mercury's proximity to the Sun and its slow rotation present challenges to the thermal design for a camera on an orbital mission around Mercury. In addition, strict limitations on spacecraft pointing and the highly elliptical orbit create challenges in attaining coverage at desired geometries and relatively uniform spatial resolution. The instrument designed to meet these challenges consists of dual imagers, a monochrome narrow-angle camera (NAC) with a 1.5?? field of view (FOV) and a multispectral wide-angle camera (WAC) with a 10.5?? FOV, co-aligned on a pivoting platform. The focal-plane electronics of each camera are identical and use a 1024??1024 charge-coupled device detector. The cameras are passively cooled but use diode heat pipes and phase-change-material thermal reservoirs to maintain the thermal configuration during the hot portions of the orbit. Here we present an overview of the instrument design and how the design meets its technical challenges. We also review results from the first two flybys, discuss the quality of MDIS data from the initial periods of data acquisition and how that compares with requirements, and summarize how in-flight tests are being used to improve the quality of the instrument calibration. ?? 2009 SPIE.

  20. Model and Sensor Based Nonlinear Adaptive Flight Control with Online System Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Consensus exists that many loss-of-control (LOC) in flight accidents caused by severe aircraft damage or system failure could be prevented if flight performance could be recovered using the valid and remaining control authorities. However, the safe maneuverability of a post-failure aircraft will

  1. Model and Sensor Based Nonlinear Adaptive Flight Control with Online System Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Consensus exists that many loss-of-control (LOC) in flight accidents caused by severe aircraft damage or system failure could be prevented if flight performance could be recovered using the valid and remaining control authorities. However, the safe maneuverability of a post-failure aircraft will ine

  2. HTML 5 Displays for On-Board Flight Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Chandika

    2016-01-01

    During my Internship at NASA in the summer of 2016, I was assigned to a project which dealt with developing a web-server that would display telemetry and other system data using HTML 5, JavaScript, and CSS. By doing this, it would be possible to view the data across a variety of screen sizes, and establish a standard that could be used to simplify communication and software development between NASA and other countries. Utilizing a web- approach allowed us to add in more functionality, as well as make the displays more aesthetically pleasing for the users. When I was assigned to this project my main task was to first establish communication with the current display server. This display server would output data from the on-board systems in XML format. Once communication was established I was then asked to create a dynamic telemetry table web page that would update its header and change as new information came in. After this was completed, certain minor functionalities were added to the table such as a hide column and filter by system option. This was more for the purpose of making the table more useful for the users, as they can now filter and view relevant data. Finally my last task was to create a graphical system display for all the systems on the space craft. This was by far the most challenging part of my internship as finding a JavaScript library that was both free and contained useful functions to assist me in my task was difficult. In the end I was able to use the JointJs library and accomplish the task. With the help of my mentor and the HIVE lab team, we were able to establish stable communication with the display server. We also succeeded in creating a fully dynamic telemetry table and in developing a graphical system display for the advanced modular power system. Working in JSC for this internship has taught me a lot about coding in JavaScript and HTML 5. I was also introduced to the concept of developing software as a team, and exposed to the different

  3. Synthetic and Enhanced Vision Systems for NextGen (SEVS) Simulation and Flight Test Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Kevin J.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Ellis,Kyle K.; Rehfeld, Sherri A.

    2012-01-01

    The Synthetic and Enhanced Vision Systems for NextGen (SEVS) simulation and flight tests are jointly sponsored by NASA's Aviation Safety Program, Vehicle Systems Safety Technology project and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The flight tests were conducted by a team of Honeywell, Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation and NASA personnel with the goal of obtaining pilot-in-the-loop test data for flight validation, verification, and demonstration of selected SEVS operational and system-level performance capabilities. Nine test flights (38 flight hours) were conducted over the summer and fall of 2011. The evaluations were flown in Gulfstream.s G450 flight test aircraft outfitted with the SEVS technology under very low visibility instrument meteorological conditions. Evaluation pilots flew 108 approaches in low visibility weather conditions (600 ft to 2400 ft visibility) into various airports from Louisiana to Maine. In-situ flight performance and subjective workload and acceptability data were collected in collaboration with ground simulation studies at LaRC.s Research Flight Deck simulator.

  4. Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) KM Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraccioli, Paul; Varnadoe, Tom; McCarter, Mike

    2006-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center s Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) is four months into a fifteen month Knowledge Management (KM) initiative to support enhanced engineering decision making and analyses, faster resolution of anomalies (near-term) and effective, efficient knowledge infused engineering processes, reduced knowledge attrition, and reduced anomaly occurrences (long-term). The near-term objective of this initiative is developing a KM Pilot project, within the context of a 3-5 year KM strategy, to introduce and evaluate the use of KM within PSD. An internal NASA/MSFC PSD KM team was established early in project formulation to maintain a practitioner, user-centric focus throughout the conceptual development, planning and deployment of KM technologies and capabilities with in the PSD. The PSD internal team is supported by the University of Alabama's Aging Infrastructure Systems Center Of Excellence (AISCE), Intergraph Corporation, and The Knowledge Institute. The principle product of the initial four month effort has been strategic planning of PSD KM implementation by first determining the "as is" state of KM capabilities and developing, planning and documenting the roadmap to achieve the desired "to be" state. Activities undertaken to support the planning phase have included data gathering; cultural surveys, group work-sessions, interviews, documentation review, and independent research. Assessments and analyses have been performed including industry benchmarking, related local and Agency initiatives, specific tools and techniques used and strategies for leveraging existing resources, people and technology to achieve common KM goals. Key findings captured in the PSD KM Strategic Plan include the system vision, purpose, stakeholders, prioritized strategic objectives mapped to the top ten practitioner needs and analysis of current resource usage. Opportunities identified from research, analyses, cultural/KM surveys and practitioner interviews include

  5. Optimizing Flight Schedules by an Automated Decision Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    As a result of this, constructing the solution model in a language which is easy to enhance is critical. VBA is a powerful language for easy and quick...Flight Schedule Model ...............................................................................................45 Manual Assignments by...Scheduling Model .............................................................................62 Contribution of scheduling model to air force(s

  6. Highly segmented, high resolution time-of-flight system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, T.K.; Nagamiya, S.; Vossnack, O.; Wu, Y.D.; Zajc, W.A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Miake, Y.; Ueno, S.; Kitayama, H.; Nagasaka, Y.; Tomizawa, K.; Arai, I.; Yagi, K [Univ. of Tsukuba, (Japan)

    1991-12-31

    The light attenuation and timing characteristics of time-of-flight counters constructed of 3m long scintillating fiber bundles of different shapes and sizes are presented. Fiber bundles made of 5mm diameter fibers showed good timing characteristics and less light attenuation. The results for a 1.5m long scintillator rod are also presented.

  7. Highly segmented, high resolution time-of-flight system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, T.K.; Nagamiya, S.; Vossnack, O.; Wu, Y.D.; Zajc, W.A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Miake, Y.; Ueno, S.; Kitayama, H.; Nagasaka, Y.; Tomizawa, K.; Arai, I.; Yagi, K [Univ. of Tsukuba, (Japan)

    1991-12-31

    The light attenuation and timing characteristics of time-of-flight counters constructed of 3m long scintillating fiber bundles of different shapes and sizes are presented. Fiber bundles made of 5mm diameter fibers showed good timing characteristics and less light attenuation. The results for a 1.5m long scintillator rod are also presented.

  8. EVALUATION OF DYNAMIC CARACTERISTICS OF GAS COOLER OF THE CARBON DIOXIDE HEAT PUMP ÎN THE TRANSCRITICAL CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sit M.L.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic characteristics of heat pump gas cooler obtained by means of the solution of the dynamics equations in partial derivatives are examined. Control system of the heat pump used for the heating of the heating–system water, supplied from CHP to the district heating system is examined. Possibility of PID-controller with gain scheduling utilization with the coefficients changing depending on gas cooler mode of operation for temperature disturbances compensation of direct heating–system water is shown.

  9. The response of endocrine system to stress loads during space flight in human subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, L; Koska, J; Ksinantova, L; Pacak, K; Hoff, T; Noskov, V B; Grigoriev, A I; Vigas, M; Kvetnansky, R

    2003-01-01

    The responses of endocrine system to the exposure to stress-work load and hormonal changes during oral glucose tolerance tests were studied in the Slovak astronaut before (three weeks before flight), during (on the 4th and the 6th days of space flight), and after space flight (1-3 days and 15-17 days after space flight) on board of space station MIR. Blood samples during the tests were collected via cannula inserted into cubital vein, centrifuged in the special appliance Plasma-03, frozen in Kryogem-03, and at the end of the 8-day space flight transferred to Earth in special container for hormonal analysis. Preflight workload produced an increase of plasma norepinephrine and a moderate elevation of epinephrine levels. Plasma levels of insulin, growth hormone, prolactin and cortisol were not markedly changed immediately or 10 min after the end of work load. The higher increases of plasma growth hormone, prolactin and catecholamine levels were noted after workload during space flight as compared to preflight response. The higher plasma glucose and insulin levels were noted during the oral glucose tolerance test in space flight and also in the post flight period. Plasma epinephrine levels were slightly decreasing during glucose tolerance test; however, plasma norepinephrine levels were not changed. The similar patterns of catecholamine levels during glucose tolerance test were found when compared the preflight, in-flight and post flight values. These data demonstrate the changes of the dynamic responses of endocrine system to stress-work and metabolic loads during space flight in human subject.

  10. The response of endocrine system to stress loads during space flight in human subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, L.; Koška, J.; Kšinantová, L.; Pacak, K.; Hoff, T.; Noskov, V. B.; Grigoriev, A. I.; Vigaš, M.; Kvetňanský, R.

    The responses of endocrine system to the exposure to stress-work load and hormonal changes during oral glucose tolerance tests were studied in the Slovak astronaut before (three weeks before flight), during (on the 4th and the 6th days of space flight), and after space flight (1-3 days and 15-17 days after space flight) on board of space station MIR. Blood samples during the tests were collected via cannula inserted into cubital vein, centrifuged in the special appliance Plasma-03, frozen in Kryogem-03, and at the end of the 8-day space flight transforred to Earth in special container for hormonal analysis. Preflight workload produced an increase of plasma norepinephrine and a moderate elevation of epinephrine levels. Plasma levels of insulin, growth hormone, prolactin and cortisol were not markedly changed immediately or 10 min after the end of work load. The higher increases of plasma growth hormone, prolactin and catecholamine levels were noted after workload during space flight as compared to preflight response. The higher plasma glucose and insulin levels were noted during the oral glucose tolerance test in space flight and also in the post flight period. Plasma epinephrine levels were slightly decreasing during glucose tolerance test; however, plasma norepinephrine levels were not changed. The similar patterns of catecholamine levels during glucose tolerance test were found when compared the preflight, in-flight and post flight values. These data demonstrate the changes of the dynamic responses of endocrine system to stress-work and metabolic loads during space flight in human subject.

  11. IXV re-entry demonstrator: Mission overview, system challenges and flight reward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Roberto; Denaro, Angelo

    2016-07-01

    The Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) is an advanced re-entry demonstrator vehicle aimed to perform in-flight experimentation of atmospheric re-entry enabling systems and technologies. The IXV integrates key technologies at the system level, with significant advancements on Europe's previous flying test-beds. The project builds on previous achievements at system and technology levels, and provides a unique and concrete way of establishing and consolidating Europe's autonomous position in the strategic field of atmospheric re-entry. The IXV mission and system objectives are the design, development, manufacturing, assembling and on-ground to in-flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled reentry system, integrating critical re-entry technologies at system level. Among such critical technologies of interest, special attention is paid to aerodynamic and aerothermodynamics experimentation, including advanced instrumentation for aerothermodynamics phenomena investigations, thermal protections and hot-structures, guidance, navigation and flight control through combined jets and aerodynamic surfaces (i.e. flaps), in particular focusing on the technologies integration at system level for flight. Following the extensive detailed design, manufacturing, qualification, integration and testing of the flight segment and ground segment elements, IXV has performed a full successful flight on February 11th 2015. After the launch with the VEGA launcher form the CSG spaceport in French Guyana, IXV has performed a full nominal mission ending with a successful splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. During Flight Phase, the IXV space and ground segments worked perfectly, implementing the whole flight program in line with the commanded maneuvers and trajectory prediction, performing an overall flight of 34.400 km including 7.600 km with hot atmospheric re-entry in automatic guidance, concluding with successful precision landing at a distance of ~1

  12. Design of Launch Vehicle Flight Control Systems Using Ascent Vehicle Stability Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Alaniz, Abran; Hall, Robert; Bedossian, Nazareth; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A launch vehicle represents a complicated flex-body structural environment for flight control system design. The Ascent-vehicle Stability Analysis Tool (ASAT) is developed to address the complicity in design and analysis of a launch vehicle. The design objective for the flight control system of a launch vehicle is to best follow guidance commands while robustly maintaining system stability. A constrained optimization approach takes the advantage of modern computational control techniques to simultaneously design multiple control systems in compliance with required design specs. "Tower Clearance" and "Load Relief" designs have been achieved for liftoff and max dynamic pressure flight regions, respectively, in the presence of large wind disturbances. The robustness of the flight control system designs has been verified in the frequency domain Monte Carlo analysis using ASAT.

  13. Future Standardization of Space Telecommunications Radio System with Core Flight System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, Janette C.; Hickey, Joseph P.; Roche, Rigoberto; Handler, Louis M.; Hall, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is integrating the NASA Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Standard with the Core Flight System (cFS), an avionics software operating environment. The STRS standard provides a common, consistent framework to develop, qualify, operate and maintain complex, reconfigurable and reprogrammable radio systems. The cFS is a flexible, open architecture that features a plugand- play software executive called the Core Flight Executive (cFE), a reusable library of software components for flight and space missions and an integrated tool suite. Together, STRS and cFS create a development environment that allows for STRS compliant applications to reference the STRS application programmer interfaces (APIs) that use the cFS infrastructure. These APIs are used to standardize the communication protocols on NASAs space SDRs. The cFS-STRS Operating Environment (OE) is a portable cFS library, which adds the ability to run STRS applications on existing cFS platforms. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the cFS-STRS OE prototype, preliminary experimental results performed using the Advanced Space Radio Platform (ASRP), the GRC S- band Ground Station and the SCaN (Space Communication and Navigation) Testbed currently flying onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Additionally, this paper presents a demonstration of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Spacecraft Onboard Interface Services (SOIS) using electronic data sheets (EDS) inside cFE. This configuration allows for the data sheets to specify binary formats for data exchange between STRS applications. The integration of STRS with cFS leverages mission-proven platform functions and mitigates barriers to integration with future missions. This reduces flight software development time and the costs of software-defined radio (SDR) platforms. Furthermore, the combined benefits of STRS standardization with the flexibility of cFS provide an effective, reliable and

  14. CFD modeling of thermoelectric generators in automotive EGR-coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högblom, Olle; Andersson, Ronnie

    2012-06-01

    A large amount of the waste heat in the exhaust gases from diesel engines is removed in the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler. Introducing a thermoelectric generator (TEG) in an EGR cooler requires a completely new design of the heat exchanger. To accomplish that a model of the TEG-EGR system is required. In this work, a transient 3D CFD model for simulation of gas flow, heat transfer and power generation has been developed. This model allows critical design parameters in the TEG-EGR to be identified and design requirements for the systems to be specified. Besides the prediction of Seebeck, Peltier, Thomson and Joule effects, the simulations also give detailed insight to the temperature gradients in the gas-phase and inside the thermoelectric (TE) elements. The model is a very valuable tool to identify bottlenecks, improve design, select optimal TE materials and operating conditions. The results show that the greatest heat transfer resistance is located in the gas phase and it is critical to reduce this in order to achieve a large temperature difference over the thermoelectric elements without compromising on the maximum allowable pressure drop in the system. Further results from an investigation of the thermoelectric performance during a vehicle test cycle is presented.

  15. MMW radar enhanced vision systems: the Helicopter Autonomous Landing System (HALS) and Radar-Enhanced Vision System (REVS) are rotary and fixed wing enhanced flight vision systems that enable safe flight operations in degraded visual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jack; Schneider, John; Cariani, Pete

    2013-05-01

    Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has developed rotary and fixed wing millimeter wave radar enhanced vision systems. The Helicopter Autonomous Landing System (HALS) is a rotary-wing enhanced vision system that enables multi-ship landing, takeoff, and enroute flight in Degraded Visual Environments (DVE). HALS has been successfully flight tested in a variety of scenarios, from brown-out DVE landings, to enroute flight over mountainous terrain, to wire/cable detection during low-level flight. The Radar Enhanced Vision Systems (REVS) is a fixed-wing Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) undergoing prototype development testing. Both systems are based on a fast-scanning, threedimensional 94 GHz radar that produces real-time terrain and obstacle imagery. The radar imagery is fused with synthetic imagery of the surrounding terrain to form a long-range, wide field-of-view display. A symbology overlay is added to provide aircraft state information and, for HALS, approach and landing command guidance cuing. The combination of see-through imagery and symbology provides the key information a pilot needs to perform safe flight operations in DVE conditions. This paper discusses the HALS and REVS systems and technology, presents imagery, and summarizes the recent flight test results.

  16. Interactions of the human cardiopulmonary, hormonal and body fluid systems in parabolic flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limper, U; Gauger, P; Beck, P; Krainski, F; May, F; Beck, L E J

    2014-06-01

    Commercial parabolic flights accessible to customers with a wide range of health states will become more prevalent in the near future because of a growing private space flight sector. However, parabolic flights present the passengers' cardiovascular system with a combination of stressors, including a moderately hypobaric hypoxic ambient environment (HH) and repeated gravity transitions (GT). Thus, the aim of this study was to identify unique and combined effects of HH and GT on the human cardiovascular, pulmonary and fluid regulation systems. Cardiac index was determined by inert gas rebreathing (CI(rb)), and continuous non-invasive finger blood pressure (FBP) was repeatedly measured in 18 healthy subjects in the standing position while they were in parabolic flight at 0 and 1.8 G(z). Plasma volume (PV) and fluid regulating blood hormones were determined five times over the flight day. Eleven out of the 18 subjects were subjected to an identical test protocol in a hypobaric chamber in ambient conditions comparable to parabolic flight. CI(rb) in 0 G(z) decreased significantly during flight (early, 5.139 ± 1.326 L/min; late, 4.150 ± 1.082 L/min) because of a significant decrease in heart rate (HR) (early, 92 ± 15 min(-1); late, 78 ± 12 min(-1)), even though the stroke volume (SV) remained the same. HH produced a small decrease in the PV, both in the hypobaric chamber and in parabolic flight, indicating a dominating HH effect without a significant effect of GT on PV (-52 ± 34 and -115 ± 32 ml, respectively). Pulmonary tissue volume decreased in the HH conditions because of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (0.694 ± 0.185 and 0.560 ± 0.207 ml) but increased at 0 and 1.8 G(z) in parabolic flight (0.593 ± 0.181 and 0.885 ± 0.458 ml, respectively), indicating that cardiac output and arterial blood pressure rather than HH are the main factors affecting pulmonary vascular regulation in parabolic flight. HH and GT each lead to specific responses of the

  17. Voice Activated Cockpit Management Systems: Voice-Flight NexGen Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Speaking to the cockpit as a method of system management in flight can become an effective interaction method, since voice communication is very efficient. Automated...

  18. An All Electronic, Adaptive, Focusing Schlieren System for Flight Research Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a proposal to develop an electronic, focusing schlieren system for flight research based on electronic cameras and spatial light modulators as dynamic...

  19. Intelligent Flight Support System (IFSS): A Real-time Intelligent Decision Support Prototype Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The integration of the analysis tools with the advanced visualization capabilities in The Intelligent Flight Support System (IFSS) can provide a unique method for...

  20. Bifurcation Tools for Flight Dynamics Analysis and Control System Design Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Modern bifurcation analysis methods have been proposed for investigating flight dynamics and control system design in highly nonlinear regimes and also for the...

  1. A Scalable Semantics-Based Verification System for Flight Critical Software Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Modern flight-critical systems include hundreds of thousands to millions of lines of code. The Boeing 777, for instance, includes over 2 million lines of code....

  2. A Scalable Semantics-Based Verification System for Flight Critical Software Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flight-critical systems rely on an ever increasing amount of software—the Boe- ing 777 contains over 2 million lines of code. Most of this code is written in...

  3. A Stochastic Model for the Landing Dispersion of Hazard Detection and Avoidance Capable Flight Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, L.

    2014-06-01

    To support landing site assessments for HDA-capable flight systems and to facilitate trade studies between the potential HDA architectures versus the yielded probability of safe landing a stochastic landing dispersion model has been developed.

  4. Self-Repairing Flight Control System for Online Health Monitoring and Recovery Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR project, a reliable self-repairing Flight Control System (FCS) will be developed. To achieve this goal, an artificial Neural Network based Sensor...

  5. Use of animal models for space flight physiology studies, with special focus on the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Animal models have been used to study the effects of space flight on physiological systems. The animal models have been used because of the limited availability of human subjects for studies to be carried out in space as well as because of the need to carry out experiments requiring samples and experimental conditions that cannot be performed using humans. Experiments have been carried out in space using a variety of species, and included developmental biology studies. These species included rats, mice, non-human primates, fish, invertebrates, amphibians and insects. The species were chosen because they best fit the experimental conditions required for the experiments. Experiments with animals have also been carried out utilizing ground-based models that simulate some of the effects of exposure to space flight conditions. Most of the animal studies have generated results that parallel the effects of space flight on human physiological systems. Systems studied have included the neurovestibular system, the musculoskeletal system, the immune system, the neurological system, the hematological system, and the cardiovascular system. Hindlimb unloading, a ground-based model of some of the effects of space flight on the immune system, has been used to study the effects of space flight conditions on physiological parameters. For the immune system, exposure to hindlimb unloading has been shown to results in alterations of the immune system similar to those observed after space flight. This has permitted the development of experiments that demonstrated compromised resistance to infection in rodents maintained in the hindlimb unloading model as well as the beginning of studies to develop countermeasures to ameliorate or prevent such occurrences. Although there are limitations to the use of animal models for the effects of space flight on physiological systems, the animal models should prove very valuable in designing countermeasures for exploration class missions of the future.

  6. Results from the Cooler and Lead Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A

    2010-06-10

    The report presents the results of testing MICE spectrometer magnet current leads on a test apparatus that combines both the copper leads and the high temperature superconducting (HTS) leads with a single Cryomech PT415 cooler and liquid helium tank. The current is carried through the copper leads from 300 K to the top of the HTS leads. The current is then carried through the HTS leads to a feed-through from the vacuum space to the inside of a liquid helium tank. The experiment allows one to measure the performance of both cooler stages along with the performance of the leads. While the leads were powered we measured the voltage drops through the copper leads, through the HTS leads, through spliced to the feed-through, through the feed-through and through the low-temperature superconducting loop that connects one lead to the other. Measurements were made using the leads that were used in spectrometer magnet 1A and spectrometer magnet 2A. These are the same leads that were used for Superbend and Venus magnets at LBNL. The IL/A for these leads was 5.2 x 10{sup 6} m{sup -1}. The leads turned out to be too long. The same measurements were made using the leads that were installed in magnet 2B. The magnet 2B leads had an IL/A of 3.3 x 10{sup 6} A m{sup -1}. This report discusses the cooler performance and the measured electrical performance of the lead circuit that contains the copper leads and the superconducting leads. All of the HTS leads that were installed in magnet 2B were current tested using this apparatus.

  7. Flight Investigation of a Normal-Acceleration Automatic Longitudinal Control System in a Fighter Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoberg, S. A.; Russell, Walter R.; Alford, William L.

    1958-01-01

    A flight investigation was made to obtain experimental information on the handling qualities of a normal-acceleration type of automatic longitudinal control system. The control system was installed in a subsonic fighter-type airplane. In hands-off (stick-free) flight the normal-acceleration control system attempted to regulate the normal acceleration to a constant value which is dependent on the automatic-control-system trim setting. In maneuvering flight a given pilot's stick deflection produced a proportional change in normal acceleration, the change in acceleration being independent of flight condition. A small side-located controller stick was used by the pilot to introduce signals into the automatic control system. In the flight program emphasis was placed on the acceleration-limiting capabilities of the control system. The handling qualities were investigated in maneuvers such as slow and rapid pull-ups and turns and also in flight operations such as cruising, stalls, landings, aerobatics, and air-to-air tracking. Good acceleration limiting was obtained with the normal-acceleration control system by limiting the magnitude of the input signal that the pilot could introduce into the control system. The same values of control-system gain settings could be used from an acceleration-limiting stand-point at both 10,000 and 30,000 feet for the complete speed range of the airplane. The response characteristics of the airplane-control system combination were also satisfactory at both high and low altitude with these same values of control-system gain setting. In the pilot's opinion, the normal-acceleration control system provided good stability and control characteristics in flight operations such as cruising, stalls, landings, aerobatics, and air-to-air tracking.

  8. A new ball launching system with controlled flight parameters for catching experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Avella, A; Cesqui, B; Portone, A; Lacquaniti, F

    2011-03-30

    Systematic investigations of sensorimotor control of interceptive actions in naturalistic conditions, such as catching or hitting a ball moving in three-dimensional space, requires precise control of the projectile flight parameters and of the associated visual stimuli. Such control is challenging when air drag cannot be neglected because the mapping of launch parameters into flight parameters cannot be computed analytically. We designed, calibrated, and experimentally validated an actuated launching apparatus that can control the average spatial position and flight duration of a ball at a given distance from a fixed launch location. The apparatus was constructed by mounting a ball launching machine with adjustable delivery speed on an actuated structure capable of changing the spatial orientation of the launch axis while projecting balls through a hole in a screen hiding the apparatus. The calibration procedure relied on tracking the balls with a motion capture system and on approximating the mapping of launch parameters into flight parameters by means of polynomials functions. Polynomials were also used to estimate the variability of the flight parameters. The coefficients of these polynomials were obtained using the launch and flight parameters of 660 launches with 65 different initial conditions. The relative accuracy and precision of the apparatus were larger than 98% for flight times and larger than 96% for ball heights at a distance of 6m from the screen. Such novel apparatus, by reliably and automatically controlling desired ball flight characteristics without neglecting air drag, allows for a systematic investigation of naturalistic interceptive tasks.

  9. Flight-induced inhibition of the cerebral median peptidergic neurosecretory system in Locusta migratoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diederen, J.H.; van Etten, E.W.; Biegstraaten, A.I.; Terlou, M.; Vullings, H.G.; Jansen, W.F.

    1988-08-01

    This study discusses the effects of a 1-hr period of flight on the peptidergic pars intercerebralis (PI)-corpus cardiacum storage part (CCS) system in male Locusta migratoria, particularly the effect on material in this system stained by a histochemical method for peptidergic neurosecretory material (NSM) or labeled by in vivo incorporation of radioactive amino acid molecules. By use of an automatic image analysis system a number of parameters of the stained or radioactively labeled substances were measured to quantify the flight-induced effects and to get information on the manner in which the neurosecretory cell bodies in the PI and their axonal endings in the CCS accommodate changing amounts of NSM. The CCS of flown locusts contained distinctly more stained and radioactively labeled substances than the CCS of unflown locusts. A tendency to similar differences was observed in the cluster of neurosecretory cell bodies in the PI. The results indicate that 1 hr flight inhibited the release of NSM by the PI-CCS system. After the onset of reduced release activity by flight, some NSM continued to be synthesized and transported from the PI to the CCS, gradually filling up and expanding the entire PI-CCS system, the NSM at the same time becoming more and more densely packed. It is concluded that the peptidergic PI-CCS system is not actively involved in the control of flight metabolism or flight behavior.

  10. ADAPTIVE FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEM OF ARMED HELICOPTER USING WAVELET NEURAL NETWORK METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHURong-gang; JIANGChangsheng; FENGBin

    2004-01-01

    A discussion is devoted to the design of an adaptive flight control system of the armed helicopter using wavelet neural network method. Firstly, the control loop of the attitude angle is designed with a dynamic inversion scheme in a quick loop and a slow loop. respectively. Then, in order to compensate the error caused by dynamic inversion, the adaptive flight control system of the armed helicopter using wavelet neural network method is put forward, so the BP wavelet neural network and the Lyapunov stable wavelet neural network are used to design the helicopter flight control system. Finally, the typical maneuver flight is simulated to demonstrate its validity and effectiveness. Result proves that the wavelet neural network has an engineering practical value and the effect of WNN is good.

  11. Integrated digital flight-control system for the space shuttle orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The integrated digital flight control system is presented which provides rotational and translational control of the space shuttle orbiter in all phases of flight: from launch ascent through orbit to entry and touchdown, and during powered horizontal flights. The program provides a versatile control system structure while maintaining uniform communications with other programs, sensors, and control effectors by using an executive routine/functional subroutine format. The program reads all external variables at a single point, copies them into its dedicated storage, and then calls the required subroutines in the proper sequence. As a result, the flight control program is largely independent of other programs in the GN&C computer complex and is equally insensitive to the characteristics of the processor configuration. The integrated structure of the control system and the DFCS executive routine which embodies that structure are described along with the input and output. The specific estimation and control algorithms used in the various mission phases are given.

  12. Study of thermal-flow processes in ash cooler cooperating with CFB boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Regucki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an example of thermal-flow analysis of the bottom ash cooler cooperating with the circulating fluidized bed boiler. There is presented a mathematical model of series-parallel hydraulic system supplying the ash cooler in cooling water. The numerical calculations indicate an influence of changes of the pipeline geometrical parameters on the cooling water flow rate in the system. Paper discusses the methodology of the studies and presents examples of the results of thermal balance calculations based on the results of measurements. The numerical results of the thermal-flow analysis in comparison with the measurements on the object indicate that the presented approach could be used as a diagnostic tool investigating the technical state of the bottom ash cooler.

  13. A thermoacoustically driven cooler capable of reaching temperature below 77 K with no moving part

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Wei; LUO Ercang; LING Hong; HU Jianying

    2005-01-01

    @@ The pulse tube cooler has no cryogenic displacer and has attracted lots of attention in the field of cryocooler research. On the other hand, the thermoacoustic engine can generate self-oscillation and output work without moving components[1]. Combining both technologies leads to a cryogenic cooler system with no moving components at all, which has great advantages of high reliability, low manufacturing cost, etc. Limited by largest available pressure ratio of thermoacoustic engines, up to now the best results on such a combined system are 88.6K when standing-wave thermoacoustic engine[2] is used and 80.9K when traveling-wave thermoacoustic engine[3] is used.

  14. X-33 Attitude Control System Design for Ascent, Transition, and Entry Flight Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Charles E.; Gallaher, Michael W.; Hendrix, Neal D.

    1998-01-01

    The Vehicle Control Systems Team at Marshall Space Flight Center, Systems Dynamics Laboratory, Guidance and Control Systems Division is designing under a cooperative agreement with Lockheed Martin Skunkworks, the Ascent, Transition, and Entry flight attitude control system for the X-33 experimental vehicle. Ascent flight control begins at liftoff and ends at linear aerospike main engine cutoff (NECO) while Transition and Entry flight control begins at MECO and concludes at the terminal area energy management (TAEM) interface. TAEM occurs at approximately Mach 3.0. This task includes not only the design of the vehicle attitude control systems but also the development of requirements for attitude control system components and subsystems. The X-33 attitude control system design is challenged by a short design cycle, the design environment (Mach 0 to about Mach 15), and the X-33 incremental test philosophy. The X-33 design-to-launch cycle of less than 3 years requires a concurrent design approach while the test philosophy requires design adaptation to vehicle variations that are a function of Mach number and mission profile. The flight attitude control system must deal with the mixing of aerosurfaces, reaction control thrusters, and linear aerospike engine control effectors and handle parasitic effects such as vehicle flexibility and propellant sloshing from the uniquely shaped propellant tanks. The attitude control system design is, as usual, closely linked to many other subsystems and must deal with constraints and requirements from these subsystems.

  15. Analysis and Design of Launch Vehicle Flight Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong; Du, Wei; Whorton, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the fundamental principles of launch vehicle flight control analysis and design. In particular, the classical concept of "drift-minimum" and "load-minimum" control principles is re-examined and its performance and stability robustness with respect to modeling uncertainties and a gimbal angle constraint is discussed. It is shown that an additional feedback of angle-of-attack or lateral acceleration can significantly improve the overall performance and robustness, especially in the presence of unexpected large wind disturbance. Non-minimum-phase structural filtering of "unstably interacting" bending modes of large flexible launch vehicles is also shown to be effective and robust.

  16. Investigations of waste heat recovery from bulk milk cooler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Sapali

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bulk milk coolers are used to chill the milk from its harvest temperature of 35–4 °C to arrest the bacterial growth and maintain the quality of harvested milk. Milk chilling practices are energy intensive with low coefficient of performance (COP of about 3.0. Increased energy cost concern encouraged an investigation of heat recovery from bulk milk cooler as one conservation alternative for reducing water heating cost in dairy industry. Heat dissipated to atmosphere through condenser is recovered to improve the energy efficiency of plant. The waste heat is utilized to heat the water which is used to clean the milk processing equipments thus saving thermal or electrical energy used to heat the water separately. Shell and coil type heat exchanger is designed and used to recover the waste heat during condensation process. Heat rejected in condensation process consists of superheat and latent heat of the refrigerant. In this work, attempt has been made to recover complete superheat along with part of latent heat which is a present research issue. The results show that complete superheat and 35% of latent heat is recovered. Heat recovery rate is measured for various mass flow rates. Water is flowing on shell side and refrigerant through tubes. The effectiveness of the heat exchanger is determined and the results achieved are presented in this paper. Significant improvements have been achieved and COP of the system is increased from 3 to 4.8.

  17. Experimental research on thermoelectric cooler for imager camera thermal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bing-ting; Kang, Ao-feng; Fu, Xin; Jiang, Shi-chen; Dong, Yao-hai

    2013-09-01

    Conventional passive thermal design failed to satisfy CCD's temperature requirement on a geostationary earth orbit satellite Imager camera because of the high power and low working temperature, leading to utilization of thermoelectric cooler (TEC) for heat dissipation. TEC was used in conjunction with the external radiator in the CCDs' thermal design. In order to maintain the CCDs at low working temperature, experimental research on the performance of thermoelectric cooler was necessary and the results could be the guide for the application of TEC in different conditions. The experimental system to evaluate the performance of TEC was designed and built, consisting of TEC, heat pipe, TEC mounting plate, radiator and heater. A series of TEC performance tests were conducted for domestic and oversea TECs in thermal vacuum environment. The effects of TEC's mounting, input power and heat load on the temperature difference of TEC's cold and hot face were explored. Results demonstrated that the temperature difference of TEC's cold and hot face was slightly increased when TEC's operating voltage reached 80% of rating voltage, which caused the temperature rise of TEC's hot face. It recommended TEC to operate at low voltage. Based on experiment results, thermal analysis indicated that the temperature difference of TEC's cold and hot face could satisfy the temperature requirement and still had surplus.

  18. Development of an Autonomous Flight Control System for Small Size Unmanned Helicopter Based on Dynamical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It is devoted to the development of an autonomous flight control system for small size unmanned helicopter based on dynamical model. At first, the mathematical model of a small size helicopter is described. After that simple but effective MTCV control algorithm was proposed. The whole flight control algorithm is composed of two parts:orientation controller based on the model for rotation dynamics and a robust position controller for a double integrator. The MTCV block is also used to achieve translation velocity control. To demonstrate the performance of the presented algorithm, simulation results and results achieved in real flight experiments were presented.

  19. Russian Countermeasure Systems for Adverse Effects of Microgravity on Long-Duration ISS Flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovskaya, Inessa B; Yarmanova, E N; Yegorov, A D; Stepantsov, V I; Fomina, E V; Tomilovaskaya, E S

    2015-12-01

    The system of countermeasures for the adverse effects of microgravity developed in the USSR supported the successful implementation of long-duration spaceflight (LDS) programs on the Salyut and Mir orbital stations and was subsequently adapted for flights on the International Space Station (ISS). From 2000 through 2010, crews completed 26 ISS flight increments ranging in duration from 140 to 216 d, with the participation of 27 Russian cosmonauts. These flights have made it possible to more precisely determine a crew-member's level of conditioning, better assess the advantages and disadvantages of training processes, and determine prospects for future developments.

  20. Thermal design of two-stage evaporative cooler based on thermal comfort criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Neda; Poshtiri, Amin Haghighi

    2017-04-01

    Performance of two-stage evaporative coolers at various outdoor air conditions was numerically studied, and its geometric and physical characteristics were obtained based on thermal comfort criteria. For this purpose, a mathematical model was developed based on conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy to determine heat and mass transfer characteristics of the system. The results showed that two-stage indirect/direct cooler can provide the thermal comfort condition when outdoor air temperature and relative humidity are located in the range of 34-54 °C and 10-60 %, respectively. Moreover, as relative humidity of the ambient air rises, two-stage evaporative cooler with the smaller direct and larger indirect cooler will be needed. In building with high cooling demand, thermal comfort may be achieved at a greater air change per hour number, and thus an expensive two-stage evaporative cooler with a higher electricity consumption would be required. Finally, a design guideline was proposed to determine the size of required plate heat exchangers at various operating conditions.

  1. Reliability improvements on Thales RM2 rotary Stirling coolers: analysis and methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauquil, J. M.; Seguineau, C.; Martin, J.-Y.; Benschop, T.

    2016-05-01

    The cooled IR detectors are used in a wide range of applications. Most of the time, the cryocoolers are one of the components dimensioning the lifetime of the system. The cooler reliability is thus one of its most important parameters. This parameter has to increase to answer market needs. To do this, the data for identifying the weakest element determining cooler reliability has to be collected. Yet, data collection based on field are hardly usable due to lack of informations. A method for identifying the improvement in reliability has then to be set up which can be used even without field return. This paper will describe the method followed by Thales Cryogénie SAS to reach such a result. First, a database was built from extensive expertizes of RM2 failures occurring in accelerate ageing. Failure modes have then been identified and corrective actions achieved. Besides this, a hierarchical organization of the functions of the cooler has been done with regard to the potential increase of its efficiency. Specific changes have been introduced on the functions most likely to impact efficiency. The link between efficiency and reliability will be described in this paper. The work on the two axes - weak spots for cooler reliability and efficiency - permitted us to increase in a drastic way the MTTF of the RM2 cooler. Huge improvements in RM2 reliability are actually proven by both field return and reliability monitoring. These figures will be discussed in the paper.

  2. Thermal design of two-stage evaporative cooler based on thermal comfort criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Neda; Poshtiri, Amin Haghighi

    2016-09-01

    Performance of two-stage evaporative coolers at various outdoor air conditions was numerically studied, and its geometric and physical characteristics were obtained based on thermal comfort criteria. For this purpose, a mathematical model was developed based on conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy to determine heat and mass transfer characteristics of the system. The results showed that two-stage indirect/direct cooler can provide the thermal comfort condition when outdoor air temperature and relative humidity are located in the range of 34-54 °C and 10-60 %, respectively. Moreover, as relative humidity of the ambient air rises, two-stage evaporative cooler with the smaller direct and larger indirect cooler will be needed. In building with high cooling demand, thermal comfort may be achieved at a greater air change per hour number, and thus an expensive two-stage evaporative cooler with a higher electricity consumption would be required. Finally, a design guideline was proposed to determine the size of required plate heat exchangers at various operating conditions.

  3. Method and system for entering data within a flight plan entry field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Michael J. (Inventor); Van Omen, Debi (Inventor); Adams, Michael B. (Inventor); Chase, Karl L. (Inventor); Lewis, Daniel E. (Inventor); McCrobie, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides systems, apparatus and methods for entering data into a flight plan entry field which facilitates the display and editing of aircraft flight-plan data. In one embodiment, the present invention provides a method for entering multiple waypoint and procedure identifiers at once within a single a flight plan entry field. In another embodiment, the present invention provides for the partial entry of any waypoint or procedure identifiers, and thereafter relating the identifiers with an aircraft's flight management system to anticipate the complete text entry for display. In yet another embodiment, the present invention discloses a method to automatically provide the aircraft operator with selectable prioritized arrival and approach routing identifiers by a single manual selection. In another embodiment, the present invention is a method for providing the aircraft operator with selectable alternate patterns to a new runway.

  4. Study of flight data recorder, underwater locator beacon, data logger and flarm collision avoidance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timi, Purnota Hannan; Shermin, Saima; Rahman, Asifur

    2017-06-01

    Flight data recorder is one of the most important sources of flight data in event of aviation disaster which records a wide range of flight parameters including altitude, airspeed, heading etc. and also helps monitoring and analyzing aircraft performance. Cockpit voice recorder records radio microphone transmissions and sounds in the cockpit. These devices help to find out and understand the root causes of aircraft crashes and help building better aircraft systems and technical solutions to prevent similar type of crashes in future, which lead to improvement in safety of aircrafts and passengers. There are other devices also which enhance the aircraft safety and assists in emergency or catastrophic situations. This paper discusses the concept of Flight Data Recorder (FDR), Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR), Underwater Locator Beacon (ULB), Data logger and flarm-collision avoidance system for aircraft and their applications in aviation.

  5. Flight evaluation of a digital electronic engine control system in an F-15 airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, L. P.; Mackall, K. G.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Walter, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    Benefits provided by a full-authority digital engine control are related to improvements in engine efficiency, performance, and operations. An additional benefit is the capability of detecting and accommodating failures in real time and providing engine-health diagnostics. The digital electronic engine control (DEEC), is a full-authority digital engine control developed for the F100-PW-100 turbofan engine. The DEEC has been flight tested on an F-15 aircraft. The flight tests had the objective to evaluate the DEEC hardware and software over the F-15 flight envelope. A description is presented of the results of the flight tests, which consisted of nonaugmented and augmented throttle transients, airstarts, and backup control operations. The aircraft, engine, DEEC system, and data acquisition and reduction system are discussed.

  6. Flight Control System Design by Quadratic Stabilization with Partial Pole Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Kenji

    The most fundamental requirements for flight control system are ensuring robust stability and improving flying quality. Quadratic stabilization is a powerful technique ensuring robust stability against parameter change of aircraft due to flight condition. Furthermore, flying quality requirements are regarded as eigenstructure assignment specifications. This paper proposes a new design method of feedback gain which simultaneously achieves quadratic stabilization and partial pole placement. This design method is reduced to a numerical optimization problem including linear matrix inequality (LMI) constraints.

  7. Fiber-Optic Sensing System: Overview, Development and Deployment in Flight at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hon Man; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Richards, W. Lance

    2015-01-01

    An overview of the research and technological development of the fiber-optic sensing system (FOSS) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (NASA AFRC) is presented. Theory behind fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, as well as interrogation technique based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) is discussed. Assessment and validation of FOSS as an accurate measurement tool for structural health monitoring is realized in the laboratory environment as well as large-scale flight deployment.

  8. Anatomy of a system accident: The crash of Avianca Flight 052

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    On January 25, 1990, Avianca Flight 052 crashed after running out of fuel following a missed approach to New York's John F. Kennedy Airport. Weather was poor on the East Coast of the United States that day, and the flight had experienced several holding patterns enroute from Medellin, Colombia, to New York. The accident is analyzed in terms of Helmreich and Foushee's (1993) model of crew performance and Reason's (1990) model of latent pathogens in system operations.

  9. Simulator Evaluation of Simplified Propulsion-Only Emergency Flight Control Systems on Transport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Kaneshige, John; Bull, John; Maine, Trindel A.

    1999-01-01

    With the advent of digital engine control systems, considering the use of engine thrust for emergency flight control has become feasible. Many incidents have occurred in which engine thrust supplemented or replaced normal aircraft flight controls. In most of these cases, a crash has resulted, and more than 1100 lives have been lost. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has developed a propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system in which computer-controlled engine thrust provides emergency flight control capability. Using this PCA system, an F-15 and an MD-11 airplane have been landed without using any flight controls. In simulations, C-17, B-757, and B-747 PCA systems have also been evaluated successfully. These tests used full-authority digital electronic control systems on the engines. Developing simpler PCA systems that can operate without full-authority engine control, thus allowing PCA technology to be installed on less capable airplanes or at lower cost, is also a desire. Studies have examined simplified ?PCA Ultralite? concepts in which thrust control is provided using an autothrottle system supplemented by manual differential throttle control. Some of these concepts have worked well. The PCA Ultralite study results are presented for simulation tests of MD-11, B-757, C-17, and B-747 aircraft.

  10. Three axis electronic flight motion simulator real time control system design and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiyuan; Miao, Zhonghua; Wang, Xuyong; Wang, Xiaohua

    2014-12-01

    A three axis electronic flight motion simulator is reported in this paper including the modelling, the controller design as well as the hardware implementation. This flight motion simulator could be used for inertial navigation test and high precision inertial navigation system with good dynamic and static performances. A real time control system is designed, several control system implementation problems were solved including time unification with parallel port interrupt, high speed finding-zero method of rotary inductosyn, zero-crossing management with continuous rotary, etc. Tests were carried out to show the effectiveness of the proposed real time control system.

  11. Three axis electronic flight motion simulator real time control system design and implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhiyuan; Miao, Zhonghua, E-mail: zhonghua-miao@163.com; Wang, Xiaohua [School of Mechatronic Engineering and Automation, Shanghai University, Shanghai, 200072 (China); Wang, Xuyong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-12-15

    A three axis electronic flight motion simulator is reported in this paper including the modelling, the controller design as well as the hardware implementation. This flight motion simulator could be used for inertial navigation test and high precision inertial navigation system with good dynamic and static performances. A real time control system is designed, several control system implementation problems were solved including time unification with parallel port interrupt, high speed finding-zero method of rotary inductosyn, zero-crossing management with continuous rotary, etc. Tests were carried out to show the effectiveness of the proposed real time control system.

  12. Research and Implementation of 3D Stereo Visual System for Flight Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄安祥; 于恒进; 陈宗基; 李明

    2002-01-01

    In military aircrafl fiight simulation, visual cues require depth sense,stereo sense and large field of view. To satisfy these requirements, we set up a space stereo visual system for flight simulation. This paper discusses the design issues of this visual system, including design principles, system implementations,as well as practical solutions to some key problems.

  13. 空气冷却器系统铵盐沉积及影响因素研究%STUDY ON THE AMMONIUM SALT DEPOSITION IN AIR COOLER SYSTEM AND INFLUENCING FACTOR ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    偶国富; 王宽心; 刘慧慧; 詹剑良

    2012-01-01

    采用流程模拟软件HYSYS,运用物料守恒原理建立闪蒸过程模型,得到加氢裂化反应流出物的油气-水三相平衡体系.利用闪蒸过程模型计算得到原料硫、氮、氯含量,注水量,压力等因素对加氢反应流出物空气冷却器(REAC)系统中NH4Cl、NH4HS沉积温度的影响情况.结果表明:NH4Cl沉积主要发生在REAC系统入口位置,NH4 HS沉积主要发生在REAC系统出口位置;NH4Cl的沉积温度受原料氯含量的影响较大,强化原油的脱氯过程、将注水点设置在NH4Cl的沉积位置以前并保持有25%(ψ)的液态水是降低NH4Cl沉积风险的有效方法;硫含量及注水量是影响NH4HS沉积温度的主要因素,加强循环氢脱硫并适当提高系统注水量,使NH4HS的沉积温度低于系统的操作温度可有效避免NH4 HS沉积.%In order to get the oil-gas-water equilibrium system of hydrocracking reaction effluent, a three-phase flash distillation module was established by HYSYS process simulation software combined with mass conservation principle. The impact of sulfur, nitrogen and chlorine contents in feed, amount of water injection and pressure on the deposition temperatures of NH4Cl and NH4HS in air cooler of reaction effluent (REAC) system were analyzed through the flash distillation module calculation. Results showed that the deposition of NH4Cl and NH4HS occurred mainly at the inlet and outlet of REAC system, respectively. The NH4Cl deposition temperature was greatly affected by the chlorine content of feed, thus, strengthening the dechlorination process of crude oil, setting the water injection point above the site of NH4Cl deposition and keeping 25% of liquid water in effluent could effectively reduce the risk of forming NH4Cl deposit. Sulfur content in the system and the amount of water injection were the main causes affecting the deposition temperature of NH4HS, enhancing desulfurization of recycle hydrogen and increase water injection to keep NH4HS

  14. ZERO PHASE ERROR REAL TIME CONTROL FOR FLIGHT SIMULATOR SERVO SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jinkun; Liu Qiang; Er Lianjie

    2004-01-01

    Flight simulator is an important device and a typical high performance position servo system used in the hardware-in-the-loop simulation of flight control system.Without using the future desired output, zero phase error controller makes the overall system's frequency response exhibit zero phase shift for all frequencies and a very small gain error at low frequency range can be achieved.A new algorithm to design the feedforward controller is presented, in order to reduce the phase error, the design of proposed feedforward controller uses a modified plant model, which is a closed loop transfer function, through which the system tracking precision performance can be improved greatly.Real-time control results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach in flight simulator servo system.

  15. Performance Analysis of Joule-Thomson Cooler Supplied with Gas Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, A.; Chorowski, M.; Dorosz, P.

    2017-02-01

    Joule-Thomson (J-T) cryo-coolers working in closed cycles and supplied with gas mixtures are the subject of intensive research in different laboratories. The replacement of pure nitrogen by nitrogen-hydrocarbon mixtures allows to improve both thermodynamic parameters and economy of the refrigerators. It is possible to avoid high pressures in the heat exchanger and to use standard refrigeration compressor instead of gas bottles or high-pressure oil free compressor. Closed cycle and mixture filled Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigerator providing 10-20 W of cooling power at temperature range 90-100 K has been designed and manufactured. Thermodynamic analysis including the optimization of the cryo-cooler mixture has been performed with ASPEN HYSYS software. The paper describes the design of the cryo-cooler and provides thermodynamic analysis of the system. The test results are presented and discussed.

  16. Selecting a software development methodology. [of digital flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The state of the art analytical techniques for the development and verification of digital flight control software is studied and a practical designer oriented development and verification methodology is produced. The effectiveness of the analytic techniques chosen for the development and verification methodology are assessed both technically and financially. Technical assessments analyze the error preventing and detecting capabilities of the chosen technique in all of the pertinent software development phases. Financial assessments describe the cost impact of using the techniques, specifically, the cost of implementing and applying the techniques as well as the relizable cost savings. Both the technical and financial assessment are quantitative where possible. In the case of techniques which cannot be quantitatively assessed, qualitative judgements are expressed about the effectiveness and cost of the techniques. The reasons why quantitative assessments are not possible will be documented.

  17. Development and Evaluation of a Sandia Cooler-based Refrigerator Condenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kariya, Harumichi Arthur [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Leick, Michael T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zimmerman, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Li, Manjie [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Du, Yilin [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Lee, Hoseong [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Hwang, Yunho [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Radermacher, Reinhard [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report describes the first design of a refrigerator condenser using the Sandia Cooler, i.e. air - bearing supported rotating heat - sink impeller. The project included ba seline performance testing of a residential refrigerator, analysis and design development of a Sandia Cooler condenser assembly including a spiral channel baseplate, and performance measurement and validation of this condenser system as incorporated into the residential refrigerator. Comparable performance was achieved in a 60% smaller volume package. The improved modeling parameters can now be used to guide more optimized designs and more accurately predict performance.

  18. Experimental investigation of the influences of shape and surface area on the EGR cooler efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sanghoon; Park, Sangki; Choi, Kapseung; Kim, Hyungman

    2011-06-01

    The cooled EGR system is one of the most effective techniques currently available for reducing NOx emissions. In this study, engine dynamometer experiments were performed to investigate the efficiencies of the shell and tube-type and stack-type EGR coolers. The results show that the heat exchange of the stack-type EGR cooler is much more effective than that of the shell and tube type because of the increased surface area and better mixing of the coolant flow, and also more PM is produced at low exhaust gas temperature than at high temperature.

  19. Toward a Model-Based Approach to Flight System Fault Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John; Murray, Alex; Meakin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Fault Protection (FP) is a distinct and separate systems engineering sub-discipline that is concerned with the off-nominal behavior of a system. Flight system fault protection is an important part of the overall flight system systems engineering effort, with its own products and processes. As with other aspects of systems engineering, the FP domain is highly amenable to expression and management in models. However, while there are standards and guidelines for performing FP related analyses, there are not standards or guidelines for formally relating the FP analyses to each other or to the system hardware and software design. As a result, the material generated for these analyses are effectively creating separate models that are only loosely-related to the system being designed. Development of approaches that enable modeling of FP concerns in the same model as the system hardware and software design enables establishment of formal relationships that has great potential for improving the efficiency, correctness, and verification of the implementation of flight system FP. This paper begins with an overview of the FP domain, and then continues with a presentation of a SysML/UML model of the FP domain and the particular analyses that it contains, by way of showing a potential model-based approach to flight system fault protection, and an exposition of the use of the FP models in FSW engineering. The analyses are small examples, inspired by current real-project examples of FP analyses.

  20. Performance Assessment of Flight Simulator Servo System Based on LQG Performance Benchmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Huibo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flight simulator is an important application in the field of aerospace as semi-physical simulation equipment. As it requires supreme control precision and stability, it is especially important to search the performance assessment of flight simulator servo system. The traditional researches on flight simulator control performance index is more about dynamic output tracking features but few on input characteristics and effects. Based on Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG performance benchmark, this paper makes analyses on high precision flight simulator in three kinds of controller while considering the influences of input and output signals’ effect on controllers. After processing the input and output data, combined with the linear fitting method, we can obtain LQG performance tradeoff curve. Through comparing the controller’s actual performance with the optimal performance, we’ll gain the controller’s control performance index and its potential.

  1. Immune System Dysregulation, Viral Reactivation and Stress During Short-Duration Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarence

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a study that was conducted to ascertain if the immune system dysregulation, viral reactivation and stress from short duration space flight were a result of the stress of landing and readjustment to gravity. The objectives of the study were to replace several recent immune studies with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling; address lack of in-flight data: (i.e., determine the in-flight status of immunity, physiological stress, viral immunity/reactivation); determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  2. Activity of the sympathoadrenal system in cosmonauts during 25-day space flight on station Mir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvetňanský, R.; Noskov, V. B.; Blazicek, P.; Gharib, C.; Popova, I. A.; Gauquelin, G.; Macho, L.; Guell, A.; Grigoriev, A. I.

    The activity of the sympathoadrenal system in cosmonauts was studied by measuring plasma and urinary catecholamines and their metabolites and conjugates. The appliance Plasma 02 was used for collecting, processing, and storing blood and urine samples from the cosmonauts during the course of a 25-day flight on board the station Mir. Plasma and urine concentrations of adrenaline (A), noradrenaline (NA), and dopamine (DA) as well as urinary levels of vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) and homovanillic acid (HVA), and plasma levels of catecholamine sulphates were determined before, during and after the space flight. Plasma NA levels were slightly elevated on day 9 and plasma A on day 20, whereas plasma DA levels were unchanged. However, most of the changes were within the normal range of control values. Sulphates of plasma catecholamines did not change during flight but they were significantly elevated after landing. Urinary levels of A, NA, DA, VMA, and HVA were comparable with preflight values but were elevated at the different intervals studied after landing. The results obtained suggest that in the short period of about 9 days of the cosmonaut's stay in space the sympathoadrenal system was slightly activated indicating a mild stressful influence of the initial period of flight. This short-term space flight compared to long-term flight did not as markedly activate the sympathoadrenal system during the process of re-adaptation to Earth's gravity after landing. Our data suggest that weightlessness is not a stressful factor activating the sympathoadrenal system but it sensitizes the responsiveness of this system during the re-adaptation period after space flight.

  3. Towards a characterization of information automation systems on the flight deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Rachel Feddersen

    This thesis summarizes research to investigate the characteristics that define information automation systems used on aircraft flight decks and the significant impacts that these characteristics have on pilot performance. Major accomplishments of the work include the development of a set of characteristics that describe information automation systems on the flight deck and an experiment designed to study a subset of these characteristics. Information automation systems on the flight deck are responsible for the collection, processing, analysis, and presentation of data to the flightcrew. These systems pose human factors issues and challenges that must be considered by designers of these systems. Based on a previously developed formal definition of information automation for aircraft flight deck systems, an analysis process was developed and conducted to reach a refined set of information automation characteristics. In this work, characteristics are defined as a set of properties or attributes that describe an information automation system's operation or behavior, which can be used to identify and assess potential human factors issues. Hypotheses were formed for a subset of the characteristics: Automation Visibility, Information Quality, and Display Complexity. An experimental investigation was developed to measure performance impacts related to these characteristics, which showed mixed results of expected and surprising findings, with many interactions. A set of recommendations were then developed based on the experimental observations. Ensuring that the right information is presented to pilots at the right time and in the appropriate manner is the job of flight deck system designers. This work provides a foundation for developing recommendations and guidelines specific to information automation on the flight deck with the goal of improving the design and evaluation of information automation systems before they are implemented.

  4. In-flight investigation of a rotating cylinder-based structural excitation system for flutter testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Lura

    1993-01-01

    A research excitation system was test flown at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility on the two-seat F-16XL aircraft. The excitation system is a wingtip-mounted vane with a rotating slotted cylinder at the trailing edge. As the cylinder rotates during flight, the flow is alternately deflected upward and downward through the slot, resulting in a periodic lift force at twice the cylinder's rotational frequency. Flight testing was conducted to determine the excitation system's effectiveness in the subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flight regimes. Primary research objectives were to determine the system's ability to develop adequate force levels to excite the aircraft's structure and to determine the frequency range over which the system could excite structural modes of the aircraft. In addition, studies were conducted to determine optimal excitation parameters, such as sweep duration, sweep type, and energy levels. The results from the exciter were compared with results from atmospheric turbulence excitation at the same flight conditions. The comparison indicated that the vane with a rotating slotted cylinder provides superior results. The results from the forced excitation were of higher quality and had less variation than the results from atmospheric turbulence. The forced excitation data also invariably yielded higher structural damping values than those from the atmospheric turbulence data.

  5. Multistrand, Fast Reaction, Shape Memory Alloy System for Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Flight Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brennison

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper details an investigation of shape memory alloy (SMA filaments which are used to drive a flight control system with precision control in a real flight environment. An antagonistic SMA actuator was developed with an integrated demodulator circuit from a JR NES 911 subscale UAV actuator. Most SMA actuator studies concentrate on modeling the open-loop characteristics of such a system with full actuator performance modeling. This paper is a bit different in that it is very practically oriented and centered on development of a flight-capable system which solves the most tricky, practical problems associated with using SMA filaments for aircraft flight control. By using well-tuned feedback loops, it is shown that intermediate SMA performance prediction is not appropriate for flight control system (FCS design. Rather, capturing the peak behavior is far more important, along with appropriate feedback loop design. To prove the system, an SMA actuator was designed and installed in the fuselage of a 2 m uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV and used to control the rudder through slips and coordinated turns. The actuator was capable of 20 degrees of positive and negative deflection and was capable of 7.5 in-oz (5.29 N cm of torque at a bandwidth of 2.8 Hz.

  6. Specification and Design of Electrical Flight System Architectures with SysML

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvin, Mark L., Jr.; Jimenez, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Modern space flight systems are required to perform more complex functions than previous generations to support space missions. This demand is driving the trend to deploy more electronics to realize system functionality. The traditional approach for the specification, design, and deployment of electrical system architectures in space flight systems includes the use of informal definitions and descriptions that are often embedded within loosely coupled but highly interdependent design documents. Traditional methods become inefficient to cope with increasing system complexity, evolving requirements, and the ability to meet project budget and time constraints. Thus, there is a need for more rigorous methods to capture the relevant information about the electrical system architecture as the design evolves. In this work, we propose a model-centric approach to support the specification and design of electrical flight system architectures using the System Modeling Language (SysML). In our approach, we develop a domain specific language for specifying electrical system architectures, and we propose a design flow for the specification and design of electrical interfaces. Our approach is applied to a practical flight system.

  7. Flight Parameter Display System For The Mi-17 Helicopter – Test Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bęczkowski Grzegorz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents flight tests of a newly developed Helmet-Mounted Flight Parameters Display System (SWPL. Presented system is designed to illustrate full piloting and navigational information, warning about emergency on the helicopter’s board and signaling on-board helicopter systems failures on the translucent display. The system is designed to work in day and night time conditions. In night time conditions, the system cooperates with night vision goggles applicable in Polish Air Force. The article presents the main components of the tested system, along with their purpose and function. It also describes in detail the methods of display implemented in the system and the amount of displayed information. The article discusses the required range and the actual course of the flight tests of that system. Tests were conducted on a Mi-17-1V helicopter. The results of the flight tests of the Helmet-Mounted Display System are given in conclusion, in particular regarding meeting the tactical and technical requirements of the system.

  8. Research requirements for a real-time flight measurements and data analysis system for subsonic transport high-lift research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Julia H.; Harris, Franklin K.; Lytle, Carroll D.

    1993-01-01

    A multiphased research program to obtain detailed flow characteristics on a multielement high-lift flap system is being conducted on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (B737-100 aircraft) at NASA Langley Research Center. Upcoming flight tests have required the development of a highly capable and flexible flight measurement and data analysis instrumentation system. This instrumentation system will be more comprehensive than any of the systems used on previous high-lift flight experiment at NASA Langley. The system will provide the researcher near-real-time information for decision making needed to modify a flight test in order to further examine unexpected flow conditions. This paper presents the research requirements and instrumentation design concept for an upcoming flight experiment for the subsonic transport high-lift research program. The flight experiment objectives, the measurement requirements, the data acquisition system, and the onboard data analysis and display capabilities are described.

  9. Flight Tests of the DELICAT Airborne LIDAR System for Remote Clear Air Turbulence Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrancken Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An important aeronautics application of lidar is the airborne remote detection of Clear Air Turbulence which cannot be performed with onboard radar. We report on a DLR-developed lidar system for the remote detection of such turbulent areas in the flight path of an aircraft. The lidar, consisting of a high-power UV laser transmitter and a direct detection system, was installed on a Dutch research aircraft. Flight tests executed in 2013 demonstrated the performance of the lidar system to detect local subtle variations in the molecular backscatter coefficient indicating the turbulence some 10 to 15 km ahead.

  10. A nonlinear trajectory command generator for a digital flight-control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicolani, L. S.; Weissenberger, S.

    1978-01-01

    Operational application of the command generator (CG) was examined in detail in a simulation of a flight control system with the augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft. The basic repertoire of single axis maneuvers and operational constraints are discussed, and the system behavior is tested on a rigorous STOL approach path and as affected by various approximations in the CG synthesis and types of disturbances found in the operational environment. The simulation results indicate that a satisfactory nonlinear system with general maneuvering capabilities throughout the flight envelope was developed which satisfies the basic design objectives while maintaining a practicable degree of simplicity.

  11. Study on the COP of free piston Stirling cooler (FPSC) in the anti-sublimation CO2 capture process

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Chunfeng; Lu, Jingwen; Kitamura, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Free piston Stirling cooler (FPSC) is a promising alternative for the conventional coolers and has been applied to various fields. In the previous research, a novel cryogenic CO2 capture system based on FPSCs has been exploited. In order to enhance the cryogenic CO2 capture efficiency, the investigation on the coefficient of performance (COP) of the FPSC is carried out in this work. In detail, the influence of different materials (aluminium and copper), size of cold head (length and diameter)...

  12. A Proposed Ascent Abort Flight Test for the Max Launch Abort System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartabini, Paul V.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Starr, Brett R.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center initiated the Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) Project to investigate alternate crew escape system concepts that eliminate the conventional launch escape tower by integrating the escape system into an aerodynamic fairing that fully encapsulates the crew capsule and smoothly integrates with the launch vehicle. This paper proposes an ascent abort flight test for an all-propulsive towerless escape system concept that is actively controlled and sized to accommodate the Orion Crew Module. The goal of the flight test is to demonstrate a high dynamic pressure escape and to characterize jet interaction effects during operation of the attitude control thrusters at transonic and supersonic conditions. The flight-test vehicle is delivered to the required test conditions by a booster configuration selected to meet cost, manufacturability, and operability objectives. Data return is augmented through judicious design of the boost trajectory, which is optimized to obtain data at a range of relevant points, rather than just a single flight condition. Secondary flight objectives are included after the escape to obtain aerodynamic damping data for the crew module and to perform a high-altitude contingency deployment of the drogue parachutes. Both 3- and 6-degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation results are presented that establish concept feasibility, and a Monte Carlo uncertainty assessment is performed to provide confidence that test objectives can be met.

  13. Marshall Space Flight Center Ground Systems Development and Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Ground Systems Development and Integration performs a variety of tasks in support of the Mission Operations Laboratory (MOL) and other Center and Agency projects. These tasks include various systems engineering processes such as performing system requirements development, system architecture design, integration, verification and validation, software development, and sustaining engineering of mission operations systems that has evolved the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) into a leader in remote operations for current and future NASA space projects. The group is also responsible for developing and managing telemetry and command configuration and calibration databases. Personnel are responsible for maintaining and enhancing their disciplinary skills in the areas of project management, software engineering, software development, software process improvement, telecommunications, networking, and systems management. Domain expertise in the ground systems area is also maintained and includes detailed proficiency in the areas of real-time telemetry systems, command systems, voice, video, data networks, and mission planning systems.

  14. Air cooler ducts. A simple kind of air conditioner; Luftkuehlschaechte. Eine einfache Teilklimaanlage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glueck, B. [F und E TGA, Joessnitz (Germany); Westsaechsische Hochschule Zwickau (F.H.) (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Air cooler duct cabinets are used increasingly for cooling and demoisturizing of room air and fresh air, sometimes also as auxiliary heating systems. They are more complex than conventional and have specific characteristics concerning construction, dimensioning, optimisation and control. A newly developed computer program enables pre-assessment of specific operational situations. (orig.)

  15. Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen; Chan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this task is to investigate, develop, and demonstrate a low-cost swept lasing light source for NASA DFRC's fiber optics sensing system (FOSS) to perform structural health monitoring on current and future aerospace vehicles. This is the regular update of the Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems website.

  16. Performances of thermoelectric cooler integrated with microchannel heat sinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiyu Chein; Yehong Chen [National Chung Hsing University, Taichung (Taiwan). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2005-09-01

    In this study, experimental and theoretical studies on thermoelectric cooler (TEC) performance for cooling a refrigerated object (water in a tank) were performed. Microchannel heat sinks fabricated with etched silicon wafers were employed on the TEC hot side to dissipate heat. The measurements show that the temperature of the refrigerated object decreased with time. A theoretical model based on a lumped system was established to predict the transient behavior of the variation in temperature for the refrigerated object with time. The theoretical predicted temperature variation was in good agreement with the measured data. The relationship among the heat sink thermal resistances, TEC electric current input and minimum refrigerated objected temperature was examined based on the theoretical model. The calculated minimum temperatures were showed for the several cases of heat sink thermal resistance on the TEC hot side and electric current input. The minimum temperature can be obtained by increasing the electrical current input and decreasing the heat sink thermal resistance. (author)

  17. Modeling of efficient solid-state cooler on layered multiferroics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, Ivan; Starkov, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    We have developed theoretical foundations for the design and optimization of a solid-state cooler working through caloric and multicaloric effects. This approach is based on the careful consideration of the thermodynamics of a layered multiferroic system. The main section of the paper is devoted to the derivation and solution of the heat conduction equation for multiferroic materials. On the basis of the obtained results, we have performed the evaluation of the temperature distribution in the refrigerator under periodic external fields. A few practical examples are considered to illustrate the model. It is demonstrated that a 40-mm structure made of 20 ferroic layers is able to create a temperature difference of 25K. The presented work tries to address the whole hierarchy of physical phenomena to capture all of the essential aspects of solid-state cooling.

  18. Analysis of Pilot-Induced-Oscillation and Pilot Vehicle System Stability Using UAS Flight Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay K. Mandal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a Pilot-Induced Oscillation (PIO and human pilot control characterization study performed using flight data collected with a Remotely Controlled (R/C unmanned research aircraft. The study was carried out on the longitudinal axis of the aircraft. Several existing Category 1 and Category 2 PIO criteria developed for manned aircraft are first surveyed and their effectiveness for predicting the PIO susceptibility for the R/C unmanned aircraft is evaluated using several flight experiments. It was found that the Bandwidth/Pitch rate overshoot and open loop onset point (OLOP criteria prediction results matched flight test observations. However, other criteria failed to provide accurate prediction results. To further characterize the human pilot control behavior during these experiments, a quasi-linear pilot model is used. The parameters of the pilot model estimated using data obtained from flight tests are then used to obtain information about the stability of the Pilot Vehicle System (PVS for Category 1 PIOs occurred during straight and level flights. The batch estimation technique used to estimate the parameters of the quasi-linear pilot model failed to completely capture the compatibility nature of the human pilot. The estimation results however provided valuable insights into the frequency characteristics of the human pilot commands. Additionally, stability analysis of the Category 2 PIOs for elevator actuator rate limiting is carried out using simulations and the results are compared with actual flight results.

  19. Methodology for Flight Relevant Arc-Jet Testing of Flexible Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Alireza; Bruce, Walter E., III; Mesick, Nathaniel J.; Sutton, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    A methodology to correlate flight aeroheating environments to the arc-jet environment is presented. For a desired hot-wall flight heating rate, the methodology provides the arcjet bulk enthalpy for the corresponding cold-wall heating rate. A series of analyses were conducted to examine the effects of the test sample model holder geometry to the overall performance of the test sample. The analyses were compared with arc-jet test samples and challenges and issues are presented. The transient flight environment was calculated for the Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Earth Atmospheric Reentry Test (HEART) vehicle, which is a planned demonstration vehicle using a large inflatable, flexible thermal protection system to reenter the Earth's atmosphere from the International Space Station. A series of correlations were developed to define the relevant arc-jet test environment to properly approximate the HEART flight environment. The computed arcjet environments were compared with the measured arc-jet values to define the uncertainty of the correlated environment. The results show that for a given flight surface heat flux and a fully-catalytic TPS, the flight relevant arc-jet heat flux increases with the arc-jet bulk enthalpy while for a non-catalytic TPS the arc-jet heat flux decreases with the bulk enthalpy.

  20. Aircraft health and usage monitoring system for in-flight strain measurement of a wing structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Hyuk; Park, Yurim; Kim, Yoon-Young; Shrestha, Pratik; Kim, Chun-Gon

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an aircraft health and usage monitoring system (HUMS) using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. This study aims to implement and evaluate the HUMS for in-flight strain monitoring of aircraft structures. An optical-fiber-based HUMS was developed and applied to an ultralight aircraft that has a rectangular wing shape with a strut-braced configuration. FBG sensor arrays were embedded into the wing structure during the manufacturing process for effective sensor implementation. Ground and flight tests were conducted to verify the integrity and availability of the installed FBG sensors and HUMS devices. A total of 74 flight tests were conducted using the HUMS implemented testbed aircraft, considering various maneuvers and abnormal conditions. The flight test results revealed that the FBG-based HUMS was successfully implemented on the testbed aircraft and operated normally under the actual flight test environments as well as providing reliable in-flight strain data from the FBG sensors over a long period of time.

  1. Integrated Health Management for Space Flight Digital Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal addresses the need for a real-time Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) system to identify anomalous states in digital electronic systems used in...

  2. Enhanced Flight Termination System Study Phase I - IV Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-11-01

    manufactured by Zeta ( EPSCO ) Corp. The CTS equipment is remotely activated by the RSO in the mission control area. The CTS hardware is similar to the...Command Panel System Operations and Maintenance Manual, August 1998. 14. ZETA ( EPSCO ) Command Transmitter System Maintenance Manual for Model 1376...Command Panel System Operations and Maintenance Manual, August 1998. 14. ZETA ( EPSCO ) Command Transmitter System Maintenance Manual for Model 1376

  3. Behavioural system identification of visual flight speed control in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrseitz, Nicola; Fry, Steven N

    2011-02-06

    Behavioural control in many animals involves complex mechanisms with intricate sensory-motor feedback loops. Modelling allows functional aspects to be captured without relying on a description of the underlying complex, and often unknown, mechanisms. A wide range of engineering techniques are available for modelling, but their ability to describe time-continuous processes is rarely exploited to describe sensory-motor control mechanisms in biological systems. We performed a system identification of visual flight speed control in the fruitfly Drosophila, based on an extensive dataset of open-loop responses previously measured under free flight conditions. We identified a second-order under-damped control model with just six free parameters that well describes both the transient and steady-state characteristics of the open-loop data. We then used the identified control model to predict flight speed responses after a visual perturbation under closed-loop conditions and validated the model with behavioural measurements performed in free-flying flies under the same closed-loop conditions. Our system identification of the fruitfly's flight speed response uncovers the high-level control strategy of a fundamental flight control reflex without depending on assumptions about the underlying physiological mechanisms. The results are relevant for future investigations of the underlying neuromotor processing mechanisms, as well as for the design of biomimetic robots, such as micro-air vehicles.

  4. Pilot-in-the-Loop Analysis of Propulsive-Only Flight Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hwei-Lan; Biezad, Daniel J.

    1996-01-01

    Longitudinal control system architectures are presented which directly couple flight stick motions to throttle commands for a multi-engine aircraft. This coupling enables positive attitude control with complete failure of the flight control system. The architectures chosen vary from simple feedback gains to classical lead-lag compensators with and without prefilters. Each architecture is reviewed for its appropriateness for piloted flight. The control systems are then analyzed with pilot-in-the-loop metrics related to bandwidth required for landing. Results indicate that current and proposed bandwidth requirements should be modified for throttles only flight control. Pilot ratings consistently showed better ratings than predicted by analysis. Recommendations are made for more robust design and implementation. The use of Quantitative Feedback Theory for compensator design is discussed. Although simple and effective augmented control can be achieved in a wide variety of failed configurations, a few configuration characteristics are dominant for pilot-in-the-loop control. These characteristics will be tested in a simulator study involving failed flight controls for a multi-engine aircraft.

  5. Research and implementation of a shaking seat system for flight simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaolin; Yu, Youzhi; Shen, Weiqun; Song, Zishan

    2006-11-01

    To a helicopter the shaking seat system can simulate the vibration caused by the main rotor, tail rotor, engine, weapon firing, landing, etc. This paper focuses on the research and analysis of the shaking system of a helicopter flight simulator. The vibration model of the seat is built and the system is also developed. According to different flight states of the helicopter the vibration states of the seat are classified based on real measurement data, and the spectra of the vibration are interpolated to model the vibration of the seat. An electro-hydraulic servo system is used to drive the seat to shake along the direction that is parallel to the vertical body axis. The seat is shaken under the instructions at reference height with position close-loop control method, and the control law is PID algorithm. Running parameters of the system are configured by the software. The motional states of the shaking seat are displayed to the user through the visualization software. The main parts of the system and some key technologies of the implementation are also presented in the paper. The system can generate the special vibration environment in the helicopter flight process, and is successfully applied to the flight simulator. So the pilots' immersion feelings are increased.

  6. Storage Information Management System (SIMS) Spaceflight Hardware Warehousing at Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicko, Richard M.; Bingham, Lindy

    1995-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) on site and leased warehouses contain thousands of items of ground support equipment (GSE) and flight hardware including spacecraft, scaffolding, computer racks, stands, holding fixtures, test equipment, spares, etc. The control of these warehouses, and the management, accountability, and control of the items within them, is accomplished by the Logistics Management Division. To facilitate this management and tracking effort, the Logistics and Transportation Management Branch, is developing a system to provide warehouse personnel, property owners, and managers with storage and inventory information. This paper will describe that PC-based system and address how it will improve GSFC warehouse and storage management.

  7. Techniques for determining propulsion system forces for accurate high speed vehicle drag measurements in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to evaluate current methods of predicting the performance of large, supersonic airplanes, the drag of the XB-70 airplane was measured accurately in flight at Mach numbers from 0.75 to 2.5. This paper describes the techniques used to determine engine net thrust and the drag forces charged to the propulsion system that were required for the in-flight drag measurements. The accuracy of the measurements and the application of the measurement techniques to aircraft with different propulsion systems are discussed. Examples of results obtained for the XB-70 airplane are presented.

  8. Sliding Mode Controller Design for Position and Speed Control of Flight Simulator Servo System with Large Friction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金琨; 尔联洁

    2003-01-01

    Flight simulator is an important device and a typical high-performance position and speed servo system used in the hardware-in-the-loop simulation of flight control system. Friction is the main nonlinear resistance in the flight simulator servo system, especially in a low-speed state. Based on the description of dynamic and static models of a nonlinear Stribeck friction model, this paper puts forward sliding mode controller to overcome the friction, whose stability is proved. Simulation example indicates that the controller can guarantee a high robust performance and have a high precision of position tracking and speed tracking for a flight simulator servo system.

  9. Evolution of the Systems Engineering Education Development (SEED) Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagg, Thomas C., III; Brumfield, Mark D.; Jamison, Donald E.; Granata, Raymond L.; Casey, Carolyn A.; Heller, Stuart

    2003-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Education Development (SEED) Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center develops systems engineers from existing discipline engineers. The program has evolved significantly since the report to INCOSE in 2003. This paper describes the SEED Program as it is now, outlines the changes over the last year, discusses current status and results, and shows the value of human systems and leadership skills for practicing systems engineers.

  10. A self-reorganizing digital flight control system for aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, R. C.; Caglayan, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents a design method for digital self-reorganizing control systems which is optimally tolerant of failures in aircraft sensors. The functions of this system are accomplished with software instead of the popular and costly technique of hardware duplication. The theoretical development, based on M-ary hypothesis testing, results in a bank of M Kalman filters operating in parallel in the failure detection logic. A moving window of the innovations of each Kalman filter drives the detection logic to decide the failure state of the system. The detection logic also selects the optimal state estimate (for control logic) from the bank of Kalman filters. The design process is applied to the design of a self-reorganizing control system for a current configuration of the space shuttle orbiter at Mach 5 and 120,000 feet. The failure detection capabilities of the system are demonstrated using a real-time simulation of the system with noisy sensors.

  11. Verification and Validation of Flight Critical Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Verification and Validation is a multi-disciplinary activity that encompasses elements of systems engineering, safety, software engineering and test. The elements...

  12. DESIGNING REDUCED-ORDER CONTROLLERS OF MIXED SENSITIVITY PROBLEM FOR FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on linear matrix inequalities (LMI), the design method of reduced-order controllers of mixed sensitivity problem is studied for flight control systems. It is shown that there exists a controller with order not greater than the difference between the generalized plant order and the number of independent control variables, if the mixed sensitivity problem is solvable for strict regular flight control plants. The proof is constructive, and an approach to design such a controller can be obtained in terms of a pair of feasible solution to the well-known 3 LMI. Finally, an example of mixed sensitivity problem for a flight control system is given to demonstrate practice of the approach.

  13. Pressure Distribution and Air Data System for the Aeroassist Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Lorelei S.; Siemers, Paul M., III; Kern, Frederick A.

    1989-01-01

    The Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) is designed to provide critical flight data necessary for the design of future Aeroassist Space Transfer Vehicles (ASTV). This flight experiment will provide aerodynamic, aerothermodynamic, and environmental data for verification of experimental and computational flow field techniques. The Pressure Distribution and Air Data System (PD/ADS), one of the measurement systems incorporated into the AFE spacecraft, is designed to provide accurate pressure measurements on the windward surface of the vehicle. These measurements will be used to determine the pressure distribution and air data parameters (angle of attack, angle of sideslip, and free-stream dynamic pressure) encountered by the blunt-bodied vehicle over an altitude range of 76.2 km to 94.5 km. Design and development data are presented and include: measurement requirements, measurement heritage, theoretical studies to define the vehicle environment, flush-mounted orifice configuration, pressure transducer selection and performance evaluation data, and pressure tubing response analysis.

  14. Advanced AFCS developments on the XV-15 tilt rotor research aircraft. [Automatic Flight Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, G. B.; Gerdes, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    The design criteria and control and handling qualities of the Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS), developed in the framework of the XV-15 tilt-rotor research aircraft, are evaluated, differentiating between the stability and control criteria. A technically aggressive SCAS control law was implemented, demonstrating that significant benefits accrue when stability criteria are separated from design criteria; the design analyses for application of the control law are presented, and the limit bandwidth for stabilization in hovering flight is shown to be defined by rotor or control lag functions. Flight tests of the aircraft resulted in a rating of 3 on the Cooper-Harper scale; a possibility of achieving a rating of 2 is expected if the system is applied to the yaw and heave control modes.

  15. Advanced AFCS developments on the XV-15 tilt rotor research aircraft. [Automatic Flight Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, G. B.; Gerdes, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    The design criteria and control and handling qualities of the Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS), developed in the framework of the XV-15 tilt-rotor research aircraft, are evaluated, differentiating between the stability and control criteria. A technically aggressive SCAS control law was implemented, demonstrating that significant benefits accrue when stability criteria are separated from design criteria; the design analyses for application of the control law are presented, and the limit bandwidth for stabilization in hovering flight is shown to be defined by rotor or control lag functions. Flight tests of the aircraft resulted in a rating of 3 on the Cooper-Harper scale; a possibility of achieving a rating of 2 is expected if the system is applied to the yaw and heave control modes.

  16. 14 CFR 417.309 - Flight safety system analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; (3) Use a reliability model that is statistically valid and accurately represents the system; (4... that the margin is satisfied over 95% of the antenna radiation sphere surrounding the launch vehicle... automatic or inadvertent destruct system; (2) An engine hard-over nozzle induced tumble during each phase...

  17. Monocular Vision System for Fixed Altitude Flight of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Lung; Chiu, Chung-Cheng; Chiu, Sheng-Yi; Teng, Yao-Jen; Hao, Shu-Sheng

    2015-07-13

    The fastest and most economical method of acquiring terrain images is aerial photography. The use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has been investigated for this task. However, UAVs present a range of challenges such as flight altitude maintenance. This paper reports a method that combines skyline detection with a stereo vision algorithm to enable the flight altitude of UAVs to be maintained. A monocular camera is mounted on the downside of the aircraft's nose to collect continuous ground images, and the relative altitude is obtained via a stereo vision algorithm from the velocity of the UAV. Image detection is used to obtain terrain images, and to measure the relative altitude from the ground to the UAV. The UAV flight system can be set to fly at a fixed and relatively low altitude to obtain the same resolution of ground images. A forward-looking camera is mounted on the upside of the aircraft's nose. In combination with the skyline detection algorithm, this helps the aircraft to maintain a stable flight pattern. Experimental results show that the proposed system enables UAVs to obtain terrain images at constant resolution, and to detect the relative altitude along the flight path.

  18. Development of the Flight Test Telemetry System for Clipper Graham: A New Way to do Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Lisa; Crawford, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    Since the beginning of NASA, there has been one way to do business. To procedure flight hardware you did things a certain way, to monitor contracts you did things a certain way and to support tests you did things a certain way. When the Delta Clipper Experimental (DC-X) space flight test vehicle was being upgraded (to the DC-XA, later called the Clipper Graham), the opportunity to change the way NASA did business presented itself The development of a flight test telemetry system (FTTS) for the Clipper Graham presented the perfect opportunity to change the way NASA did business. This paper will discuss the differences from the old way to the new way of doing business during the development of the FTTS from the conceptual stage thru the flight stages. The major focus will be the pulse code modulation system of the FTTS. Topics that will be discussed are working with procurement, working with contractors and subcontractors, supporting ground and flight testing and lessons learned.

  19. Monocular Vision System for Fixed Altitude Flight of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Lung Huang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The fastest and most economical method of acquiring terrain images is aerial photography. The use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs has been investigated for this task. However, UAVs present a range of challenges such as flight altitude maintenance. This paper reports a method that combines skyline detection with a stereo vision algorithm to enable the flight altitude of UAVs to be maintained. A monocular camera is mounted on the downside of the aircraft’s nose to collect continuous ground images, and the relative altitude is obtained via a stereo vision algorithm from the velocity of the UAV. Image detection is used to obtain terrain images, and to measure the relative altitude from the ground to the UAV. The UAV flight system can be set to fly at a fixed and relatively low altitude to obtain the same resolution of ground images. A forward-looking camera is mounted on the upside of the aircraft’s nose. In combination with the skyline detection algorithm, this helps the aircraft to maintain a stable flight pattern. Experimental results show that the proposed system enables UAVs to obtain terrain images at constant resolution, and to detect the relative altitude along the flight path.

  20. Initial virtual flight test for a dynamically similar aircraft model with control augmentation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linliang Guo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To satisfy the validation requirements of flight control law for advanced aircraft, a wind tunnel based virtual flight testing has been implemented in a low speed wind tunnel. A 3-degree-of-freedom gimbal, ventrally installed in the model, was used in conjunction with an actively controlled dynamically similar model of aircraft, which was equipped with the inertial measurement unit, attitude and heading reference system, embedded computer and servo-actuators. The model, which could be rotated around its center of gravity freely by the aerodynamic moments, together with the flow field, operator and real time control system made up the closed-loop testing circuit. The model is statically unstable in longitudinal direction, and it can fly stably in wind tunnel with the function of control augmentation of the flight control laws. The experimental results indicate that the model responds well to the operator’s instructions. The response of the model in the tests shows reasonable agreement with the simulation results. The difference of response of angle of attack is less than 0.5°. The effect of stability augmentation and attitude control law was validated in the test, meanwhile the feasibility of virtual flight test technique treated as preliminary evaluation tool for advanced flight vehicle configuration research was also verified.

  1. 77 FR 57039 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ...; Electronic Flight Control System: Control Surface Awareness and Mode Annunciation AGENCY: Federal Aviation... control system. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety... electronic flight control system and no direct coupling from the flightdeck controller to the control surface...

  2. 78 FR 11553 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System: Control Surface Awareness and Mode Annunciation AGENCY: Federal... control system. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety... a fly-by-wire electronic flight control system and no direct coupling from the flightdeck controller...

  3. Optimization of a microfluidic electrophoretic immunoassay using a Peltier cooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhitov, Nikita; Yi, Lian; Schrell, Adrian M; Roper, Michael G

    2014-11-07

    Successful analysis of electrophoretic affinity assays depends strongly on the preservation of the affinity complex during separations. Elevated separation temperatures due to Joule heating promotes complex dissociation leading to a reduction in sensitivity. Affinity assays performed in glass microfluidic devices may be especially prone to this problem due to poor heat dissipation due to the low thermal conductivity of glass and the large amount of bulk material surrounding separation channels. To address this limitation, a method to cool a glass microfluidic chip for performing an affinity assay for insulin was achieved by a Peltier cooler localized over the separation channel. The Peltier cooler allowed for rapid stabilization of temperatures, with 21°C the lowest temperature that was possible to use without producing detrimental thermal gradients throughout the device. The introduction of cooling improved the preservation of the affinity complex, with even passive cooling of the separation channel improving the amount of complex observed by 2-fold. Additionally, the capability to thermostabilize the separation channel allowed for utilization of higher separation voltages than what was possible without temperature control. Kinetic CE analysis was utilized as a diagnostic of the affinity assay and indicated that optimal conditions were at the highest separation voltage, 6 kV, and the lowest separation temperature, 21°C, leading to 3.4% dissociation of the complex peak during the separation. These optimum conditions were used to generate a calibration curve and produced 1 nM limits of detection, representing a 10-fold improvement over non-thermostated conditions. This methodology of cooling glass microfluidic devices for performing robust and high sensitivity affinity assays on microfluidic systems should be amenable in a number of applications.

  4. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) Instrument: Flight Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) Acceptance Thermal Vacuum Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Charles; Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Grob, Eric; Swanson, Ted; Nikitkin, Michael; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Two loop heat pipes (LHPs) are to be used for tight thermal control of the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instrument, planned for flight in late 2001. The LHPs are charged with Propylene as a working fluid. One LHP will be used to transport 110 W from a laser to a radiator, the other will transport 160 W from electronic boxes to a separate radiator. The application includes a large amount of thermal mass in each LHP system and low initial startup powers. The initial design had some non-ideal flight design compromises, resulted in a less than ideal charge level for this design concept with a symmetrical secondary wick. This less than ideal charge was identified as the source of inadequate performance of the flight LHPs during the flight thermal vacuum test in October of 2000. We modified the compensation chamber design, re-built and charged the LHPs for a final LHP acceptance thermal vacuum test. This test performed March of 2001 was 100% successful. This is the last testing to be performed on the LHPs prior to instrument thermal vacuum test. This sensitivity to charge level was shown through varying the charge on a Development Model Loop Heat Pipe (DM LHP) and evaluating performance at various fill levels. At lower fills similar to the original charge in the flight units, the same poor performance was observed. When the flight units were re-designed and filled to the levels similar to the initial successful DM LHP test, the flight units also successfully fulfilled all requirements. This final flight Acceptance test assessed performance with respect to startup, low power operation, conductance, and control heater power, and steady state control. The results of the testing showed that both LHPs operated within specification. Startup on one of the LHPs was better than the other LHP because of the starter heater placement and a difference in evaporator design. These differences resulted in a variation in the achieved superheat prior to startup. The LHP with

  5. 50 mK cooling solution with an ADR precooled by a sorption cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchier, N.; Duval, J. M.; Duband, L.; Camus, P.; Donnier-Valentin, G.; Linder, M.

    2010-09-01

    CEA/SBT is currently developing a 2.5 K-50 mK cooling solution composed of a small demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) precooled by a sorption cooler, equivalent to the high temperature stage of a two-stage ADR system. Thanks to the use of this dual technology, a low weight cooler able to reach 50 mK with a heat sink up to 2.5 K can be designed. Because the sorption cooler is probably the lightest solution to produce sub-Kelvin temperatures, these developments allow us to propose a solution to face the drastic reduction in the mass budget of space missions like SPICA or IXO. The European Space Agency (ESA) is funding the development of an engineering model able to produce 1 μW net heat lift at 50 mK. It is sized so that the sorption cooler provides an additional 10 μW at 300 mK. The ESA main requirements are an autonomy of more than 24 h and a recycling time smaller than 8 h. We present the design of the system able to meet these requirements as well as the expected performances and preliminary measurements.

  6. Case Study: Test Results of a Tool and Method for In-Flight, Adaptive Control System Verification on a NASA F-15 Flight Research Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.; Schumann, Johann; Guenther, Kurt; Bosworth, John

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive control technologies that incorporate learning algorithms have been proposed to enable autonomous flight control and to maintain vehicle performance in the face of unknown, changing, or poorly defined operating environments [1-2]. At the present time, however, it is unknown how adaptive algorithms can be routinely verified, validated, and certified for use in safety-critical applications. Rigorous methods for adaptive software verification end validation must be developed to ensure that. the control software functions as required and is highly safe and reliable. A large gap appears to exist between the point at which control system designers feel the verification process is complete, and when FAA certification officials agree it is complete. Certification of adaptive flight control software verification is complicated by the use of learning algorithms (e.g., neural networks) and degrees of system non-determinism. Of course, analytical efforts must be made in the verification process to place guarantees on learning algorithm stability, rate of convergence, and convergence accuracy. However, to satisfy FAA certification requirements, it must be demonstrated that the adaptive flight control system is also able to fail and still allow the aircraft to be flown safely or to land, while at the same time providing a means of crew notification of the (impending) failure. It was for this purpose that the NASA Ames Confidence Tool was developed [3]. This paper presents the Confidence Tool as a means of providing in-flight software assurance monitoring of an adaptive flight control system. The paper will present the data obtained from flight testing the tool on a specially modified F-15 aircraft designed to simulate loss of flight control faces.

  7. Thermo-Electron Ballistic Coolers or Heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang H.

    2003-01-01

    Electronic heat-transfer devices of a proposed type would exploit some of the quantum-wire-like, pseudo-superconducting properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes or, optionally, room-temperature-superconducting polymers (RTSPs). The devices are denoted thermo-electron ballistic (TEB) coolers or heaters because one of the properties that they exploit is the totally or nearly ballistic (dissipation or scattering free) transport of electrons. This property is observed in RTSPs and carbon nanotubes that are free of material and geometric defects, except under conditions in which oscillatory electron motions become coupled with vibrations of the nanotubes. Another relevant property is the high number density of electrons passing through carbon nanotubes -- sufficient to sustain electron current densities as large as 100 MA/square cm. The combination of ballistic motion and large current density should make it possible for TEB devices to operate at low applied potentials while pumping heat at rates several orders of magnitude greater than those of thermoelectric devices. It may also enable them to operate with efficiency close to the Carnot limit. In addition, the proposed TEB devices are expected to operate over a wider temperature range

  8. Thermoelectric cooler application in electronic cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiyu Chein; Guanming Huang [National Chung Hsing University, Taichung City (China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-10-01

    This study addresses thermoelectric cooler (TEC) applications in the electronic cooling. The cold side temperature (T{sub c}) and temperature difference between TEC cold and hot sides ({delta}T=T{sub h} T{sub c}, T{sub h} temperature of hot side of TEC) were used as the parameters. The cooling capacity, junction temperature, coefficient of performance (COP) of TEC and the required heat sink thermal resistance at the TEC hot side were computed. The results indicated that the cooling capacity could be increased as T{sub c} increased and {delta}T was reduced. The maximum cooling capacity and chip junction temperature obtained were 207 W and 88{sup o}C, respectively. The required heat sink thermal resistance on TEC hot side was 0.054{sup o}C/W. Larger cooling capacity and higher COP could be obtained when the TEC was operated in the enforced regimes ({delta}T<0). However, TEC performance was restricted by the T{sub c} values and heat sink thermal resistance at the TEC hot side. A microchannel heat sink using water or air as the coolant was demonstrated to meet the low thermal heat sink resistance requirement for TEC operated at maximum cooling capacity conditions. (author)

  9. Thermoelectric cooler application in electronic cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chein Reiyu; Huang Guanming

    2004-10-01

    This study addresses thermoelectric cooler (TEC) applications in the electronic cooling. The cold side temperature (T{sub c}) and temperature difference between TEC cold and hot sides ({delta}T=T{sub h}-T{sub c}, T{sub h}=temperature of hot side of TEC) were used as the parameters. The cooling capacity, junction temperature, coefficient of performance (COP) of TEC and the required heat sink thermal resistance at the TEC hot side were computed. The results indicated that the cooling capacity could be increased as T{sub c} increased and {delta}T was reduced. The maximum cooling capacity and chip junction temperature obtained were 207 W and 88 deg. C, respectively. The required heat sink thermal resistance on TEC hot side was 0.054 deg. C/W. Larger cooling capacity and higher COP could be obtained when the TEC was operated in the enforced regimes ({delta}T<0). However, TEC performance was restricted by the T{sub c} values and heat sink thermal resistance at the TEC hot side. A microchannel heat sink using water or air as the coolant was demonstrated to meet the low thermal heat sink resistance requirement for TEC operated at maximum cooling capacity conditions.

  10. Integration of Predictive Display and Aircraft Flight Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efremov A.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of predictive display information and direct lift control system are considered for the path control tracking tasks (in particular landing task. The both solutions are based on pilot-vehicle system analysis and requirements to provide the highest accuracy and lowest pilot workload. The investigation was carried out for cases with and without time delay in aircraft dynamics. The efficiency of the both ways for the flying qualities improvement and their integration is tested by ground based simulation.

  11. Syngas Cooler Characteristic in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle System%整体煤气化联合循环系统中废热锅炉特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王颖; 邱朋华; 吴少华; 李振中; 王阳; 庞克亮; 陈雷; 陈晓利

    2010-01-01

    废热锅炉包括辐射废热锅炉(radiant syngas cooler,RSC)和对流废热锅炉(convective syngas cooler,CSC),它是整体煤气化联合循环(integrated gasification combined Cycle,IGCC)系统中的高温冷却单元,可回收气化炉出口粗合成气热能,以提高系统的效率,所以研究IGCC系统中废热锅炉的特性是很有意义的.该文利用ThermoFlex软件建立200 MW级IGCC系统模型,从系统效率角度出发,首先研究对流废热锅炉出口合成气温度对IGCC系统性能的影响,然后研究废热锅炉产生不同蒸汽参数对IGCC系统性能的影响.结果表明:随着对流废热锅炉出口合成气温度的提高,系统的发电功率和效率下降;废热锅炉产生过热蒸汽的系统效率优于产生饱和蒸汽的系统效率,废热锅炉产生高压蒸汽的系统效率优于产生中压蒸汽的系统效率;综合考虑造价及其系统效率的影响,推荐最佳的蒸汽参数方案为辐射废热锅炉和对流废热锅炉均产生高压饱和蒸汽的系统.

  12. A high fidelity video delivery system for real-time flight simulation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Daniel A.; Roach, Carl C.

    1993-01-01

    The Flight Systems and Simulation Research Laboratory (Simlab) at the NASA Ames Research Center, utilizes an extensive network of video image generation, delivery, processing, and display systems coupled with a large amplitude Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) to provide a high fidelity visual environment for flight simulation research. This paper will explore the capabilities of the current Simlab video distribution system architecture with a view toward technical solutions implemented to resolve a variety of video interface, switching, and distribution issues common to many simulation facilities. Technical discussions include a modular approach to a video switching and distribution system capable of supporting both coax and fiber optic video signal transmission, video scan conversion and processing techniques for lab observation and recording, adaptation of image generation and display system video interfaces to industry standards, an all raster solution for 'glass cockpit' configurations encompassing Head up, Head-down, and Out-the-Window display systems.

  13. A high fidelity video delivery system for real-time flight simulation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Daniel A.; Roach, Carl C.

    The Flight Systems and Simulation Research Laboratory (Simlab) at the NASA Ames Research Center, utilizes an extensive network of video image generation, delivery, processing, and display systems coupled with a large amplitude Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) to provide a high fidelity visual environment for flight simulation research. This paper will explore the capabilities of the current Simlab video distribution system architecture with a view toward technical solutions implemented to resolve a variety of video interface, switching, and distribution issues common to many simulation facilities. Technical discussions include a modular approach to a video switching and distribution system capable of supporting both coax and fiber optic video signal transmission, video scan conversion and processing techniques for lab observation and recording, adaptation of image generation and display system video interfaces to industry standards, an all raster solution for 'glass cockpit' configurations encompassing Head up, Head-down, and Out-the-Window display systems.

  14. Diverter - Perspectives on the integration and display of flight critical information using an expert system and menu-driven displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Frederick M.

    1991-01-01

    An expert system prototype, called Diverter, was developed which evaluates, integrates, and displays flight plan recommendations to the pilot during the planning of an inflight diversion. The system integrates information from many sources to provide a comprehensive description of the flight planning alternatives available to the pilot. Diverter evaluates all applicable constraints to arrive at a flight plan to make efficient use of manpower, fuel, and time. The use of an expert system automates much of the integration and evaluation of variables impacting the flight. The use of hierarchical menu-driven displays and direct manipulation interface techniques may reduce workload.

  15. On the synthesis of sliding mode controller for the autopilot design of free flight system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devika K., B.; Thomas, Susy

    2017-01-01

    Today's rapid growth in air transportation demand leads to the problem of congestion in air traffic routes. In recent years, free flight concept is widely discussed as the solution to this problem. Free flight is a decentralized method of air traffic management, in which each aircraft has the freedom to self optimize its own route. Conflict detection and its subsequent resolution are the major challenges in the realization of this concept. Today's modern navigation and surveillance equipment can ensure accurate conflict predictions. Once a conflict is detected, it should be avoided through suitable conflict avoidance maneuvers. An autopilot capable of initiating these conflict free maneuvers should be a necessary part of any aircraft in free flight to ensure conflict avoided flight. Controller design based on Sliding Mode Control (SMC) strategy is presented in this paper for the purpose of free flight autopilot implementation. Since SMC has the inherent property of robustness in sliding mode, it can ensure a highly efficient autopilot design. Conventional and reaching law approaches of SMC design are considered here for controller design. Conventional SMC technique usually exhibits an unacceptable phenomenon, viz., chattering. Reaching law approaches for SMC design are being investigated here so as to identify an appropriate strategy that can ensure near chattering free operation. Considering typical free flight conflict avoidance modes of operation, the performance of all the considered SMC strategies are compared through simulation studies. The comparison is based on their ability to reduce chattering and the effectiveness in ensuring quick conflict resolution maneuvers, so that an efficient controller for free flight autopilot system can be recommended.

  16. External Vision Systems (XVS) proof-of-concept flight test evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Kevin J.; Williams, Steven P.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, Jarvis J.; Prinzel, Lawrence; Bailey, Randall E.

    2014-06-01

    NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program, High Speed Project is performing research, development, test and evaluation of flight deck and related technologies to support future low-boom, supersonic configurations (without forward-facing windows) by use of an eXternal Vision System (XVS). The challenge of XVS is to determine a combination of sensor and display technologies which can provide an equivalent level of safety and performance to that provided by forward-facing windows in today's aircraft. This flight test was conducted with the goal of obtaining performance data on see-and-avoid and see-to-follow traffic using a proof-of-concept XVS design in actual flight conditions. Six data collection flights were flown in four traffic scenarios against two different sized participating traffic aircraft. This test utilized a 3x1 array of High Definition (HD) cameras, with a fixed forward field-of-view, mounted on NASA Langley's UC-12 test aircraft. Test scenarios, with participating NASA aircraft serving as traffic, were presented to two evaluation pilots per flight - one using the proof-of-concept (POC) XVS and the other looking out the forward windows. The camera images were presented on the XVS display in the aft cabin with Head-Up Display (HUD)-like flight symbology overlaying the real-time imagery. The test generated XVS performance data, including comparisons to natural vision, and post-run subjective acceptability data were also collected. This paper discusses the flight test activities, its operational challenges, and summarizes the findings to date.

  17. External Vision Systems (XVS) Proof-of-Concept Flight Test Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Kevin J.; Williams, Steven P.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, Jarvis J.; Prinzel, Lawrence, III; Bailey, Randall E.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program, High Speed Project is performing research, development, test and evaluation of flight deck and related technologies to support future low-boom, supersonic configurations (without forward-facing windows) by use of an eXternal Vision System (XVS). The challenge of XVS is to determine a combination of sensor and display technologies which can provide an equivalent level of safety and performance to that provided by forward-facing windows in today's aircraft. This flight test was conducted with the goal of obtaining performance data on see-and-avoid and see-to-follow traffic using a proof-of-concept XVS design in actual flight conditions. Six data collection flights were flown in four traffic scenarios against two different sized participating traffic aircraft. This test utilized a 3x1 array of High Definition (HD) cameras, with a fixed forward field-of-view, mounted on NASA Langley's UC-12 test aircraft. Test scenarios, with participating NASA aircraft serving as traffic, were presented to two evaluation pilots per flight - one using the proof-of-concept (POC) XVS and the other looking out the forward windows. The camera images were presented on the XVS display in the aft cabin with Head-Up Display (HUD)-like flight symbology overlaying the real-time imagery. The test generated XVS performance data, including comparisons to natural vision, and post-run subjective acceptability data were also collected. This paper discusses the flight test activities, its operational challenges, and summarizes the findings to date.

  18. Structural-parametric synthesis of the digital robust flight control system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.A. Тунік

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available  The paper is devoted to the synthesis of the digital controller for a system with stochastic disturbances and incomplete measurements of the state vector. Then parametric robust optimization of obtained system is conducted to achieve stabilization and acceptable performance for nominal and parametrically disturbed plants using the same controller. Research is performed at the example of the small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle flight control system.

  19. Impact of new computing systems on computational mechanics and flight-vehicle structures technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, A. K.; Storaasli, O. O.; Fulton, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in computer technology which may have an impact on computational mechanics and flight vehicle structures technology were reviewed. The characteristics of supersystems, highly parallel systems, and small systems are summarized. The interrelations of numerical algorithms and software with parallel architectures are discussed. A scenario for future hardware/software environment and engineering analysis systems is presented. Research areas with potential for improving the effectiveness of analysis methods in the new environment are identified.

  20. Description and Flight Test Results of the NASA F-8 Digital Fly-by-Wire Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A NASA program to develop digital fly-by-wire (DFBW) technology for aircraft applications is discussed. Phase I of the program demonstrated the feasibility of using a digital fly-by-wire system for aircraft control through developing and flight testing a single channel system, which used Apollo hardware, in an F-8C airplane. The objective of Phase II of the program is to establish a technology base for designing practical DFBW systems. It will involve developing and flight testing a triplex digital fly-by-wire system using state-of-the-art airborne computers, system hardware, software, and redundancy concepts. The papers included in this report describe the Phase I system and its development and present results from the flight program. Man-rated flight software and the effects of lightning on digital flight control systems are also discussed.

  1. Design and Flight Performance of the Orion Pre-Launch Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Launched in December 2014 atop a Delta IV Heavy from the Kennedy Space Center, the Orion vehicle's Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) successfully completed the objective to test the prelaunch and entry components of the system. Orion's pre-launch absolute navigation design is presented, together with its EFT-1 performance.

  2. NASA Space Flight Human System Standard, Volume 2, and HIDH (Human Integration Design Handbook)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Janis; Fitts, David; Stroud, Kenneth; Boyer, Jennifer; Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the review and re-issuance of the NASA Space Flight Human System Standard, Volume 2, and the Human Integration Design Handbook. These standards were last updated in 1995. The target date for the release is September 2009.

  3. Design, fabrication and testing of a wet oxidation waste processing system. [for manned space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The wet oxidation of sewage sludge during space flight was studied for water and gas recovery, and the elimination of overboard venting. The components of the system are described. Slurry and oxygen supply modules were fabricated and tested. Recommendations for redesign of the equipment are included.

  4. The Integrated Medical Model: A Risk Assessment and Decision Support Tool for Space Flight Medical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstman, Eric; Minard, Charles; Saile, Lynn; deCarvalho, Mary Freire; Myers, Jerry; Walton, Marlei; Butler, Douglas; Iyengar, Sriram; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Baumann, David

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a decision support tool that is useful to mission planners and medical system designers in assessing risks and designing medical systems for space flight missions. The IMM provides an evidence based approach for optimizing medical resources and minimizing risks within space flight operational constraints. The mathematical relationships among mission and crew profiles, medical condition incidence data, in-flight medical resources, potential crew functional impairments, and clinical end-states are established to determine probable mission outcomes. Stochastic computational methods are used to forecast probability distributions of crew health and medical resource utilization, as well as estimates of medical evacuation and loss of crew life. The IMM has been used in support of the International Space Station (ISS) medical kit redesign, the medical component of the ISS Probabilistic Risk Assessment, and the development of the Constellation Medical Conditions List. The IMM also will be used to refine medical requirements for the Constellation program. The IMM outputs for ISS and Constellation design reference missions will be presented to demonstrate the potential of the IMM in assessing risks, planning missions, and designing medical systems. The implementation of the IMM verification and validation plan will be reviewed. Additional planned capabilities of the IMM, including optimization techniques and the inclusion of a mission timeline, will be discussed. Given the space flight constraints of mass, volume, and crew medical training, the IMM is a valuable risk assessment and decision support tool for medical system design and mission planning.

  5. Development of Flight-Test Performance Estimation Techniques for Small Unmanned Aerial Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrink, Matthew Henry

    This dissertation provides a flight-testing framework for assessing the performance of fixed-wing, small-scale unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) by leveraging sub-system models of components unique to these vehicles. The development of the sub-system models, and their links to broader impacts on sUAS performance, is the key contribution of this work. The sub-system modeling and analysis focuses on the vehicle's propulsion, navigation and guidance, and airframe components. Quantification of the uncertainty in the vehicle's power available and control states is essential for assessing the validity of both the methods and results obtained from flight-tests. Therefore, detailed propulsion and navigation system analyses are presented to validate the flight testing methodology. Propulsion system analysis required the development of an analytic model of the propeller in order to predict the power available over a range of flight conditions. The model is based on the blade element momentum (BEM) method. Additional corrections are added to the basic model in order to capture the Reynolds-dependent scale effects unique to sUAS. The model was experimentally validated using a ground based testing apparatus. The BEM predictions and experimental analysis allow for a parameterized model relating the electrical power, measurable during flight, to the power available required for vehicle performance analysis. Navigation system details are presented with a specific focus on the sensors used for state estimation, and the resulting uncertainty in vehicle state. Uncertainty quantification is provided by detailed calibration techniques validated using quasi-static and hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) ground based testing. The HIL methods introduced use a soft real-time flight simulator to provide inertial quality data for assessing overall system performance. Using this tool, the uncertainty in vehicle state estimation based on a range of sensors, and vehicle operational environments is

  6. In-Flight Thermal Performance of the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Eric; Baker, Charles; McCarthy, Tom

    2003-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instrument is NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's first application of Loop Heat Pipe technology that provides selectable/stable temperature levels for the lasers and other electronics over a widely varying mission environment. GLAS was successfully launched as the sole science instrument aboard the Ice, Clouds, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) from Vandenberg AFB at 4:45pm PST on January 12, 2003. After SC commissioning, the LHPs started easily and have provided selectable and stable temperatures for the lasers and other electronics. This paper discusses the thermal development background and testing, along with details of early flight thermal performance data.

  7. Preliminary Design and Analysis of the ARES Atmospheric Flight Vehicle Thermal Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, J. F.; Dillman, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Survey (ARES) is a proposed 2007 Mars Scout Mission that will be the first mission to deploy an atmospheric flight vehicle (AFV) on another planet. This paper will describe the preliminary design and analysis of the AFV thermal control system for its flight through the Martian atmosphere and also present other analyses broadening the scope of that design to include other phases of the ARES mission. Initial analyses are discussed and results of trade studies are presented which detail the design process for AFV thermal control. Finally, results of the most recent AFV thermal analysis are shown and the plans for future work are discussed.

  8. Flight simulation visual requirements and a new display system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amery, John G.; Streid, Harry R.

    1999-08-01

    This paper reviews the technical requirements for Out The Window (OTW) visual systems. Requirements for different modes of training and/or simulation will be stated. A new type of visual display will be described that provides improved, cost effective implementation and performance.

  9. 14 CFR 25.1329 - Flight guidance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... guidance system. (a) Quick disengagement controls for the autopilot and autothrust functions must be provided for each pilot. The autopilot quick disengagement controls must be located on both control wheels... the autopilot or autothrust functions when manually commanded by the pilot must be assessed...

  10. A 300 Hz high frequency thermoacoustically driven pulse tube cooler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU ShangLong; YU GuoYao; ZHANG XiaoDong; DAI Wei; LUO ErCang; ZHOU Yuan

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces the latest progress of a 300 Hz thermoacoustically driven pulse tube cooler. Based on the experience of former experiments, improvements have been made in the standing-wave engine, pulse tube cooler and their coupling mechanism. An inlet pressure ratio of 1.248 was obtained with the mean pressure and heating power of 4.13 MPa and 1760 W, respectively. A lowest no-load temperature of 69.5 K has been reached under this condition. This is the first time for thermoacousti-cally driven pulse tube coolers to reach the temperature below 76 K with such a high frequency.

  11. Development of software for the thermohydraulic analysis of air coolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šerbanović Slobodan P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Air coolers consume much more energy compared to other heat exchangers due to the large fan power required. This is an additional reason to establish reliable methods for the rational design and thermohydraulic analysis of these devices. The optimal values of the outlet temperature and air flow rate are of particular importance. The paper presents a methodology for the thermohydraulic calculation of air cooler performances, which is incorporated in the "Air Cooler" software module. The module covers two options: cooling and/or condensation of process fluids by ambient air. The calculated results can be given in various ways ie. in the tabular and graphical form.

  12. New reference trajectory optimization algorithm for a flight management system inspired in beam search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro MURRIETA-MENDOZA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With the objective of reducing the flight cost and the amount of polluting emissions released in the atmosphere, a new optimization algorithm considering the climb, cruise and descent phases is presented for the reference vertical flight trajectory. The selection of the reference vertical navigation speeds and altitudes was solved as a discrete combinatory problem by means of a graph-tree passing through nodes using the beam search optimization technique. To achieve a compromise between the execution time and the algorithm’s ability to find the global optimal solution, a heuristic methodology introducing a parameter called “optimism coefficient was used in order to estimate the trajectory’s flight cost at every node. The optimal trajectory cost obtained with the developed algorithm was compared with the cost of the optimal trajectory provided by a commercial flight management system(FMS. The global optimal solution was validated against an exhaustive search algorithm(ESA, other than the proposed algorithm. The developed algorithm takes into account weather effects, step climbs during cruise and air traffic management constraints such as constant altitude segments, constant cruise Mach, and a pre-defined reference lateral navigation route. The aircraft fuel burn was computed using a numerical performance model which was created and validated using flight test experimental data.

  13. Realization of a Desktop Flight Simulation System for Motion-Cueing Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkay Volkaner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Parallel robotic mechanisms are generally used in flight simulators with a motion-cueing algorithm to create an unlimited motion feeling of a simulated medium in a bounded workspace of the simulator. A major problem in flight simulators is that the simulation has an unbounded space and the manipulator has a limited one. Using a washout filter in the motion-cueing algorithm overcomes this. In this study, a low-cost six degrees of freedom (DoF desktop parallel manipulator is used to test a classical motion-cueing algorithm; the algorithm's functionality is confirmed with a Simulink real-time environment. Translational accelerations and angular velocities of the simulated medium obtained from FlightGear flight simulation software are processed through a generated washout filter algorithm and the simulated medium's motion information is transmitted to the desktop parallel robotic mechanism as a set point for each leg. The major issues of this paper are designing a desktop simulation system, controlling the parallel manipulator, communicating between the flight simulation and the platform, designing a motion-cueing algorithm and determining the parameters of the washout filters.

  14. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Controls Systems Design and Analysis Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center maintains a critical national capability in the analysis of launch vehicle flight dynamics and flight certification of GN&C algorithms. MSFC analysts are domain experts in the areas of flexible-body dynamics and control-structure interaction, thrust vector control, sloshing propellant dynamics, and advanced statistical methods. Marshall's modeling and simulation expertise has supported manned spaceflight for over 50 years. Marshall's unparalleled capability in launch vehicle guidance, navigation, and control technology stems from its rich heritage in developing, integrating, and testing launch vehicle GN&C systems dating to the early Mercury-Redstone and Saturn vehicles. The Marshall team is continuously developing novel methods for design, including advanced techniques for large-scale optimization and analysis.

  15. Plotting the Flight Envelope of an Unmanned Aircraft System Air Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glīzde Nikolajs

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The research is focused on the development of an Unmanned Aircraft System. One of the design process steps in the preliminary design phase is the calculation of the flight envelope for the Unmanned Aircraft System air vehicle. The results obtained will be used in the further design process. A flight envelope determines the minimum requirements for the object in Certification Specifications. The present situation does not impose any Certification Specification requirements for the class of the Unmanned Aircraft System under the development of the general European Union trend defined in the road map for the implementation of the Unmanned Aircraft System. However, operation in common European Aerospace imposes the necessity for regulations for micro class systems as well.

  16. Condensation-Fouling Interaction in Low-Temperature EGR-Coolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reißig Martin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available EGR cooling is a worthwhile technology capable of reducing NOx-emissions and increasing the efficiency of CI engines. Challenges arise when low-temperature cooling is applied with high fuel sulfur contents. The resulting sulfuric acid condenses in conjunction with the water of the exhaust gas and gives rise to corrosion of coolers and engine components. Additionally, fouling of the EGR cooler is exacerbated by the condensation of acidic components compromising EGR performance. In order to gain a better understanding of the underlying processes a combined experimental and model-based approach is presented. Tests of two different EGR-cooler concepts under various conditions showed a strong influence of the fuel sulfur content on fouling and condensation. The one-dimensional cooler model developed alongside these experiments consists of an activity coefficient model (NRTL of the binary system water - sulfuric acid and a condensation model that allows for simulating the coupled condensation of both vapor components. Comparison of experimental fouling and simulated condensation results show good agreement in interpreting critical fouling phenomena that occur at temperatures in between the acid-water dew point and the dew point of pure water.

  17. Split Stirling linear cryogenic cooler for a new generation of high temperature infrared imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veprik, A.; Zechtzer, S.; Pundak, N.

    2010-04-01

    Split linear cryocoolers find use in a variety of infrared equipment installed in airborne, heliborne, marine and vehicular platforms along with hand held and ground fixed applications. An upcoming generation of portable, high-definition night vision imagers will rely on the high-temperature infrared detectors, operating at elevated temperatures, ranging from 95K to 200K, while being able to show the performance indices comparable with these of their traditional 77K competitors. Recent technological advances in industrial development of such high-temperature detectors initialized attempts for developing compact split Stirling linear cryogenic coolers. Their known advantages, as compared to the rotary integral coolers, are superior flexibility in the system packaging, constant and relatively high driving frequency, lower wideband vibration export, unsurpassed reliability and aural stealth. Unfortunately, such off-the-shelf available linear cryogenic coolers still cannot compete with rotary integral rivals in terms of size, weight and power consumption. Ricor developed the smallest in the range, 1W@95K, linear split Stirling cryogenic cooler for demanding infrared applications, where power consumption, compactness, vibration, aural noise and ownership costs are of concern.

  18. Flight Simulator: Evaluation of SODERN Visualization System SVS-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    29 96 rfgrmance characteristics visull diselay system 19 ABSTRACT iContinur on reverl if neceuary and identify by block nurnberi Engineering and Human...image, good picture aI dynamics with AVTS/IG video, excellent color rendition an contrast Human Factor Studies. Following the successful acceptance of...leads to the final comments as per attached data sheets in annex 2 p 1 to 6. The basic data from which these values are taken is the SODERN

  19. A digital-analog hybrid system and its application to the automatic flight control system simulation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of a digital-analog hybrid system composed of a DJS-8 digital computer and a HMJ-200 analog computer are described as well as its applications to simulation research for an automatic flight control system. A hybrid computational example is included to illustrate the application.

  20. LiPo battery energy studies for improved flight performance of unmanned aerial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K.; Rammos, P.; Wilkerson, S. A.; Bundy, M.; Gadsden, S. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Energy storage is one of the most important determinants of how long and far a small electric powered unmanned aerial system (UAS) can fly. For years, most hobby and experimentalists used heavy fuels to power small drone-like systems. Electric motors and battery storage prior to the turn of the century were either too heavy or too inefficient for flight times of any usable duration. However, with the availability of brushless electric motors and lithium-based batteries everything has changed. Systems like the Dragon Eye, Pointer, and Raven are in service performing reconnaissance, intelligence, surveillance, and target acquisition (RISTA) for more than an hour at a time. More recently, multi-rotor vehicles have expanded small UAS capabilities to include activities with hovering and persistent surveillance. Moreover, these systems coupled with the surge of small, low-cost electronics can perform autonomous and semi-autonomous missions not possible just ten years ago. This paper addresses flight time limitation issues by proposing an experimental method with procedures for system identification that may lead to modeling of energy storage in electric UAS'. Consequently, this will allow for energy storage to be used more effectively in planning autonomous missions. To achieve this, a set of baseline experiments were designed to measure the energy consumption of a mid-size UAS multi-rotor. Several different flight maneuvers were considered to include different lateral velocities, climbing, and hovering. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to create baseline flight data for each maneuver to be characterized with a certain rate of energy usage. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and robustness of the proposed approach. Future work will include the development of mission planning algorithms that provide realistic estimates of possible mission flight times and distances given specific mission parameters.

  1. Commonality of flight control systems for support of European telecommunications missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debatin, Kurt

    1993-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the presentation of mission-independent software systems that provide a common software platform to ground data systems for mission operations. The objectives of such common software platforms are to reduce the cost of the development of mission-dedicated software systems and to increase the level of reliability of the ground data systems for mission operations. In accordance with this objective, the Multi-Satellite Support System (MSSS) was developed at the European Space Operations Center (ESOC). Between 1975 and 1992, the MSSS provided support to 16 European Space Agency (ESA) missions, among them very demanding science missions such as GEOS, EXOSAT, and Giotto. The successful support of these missions proved the validity of the MSSS concept with its extended mission-independent platform. This paper describes the MSSS concept and focuses on the wide use of MSSS as a flight control system for geosynchronous telecommunications satellites. Reference is made to more than 15 telecommunications missions that are operated from Western Europe using flight control systems with an underlying MSSS concept, demonstrating the benefits of a commonly used software platform. Finally, the paper outlines the design of the new generation of flight control systems, which is being developed at ESOC for this decade, following a period of more than 15 years of MSSS support.

  2. Self-Contained Avionics Sensing and Flight Control System for Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Logan, Michael J. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor); Ingham, John C. (Inventor); Laughter, Sean A. (Inventor); Kuhn, III, Theodore R. (Inventor); Adams, James K. (Inventor); Babel, III, Walter C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A self-contained avionics sensing and flight control system is provided for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The system includes sensors for sensing flight control parameters and surveillance parameters, and a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. Flight control parameters and location signals are processed to generate flight control signals. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is configured to provide a look-up table storing sets of values with each set being associated with a servo mechanism mounted on the UAV and with each value in each set indicating a unique duty cycle for the servo mechanism associated therewith. Each value in each set is further indexed to a bit position indicative of a unique percentage of a maximum duty cycle for the servo mechanism associated therewith. The FPGA is further configured to provide a plurality of pulse width modulation (PWM) generators coupled to the look-up table. Each PWM generator is associated with and adapted to be coupled to one of the servo mechanisms.

  3. Assessing Impact of Dual Sensor Enhanced Flight Vision Systems on Departure Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Etherington, Timothy J.; Severance, Kurt; Bailey, Randall E.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Vision (SV) and Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS) may serve as game-changing technologies to meet the challenges of the Next Generation Air Transportation System and the envisioned Equivalent Visual Operations (EVO) concept - that is, the ability to achieve the safety and operational tempos of current-day Visual Flight Rules operations irrespective of the weather and visibility conditions. One significant obstacle lies in the definition of required equipage on the aircraft and on the airport to enable the EVO concept objective. A motion-base simulator experiment was conducted to evaluate the operational feasibility and pilot workload of conducting departures and approaches on runways without centerline lighting in visibility as low as 300 feet runway visual range (RVR) by use of onboard vision system technologies on a Head-Up Display (HUD) without need or reliance on natural vision. Twelve crews evaluated two methods of combining dual sensor (millimeter wave radar and forward looking infrared) EFVS imagery on pilot-flying and pilot-monitoring HUDs. In addition, the impact of adding SV to the dual sensor EFVS imagery on crew flight performance and workload was assessed. Using EFVS concepts during 300 RVR terminal operations on runways without centerline lighting appears feasible as all EFVS concepts had equivalent (or better) departure performance and landing rollout performance, without any workload penalty, than those flown with a conventional HUD to runways having centerline lighting. Adding SV imagery to EFVS concepts provided situation awareness improvements but no discernible improvements in flight path maintenance.

  4. Instrumentation Upgrades to TITAN's Cooler Penning Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascar, Daniel; Titan Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The use of Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) is critical to improving the precision of Penning trap mass measurements of nuclides with half-lives substantially less than 100 ms, but the process of charge breeding imparts an unacceptably high energy spread to the ion bunch sent to TITAN's precision Penning trap for mass measurement. TITAN's Cooler PEnning Trap (CPET) at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada was designed to cool HCIs with a plasma of simultaneously trapped electrons. CPET is currently undergoing commissioning offline at TRIUMF. In order to prepare CPET for full operation, several technical challenges associated with the use of electrons in a strong magnetic field had to be overcome. First among these was the detection of electrons outside of CPET. A novel, thin charge-collecting detector was successfully developed. Known as the mesh detector, it is charge-agnostic and can be made effectively transparent to allow for the passage of any charged particle at the user's request. The second challenge, moving CPET's electron source off the central beam axis was overcome by the creation of an electron source which would allow for electron injection into CPET and the passage of cooled ions out of CPET. CPET's 7 T solenoid generates a stray field far outside of the magnet's central bore that forced the design of a set of electron injection optics that bend, steer and focus the beam in three dimensions. Results from the successful installation of these upgrades as well as a report on future work will be discussed. This work was partially supported by NSERC, the CFI and the DFG.

  5. Aeroelastic and Flight Dynamics Analysis of Folding Wing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ivan

    This dissertation explores the aeroelastic stability of a folding wing using both theoretical and experimental methods. The theoretical model is based on the existing clamped-wing aeroelastic model that uses beam theory structural dynamics and strip theory aerodynamics. A higher-fidelity theoretical model was created by adding several improvements to the existing model, namely a structural model that uses ANSYS for individual wing segment modes and an unsteady vortex lattice aerodynamic model. The comparison with the lower-fidelity model shows that the higher-fidelity model typical provides better agreement between theory and experiment, but the predicted system behavior in general does not change, reinforcing the effectiveness of the low-fidelity model for preliminary design of folding wings. The present work also conducted more detailed aeroelastic analyses of three-segment folding wings, and in particular considers the Lockheed-type configurations to understand the existence of sudden changes in predicted aeroelastic behavior with varying fold angle for certain configurations. These phenomena were observed in carefully conducted experiments, and nonlinearities---structural and geometry---were shown to suppress the phenomena. Next, new experimental models with better manufacturing tolerances are designed to be tested in the Duke University Wind Tunnel. The testing focused on various configurations of three-segment folding wings in order to obtain higher quality data. Next, the theoretical model was further improved by adding aircraft longitudinal degrees of freedom such that the aeroelastic model may predict the instabilities for the entire aircraft and not just a clamped wing. The theoretical results show that the flutter instabilities typically occur at a higher air speed due to greater frequency separation between modes for the aircraft system than a clamped wing system, but the divergence instabilities occur at a lower air speed. Lastly, additional

  6. Saenger II, a hypersonic flight and space transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelle, Dietrich E.

    The paper presents the actual design status of the Saenger advanced space transportation system which comprises a hypersonic aircraft as first stage (EHTV). This vehicle (European Hypersonic Transport Vehicle) has been conceived for a dual purpose: to serve as the first stage of a launch vehicle with cruise capability, which is required to reach the space station orbit (28.5 deg) from Europe, and in the same basic configuration as passenger plane with some 230 passengers for a range of more than 10,000 km. The optimum cruise speed seems to be Mach 4.4 in 24.5 km altitude for economic and environmental reasons.

  7. Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) System Concept Applications at Solar System Bodies With an Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Greg; Polidan, Ronald; Ross, Floyd; Sokol, Daniel; Warwick, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Northrop Grumman and L’Garde have continued the development of a hypersonic entry, semi-buoyant, maneuverable platform capable of performing long-duration (months to a year) in situ and remote measurements at any solar system body that possesses an atmosphere.The Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) family of vehicles achieves this capability by using a semi-buoyant, ultra-low ballistic coefficient vehicle whose lifting entry allows it to enter the atmosphere without an aeroshell. The mass savings realized by eliminating the heavy aeroshell allows significantly more payload to be accommodated by the platform for additional science collection and return.In this presentation, we discuss the application of the LEAF system at various solar system bodies: Venus, Titan, Mars, and Earth. We present the key differences in platform design as well as operational differences required by the various target environments. The Venus implementation includes propulsive capability to reach higher altitudes during the day and achieves full buoyancy in the mid-cloud layer of Venus’ atmosphere at night.Titan also offers an attractive operating environment, allowing LEAF designs that can target low or medium altitude operations, also with propulsive capabilities to roam within each altitude regime. The Mars version is a glider that descends gradually, allowing targeted delivery of payloads to the surface or high resolution surface imaging. Finally, an Earth version could remain in orbit in a stowed state until activated, allowing rapid response type deployments to any region of the globe.

  8. A robust rotorcraft flight control system design methodology utilizing quantitative feedback theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorder, Peter James

    1993-01-01

    Rotorcraft flight control systems present design challenges which often exceed those associated with fixed-wing aircraft. First, large variations in the response characteristics of the rotorcraft result from the wide range of airspeeds of typical operation (hover to over 100 kts). Second, the assumption of vehicle rigidity often employed in the design of fixed-wing flight control systems is rarely justified in rotorcraft where rotor degrees of freedom can have a significant impact on the system performance and stability. This research was intended to develop a methodology for the design of robust rotorcraft flight control systems. Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) was chosen as the basis for the investigation. Quantitative Feedback Theory is a technique which accounts for variability in the dynamic response of the controlled element in the design robust control systems. It was developed to address a Multiple-Input Single-Output (MISO) design problem, and utilizes two degrees of freedom to satisfy the design criteria. Two techniques were examined for extending the QFT MISO technique to the design of a Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output (MIMO) flight control system (FCS) for a UH-60 Black Hawk Helicopter. In the first, a set of MISO systems, mathematically equivalent to the MIMO system, was determined. QFT was applied to each member of the set simultaneously. In the second, the same set of equivalent MISO systems were analyzed sequentially, with closed loop response information from each loop utilized in subsequent MISO designs. The results of each technique were compared, and the advantages of the second, termed Sequential Loop Closure, were clearly evident.

  9. Development of an Exploration-Class Cascade Distillation System: Flight Like Prototype Preliminary Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to recover and purify water through physiochemical processes is crucial for realizing long-term human space missions, including both planetary habitation and space travel. Because of their robust nature, distillation systems have been actively pursued as one of the technologies for water recovery. One such technology is the Cascade Distillation System (CDS) a multi-stage vacuum rotary distiller system designed to recover water in a microgravity environment. Its rotating cascading distiller operates similarly to the state of the art (SOA) vapor compressor distiller (VCD), but its control scheme and ancillary components are judged to be straightforward and simpler to implement into a successful design. Through the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Life Support Systems (LSS) Project, the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in collaboration with Honeywell International is developing a second generation flight forward prototype (CDS 2.0). The key objectives for the CDS 2.0 design task is to provide a flight forward ground prototype that demonstrates improvements over the SOA system in the areas of increased reliability and robustness, and reduced mass, power and volume. It will also incorporate exploration-class automation. The products of this task are a preliminary flight system design and a high fidelity prototype of an exploration class CDS. These products will inform the design and development of the third generation CDS which is targeted for on-orbit DTO. This paper details the preliminary design of the CDS 2.0.

  10. Design criteria for integrated flight/propulsion control systems for STOVL fighter aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, James A.

    1993-01-01

    As part of NASA's program to develop technology for short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft, control system designs have been developed for a conceptual STOVL aircraft. This aircraft is representative of the class of mixed-flow remote-lift concepts that was identified as the preferred design approach by the US/UK STOVL Joint Assessment and Ranking Team. The control system designs have been evaluated throughout the powered-lift flight envelope on Ames Research Center's Vertical Motion Simulator. Items assessed in the control system evaluation were: maximum control power used in transition and vertical flight, control system dynamic response associated with thrust transfer for attitude control, thrust margin in the presence of ground effect and hot gas ingestion, and dynamic thrust response for the engine core. Effects of wind, turbulence, and ship airwake disturbances are incorporated in the evaluation. Results provide the basis for a reassessment of existing flying qualities design criteria applied to STOVL aircraft.

  11. Singular perturbations and time scales in the design of digital flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Desineni S.; Price, Douglas B.

    1988-01-01

    The results are presented of application of the methodology of Singular Perturbations and Time Scales (SPATS) to the control of digital flight systems. A block diagonalization method is described to decouple a full order, two time (slow and fast) scale, discrete control system into reduced order slow and fast subsystems. Basic properties and numerical aspects of the method are discussed. A composite, closed-loop, suboptimal control system is constructed as the sum of the slow and fast optimal feedback controls. The application of this technique to an aircraft model shows close agreement between the exact solutions and the decoupled (or composite) solutions. The main advantage of the method is the considerable reduction in the overall computational requirements for the evaluation of optimal guidance and control laws. The significance of the results is that it can be used for real time, onboard simulation. A brief survey is also presented of digital flight systems.

  12. Assessing Dual Sensor Enhanced Flight Vision Systems to Enable Equivalent Visual Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Etherington, Timothy J.; Severance, Kurt; Bailey, Randall E.; Williams, Steven P.; Harrison, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    Flight deck-based vision system technologies, such as Synthetic Vision (SV) and Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS), may serve as a revolutionary crew/vehicle interface enabling technologies to meet the challenges of the Next Generation Air Transportation System Equivalent Visual Operations (EVO) concept - that is, the ability to achieve the safety of current-day Visual Flight Rules (VFR) operations and maintain the operational tempos of VFR irrespective of the weather and visibility conditions. One significant challenge lies in the definition of required equipage on the aircraft and on the airport to enable the EVO concept objective. A motion-base simulator experiment was conducted to evaluate the operational feasibility, pilot workload and pilot acceptability of conducting straight-in instrument approaches with published vertical guidance to landing, touchdown, and rollout to a safe taxi speed in visibility as low as 300 ft runway visual range by use of onboard vision system technologies on a Head-Up Display (HUD) without need or reliance on natural vision. Twelve crews evaluated two methods of combining dual sensor (millimeter wave radar and forward looking infrared) EFVS imagery on pilot-flying and pilot-monitoring HUDs as they made approaches to runways with and without touchdown zone and centerline lights. In addition, the impact of adding SV to the dual sensor EFVS imagery on crew flight performance, workload, and situation awareness during extremely low visibility approach and landing operations was assessed. Results indicate that all EFVS concepts flown resulted in excellent approach path tracking and touchdown performance without any workload penalty. Adding SV imagery to EFVS concepts provided situation awareness improvements but no discernible improvements in flight path maintenance.

  13. A Robust H∞ Controller for an UAV Flight Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. López

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is the implementation and validation of a robust H∞ controller for an UAV to track all types of manoeuvres in the presence of noisy environment. A robust inner-outer loop strategy is implemented. To design the H∞ robust controller in the inner loop, H∞ control methodology is used. The two controllers that conform the outer loop are designed using the H∞ Loop Shaping technique. The reference vector used in the control architecture formed by vertical velocity, true airspeed, and heading angle, suggests a nontraditional way to pilot the aircraft. The simulation results show that the proposed control scheme works well despite the presence of noise and uncertainties, so the control system satisfies the requirements.

  14. Micromachined Active Magnetic Regenerator for Low Temperature Magnetic Coolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future science missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require highly efficient, very low temperature coolers for low noise...

  15. Lightweight Magnetic Cooler with a Reversible Circulator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require highly-efficient, very low temperature coolers for low-noise detector...

  16. Lightweight Magnetic Cooler with a Reversible Circulator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require highly efficient, very low temperature coolers for low-noise detector...

  17. Lightweight Superconducting Magnets for Low Temperature Magnetic Coolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future science missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require efficient, very low temperature coolers for low noise detector...

  18. Miniaturized Thermal-Cooler for IC Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is submitted for research on using MEMS technology to make unique, highly reliable, miniaturized capillary pumped coolers in the application of Thermal...

  19. Micromachined Active Magnetic Regenerator for Low Temperature Magnetic Coolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future science missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require highly efficient, very low temperature coolers for low noise...

  20. Timing performances of a data acquisition system for Time of Flight PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrocchi, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.morrocchi@pi.infn.it [University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, I 56127 Pisa (Italy); Marcatili, Sara; Belcari, Nicola; Bisogni, Maria G. [University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, I 56127 Pisa (Italy); Collazuol, Gianmaria [University of Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova (Italy); Ambrosi, Giovanni [INFN Sezione di Perugia, I 06100 Perugia (Italy); Corsi, Francesco; Foresta, Maurizio; Marzocca, Cristoforo; Matarrese, Gianvito [Politecnico di Bari and INFN Sezione di Bari, I 70100 Bari (Italy); Sportelli, Giancarlo; Guerra, Pedro; Santos, Andres [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E 28040 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Del Guerra, Alberto [University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, I 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2012-12-11

    We are investigating the performances of a data acquisition system for Time of Flight PET, based on LYSO crystal slabs and 64 channels Silicon Photomultipliers matrices (1.2 cm{sup 2} of active area each). Measurements have been performed to test the timing capability of the detection system (SiPM matices coupled to a LYSO slab and the read-out electronics) with both test signal and radioactive source.

  1. MM&T for Linear Resonant Cooler. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-16

    COOSS 16-S SUBJECT TERMS (COntInuf O on fri WUI( Rfe*"Gnr and identify 6) bloct ri.rmbe, FIELD GROUP j SUB. GRPI Li near-Resonant; Compressor; Stirling ...Cycle I i Free-Displacer Cooler; Regenerator IS. ABSTRACT (Con notuor on Forvermi if necorstwy mnd iden afr 67 Weorknufflep This final report...producibility and performance of the prototype linear-drive Stirling cycle cooler design established in a prior contract, 2) qualify the design to the target

  2. Present and future of vision systems technologies in commercial flight operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jim

    2016-05-01

    The development of systems to enable pilots of all types of aircraft to see through fog, clouds, and sandstorms and land in low visibility has been widely discussed and researched across aviation. For military applications, the goal has been to operate in a Degraded Visual Environment (DVE), using sensors to enable flight crews to see and operate without concern to weather that limits human visibility. These military DVE goals are mainly oriented to the off-field landing environment. For commercial aviation, the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) implemented operational regulations in 2004 that allow the flight crew to see the runway environment using an Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS) and continue the approach below the normal landing decision height. The FAA is expanding the current use and economic benefit of EFVS technology and will soon permit landing without any natural vision using real-time weather-penetrating sensors. The operational goals of both of these efforts, DVE and EFVS, have been the stimulus for development of new sensors and vision displays to create the modern flight deck.

  3. Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ullaland, O

    2011-01-01

    Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors in 'Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Section '3.3 Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.3 Particle Identification: Time-of-Flight, Cherenkov and Transition Radiation Detectors 3.3.1 Introduction 3.3.2 Time of Flight Measurements 3.3.2.1 Scintillator hodoscopes 3.3.2.2 Parallel plate ToF detectors 3.3.3 Cherenkov Radiation 3.3.3.1 ...

  4. Real-Time Reliability Verification for UAV Flight Control System Supporting Airworthiness Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiyang; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    In order to verify the real-time reliability of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) flight control system and comply with the airworthiness certification standard, we proposed a model-based integration framework for modeling and verification of time property. Combining with the advantages of MARTE, this framework uses class diagram to create the static model of software system, and utilizes state chart to create the dynamic model. In term of the defined transformation rules, the MARTE model could be transformed to formal integrated model, and the different part of the model could also be verified by using existing formal tools. For the real-time specifications of software system, we also proposed a generating algorithm for temporal logic formula, which could automatically extract real-time property from time-sensitive live sequence chart (TLSC). Finally, we modeled the simplified flight control system of UAV to check its real-time property. The results showed that the framework could be used to create the system model, as well as precisely analyze and verify the real-time reliability of UAV flight control system.

  5. An approach to the synthesis of separate surface automatic flight control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskam, J.; Henry, S.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented for the analysis of separate surface automatic flight control systems. The feasibility of such systems is demonstrated by the analysis of an example system, a separate surface wing-leveler for a Cessna 172. This example system employs a separate surface aileron with 15% of the basic airplane roll control power. A 90% reduction in bank-angle gust response can be obtained when compared with the basic airplane. The system does not feed back to the pilot's wheel. When failed (even hardover) the pilot retains more than adequate control of the airplane.

  6. Large-Scale Containment Cooler Performance Experiments under Accident Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Kapulla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational Fluid Dynamics codes are increasingly used to simulate containment conditions after various transient accident scenarios. This paper presents validation experiments, conducted in the frame of the OECD/SETH-2 project. These experiments address the combined effects of mass sources and heat sinks related to gas mixing and hydrogen transport within containment compartments. A wall jet interacts with an operating containment cooler located in the middle (M-configuration and the top (T-configuration of the containment vessel. The experiments are characterized by a 3-phase injection scenario. In Phase I, pure steam is injected, while in Phase II, a helium-steam mixture is injected. Finally, in Phase III, pure steam is injected again. Results for the M-configuration show helium stratification build up during Phase II. During Phase III, a positively buoyant plume emerging from the cooler housing becomes negatively buoyant once it reaches the helium-steam layer and continuously erodes the layer. For the M-configuration, a strong degradation of the cooler performance was observed during the injection of the helium/steam mixture (Phase II. For the T-configuration, we observe a mainly downwards acting cooler resulting in a combination of forced and natural convection flow patterns. The cooler performance degradation was much weaker compared with the M-configuration and a good mixing was ensured by the operation of the cooler.

  7. Design of a Multi-mode Flight Deck Decision Support System for Airborne Conflict Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhydt, Richard; Krishnamurthy, Karthik

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley has developed a multi-mode decision support system for pilots operating in a Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM) environment. An Autonomous Operations Planner (AOP) assists pilots in performing separation assurance functions, including conflict detection, prevention, and resolution. Ongoing AOP design has been based on a comprehensive human factors analysis and evaluation results from previous human-in-the-loop experiments with airline pilot test subjects. AOP considers complex flight mode interactions and provides flight guidance to pilots consistent with the current aircraft control state. Pilots communicate goals to AOP by setting system preferences and actively probing potential trajectories for conflicts. To minimize training requirements and improve operational use, AOP design leverages existing alerting philosophies, displays, and crew interfaces common on commercial aircraft. Future work will consider trajectory prediction uncertainties, integration with the TCAS collision avoidance system, and will incorporate enhancements based on an upcoming air-ground coordination experiment.

  8. General Relationships Between the Various Systems of Reference Axes Employed in Flight Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautenberg, H J

    1940-01-01

    The different possibilities of orientation of the systems of axes currently employed in flight mechanics are compiled and described. Of the three possible couplings between the wind and aircraft axes, the most suitable coupling is that in which the y axis is made the principal axis of rotation for one of the two coupling angles (angles of attack). In connection with this coupling, an experimental system of axes is introduced, whose axes x(sub e) and z(sub e) are situated in the plane of symmetry of the airplane and rotate about the airplane lateral axis y = y(sub e). This system of axes enables the utilization of the coefficients obtained in the wind tunnel in the flight-mechanic equations by a simple transformation, with the aid of the angle of attack, measured in the plane of symmetry of the airplane.

  9. Sliding Mode Implementation of an Attitude Command Flight Control System for a Helicopter in Hover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. McGeoch

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation into the design of a flight control system, using a decoupled non-linear sliding mode control structure, designed using a linearised, 9th order representation of the dynamics of a PUMA helicopter in hover. The controllers are then tested upon a higher order, non-linear helicopter model, called RASCAL. This design approach is used for attitude command flight control implementation and the control performance is assessed in the terms of handling qualities through the Aeronautical Design Standards for Rotorcraft (ADS-33. In this context a linearised approximation of the helicopter system is used to design an SMC control scheme. These controllers have been found to yield a system that satisfies the Level 1 handling qualities set out by ADS-33. 

  10. An integrative approach to space-flight physiology using systems analysis and mathematical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J. I.; White, R. J.; Rummel, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    An approach was developed to aid in the integration of many of the biomedical findings of space flight, using systems analysis. The mathematical tools used in accomplishing this task include an automated data base, a biostatistical and data analysis system, and a wide variety of mathematical simulation models of physiological systems. A keystone of this effort was the evaluation of physiological hypotheses using the simulation models and the prediction of the consequences of these hypotheses on many physiological quantities, some of which were not amenable to direct measurement. This approach led to improvements in the model, refinements of the hypotheses, a tentative integrated hypothesis for adaptation to weightlessness, and specific recommendations for new flight experiments.

  11. Spacecraft flight control system design selection process for a geostationary communication satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Earth's first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1, slowly tumbled in orbit. The first U.S. satellite, Explorer 1, also tumbled out of control. Now, as we launch the Mars observer and the Cassini spacecraft, stability and control have become higher priorities. The flight control system design selection process is reviewed using as an example a geostationary communication satellite which is to have a life expectancy of 10 to 14 years. Disturbance torques including aerodynamic, magnetic, gravity gradient, solar, micrometeorite, debris, collision, and internal torques are assessed to quantify the disturbance environment so that the required compensating torque can be determined. Then control torque options, including passive versus active, momentum control, bias momentum, spin stabilization, dual spin, gravity gradient, magnetic, reaction wheels, control moment gyros, nutation dampers, inertia augmentation techniques, three-axis control, reactions control system (RCS), and RCS sizing, are considered. A flight control system design is then selected and preliminary stability criteria are met by the control gains selection.

  12. Computational imaging with multi-camera time-of-flight systems

    KAUST Repository

    Shrestha, Shikhar

    2016-07-11

    Depth cameras are a ubiquitous technology used in a wide range of applications, including robotic and machine vision, human computer interaction, autonomous vehicles as well as augmented and virtual reality. In this paper, we explore the design and applications of phased multi-camera time-of-flight (ToF) systems. We develop a reproducible hardware system that allows for the exposure times and waveforms of up to three cameras to be synchronized. Using this system, we analyze waveform interference between multiple light sources in ToF applications and propose simple solutions to this problem. Building on the concept of orthogonal frequency design, we demonstrate state-of-the-art results for instantaneous radial velocity capture via Doppler time-of-flight imaging and we explore new directions for optically probing global illumination, for example by de-scattering dynamic scenes and by non-line-of-sight motion detection via frequency gating. © 2016 ACM.

  13. Energy analysis of the cryogenic CO2 capture process based on Stirling coolers

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Chunfeng; Kitamura, Yutaka; Li, Shuhong

    2014-01-01

    In the existing coal-fired power plants, the energy penalty associated with CO2 capture process is an important challenge. For this reason, energy analysis has been widely used as a powerful tool to optimize the capture efficiency and reduce energy consumption. In our previous work, a Stirling cooler based cryogenic CO2 capture system was outlined. Process simulation and energy analysis of the system were undertaken in this research. The whole CO2 capture process is composed of three sections...

  14. Life and Reliability Characteristics of TurboBrayton Coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedlove, Jeff J.; Zagarola, Mark; Nellis, Greg; Dolan, Frank; Swift, Walt; Gibbon, Judith; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Wear and internal contaminants are two of the primary factors that influence reliable, long-life operation of turbo-Brayton cryocoolers. This paper describes tests that have been conducted and methods that have been developed for turbo-Brayton components and systems to assure reliable operation. The turbomachines used in these coolers employ self-acting gas bearings to support the miniature high-speed shafts, thus providing vibration-free operation. Because the bearings are self-acting, rubbing contact occurs during initial start-up and shutdown of the machines. Bearings and shafts are designed to endure multiple stop/start cycles without producing particles or surface features that would impair the proper operation of the machines. Test results are presented for a variety of turbomachines used in these systems. The tests document extended operating life and start/stop cycling behavior for machines over a range of time and temperature scales. Contaminants such as moisture and other residual gas impurities can be a source of degraded operation if they freeze out in sufficient quantities to block flow passages or if they mechanically affect the operation of the machines. A post-fabrication bakeout procedure has been successfully used to reduce residual internal contamination to acceptable levels in a closed cycle system. The process was developed during space qualification tests on the NICMOS cryocooler. Moisture levels were sampled over a six-month time interval confirming the effectiveness of the technique. A description of the bakeout procedure is presented.

  15. Evaluating the Handling Qualities of Flight Control Systems Including Nonlinear Aircraft and System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Raymond Chao

    The handling qualities evaluation of nonlinear aircraft systems is an area of concern in loss-of-control (LOC) prevention. The Get Transfer Function (GetTF) method was demonstrated for evaluating the handling qualities of flight control systems and aircraft containing nonlinearities. NASA's Generic Transport Model (GTM), a nonlinear model of a civilian jet transport aircraft, was evaluated. Using classical techniques, the stability, control, and augmentation (SCAS) systems were designed to control pitch rate, roll rate, and airspeed. Hess's structural pilot model was used to model pilot dynamics in pitch and roll-attitude tracking. The simulated task was simultaneous tracking of, both, pitch and roll attitudes. Eight cases were evaluated: 1) gain increase of pitch-attitude command signal, 2) gain increase of roll-attitude command signal, 3) gain reduction of elevator command signal, 4) backlash in elevator actuator, 5) combination 3 and 4 in elevator actuator, 6) gain reduction of aileron command signal, 7) backlash in aileron actuator, and 8) combination of 6 and 7 in aileron actuator. The GetTF method was used to estimate the transfer function approximating a linear relationship between the proprioceptive signal of the pilot model and the command input. The transfer function was then used to predict the handling qualities ratings (HQR) and pilot-induced oscillation ratings (PIOR). The HQR is based on the Cooper-Harper rating scale. In pitch-attitude tracking, the nominal aircraft is predicted to have Level 2* HQRpitch and 2 control and aircraft systems. A limited human-in-the-loop pitch tracking exercise was also conducted to validate the structural pilot model.

  16. A helicopter flight does not induce significant changes in systemic biomarker profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kåsin, Jan Ivar; Kjekshus, John; Aukrust, Pål; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Wagstaff, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Whole-body vibration and noise are inherent characteristics of helicopter operations. The helicopter pilot is affected by vibration from both low-frequency noise and mechanical vibration sources. The way this energy is transmitted to different tissues and organs depends on intensity, frequency and resonance phenomena within the body. Whole-body vibration is known to affect the muscular and skeletal system in the lower part of the spine, but less is known about the response at the cellular level to this stimulation. In some studies, chronic pathological changes have been described in different types of tissue in people exposed to low-frequency noise and vibration. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible cellular reactions to acute exposure to low-frequency noise and vibration in a helicopter. Thirteen healthy males aged 38 (18-69) years were subjected to a 3.5 h helicopter flight in a Westland Sea King Rescue helicopter. Blood tests taken before and after the flight were analysed for more than 40 parameters, including acute phase reactants, markers of leucocyte and platelet activation, complement and hemostasis markers, as well as a broad panel of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and cell adhesion molecules. The subjects served as their own controls. With the exception of an increase in vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) during the flight, no statistically significant changes in the biomarkers were found after controlling for diurnal variation in the control blood tests, which were observed independently of the helicopter flight. In conclusion, one helicopter flight does not induce measurable changes in systemic biomarkers.

  17. The development of an airborne information management system for flight test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bever, Glenn A.

    1992-01-01

    An airborne information management system is being developed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. This system will improve the state of the art in management data acquisition on-board research aircraft. The design centers around highly distributable, high-speed microprocessors that allow data compression, digital filtering, and real-time analysis. This paper describes the areas of applicability, approach to developing the system, potential for trouble areas, and reasons for this development activity. System architecture (including the salient points of what makes it unique), design philosophy, and tradeoff issues are also discussed.

  18. Flight Management System Execution of Idle-Thrust Descents in Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stell, Laurel L.

    2011-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the trajectory predictor and its error models, commercial flights executed idle-thrust descents, and the recorded data includes the target speed profile and FMS intent trajectories. The FMS computes the intended descent path assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and any intervention by the controllers that alters the FMS execution of the descent is recorded so that such flights are discarded from the analysis. The horizontal flight path, cruise and meter fix altitudes, and actual TOD location are extracted from the radar data. Using more than 60 descents in Boeing 777 aircraft, the actual speeds are compared to the intended descent speed profile. In addition, three aspects of the accuracy of the FMS intent trajectory are analyzed: the meter fix crossing time, the TOD location, and the altitude at the meter fix. The actual TOD location is within 5 nmi of the intent location for over 95% of the descents. Roughly 90% of the time, the airspeed is within 0.01 of the target Mach number and within 10 KCAS of the target descent CAS, but the meter fix crossing time is only within 50 sec of the time computed by the FMS. Overall, the aircraft seem to be executing the descents as intended by the designers of the onboard automation.

  19. Enhanced Flight Vision Systems and Synthetic Vision Systems for NextGen Approach and Landing Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Ellis, Kyle K. E.; Williams, Steven P.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic Vision Systems and Enhanced Flight Vision System (SVS/EFVS) technologies have the potential to provide additional margins of safety for aircrew performance and enable operational improvements for low visibility operations in the terminal area environment with equivalent efficiency as visual operations. To meet this potential, research is needed for effective technology development and implementation of regulatory standards and design guidance to support introduction and use of SVS/EFVS advanced cockpit vision technologies in Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) operations. A fixed-base pilot-in-the-loop simulation test was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center that evaluated the use of SVS/EFVS in NextGen low visibility approach and landing operations. Twelve crews flew approach and landing operations in a simulated NextGen Chicago O'Hare environment. Various scenarios tested the potential for using EFVS to conduct approach, landing, and roll-out operations in visibility as low as 1000 feet runway visual range (RVR). Also, SVS was tested to evaluate the potential for lowering decision heights (DH) on certain instrument approach procedures below what can be flown today. Expanding the portion of the visual segment in which EFVS can be used in lieu of natural vision from 100 feet above the touchdown zone elevation to touchdown and rollout in visibilities as low as 1000 feet RVR appears to be viable as touchdown performance was acceptable without any apparent workload penalties. A lower DH of 150 feet and/or possibly reduced visibility minima using SVS appears to be viable when implemented on a Head-Up Display, but the landing data suggests further study for head-down implementations.

  20. Thermal electron-tunneling devices as coolers and amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shanhe; Zhang, Yanchao; Chen, Jincan; Shih, Tien-Mo

    2016-02-01

    Nanoscale thermal systems that are associated with a pair of electron reservoirs have been previously studied. In particular, devices that adjust electron tunnels relatively to reservoirs’ chemical potentials enjoy the novelty and the potential. Since only two reservoirs and one tunnel exist, however, designers need external aids to complete a cycle, rendering their models non-spontaneous. Here we design thermal conversion devices that are operated among three electron reservoirs connected by energy-filtering tunnels and also referred to as thermal electron-tunneling devices. They are driven by one of electron reservoirs rather than the external power input, and are equivalent to those coupling systems consisting of forward and reverse Carnot cycles with energy selective electron functions. These previously-unreported electronic devices can be used as coolers and thermal amplifiers and may be called as thermal transistors. The electron and energy fluxes of devices are capable of being manipulated in the same or oppsite directions at our disposal. The proposed model can open a new field in the application of nano-devices.

  1. Cooler Storage Ring at China Institute of Modern Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wen-Xia, Jia; Zhan, W

    2005-01-01

    CSR, a new ion cooler-storage-ring project in China IMP, is a double ring system, and consists of a main ring (CSRm) and an experimental ring (CSRe). The two existing cyclotrons SFC (K=69) and SSC (K=450) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) will be used as its injector system. The heavy ion beams with the energy range of 7-30 MeV/nucleus from the HIRFL will be accumulated, cooled and accelerated to the higher energy range of 100-500 MeV/ nucleus in CSRm, and then extracted fast to produce radioactive ion beams or highly charged heavy ions. Those secondary beams will be accepted and stored or decelerated by CSRe for many internal-target experiments or high precision spectroscopy with beam cooling. On the other hand, the beams with the energy range of 100-1000MeV/ nucleus will also be extracted from CSRm by using slow extraction or fast extraction for many external-target experiments. CSR project was started in the end of 1999 and will be finished in 2006. In this paper the outline and the act...

  2. THE INVARIANT ADAPTATION OF THE AIRCRAFT CONTROL SYSTEM IN EMERGENCY SITUATION DURING THE FLIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Pavlova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop a method for compensating the effects of failures of the aircraft automatic control system during the flight. Methods: This article reviews an approach based on the methods of theory of absolute nonlinear invariance. Results: In this paper, we present the example of a case of compensation of failure of the elevator with using the solution of the equation of the absolute invariance for pitch angle. Synthesis of automatic control device of aircraft orientation angles based on the analysis of the equations of the absolute nonlinear invariance is presented. Discussion: The use of the reconfiguration of the aircraft control system to ensure its survivability in flight is a perspective direction. However, the development of the concept of motion control of the aircraft with the use of the theory of absolute invariance will allow to realize an effective developed aircraft control method that will have advantages compared with the existing methods.

  3. Software reliability - Measures and effects in flight critical digital avionics systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, William R.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses software reliability as it applies particularly to design and evaluation of flight-critical digital avionics systems. Measures of software reliability, measurement methods and reliability (macro-) models are discussed. Recent work assessing their accuracy in predicting software errors in 'fly-by-wire' Newtonian applications is presented. Additional, detailed topics are discussed including software error distributions (e.g. catastrophic vs. noncatastrophic) and the effects of system growth/maturity on reliability improvement. In practical flight-critical digital applications, software reliability improvement is sought through use of parallel, redundant software (i.e. N-version programming) or backup software that can be invoked in the event of (primary) software failure. Achievable reliability levels are however highly sensitive to common-mode specification and programming errors. Recent data correlating these errors with net software reliability are discussed.

  4. Synthetic Vision System Commercial Aircraft Flight Deck Display Technologies for Unusual Attitude Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Ellis, Kyle E.; Arthur, Jarvis J.; Nicholas, Stephanie N.; Kiggins, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    A Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) study of 18 worldwide loss-of-control accidents and incidents determined that the lack of external visual references was associated with a flight crew's loss of attitude awareness or energy state awareness in 17 of these events. Therefore, CAST recommended development and implementation of virtual day-Visual Meteorological Condition (VMC) display systems, such as synthetic vision systems, which can promote flight crew attitude awareness similar to a day-VMC environment. This paper describes the results of a high-fidelity, large transport aircraft simulation experiment that evaluated virtual day-VMC displays and a "background attitude indicator" concept as an aid to pilots in recovery from unusual attitudes. Twelve commercial airline pilots performed multiple unusual attitude recoveries and both quantitative and qualitative dependent measures were collected. Experimental results and future research directions under this CAST initiative and the NASA "Technologies for Airplane State Awareness" research project are described.

  5. Design of an intelligent information system for in-flight emergency assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyock, Stefan; Karamouzis, Stamos

    1991-01-01

    The present research has as its goal the development of AI tools to help flight crews cope with in-flight malfunctions. The relevant tasks in such situations include diagnosis, prognosis, and recovery plan generation. Investigation of the information requirements of these tasks has shown that the determination of paths figures largely: what components or systems are connected to what others, how are they connected, whether connections satisfying certain criteria exist, and a number of related queries. The formulation of such queries frequently requires capabilities of the second-order predicate calculus. An information system is described that features second-order logic capabilities, and is oriented toward efficient formulation and execution of such queries.

  6. Implementation of spatial touch system using time-of-flight camera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AHN Yang-Keun; PARK Young-Choong; CHOI Kwang-Soon; PARK Woo-Choo; SEO Hae-Moon; JUNG Kwang-Mo

    2009-01-01

    Recently developed time-of-flight principle based depth-sensing video camera technologies provide precise per-pixel range data in addition to color video. Such cameras will find application in robotics and vision-based human computer interaction scenarios such as games and gesture input systems. Time-of-flight principle range cameras are becoming more and more available. They promise to make the 3D reconstruction of scenes easier, avoiding the practical issues resulting from 3D imaging techniques based on triangulation or disparity estimation. A spatial touch system was presented which uses a depth-sensing camera to touch spatial objects and details on its implementation, and how this technology will enable new spatial interactions was speculated.

  7. Development and flight qualification of the C-SiC thermal protection systems for the IXV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffenoir, François; Zeppa, Céline; Pichon, Thierry; Girard, Florent

    2016-07-01

    The Intermediate experimental Vehicle (IXV) atmospheric re-entry demonstrator, developed within the FLPP (Future Launcher Preparatory Programme) and funded by ESA, aimed at developing a demonstration vehicle that gave Europe a unique opportunity to increase its knowledge in the field of advanced atmospheric re-entry technologies. A key technology that has been demonstrated in real conditions through the flight of this ambitious vehicle is the thermal protection system (TPS) of the Vehicle. Within this programme, HERAKLES, Safran Group, has been in charge of the TPS of the windward and nose assemblies of the vehicle, and has developed and manufactured SepcarbInox® ceramic matrix composite (CMC) protection systems that provided a high temperature resistant non ablative outer mould line (OML) for enhanced aerodynamic control. The design and flight justification of these TPS has been achieved through extensive analysis and testing:

  8. The use of minimum order state observers in digital flight-control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, R. C.; Hatch, H. G., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of selecting the 'arbitrary' design parameters of digital state observers when they are being used as a part of a digital flight-control system. A cost index is developed which indicates the output noise caused by input quantization due to analog-to-digital conversion. The cost index assumes that the input quantization error is uniformly distributed over the least-significant-bit of the conversion. Formulas relating the cost index to the observer design parameters are presented. The cost index is minimized with respect to the design parameters using a conjugate gradient algorithm. An example of the theory is presented in which a digital observer is designed so that a satisfactory digital flight-control system is obtained starting from an unacceptable one.

  9. To Fly or Not to Fly: Teaching Advanced Secondary School Students about Principles of Flight in Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Renée B.; Bohland, Cynthia L.; Schmale, David G., III.

    2015-01-01

    Biological flight mechanics is typically taught in graduate level college classes rather than in secondary school classes. We developed an interdisciplinary unit for advanced upper-level secondary school students (ages 15-18) to teach the principles of flight and applications to biological systems. This unit capitalised on the tremendous…

  10. Dynamic planning of navigation determinations of airspace and missile objects in an automated flight test control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovtsov, D. A.; Karpov, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    This study considers an approach to planning navigation determinations of airspace and missile objects in the course of preparing for and carrying out an active flight test in an automated flight test control system. The approach is based on special information and mathematical software. The performance indices of the navigation determination subsystem are studied. Results of simulated modeling are provided.

  11. Comparative evaluation of Space Transportation System (STS)-3 flight and acoustic test random vibration response of the OSS-1 payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    On, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of the Space Transportation System (STS)-3 flight and acoustic test random vibration response of the Office of Space Science-1 (OSS-1) payload is presented. The results provide insight into the characteristics of vibroacoustic response of pallet payload components in the payload bay during STS flights.

  12. 46 CFR 119.422 - Integral and non-integral keel cooler installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integral and non-integral keel cooler installations. 119... MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 119.422 Integral and non-integral keel cooler... connections for a keel cooler installation. (e) Shutoff valves are not required for integral keel coolers. A...

  13. Analysis, Modeling and Dynamic Optimization of 3D Time-of-Flight Imaging Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the optimization of 3D Time-of-Flight (ToF) imaging systems. These novel cameras determine range images by actively illuminating a scene and measuring the time until the backscattered light is detected. Depth maps are constructed from multiple raw images. Usually two of such raw images are acquired simultaneously using special correlating sensors. This thesis covers four main contributions: A physical sensor model is presented which enables the analysis a...

  14. Evaluation of Management System Effectiveness in the Preparation of the Aircraft for Flight in Faulty Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdane Ruta

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Most flight delays in aviation enterprises are related to air traffic management and technical centers. This can happen for various reasons: untimely removal of defects, lack of spare parts, deficiencies in maintenance scheduling, etc. Another reason may be inefficient management in the system of preparing the aircraft for departure. The article suggests a possible option of such an assessment as well as the results obtained from the use of this methodology applied to a specific airline.

  15. Modeling the Fault Tolerant Capability of a Flight Control System: An Exercise in SCR Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Chris; Cortellessa, Vittorio; DelGobbo, Diego; Mili, Ali; Napolitano, Marcello

    2000-01-01

    In life-critical and mission-critical applications, it is important to make provisions for a wide range of contingencies, by providing means for fault tolerance. In this paper, we discuss the specification of a flight control system that is fault tolerant with respect to sensor faults. Redundancy is provided by analytical relations that hold between sensor readings; depending on the conditions, this redundancy can be used to detect, identify and accommodate sensor faults.

  16. In-Flight Suppression of a Destabilized F/A-18 Structural Mode Using the Space Launch System Adaptive Augmenting Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, John H.; VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Flight Control System (FCS) includes an Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) component which employs a multiplicative gain update law to enhance the performance and robustness of the baseline control system for extreme off nominal scenarios. The SLS FCS algorithm including AAC has been flight tested utilizing a specially outfitted F/A-18 fighter jet in which the pitch axis control of the aircraft was performed by a Non-linear Dynamic Inversion (NDI) controller, SLS reference models, and the SLS flight software prototype. This paper describes test cases from the research flight campaign in which the fundamental F/A-18 airframe structural mode was identified using frequency-domain reconstruction of flight data, amplified to result in closed loop instability, and suppressed in-flight by the SLS adaptive control system.

  17. In-Flight Suppression of an Unstable F/A-18 Structural Mode Using the Space Launch System Adaptive Augmenting Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Wall, John H.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Flight Control System (FCS) includes an Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) component which employs a multiplicative gain update law to enhance the performance and robustness of the baseline control system for extreme off-nominal scenarios. The SLS FCS algorithm including AAC has been flight tested utilizing a specially outfitted F/A-18 fighter jet in which the pitch axis control of the aircraft was performed by a Non-linear Dynamic Inversion (NDI) controller, SLS reference models, and the SLS flight software prototype. This paper describes test cases from the research flight campaign in which the fundamental F/A-18 airframe structural mode was identified using post-flight frequency-domain reconstruction, amplified to result in closed loop instability, and suppressed in-flight by the SLS adaptive control system.

  18. Flight results of attitude matching between Space Shuttle and Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) navigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treder, Alfred J.; Meldahl, Keith L.

    The recorded histories of Shuttle/Orbiter attitude and Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) attitude have been analyzed for all joint flights of the IUS in the Orbiter. This database was studied to determine the behavior of relative alignment between the IUS and Shuttle navigation systems. It is found that the overall accuracy of physical alignment has a Shuttle Orbiter bias component less than 5 arcmin/axis and a short-term stability upper bound of 0.5 arcmin/axis, both at 1 sigma. Summaries of the experienced physical and inertial alginment offsets are shown in this paper, together with alignment variation data, illustrated with some flight histories. Also included is a table of candidate values for some error source groups in an Orbiter/IUS attitude errror model. Experience indicates that the Shuttle is much more accurate and stable as an orbiting launch platform than has so far been advertised. This information will be valuable for future Shuttle payloads, especially those (such as the Aeroassisted Flight Experiment) which carry their own inertial navigation systems, and which could update or initialize their attitude determination systems using the Shuttle as the reference.

  19. A system architecture for long duration free floating flight for military applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epley, L.E. (CIRRUS Aerospace Corp., Burke, VA (USA))

    1990-08-31

    Accessibility is today's space frontier. Our need for wide-band global communications, earth imaging an sensing, atmospheric measurements and military reconnaissance is endless but growing dependence on space-based systems raises concerns about potential vulnerability. Military commanders want space assets more accessible and under direct local control. As a result, a robust and low cost access to space-like capability has become a national priority. Buoyant vehicles, free floating in the middle stratosphere could provide the kind of cost effective access to space-like capability needed for a verity of missions. These vehicles are inexpensive, invisible and easily launched. Developments in payload electronics, atmospheric wind modeling and materials combined with ever-improving communications and navigation infrastructure are making balloon-borne concepts more attractive. The fundamental question is whether a free floating balloon, used in a pseudo-satellite role, has value in a military system. Flight tests are ongoing under NASA sponsorship. Following these tests NASA intends to use the vehicles for research in the Antarctic. The concept is being reviewed by other agencies interested in stratospheric research. We believe that LDFFF systems have applications in areas of communications, surveillance and other traditional satellite missions. Dialogue with the broader community of space users is needed to expand the applications. This report reviews the status of the recent flight tests and presents an overview of the concept of Long Duration Free Floating Flight for military applications. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  20. The use of differential pressure feedback in an automatic flight control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, D. W.; Roskam, J.; Finn, P. D.

    1982-01-01

    A feasibility study has been performed to evaluate the performance of a system whereby a control surface is positioned with differential pressure as the feedback variable. Analogous to a position command system, the control surface is commanded to move until a certain differential pressure is achieved at a given point on the surface. Frequency response tests and theoretical considerations indicate that the pressure feedback transfer function is first order, with a break frequency up to 50 rad/sec. There exist applications to the outer loops of flight control systems as well. Stability augmentation, gust alleviation, and stall prevention appear to be possible by feeding back differential pressure across lifting and control surfaces.

  1. Zero phase error control based on neural compensation for flight simulator servo system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jinkun; He Peng; Er Lianjie

    2006-01-01

    Using the future desired input value, zero phase error controller enables the overall system's frequency response exhibit zero phase shift for all frequencies and a small gain error at low frequency range, and based on this, a new algorithm is presented to design the feedforward controller. However, zero phase error controller is only suitable for certain linear system. To reduce the tracking error and improve robustness, the design of the proposed feedforward controller uses a neural compensation based on diagonal recurrent neural network. Simulation and real-time control results for flight simulator servo system show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  2. 2nd Biennial Conference on Refrigeration for Cryogenic Sensors and Electronic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    1983-01-01

    This proceedings documents the output of the Second Biennial Conference on Refrigeration for Cryogenic Sensors and Electronic Systems held at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, on December 7-8, 1982. Building on the first open meeting hosted by the National Bureau of Standards in 1980, the focus of this second meeting was again on low-temperature, closed-cycle cooler technology. However, higher temperature coolers (77 K), with technology applicable to the low temperature coolers, were considered to be within the scope of this meeting. This second conference consisted of 30 papers presented by representatives of industry, government, and academia. The conference proceedings reproduced here was published by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt Maryland as NASA Conference Publication 2287.

  3. An Advanced Fly-By-Wire Flight Control System for the RASCAL Research Rotorcraft: Concept to Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rediess, Nicholas A.; Dones, Fernando; McManus, Bruce L.; Ulmer, Lon; Aiken, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Design features of a new fly-by-wire flight control system for the Rotorcraft-Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) are described. Using a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter as a baseline vehicle, the RASCAL will be a flying laboratory capable of supporting the research requirements of major NASA and Army guidance, control, and display research programs. The paper describes the research facility requirements of these pro-rams and the design implementation of the research flight control system (RFCS), with emphasis on safety-of-flight, adaptability to multiple requirements and performance considerations.

  4. Vibration Control of Linear Split Stirling Cryogenic Cooler for Airborne Infrared Application

    OpenAIRE

    A.M. Veprik; V.I. Babitsky; N. Pundak; S.V. Riabzev

    2000-01-01

    Modern infrared imagers often rely on the split Stirling cryogenic coolers the linear compressors of which are the well-known sources of harmonic disturbance. The traditional method of their passive isolation fails to meet the restraints on the static and dynamic deflections which are originated by the combined action of the airborne g-loading and harsh random vibration.The vibration protection system, which combines a stiff and heavily damped vibration isolator with tuned dynamic absorber, i...

  5. FPGA-BASED CONTROL OF THERMOELECTRIC COOLERS FOR LASER DIODE TEMPERATURE REGULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHTESHAM ALI

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The proportional-integral-derivative (PID controller is the most used controller in the industry. Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs allow efficient implementation of PID controllers. This paper presents the temperature regulation of a 48W laser diode through thermoelectric coolers (TECs. The temperature regulation system is designed and tested. The results demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of PID control through FPGA.

  6. X-38: Parachute Canister Fired from Plywood Mockup during Flight Termination System Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The canister containing a seven-foot-diameter X-38 Flight Termination System (FTS) parachute is launched safely away from a plywood mockup of the X-38 by a pyrotechnic firing system on December 19, 1996, at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The test was economically accomplished by mounting the mockup of the X-38's aft end, minus vertical stabilizers, on a truck prior to installation in the X-38. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally

  7. X-38: Plywood Mockup of Aft End Used for Flight Termination System Parachute Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows a plywood mockup of the X-38's aft end, minus vertical stabilizers, mounted on a truck for an economical test of the X-38's Flight Termination System (FTS) on December 19, 1996, at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The FTS seven-foot diameter parachute was launched safely away from the mockup by a pyrotechnic firing system. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be

  8. X-38: Close-up of Pyrotechnic Firing during Test of Flight Termination System Parachute Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    In these close-ups, the canister containing the seven-foot-diameter X-38 Flight Termination System (FTS) parachute can be seen launching safely away from an aft-end mockup of the X-38 by a pyrotechnic firing system in December 19, 1996, at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The test was economically accomplished by mounting the mockup of the X-38's aft-end, minus vertical stabilizers, on a truck prior to installation in the X-38. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research

  9. Flight and analytical investigations of a structural mode excitation system on the YF-12A airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, E. A.; Murphy, R. C.; Beranek, J. A.; Davis, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    A structural excitation system, using an oscillating canard vane to generate force, was mounted on the forebody of the YF-12A airplane. The canard vane was used to excite the airframe structural modes during flight in the subsonic, transonic, and supersonic regimes. Structural modal responses generated by the canard vane forces were measured at the flight test conditions by airframe-mounted accelerometers. Correlations of analytical and experimental aeroelastic results were made. Doublet lattice, steady state double lattice with uniform lag, Mach box, and piston theory all produced acceptable analytical aerodynamic results within the restrictions that apply to each. In general, the aerodynamic theory methods, carefully applied, were found to predict the dynamic behavior of the YF-12A aircraft adequately.

  10. Flight validation of an embedded structural health monitoring system for an unmanned aerial vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kressel, I.; Dorfman, B.; Botsev, Y.; Handelman, A.; Balter, J.; Pillai, A. C. R.; Prasad, M. H.; Gupta, N.; Joseph, A. M.; Sundaram, R.; Tur, M.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the design and flight validation of an embedded fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) based structural health monitoring (SHM) system for the Indian unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), Nishant. The embedding of the sensors was integrated with the manufacturing process, taking into account the trimming of parts and assembly considerations. Reliable flight data were recorded on board the vehicle and analyzed so that deviations from normal structural behaviors could be identified, evaluated and tracked. Based on the data obtained, it was possible to track both the loads and vibration signatures by direct sensors’ cross correlation using principal component analysis (PCA) and artificial neural networks (ANNs). Sensor placement combined with proper ground calibration, enabled the distinction between strain and temperature readings. The start of a minor local structural temporary instability was identified during landing, proving the value of such continuous structural airworthy assessment for UAV structures.

  11. Modeling Pilot Behavior for Assessing Integrated Alert and Notification Systems on Flight Decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover, Mathew; Schnell, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Numerous new flight deck configurations for caution, warning, and alerts can be conceived; yet testing them with human-in-the-Ioop experiments to evaluate each one would not be practical. New sensors, instruments, and displays are being put into cockpits every day and this is particularly true as we enter the dawn of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). By modeling pilot behavior in a computer simulation, an unlimited number of unique caution, warning, and alert configurations can be evaluated 24/7 by a computer. These computer simulations can then identify the most promising candidate formats to further evaluate in higher fidelity, but more costly, Human-in-the-Ioop (HITL) simulations. Evaluations using batch simulations with human performance models saves time, money, and enables a broader consideration of possible caution, warning, and alerting configurations for future flight decks.

  12. Observations of atmospheric effects for FALCON laser communication system flight test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, T. Matthew; Cunningham, James; Baber, Daniel; Wickholm, Dave; Goode, Timothy; Gaughan, Brian; Burgan, Stephen; Deck, Andrew; Young, David W.; Juarez, Juan; Sluz, Joseph; Cohen, Janette; Stallings, Patrick; Stadler, Brian K.

    2011-06-01

    Free-space optical communication terminals have been designed and extensively tested in various configurations. The FALCON terminals are designed to operate on large unmanned airborne vehicles (UAVs) or piloted aircraft. They provide a secure, two-way air-to-air and air-to-ground data link. In the latest flight test a successful 132km link was established. The beacon lasers operated at half of their available power, which was sufficient to establish and maintain link for the full flight track. The data and beacon links remained locked for approximately 30 minutes during which both aircraft turned, banked, and experienced air turbulence. This demonstration proved that laser communications is possible with tip-tilt correction as the primary control system compensation. It further demonstrated that compact, low cost free-space optical communications are now available for test and evaluation of operational scenarios.

  13. Flight Testing of an Advanced Airborne Natural Gas Leak Detection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawn Lenz; Raymond T. Lines; Darryl Murdock; Jeffrey Owen; Steven Stearns; Michael Stoogenke

    2005-10-01

    ITT Industries Space Systems Division (Space Systems) has developed an airborne natural gas leak detection system designed to detect, image, quantify, and precisely locate leaks from natural gas transmission pipelines. This system is called the Airborne Natural Gas Emission Lidar (ANGEL) system. The ANGEL system uses a highly sensitive differential absorption Lidar technology to remotely detect pipeline leaks. The ANGEL System is operated from a fixed wing aircraft and includes automatic scanning, pointing system, and pilot guidance systems. During a pipeline inspection, the ANGEL system aircraft flies at an elevation of 1000 feet above the ground at speeds of between 100 and 150 mph. Under this contract with DOE/NETL, Space Systems was funded to integrate the ANGEL sensor into a test aircraft and conduct a series of flight tests over a variety of test targets including simulated natural gas pipeline leaks. Following early tests in upstate New York in the summer of 2004, the ANGEL system was deployed to Casper, Wyoming to participate in a set of DOE-sponsored field tests at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). At RMOTC the Space Systems team completed integration of the system and flew an operational system for the first time. The ANGEL system flew 2 missions/day for the duration for the 5-day test. Over the course of the week the ANGEL System detected leaks ranging from 100 to 5,000 scfh.

  14. Numerical analysis of thermal effects in semiconductor disk laser with TEC cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Renjiang; Zhang, Peng; Jiang, Maohua

    2016-11-01

    Based on generalized heat transfer model of thermoelectric cooler(TEC), the heat management model of semiconductor disk laser with TEC cooler has been built. With finite element method, this article has calculated the temperature distribution characteristics, and studied the effects of TEC current, heat exchange coefficient, the heatsink and the pump laser for the maximum temperature of quantum wells. Calculations show that the heat transfer coefficient significantly affects the ability of the TEC temperature shift, cooling system performance which is nearly inversely proportional to the heatsink thermal conductivity is not sensitive to its the thickness variation, and the performance of oxygen-free copper with optimization of the area is close to diamond. Meanwhile the maximum temperature of the quantum well has a linear relationship with the pump power, and increasing the pump spot size is an effective way to increase the optical power output

  15. RFQ beam cooler and buncher for collinear laser spectroscopy of rare isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquest, B. R.; Bollen, G.; Mantica, P. F.; Minamisono, K.; Ringle, R.; Schwarz, S.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.

    2017-09-01

    A radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) ion beam cooler and buncher has been developed to deliver bunched beams with low transverse emittance, energy spread, and time spread to the BECOLA collinear laser spectroscopy system at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University. The beam cooler and buncher contains new features which enhance performance, especially for high count rate beams, as well as simplifying construction, maintenance, and operation. The transverse emittance, energy spread, and time spread of the bunched beam, as well as buncher efficiency are reported, showcasing the capabilities of the BECOLA facility to perform collinear laser spectroscopy measurements with bunched rare isotope beams at NSCL and at the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB).

  16. Examples of cost reduction and energy saving by thermal storage heat pump system. Part 5. Control of the flowering season of alstroemeria by using 'ice storage ground cooler'. Chikunetsushiki heat pump system katsuyo ni yoru costdown sho energy jirei no shokai. 5. 'Kori chikunetsushiki chichu reikyaku sochi' ni yori arusutoromeria no kaika jiki wo chosetsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-07-01

    Alstroemeria has a habit to flower by sensing temperature through an organ in rhizome. Since its market price is higher in late fall and early winter, a culture method cooling the ground in summer is in wide use. Although the ground is cooled with an equipment composed of a chiller, ground piping for heat exchange and cold water pump during the whole day, cost reduction is a major problem. To study a heat storage ground cooler, its culture test was made by using a prototype ice storage ground cooler. The test result showed that ground temperature of both test zone and reference zone was constantly 18-20 degrees C during the test period, and both the whole yield and that every class were nearly equivalent between the test and reference zones. The estimation result on the profitability of a full-scale ice storage ground cooler based on the above result showed that this ground cooler probably can reduce annual electric charge by nearly 200,000 yen as compared with a cooler without heat storage. (NEDO)

  17. Examples of cost reduction and energy saving by thermal storage heat pump system. Part 5. Control of the flowering season of alstroemeria by using `ice storage ground cooler`; Chikunetsushiki heat pump system katsuyo ni yoru costdown sho energy jirei no shokai. 5. `Kori chikunetsushiki chichu reikyaku sochi` ni yori arusutoromeria no kaika jiki wo chosetsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Alstroemeria has a habit to flower by sensing temperature through an organ in rhizome. Since its market price is higher in late fall and early winter, a culture method cooling the ground in summer is in wide use. Although the ground is cooled with an equipment composed of a chiller, ground piping for heat exchange and cold water pump during the whole day, cost reduction is a major problem. To study a heat storage ground cooler, its culture test was made by using a prototype ice storage ground cooler. The test result showed that ground temperature of both test zone and reference zone was constantly 18-20 degrees C during the test period, and both the whole yield and that every class were nearly equivalent between the test and reference zones. The estimation result on the profitability of a full-scale ice storage ground cooler based on the above result showed that this ground cooler probably can reduce annual electric charge by nearly 200,000 yen as compared with a cooler without heat storage. (NEDO)

  18. Micro-cooler enhancements by barrier interface analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen, A.; Dunn, G. M. [Department of Physics, University of Aberdeen, King' s College, AB24 3UE Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Glover, J.; Oxley, C. H. [Department of Engineering, De Montfort University, Gateway, LE1 9BH Leicester (United Kingdom); Bajo, M. Montes; Kuball, M. [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, BS8 1TL Bristol (United Kingdom); Cumming, D. R. S.; Khalid, A. [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Rankine Building, G12 8LT Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    A novel gallium arsenide (GaAs) based micro-cooler design, previously analysed both experimentally and by an analytical Heat Transfer (HT) model, has been simulated using a self-consistent Ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) model for a more in depth analysis of the thermionic cooling in the device. The best fit to the experimental data was found and was used in conjunction with the HT model to estimate the cooler-contact resistance. The cooling results from EMC indicated that the cooling power of the device is highly dependent on the charge distribution across the leading interface. Alteration of this charge distribution via interface extensions on the nanometre scale has shown to produce significant changes in cooler performance.

  19. Micro-cooler enhancements by barrier interface analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stephen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel gallium arsenide (GaAs based micro-cooler design, previously analysed both experimentally and by an analytical Heat Transfer (HT model, has been simulated using a self-consistent Ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC model for a more in depth analysis of the thermionic cooling in the device. The best fit to the experimental data was found and was used in conjunction with the HT model to estimate the cooler-contact resistance. The cooling results from EMC indicated that the cooling power of the device is highly dependent on the charge distribution across the leading interface. Alteration of this charge distribution via interface extensions on the nanometre scale has shown to produce significant changes in cooler performance.

  20. New Regenerator Materials for use in pulse tube coolers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Kashani; B.P.M. Helvensteijn; P. Kittel; K.A. Gschneidner,jr; V.K. Pecharsky; A.O. Pecharsky

    2004-09-30

    A two-stage pulse tube cooler driven by a linear compressor is being developed to provide cooling at 20 K. The first stage of the cooler will have the conventional stainless steel screen regenerator matrix. The matrix for the second stage regenerator (<60 K) will be made from a new class of Er based alloys which was recently developed at Ames Laboratory, in Ames, Iowa. These alloys exhibit heat capacities that exceed that of all other materials, including lead, over a Wide range in temperature (15 K < T C 85 K). The performance of one such alloy was shown to be better than lead when tested in a single-stage pulse tube cooler driven by a G-M compressor and operating at 2 Hz. An effort is underway to establish their suitability at frequencies above 40 IIZ. An approach to testing these alloys at low temperatures while using a low-power linear compressor is presented.