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Sample records for cooled cfc armoured

  1. Comparison between actively cooled divertor dump plates with beryllium and CFC armour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falter, H.D.; Araki, M.; Sato, K.; Suzuki, S.; Cardella, A.

    1995-01-01

    Actively cooled test sections with beryllium and graphite armour all withstand power densities between 15 and 20 MW/m 2 . Beryllium as structural material fails mechanically at low power densities. Monoblocks appear to be the most rigid design but frequently large variations in surface temperature are observed. All other test sections show a uniform surface temperature distribution. (orig.)

  2. Initiation and propagation of damage in actively cooled CFC armoured high heat flux components in fusion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevet, G.; Schlosser, J.; Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G.; Escourbiac, F.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) in magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines are armoured with carbon fibre composite (CFC) bonded to a copper alloy heat sink. The manufacturing process induces high level of residual stresses due to the thermal expansion mismatch between CFC and copper and PFCs have to withstand strong stress ranges during operation. To study the initiation and propagation of damage in the CFC part, the ONERA damage model is used to describe the behaviour of the N11 material. The finite element simulations show that the damage is located near the interface and develops during the manufacturing of the PFCs as a consequence of the high amplitude of shear stresses. Under high heat flux, stresses decrease and the damage does not evolve. Further studies will take into account the damageable behaviour of the composite/copper interface, which will lead to geometrical optimisations and better knowledge of the link between damage and conductivity.

  3. Application of lock-in thermography non destructive technique to CFC armoured plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escourbiac, F.; Constans, S.; Courtois, X.; Durocher, A.

    2007-01-01

    A non destructive testing technique - so called modulated photothermal thermography or lock-in thermography - has been set-up for plasma facing components examination. Reliable measurements of phase contrast were obtained on 8 mm carbon fiber composite (CFC) armoured W7-X divertor component with calibrated flaws. A 3D finite element analysis allowed the correlation of the measured phase contrast and showed that a 4 mm strip flaw can be detected at the CFC/copper interface

  4. Towards the development of workable acceptance criteria for the divertor CFC monoblock armour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Agata, E. [ITER International Team, ITER Joint Work Site, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: dagatae@itereu.de; Tivey, R. [ITER International Team, ITER Joint Work Site, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2005-11-15

    The plasma-facing components (PFCs) of the ITER divertor will be subjected to high heat flux (HHF). Carbon-fibre composite (CFC) is selected as the armour for the region of highest heat flux where the scrape-off layer of the plasma intercepts the vertical targets (VT). Failure of the armour to heat sink joints will compromise the performance of the divertor and could ultimately result in its failure and the shut down of the ITER machine. There are tens of thousands of CFCs to CuCrZr joints. The aim of the PFC design is to ensure that the divertor can continue to function even with the failure of a few joints. In preparation for writing the procurement specification for the ITER vertical target PFCs, a programme of work is underway with the objective of defining workable acceptance criteria for the PFC armour joints.

  5. Towards the development of workable acceptance criteria for the divertor CFC monoblock armour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agata, E.; Tivey, R.

    2005-01-01

    The plasma-facing components (PFCs) of the ITER divertor will be subjected to high heat flux (HHF). Carbon-fibre composite (CFC) is selected as the armour for the region of highest heat flux where the scrape-off layer of the plasma intercepts the vertical targets (VT). Failure of the armour to heat sink joints will compromise the performance of the divertor and could ultimately result in its failure and the shut down of the ITER machine. There are tens of thousands of CFCs to CuCrZr joints. The aim of the PFC design is to ensure that the divertor can continue to function even with the failure of a few joints. In preparation for writing the procurement specification for the ITER vertical target PFCs, a programme of work is underway with the objective of defining workable acceptance criteria for the PFC armour joints

  6. CFC environmental problems and cooling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornung, M.O.

    1991-08-01

    The aim of the report is to provide a broad survey of the technological problems imposed on the production of cooling systems by the demands for reduction in the use of chlorofluorocarbons as refrigerants. With regard to industrial research in this area the present situation is clarified and possible future developments are discussed. The influence of CFC gasses on the global environment and international and national legislation within this field are explained. Alternative refrigerants and cooling processes, and ways of reducing refrigerant leakage, are described. It is concluded that currently the use of alternative refrigerants is the policy which is generally accepted, and intensive research is being carried out in this field. R134a should substitute R12 in the cases of household refrigerators and air conditioning, and will soon be commercially available. The use of R22 and ammonia will be extended. This is a practical policy to follow up commercially, whereas the policy of alternative processes presents more problems because they are not so developed and there is less available know-how in this area. The possibilities for hermetic sealing of cooling systems are unrealistic and should anyway be regarded only as a supplement to alternative refrigerants. Within the European Community it is intended to provide standards and regulations in relation to air pollution from refrigerants. (AB) (58 refs.)

  7. Damage prediction of carbon fibre composite armoured actively cooled plasma-facing components under cycling heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevet, G; Schlosser, J; Courtois, X; Escourbiac, F; Missirlian, M; Herb, V; Martin, E; Camus, G; Braccini, M

    2009-01-01

    In order to predict the lifetime of carbon fibre composite (CFC) armoured plasma-facing components in magnetic fusion devices, it is necessary to analyse the damage mechanisms and to model the damage propagation under cycling heat loads. At Tore Supra studies have been launched to better understand the damage process of the armoured flat tile elements of the actively cooled toroidal pump limiter, leading to the characterization of the damageable mechanical behaviour of the used N11 CFC material and of the CFC/Cu bond. Up until now the calculations have shown damage developing in the CFC (within the zone submitted to high shear stress) and in the bond (from the free edge of the CFC/Cu interface). Damage is due to manufacturing shear stresses and does not evolve under heat due to stress relaxation. For the ITER divertor, NB31 material has been characterized and the characterization of NB41 is in progress. Finite element calculations show again the development of CFC damage in the high shear stress zones after manufacturing. Stresses also decrease under heat flux so the damage does not evolve. The characterization of the CFC/Cu bond is more complex due to the monoblock geometry, which leads to more scattered stresses. These calculations allow the fabrication difficulties to be better understood and will help to analyse future high heat flux tests on various mock-ups.

  8. CFC/Cu bond damage in actively cooled plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, J; Martin, E; Henninger, C; Boscary, J; Camus, G; Escourbiac, F; Leguillon, D; Missirlian, M; Mitteau, R

    2007-01-01

    Carbon fibre composite (CFC) armours have been successfully used for actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs) of the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak. They were also selected for the divertor of the stellarator W7-X under construction and for the vertical target of the ITER divertor. In TS and W7-X a flat tile design for heat fluxes of 10 MW m -2 has been chosen. To predict the lifetime of such PFCs, it is necessary to analyse the damage mechanisms and to model the damage propagation when the component is exposed to thermal cycling loads. Work has been performed to identify a constitutive law for the CFC and parameters to model crack propagation from the edge singularity. The aim is to predict damage rates and to propose geometric or material improvements to increase the strength and the lifetime of the interfacial bond. For ITER a tube-in-tile concept (monoblock), designed to sustain heat fluxes up to 20 MW m -2 , has been developed. The optimization of the CFC/Cu bond, proposed for flat tiles, could be adopted for the monoblock concept

  9. Modelling of steady state erosion of CFC actively water-cooled mock-up for the ITER divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogorodnikova, O.V. [Departement de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, Association Euratom-CEA, CEA-Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance cedex (France)], E-mail: igra32@rambler.ru

    2008-04-15

    Calculations of the physical and chemical erosion of CFC (carbon fibre composite) monoblocks as outer vertical target of the ITER divertor during normal operation regimes have been done. Off-normal events and ELM's are not considered here. For a set of components under thermal and particles loads at glancing incident angle, variations in the material properties and/or assembly of defects could result in different erosion of actively-cooled components and, thus, in temperature instabilities. Operation regimes where the temperature instability takes place are investigated. It is shown that the temperature and erosion instabilities, probably, are not a critical point for the present design of ITER vertical target if a realistic variation of material properties is assumed, namely, the difference in the thermal conductivities of the neighbouring monoblocks is 20% and the maximum allowable size of a defect between CFC armour and cooling tube is +/-90{sup o} in circumferential direction from the apex.

  10. Modelling of steady state erosion of CFC actively water-cooled mock-up for the ITER divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.

    2008-04-01

    Calculations of the physical and chemical erosion of CFC (carbon fibre composite) monoblocks as outer vertical target of the ITER divertor during normal operation regimes have been done. Off-normal events and ELM's are not considered here. For a set of components under thermal and particles loads at glancing incident angle, variations in the material properties and/or assembly of defects could result in different erosion of actively-cooled components and, thus, in temperature instabilities. Operation regimes where the temperature instability takes place are investigated. It is shown that the temperature and erosion instabilities, probably, are not a critical point for the present design of ITER vertical target if a realistic variation of material properties is assumed, namely, the difference in the thermal conductivities of the neighbouring monoblocks is 20% and the maximum allowable size of a defect between CFC armour and cooling tube is +/-90° in circumferential direction from the apex.

  11. Flat Tile Armour Cooled by Hypervapotron Tube: a Possible Technology for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Bayetti, P.; Missirlian, M.; Mitteau, R. [Association Euratom CEA, DSM/DRFC/SIPP, St Paul lez Durance (France); Merola, M. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany); Schedler, B. [Plansee Aktiengesellschaft, Reutte (Austria). Technology Center; Bobin-Vastra, I. [Framatome-ANP, Le Creusot (France). Centre Technique

    2004-08-01

    Carbon fibre composite (CFC) flat tile armours for actively cooled plasma facing components (PFC's) are an important challenge for controlled fusion machines. Flat tile concepts, water cooled by tubes, were studied, developed, tested and finally operated with success in Tore Supra. The components were designed for 10MW/m{sup 2} and mock-ups were successfully fatigue tested at 15MW/m{sup 2}; 1000 cycles. For ITER, a tube-in-tile concept was developed and mock-ups sustained up to 25MW/m{sup 2} for 1000 cycles without failure. Recently flat tile armoured mock-ups cooled by a hypervapotron tube successfully sustained a cascade failure test under a mean heat flux of 10MW/m{sup 2} but with a doubling of the heat flux on some tiles to simulate missing tiles (500 cycles). This encouraging results lead to reconsider the limits for flat tile concept when cooled by hypervapotron (HV) tube. New tests are now scheduled to investigate these limits in regard to the ITER requirements. Experimental evidence of the concept could be gained in Tore Supra by installing a new limiter into the machine.

  12. Flat Tile Armour Cooled by Hypervapotron Tube: a Possible Technology for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Merola, M.; Schedler, B.; Bayetti, P.; Missirlian, M.; Mitteau, R.; Robin-Vastra, I.

    Carbon fibre composite (CFC) flat tile armours for actively cooled plasma facing components (PFC’s) are an important challenge for controlled fusion machines. Flat tile concepts, water cooled by tubes, were studied, developed, tested and finally operated with success in Tore Supra. The components were designed for 10 MW/m2 and mock-ups were successfully fatigue tested at 15 MW/m2, 1000 cycles. For ITER, a tube-in-tile concept was developed and mock-ups sustained up to 25 MW/m2 for 1000 cycles without failure. Recently flat tile armoured mock-ups cooled by a hypervapotron tube successfully sustained a cascade failure test under a mean heat flux of 10 MW/m2 but with a doubling of the heat flux on some tiles to simulate missing tiles (500 cycles). This encouraging results lead to reconsider the limits for flat tile concept when cooled by hypervapotron (HV) tube. New tests are now scheduled to investigate these limits in regard to the ITER requirements. Experimental evidence of the concept could be gained in Tore Supra by installing a new limiter into the machine.

  13. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G., E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Martin, E., E-mail: martin@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Boscary, J., E-mail: jean.boscary@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Camus, G., E-mail: camus@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Herb, V., E-mail: herb@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Schlosser, J., E-mail: jacques.schlosser@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F., E-mail: frederic.escourbiac@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Missirlian, M., E-mail: marc.missirlian@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2011-10-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  14. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevet, G.; Martin, E.; Boscary, J.; Camus, G.; Herb, V.; Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Missirlian, M.

    2011-01-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  15. Flat tile armour cooled by hypervapotron tube: a possible technology for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Bayetti, P.; Missirlian, M.; Mitteau, R. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Merola, M. [European Fusion Development Agreement - Close Support Unit (EFDA), Garching (Germany); Schedler, B. [Plansee Aktiengesellschaft, Technology Center, Reutte/Tirol (Austria); Bobin-Vastra, I. [FRAMATOME-ANP, Centre Technique, 71 - Le Creusot (France)

    2003-07-01

    Carbon fibre composite (CFC) flat tile armours for actively cooled plasma facing components (PFC's) are an important challenge for controlled fusion machine. Flat tile concepts, water cooled by tubes, were studied, developed, tested and finally experienced with success in Tore Supra. The components were designed for 10 MW/m{sup 2} and mock-ups were successfully fatigue tested at 15 MW/m{sup 2}, 1000 cycles. For ITER, a tube-in-tile concept was developed and mock-ups sustained up to 25 MW/m{sup 2} for 1000 cycles without failure. Recently flat tile armored mock-ups cooled by Hypervapotron tube successfully sustained a cascade failure test under a mean heat flux of 10 MW/m{sup 2} but with a doubling of the heat flux on some tiles to simulate missing tiles (500 cycles). This encouraging results lead to reconsider the limits for flat tile concept when cooled by Hypervapotron tube. New tests are now scheduled to investigate these limits notably in regards to the ITER requirements. The concept could also be experimented in Tore Supra by installing a new limiter into the machine. (authors)

  16. Flat tile armour cooled by hypervapotron tube: a possible technology for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Bayetti, P.; Missirlian, M.; Mitteau, R.; Schedler, B.; Bobin-Vastra, I.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon fibre composite (CFC) flat tile armours for actively cooled plasma facing components (PFC's) are an important challenge for controlled fusion machine. Flat tile concepts, water cooled by tubes, were studied, developed, tested and finally experienced with success in Tore Supra. The components were designed for 10 MW/m 2 and mock-ups were successfully fatigue tested at 15 MW/m 2 , 1000 cycles. For ITER, a tube-in-tile concept was developed and mock-ups sustained up to 25 MW/m 2 for 1000 cycles without failure. Recently flat tile armored mock-ups cooled by Hypervapotron tube successfully sustained a cascade failure test under a mean heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 but with a doubling of the heat flux on some tiles to simulate missing tiles (500 cycles). This encouraging results lead to reconsider the limits for flat tile concept when cooled by Hypervapotron tube. New tests are now scheduled to investigate these limits notably in regards to the ITER requirements. The concept could also be experimented in Tore Supra by installing a new limiter into the machine. (authors)

  17. Improvement of non destructive infrared test bed SATIR for examination of actively cooled tungsten armour Plasma Facing Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignal, N., E-mail: nicolas.vignal@cea.fr; Desgranges, C.; Cantone, V.; Richou, M.; Courtois, X.; Missirlian, M.; Magaud, Ph.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Non destructive infrared techniques for control ITER like PFCs. • Reflective surface such as W induce a measurement temperature error. • Numerical data processing by evaluation of the local emissivity. • SATIR test bed can control metallic surface with low and variable emissivity. -- Abstract: For steady state (magnetic) thermonuclear fusion devices which need large power exhaust capability and have to withstand heat fluxes in the range 10–20 MW m{sup −2}, advanced Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) have been developed. The importance of PFCs for operating tokamaks requests to verify their manufacturing quality before mounting. SATIR is an IR test bed validated and recognized as a reliable and suitable tool to detect cooling defaults on PFCs with CFC armour material. Current tokamak developments implement metallic armour materials for first wall and divertor; their low emissivity causes several difficulties for infrared thermography control. We present SATIR infrared thermography test bed improvements for W monoblocks components without defect and with calibrated defects. These results are compared to ultrasonic inspection. This study demonstrates that SATIR method is fully usable for PFCs with low emissivity armour material.

  18. Improvement of non destructive infrared test bed SATIR for examination of actively cooled tungsten armour Plasma Facing Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignal, N.; Desgranges, C.; Cantone, V.; Richou, M.; Courtois, X.; Missirlian, M.; Magaud, Ph.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Non destructive infrared techniques for control ITER like PFCs. • Reflective surface such as W induce a measurement temperature error. • Numerical data processing by evaluation of the local emissivity. • SATIR test bed can control metallic surface with low and variable emissivity. -- Abstract: For steady state (magnetic) thermonuclear fusion devices which need large power exhaust capability and have to withstand heat fluxes in the range 10–20 MW m −2 , advanced Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) have been developed. The importance of PFCs for operating tokamaks requests to verify their manufacturing quality before mounting. SATIR is an IR test bed validated and recognized as a reliable and suitable tool to detect cooling defaults on PFCs with CFC armour material. Current tokamak developments implement metallic armour materials for first wall and divertor; their low emissivity causes several difficulties for infrared thermography control. We present SATIR infrared thermography test bed improvements for W monoblocks components without defect and with calibrated defects. These results are compared to ultrasonic inspection. This study demonstrates that SATIR method is fully usable for PFCs with low emissivity armour material

  19. Numerical simulation of CFC and tungsten target erosion in ITER-FEAT divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filatov, V.

    2003-01-01

    Physical, chemical and thermal surface erosion for water-cooled target armoured by CFC and tungsten is simulated by numerical code ERosion OF Immolated Layer (EROFIL-1). Some calculation results on the CFC and tungsten vertical target (VT) erosion in the ITER-FEAT divertor are presented for various operation modes (normal operations, slow transients, ELMs and disruptions). The main erosion mechanisms of CFC armour are the chemical and sublimation ones. Maximum erosion depth per 3000 cycles during normal operations and slow transients is of 2.7 mm at H phase and of 13.5 mm at DT phase. An evaluation of VT tungsten armour erosion per 3000 cycles of H and DT operations shows that no physical or chemical erosion as well as no melting are expected for tungsten armour at normal operations and slow transients. The tungsten armour melting at 2x10 6 ELMs is not allowable. The 300 disruptions are not dangerous in view of evaporation

  20. Safety characteristics of the monolithic CFC divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.; Merola, M.; Matera, R.

    1994-01-01

    The main distinguishing feature of the monolithic CFC divertor is the use of a single material, a carbon fibre reinforced carbon, for the protective armour, the heat sink and the cooling channels. This removes joint interface problems which are one of the most important concerns related to the reference solutions of the ITER CDA divertor. An activation analysis of the different coolant options for this concept is presented. It turns out that neither short-term nor long-term activation are a concern for any coolants investigated. Therefore the proposed concept proves to be attractive from a safety stand-point also. ((orig.))

  1. Safety characteristics of the monolithic CFC divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchetti, M.; Merola, M.; Matera, R.

    1994-09-01

    The main distinguishing feature of the monolithic CFC divertor is the use of a single material, a carbon fibre reinforced carbon, for the protective armour, the heat sink and the cooling channels. This removes joint interface problems which are one of the most important concerns related to the reference solutions of the ITER CDA divertor. An activation analysis of the different coolant options for this concept is presented. It turns out that neither short-term nor long-term activation are a concern for any coolants investigated. Therefore the proposed concept proves to be attractive from a safety stand-point also.

  2. Progress in the design of mechanically attached, conductively cooled low-Z armour tiles for the NET integrated first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.; Vieider, G.

    1991-01-01

    For the NET device complete or extensive coverage of the first wall with a low-Z armour is envisaged. This armour may comprise a general protection, ∝90% total first-wall surface, of low-temperature conductively cooled tiles, complemented by a local protection of radiatively cooled tiles in regions where near peak fluxes are incident. A low-temperature (∝1000deg C) carbon-based armour, cooled via conduction to the reference NET integrated first wall, has been developed using currently available materials. The armour comprises a small square tile fabricated in high-conductivity 3-D or random-fibre carbon fibre reinforced carbon composite attached to the steel first wall via a stainless-steel/refractory metal stud assembly. Attachment forces are maintained within acceptable limits, particularly during baking, through material selection and component geometry. To ensure effective heat transfer throughout the duty cycle an intermediate conductive layer of a highly compliant material is foreseen. The scope of the paper covers the design of the armour assembly for proof of principle testing with the NET first-wall test section, TS1, and reports the results of supporting thermomechanical analyses. (orig.)

  3. Pre-Brazed Casting and Hot Radial Pressing: A Reliable Process for the Manufacturing of CFC and W Monoblock Mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visca, E.; Libera, S.; Mancini, A.; Mazzone, G.; Pizzuto, A.; Testani, C.

    2006-01-01

    ENEA association is involved in the European International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) R-and-D activities and in particular for the manufacturing of high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC), such as the divertor targets, the baffles and the limiters: During the last years ENEA has manufactured actively cooled mock-ups by using different technologies, namely brazing, diffusion bonding and hot isostatic pressing (HIPping). A new manufacturing process has been set up and tested. It was successfully applied for the manufacturing of W armoured monoblock mockups. This technique is the HRP (Hot Radial Pressing) based on performing a radial diffusion bonding between the cooling tube and the armour tile by pressurizing only the internal tube and by keeping the joining zone in vacuum and at the required bonding temperature. The heating is obtained by a standard air furnace. The next step was to apply the HRP technique for the manufacturing of CFC armoured monoblock components. For this purpose some issues have to be solved like as the low CFC tensile strength, the pure copper interlayer between the heat sink and the armour necessary to mitigate the stress at the joint interface and the low wettability of the pure copper on the CFC matrix. This paper reports the research path followed to manufacture a medium scale vertical target CFC and W armoured mockup by HRP. An ad hoc rig able to maintain the CFC in a compressive constant condition was also designed and tested. The casting of a soft copper interlayer between the tube and the tile was performed by a new technique: the Pre-Brazed Casting (PBC, ENEA patent). Some mock-ups with three NB31 CFC tiles were successfully manufactured and tested to thermal fatigue using electron beam facilities. They all reached at least 1000 cycles at 20 MW/m 2 without suffering any damage. The manufactured medium scale vertical target mock-up is now under testing at the FE2000 (France) facility. (author)

  4. Non-destructive testing of CFC/Cu joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casalegno, V.; Ferraris, M.; Salvo, M.; Vesprini, R.; Merola, M.

    2006-01-01

    Reliable non-destructive tests (NDT) are fundamental for the manufacturing of ITER components, especially for high heat flux plasma facing components. NDT include various techniques, which allow inspection of a component without impairing serviceability; it's important to detect and characterize defects (type, size and position) as well as the set-up of acceptance standards in order to predict their influence on the component performance in service conditions. The present study shows a description of NDT used to assess the manufacturing quality of CFC (carbon fibre reinforced carbon matrix composites)/Cu/CuCrZr joints. In the ITER divertor, armor tiles made of CFC are joined to the cooling structure made of precipitation hardened copper alloy CuCrZr; a soft pure Cu interlayer is required between the heat sink and the armour in order to mitigate the stresses at the joint interface. NDT on CFC/Cu joint are difficult because of the different behavior of CFC and copper with regard to physical excitations (e.g. ultrasonic wave) used to test the component; furthermore the response to this input must be accurately studied to identify the detachment of CFC tiles from Cu alloy. The inspected CFC/Cu/CuCrZr joints were obtained through direct casting of pure Cu on modified CFC surface and subsequently through brazing of CFC/Cu joints to CuCrZr by a Cu-based alloy. Different non-destructive methods were used for inspecting these joints: lock-in thermography, ultrasonic inspections, microtomography and microradiography. The NDT tests were followed by metallographic investigation on the samples, since the reliability of a certain non destructive test can be only validated by morphological evidence of the detected defects. This study will undertake a direct comparison of NDT used on CFC/Cu joints in terms of real flaws presence. The purpose of this work is to detect defects at the joining interface as well as in the cast copper ( for instance voids). The experimental work was

  5. Pre-brazed casting and hot radial pressing: A reliable process for the manufacturing of CFC and W monoblock mock-ups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visca, Eliseo [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi, 45, IT-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy)], E-mail: visca@frascati.enea.it; Libera, S.; Mancini, A.; Mazzone, G.; Pizzuto, A. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi, 45, IT-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Testani, C. [CSM S.p.A., IT-00128 Castel Romano, RM (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    ENEA is involved in the European International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) R and D activities and, in particular, for the manufacturing of high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC), such as the divertor targets, the baffles and the limiters. During last years, ENEA has manufactured actively cooled mock-ups by using different technologies, namely brazing, diffusion bonding and hot isostatic pressing (HIPping). A new manufacturing process has been set up and tested. It was successfully applied for the manufacturing of W armoured monoblock mock-ups. This technique is the HRP (hot radial pressing) based on performing a radial diffusion bonding between the cooling tube and the armour tile by pressurizing only internal tube and by keeping the joining zone in vacuum at the required bonding temperature. The heating is obtained by a standard air furnace. The HRP technique is now used for the manufacturing of CFC armoured monoblock components. For this purpose, some issues have to be faced, like the low CFC tensile strength, the pure copper interlayer between the heat sink and the armour necessary to mitigate the stress at the joint interface, and the low wettability of the pure copper on the CFC matrix. This paper reports the research path followed to manufacture a medium scale vertical target CFC and W armoured mock-up by HRP. A casting of a soft copper interlayer between the tube and the tile was obtained by a new technique: the pre-brazed casting (PBC, ENEA patent). Some preliminary mock-ups with three NB31 CFC tiles were successfully manufactured and tested to thermal fatigue using electron beam facilities. They all reached at least 1000 cycles at 20 MW/m{sup 2} without suffering any damage. The manufactured medium scale vertical target mock-up is now under testing at the FE2000 (France) facility. These activities were performed in the frame of ITER-EFDA contracts.

  6. Pre-brazed casting and hot radial pressing: A reliable process for the manufacturing of CFC and W monoblock mock-ups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visca, Eliseo; Libera, S.; Mancini, A.; Mazzone, G.; Pizzuto, A.; Testani, C.

    2007-01-01

    ENEA is involved in the European International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) R and D activities and, in particular, for the manufacturing of high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC), such as the divertor targets, the baffles and the limiters. During last years, ENEA has manufactured actively cooled mock-ups by using different technologies, namely brazing, diffusion bonding and hot isostatic pressing (HIPping). A new manufacturing process has been set up and tested. It was successfully applied for the manufacturing of W armoured monoblock mock-ups. This technique is the HRP (hot radial pressing) based on performing a radial diffusion bonding between the cooling tube and the armour tile by pressurizing only internal tube and by keeping the joining zone in vacuum at the required bonding temperature. The heating is obtained by a standard air furnace. The HRP technique is now used for the manufacturing of CFC armoured monoblock components. For this purpose, some issues have to be faced, like the low CFC tensile strength, the pure copper interlayer between the heat sink and the armour necessary to mitigate the stress at the joint interface, and the low wettability of the pure copper on the CFC matrix. This paper reports the research path followed to manufacture a medium scale vertical target CFC and W armoured mock-up by HRP. A casting of a soft copper interlayer between the tube and the tile was obtained by a new technique: the pre-brazed casting (PBC, ENEA patent). Some preliminary mock-ups with three NB31 CFC tiles were successfully manufactured and tested to thermal fatigue using electron beam facilities. They all reached at least 1000 cycles at 20 MW/m 2 without suffering any damage. The manufactured medium scale vertical target mock-up is now under testing at the FE2000 (France) facility. These activities were performed in the frame of ITER-EFDA contracts

  7. Improvement of the CFC structure to withstand high heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestchanyi, S.; Landman, I.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of the peculiarities of the erosion of NB31 CFC allowed proposition of a new CFC fibre structure for considerable reduction of the erosion rate. The improvement concerns the needling and vowing fibres arrangement only and keeping the same structure of the pitch fibres - the main heat conducting component of NB31. The needling and the vowing fibres of the improved structure provide the armour stiffness, comparable to that of NB31. Numerical simulation of erosion for CFC with the improved structure has confirmed that the erosion rate is four to five times lower in comparison with that of NB31

  8. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G. [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)], E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr; Schlosser, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G. [Universite Bordeaux 1, UMR 5801 (CNRS-SAFRAN-CEA-UB1), Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2009-03-31

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load.

  9. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevet, G.; Schlosser, J.; Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G.

    2009-03-01

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load.

  10. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevet, G.; Schlosser, J.; Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load

  11. Divertor armour issues: lifetime, safety and influence on ITER performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestchanyi, S.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive simulations of the ITER divertor armour vaporization and brittle destruction under ELMs of different sizes have revealed that the erosion rate of CFC armour is intolerable for an industrial reactor, but it can be considerably reduced by the armour fibre structure optimization. The ITER core contamination with carbon is tolerable for medium size ELMs, but large type I ELM can run the confinement into the disruption. Erosion of tungsten, an alternative armour material, under ELMs influence is satisfactory, but the danger of the core plasma contamination with tungsten is still not enough understood and potentially it could be very dangerous. Vaporization of tungsten, its cracking and dust production during ELMs are rather urgent issues to be investigated for proper choice of the divertor armour material for ITER. However, the erosion rate under action of the disruptive heat loads is tolerable for both armour materials assuming few hundred disruptions falls out during ITER lifetime

  12. Tests on the integration of the ITER divertor dummy armour prototype on a simplified model of cassette body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Orco, G.; Canneta, A.; Cattadori, G.; Gaspari, G.P.; Merola, M.; Polazzi, G.; Vieider, G.; Zito, D.

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, in the frame of the European R and D on ITER high heat flux components, the fabrication of a full scale ITER Divertor Outboard mock-up was launched. It comprised a Cassette Body, designed with some mechanical and hydraulic simplifications with respect to the reference body, and the actively cooled Dummy Armour Prototype (DAP). This DAP consists of the Vertical Target, the Wing and the Dump Target, manufactured by the European industry, which are integrated with the Gas Box Liner supplied by the Russian Federation Home Team. In order to simplify the manufacturing, the DAP was layered with an equivalent CuCrZr thickness simulating the real armour (CFC or W tiles). In parallel with the manufacturing activity, the ITER European HT decided to assign to ENEA the Task EU-DV1 for the 'Component Integration and Thermal-Hydraulic Testing of the ITER Divertor Targets and Wing Dummy Prototypes and Cassette Body'

  13. Tests on the integration of the ITER divertor dummy armour prototype on a simplified model of cassette body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Orco, G. E-mail: dellorco@brasimone.enea.it; Canneta, A.; Cattadori, G.; Gaspari, G.P.; Merola, M.; Polazzi, G.; Vieider, G.; Zito, D

    2001-10-01

    In 1998, in the frame of the European R and D on ITER high heat flux components, the fabrication of a full scale ITER Divertor Outboard mock-up was launched. It comprised a Cassette Body, designed with some mechanical and hydraulic simplifications with respect to the reference body, and the actively cooled Dummy Armour Prototype (DAP). This DAP consists of the Vertical Target, the Wing and the Dump Target, manufactured by the European industry, which are integrated with the Gas Box Liner supplied by the Russian Federation Home Team. In order to simplify the manufacturing, the DAP was layered with an equivalent CuCrZr thickness simulating the real armour (CFC or W tiles). In parallel with the manufacturing activity, the ITER European HT decided to assign to ENEA the Task EU-DV1 for the 'Component Integration and Thermal-Hydraulic Testing of the ITER Divertor Targets and Wing Dummy Prototypes and Cassette Body'.

  14. Estimation of carbon fibre composites as ITER divertor armour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestchanyi, S.; Safronov, V.; Landman, I.

    2004-08-01

    Exposure of the carbon fibre composites (CFC) NB31 and NS31 by multiple plasma pulses has been performed at the plasma guns MK-200UG and QSPA. Numerical simulation for the same CFCs under ITER type I ELM typical heat load has been carried out using the code PEGASUS-3D. Comparative analysis of the numerical and experimental results allowed understanding the erosion mechanism of CFC based on the simulation results. A modification of CFC structure has been proposed in order to decrease the armour erosion rate.

  15. Estimation of carbon fibre composites as ITER divertor armour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestchanyi, S.; Safronov, V.; Landman, I.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of the carbon fibre composites (CFC) NB31 and NS31 by multiple plasma pulses has been performed at the plasma guns MK-200UG and QSPA. Numerical simulation for the same CFCs under ITER type I ELM typical heat load has been carried out using the code PEGASUS-3D. Comparative analysis of the numerical and experimental results allowed understanding the erosion mechanism of CFC based on the simulation results. A modification of CFC structure has been proposed in order to decrease the armour erosion rate

  16. Macroscopic erosion of divertor and first wall armour in future tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würz, H.; Bazylev, B.; Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S.; Safronov, V.

    2002-12-01

    Sputtering, evaporation and macroscopic erosion determine the lifetime of the 'in vessel' armour materials CFC, tungsten and beryllium presently under discussion for future tokamaks. For CFC armour macroscopic erosion means brittle destruction and dust formation whereas for metallic armour melt layer erosion by melt motion and droplet splashing. Available results on macroscopic erosion from hot plasma and e-beam simulation experiments and from tokamaks are critically evaluated and a comprehensive discussion of experimental and numerical macroscopic erosion and its extrapolation to future tokamaks is given. Shielding of divertor armour materials by their own vapor exists during plasma disruptions. The evolving plasma shield protects the armour from high heat loads, absorbs the incoming energy and reradiates it volumetrically thus reducing drastically the deposited energy. As a result, vertical target erosion by vaporization turns out to be of the order of a few microns per disruption event and macroscopic erosion becomes the dominant erosion source.

  17. Macroscopic erosion of divertor and first wall armour in future tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerz, H.; Bazylev, B.; Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S.; Safronov, V.

    2002-01-01

    Sputtering, evaporation and macroscopic erosion determine the lifetime of the 'in vessel' armour materials CFC, tungsten and beryllium presently under discussion for future tokamaks. For CFC armour macroscopic erosion means brittle destruction and dust formation whereas for metallic armour melt layer erosion by melt motion and droplet splashing. Available results on macroscopic erosion from hot plasma and e-beam simulation experiments and from tokamaks are critically evaluated and a comprehensive discussion of experimental and numerical macroscopic erosion and its extrapolation to future tokamaks is given. Shielding of divertor armour materials by their own vapor exists during plasma disruptions. The evolving plasma shield protects the armour from high heat loads, absorbs the incoming energy and reradiates it volumetrically thus reducing drastically the deposited energy. As a result, vertical target erosion by vaporization turns out to be of the order of a few microns per disruption event and macroscopic erosion becomes the dominant erosion source

  18. Atmospheric lifetimes of CFC 11 and CFC 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, A.J.; Steed, J.M.; Miller, C.; Filkin, D.L.; Jesson, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) chemical model of the atmosphere is used to investigate the stratospheric removal rates of the chlorofluorocarbons CFC 11 (CFCl 3 ) and CFC 12 (CF 2 Cl 2 ). Assuming equivalent vertical transport rates, one-dimensional (1-D) models are shown to overestimate the atmospheric lifetime of CFC 11 by approx.10% because of their neglect of latitudinal effects. The present Du Pont 1-D and 2-D models have somewhat different effective transport rates and give steady state CFC 11 atmospheric lifetimes of 75 and 60 years, respectively, assuming no tropospheric destructive mechanism. For CFC 12, the corresponding calculated lifetimes are 140 and 120 years

  19. Innovative transparent armour concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Broos, J.P.F.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since WWII transparent armour consists of a multi-layer of glass panels bonded by thin polymer bond-films using an autoclave process. TNO has worked on the development of innovative transparent armour concepts that are lighter and a have better multi-hit capacity. Two new transparent armour

  20. The heat removal capability of actively cooled plasma-facing components for the ITER divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missirlian, M.; Richou, M.; Riccardi, B.; Gavila, P.; Loarer, T.; Constans, S.

    2011-12-01

    Non-destructive examination followed by high-heat-flux testing was performed for different small- and medium-scale mock-ups; this included the most recent developments related to actively cooled tungsten (W) or carbon fibre composite (CFC) armoured plasma-facing components. In particular, the heat-removal capability of these mock-ups manufactured by European companies with all the main features of the ITER divertor design was investigated both after manufacturing and after thermal cycling up to 20 MW m-2. Compliance with ITER requirements was explored in terms of bonding quality, heat flux performances and operational compatibility. The main results show an overall good heat-removal capability after the manufacturing process independent of the armour-to-heat sink bonding technology and promising behaviour with respect to thermal fatigue lifetime under heat flux up to 20 MW m-2 for the CFC-armoured tiles and 15 MW m-2 for the W-armoured tiles, respectively.

  1. The heat removal capability of actively cooled plasma-facing components for the ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missirlian, M; Richou, M; Loarer, T; Riccardi, B; Gavila, P; Constans, S

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive examination followed by high-heat-flux testing was performed for different small- and medium-scale mock-ups; this included the most recent developments related to actively cooled tungsten (W) or carbon fibre composite (CFC) armoured plasma-facing components. In particular, the heat-removal capability of these mock-ups manufactured by European companies with all the main features of the ITER divertor design was investigated both after manufacturing and after thermal cycling up to 20 MW m - 2. Compliance with ITER requirements was explored in terms of bonding quality, heat flux performances and operational compatibility. The main results show an overall good heat-removal capability after the manufacturing process independent of the armour-to-heat sink bonding technology and promising behaviour with respect to thermal fatigue lifetime under heat flux up to 20 MW m - 2 for the CFC-armoured tiles and 15 MW m - 2 for the W-armoured tiles, respectively.

  2. Atlantic CFC data in CARINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Steinfeldt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Water column data of carbon and carbon-relevant parameters have been collected and merged into a new database called CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic. In order to provide a consistent data set, all data have been examined for systematic biases and adjusted if necessary (secondary quality control (QC. The CARINA data set is divided into three regions: the Arctic/Nordic Seas, the Atlantic region and the Southern Ocean. Here we present the CFC data for the Atlantic region, including the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-113 as well as carbon tetrachloride (CCl4. The methods applied for the secondary quality control, a crossover analyses, the investigation of CFC ratios in the ocean and the CFC surface saturation are presented. Based on the results, the CFC data of some cruises are adjusted by a certain factor or given a "poor'' quality flag.

  3. Erosion of ITER divertor armour and contamination of sol after transient events erosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazylev, B.N.; Landman, I.S.; Pestchanyi, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma impact to the divertor expected in the tokamak ITER during ELMs or disruptions can result in a significant surface damage to CFC- and tungsten armours (brittle destruction and melting respectively) as well as in contamination of SOL by evaporated impurities. Numerical investigations for tungsten and CFC targets provide important details of the material erosion process. The simulations carried out in FZK on the material damage, carbon plasma expansion and the radiation fluxes from the carbon impurity are surveyed

  4. A program to evaluate the erosion on the CFC tiles of the ITER divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Agata, E. [ITER International Team, ITER Joint Work Site, Boltzmannstr 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: elio.dagata@iter.org; Ogorodnikova, O.V. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Tivey, R. [ITER International Team, ITER Joint Work Site, Boltzmannstr 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lowry, C.; Schlosser, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2007-10-15

    The plasma-facing surfaces of the ITER divertor are armoured with tungsten in the upper part of the inner and outer vertical targets, and carbon fibre composite (CFC) in the lower part, the region where the scrape-off layer intercepts the divertor. The CFC in the form of a monoblock in the vertical target is the most loaded part of the plasma-facing surfaces, and hence it is subjected to high erosion and has a significant risk of failure. A program has been developed with the aim of understanding the impact on the erosion lifetime due to a combination of two main effects: the material property variations (particularly pronounced in CFC) and the presence of joining defects. The software allows the evolution of the surface profile of the armour to be predicted and the margin on critical heat flux at the heat-sink-to-coolant interface to be estimated for a range of postulated defects, from start-of-life through to end-of-life of the component. In assessing erosion, the code takes account of geometry and sublimation, and physical and chemical erosion of the CFC armour. The incident angle (a glancing angle of a few degrees) of the particle and heat flux onto the target is taken into account. The program has been validated by comparison with analytical approximations very well validated against experimental data. The code has been developed in the APDL language to operate inside a commercial and certificated finite element program such as ANSYS.

  5. A program to evaluate the erosion on the CFC tiles of the ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agata, E.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Tivey, R.; Lowry, C.; Schlosser, J.

    2007-01-01

    The plasma-facing surfaces of the ITER divertor are armoured with tungsten in the upper part of the inner and outer vertical targets, and carbon fibre composite (CFC) in the lower part, the region where the scrape-off layer intercepts the divertor. The CFC in the form of a monoblock in the vertical target is the most loaded part of the plasma-facing surfaces, and hence it is subjected to high erosion and has a significant risk of failure. A program has been developed with the aim of understanding the impact on the erosion lifetime due to a combination of two main effects: the material property variations (particularly pronounced in CFC) and the presence of joining defects. The software allows the evolution of the surface profile of the armour to be predicted and the margin on critical heat flux at the heat-sink-to-coolant interface to be estimated for a range of postulated defects, from start-of-life through to end-of-life of the component. In assessing erosion, the code takes account of geometry and sublimation, and physical and chemical erosion of the CFC armour. The incident angle (a glancing angle of a few degrees) of the particle and heat flux onto the target is taken into account. The program has been validated by comparison with analytical approximations very well validated against experimental data. The code has been developed in the APDL language to operate inside a commercial and certificated finite element program such as ANSYS

  6. Optimization of armour geometry and bonding techniques for tungsten-armoured high heat flux components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giniyatulin, R.N.; Komarov, V.L.; Kuzmin, E.G.; Makhankov, A.N.; Mazul, I.V.; Yablokov, N.A.; Zhuk, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    Joining of tungsten with copper-based cooling structure and armour geometry optimization are the major aspects in development of the tungsten-armoured plasma facing components (PFC). Fabrication techniques and high heat flux (HHF) tests of tungsten-armoured components have to reflect different PFC designs and acceptable manufacturing cost. The authors present the recent results of tungsten-armoured mock-ups development based on manufacturing and HHF tests. Two aspects were investigated--selection of armour geometry and examination of tungsten-copper bonding techniques. Brazing and casting tungsten-copper bonding techniques were used in small mock-ups. The mock-ups with armour tiles (20x5x10, 10x10x10, 20x20x10, 27x27x10) mm 3 in dimensions were tested by cyclic heat fluxes in the range of (5-20) MW/m 2 , the number of thermal cycles varied from hundreds to several thousands for each mock-up. The results of the tests show the applicability of different geometry and different bonding technique to corresponding heat loading. A medium-scale mock-up 0.6-m in length was manufactured and tested. HHF tests of the medium-scale mock-up have demonstrated the applicability of the applied bonding techniques and armour geometry for full-scale PFC's manufacturing

  7. CFC Outdoor Tournament 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of whether you’re a fan of the "beautiful game", you’ve probably heard that the CFC Outdoor Tournament 2011 is the sporting event of the year for the CERN Football Club. This unmissable social, cultural and sporting event will be a chance for CERNois to mingle with external visitors. In the 2011 edition of this legendary tournament, which is over 45 years old, the principle of “fair play” is once again on display. Ten teams – 8 from CERN – are competing for the CFC title. The tournament concludes with a final on 7 July final. Along with a thrilling match, there will also be a host of festivities for the final, including an exhibition game, the final awards ceremony, surprise gifts, a barbeque, musical performances, and more! Make sure to highlight 7 July (after 18.00) on your agenda, and take advantage of what will surely be an unforgettable day! The final tournament matches have been in progress since April and are ...

  8. Chlorofluorocarbons: CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, HCFC-21, HCFC-31, HCFC-133a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredsdorff, Lea; Nielsen, Else

    The Danish EPA has requested documentation for health-based quality criteria in air and groundwater for the following six chlorofluorocarbons: CFC-11, CFC-12, HCFC-21, HCFC-31, CFC-113 (1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane) and HCFC-133a (1-chloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane). A concern for toxic effe...... effects of these chlorofluorocarbons related to soil contamination at old industrial sites, as well as of a carcinogenic potential has been expressed and therefore this issue will be addressed in the documentation....

  9. Behaviour of molten beryllium with ITER reference CFC SEPCARB NB31 under moisture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipa, M. [CEA/Cadarache-DSM/DRFC, Euratom-Association, Saint Paul Lez Durance F-13108 (France)], E-mail: manfred.lipa@cea.fr; Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Euratom-Association, Juelich D-52425 (Germany); Martin, G. [CEA/Cadarache-DSM/DRFC, Euratom-Association, Saint Paul Lez Durance F-13108 (France); Wessel, E. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Euratom-Association, Juelich D-52425 (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    A dramatic exothermic reaction has been observed in Tore Supra with molten aluminium enclosed in a thermally loaded 2D carbon fibre reinforced carbon composite (CFC) tile, exposed after component removal to atmospheric moisture. This led to an important local destruction of the graphite matrix and fibre texture. Beryllium, as aluminium, a carbide forming metal, is foreseen for the ITER first wall armour. Since it can be expected that sputtered, molten and/or evaporated beryllium material will be transported to the hot CFC based divertor surface during normal and off-normal plasma operation, a preliminary reaction experiment has been performed in order to investigate to which extent the Be contaminated graphite matrix and fibre texture of 3D-CFC SEPCARB NB31 could be locally damaged ('erosion') following a subsequent long lasting air venting or a supposed in-vessel ingress of coolant (steam) event (ICE)

  10. Smart Rocking Armour Units

    OpenAIRE

    Hofland, B.; Arefin, Syed Shamsil; van der Lem, Cock; van gent, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a method to measure the rocking motion of lab-scale armour units. Sensors as found in mobile phones are used. These sensors, data-storage and battery are all embedded in the model units, such that they can be applied without wires attached to them. The technique is applied to double-layer units in order to compare the results to the existing knowledge for this type of armour layers. In contrast to previous research, the gyroscope reading is used to determine the (rocking)...

  11. A program to Evaluate the Erosion on the CFC tiles of the ITER Divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAgata, E.; Tivey, R.; Ogorodnikova, O.; Lowry, Ch.; Schlosser, J.

    2006-01-01

    The plasma-facing surfaces of the ITER divertor are armoured with tungsten in the upper part of the inner and outer vertical targets and carbon-fibre composite (CFC) in the lower part, the region where the scrape-off layer intercepts the divertor. The CFC in the form of a monoblock in the vertical target is the most loaded part of the plasma-facing surfaces, and hence it is subjected to high erosion and has a significant risk of failure. A program has been developed with the aim of understanding the impact on the erosion lifetime and on the probability of a critical heat flux event in the heat sink of a combination of two main effects: the material property variations (particularly pronounced in CFC) and the presence of joining defects. The software allows the evolution of the surface profile of the armour to be predicted and the margin on critical heat flux at the heat-sink-to-coolant interface to be estimated for a range of postulated defects, for start-of-life through to end-of-life of the component. In assessing erosion, the code takes account of geometry and sublimation, and physical and chemical erosion of the CFC armour. The code allows the computation of the effect of normal and off-normal (ELMs, etc.) operation. The incident angle (a glancing angle of a few degrees) of the particle and heat flux onto the target is taken into account. The program has been validated by comparison with analytical approximations and experimental data. The code has been developed in APDL language to operate inside a commercial and certificate finite element program such as ANSYS. (author)

  12. My week: Marc Armour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-11

    Marc Armour, is a fourth-year vet student at the Royal Veterinary College. Now on rotations, he chose to spend a week doing EMS with the BVA's journals, which are published by BMJ. Here's how he got on. British Veterinary Association.

  13. Smart Rocking Armour Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland, B.; Arefin, Syed Shamsil; van der Lem, Cock; van gent, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a method to measure the rocking motion of lab-scale armour units. Sensors as found in mobile phones are used. These sensors, data-storage and battery are all embedded in the model units, such that they can be applied without wires attached to them. The technique is applied to

  14. Stab resistant body armour

    OpenAIRE

    Horsfall, I

    2000-01-01

    There is now a widely accepted need for stab resistant body armour for the police in the UK. However, very little research has been done on knife resistant systems and the penetration mechanics of sharp projectiles are poorly understood. This thesis explores the general background to knife attack and defence with a particular emphasis on the penetration mechanics of edged weapons. The energy and velocity that can be achieved in stabbing actions has been determined for a numb...

  15. Atmospheric Histories (1765-2015) for CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CCl4, SF6 and N2O (NCEI Accession 0164584)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The initiation of global atmospheric monitoring programs for CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113 and CCl4 began in the late 1970's and early 1980's. Atmospheric concentrations...

  16. CFC alternatives for thermal insulation foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankland, I.R. (Allied-Signal Inc., Buffalo, NY (US))

    1990-03-01

    Low density polymeric foam materials expanded with chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) blowing agents have found widespread use as highly efficient thermal insulation materials in the construction, refrigeration appliance and transportation industries. The advent of regulations which are reducing the production and consumption of the fully halogenated CFCs for environmental reasons has prompted the development of environmentally acceptable substitutes for the CFC blowing agents. This paper summarizes the physical properties and performance of the leading alternatives for CFC-11, which is used to expand rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate foams, and the leading alternatives for CFC-12 which is used to expand extruded polystyrene board foam. Although the alternatives, HCFC-123 and HCFC-14lb for CFC-11 and HCFC142b and HCFC-124 for CFC-12, are not perfect matches from the performance viewpoint, they represent the optimum choice given the constraints on environmental acceptability, toxicity, flammability and performance. (author).

  17. Fatigue of Concrete Armour Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, N. B.; Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    1995-01-01

    In the present article fatigue as a possible reason for failure of Dolosse armour units made of plain concrete is discussed.......In the present article fatigue as a possible reason for failure of Dolosse armour units made of plain concrete is discussed....

  18. Experimental analysis of armouring process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Alberto; Paris, Ennio

    Preliminary results from an experimental investigation on armouring processes are presented. Particularly, the process of development and formation of the armour layer under different steady flow conditions has been analyzed in terms of grain size variations and sediment transport rate associated to each size fraction.

  19. Polyurethane elastomers in armour applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Broos, J.P.F.

    2012-01-01

    The use of elastomers in ballistic protection products (armour) is limited to low threat levels and transparent armour solution components. Often armor is considered a parasitic mass that increases with increasing threat levels. Therefore, low weight solutions are welcomed and bulk polymers,

  20. Equity valuation : Under Armour

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente, António Rafael Mendes

    2016-01-01

    The present dissertation aims to value Under Armour, an American sportswear company. Since Valuation is not an exact science, during the literature review will be presented several valuation methods. Most of the authors mention DCF Valuation as one of the best but it seems impossible for them to reach a consensus about which one is in fact the best. In order to get Under Armour’s target price, a DCF valuation will be made and accompanied by a Relative Valuation that, when it is properly us...

  1. Chlorine isotope composition in chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-113 in firn, stratospheric and tropospheric air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allin, S. J.; Laube, J. C.; Witrant, E.; Kaiser, J.; McKenna, E.; Dennis, P.; Mulvaney, R.; Capron, E.; Martinerie, P.; Roeckmann, Thomas; Blunier, T.; Schwander, J.; Fraser, P. J.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Sturges, W. T.

    2015-01-01

    The stratospheric degradation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) releases chlorine, which is a major contributor to the destruction of stratospheric ozone (O-3). A recent study reported strong chlorine isotope fractionation during the breakdown of the most abundant CFC (CFC-12, CCl2F2, Laube et al.,

  2. Development of residual thermal stress-relieving structure of CFC monoblock target for JT-60SA divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuru, Daigo, E-mail: tsuru.daigo@jaea.go.jp; Sakurai, Shinji; Nakamura, Shigetoshi; Ozaki, Hidetsugu; Seki, Yohji; Yokoyama, Kenji; Suzuki, Satoshi

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We carried out numerical simulations on residual thermal stress of targets for the JT-60SA divertor. • We developed three measures to reduce residual thermal stress. • We proposed two structures of CFC monoblock target for the JT-60SA divertor. • We confirmed the effectiveness of the structure by infrared thermography inspection and high heat flux test. - Abstract: Carbon fibre-reinforced carbon composite (CFC) monoblock target for JT-60SA divertor is under development towards the mass-production. CFC monoblocks, WCu interlayers and a CuCrZr cooling tube at the centre of the monoblocks were bonded by vacuum brazing in a high temperature, to a target. If residual thermal stress due to difference of thermal expansions between CFC and CuCrZr exceeds the maximum allowable stress of the CFC after the bonding, cracks are generated in the CFC monoblock and heat removal capacity of the target degrades. In this paper, new structures of the targets were proposed, to reduce residual thermal stress and to mitigate the degradation of heat removal capacity of the targets. Some measures, including slitting of the CFC monoblock aside of the cooling tube, replacement of the interlayer material and shifting the position of the cooling tube, were implemented. The effectiveness of the measures was evaluated by numerical simulations. Target mock-ups with the proposed structures were manufactured. Infrared thermography inspection and high heat flux test were carried out on the mock-ups in order to evaluate the heat removal capacity.

  3. CFC legislation and its compliance with Community Law : Sweden's lack of double CFC tax relief

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, Evelina

    2009-01-01

    CFC legislation has become an instrument to protect national tax bases and minimize the abusive effects of international tax planning. The Swedish CFC legislation is found in chapter 39a of the ITA whereas it is established under what circumstances CFC taxation can arise. If a shareholder of a foreign legal entity is liable of CFC taxation in Sweden such a holder is also entitled to deduct tax paid by the CFC abroad. The purpose of the granted tax credit is to avoid double taxation, although ...

  4. Design of Dolos Armour Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Zhou

    1993-01-01

    The slender, complex types of armour units, such as Tetrapods and Dolosse are widely used. Many of the recent failures are such rubble mound breakwaters revealed that there is an imbalance between strength (structural integrity) of the units and the hydraulic stability (resistance to displacements......) of the armour layers. The paper deals only with dolos armour and presents the first design diagrammes and formulae where stresses from static, quasistatic and impact loads are implemented as well as the hydraulic stability. The dolos is treated as a multi shape unit where the thickness can be adjusted...

  5. Hydraulic Stability of Accropode Armour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.; Burcharth, H. F.; Frigaard, Peter

    The present report describes the hydraulic model tests of Accropode armour layers carried out at the Hydraulics Laboratory at Aalborg University from November 1995 through March 1996. The objective of the model tests was to investigate the hydraulic stability of Accropode armour layers...... with permeable core (crushed granite with a gradation of 5-8 mm). The outcome of this study is described in "Hydraulic Stability of Single-Layer Dolos and Accropode Armour Layers" by Christensen & Burcharth (1995). In January/February 1996, Research Assistant Thomas Jensen carried out a similar study...

  6. Development of non-destructive examination techniques for CFC-metal joints in annular geometry and their application to the manufacturing of plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Pietro, E.; Visca, E.; Orsini, A.; Sacchetti, M.; Borruto, T.M.R.; Varone, P.; Vesprini, R.

    1995-01-01

    The design of plasma-facing components for ITER, as for any of the envisaged next-step machines, relies heavily on the use of brazed junctions to couple armour materials to the heat sink and cooling tubes. Moreover, the typical number of brazed components and the envisaged effects of local overheating due to failure in a single brazed junction stress the importance of having a set of NDE techniques developed that can ensure the flawless quality of the joint. The qualification and application of two NDE techniques (ultrasonic and thermographic analysis) for inspection of CFC-to-metal joints is described with particular regard to the annular geometry typical of macroblock/monoblock solutions for divertor high-heat-flux components. The results of the eddy current inspection are not reported. The development has been focused specifically on the joint between carbon-fiber composite and TZM molybdenum alloy; techniques for the production of reference defect samples have been devised and a set of reference defect samples produced. The comparative results of the NDE inspections are reported and discussed, also on the basis of the destructive examination of the samples. The nature and size of relevant and detectable defects are discussed together with hints for a possible NDE strategy for divertor high-heat-flux components

  7. Numerical simulations for ITER divertor armour erosion and SOL contamination due to disruptions and ELMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landman, I.S.; Pestchanyi, S.E.; Bazylev, B.N.

    2005-01-01

    The divertor armour materials for ITER are going to be tungsten (as brushe or plates) and CFC. Disruptive loads with the heat deposition Q up to 30 MJ/m 2 on the time scale τ of 3 ms or operation with ELMs at repetitive loads of Q ∼ 3 MJ/m 2 and τ ∼ 0.3 ms cause enhanced armour erosion and produce contamination of SOL. Recent numerical investigations of erosion mechanisms with the anisotropic thermomechanics code PEGASUS-3D and the surface melt motion code MEMOS-1.5D as well as hot hydrogen plasma dynamics, heat loads at the armour surface and backward propagation of material plasma in SOL with the radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code FOREV-2D are survived. For CFC targets, the local overheating model is explained and numerically demonstrated. For the tungsten targets the numerical analysis of melt motion erosion of W-brushe and bulk tungsten targets on the base of MEMOS-1.5D calculations is developed and accompanied by numerical results. For validation of the codes at the regimes relevant to ITER disruptions and ELMs, the simulation results are compared with available experiments carried out at plasma guns, electron beam test facilities and the tokamak JET. (author)

  8. Evaporation and Vapor Shielding of CFC Targets Exposed to Plasma Heat Fluxes Relevant to ITER ELMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.; Landman, I.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Carbon-fibre composite (CFC) is foreseen presently as armour material for the divertor target in ITER. During the transient processes such as instabilities of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) the target as anticipated will be exposed to the plasma heat loads of a few MJ/m 2 on the time scale of a fraction of ms, which causes an intense evaporation at the target surface and contaminates tokamak plasma by evaporated carbon. The ITER transient loads are not achievable at existing tokamaks therefore for testing divertor armour materials other facilities, in particular plasma guns are employed. In the present work the CFC targets have been tested for ITER at the plasma gun facility MK- 200 UG in Troitsk by ELM relevant heat fluxes. The targets in the applied magnetic field up to 2 T were irradiated by hydrogen plasma streams of diameter 6 - 8 cm, impact ion energy 2 - 3 keV, pulse duration 0.05 ms and energy density varying in the range 0.05 - 1 MJ/m 2 . Primary attention has been focused on the measurement of evaporation threshold and investigation of carbon vapor properties. Fast infrared pyrometer, optical and VUV spectrometers, framing cameras and plasma calorimeters were applied as diagnostics. The paper reports the results obtained on the evaporation threshold of CFC, the evaporation rate of the carbon fibers oriented parallel and perpendicular to the exposed target surface, the velocity of carbon vapor motion along and across the magnetic field lines, and the parameters of carbon plasma such as temperature, density and ionization state measured up to the distance 15 cm at varying plasma load. First experimental results on investigation of the vapor shield onset conditions are presented also. (authors)

  9. Fatigue in Breakwater Concrete Armour Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    The reliability of rubble mound breakwaters depends on the hydraulic stability and the mechanical strength of the armour units. The paper deals with the important aspect of fatigue related to the strength of concrete armour units.......The reliability of rubble mound breakwaters depends on the hydraulic stability and the mechanical strength of the armour units. The paper deals with the important aspect of fatigue related to the strength of concrete armour units....

  10. Testing of improved CFC/Cu bondings for the W7-X divertor targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuner, H.; Buswirth, B.; Boscary, J.; Tivey, R.; Plankensteiner, A.; Schedler, B.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Extensive high heat flux (HHF) testing of pre-series divertor targets was performed to establish the industrial process for the manufacturing of 890 targets, which will be needed for the installation of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor. The target design consists of flat tiles of CFC NB31 as plasma facing material bonded by an Active Meta] Casting copper (AMC) interlayer onto a water-cooled CuCrZr structure. This design is required by the specific geometrical requirements of the W7-X divertor. The heat removal capability of this target concept has been demonstrated for the envisaged operational power load of 10 MW/m 2 in previous test series of more than 30 full-scale elements. No large detachment or loss of CFC tiles occurred during cyclic loading tests at 10.5 and 13 MW/m 2 , but growing local de-bonded zones at the free edges of several CFC tiles were observed. Therefore a detailed analysis of the system of CFC/Cu bonding was carried out with respect to a further reduction of the stress at the CFC/Cu interface. Based on the results of the 3/D non-linear thermomechanical FEM analysis of the CFC/Cu interface a set of 17 additional pre-series elements was manufactured by PLANSEE SE. Three types of design variations have been investigated: - adopting an additional plastically compliant Cu interlayer between the cooling structure and the AMC region, - reduced size of CFC tiles, - arrangement of tiles with 90 deg. rotation of the CFC fibre plane. HHF tests were performed in the ion beam test facility GLADIS at IPP Garching with up to 3000 cycles at 10.5 MW/m 2 on this elements. The aim of these tests is to investigate the crack propagation between CFC/Cu and to define the acceptable defect size after 100 HHF cycles as an acceptance criterion for the series manufacturing. The applied criterion should allow the selection of elements for W7-X expected to achieve a suitable operational life time. Finally, the design variant with the

  11. Mock-up test results of monoblock-type CFC divertor armor for JT-60SA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashijima, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)], E-mail: higashijima.satoru@jaea.go.jp; Sakurai, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yokoyama, K.; Kashiwa, Y.; Masaki, K.; Shibama, Y.K.; Takechi, M.; Shibanuma, K.; Sakasai, A.; Matsukawa, M.; Kikuchi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    The JT-60 Super Advanced (JT-60SA) tokamak project starts under both the Japanese domestic program and the international program 'Broader Approach'. The maximum heat flux to JT-60SA divertor is estimated to {approx}15 MW/m{sup 2} for 100 s. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed a divertor armor facing high heat flux in the engineering R and D for ITER, and it is concluded that monoblock-type CFC divertor armor is promising for JT-60SA. The JT-60SA armor consists of CFC monoblocks, a cooling CuCrZr screw-tube, and a thin oxygen-free high conductivity copper (OFHC-Cu) buffer layer between the CFC monoblock and the screw-tube. CFC/OFHC-Cu and OFHC-Cu/CuCrZr joints are essential for the armor, and these interfaces are brazed. Needed improvements from ITER engineering R and D are good CFC/OFHC-Cu and OFHC-Cu/CuCrZr interfaces and suppression of CFC cracking. For these purposes, metalization inside CFC monoblock is applied, and we confirmed again that the mock-up has heat removal capability in excess of ITER requirement. For optimization of the fabrication method and understanding of the production yield, the mock-ups corresponding to quantity produced in one furnace at the same time is also produced, and the half of the mock-ups could remove 15 MW/m{sup 2} as required. This paper summarizes the recent progress of design and mock-up test results for JT-60SA divertor armor.

  12. Influence of armour porosity on the hydraulic stability of cube armour layers

    OpenAIRE

    Medina Folgado, Josep Ramón; Molines Llodra, Jorge; GÓMEZ MARTÍN, MARÍA ESTHER

    2014-01-01

    Armour placement and packing density directly affect construction costs and hydraulic performance of mound breakwaters. In this paper, the literature concerning the influence of armour porosity on the hydraulic stability of single- and double-layer armours is discussed. Qualitative and quantitative estimations for the influence of armour porosity and packing density on the hydraulic stability are given for the most common concrete armour units. The analysis focuses on specific 2D hydraulic st...

  13. Equity valuation of Under Armour

    OpenAIRE

    Diogo, Rafael Martins Ribeiro

    2017-01-01

    A dissertação aqui apresentada tem como objetivo apresentar uma avaliação para a Under Armour, - empresa que desenvolve a sua atividade na indústria do equipamento desportivo. A Under Armour representa um exemplo de empreendedorismo, determinação e excelência, personalizada pelo seu fundador e atual diretor executivo. Kevin Plank criou a empresa em 1996, com apenas 23 anos, através do desenvolvimento de um protótipo de uma t-shirt desportiva. Entretanto, a empresa já experienciou uma OPA e...

  14. On the use of flat tile armour in high heat flux components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merola, M.; Vieider, G

    1998-10-01

    The possibility to have a flat tile geometry for those high heat flux components subjected to a convective heat flux (namely the divertor dump target, lower vertical target, and the limiter) has been investigated. Because of the glancing incidence of the power load, if an armour tile falls off an extremely high heat flux hits the leading edge of the adjacent tile. As a result a rapid temperature increase occurs in the armour-heat sink joint. The heat flux to the water coolant also increases rapidly up to a factor of 1.7 and 2.3 for a beryllium and CFC armour, respectively, thus causing possible critical heat flux problems. Thermal stresses in the armour-heat sink joint double in less than 0.4 s and triplicate after 1 s thus leading to a possible cascade failure. Therefore the use of a flat tile geometry for these components does not seem to be appropriate. In this case a monoblock geometry gives a much more robust solution. (orig.) 7 refs.

  15. On the use of flat tile armour in high heat flux components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merola, M.; Vieider, G.

    1998-10-01

    The possibility to have a flat tile geometry for those high heat flux components subjected to a convective heat flux (namely the divertor dump target, lower vertical target, and the limiter) has been investigated. Because of the glancing incidence of the power load, if an armour tile falls off an extremely high heat flux hits the leading edge of the adjacent tile. As a result a rapid temperature increase occurs in the armour-heat sink joint. The heat flux to the water coolant also increases rapidly up to a factor of 1.7 and 2.3 for a beryllium and CFC armour, respectively, thus causing possible critical heat flux problems. Thermal stresses in the armour-heat sink joint double in less than 0.4 s and triplicate after 1 s thus leading to a possible cascade failure. Therefore the use of a flat tile geometry for these components does not seem to be appropriate. In this case a monoblock geometry gives a much more robust solution.

  16. On the use of flat tile armour in high heat flux components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merola, M.; Vieider, G.

    1998-01-01

    The possibility to have a flat tile geometry for those high heat flux components subjected to a convective heat flux (namely the divertor dump target, lower vertical target, and the limiter) has been investigated. Because of the glancing incidence of the power load, if an armour tile falls off an extremely high heat flux hits the leading edge of the adjacent tile. As a result a rapid temperature increase occurs in the armour-heat sink joint. The heat flux to the water coolant also increases rapidly up to a factor of 1.7 and 2.3 for a beryllium and CFC armour, respectively, thus causing possible critical heat flux problems. Thermal stresses in the armour-heat sink joint double in less than 0.4 s and triplicate after 1 s thus leading to a possible cascade failure. Therefore the use of a flat tile geometry for these components does not seem to be appropriate. In this case a monoblock geometry gives a much more robust solution. (orig.)

  17. CFC legislation in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvjetković Cvjetana M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author considers CFC legislation in the Member States of the European Union, and points to the official attitude of the institutions of the European Union toward CFC legislation. Special attention in this paper is focused on Judgment of the Court of Justice of the European Union in the case Cadbury Schweppes. The aim of the paper is to analyze CFC legislation in the Member States in order to determine its basic characteristics, as well as to determine its compatibility with freedoms guaranteed by the primary law of the European Union, i.e. with Judgment of the Court of Justice of the European Union in the Cadbury Schweppes case.

  18. Crablock Concrete Breakwater Armour Unit

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phelp, D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available During cyclone Gonu, a category 5 storm, which impacted the east coast of Oman in June 2007, a number of small craft harbours were severly damaged. Most of the breakwater structures were armoured with various sizes of rock protection. The Al Masaood...

  19. Breakwater stability with damaged single layer armour units

    OpenAIRE

    De Rover, R.; Verhagen, H.J.; Van den Berge, A.; Reedijk, B.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of single layer interlocking armour unit breakage on the hydraulic armour layer stability and potential damage progression is addressed in this paper. A 2-dimensional scale model of a rubble mound breakwater with an armour layer consisting of Xbloc armour units was tested. The residual armour layer stability with broken units was determined. The armour unit displacement and damage progression was assessed. According to the test series breakage of the single layer armour units has a...

  20. Fabrication of the wing and vertical target dummy armour prototypes of the ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grattarola, M.; Bet, M.; Biagiotti, B.; Gandini, G.; Merola, M.; Ottonello, G.B.; Riccardi, B.; Vieider, G.; Zacchia, F.

    2000-01-01

    The dummy armour prototypes are identical to the reference components in terms of geometry, cooling circuit and material except for the armour material, which is replaced by an equivalent thickness of copper alloy. The main objectives of the dummy armour prototypes are the demonstration of the overall engineering concept of the Divertor, the integration in a 3 deg. cassette together with components manufactured by the other ITER Home Teams and the successive thermo-hydraulic tests on the whole Divertor module. This paper describes the realization of both the wing and the vertical target dummy armour prototypes focusing on the critical aspects of the fabrication and their impact on a further industrialization of the components

  1. Fabrication of the wing and vertical target dummy armour prototypes of the ITER divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grattarola, M. E-mail: gratta@ari.ansaldo.it; Bet, M.; Biagiotti, B.; Gandini, G.; Merola, M.; Ottonello, G.B.; Riccardi, B.; Vieider, G.; Zacchia, F

    2000-11-01

    The dummy armour prototypes are identical to the reference components in terms of geometry, cooling circuit and material except for the armour material, which is replaced by an equivalent thickness of copper alloy. The main objectives of the dummy armour prototypes are the demonstration of the overall engineering concept of the Divertor, the integration in a 3 deg. cassette together with components manufactured by the other ITER Home Teams and the successive thermo-hydraulic tests on the whole Divertor module. This paper describes the realization of both the wing and the vertical target dummy armour prototypes focusing on the critical aspects of the fabrication and their impact on a further industrialization of the components.

  2. Dicty_cDB: CFC543 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TTTAAAAAAAAAAAAANCAAAAAA AAAAXXXXXXXXXXTGTCGAATGTCCAGATTTCCATANATGTGTTGAAANACGTGG...--------- Length of 5' end seq. 124 3' end seq. ID CFC543Z 3' end seq. >CFC543Z.Seq ----------TGTCGAATGTCCAGATTTCCATANA...TTAAAAAAAAAAAAANCAAAAAA AAAA----------TGTCGAATGTCCAGATTTCCATANATGTGTTGAAANACGTGGT

  3. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF PIC FORMATION IN CFC INCINERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of the collection of combustion emission characterization data from chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) incineration. A bench scale test program to provide emission characterization data from CFC incineration was developed and performed, with emphasis on the format...

  4. Dispensation fra CFC-reglerne for selskaber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Peter Koerver

    2011-01-01

    Artiklen, der er fagfællebedømt, omhandler dispensationsbestemmelsen i SEL § 32, stk. 2, 2-4 pkt, hvorefter Skatterådet kan tillade, at indkomsten i et datterselskab med koncession til at udøve forskellig økonomisk virksomhed ikke skal være omfattet af reglerne om CFC-beskatning. I den forbindels...

  5. Manufacturing and testing of a copper/CFC divertor mock-up for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brossa, M.; Ciric, D.; Deksnis, E.; Falter, H.; Guerreschi, U.; Peacock, A.; Pick, M.; Rossi, M.; Shen, Y.; Zacchia, F.

    1995-01-01

    An actively cooled divertor is a possible option for future developments at The Joint European Torus (JET). A proof of principle actively cooled tile has been produced in order to qualify the relevant manufacturing technologies and the non destructive control processes. In this frame Ansaldo Ricerche (ARI) has been involved in the construction of a mock-up comprising 6 OFHC copper tubes for water cooling that are brazed to a plate made out of carbon fibre composite (CFC). The final objective was the high heat flux testing of the mock-up at JET in order to evaluate the general behaviour of the component under relevant operating conditions. The key point of the work was the realisation of a sound joint by adapting the expertise gained in ARI in previous R and D activities on brazing heterogeneous materials. Reliable methods for ultrasonic examinations of the pieces were also set up. For successful application to the JET pumped divertor a water-cooled CFC target plate must show surface temperatures of 2 . Furthermore, global hydraulic considerations specific to JET limit the system pressure to 0.7 MPa. In such a design, critical heat flux is not the key limit, rather the reliability of the CFC-copper joint in terms of extent of wetting. First tests in the neutral beam test bed at JET show an adequate response for fluxes up to 15 MW/m 2 . (orig.)

  6. Ballistic impact on composite armour

    OpenAIRE

    Bourke, P

    2007-01-01

    Armoured vehicles in current military service are requiring ever more protection to enable them to carry out their mission in a safe, effective manner. This requirement is driving vehicle weight up to such an extent that the logistics of vehicle transport is becoming increasingly difficult. Composite materials are an important material group whose high specific properties can enable structures to be manufactured for a far lower weight than might otherwise be possible. Composite...

  7. Fatigue in Breakwater Concrete Armour Units

    OpenAIRE

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    1984-01-01

    The reliability of rubble mound breakwaters depends on the hydraulic stability and the mechanical strength of the armour units. The paper deals with the important aspect of fatigue related to the strength of concrete armour units. Results showing significant fatigue from impact tests with Dolosse made of unreinforced and steel fibre reinforced flyash concrete are presented. Moreover universal graphs for fatigue in armour units made of conventional unreinforced concrete exposed to impact load ...

  8. International research into chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marseille, T.J.; Shankle, D.L.; Thurman, A.G.

    1992-05-01

    Selected researchers from 21 countries were queried through questionnaires about their current and planned research activities. The results of the survey show that the majority of research being conducted by the respondents is devoted to investigating the hydrogenated fluorocarbon HFC-134a as a replacement for CFC-12 in refrigeration applications. The main issue with this alternative is identifying compatible lubricants that do not reduce its effectiveness.

  9. Examination of C/C flat tile mock-ups with hypervapotron cooling after high heat flux testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schedler, B.; Friedrich, T.; Traxler, H.; Eidenberger, E.; Scheu, C.; Clemens, H.; Pippan, R.; Escourbiac, F.

    2007-01-01

    Two C/C flat tile mock-ups with a hypervapotron cooling concept, have been successfully tested beyond ITER specification (3000 cycles at 15 MW/m 2 , 300 cycles at 20 MW/m 2 and 800-1000 cycles at 25 MW/m 2 ) in two electron beam testing facilities [F. Escourbiac, et al., Experimental simulation of cascade failure effect on tungsten and CFC flat tile armoured HHF components, Fusion Eng. Des., submitted for publication; F. Escourbiac, et al., A mature industrial solution for ITER divertor plasma facing components: hypervapotron cooling concept adapted to Tore Supra flat tile technology, Fusion Eng. Des. 75-79 (2005) 387-390]. Both mock-ups provide a SNECMA SEPCARB NS31 armour, which has been joined onto the CuCrZr heat sink by active metal casting (AMC) and electron beam welding (EBW). No tile detachment or sudden loss of single tiles has been observed; a cascade-like failure of flat tile armours was impossible to generate. At the maximum cyclic heat flux load of 25 MW/m 2 all tested tiles performed well except one, which revealed already a clear indication in the thermographic examination at the end of the manufacture. Visual examination and analysis of metallographic cuts of the remaining tiles demonstrated that the interface has not been altered. In addition, the shear strength of the C/C to copper joints measured after the high heat flux (HHF) test has been found to be still above the interlamellar shear strength of the used C/C material. The high resistance of the interface is explained by a modification of the C/C to copper joint interface due to silicon originating from the used C/C material

  10. Examination of C/C flat tile mock-ups with hypervapotron cooling after high heat flux testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schedler, B. [Technology Centre of PLANSEE SE, A-6600 Reutte (Austria)], E-mail: bertram.schedler@plansee.com; Friedrich, T.; Traxler, H. [Technology Centre of PLANSEE SE, A-6600 Reutte (Austria); Eidenberger, E.; Scheu, C.; Clemens, H. [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, University of Leoben, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Pippan, R. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Erich-Schmid-Institute of Material Science, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Escourbiac, F. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2007-04-15

    Two C/C flat tile mock-ups with a hypervapotron cooling concept, have been successfully tested beyond ITER specification (3000 cycles at 15 MW/m{sup 2}, 300 cycles at 20 MW/m{sup 2} and 800-1000 cycles at 25 MW/m{sup 2}) in two electron beam testing facilities [F. Escourbiac, et al., Experimental simulation of cascade failure effect on tungsten and CFC flat tile armoured HHF components, Fusion Eng. Des., submitted for publication; F. Escourbiac, et al., A mature industrial solution for ITER divertor plasma facing components: hypervapotron cooling concept adapted to Tore Supra flat tile technology, Fusion Eng. Des. 75-79 (2005) 387-390]. Both mock-ups provide a SNECMA SEPCARB NS31 armour, which has been joined onto the CuCrZr heat sink by active metal casting (AMC) and electron beam welding (EBW). No tile detachment or sudden loss of single tiles has been observed; a cascade-like failure of flat tile armours was impossible to generate. At the maximum cyclic heat flux load of 25 MW/m{sup 2} all tested tiles performed well except one, which revealed already a clear indication in the thermographic examination at the end of the manufacture. Visual examination and analysis of metallographic cuts of the remaining tiles demonstrated that the interface has not been altered. In addition, the shear strength of the C/C to copper joints measured after the high heat flux (HHF) test has been found to be still above the interlamellar shear strength of the used C/C material. The high resistance of the interface is explained by a modification of the C/C to copper joint interface due to silicon originating from the used C/C material.

  11. Spatial Damage Distribution over Cube Armoured Roundheads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alonso, Enrique Maciñeira; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2009-01-01

    Different authors have studied and defined the most critical sector of the roundheads with respect to armour stability in order to calculate the mass needed in the units of the armour. This sector has been located between 90° and 135° relative to the orthogonal of the waves. Moreover, from...

  12. Stresses in Dolos Breakwater Armour Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Breakage of slender unreinforced armour unite is the cause of many breakwater failures. Design diagrams to ensure structural integrity of armour unite such as dolosse and tetrapods have not been available. The article presents results of an analysis of the stresses in dolosse based on model tests...

  13. Divertor plate concept with carbon based armour for NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.; Howard, R.; Kneringer, G.; Stickler, R.

    1989-01-01

    A series of tests has been performed on simulated divertor elements for NET at the JET neutral beam injector test bed. The test section consisted of a water cooled main structure, the surface of which was protected with a carbon based armour in the form of tiles. The scope of these was to study the thermal behaviour of mechanically attached tiles with the use of an intermediate soft carbon layer to improve the thermal contact under divertor relevant conditions. (author). 4 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  14. The development of divertor and first wall armour parts at JAERI, Sandia N.L. and KFA Juelich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, M.; Bolt, H.; Watson, R.; Kneringer, G.; Linke, J.

    1991-01-01

    The development of new armour materials, and fabrication and testings of the divertor and first wall mock-ups have worldwidely been carried out during the Conceptual Design Activites (CDA) of ITER. This paper is a review of the activities on the divertor and first wall armour components which has been performed by JAERI, Sandia National Laboratory, and KFA Juelich. The design requirements have instantly been reflected in material development. For instance, carbon fiber composites (CFCs) have already been developed to have a thermal conductivity as high as copper at room temperature. Further modification of CFC's has been made. Based on the extensive progress in armour materials, the fabrication and testings of mock-ups have been started. Divertor mock-ups which are able to endure a stationary heat flux of 8 to 15 MW/m 2 have already been developed. Some new high heat flux test facilities have been constructed and are able to simulate a heat load of plasma disruption. Extensive understanding on disruption erosion of the armour materials has been obtained by experiments with these facilities. Some mock-up tests and disruption simulating tests have been performed under international collaboration. (orig.)

  15. Dicty_cDB: CFC652 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CF (Link to library) CFC652 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U02523-1 CFC652Z (Link... to Original site) - - CFC652Z 713 - - - - Show CFC652 Library CF (Link to library) Clone ID CFC652 (Link to dict...yBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U02523-1 Original site URL http://dict... clone DKEY-104M9 in linkage group 19. 46 0.73 1 AC148615 |AC148615.2 Ictalurus punctatus clone CH212-99A22,...luding cell wall 4.0 %: peroxisomal >> prediction for CFC652 is mit 5' end seq. ID - 5' end seq. - Length of

  16. CFC-beskatning og retsmisbrugsbegrebet i EU-retten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Aage

    2008-01-01

    /9 2006 i Cadbury Schweppes-sagen (C-196/04 (SU 2006, 333)) om de engelske CFC-beskatningsregler, der blev anset for at være uforenelige med EF-traktatens art. 43 om fri etableringsret. Da de tidligere gældende danske CFC-regler mindede meget om de tidligere gældende engelske CFC-regler, er de danske regler...

  17. Breakwater stability with damaged single layer armour units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Rover, R.; Verhagen, H.J.; Van den Berge, A.; Reedijk, B.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of single layer interlocking armour unit breakage on the hydraulic armour layer stability and potential damage progression is addressed in this paper. A 2-dimensional scale model of a rubble mound breakwater with an armour layer consisting of Xbloc armour units was tested. The residual

  18. Defeating Mechanisms of Armours for Main Battle Tanks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manfred Held

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental protection principles of the new armours for main battle tanks against kinetic energy projectiles (KE) and chemical energy weapons (CE)--shaped charges are shortly described and their efficiency against both threats discussed. The armour topics can be split into: "perpendicular or zero-degree armours", such as rolled homogeneous armour (RHA), also with extremely high strength, ceramics, glass, liquid filled columns and explosive filled cells,"inclined armours", as spaced RHA plates with their corner effects, bulging armour, additive and integrated explosive reactive armours (ERA) and "hard kill active defence possibilities" in different defeating distances.

  19. Fatigue in Breakwater Concrete Armour Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    1985-01-01

    The reliability of rubble mound breakwaters depends on the hydraulic stability and the mechanical strength of the armour units. The paper deals with the important aspect of fatigue related to the strength of concrete armour units. Results showing significant fatigue from impact tests with Dolosse...... made of unreinforced and steel fibre reinforced flyash concrete are presented. Moreover universal graphs for fatigue in armour units made of conventional unreinforced concrete exposed to impact load and pulsating load are presented. The effect of fibre reinforcement and the implementation of fatigue...

  20. Stability of Roundheads Armoured with Cubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Haagensen, Per; Macineira, Enrique

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a hydraulic model test study of the influence of concrete mass density and placement method on the stability of cube armour in a 1:2 slope cone shaped roundhead exposed to short ? crested seas. Location and development of armour displacements were studied...... are used cubes with concrete mass density 2.8 t/m 3 instead of 2.4 t/m 3 . Significant smaller crane capacity is needed compared to the conventional solution of unchanged mass density which implies approximately a doubling the mass of the roundhead armour units....

  1. Structure and properties of GMA surfaced armour plates

    OpenAIRE

    A. Klimpel; K. Luksa; M. Burda

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In the combat vehicles many materials can be used for the armour. Application of the monolithic armour plates in light combat vehicles is limited by the high armour weigh. Introduction of the layered armour plates is a way to limit the vehicle weight. In the paper test results of graded and nanostructural GMA surfaced armour plates are presented.Design/methodology/approach: Metallographic structure, chemical composition and hardness of surfaced layers were investigated in order to ex...

  2. Limitations imposed by wearing armour on Medieval soldiers' locomotor performance

    OpenAIRE

    Askew, Graham N.; Formenti, Federico; Minetti, Alberto E.

    2011-01-01

    In Medieval Europe, soldiers wore steel plate armour for protection during warfare. Armour design reflected a trade-off between protection and mobility it offered the wearer. By the fifteenth century, a typical suit of field armour weighed between 30 and 50 kg and was distributed over the entire body. How much wearing armour affected Medieval soldiers' locomotor energetics and biomechanics is unknown. We investigated the mechanics and the energetic cost of locomotion in armour, and determined...

  3. A Comparison of Military and Law Enforcement Body Armour

    OpenAIRE

    Robin Orr; Ben Schram; Rodney Pope

    2018-01-01

    Law-enforcement officers increasingly wear body armour for protection; wearing body armour is common practice in military populations. Law-enforcement and military occupational demands are vastly different and military-styled body armour may not be suitable for law-enforcement. This study investigated differences between selected military body armour (MBA: 6.4 kg) and law-enforcement body armour (LEBA: 2.1 kg) in impacts on postural sway, vertical jump, agility, a functional movement screen (...

  4. Cell kinetics of GM-CFC in the steady state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, M.P.; MacVittie, T.J.; Dodgen, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of cell turnover for myeloid/monocyte cells that form colonies in agar (GM-CFC) were measured through the progressive increase in their sensitivity to 313-nm light during a period of cell labeling with BrdCyd. Two components of cell killing with distinctly separate labeling kinetics revealed both the presence of two generations within the GM-CFC compartment and the properties of the kinetics of the precursors of the GM-CFC. These precursors of the GM-CFC were not assayable in a routine GM-CFC assay when pregnant mouse uterus extract and mouse L-cell-conditioned medium were used to stimulate colony formation but were revealed by the labeling kinetics of the assayable GM-CFC. Further, these precursor cells appeared to enter the assayable GM-CFC population from a noncycling state. This was evidenced by the failure of the majority of these cells to incorporate BrdCyd during five days of infusion. The half-time for cell turnover within this precursor compartment was measured to be approximately 5.5 days. Further, these normally noncycling cells proliferated rapidly in response to endotoxin. High-proliferative-potential colony-forming cells (HPP-CFC) were tested as a candidate for this precursor population. The results of the determination of the kinetics for these cells showed that the HPP-CFC exist largely in a Go state, existing at an average rate of once every four days. The slow turnover time for these cells and their response to endotoxin challenge are consistent with a close relationship between the HPP-CFC and the Go pool of cells that is the direct precursor of the GM-CFC

  5. Development of decomposition method for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvent by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimokawa, Toshinari; Nakagawa, Seiko

    1995-01-01

    CFC is chemically and thermally stable, and almost harmless to human body, therefore, it has been used widely for various industries, in particular as the heat media for air conditioners and the washing agent for semiconductors and printed circuit substrates. In 1974, it was pointed out that CFC causes the breakdown of ozone layer, and the ozone hole was found, consequently, it was decided to limit its use, and to prohibit the production of specific CFC. The development of the decomposition treatment technology for the CFC now in use, which is friendly to the global environment including mankind and ozone layer, is strongly desired. Recently, the authors have examined the decomposition treatment method for specific CFC solvents by irradiation, and obtained the interesting knowledge. For the experiment, the CFC 113 was used, and its chemical structure is shown. The experimental method is explained. As the results, the effect of hydroxide ions, the decomposition products such as CFC 123, and the presumption of the mechanism of the chain dechlorination reaction of CFC 113 are reported. The irradiation decomposition method was compared with various other methods, and the cost of treatment is high. The development for hereafter is mentioned. (K.I.)

  6. Sediment transport simulation in an armoured stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhous, Robert T.; Bradley, Jeffrey B.; Loeffler, Cindy L.

    1986-01-01

    Improved methods of calculating bed material stability and transport must be developed for a gravel bed stream having an armoured surface in order to use the HEC-6 model to examine channel change. Good possibilities exist for use of a two layer model based on the Schoklitsch and the Einstein-Brown transport equations. In Einstein-Brown the D35 of the armour is used for stabilities and the D50 of the bed (sub-surface) is used for transport. Data on the armour and sub-surface size distribution needs to be obtained as part of a bed material study in a gravel bed river; a "shovel" sample is not adequate. The Meyer-Peter, Muller equation should not be applied to a gravel bed stream with an armoured surface to estimate the initiation of transport or for calculation of transport at low effective bed shear stress.

  7. Spatial Damage Distribution over Cube Armoured Roundheads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alonso, Enrique Maciñeira; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2009-01-01

    Different authors have studied and defined the most critical sector of the roundheads with respect to armour stability in order to calculate the mass needed in the units of the armour. This sector has been located between 90° and 135° relative to the orthogonal of the waves. Moreover, from...... provides data on damage distribution over the head obtained in 3D physical model tests with short crested waves at Aalborg University. Furthermore, the factors influencing the distributions are explained....

  8. Stability of Armour Units in Oscillatory Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Thompson, A. C.

    Despite numerous breakwater model tests very little is known today about the various phenomena and parameters that determine the hydraulic stability characteristics of different types of armour. This is because separation of parameters is extremely difficult in traditional tests.With the object...... of separating some of the factors a deterministic test, in which horizontal beds of armour units were exposed to oscillatory flow, was performed in a pulsating water tunnel....

  9. Release of CFC-11 from disposal of polyurethane foam waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Jensen, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    The halocarbon CFC-11 has extensively been used as a blowing agent for polyurethane (PUR) insulation foams in home appliances and for residential and industrial construction. Release of CFCs is an important factor in the depletion of the ozone layer. For CFC-11 the future atmospheric concentrations...... will mainly depend on the continued release from PUR foams. Little is known about rates and time frames of the CFC release from foams especially after treatment and disposal of foam containing waste products. The CFC release is mainly controlled by slow diffusion out through the PUR. From the literature...... and by reevaluation of an old reported experiment, diffusion coefficients in the range of 0.05-1.7.10(-14) m(2) s(-1) were found reflecting differences in foam properties and experimental designs. Laboratory experiments studying the distribution of CFC in the foam and the short-term releases after shredding showed...

  10. Manufacturing study of Be, W and CFC bonded structures for plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Hirai, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Oda, Y.; Shimizu, K.

    2004-01-01

    A manufacturing study has been conducted for Be, W, and CFC bonded structures employed in plasma-facing components for the ITER. For Be tiles bonded to the Cu-Cr-Zr alloy heat sink with stainless-steel cooling pipes, a one-axis hot press with two heating processes has been used to bond the three materials. An Al-Si base interlayer has been used to bond Be to the Cu-alloy. The heating processes have been selected to match the required heat treatment conditions for the Cu-alloy. Because of the limited heat processes using a conventional hot press, the manufacturing cost can be minimized. For both the W and CFC tiles, the materials have been brazed at the same time to the Cu-alloy. Ni-Cu-Mn and Cu-Ti brazing materials have been used for the W and CFC tiles, respectively. Using the above bonding techniques, partial mockups of a blanket first-wall panel and divertor target have been successfully manufactured

  11. Manufacturing study of Be, W and CFC bonded structures for plasma-facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, M.; Hirai, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Oda, Y.; Shimizu, K.

    2004-08-01

    A manufacturing study has been conducted for Be, W, and CFC bonded structures employed in plasma-facing components for the ITER. For Be tiles bonded to the Cu-Cr-Zr alloy heat sink with stainless-steel cooling pipes, a one-axis hot press with two heating processes has been used to bond the three materials. An Al-Si base interlayer has been used to bond Be to the Cu-alloy. The heating processes have been selected to match the required heat treatment conditions for the Cu-alloy. Because of the limited heat processes using a conventional hot press, the manufacturing cost can be minimized. For both the W and CFC tiles, the materials have been brazed at the same time to the Cu-alloy. Ni-Cu-Mn and Cu-Ti brazing materials have been used for the W and CFC tiles, respectively. Using the above bonding techniques, partial mockups of a blanket first-wall panel and divertor target have been successfully manufactured.

  12. Atmospheric Science and the CFC Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steed, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Industry involvement with developing atmospheric science and subsequent regulations to protect ozone was unusual. Chlorofluorocarbon manufacturers were research-based businesses accustomed to understanding the science behind product-related issues. When Lovelock's measurements in 1971 implied most of the cumulative production of CFCs remained in the atmosphere, global CFC producers funded academic research to identify natural sinks for the materials. The Fluorocarbon Program Panel (FPP) began in 1972, but changed focus to atmospheric photochemistry following Rowland and Molina's work in 1974. Despite early vociferous opposition, especially by the CFC-using aerosol industry, to any regulations, leaders among the producers worked to build their scientific understanding, expanding FPP funding and launching internal work in modeling and ozone trend analysis. The key first question for industry was not how much depletion might occur, but whether it would occur at all. If so, regardless of the amount, regulations and a major transition would be required in CFC-using industries, and the response would need to be global and prompt. So long as that basic question was in doubt, some businesses and countries would resist the economic cost of action. In the meantime, the producing industry worked to identify potential alternatives and to communicate atmospheric science to the downstream industries. Although the industry science effort was often disparaged as an attack on "real" science, my only assignment when I joined DuPont's Central Research Department in 1979 was to understand and contribute to the science, keeping both the company and our customers informed. Our modeling results were published freely. FPP funding led to better knowledge of the ClO + O rate constant, significantly increasing depletion in model calculations; supported the development of the techniques used to measure in situ atmospheric ClO, so important in later strengthening the case for chlorine

  13. CFC and HFC recycling equipments: Test performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picini, P.; Caropreso, G.; Cicoli, G.; Posarelli, M.

    1996-12-01

    Actual regulatory conditions about ozone layer depleting chemicals set problems on their disposal and on the management of plants still using illegal CFCs. Anyway fluids that will replace CFCs (i.e. HFCs) will not be allowed to be spread into the atmosphere, due to their high costs and to the greenhouse effect. A viable solution would be the recovery, purification and recycle of contaminated fluids. ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment), in cooperation with ICF (Industria Componenti Frigoriferi) Company leader in the field of air refrigerating and conditioning, patented a device able to extract, to clean and to recycle CFC 12 and HFC 134a in the refrigerating systems. This paper presents experimental data from the qualification tests on a device performing the above mentioned operations regarding systems that use HFC 134a as process fluid

  14. Investigation of tungsten coatings on graphite and CFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, R; Maier, H; Gauthier, E; Greuner, H; Hirai, T; Hopf, Ch; Likonen, J; Maddaluno, G; Matthews, G F; Mitteau, R; Philipps, V; Piazza, G; Ruset, C

    2007-01-01

    In the frame of JET's ITER-like wall (ILW) project tungsten coatings on carbon fibre reinforced carbon substrates will be used in the divertor and highly loaded areas in the main chamber. Fourteen different types of samples were produced by physical or chemical vapour deposition and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) with coating thickness of 4, 10 and 200 μm. Similarly, three different VPS W coatings (200 μm) on two different graphite substrates, were produced for use at the strike-point regions of ASDEX Upgrade. All coatings were subjected to thermal screening and thermal cycling tests in the ion beam facility GLADIS. Additionally, the coatings intended for the ILW project were exposed to edge localized mode (ELM)-like thermal loads in the electron beam facility JUDITH. A general failure mode with the CFC substrate is crack formation upon cool-down, whereas the coatings on graphite do not show any crack formation. Additionally, metallographic investigations, x-ray diffraction measurements, adhesion testing as well as measurements on the contents of light impurities were performed

  15. Reglamentation of cfc rules in lithuania, junited kingdom and germany

    OpenAIRE

    Lukas, Mindaugas

    2007-01-01

    Šiame magistro darbe nagrinėjamos ir vertinamos Lietuvoje galiojančių kontroliuojamųjų užsienio vienetų pajamų apmokestinimo taisyklių, dar vadinamų CFC taisyklėmis, nuostatos. Būtinybę analizuoti ir tobulinti lietuviškąsias CFC taisykles patvirtina tiek besiformuojanti Europos Teisingumo Tesimo pozicija, vertinant šias taisykles Europos Sąjungos teisės kontekste, tiek itin skurdi CFC taisyklių taikymo praktika Lietuvoje. Pagrindinis darbo tikslas yra išanalizuoti esmines Lietuvoje taikomų CF...

  16. HCl co-production from CFC alternatives: Threat or opportunity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikulka, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    CFC production facilities have typically been located near CFC consumers and not necessarily near their feedstock sources. The co-production of HCl from these facilities has in the past been small and manageable by the CFC producers. Production of the CFC replacements, however, will result in larger quantities of HCl co-production at a scrutiny. Since new facilities are likely to be required for the replacements, there may be the opportunity to site facilities next to chlorocarbon suppliers who may be in a better position to take back the HCl co-product for reuse in their production facilities. This paper provides an overview of these issues as well as considers the implications of returning the HCl to the chlorocarbon supplier as well as viability of converting HCl back to chlorine

  17. EVALUASI PENGELOLAAN REFRIGERAN CFC, DAN HFC DENGAN MESIN 3R DAN UJI UNJUK KERJA MESIN PENDINGIN STUDI KASUS PADA BENGKEL AC MOBIL DI DENPASAR - BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I MADE RASTA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available CFC refrigerant has been known to be one of causes of ozone layer diminishing and HFC is one of green house gases contributing to global warming through the leak and synthetic refrigerant waste to environment. As a response to the ozone layer diminishment on stratosphere, UNEP, in 1981, through a negotiating process of international stages of development reserve the ozone layer through Wina Convention legalized in March 1985. It was then followed up with Montreal Protocol in September 1987 consisting supervision rules on producing, consuming, and treading ozone damaging materials. The government of Indonesia had ratified the convention through President Decree Number 23 Year 1999. The ozone layer reservation program implementation in Indonesia is facilitated by KLH. Governor of Bali issued Decree Number 523/04-B/HK/2010 on membership restructuring of ozone layer reservation and ozone damaging materials control team work in province of Bali. This research was done in 27 car AC service companies or workshop, which received grant of 3R engine in Denpasar, Bali. The research was dominantly focused on monitoring and evaluation, that is how car AC service company or workshop manage CFC/ R-12 and HFC/R-134a refrigerant at service time using 3R engine that refrigerant does not escape to atmostphere. Cooling machine work procedure test (COP was conducted in laboratory. Research result showed that car AC service company or workshop could manage CFC/ R-12 and HFC /R-l 34a eefctively ( 88,3%. The cooling engine work procedure using CFC /R-12 as the result of 3R engine recovery and recycel resulted in 2,435 while pure CFC/R-12 resulted in 2,54. There were differences in cooling engine work procedure to the use of pure CFC/R-12 refrigerant with that resulted by 3R engine with avarage difference 0,089 or 3,53%.

  18. Stability of Cubipod Armoured Roundheads in Short Crested Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Medina, Josep R.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a comparison of the stability of concrete cube armour and Cubipod armour in a breakwater roundhead with slope 1:1.5, exposed to both 2-D (long-crested) and 3-D (short-crested) waves. The model tests were performed at the Hydraulics and Coastal Engineering Laboratory at Aalborg...... University, Denmark. The model tests showed that Cubipod armour is more stable than cube armour when exposed to longer waves (steepness approx. 0.025) and has equal stability to cubes in shorter waves. The Cubipod armour layer contained due to its high porosity approximately 6-17% less concrete than the cube...

  19. Influence of Core Permeability on Accropode Armour Layer Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Christensen, M.; Jensen, T.

    1998-01-01

    Hedar and van der Meer studied the influence of core permeability on the stability of two layer rock armour. In both cases a significant influence was found. However, it is to be expected that for single layer armour there will be an even larger influence on the core permeability. This is because...... the dissipation of wave energy in single layer armour will e smaller than in double layer armour, thus giving room for larger flow velocities in and over armour layer On this background a laboratory stud of single layer Accropode stability was undertaken at Aalborg University in 1995. The test results as well...

  20. UV and infrared absorption spectra, atmospheric lifetimes, and ozone depletion and global warming potentials for CCl2FCCl2F (CFC-112, CCl3CClF2 (CFC-112a, CCl3CF3 (CFC-113a, and CCl2FCF3 (CFC-114a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Davis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The potential impact of CCl2FCF3 (CFC-114a and the recently observed CCl2FCCl2F (CFC-112, CCl3CClF2 (CFC-112a, and CCl3CF3 (CFC-113a chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs on stratospheric ozone and climate is presently not well characterized. In this study, the UV absorption spectra of these CFCs were measured between 192.5 and 235 nm over the temperature range 207–323 K. Precise parameterizations of the UV absorption spectra are presented. A 2-D atmospheric model was used to evaluate the CFC atmospheric loss processes, lifetimes, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs, and the associated uncertainty ranges in these metrics due to the kinetic and photochemical uncertainty. The CFCs are primarily removed in the stratosphere by short-wavelength UV photolysis with calculated global annually averaged steady-state lifetimes (years of 63.6 (61.9–64.7, 51.5 (50.0–52.6, 55.4 (54.3–56.3, and 105.3 (102.9–107.4 for CFC-112, CFC-112a, CFC-113a, and CFC-114a, respectively. The range of lifetimes given in parentheses is due to the 2σ uncertainty in the UV absorption spectra and O(1D rate coefficients included in the model calculations. The 2-D model was also used to calculate the CFC ozone depletion potentials (ODPs with values of 0.98, 0.86, 0.73, and 0.72 obtained for CFC-112, CFC-112a, CFC-113a, and CFC-114a, respectively. Using the infrared absorption spectra and lifetimes determined in this work, the CFC global warming potentials (GWPs were estimated to be 4260 (CFC-112, 3330 (CFC-112a, 3650 (CFC-113a, and 6510 (CFC-114a for the 100-year time horizon.

  1. Losses in armoured three-phase submarine cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Thomas; Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da; Bak, Claus Leth

    2014-01-01

    The number of offshore wind farms will keep increasing in the future as a part of the shift towards a CO2 free energy production. The energy harvested from the wind farm must be brought to shore, which is often done by using a three-phase armoured submarine power cable. The use of an armour...... increases the losses in armoured cables compared to unarmoured cables. In this paper a thorough state of the art analysis is conducted on armour losses in three-phase armoured submarine power cables. The analysis shows that the IEC 60287-1-1 standard overestimates the armour losses which lead...... to the installation of cables with excessive phase conductor cross section. This paper also presents an example of the potential economic benefits of having a better knowledge of the losses introduced by the armour....

  2. A carbon fibre composite (CFC Byelorussian peat corer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.G. Franzén

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The design specification, development and manufacture of a Byelorussian (Russian peat corer constructed from carbon fibre composite (CFC are described. The availability of this new composite material introduces new possibilities for constructing field instruments that are as strong as, or stronger than, equipment made from steel and other metals. One advantage is a significant weight reduction. A 10.5 metre coring set in standard stainless and soft steel weighs around 16 kg, whereas the total weight of a similar CFC set is 5.2 kg, giving a weight reduction of almost 70%. The CFC sample chamber is 500 mm long with internal diameter 65 mm, and so contains almost twice the volume of peat that can be collected with a standard 45 mm diameter steel corer. The diameter of the rods is 30 mm, which improves ergonomics, and the CFC has better thermic properties for winter use. Another advantage is that the contamination of samples (notably by chromium and nickel associated with the use of steel corers is eliminated. The CFC sampler works well in soft peats such as Sphagnum and Carex types. It is less suitable for little-decomposed fibrous and forest peats (e.g. Polytrichum type and those containing hardwood remains, especially in the more compacted bottom layers. It should be totally satisfactory for organic lake sediments, but probably not for stiff and coarse mineral deposits.

  3. Stability of Roundheads Armoured with Cubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Haagensen, Per; Macineira, Enrique

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a hydraulic model test study of the influence of concrete mass density and placement method on the stability of cube armour in a 1:2 slope cone shaped roundhead exposed to short ? crested seas. Location and development of armour displacements were studied...... for concrete cubes with mass density of 2.4 t/m 3 and 2.8 t/m 3 in random and regular placement. Significant increase in stability for the higher mass density cubes was found showing that the same dimension cubes can be used in roundhead and trunk, if for the top layer of the most exposed part of the roundhead...

  4. Blast Performance of Four Armour Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    provided in the Q&T condition, possessing tempered martensitic microstructures. Steels H, A and M possessed very similar microstructures at the...weld metal solidification cracking in steels and stainless steels . He has also undertaken extensive work on improving the weld zone toughness of high...3.1 Microstructures of steels It is generally accepted that a tempered martensitic microstructure is the most desirable condition for armour steel

  5. The Island Warrior: Coconut Fibre Armour from Kiribati

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Alison; Howie, Rachel; Leckie, Lizzy; Watson, Kaetaeta; Charteris, Chris

    2017-01-01

    This brochure accompanies a small exhibition focusing on the extraordinary suits of armour made in the small islands of Kiribati, in the Pacific Ocean, throughout the 19th century. By looking closely at the armour we will discover how these complex objects were made, worn and used. Other objects on display will explore the contemporary relevance of this armour to I-Kiribati people today. The display will also include a new suit of armour made especially for the Museum by artists Kaetaeta Wats...

  6. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF PIC FORMATION IN CFC-12 INCINERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of experiments to determine the effect of flame zone temperature on gas-phase flame formation and destruction of products of incomplete combustion (PICS) during dichlorodi-fluoromethane (CFC-12) incineration. The effect of water injection into the flame ...

  7. A comparison of the behind armour blunt trauma effects between ceramic faced and soft body armours caused by ballistic impact

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, E. A.; Horsfall, Ian; Watson, Celia H.

    2002-01-01

    Recently published research has characterised the behind armour blunt trauma (BABT) effects associated with high velocity ballistic impact on textile-based armour faced with a ceramic plate. Subsequently dynamic displacements, accelerations and pressures have been characterised both in Gelatine experiments and animal experiments and used to provide test methodologies. High velocity armour consists of a ceramic plate usually backed with a composite panel, which is worn over the conventional te...

  8. Tungsten and beryllium armour development for the JET ITER-like wall project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, H.; Hirai, T.; Rubel, M.; Neu, R.; Mertens, Ph.; Greuner, H.; Hopf, Ch.; Matthews, G.F.; Neubauer, O.; Piazza, G.; Gauthier, E.; Likonen, J.; Mitteau, R.; Maddaluno, G.; Riccardi, B.; Philipps, V.; Ruset, C.; Lungu, C.P.; Uytdenhouwen, I.

    2007-01-01

    For the ITER-like wall project at JET the present main chamber CFC tiles will be exchanged with Be tiles and in parallel a fully tungsten-clad divertor will be prepared. Therefore three R and D programmes were initiated: Be coatings on Inconel as well as Be erosion markers were developed for the first wall of the main chamber. High heat flux screening and cyclic loading tests carried out on the Be coatings on Inconel showed excellent performance, above the required power and energy density. For the divertor a conceptual design for a bulk W horizontal target plate was investigated, with the emphasis on minimizing electromagnetic forces. The design consisted of stacks of W lamellae of 6 mm width that were insulated in the toroidal direction. High heat flux tests of a test module were performed with an electron beam at an absorbed power density up to 9 MW m -2 for more than 150 pulses and finally with increasing power loads leading to surface temperatures in excess of 3000 0 C. No macroscopic failure occurred during the test while SEM showed the development of micro-cracks on the loaded surface. For all other divertor parts R and D was performed to provide the technology to coat the 2-directional CFC material used at JET with thin tungsten coatings. The W-coated CFC tiles were subjected to heat loads with power densities ranging up to 23.5 MW m -2 and exposed to cyclic heat loading for 200 pulses at 10.5 MW m -2 . All coatings developed cracks perpendicular to the CFC fibres due to the stronger contraction of the coating upon cool-down after the heat pulses

  9. Tungsten and beryllium armour development for the JET ITER-like wall project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, H.; Hirai, T.; Rubel, M.; Neu, R.; Mertens, Ph.; Greuner, H.; Hopf, Ch.; Matthews, G. F.; Neubauer, O.; Piazza, G.; Gauthier, E.; Likonen, J.; Mitteau, R.; Maddaluno, G.; Riccardi, B.; Philipps, V.; Ruset, C.; Lungu, C. P.; Uytdenhouwen, I.; EFDA contributors, JET

    2007-03-01

    For the ITER-like wall project at JET the present main chamber CFC tiles will be exchanged with Be tiles and in parallel a fully tungsten-clad divertor will be prepared. Therefore three R&D programmes were initiated: Be coatings on Inconel as well as Be erosion markers were developed for the first wall of the main chamber. High heat flux screening and cyclic loading tests carried out on the Be coatings on Inconel showed excellent performance, above the required power and energy density. For the divertor a conceptual design for a bulk W horizontal target plate was investigated, with the emphasis on minimizing electromagnetic forces. The design consisted of stacks of W lamellae of 6 mm width that were insulated in the toroidal direction. High heat flux tests of a test module were performed with an electron beam at an absorbed power density up to 9 MW m-2 for more than 150 pulses and finally with increasing power loads leading to surface temperatures in excess of 3000 °C. No macroscopic failure occurred during the test while SEM showed the development of micro-cracks on the loaded surface. For all other divertor parts R&D was performed to provide the technology to coat the 2-directional CFC material used at JET with thin tungsten coatings. The W-coated CFC tiles were subjected to heat loads with power densities ranging up to 23.5 MW m-2 and exposed to cyclic heat loading for 200 pulses at 10.5 MW m-2. All coatings developed cracks perpendicular to the CFC fibres due to the stronger contraction of the coating upon cool-down after the heat pulses.

  10. Influence of CFC quality on the performance of TS limiter elements under cyclic heat loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missirlian, M.; Greuner, H.; Hoeschen, T.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Richou, M.; Lipa, M.; Boeswirth, B.; Boscary, J.

    2011-01-01

    For the fabrication of 600 actively cooled finger elements for the Tore Supra pump limiter in operation since 2001 it was necessary to rely on two different batches of the CFC N11 grade (Carbon Fibre reinforced Composite) namely so-called SEP N11-92 (fabricated in 1992) and N11-98 (fabricated in 1998). It came out during the incoming inspection of the fingers that the bonding quality was degraded for the 98-batch so that an important number of tiles had to be repaired. Due to the coming upgrade of the Tore Supra heating system, two high heat flux test campaigns were performed on the neutral beam GLADIS facility (IPP Garching, Germany) including micro-structural analyses in order to evaluate, compare and understand the fatigue behaviour of 92- and 98-batch finger elements.

  11. Tropospheric observations of CFC-114 and CFC-114a with a focus on long-term trends and emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Laube

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs are ozone-depleting substances as well as strong greenhouse gases, and the control of their production and use under the Montreal Protocol has had demonstrable benefits to both mitigation of increasing surface UV radiation and climate forcing. A global ban on consumption came into force in 2010, but there is evidence of continuing emissions of certain CFCs from a range of sources. One compound has received little attention in the literature, namely CFC-114 (C2Cl2F4. Of particular interest here is the differentiation between CFC-114 (CClF2CClF2 and its asymmetric isomeric form CFC-114a (CF3CCl2F as atmospheric long-term measurements in the peer-reviewed literature to date have been assumed to represent the sum of both isomers with a time-invariant isomeric speciation. Here we report the first long-term measurements of the two isomeric forms separately, and find that they have different origins and trends in the atmosphere. Air samples collected at Cape Grim (41° S, Australia, during atmospheric background conditions since 1978, combined with samples collected from deep polar snow (firn enable us to obtain a near-complete record of both gases since their initial production and release in the 1940s. Both isomers were present in the unpolluted atmosphere in comparably small amounts before 1960. The mixing ratio of CFC-114 doubled from 7.9 to 14.8 parts per trillion (ppt between the start of the Cape Grim record in 1978 and the end of our record in 2014, while over the same time CFC-114a trebled from 0.35 to 1.03 ppt. Mixing ratios of both isomers are slowly decreasing by the end of this period. This is consistent with measurements of recent aircraft-based samples showing no significant interhemispheric mixing ratio gradient. We also find that the fraction of CFC-114a mixing ratio relative to that of CFC-114 increased from 4.2 to 6.9 % over the 37-year period. This contradicts the current tacit assumption used in

  12. Tropospheric observations of CFC-114 and CFC-114a with a focus on long-term trends and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Johannes C.; Hanif, Norfazrin Mohd; Martinerie, Patricia; Gallacher, Eileen; Fraser, Paul J.; Langenfelds, Ray; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Schwander, Jakob; Witrant, Emmanuel; Wang, Jia-Lin; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Gooch, Lauren J.; Reeves, Claire E.; Sturges, William T.; Oram, David E.

    2016-12-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are ozone-depleting substances as well as strong greenhouse gases, and the control of their production and use under the Montreal Protocol has had demonstrable benefits to both mitigation of increasing surface UV radiation and climate forcing. A global ban on consumption came into force in 2010, but there is evidence of continuing emissions of certain CFCs from a range of sources. One compound has received little attention in the literature, namely CFC-114 (C2Cl2F4). Of particular interest here is the differentiation between CFC-114 (CClF2CClF2) and its asymmetric isomeric form CFC-114a (CF3CCl2F) as atmospheric long-term measurements in the peer-reviewed literature to date have been assumed to represent the sum of both isomers with a time-invariant isomeric speciation. Here we report the first long-term measurements of the two isomeric forms separately, and find that they have different origins and trends in the atmosphere. Air samples collected at Cape Grim (41° S), Australia, during atmospheric background conditions since 1978, combined with samples collected from deep polar snow (firn) enable us to obtain a near-complete record of both gases since their initial production and release in the 1940s. Both isomers were present in the unpolluted atmosphere in comparably small amounts before 1960. The mixing ratio of CFC-114 doubled from 7.9 to 14.8 parts per trillion (ppt) between the start of the Cape Grim record in 1978 and the end of our record in 2014, while over the same time CFC-114a trebled from 0.35 to 1.03 ppt. Mixing ratios of both isomers are slowly decreasing by the end of this period. This is consistent with measurements of recent aircraft-based samples showing no significant interhemispheric mixing ratio gradient. We also find that the fraction of CFC-114a mixing ratio relative to that of CFC-114 increased from 4.2 to 6.9 % over the 37-year period. This contradicts the current tacit assumption used in international climate

  13. Is behind armour blunt trauma a real threat to users of body armour? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Debra J; Horsfall, I; Malbon, C

    2016-02-01

    Behind armour blunt trauma (BABT) has been defined as a non-penetrating injury caused by the rapid deformation of body armour. There has been an increasing awareness of BABT as an injury mechanism in both the military and civilian worlds; whether BABT results in serious injuries is debatable. A systematic review of the openly accessible literature was conducted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses method to investigate those injuries classified as BABT and their severity. 50 sources were identified that included pertinent information relevant to this systematic review on BABT injuries. Typical injuries reported included skin contusion, laceration and penetration, rib fracture and contusions to lungs, kidneys, spleen and (rarely) the heart. No evidence of fatal injuries due to BABT was identified. Whether BABT can lead to life-threatening injuries when small-arms ammunition impacts body armour components designed to stop that ammunition is debatable. It should be emphasised that other data may be available in government reports that are not openly available. Further research should be considered that investigates developments in body armour, including initiatives that involve reducing burden, and how they affect BABT. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. New Formula for Stability of Cube Armoured Roundheads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maciñeira, Enrique; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2007-01-01

    Design of armour for rubble mound breakwater roundheads constitutes in many cases a problem due to the limitation of available data and guidelines. The objective of the paper is to present the results of a comprehensive model test study on the stability of cube armoured roundheads, resulting...... in a new stability formula...

  15. Thermal effects of runaway electrons in an armoured divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stad, R.C.L. van der.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes the results of a numerical thermal analysis of the heat deposition of runaway electrons accompanying plasma disruptions in a armoured divertor. The divertor concepts studied are carbon on molybdenum and beryllium on copper. The conclusion is that the runaway electrons can cause melting of the armour as well as melting of the structure and can damage the divertor severely. (orig.)

  16. Limitations imposed by wearing armour on Medieval soldiers' locomotor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, Graham N; Formenti, Federico; Minetti, Alberto E

    2012-02-22

    In Medieval Europe, soldiers wore steel plate armour for protection during warfare. Armour design reflected a trade-off between protection and mobility it offered the wearer. By the fifteenth century, a typical suit of field armour weighed between 30 and 50 kg and was distributed over the entire body. How much wearing armour affected Medieval soldiers' locomotor energetics and biomechanics is unknown. We investigated the mechanics and the energetic cost of locomotion in armour, and determined the effects on physical performance. We found that the net cost of locomotion (C(met)) during armoured walking and running is much more energetically expensive than unloaded locomotion. C(met) for locomotion in armour was 2.1-2.3 times higher for walking, and 1.9 times higher for running when compared with C(met) for unloaded locomotion at the same speed. An important component of the increased energy use results from the extra force that must be generated to support the additional mass. However, the energetic cost of locomotion in armour was also much higher than equivalent trunk loading. This additional cost is mostly explained by the increased energy required to swing the limbs and impaired breathing. Our findings can predict age-associated decline in Medieval soldiers' physical performance, and have potential implications in understanding the outcomes of past European military battles.

  17. Stability of Armour Units in Oscillatory Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Thompson, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a program to study the hydraulics of wave attack on rubble mound breakwaters tests were made on model armour units in a steady flow through a layer laid on a slope. The flow angle has little effect on stability for dolosse or rock layers. The head drop at failure across each type...... of layer is similar but the dolosse layer is more permeable and fails as a whole. There was no viscous scale effect. These results and earlier tests in oscillating flow suggest a 'reservoir' effect is important in the stability in steep waves....

  18. Stability of Armour Units in Oscillatory Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Thompson, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a program to study the hydraulics of wave attack on rubble mound breakwaters tests were made on model armour units in a steady flow through a layer laid on a slope. The flow angle has little effect on stability for dolosse or rock layers. The head drop at failure across each type of layer is similar but the dolosse layer is more permeable and fails as a whole. There was no viscous scale effect. These results and earlier tests in oscillating flow suggest a 'reservoir' effect is impo...

  19. Do air-gaps behind soft body armour affect protection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilsley, Lee; Carr, D J; Lankester, C; Malbon, C

    2018-02-01

    Body armour typically comprises a fabric garment covering the torso combined with hard armour (ceramic/composite). Some users wear only soft armour which provides protection from sharp weapons and pistol ammunition. It is usually recommended that body armour is worn against the body with no air-gaps being present between the wearer and the armour. However, air-gaps can occur in certain situations such as females around the breasts, in badly fitting armour and where manufacturers have incorporated an air-gap claiming improvements in thermophysiological burden. The effect of an air-gap on the ballistic protection and the back face signature (BFS) as a result of a non-perforating ballistic impact was determined. Armour panels representative of typical police armour (400x400 mm) were mounted on calibrated Roma Plastilina No 1 and impacted with 9 mm Luger FMJ (9×19 mm; full metal jacket; Dynamit Nobel DM11A1B2) ammunition at 365±10 m/s with a range of air-gaps (0-15 mm). Whether or not the ammunition perforated the armour was noted, the BFS was measured and the incidence of pencilling (a severe, deep and narrow BFS) was identified. For 0° impacts, a critical air-gap size of 10 mm is detrimental to armour performance for the armour/ammunition combination assessed in this work. Specifically, the incidences of pencilling were more common with a 10 mm air-gap and resulted in BFS depth:volume ratios ≥1.0. For impacts at 30° the armour was susceptible to perforation irrespective of air-gap. This work suggested that an air-gap behind police body armour might result in an increased likelihood of injury. It is recommended that body armour is worn with no air-gap underneath. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Armours for soft bodies: how far can bioinspiration take us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Zachary W; Vernerey, Franck J

    2018-05-15

    The development of armour is as old as the dawn of civilization. Early man looked to natural structures to harvest or replicate for protection, leaning on millennia of evolutionary developments in natural protection. Since the advent of more modern weaponry, Armor development has seemingly been driven more by materials research than bio-inspiration. However, parallels can still be drawn between modern bullet-protective armours and natural defensive structures. Soft armour for handgun and fragmentation threats can be likened to mammalian skin, and similarly, hard armour can be compared with exoskeletons and turtle shells. Via bio-inspiration, it may be possible to develop structures previously un-researched for ballistic protection. This review will cover current modern ballistic protective structures focusing on energy dissipation and absorption methods, and their natural analogues. As all armour is a compromise between weight, flexibility and protection, the imbricated structure of scaled skin will be presented as a better balance between these factors.

  1. Reactivity of solvent alcohol on degradation of CFC113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Seiko

    2003-01-01

    1,1,2-Trichloro-trifluoroethane (CFC113) was dissolved in alkaline 1-butanol, 2-butanol, iso-butyl alcohol, and phenyl ethyl alcohol and irradiated with 60 Co gamma rays after purged with pure nitrogen gas. In all these solvents, the concentration of CFC113 and hydroxide ion decreased and that of chloride ion increased with a dose observed in 2-propanol solution. The reaction efficiency increases in order of 1-butanol< iso-butyl alcohol< phenyl ethyl alcohol<2-butanol<2-propanol. The solvent effect will depend on the binding energy of the αC-H of the alcohol molecule and electron affinity and dipole moment of the ketones or aldehydes produced from the alcohols

  2. Materials design principles of ancient fish armour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruet, Benjamin J. F.; Song, Juha; Boyce, Mary C.; Ortiz, Christine

    2008-09-01

    Knowledge of the structure-property-function relationships of dermal scales of armoured fish could enable pathways to improved bioinspired human body armour, and may provide clues to the evolutionary origins of mineralized tissues. Here, we present a multiscale experimental and computational approach that reveals the materials design principles present within individual ganoid scales from the `living fossil' Polypterus senegalus. This fish belongs to the ancient family Polypteridae, which first appeared 96 million years ago during the Cretaceous period and still retains many of their characteristics. The mechanistic origins of penetration resistance (approximating a biting attack) were investigated and found to include the juxtaposition of multiple distinct reinforcing composite layers that each undergo their own unique deformation mechanisms, a unique spatial functional form of mechanical properties with regions of differing levels of gradation within and between material layers, and layers with an undetectable gradation, load-dependent effective material properties, circumferential surface cracking, orthogonal microcracking in laminated sublayers and geometrically corrugated junctions between layers.

  3. CFC rules in the context of the proposed CCCTB directive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Sobotková

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the proposal for a Council Directive on a Common Consolidated Corporate Tax Base (CCCTB there have been introduced a specific anti-abuse provisions, CFC rules. These rules are aimed at tax evasions and tax avoidance. The basic principle is the protection of the tax base against erosion through practices of artificial income shifting. Generally, CFC rules prevent tax avoidance in a state of a shareholder by denying the deferred taxation of profits generated by its controlled company, which is a resident in a tax preference jurisdiction. Even thought the CCCTB directive would be aided easier and low-costs cross-border business as well as it would be restricted the harmful tax competition there are questions whether it is advisable to introduce these rules into such system of the CCCTB, whether these rules are compatible with the CCCTB and whether it is regulated properly. So, the focus of this paper rests on the interaction of the proposed CCCTB directive with existing CFC rules in the European Union. The paper deals with pros and cons, economic and legal perspectives these rules in the context of the proposed CCCTB directive.

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF H-Y AND CR-Y ZEOLITE CATALYSTS DURING THE OXIDATIVE DESTRUCTION OF CFC11 AND CFC12

    Science.gov (United States)

    The long term stability-deactivation characteristics of two Y zeolite catalysts, namely H-Y and cation exchanged Cr-Y, were studied during the oxidative destruction of CFC11 and CFC12 feeds. Experiments were carried out at 300 degrees C and 500 h-1 space velocity. Properties of...

  5. Stability of cube armoured roundheads exposed to long crested and short crested waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maciñeira, Enrique G.; Burcharth, Hans Falk

    2016-01-01

    Highlights •A formula to estimate armour damage in cube armoured roundheads is presented •Damage limits for design limit states are proposed......Highlights •A formula to estimate armour damage in cube armoured roundheads is presented •Damage limits for design limit states are proposed...

  6. A Comparison of Military and Law Enforcement Body Armour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Rodney

    2018-01-01

    Law-enforcement officers increasingly wear body armour for protection; wearing body armour is common practice in military populations. Law-enforcement and military occupational demands are vastly different and military-styled body armour may not be suitable for law-enforcement. This study investigated differences between selected military body armour (MBA: 6.4 kg) and law-enforcement body armour (LEBA: 2.1 kg) in impacts on postural sway, vertical jump, agility, a functional movement screen (FMS), task simulations (vehicle exit; victim recovery), and subjective measures. Ten volunteer police officers (six females, four males) were randomly allocated to one of the designs on each of two days. Body armour type did not significantly affect postural sway, vertical jump, vehicle exit and 5 m sprint times, or victim recovery times. Both armour types increased sway velocity and sway-path length in the final five seconds compared to the first 5 s of a balance task. The MBA was associated with significantly slower times to complete the agility task, poorer FMS total scores, and poorer subjective ratings of performance and comfort. The LEBA was perceived as more comfortable and received more positive performance ratings during the agility test and task simulations. The impacts of MBA and LEBA differed significantly and they should not be considered interchangeable. PMID:29443905

  7. A Comparison of Military and Law Enforcement Body Armour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Robin; Schram, Ben; Pope, Rodney

    2018-02-14

    Law-enforcement officers increasingly wear body armour for protection; wearing body armour is common practice in military populations. Law-enforcement and military occupational demands are vastly different and military-styled body armour may not be suitable for law-enforcement. This study investigated differences between selected military body armour (MBA: 6.4 kg) and law-enforcement body armour (LEBA: 2.1 kg) in impacts on postural sway, vertical jump, agility, a functional movement screen (FMS), task simulations (vehicle exit; victim recovery), and subjective measures. Ten volunteer police officers (six females, four males) were randomly allocated to one of the designs on each of two days. Body armour type did not significantly affect postural sway, vertical jump, vehicle exit and 5 m sprint times, or victim recovery times. Both armour types increased sway velocity and sway-path length in the final five seconds compared to the first 5 s of a balance task. The MBA was associated with significantly slower times to complete the agility task, poorer FMS total scores, and poorer subjective ratings of performance and comfort. The LEBA was perceived as more comfortable and received more positive performance ratings during the agility test and task simulations. The impacts of MBA and LEBA differed significantly and they should not be considered interchangeable.

  8. A Comparison of Military and Law Enforcement Body Armour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Orr

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Law-enforcement officers increasingly wear body armour for protection; wearing body armour is common practice in military populations. Law-enforcement and military occupational demands are vastly different and military-styled body armour may not be suitable for law-enforcement. This study investigated differences between selected military body armour (MBA: 6.4 kg and law-enforcement body armour (LEBA: 2.1 kg in impacts on postural sway, vertical jump, agility, a functional movement screen (FMS, task simulations (vehicle exit; victim recovery, and subjective measures. Ten volunteer police officers (six females, four males were randomly allocated to one of the designs on each of two days. Body armour type did not significantly affect postural sway, vertical jump, vehicle exit and 5 m sprint times, or victim recovery times. Both armour types increased sway velocity and sway-path length in the final five seconds compared to the first 5 s of a balance task. The MBA was associated with significantly slower times to complete the agility task, poorer FMS total scores, and poorer subjective ratings of performance and comfort. The LEBA was perceived as more comfortable and received more positive performance ratings during the agility test and task simulations. The impacts of MBA and LEBA differed significantly and they should not be considered interchangeable.

  9. Behind armour blunt trauma--an emerging problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, L

    2001-02-01

    Behind Armour Blunt Trauma (BABT) is the non-penetrating injury resulting from the rapid deformation of armours covering the body. The deformation of the surface of an armour in contact with the body wall arises from the impact of a bullet or other projectile on its front face. The deformation is part of the retardation and energy absorbing process that captures the projectile. In extreme circumstances, the BABT may result in death, even though the projectile has not perforated the armour. An escalation of the available energy of bullets and the desire of armour designers to minimise the weight and bulk of personal armour systems will increase the risk of BABT in military and security forces personnel. In order to develop materials that can be interposed between the armour and the body wall to attenuate the transfer of energy into the body, it is essential that the mechanism of BABT is known. There is a great deal of activity within UK and NATO to unravel the interactions; the mechanism is likely to be a combination of stress (pressure) waves generated by the rapid initial motion of the rear of the armour, and shear deformation to viscera produced by gross deflection of the body wall. Physical and computer model systems are under development to characterise the biophysical processes and provide performance targets for materials to be placed between armours and the body wall in order to attenuate the injuries (trauma attenuating backings-TABs). The patho-physiological consequences of BABT are being clarified by research, but the injuries will have some of the features of blunt chest trauma observed in road traffic accidents and other forms of civilian blunt impact injury. The injuries also have characteristics of primary blast injury. An overview diagnosis and treatment is described.

  10. Tungsten versus depleted uranium for armour-piercing penetrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have been widely used in the production of armour-piercing (AP) penetrators for defense purposes for the past 40 years. In recent years, however, depleted uranium (DU) has also been utilised for this application. Both materials exhibit high density and strength, two properties necessary for kinetic-energy projectiles to penetrate armour on tanks and other vehicles. The facts, however, support the view that tungsten can and should be utilised as the primary material for most armour-defeating ordnance applications. (author)

  11. Reliability Evaluation of Armour Layer and Toe Berm Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiani, E.; Burcharth, H. F.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1995-01-01

    Failure of various parts of a rubble mound breakwater can be crucial for the stability of the rubble mound breakwater as a whole. This is illustrated in Fig 1, showing the various failure modes. The primary failure modes which will be focused on in this investigation are failure in the armour layer...... and the toe berm. The main function of the toe berm, is to keep the main armour layer in place so that movement is restricted to a minimum. As the water depth is lowered at the breakwater, the stability of the toe will decrease. The armour layer is also more susceptable to damage when the water level...

  12. Cyclic heat load testing of improved CFC/Cu bonding for the W 7-X divertor targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuner, H.; Boeswirth, B.; Boscary, J.; Chaudhuri, P.; Schlosser, J.; Friedrich, T.; Plankensteiner, A.; Tivey, R.

    2009-01-01

    Extensive high heat flux cycling testing of pre-series targets was performed in the neutral beam facility GLADIS to establish the industrial process for the manufacturing of 890 targets, which will be needed for the installation of the WENDELSTEIN 7-X divertor. The targets are manufactured of flat tiles of CFC NB31 as plasma facing material bonded by an Active Metal Casting copper interlayer onto a water-cooled CuCrZr structure. Based on the results of the 3D thermo-mechanical FEM analysis of the CFC/Cu interface, an additional set of 17 full-scale pre-series elements including three design variations was manufactured by PLANSEE SE. The insertion of an additional plastically compliant copper interlayer between the cooling structure and the Active Metal Casting interlayer showed the best results. No critical tile detachment was observed during >5000 cycles at 10 MW/m 2 . These results demonstrated the sufficient life time of the component for the expected heat load in operation.

  13. Metallographic study of non-homogenous armour impacted by armour-piercing incendiary ammunition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balos, Sebastian; Sidjanin, Leposava

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Incendiary effect does not influence the changes in microstructure. → Impact causes plastic deformation in more ductile materials. → Impact causes shear crack instability in less ductile materials. → Crack propagation influences chipping on the inside of the perforated plate. -- Abstract: In this paper, the influence of impact and incendiary effect on the microstructure changes and crack development in non-homogenous add-on armour is studied. The main objective was to determine the parameters that may cause the yielding of the material, leading to a possible decrease in multi-hit resistance. For that purpose, patented wire fence and perforated plates made from two types of high strength steel, Hardox 450 and 50CrV4 tempered at 170 o C were tested. Various techniques were applied: high speed video camera was used, visual macroanalysis, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. It was found that incendiary effect, being of a brief nature, does not have any influence on microstructure of the add-on armour. However, impact greatly influences crack development and propagation, which occurs in 50CrV4 steel, the material with lower ductility, diminishing its multi-hit resistance. In accordance with obtained results, non-homogenous add-on armour behaviour models were devised, describing the influence of material ductility and geometry on fracture mode, stresses and deformability.

  14. Nanostructured Bainite-Austenite Steel for Armours Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burian W.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite-austenite steels are applied in the armours construction due to their excellent combination of strength and ductility which enables to lower the armour weight and to improve the protection efficiency. Mechanical properties of the bainite-austenite steels can be controlled in the wide range by chemical composition and heat treatment. In the paper the results of investigation comprising measuring of quasi - static mechanical properties, dynamic yield stress and firing tests of bainite-austenite steel NANOS-BA® are presented. Reported results show that the investigated bainite-austenite steel can be used for constructing add-on armour and that the armour fulfils requirements of protection level 2 of STANAG 4569. Obtained reduction in weight of the tested NANOS-BA® plates in comparison with the present solutions is about 30%.

  15. Atmospheric histories and emissions of chlorofluorocarbons CFC-13 (CClF3, ΣCFC-114 (C2Cl2F4, and CFC-115 (C2ClF5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Vollmer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on observations of the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-13 (chlorotrifluoromethane, ΣCFC-114 (combined measurement of both isomers of dichlorotetrafluoroethane, and CFC-115 (chloropentafluoroethane in atmospheric and firn samples, we reconstruct records of their tropospheric histories spanning nearly 8 decades. These compounds were measured in polar firn air samples, in ambient air archived in canisters, and in situ at the AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment network and affiliated sites. Global emissions to the atmosphere are derived from these observations using an inversion based on a 12-box atmospheric transport model. For CFC-13, we provide the first comprehensive global analysis. This compound increased monotonically from its first appearance in the atmosphere in the late 1950s to a mean global abundance of 3.18 ppt (dry-air mole fraction in parts per trillion, pmol mol−1 in 2016. Its growth rate has decreased since the mid-1980s but has remained at a surprisingly high mean level of 0.02 ppt yr−1 since 2000, resulting in a continuing growth of CFC-13 in the atmosphere. ΣCFC-114 increased from its appearance in the 1950s to a maximum of 16.6 ppt in the early 2000s and has since slightly declined to 16.3 ppt in 2016. CFC-115 increased monotonically from its first appearance in the 1960s and reached a global mean mole fraction of 8.49 ppt in 2016. Growth rates of all three compounds over the past years are significantly larger than would be expected from zero emissions. Under the assumption of unchanging lifetimes and atmospheric transport patterns, we derive global emissions from our measurements, which have remained unexpectedly high in recent years: mean yearly emissions for the last decade (2007–2016 of CFC-13 are at 0.48 ± 0.15 kt yr−1 (> 15 % of past peak emissions, of ΣCFC-114 at 1.90 ± 0.84 kt yr−1 (∼ 10 % of peak emissions, and of CFC-115 at 0.80 ± 0.50

  16. Atmospheric histories and emissions of chlorofluorocarbons CFC-13 (CClF3), ΣCFC-114 (C2Cl2F4), and CFC-115 (C2ClF5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Martin K.; Young, Dickon; Trudinger, Cathy M.; Mühle, Jens; Henne, Stephan; Rigby, Matthew; Park, Sunyoung; Li, Shanlan; Guillevic, Myriam; Mitrevski, Blagoj; Harth, Christina M.; Miller, Benjamin R.; Reimann, Stefan; Yao, Bo; Steele, L. Paul; Wyss, Simon A.; Lunder, Chris R.; Arduini, Jgor; McCulloch, Archie; Wu, Songhao; Siek Rhee, Tae; Wang, Ray H. J.; Salameh, Peter K.; Hermansen, Ove; Hill, Matthias; Langenfelds, Ray L.; Ivy, Diane; O'Doherty, Simon; Krummel, Paul B.; Maione, Michela; Etheridge, David M.; Zhou, Lingxi; Fraser, Paul J.; Prinn, Ronald G.; Weiss, Ray F.; Simmonds, Peter G.

    2018-01-01

    Based on observations of the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-13 (chlorotrifluoromethane), ΣCFC-114 (combined measurement of both isomers of dichlorotetrafluoroethane), and CFC-115 (chloropentafluoroethane) in atmospheric and firn samples, we reconstruct records of their tropospheric histories spanning nearly 8 decades. These compounds were measured in polar firn air samples, in ambient air archived in canisters, and in situ at the AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment) network and affiliated sites. Global emissions to the atmosphere are derived from these observations using an inversion based on a 12-box atmospheric transport model. For CFC-13, we provide the first comprehensive global analysis. This compound increased monotonically from its first appearance in the atmosphere in the late 1950s to a mean global abundance of 3.18 ppt (dry-air mole fraction in parts per trillion, pmol mol-1) in 2016. Its growth rate has decreased since the mid-1980s but has remained at a surprisingly high mean level of 0.02 ppt yr-1 since 2000, resulting in a continuing growth of CFC-13 in the atmosphere. ΣCFC-114 increased from its appearance in the 1950s to a maximum of 16.6 ppt in the early 2000s and has since slightly declined to 16.3 ppt in 2016. CFC-115 increased monotonically from its first appearance in the 1960s and reached a global mean mole fraction of 8.49 ppt in 2016. Growth rates of all three compounds over the past years are significantly larger than would be expected from zero emissions. Under the assumption of unchanging lifetimes and atmospheric transport patterns, we derive global emissions from our measurements, which have remained unexpectedly high in recent years: mean yearly emissions for the last decade (2007-2016) of CFC-13 are at 0.48 ± 0.15 kt yr-1 (> 15 % of past peak emissions), of ΣCFC-114 at 1.90 ± 0.84 kt yr-1 (˜ 10 % of peak emissions), and of CFC-115 at 0.80 ± 0.50 kt yr-1 (> 5 % of peak emissions). Mean yearly emissions of CFC-115 for

  17. Key issues in body armour: threats, materials and design

    OpenAIRE

    Horsfall, Ian

    2012-01-01

    This chapter will examine the mechanics and materials of body armour in military, police and some security related applications to protect the wearer from penetrative threats. These threats will include battlefield threats such as shell fragments and high velocity bullets, and threats to law enforcement personnel such as handgun bullets and knives. Regardless of whether the threat is a high velocity bullet, or a knife, the essential requirements of body armour are the same; first an interacti...

  18. Structural Integrity and Hydraulic Stability of Dolos Armour Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.

    A method for development of design diagrams to ensure structural integrity of slender unreinforced concrete breakwater armour units is presented. The method is based on experimental data from small scale flume tests as well as impact loading of prototype and small scale units. A prerequisite......-parameter characterization makes it possible to develop simple design diagrams for engineering purposes. Specific design diagrams for integrity of Dolos armour units with the waist ratio as a variable have been produced....

  19. A Design Method for Impact-Loaded Slender Armour Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    It is well known that the bigger a structural member like a beam, the relatively weaker it is. In the end it cannot even support its own weight. The same problem holds for slender armour units such as Dolosse.......It is well known that the bigger a structural member like a beam, the relatively weaker it is. In the end it cannot even support its own weight. The same problem holds for slender armour units such as Dolosse....

  20. CFC-11, CFC-12 and HCFC-22 ground-based remote sensing FTIR measurements at Réunion Island and comparisons with MIPAS/ENVISAT data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Profiles of CFC-11 (CCl3F, CFC-12 (CCl2F2 and HCFC-22 (CHF2Cl have been obtained from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR solar absorption measurements above the Saint-Denis (St Denis and Maïdo sites at Réunion Island (21° S, 55° E with low vertical resolution. FTIR profile retrievals are performed by the well-established SFIT4 program and the detail retrieval strategies along with the systematic/random uncertainties of CFC-11, CFC-12 and HCFC-22 are discussed in this study. The FTIR data of all three species are sensitive to the whole troposphere and the lowermost stratosphere, with the peak sensitivity between 5 and 10 km. The ground-based FTIR data have been compared with the collocated Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS/ENVISAT data and found to be in good agreement: the observed mean relative biases and standard deviations of the differences between the smoothed MIPAS and FTIR partial columns (6–30 km are (−4.3 and 4.4 %, (−2.9 and 4.6 % and (−0.7 and 4.8 % for CFC-11, CFC-12 and HCFC-22, respectively, which are within the combined error budgets from both measurements. The season cycles of CFC-11, CFC-12 and HCFC-22 from FTIR measurements and MIPAS data show a similar variation: concentration is highest in February–April and lowest in August–October. The trends derived from the combined St Denis and Maïdo FTIR time series are −0.86 ± 0.12 and 2.84 ± 0.06 % year−1 for CFC-11 and HCFC-22, respectively, for the period 2004 to 2016, and −0.76 ± 0.05 % year−1 for CFC-12 for 2009 to 2016. These measurements are consistent with the trends observed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA Global Monitoring Division's (GMD Halocarbons & other Atmospheric Trace Species Group (HATS measurements at Samoa (14.2° S, 170.5° W for CFC-11 (−0.87 ± 0.04 % year−1, but slightly weaker for HCFC-22 (3.46 ± 0.05 % year−1 and

  1. The Evolution of Splint Armour in Georgia and Byzantium: Lamellar and Scale Armour in the 10th-12th Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamuka TSURTSUMIA

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Byzantine technology was part of the military technology that existed in vast areas of Eurasia; hence study of the armament of its neighbours is important.The purpose of the present paper is to add new data about Byzantium’s Caucasian neighbour (namely, Georgia. Besides that, it also includes certain views about the stages of the evolution and provenance of splint (scale and lamellar armour. This paper also attempts to clarify the difference between banded and linear suits of lamellar armour.There is no doubt that the Byzantine military machine exercised considerable influence on its neighbours, though an opposite phenomenon can also be noticed. The article shows that changes in armour were taking place almost simultaneously in the Byzantine Empire and the Georgian kingdoms and that some of the types of armour that were widespread in Byzantium may have originated in Georgia.

  2. MIPAS IMK/IAA CFC-11 (CCl3F) and CFC-12 (CCl2F2) measurements: accuracy, precision and long-term stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, E.; Laeng, A.; Lossow, S.; Kellmann, S.; Stiller, G.; von Clarmann, T.; Glatthor, N.; Höpfner, M.; Kiefer, M.; Oelhaf, H.; Orphal, J.; Funke, B.; Grabowski, U.; Haenel, F.; Linden, A.; Wetzel, G.; Woiwode, W.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C.; Dutton, G. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Engel, A.; Gille, J. C.; Kolonjari, F.; Sugita, T.; Toon, G. C.; Walker, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    Profiles of CFC-11 (CCl3F) and CFC-12 (CCl2F2) of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) aboard the European satellite Envisat have been retrieved from versions MIPAS/4.61 to MIPAS/4.62 and MIPAS/5.02 to MIPAS/5.06 level-1b data using the scientific level-2 processor run by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research (IMK) and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA). These profiles have been compared to measurements taken by the balloon-borne cryosampler, Mark IV (MkIV) and MIPAS-Balloon (MIPAS-B), the airborne MIPAS-STRatospheric aircraft (MIPAS-STR), the satellite-borne Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and the High Resolution Dynamic Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), as well as the ground-based Halocarbon and other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) network for the reduced spectral resolution period (RR: January 2005-April 2012) of MIPAS. ACE-FTS, MkIV and HATS also provide measurements during the high spectral resolution period (full resolution, FR: July 2002-March 2004) and were used to validate MIPAS CFC-11 and CFC-12 products during that time, as well as profiles from the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer, ILAS-II. In general, we find that MIPAS shows slightly higher values for CFC-11 at the lower end of the profiles (below ˜ 15 km) and in a comparison of HATS ground-based data and MIPAS measurements at 3 km below the tropopause. Differences range from approximately 10 to 50 pptv ( ˜ 5-20 %) during the RR period. In general, differences are slightly smaller for the FR period. An indication of a slight high bias at the lower end of the profile exists for CFC-12 as well, but this bias is far less pronounced than for CFC-11 and is not as obvious in the relative differences between MIPAS and any of the comparison instruments. Differences at the lower end of the profile (below ˜ 15 km) and in

  3. High heat flux testing of CFC composites for the tokamak physics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, P. G.; Nygren, R. E.; Burns, R. W.; Rocket, P. D.; Colleraine, A. P.; Lederich, R. J.; Bradley, J. T.

    1996-10-01

    High heat flux (HHF) testing of carbon fiber reinforced carbon composites (CFC's) was conducted under the General Atomics program to develop plasma-facing components (PFC's) for Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's tokamak physics experiment (TPX). As part of the process of selecting TPX CFC materials, a series of HHF tests were conducted with the 30 kW electron beam test system (EBTS) facility at Sandia National Laboratories, and with the plasma disruption simulator I (PLADIS-I) facility at the University of New Mexico. The purpose of the tests was to make assessments of the thermal performance and erosion behavior of CFC materials. Tests were conducted with 42 different CFC materials. In general, the CFC materials withstood the rapid thermal pulse environments without fracturing, delaminating, or degrading in a non-uniform manner; significant differences in thermal performance, erosion behavior, vapor evolution, etc. were observed and preliminary findings are presented below. The CFC's exposed to the hydrogen plasma pulses in PLADIS-I exhibited greater erosion rates than the CFC materials exposed to the electron-beam pulses in EBTS. The results obtained support the continued consideration of a variety of CFC composites for TPX PFC components.

  4. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF PIC FORMATION DURING THE INCINERATION OF RECOVERED CFC-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an investigation of the formation of products of incomplete combustion (PICS) during "recovered" trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) incineration. Tests involved burning the recovered CFC-11 in a propane gas flame. combustion gas samples were taken and an...

  5. The Armour of Hope and other works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Just

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The series of work entitled 'The Skin of Hope' was produced during a 2012 Australia Council for the Arts studio residency in Barcelona, where I was accompanied by my partner Paula and our adopted daughter, Hope. Blurring the usual divide between familial life and art practice, the residency inspired a series of hand knitted sculptures and photographs weaving an account of the ways that Hope and I acknowledge, bond and imprint each other at skin level. Materialising our past wounds and present, tactile connections, the works include a hanging, child-sized, knitted suit of armour for Hope and a reversible pair of knitted arm-length gloves for me, scar-embroidered with surgical stitches and the words HOPE and MOTHER. Through the slow crafting of the works, and the photographs of us wearing the garments, I reflected on Hope's and my own resilience, repair and capacity to love. In a photographic work featuring Hope's text and drawing of herself on my naked back, I further framed skin as both a receptive and transmissive space, bearing witness to our most intimate moments.

  6. The destabilizing effect of body armour on military rifle bullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, P J; Sørensen, O H

    1997-01-01

    Soft body armour is designed to give protection against fragments and some low velocity bullets but is not designed to stop high velocity rifle bullets. Reports have claimed that soft body armour might disturb the stability of bullets that penetrate it, and that this might increase the size of the lesions. The reason for such an effect might be early yaw of the bullet, so we studied the behaviour of bullets which had passed through soft body armour. A 7.62 x 39 mm AK-47 rifle was fired from a permanent stand using full metal jacketed lead core bullets at a range of 30 m. Soft body armour composed for 14 and 28 layers of aramid fibres (Kevlar) was placed at 90 degrees and 60 degrees to the line of fire. Yaw was measured by the shadowgraph technique and a TERMA Doppler radar. A total of ten shots without body armour, and ten shots with each of the two types of body armour at the two angles were used. The results of the shadowgraph and Doppler radar measurements showed a proportional correlation between the two methods of determining the bullet yaw. The semiquantitative approach of the Doppler radar measurement was in agreement with the more concise measurement using the photographic technique. Velocity loss and loss of spin rate from penetrating 14 or 28 ply Kevlar was negligible. We observed induced instability after penetration of 14 and particularly 28 ply Kevlar, dependence of yaw with respect to the number of layers of Kevlar as well as to the angle of the body armour with respect to the line of fire.

  7. Lefty Blocks a Subset of TGFβ Signals by Antagonizing EGF-CFC Coreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Simon K; Olale, Felix; Brivanlou, Ali H

    2004-01-01

    Members of the EGF-CFC family play essential roles in embryonic development and have been implicated in tumorigenesis. The TGFβ signals Nodal and Vg1/GDF1, but not Activin, require EGF-CFC coreceptors to activate Activin receptors. We report that the TGFβ signaling antagonist Lefty also acts through an EGF-CFC-dependent mechanism. Lefty inhibits Nodal and Vg1 signaling, but not Activin signaling. Lefty genetically interacts with EGF-CFC proteins and competes with Nodal for binding to these coreceptors. Chimeras between Activin and Nodal or Vg1 identify a 14 amino acid region that confers independence from EGF-CFC coreceptors and resistance to Lefty. These results indicate that coreceptors are targets for both TGFβ agonists and antagonists and suggest that subtle sequence variations in TGFβ signals result in greater ligand diversity. PMID:14966532

  8. Lefty blocks a subset of TGFbeta signals by antagonizing EGF-CFC coreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon K Cheng

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of the EGF-CFC family play essential roles in embryonic development and have been implicated in tumorigenesis. The TGFbeta signals Nodal and Vg1/GDF1, but not Activin, require EGF-CFC coreceptors to activate Activin receptors. We report that the TGFbeta signaling antagonist Lefty also acts through an EGF-CFC-dependent mechanism. Lefty inhibits Nodal and Vg1 signaling, but not Activin signaling. Lefty genetically interacts with EGF-CFC proteins and competes with Nodal for binding to these coreceptors. Chimeras between Activin and Nodal or Vg1 identify a 14 amino acid region that confers independence from EGF-CFC coreceptors and resistance to Lefty. These results indicate that coreceptors are targets for both TGFbeta agonists and antagonists and suggest that subtle sequence variations in TGFbeta signals result in greater ligand diversity.

  9. The effect of flexible body armour on pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Nicola C; Gay, Louise A

    2016-05-01

    The additional mass and fit of current military in-service body armour (ISBA) can reduce pulmonary function in a way that is characteristic of a restrictive respiratory impairment. This could ultimately impair exercise capacity and military performance. This study compared pulmonary function (forced vital capacity [FVC] and forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1]) in UK ISBA (15.3 kg) and three flexible body armours (BAs) (FA1: 10 kg; FA2: 7.8 kg; FA3: 10 kg) in eight male soldiers. The design of the ballistic plates differed between the BAs to improve the flexibility. FVC and FEV1 were reduced by 4-6%, without reduction in FEV1/FVC for ISBA, FA2 and FA3, when compared to NoBA (p armour caused a mild restrictive ventilatory impairment. However, the design of the armour can be modified to reduce the degree of this impairment. This may lead to improvements in soldier performance during tasks that require body armour.

  10. Hydraulic Stability of Single-Layer Dolos and Accropode Armour Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M.; Burcharth, H. F.

    1995-01-01

    A new design for Dolos breakwater armour layers is presented: Dolos armour units are placed in a selected geometric pattern in a single layer. A series of model tests have been performed in order to determine the stability of such single-layer Dolos armour layers. The test results are presented...... and compared to the stability formula for the traditional double-layer, randomly placed Dolos armour layer design presented by Burcharth (1992). The results of a series of stability tests performed with Accropode® armour layers is presented and compared to the test results obtained with single-layer Dolos...... armour layers. Run-up and reflection are presented for both single-layer Dolos armour and Accropode armour....

  11. 3He and chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) in the Southern Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Baptiste, P.; Jamous, D.; Mantisi, F.; Memery, L.; Universite Paris 6

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of 3 He across the Southern Ocean is depicted on the basis of a meridional section between Antarctica and South Africa measured during the INDIGO-3 survey (1988). A core of δ 3 He values above 10% is observed south of the Polar Front, associated with very low CFC concentrations. This 3 He enriched layer is documented from the GEOSECS and INDIGO 3 He data in the Southern Ocean. It is found at a density level around θ σ =27.8 in all the waters close to Antarctica (i.e. south of 50 degS). Its zonal distribution suggests that it is likely that it originates from the central/eastern Pacific. Hence, it provides an indication of the deep Pacific waters in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, which are not easily detectable from the standard hydrographic parameters. (author). 19 refs.; 8 figs

  12. Ontogeny of the granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cell (GM-CFC) pools in the beagle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, W; Braasch, E; Calvo, W; Prümmer, O; Carbonell, F; Grilli, G; Fliedner, T M

    1984-04-01

    The pattern of development of the granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cell (GM-CFC) pools in the course of canine ontogeny was studied by means of the agar culture technique. Colony formation was stimulated by colony stimulating activity (CSA) in serum from lethally irradiated dogs in combination with erythrocyte-depleted peripheral blood leukocytes from normal adult dogs. The colonies thus obtained in cultures from the different organs were in general large (estimated maximum 50 000 cells) and consisted predominantly of mononucleated macrophages, suggesting that, in these studies, a progenitor cell with high proliferative potential (HPP-CFC) has been monitored. In the yolk sac, a transitory GM-CFC pool became established between day 23 and day 48 of gestation, reaching maximum numbers of approximately 41 X 10(3) per organ on days 36/37. At the same time the GM-CFC concentration in blood collected from the heart also reached a maximum of about 31 X 10(3)/ml, indicating its carrier function for the migration of GM-CFC. In the liver a quasi-exponential increase in the GM-CFC numbers took place between days 36/37 and days 57 to 59 when a total of about 15.2 X 10(6) was found but thereafter and up to day 4 post partum the GM-CFC numbers decreased by almost two orders of magnitude. A continuous increase in the GM-CFC numbers was found in the spleen between day 42 of gestation and day 4 post partum when a maximum of 5.1 X 10(6) to 8.7 X 10(6) was reached. In contrast to the GM-CFC numbers in the liver, the splenic GM-CFC dropped only by 50% of peak values when the dogs reached adulthood. The bone marrow always had the highest incidence of GM-CFC, the concentration per 10(6) cells being 18.7 X 10(3)/10(6) cells on days 45/46, the earliest time point at which cultures could be set up. The absolute GM-CFC numbers in the two femora increased continuously between days 45/46 and day 4 post partum in parallel with the growth of the bones. In the thymus a relatively small

  13. Understanding losses in three core armoured submarine cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da; Ebdrup, Thomas; Bak, Claus Leth

    2016-01-01

    . For practical an economical reasons the preferred choice of cable for both the array and the transmission cables are three-core armoured submarine cables. Therefore, it has becoming increasingly important to be able to calculate the ampacity of such cables accurately. At present time, the ampacity of three......-core armoured submarine cables is calculated according to IEC 60287-1-1 [1]. Various measurements conducted both by cable manufacturers and transmission system operators (TSO) have shown that using the cable rating method stated in IEC 60287-1-1 underestimates the cable ampacity [2]-[6]. Furthermore......, measurements conducted within the cable industry have shown that an armoured three core cable has higher losses than equal unarmoured three core cables. It is also suggested that the inaccuracy in the IEC armour’s loss factor (λ2) is the main responsible for the conservatism in the IEC cable rating method...

  14. Investigation on bonding defects in ITER first wall beryllium armour components by combining analytical and experimental methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, Germán, E-mail: german.perez.pichel@gmail.com; Mitteau, Raphaël; Eaton, Russell; Raffray, René

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Bonding defects at the ITER first wall beryllium armour are studied. • Experimental and analytical methods are combined. • Models supporting test results interpretation are proposed. • Guidelines for new experimental protocols are suggested. • Contribution to the definition of defects acceptance criteria. - Abstract: The reliability of the plasma facing components (PFCs) is essential for the efficient plasma operation in a fusion machine. This concerns especially the bond between the armour tiles facing the plasma and the heat sink material (copper alloy). The different thermal expansions of the bonded materials cause a stress distribution in the bond, which peaks at the bond edge. Under cyclic heat flux and accounting for the possible presence of bonding defects, this stress could reach a level where the component might be jeopardised. Because of the complexity of describing realistically by analyses and models the stress evolution in the bond, “design by experiments” is the main procedure for defining and qualifying the armour joint. Most of the existing plasma operation know-how on actively cooled PFCs has been obtained with carbon composite armour tiles. In ITER, the tiles of the first wall are made out of beryllium, which means that the know-how is progressively adapted to this specific bimetallic pair. Nonetheless, analyses are still performed for supporting the R&D experimental programme. This paper: explores methods for combining experimental results with finite element and statistical analyses; benchmarks test results; proposes hypothesis and rationales consistent with test results interpretations; suggests guidelines for defining possible further experimental protocols; and contributes to the definition of defects acceptance criteria.

  15. Investigation on bonding defects in ITER first wall beryllium armour components by combining analytical and experimental methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez, Germán; Mitteau, Raphaël; Eaton, Russell; Raffray, René

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Bonding defects at the ITER first wall beryllium armour are studied. • Experimental and analytical methods are combined. • Models supporting test results interpretation are proposed. • Guidelines for new experimental protocols are suggested. • Contribution to the definition of defects acceptance criteria. - Abstract: The reliability of the plasma facing components (PFCs) is essential for the efficient plasma operation in a fusion machine. This concerns especially the bond between the armour tiles facing the plasma and the heat sink material (copper alloy). The different thermal expansions of the bonded materials cause a stress distribution in the bond, which peaks at the bond edge. Under cyclic heat flux and accounting for the possible presence of bonding defects, this stress could reach a level where the component might be jeopardised. Because of the complexity of describing realistically by analyses and models the stress evolution in the bond, “design by experiments” is the main procedure for defining and qualifying the armour joint. Most of the existing plasma operation know-how on actively cooled PFCs has been obtained with carbon composite armour tiles. In ITER, the tiles of the first wall are made out of beryllium, which means that the know-how is progressively adapted to this specific bimetallic pair. Nonetheless, analyses are still performed for supporting the R&D experimental programme. This paper: explores methods for combining experimental results with finite element and statistical analyses; benchmarks test results; proposes hypothesis and rationales consistent with test results interpretations; suggests guidelines for defining possible further experimental protocols; and contributes to the definition of defects acceptance criteria.

  16. Tissue simulant response at projectile impact on flexible fabric armour systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bree, J.L.M.J. van; Volker, A.; Heiden, N. van der

    2006-01-01

    Behind Armour Blunt Trauma is a phenomenon which has been studied extensively for rigid personal protective armour systems. These systems used in e.g. bullet proof vests manage to defeat high velocity small arms projectiles. Tissue simulants are used to study behind armour effects. At high velocity

  17. An Alternative Stability Equation For Rock Armoured Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tue; Burcharth, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Rubble mound breakwaters are by far the most common type of breakwater, the importance of which is clearly reflected in the vast amount of published research. Especially, the hydraulic stability of the main armour layer has been studied in order to obtain reliable design equations. It should...... equations and model test results still exists. When turning toward prototype the situation is even worse. With the objective to reduce some of the variability an alternative approach based on force considerations is presented. The paper will describe a new stability equation for rock armoured slopes derived...

  18. Netherlands Army Long Range Anti Armour Study - Status Report

    OpenAIRE

    Schagen, P.A.B. van

    1989-01-01

    At the end of the nineties the munition for the TOW weapon system in use at The Netherlands army, has to be replaced. The Life of Type of The Tow carrier ends in 2005. The long range anti armour study is to gain insight into the possibilities and limitations for the Netherlands army to deploy future (time period 1995-2000) weapon systems in the long range anti armour battle. The first study results are expected at the end of 1989. The study is sponsored by the Netherlands army and is carried ...

  19. New Formula for Stability of Cube Armoured Roundheads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maciñeira, Enrique; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a new formula for the stability of cube armoured roundheads. The formula is based on physical model tests in Aalborg University which both long crested and short crested waves of different wave steepness were used. The slope of the radius of the head were varied in order...... to explore the influence of the geometry on the armour stability. Besides cubes with mass density 2.4 t/m3, cubes with mass density 2.80 t/m3 were used in order to include the effect of mass density in the formula. The damage predictions given by the formula have been compared with prototype hand...

  20. BERM BREAKWATERS WITH CONCRETE BLOCKS AS ARMOUR UNITS

    OpenAIRE

    Camara Aguilera, Altea

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to test the hydraulic stability of berm breakwaters with concrete armour units. To achieve this, five breakwater models were tested with the same wave program. All the models were modifications of the Sirevåg berm breakwater. The modifications consisted in the replacement of the class I stone form the armour layer by two different concrete units, cubes and cubipodsThe design waves were Hs,100=7.0 m, Tz=10.6 s. HoTo=48. The wave program consisted in 7 different ...

  1. Variation in armour of three-spine stickleback

    OpenAIRE

    Wiig, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    The three-spine stickleback is an adaptable fish with variation in morphology and behaviour, inhabiting saltwater, brackish water and fresh water. It is armoured with 30-35 bone plates along its lateral line. In addition, it is equipped with three spines on its back and two pelvic spine. These features constitute an excellent anti-predator defence system. Yet, there is a strong selection for reduction in armour of three-spine stickleback in freshwater stickleback. In this project, the bone st...

  2. Some aspects of using Be as high heat flux protective armour material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervash, A.; Mazul, I.; Yablokov, N.; Linke, J.

    2000-01-01

    The beryllium as plasma facing armour material must protect the actively cooled copper alloy heat sink of the First Wall and Divertor components from sputtering erosion, disruption and VDE transients and withstand the number of cycles under expected heat and neutron fluxes. The presented paper discusses some topical questions and presents recent results obtained in Russia in the frame of such consideration. In real operation beryllium as plasma facing component will be subjected to sequence of normal (cyclic heat fluxes) and off-normal (disruption, VDE) heat loads. Aiming to investigate the results of mentioned events the experiments with the number of Russian Be grades (DShG-200, TGP-56, TShG-56, TR-30, Condensed Be) as well as S-65C (ITER reference grade) at simulated disruption loads (∝5 MJ/m 2 ) and subsequent thermal cycling (∝5 MW/m 2 , 1000 cycles) were carried out. Experiments have revealed no macroscopic damage of the tested grades, although significant differences in crack formation and propagation were observed. The main statistics of performed experiments is presented and discussed. One of the main requirements to use Be as a candidate for plasma facing component is providing a reliable joint between Be and Cu-alloy heat sink structure. The unique Russian fast brazing process of joining beryllium to Cu-alloy that allows to survive high heat fluxes ≥10 MW/m 2 during thousand heating/cooling cycles without serious damaging in the armour material and its joint was described in previous works. The main goal of experiments presented in this paper was to study the high heat flux durability limit for joints as function of the pulse duration (i.e. investigation of creep/fatigue interaction). Authors present a description of the testing procedure and discuss the first results of mentioned experiments. (orig.)

  3. International symposium on environmental impacts of advanced alternative to CFC; CFC shinki daitai busshitsu no kankyo eikyo ni kansuru kokusai symposium hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-07

    The international symposium on environmental effects of new CFC substitutes was held in Tsukuba City, Ibaraki Pref. on February 7-9, 1996, and 19 papers were made public. In Session 1 (Plenary lecture), reports were made on Global warming and climate change: a review of recent studies; Stratospheric ozone, CFCs, and CFC-substitutes: an update, etc. In Session 2, Measurements of OH rate constants for advanced refrigerants as well as HCFCs and HFCs; The reaction rate of CFC alternatives with OH radical; Experimental and estimated rate constants: reactions of hydroxyl radicals with several halocarbons, etc. In Session 3, Measurement of uptake coefficients of some acetyl halides and fluorinated ethers into water; Mass transfer at the air/water interface: removal processes of halocarbonyl compounds; Heterogeneous reactions of fluorinated ethers on allophane or titanium dioxide, etc. In Session 4, papers were reported on model calculations relating to the global warming.

  4. Netherlands Army Long Range Anti Armour Study - Status Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, P.A.B. van

    1989-01-01

    At the end of the nineties the munition for the TOW weapon system in use at The Netherlands army, has to be replaced. The Life of Type of The Tow carrier ends in 2005. The long range anti armour study is to gain insight into the possibilities and limitations for the Netherlands army to deploy future

  5. Metallic witness packs for behind-armour debris characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verolme, J.L.; Szymczak, M.; Broos, J.P.F.

    1999-01-01

    For the experimental characterization of behind-armour debris so-called metallic witness packs can be used. A metallic witness pack consists of an array of metallic plates interspaced by polystyrene foam sheets. To quantify the fragment mass and velocity from the corresponding hole area and position

  6. European development of carbon armoured plasma facing components for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merola, M.; Vieider, G.; Wu, C.; Schedler, B.; Chappuis, P.; Escourbiac, F.; Schlosser, J.; Duwe, R.; Roedig, M.; Febvre, M.; Grattarola, M.; Tahtinen, S.; Vesprini, R.

    2001-01-01

    After a brief description of the rationale of the material and geometry selection for each carbon armoured plasma facing components, this paper describes the European development of the two basic geometries, namely the monoblock and the flat tile. An overview of the non-destructive inspection techniques specifically developed for these components is also presented. (orig.)

  7. Preliminary investigations of potential light weight metallic armour applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorde, M.J. van de; Diederen, A.M.; Herlaar, K.

    2005-01-01

    Now that an industrial-scale low-cost production route for ballistic-grade titanium is within reach, the potential use of titanium armour could depend on a solution for the spalling of high strength titanium. This paper addresses a titanium based metal laminate as being a possible solution for the

  8. A New Symmetrical Unit for Breakwater Armour : First Tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salauddin, M.; Broere, A.; Van der Meer, J.W.; Verhagen, H.J.; Bijl, E.

    2015-01-01

    A new and symmetrical single layer armour unit, the crablock, has been designed in the UAE. One breakwater was reconstructed with crablock, but very limited testing had been performed. Just to become more acquainted with this new unit, pre-competitive research at a university has been performed,

  9. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  10. Stability of Cubipod Armoured Roundheads in Short Crested Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Medina, Josep R.

    The roundhead is generally the most exposed part of the breakwater. Moreover, in case of rubble mound structures the needed armour size is larger than in the adjacent trunk. Typically units of almost double mass are needed in the roundhead if high density stones or concrete are not used in the head....

  11. Automatic settlement analysis of single-layer armour layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland, B.; van gent, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    A method to quantify, analyse, and present the settlement of single-layer concrete armour layers of coastal structures is presented. The use of the image processing technique for settlement analysis is discussed based on various modelling
    studies performed over the years. The accuracy of the

  12. Analysis of first wall and divertor cooling loop failures for the ITER plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, J.; Sjoberg, A.; Collen, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study the capability of the in-vessel heat transfer systems to maintain sufficiently low structure temperatures during certain events have been investigated. The findings are that in the case of blackout PWF/IBB structure temperatures remain low enough not to jeopardize the integrity. In an event of divertor pump trip generally lower copper temperatures are achieved and opening of the pressurizer safety valve is avoided if a prolonged pump coasting down period is selected. However, an adequate minimum thickness of protective CFC armour is still crucial for maintaining structure integrity. (authors)

  13. Formulation and evaluation of CFC free inhalers for beclomethasone dipropionate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopala Krishna Murthy Talasila

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Beclomethasone dipropionate CFC free inhalation formulations were developed with a view to treat asthma prophylactically. Dry powder inhalers (DPI for beclomethasone dipropionate were prepared with different grades of lactose monohydrate. The influence of carrier and overages on performance of DPI was studied. Metered dose inhalers (MDI with HFA based propellants were formulated with various doses, overages and different concentrations of alcohol. Formulated DPI and MDI were evaluated for various official and unofficial quality control tests. The influence of over doses on valve delivery, effect of overages on emitted dose and influence of alcohol on spray pattern from MDI were studied. The better fine particle fraction and emitted dose were obtained from the DPI formulated with 10:90 ratio of fine lactose: coarse lactose and with 20% w/w overages. The studies on MDI revealed that the 15% of overdoses are required for effective valve delivery and 20% overages are required for 100% drug delivery. 5-10%v/v alcohol was found to be preferable to get optimum emitted dose and fine particle fraction.

  14. Distribution and ventilation of water masses in the western Ross Sea inferred from CFC measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivaro, Paola; Ianni, Carmela; Magi, Emanuele; Massolo, Serena; Budillon, Giorgio; Smethie, William M.

    2015-03-01

    During the CLIMA Project (R.V. Italica cruise PNRA XVI, January-February 2001), hydrographic and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) observations were obtained, particularly in the western Ross Sea. Their distribution demonstrated water mass structure and ventilation processes in the investigated areas. In the surface waters (AASW) the CFC saturation levels varied spatially: CFCs were undersaturated in all the areas (range from 80 to 90%), with the exception of few stations sampled near Ross Island. In particular, the Terra Nova Bay polynya, where high salinity shelf water (HSSW) is produced, was a low-saturated surface area (74%) with respect to CFCs. Throughout most of the shelf area, the presence of modified circumpolar deep water (MCDW) was reflected in a mid-depth CFC concentration minima. Beneath the MCDW, CFC concentrations generally increased in the shelf waters towards the seafloor. We estimated that the corresponding CFCs saturation level in the source water region for HSSW was about 68-70%. Waters with high CFC concentrations were detected in the western Ross Sea on the down slope side of the Drygalski Trough, indicating that AABW was being supplied to the deep Antarctic Basin. Estimates of ventilation ages depend strongly on the saturation levels. We calculated ventilation ages using the saturation level calibrated tracer ratio, CFC11/CFC12. We deduced a mean residence time of the shelf waters of about 6-7 years between the western Ross Sea source and the shelf break.

  15. Moving Advanced Desiccant Materials into Mainstream Non-CFC Cooling Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sand, J R [ORNL; Grossman, G [ORNL; Rice, C K [ORNL; Fairchild, P D [ORNL; Gross, I L [Engelhard/ICC

    1994-01-01

    Desiccant air-conditioning systems can be used as alternatives for conventional air-conditioning equipment in any commercial or residential building. Recent breakthroughs in desiccant materials technology and the creation of new markets by Indoor Air Quality issues make desiccant-based air-conditioning equipment practical for many space-conditioning applications.

  16. Moving Advanced Desiccant Materials into Mainstream Non-CFC Cooling Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sand, J. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Grossman, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rice, C. K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fairchild, P. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gross, I. L. [Engelhard/ICC, Hatboro, PA (United States). Fresh Air Solutions

    2004-12-30

    Desiccant dehumidification technology is emerging as a technically viable alternative for comfort conditioning in many commercial and institutional buildings. Attempts to improve the indoor air quality of buildings has resulted in increasingly stringent guidelines for occupant outdoor air ventilation rates. Additionally, revised building heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) design criteria based on regional peak dew point data highlight the important of the latent (moisture removal) building load relative to the sensible (temperature) building load.

  17. Infrared Absorption Spectra, Radiative Efficiencies, and Global Warming Potentials of Newly-Detected Halogenated Compounds: CFC-113a, CFC-112 and HCFC-133a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Etminan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available CFC-113a (CF3CCl3, CFC-112 (CFCl2CFCl2 and HCFC-133a (CF3CH2Cl are three newly detected molecules in the atmosphere that are almost certainly emitted as a result of human activity. It is important to characterise the possible contribution of these gases to radiative forcing of climate change and also to provide information on the CO2-equivalence of their emissions. We report new laboratory measurements of absorption cross-sections of these three compounds at a resolution of 0.01 cm−1 for two temperatures 250 K and 295 K in the spectral range of 600–1730 cm−1. These spectra are then used to calculate the radiative efficiencies and global warming potentials (GWP. The radiative efficiencies are found to be between 0.15 and 0.3 W∙m−2∙ppbv−1. The GWP for a 100 year time horizon, relative to carbon dioxide, ranges from 340 for the relatively short-lived HCFC-133a to 3840 for the longer-lived CFC-112. At current (2012 concentrations, these gases make a trivial contribution to total radiative forcing; however, the concentrations of CFC-113a and HCFC-133a are continuing to increase. The 2012 CO2-equivalent emissions, using the GWP (100, are estimated to be about 4% of the current global CO2-equivalent emissions of HFC-134a.

  18. High-temperature resistant, thermally sprayed diffusion barrier coatings on CFC lightweight materials; Hochtemperaturbestaendige, thermisch gespritzte Diffusionsbarriereschichten auf CFC-Leichtbauchargiergestellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drehmann, Rico; Rupprecht, Christian; Wielage, Bernhard; Lampke, Thomas [Technische Univ. Chemnitz (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft und Werkstofftechnik (IWW); Gilbert, Maria; Uhlig, Volker; Trimis, Dimosthenis [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Waermetechnik und Thermodynamik (IWTT); Heuer, Volker [ALD Vacuum Technologies GmbH, Hanau (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    In heat treating processes as well as in high temperature brazing processes, charge carriers enable the positioning and transport of work pieces. Recently, charge carriers consisting of graphite or carbon fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) are used. The main disadvantage of charge carriers based on CFC is the undesirable carburization of the overlying components due to diffusion processes. Under this aspect, thermally sprayed coatings are applied on CFC and tested with respect to their suitability as a high-temperature diffusion barrier. The ceramic powders aluminium oxide, aluminium oxide/chromium oxide, aluminium oxide/titanium oxide and zirconium oxide/yttrium oxide are used as a coating material which is processed by means of the powder flame spraying as well as atmospheric plasma spraying. Molybdenum and silicon carbide are used as an adhesive layer. The coating materials aluminium oxide and aluminium oxide/chromium oxide on siliconized CFC presented excellent results. This supplies a large potential of application for thermally sprayed ceramic coatings on carbon-based lightweight materials.

  19. SIMULATION OF PERFORMANCE OF CHLORINE-FREE FLURORINATED ETHERS AND FLUORINATED HYDROCARBONS TO REPLACE CFC-11 AND CFC-114 IN CHILLERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses simulation of the performance of chlorine-free fluorinated ethers and fluorinated hydrocarbons as potential long-term replacements for CFC-11 and -114. Modeling has been done with in-house refrigeration models based on the Carnahan-Starling-DeSantis Equation o...

  20. Apparent CFC and 3H/ 3He age differences in water from Floridan Aquifer springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, James D.; Opsahl, Stephen; Top, Zafer; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    2006-03-01

    The apparent CFC-11, -12 and -113 ages of Upper Floridan Aquifer water discharged from 31 springs located in Florida and Georgia ranged from 11 to 44 years when samples were collected in 2002 and 2003. Apparent 3H/ 3He ages in these springs ranged from 12 to 66 years. Some of the springs sampled did not yield valid CFC ages because one or more of the CFCs were contaminated by non-atmospheric sources. Of the 31 springs sampled, six were contaminated with all three CFCs and nine were contaminated with one or two CFCs. Of the remaining 16 springs, the CFC distributions of four could be modeled assuming a single source of water, and 11 were best modeled by assuming two sources of water, with one of the water sources >60 years old. The CFC and 3H/ 3He apparent ages and the simple mixing models applied to these ages suggest that past impacts to the water quality of water recharging the sampled springs may take anywhere from 0 to ˜60 years or more to appear in the discharging spring water. In 27 springs where both 3H/ 3He ages and CFC ages were available, five springs gave similar results between the two techniques, while in the other 22 cases the 3H/ 3He apparent ages were 8-40 years greater than the CFC ages. Large excesses of 4He were observed in many of the springs, consistent with a source of older water. This older water may also carry an additional and unaccounted for source of 3He, which may be responsible for the greater 3H/ 3He ages relative to the CFC ages. We believe that the large excess 3He and 4He values and apparent age differences are related to regional climate variations because our samples were obtained at the end of a 4-year drought.

  1. Beryllium armour produced by evaporation-condensation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, A.; Frolov, V.; Moszherin, S.; Pepekin, G.; Pirogov, A.; Komarov, V.; Mazul, I.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium, as armour material for ITER plasma facing components, has a limited erosion lifetime. In order to repair the surface of eroded tiles in-situ, Be-deposition technologies are under consideration. One of them uses the physical vapour deposition of beryllium on copper or beryllium substrate produced by a hot Be-target placed in the vicinity of this substrate. Three different options for using this technology for ITER Be-armour application are considered. The first option is the repair in-situ of eroded Be-tiles. The second option suggests the use of this technology to provide the joining of Be to Cu-substrate. The third option assumes the use of evaporated-condensed beryllium as a bulk tile material bonded to copper substrate by conventional joining (Brazing et al.) techniques. The first results and prospects of these approaches are presented below. (orig.)

  2. Investigation of cascade effect failure for tungsten armour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhankov, A.; Barabash, V.; Berkhov, N.; Divavin, V.; Giniatullin, R.; Grigoriev, S.; Ibbott, C.; Komarov, V.; Labusov, A.; Mazul, I.; McDonald, J.; Tanchuk, V.; Youchison, D.

    2001-01-01

    The glancing angle of incident power on the target of a tokamak divertor results in doubled and highly peaked heat flux onto adjacent downstream tile in the case of lost of tile event (LOTE). As a result downstream tile has higher probability to fail resulting in triple loads to the next downstream tile and so on (cascade effect). This paper devoted to analytical and experimental investigation of the cascade effect failure for the flat tile option of tungsten armoured plasma facing components. Armour geometry resistant to the cascade effect failure was selected on the base of thermal and stress analyses. Experimental investigation of the LOTE has been performed also. Small size W/Cu mock-up withstood not only LOTE simulation load, but also survived afterwards for 1500 cycles at 26-28 MW/m 2 without damage in joint

  3. Southend-on-Sea v Armour: Proportionality Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Ramshaw, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The Court of Appeal’s decision in Southend-on-Sea v Armour represents the latest step in the arduous journey of art.8 of the European Convention on Human Rights in the realm of housing law. The following commentary discusses the facts of Southend together with the effects of the Court of Appeal’s approach to art.8 and makes suggestions as to how art.8 might develop in the future.

  4. Jihād and Islamic arms and armour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander, David

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the islamic concept of Jihad or Holy war and its differents implications on the decoration of arms and armour.

    Este artículo trata el concepto islámico de Jihad o Guerra Santa y sus diversos implicaciones trasladadas a la decoración de las armas y armaduras.

  5. Bagworm bags as portable armour against invertebrate predators

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Some animals have evolved the use of environmental materials as “portable armour” against natural enemies. Portable bags that bagworm larvae (Lepidoptera: Psychidae) construct using their own silk and plant parts are generally believed to play an important role as a physical barrier against natural enemies. However, no experimental studies have tested the importance of bags as portable armour against predators. To clarify the defensive function, I studied the bagworm Eumeta minuscula and a po...

  6. Numerical test for single concrete armour layer on breakwaters

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasaki, E; Latham, J-P; Xiang, J

    2016-01-01

    The ability of concrete armour units for breakwaters to interlock and form an integral single layer is important for withstanding severe wave conditions. In reality, displacements take place under wave loading, whether they are small and insignificant or large and representing serious structural damage. In this work, a code that combines finite- and discrete-element methods which can simulate motion and interaction among units was used to conduct a numerical investigation. Various concrete ar...

  7. Hypervelocity impact of tungsten cubes on spaced armour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandel, Pradeep S; Sood, Dharmanshu; Kumar, Rajeev; Sharma, Prince; Sewak, Bhupinder; Bhardwaj, Vikas; Athwal, Manoj; Mangla, Vikas; Biswas, Ipsita; Singh, Manjit

    2012-01-01

    The paper summarizes the experimental observations and simulation studies of damage potential of tungsten alloy cubes on relatively thin mild steel spaced armour target plates in the velocity regime 1300 – 4000 ms −1 using Two Stage Light Gas Gun technique. The cubes of size 9.5 mm and 12 mm having mass 15 g and 30 g respectively were made to impact normally on three target plates of size 300 mm × 300 mm of thickness 4, 4 and 10 mm at 100 mm distance apart. Flash radiography has been used to image the projectile-target interaction in the nitrogen environment at 300 mbar vacuum at room temperature. The results reveal clear perforation by 9.5 mm cube in all the three target plates up to impact velocity of about 2000 m/s. While 12 mm cube can perforate the spaced armour upto impact velocity of 4000 m/s. This shows that 9.5mm tungsten alloy cube is not effective beyond 2000 m/s while 12 mm tungsten alloy cube can defeat the spaced armour upto 4000 m/s. The simulation studies have been carried out using Autodyn 3D nonlinear code using Lagrange solver at velocities 1200 – 4000 m/s. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  8. Investigations on a brass armour: Authentic or forgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, C.; Chiavari, C.; Ospitali, F.; Grazzi, F.; Scherillo, A.; Soffritti, C.; Garagnani, G.L.

    2013-01-01

    A copper-based armour, supposedly excavated in Eastern Georgia and tentatively dated to the I–II century AD, was investigated with the aim of checking its authenticity. The finding consisted of several pieces, mostly in a good state of conservation: helmet, lorica musculata (i.e. muscled cuirass), forearm guards, pterygies (covering the lower body and thighs), shin greaves and a spear tip. The combination of conventional metallography with in situ and non-destructive investigations (including Time of Flight Neutron Diffraction (ToF-ND)) on the front of the lorica, on one of the pterygies and on the spear tip showed that the composition and microstructure of the armour was not fully homogeneous. However, the results from the muscled cuirass are fairly coherent and raise suspicion about the authenticity of the piece, namely because of the (i) presence of metallic Al in the alloy, in solid solution with Cu, (ii) prevalence of an as-cast microstructure, which lead to a heavy weight as well to the need for a high amount of metal by comparison to hammered sheet and (iii) presence of an artificial patina, combined with earthy deposits which are not explainable if the original patina was removed before artificial patination for aesthetical reasons. - Highlights: • Cu-based armour from Eastern Georgia (I–II century AD?): check authenticity. • Conventional metallography combined with in situ and non-destructive investigations (ToF-ND). • Suspicious points: Al in the alloy, as-cast microstructure, artificial patina

  9. Investigations on a brass armour: Authentic or forgery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martini, C., E-mail: carla.martini@unibo.it [Department of Industrial Engineering (DIN), University of Bologna, Via Risorgimento 4, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Chiavari, C., E-mail: cristina.chiavari@unibo.it [C.I.R.I. M.A.M (Advanced Applications in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Technology Interdepartmental Centre for Industrial Research), University of Bologna, Via Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Ospitali, F., E-mail: francesca.ospitali@unibo.it [Department of Industrial Chemistry “Toso Montanari”, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Grazzi, F., E-mail: francesco.grazzi@fi.isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Scherillo, A., E-mail: antonella.scherillo@stfc.ac.uk [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Science and Technology Facility Council, ISIS Neutron Source, OX0QJ Didcot (United Kingdom); Soffritti, C., E-mail: chiara.soffritti@unife.it [TekneHub, Department of Architecture, University of Ferrara, Via Quartieri 8, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Department of Engineering, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Garagnani, G.L., E-mail: gian.luca.garagnani@unife.it [Department of Engineering, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    A copper-based armour, supposedly excavated in Eastern Georgia and tentatively dated to the I–II century AD, was investigated with the aim of checking its authenticity. The finding consisted of several pieces, mostly in a good state of conservation: helmet, lorica musculata (i.e. muscled cuirass), forearm guards, pterygies (covering the lower body and thighs), shin greaves and a spear tip. The combination of conventional metallography with in situ and non-destructive investigations (including Time of Flight Neutron Diffraction (ToF-ND)) on the front of the lorica, on one of the pterygies and on the spear tip showed that the composition and microstructure of the armour was not fully homogeneous. However, the results from the muscled cuirass are fairly coherent and raise suspicion about the authenticity of the piece, namely because of the (i) presence of metallic Al in the alloy, in solid solution with Cu, (ii) prevalence of an as-cast microstructure, which lead to a heavy weight as well to the need for a high amount of metal by comparison to hammered sheet and (iii) presence of an artificial patina, combined with earthy deposits which are not explainable if the original patina was removed before artificial patination for aesthetical reasons. - Highlights: • Cu-based armour from Eastern Georgia (I–II century AD?): check authenticity. • Conventional metallography combined with in situ and non-destructive investigations (ToF-ND). • Suspicious points: Al in the alloy, as-cast microstructure, artificial patina.

  10. Behaviour of Molten Beryllium with ITER Reference CFC NB31 (SNECMA) Under Moisture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipa, M.; Martin, G.; Linke, J.

    2006-01-01

    A dramatic exothermic reaction with aluminium, a carbide forming metal, has been observed in Tore Supra. A small rod of 30 mm 3 , acting as a temperature proof, was enclosed in a blind hole of a thermally loaded low density PAN fiber CFC 1001Z block (SGL), which reached a temperature of about 1300 o C during plasma operation. The molten aluminium had penetrated the carbon matrix through to the block's front surface. After component removal and roughly 2 months of exposure to air in the laboratory, the CFC in front of the blind hole was found to have been locally destroyed over a crater-shaped structure of 2 cm diameter. This was due to an enhanced decomposition of aluminium carbide to aluminium hydroxide. Beryllium (Be), also a carbide forming metal, is used on the ITER first wall. Carbon reinforced carbon (CFC) of type NB31 (Snecma) covers the vertical divertor targets. It is expected that beryllium material will be transported during normal and/or off normal plasma operation to the carbon based divertor targets to form beryllium carbide. During air venting or a supposed accidental in-vessel water leak event, it will react exothermically under moisture to beryllium oxide. In order to investigate to which extent the CFC structure could be modified or eventually destroyed, this reaction process has been simulated with a CFC block NB31 of size 16 x 32 x 20 mm 3 , where about 40 mm 3 of Be S65 C (Brush Wellmann) has been placed in a previously drilled blind hole of 4 mm diameter oriented parallel to the high conductivity pitch fibers. When melted, by heating the CFC block, the Be penetrated in the carbon matrix through to the block's front surface. The front surface of the CFC was then exposed to humidity (tap water) for about 2 weeks and then stored for a further 2 months in a closed vinyl bag under atmospheric pressure after which the sample was analysed. After the exposure of the CFC to humidity, reaction products have been detected at the surface of the carbon

  11. Siege-shield and scale armour. Reciprocal predominance and common evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Backer, Fabrice De

    2011-01-01

    As it appears on the earliest depictions of military materials, Early Dynastic people used a huge shield during the sieges of cities, in order to protect their archers shooting at the defenders. In the meantime, the neck, chest and sides of these besieging soldiers were protected with the primitive models of the scale-armour. The shield has seen a fascinating evolution in the ancient Near East as a defensive armour, dominating the light, thin armour for centuries. Then, the spoked-wh...

  12. A systems approach to the design of personal armour for explosive ordnance disposal

    OpenAIRE

    Couldrick, C A

    2004-01-01

    A qualitative description of the personal armour design system is elicited by comparing armour throughout the ages. Inputs that 'shape' designs are the materials technology, threat, wearer, task and environment. The emergent properties of protection, ergonomic effectiveness and financial cost form the basis of trade-offs to select final solutions. Work on the protection subsystem refines the key positive emergent property of personal armour. Existing quantifications of protection effective...

  13. Evaluation of the Erosion on the CFC tiles of the ITER Divertor by means o f FE calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, J.; Bouvet, J.; Riccardi, B.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The vertical target of the ITER divertor is armoured with Carbon Fibre Composite (CFC) mono-blocks in the lower part. This part is subjected to the maximum power and particles loads and, consequently, has a risk of high erosion and a significant risk of failure. In order to calculate the erosion during operation an original methodology has been developed using the CASTEM CEA finite element code. The calculation is based on a series of steady states the mesh being updated at each step of the iteration taking into account the rate of erosion between two steps. The model was developed thanks to the routines developed 10 years ago for the toroidal pump limiter of Tore Supra and takes into account shadowing effect and possible penetration of power into the gap between two mono-blocks. Both physical and chemical sputtering together with sublimation have been included in the code to describe the loss of material by the thermal and particle loads envisaged for ITER normal operation regime. This model has been validated by comparison with analytical or other code results. As erosion instability in normal operation in case of one faulty mono-block besides good ones due to the balanced rate between the various erosion mechanisms at different temperatures can be expected, coherent plasma parameters, which represent the worse cases of erosion in normal operation, have been taken into account to analyse the erosion behaviour of the mono-blocks. The aim of the study was also to evaluate the influence of a mono-block defect on erosion behaviour and the impact of these phenomena on the mono-block acceptance criteria. The calculations have pointed out the occurrence of some erosion instabilities for the studied cases (neighbour mono-block with reduced conductivity or with 90 deg. defects). Moreover it was shown that, when applying 20 MW/m 2 to the erosion model already subjected to the normal condition loads for 10,000 s, the plasma shaping of the

  14. The Evolution of Splint Armour in Georgia and Byzantium: Lamellar and Scale Armour in the 10th-12th Centuries

    OpenAIRE

    TSURTSUMIA, Mamuka

    2011-01-01

    Byzantine technology was part of the military technology that existed in vast areas of Eurasia; hence study of the armament of its neighbours is important.The purpose of the present paper is to add new data about Byzantium’s Caucasian neighbour (namely, Georgia). Besides that, it also includes certain views about the stages of the evolution and provenance of splint (scale and lamellar) armour. This paper also attempts to clarify the difference between banded and linear suits of lamellar armou...

  15. Energy Absorption and Dynamic Deformation of Backing Material for Ballistic Evaluation of Body Armour

    OpenAIRE

    Debarati Bhattacharjee; Ajay Kumar; Ipsita Biswas

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of back face signature (BFS) or behind armour blunt trauma (BABT) is a critical aspect of ballistic evaluation of body armour. BFS is the impact experienced by the armour wearing body, when subjected to a non-penetrating projectile. Mineral or polymeric clay is used to measure the BFS. In addition to stopping the projectile, the body armour can be used only when the BFS also falls within permissible limits. The extent of the BFS depends upon the behavior of the backing materia...

  16. Surface damage characteristics of CFC and tungsten with repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Y., E-mail: ykikuchi@eng.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, 671-2280 Hyogo (Japan); Nishijima, D. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 (United States); Nakatsuka, M.; Ando, K.; Higashi, T.; Ueno, Y.; Ishihara, M.; Shoda, K.; Nagata, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, 671-2280 Hyogo (Japan); Kawai, T.; Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Fukumoto, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, 671-2280 Hyogo (Japan); Doerner, R.P. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Surface damage of carbon fiber composite (CFC) and tungsten (W) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. CX2002U CFC and stress-relieved W samples were exposed to repetitive pulsed deuterium plasmas with duration of {approx}0.5 ms, incident ion energy of {approx}30 eV, and surface absorbed energy density of {approx}0.3-0.7 MJ/m{sup 2}. Bright spots on a CFC surface during pulsed plasma exposures were clearly observed with a high-speed camera, indicating a local surface heating. No melting of a W surface was observed under a single plasma pulse exposure at energy density of {approx}0.7 MJ/m{sup 2}, although cracks were formed. Cracking of the W surface grew with repetitive pulsed plasma exposures. Subsequently, the surface melted due to localized heat absorption.

  17. Handling of CFC's - on-site recycling versus off-site reclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, S.

    1993-01-01

    Most contractors will be doing both programs to one degree or another. There will be times when the refrigerant is brand new, when a very minor problem requires servicing and the CFCs will be put right back in with no concerns about quality. There will be other times that it makes more sense to have the gas reclaimed because of burn-out. Where equipment reliability is a prerequisite and the quality of the gas is imperative, the CFC management process should be through a reclamation center. Contractors can do this themselves or deal with a low cost/no cost CFC service that will do it for them. Both options have their merits and on every recovery occasion the contractor will have to make a judgement call. They are, after all, the ones that will carry all the associated risks and responsibilities. Let's hope they make the right decisions, and within the context of good CFC management

  18. Surface modification and hydrogen isotope retention in CFC during plasma irradiation in the Tore Supra tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begrambekov, L.; Brosset, C.; Bucalossi, J.; Delchambre, E.; Gunn, J.P.; Grisolia, C.; Lipa, M.; Loarer, T.; Mitteau, R.; Moner-Garbet, P.; Pascal, J.-Y.; Shigin, P.; Titov, N.; Tsitrone, E.; Vergazov, S.; Zakharov, A.

    2007-01-01

    The uniform layer with thickness at least 50-100 μm was found on the CFC tiles from the inboard midplane after more than four years of tokamak operation. The upper part of the uniform layer was amorphous, but at the depth of ∼5 μm a structure consisting of micro-size regions with aromatic chains located parallel to the surface was found. Gradual transition from uniform layer to underlying CFC structure was observed. The reciprocating material probe was used for installation of CFC samples in the Tore Supra deuterium plasma. The thermal desorptional spectra of these samples are compared with the spectra of the samples irradiated in the laboratory stand and with the spectra of hydrogenated carbon film. The peculiarities of hydrogen isotope trapping under plasma irradiation and at the atmosphere are presented and discussed

  19. High RF power test of a CFC antenna module for lower hybrid current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maebara, S.; Seki, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Kiyono, K.; Suganuma, K.; Imai, T.; Goniche, M.; Bibet, Ph.; Brossaud, J.; Cano, V.; Kazarian-Vibert, F.; Froissard, P.; Rey, G.

    1998-01-01

    A mock-up of a 3.7 GHz Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) antenna module was fabricated from Carbon Fibre Composite (CFC) for the development of heat resistive low Z front facing the plasma. This 2 divided waveguide module is made from CFC plates and rods which are Cu-plated to reduce the RF losses. The withstand-voltage, the RF properties and the outgassing rates for long pulses and high RF power were tested at the Lower Hybrid test bed facility of Cadarache. A reference module made from Dispersion Strengthened Copper (DSC) was also fabricated. After the short pulse conditioning, long pulses with a power density ranging between 50 and 150 MW/m 2 were performed with no breakdowns on the CFC module. It was also checked that the highest power density, up to 150 MW/m 2 , could be transmitted when the waveguides are filled with H2 at a pressure of 5 x 10 -2 Pa. During a long pulse, the power reflection coefficient remains low in the 0.8-1.3 % range and no significant change in the reflection coefficient is measured after the thermal cycling provided by the long pulse operation. From thermocouple measurements, RF losses of the copper coated CFC and the DSC modules were compared. No significant differences were measured. From pressure measurements, it was found that the outgassing rate of Cu-plated CFC is about 6-7 times larger than of DSC at 300 deg.C. It is concluded that a CFC module is an attractive candidate for the hardening of the tip of the LHCD antenna. (author)

  20. Testing of CFC replacement fluids for arc-induced toxic by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cravey, W.R.; Goerz, D.A.; Hawley-Fedder, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    The authors have developed a unique test-stand for quantifying the generation of perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) replacement fluids when they are subjected to high electrical stress/breakdown environments. PFIB is an extremely toxic gas with a threshold limit value of 10 ppbv as set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. They have tested several new fluids from various manufacturers for their potential to generate PFIB. Their goal is to determine breakdown characteristics and quantify toxic by-products of these replacement fluids to determine a safe, usable alternative for present CFC`s.

  1. Thermo-mechanical tests of a CFC divertor mock-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardella, A.; Akiba, M.; Duwe, R.; Di Pietro, E.; Suzuki, S.; Satoh, K.; Reheis, N.

    1994-01-01

    Thermo-mechanical tests have been performed on a divertor mock-up consisting of a metallic tube armoured with five carbon fibre composite tiles. The tube is inserted the tiles and brazed with TiCuSil braze (monoblock concept). The tube material is TZM, a molybdenum alloy, and the armour material is SEP CARB N112, a high conductivity carbon-carbon composite. Using special surface preparation consisting of laser drilling, small (≅ 500 μm) holes in the composite have been made to increase the surface wetted by the braze and the resistance. The mock-up has been tested at the JAERI 400 kW electron beam test facility JEBIS. The aim of the test was to assess the performance of the mock-up in screening and thermal fatigue tests with particular attention to the behaviour of the armour to heat sink joint. (orig.)

  2. EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF LONGITUDINAL COMPONENT OF MAGNETIC FLUX IN FERROMAGNETIC WIRE OF SINGLE-CORE POWER CABLE ARMOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Kostiukov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A problem of determination of effective longitudinal magnetic permeability of single core power cable armour is defined. A technique for experimental determination of longitudinal component of magnetic flux in armour spiral ferromagnetic wire is proposed.

  3. The development of a quantitative flexibility test for body armour and comparison with wearer trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsfall, I; Champion, S M; Watson, C H

    2005-05-01

    In this paper a mechanical flexibility test is developed which can be used to assess multi layer body armour systems. This is compared with a subjective manual test, and then with the results of wearer trials conducted using the recently approved ISO body armour standard ISO 14876-1 (2002). A series of trials was conducted on six different ballistic and/or stab resistant body armour types with a variety of protection levels and constructions. These were tested using the mechanical test system in which the armour was forced through a 200 mm hole by a 100 mm hemispherical plunger. The results of this test were then compared to a second set of trials in which flexibility of the same armour was assessed by manual handling and flexing of the armour. Finally an ergonomic wearer trial was conducted with four armours according to ISO 14876-1 (2002) each armour being assessed by four volunteers and the results compared to flexibility data collected in the first two trials. It was shown that the mechanical flexibility test produced results which were in good agreement with a purely subjective flexibility assessment. These results in turn showed reasonable but not exact correlation with the wearer trials. The ISO wearer trials addressed other factors such as overall comfort and fit of the systems and so the results were not purely a function of flexibility.

  4. Numerical modelling of forces, stresses and breakages of concrete armour units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latham, John Paul; Xiang, Jiansheng; Anastasaki, Eleni; Guo, Liwei; Karantzoulis, Nikolaos; Viré, A.C.; Pain, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Numerical modelling has the potential to probe the complexity of the interacting physics of rubble mound armour systems. Through forward modelling of armour unit packs, stochastic variables such as unit displacement and maximum contact force per unit during an external oscillatory disturbance can

  5. Modeling the reduction in soil loss due to soil armouring caused by rainfall erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface soil properties can change as a result of soil disturbances, erosion, or deposition. One process that can significantly change surface soil properties is soil armouring, which is the selective removal of finer particles by rill or interrill erosion, leaving an armoured layer of coarser parti...

  6. Comparison of losses in an armoured and unarmoured three phase cable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Thomas; Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da; Bak, Claus Leth

    2015-01-01

    In this article, measurements of a 245 kV 3x1x630 mm2 armoured and unarmoured cable is presented along with a description of the data processing of the measured quantities. The results of the measurements show that the losses in the armoured cable are larger than the losses in the unarmoured cable...

  7. Influence of the density of placement on the stability of armour layers on breakwaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Bosch, A.; D' Angremond, K.; Verhagen, H.J.; Olthof, J.

    2002-01-01

    Studies on the stability of the amour layer (d’Angremond et. al. [1999] revealed the importance of density of placement. The current research focuses on the influence of the density of placement on the stability of cubes in a double armour layer and tetrapods and rocks in a single armour layer. The

  8. Stability of Armour Units in Flow Through a Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; C. Thompson, Alex

    1984-01-01

    As part of a program to study the hydraulics of wave attack on rubble mound breakwaters tests were made on model armour units in a steady flow through a layer laid on a slope. The flow angle has little effect on stability for dolosse or rock layers. The head drop at failure across each type...... of layer is similar but the dolosse layer is more permeable and fails as a whole. There was no viscous scale effect. These results and earlier tests in oscillating flow suggest a 'reservoir' effect is important in the stability in steep waves....

  9. Deviatoric Response of AN Armour-Grade Aluminium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Hazell, P. J.; Millett, J.; Bourne, N. K.

    2009-12-01

    Aluminium alloys such as 5083 H32 are established light-weight armour materials. As such, the shock response of these materials is of great importance. The shear strength of a material under shock loading provides an insight into its ballistic performance. In this investigation embedded manganin stress gauges have been employed to measure both the longitudinal and lateral components of stress during plate-impact experiments over a range of impact stresses. In turn, these results were used to determine the shear strength and to investigate the time dependence of lateral stress behind the shock front to give an indication of material response.

  10. Performance of kevlar fibre-reinforced rubber composite armour against shaped-charge jet penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-dong Zu

    Full Text Available AbstractThe protective capability of the Kevlar fibre-reinforced rubber composite armour (KFRRCA at different obliquities is studied using depth-of-penetration experiments method against a 56 mm-diameter standard-shaped charge. Efficiency factors are calculated to evaluate the protection capability of the KFRRCA at different obliquities. Meanwhile, an X-ray experiment is used to observe the deformation, fracture, and scatter of the shaped-charge jet as it penetrates the composite armour. Finally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM is used to analyse the effect of the Kevlar fibre-reinforced rubber for the composite armour to resist jet penetration. The results showed that the KFEECA can be used as additional armour, because it has excellent protection capability, and it can disturb the stability of the middle part of the shaped charge jet (SCJ obviously especially when the armour at 30°and 68° obliquities.

  11. Analytical Expression of Equivalent Transverse Magnetic Permeability for Three-core Wire Armoured Submarine Cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viafora, Nicola; Baù, Matteo; Dall, Laurits Bergholdt

    2016-01-01

    As three-core wire-armoured submarine cables become progressively more relevant, the need for refined modelling techniques grows likewise. IEC Standard 60287 indications though are still widely recognized to be insufficiently accurate, since several effects due to the presence of the collective...... wire armour are ignored. This paper therefore offers an insight into the induced losses mechanism as a function of the armour wires electromagnetic properties. The analysis is focused on the influence of the armour transverse permeability, whose overall resultant value is estimated by means...... the induced sheath power losses due to the presence of the armour, whereas the proposed approach improves the accuracy, as the magnetic flux density enhancement within the cable is accounted for....

  12. Performance of carbon fiber reinforced rubber composite armour against shaped charge jet penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Lian-yong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber is reinforced with carbon fiber; the protective performances of the carbonfiber reinforced rubber composite armour to shaped charge jet have been studied based on the depth of penetration experiments. The craters on the witness blocks, the nature rubber based composite plates’ deformation and the Scanning Electron Microscopy for the hybrid fiber reinforced rubber plate also is analyzed. The results showed that the composite armour can affect the stability of the jet and made part of the jet fracture. The carbon fiber reinforced rubber composite armour has good defence ablity especially when the nature rubber plate hybrid 15% volume percentage carbonfiber and the obliquity angle is 68°. The hybrid fiber reinforced rubber composite armour can be used as a new kind of light protective armour.

  13. HEAT TRANSFER EVALUATION OF HFC-236EA AND CFC-114 IN CONDENSATION AND EVAPORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a heat transfer evaluation of the refrigerants hexafluoropropane (HFC-236ea) and 1,1,2,2-dichloro-tetrafluoroethane (CFC-114). (NOTE: With the mandatory phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), as dictated by the Montreal Protocol and Clean Air Act Ame...

  14. Global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies: Combining fluorocarbon and CO2 effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, P.D.; Fischer, S.K.; Hughes, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are on their way out, due to their role in stratospheric ozone depletion and the related international Montreal Protocol agreement and various national phaseout timetables. As the research, engineering development, and manufacturing investment decisions have ensued to prepare for this transition away from CFCs, the climate change issue has emerged and there has recently been increased attention on the direct global warming potential (GWP) of the fluorocarbon alternatives as greenhouse gases. However, there has been less focus on the indirect global warming effect arising from end-use energy changes and associated CO 2 emissions. A study was undertaken to address these combined global warming effects. A concept of Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) was developed for combining the direct and indirect effects and was used for evaluating CFC-replacement options available in the required CFC transition time frame. Analyses of industry technology surveys indicate that CFC-user industries have made substantial progress toward near-equal energy efficiency with many HCFC/HFC alternatives. The findings also bring into question the relative importance of the direct effect in many applications and stress energy efficiency when searching for suitable CFC alternatives. For chillers, household refrigerators, and unitary air-conditioning or heat pump equipment, changes in efficiency of only 2--5% would have a greater effect on future TEWI than completely eliminating the direct effect

  15. Research on interactions of plasma streams with CFC targets in the Rod Plasma Injector facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaloga Dobromil R.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper present results of optical spectroscopy studies of interactions of intense plasma streams with a solid target made of carbon fibre composite (CFC. The experiments were carried out within the Rod Plasma Injector (RPI IBIS facility. The optical measurements were performed first for a freely propagating plasma stream in order to determine the optimal operational parameters of this facility. Optical emission spectra (OES were recorded for different operational modes of the RPI IBIS device, and spectral lines were identified originating from the working gas (deuterium as well as some lines from the electrode material (molybdenum. Subsequently, optical measurements of plasma interacting with the CFC target were performed. In the optical spectra recorded with the irradiated CFC samples, in addition to deuterium and molybdenum lines, many carbon lines, which enabled to estimate erosion of the investigated targets, were recorded. In order to study changes in the irradiated CFC samples, their surfaces were analysed (before and after several plasma discharges by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS techniques. The analysis of the obtained SEM images showed that the plasma irradiation induces noticeable changes in the surface morphology, for example vaporisation of some carbon fibres and formation of microcracks. The obtained EDS images showed that upon the irradiated target surface, some impurity ions are also deposited, particularly molybdenum ions from the applied electrodes.

  16. Thermal fatigue tests with actively cooled divertor mock-ups for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Linke, J.; Schuster, A.; Wiechers, B.; Ibbott, C.; Jacobson, D.; Le Marois, G.; Lind, A.; Lorenzetto, P.; Vieider, G.; Peacock, A.; Ploechl, L.; Severi, Y.; Visca, E.

    1998-01-01

    Mock-ups for high heat flux components with beryllium and CFC armour materials have been tested by means of the electron beam facility JUDITH. The experiments concerned screening tests to evaluate heat removal efficiency and thermal fatigue tests. CFC monoblocks attached to DS-Cu (Glidcop Al25) and CuCrZr tubes by active metal casting and Ti brazing showed the best thermal fatigue behaviour. They survived more than 1000 cycles at heat loads up to 25 MW m -2 without any indication of failure. Operational limits are given only by the surface temperature on the CFC tiles. Most of the beryllium mock-ups were of the flat tile type. Joining techniques were brazing, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and diffusion bonding. HIPed and diffusion bonded Be/Cu modules have not yet reached the standards for application in high heat flux components. The limit of this production method is reached for heat loads of approximately 5 MW m -2 . Brazing with and without silver seems to be a more robust solution. A flat tile mock-up with CuMnSnCe braze was loaded at 5.4 MW m -2 for 1000 cycles without damage The first test with a beryllium monoblock joined to a CuCrZr tube by means of Incusil brazing shows promising results; it survived 1000 cycles at 4.5 MW m -2 without failure. (orig.)

  17. Effects of ELMs on ITER divertor armour materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhitlukhin, A. [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: zhitlukh@triniti.ru; Klimov, N. [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Landman, I. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM-Association, Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: j.linke@fz-juelich.de; Loarte, A. [EFDA, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Merola, M. [EFDA, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Podkovyrov, V. [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Federici, G. [ITER JWS Garching, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bazylev, B. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Pestchanyi, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Safronov, V. [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Hirai, T. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM-Association, Juelich (Germany); Maynashev, V. [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Levashov, V. [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Muzichenko, A. [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2007-06-15

    This paper is concerned with investigation of an erosion of the ITER-like divertor plasma facing components under plasma heat loads expected during the Type I ELMs in ITER. These experiments were carried out on plasma accelerator QSPA at the SRC RF TRINITI under EU/RF collaboration. Targets were exposed by series repeated plasma pulses with heat loads in a range of 0.5-1.5 MJ/m{sup 2} and pulse duration 0.5 ms. Erosion of CFC macrobrushes was determined mainly by sublimation of PAN-fibres that was less than 2.5 {mu}m per pulse. The CFC erosion was negligible at the energy density less than 0.5 MJ/m{sup 2} and was increased to the average value 0.3 {mu}m per pulse at 1.5 MJ/m{sup 2}. The pure tungsten macrobrushes erosion was small in the energy range of 0.5-1.3 MJ/m{sup 2}. The sharp growth of tungsten erosion and the intense droplet ejection were observed at the energy density of 1.5 MJ/m{sup 2}.

  18. Effects of ELMs on ITER divertor armour materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitlukhin, A.; Klimov, N.; Landman, I.; Linke, J.; Loarte, A.; Merola, M.; Podkovyrov, V.; Federici, G.; Bazylev, B.; Pestchanyi, S.; Safronov, V.; Hirai, T.; Maynashev, V.; Levashov, V.; Muzichenko, A.

    2007-06-01

    This paper is concerned with investigation of an erosion of the ITER-like divertor plasma facing components under plasma heat loads expected during the Type I ELMs in ITER. These experiments were carried out on plasma accelerator QSPA at the SRC RF TRINITI under EU/RF collaboration. Targets were exposed by series repeated plasma pulses with heat loads in a range of 0.5-1.5 MJ/m2 and pulse duration 0.5 ms. Erosion of CFC macrobrushes was determined mainly by sublimation of PAN-fibres that was less than 2.5 μm per pulse. The CFC erosion was negligible at the energy density less than 0.5 MJ/m2 and was increased to the average value 0.3 μm per pulse at 1.5 MJ/m2. The pure tungsten macrobrushes erosion was small in the energy range of 0.5-1.3 MJ/m2. The sharp growth of tungsten erosion and the intense droplet ejection were observed at the energy density of 1.5 MJ/m2.

  19. IR thermography methods for evaluation of internal defects in light composite armours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiderski, W.; Szabra, D.; Szudrowicz, M.

    2009-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Light composite armour is a preferred solution against military and paramilitary sources of present threats as the reducing mass of battle vehicles provides a possibility of their quick air-transport. The light armours of these vehicles should be resistant against: common and rifle bullets, grenades, anti-personal mines, IED - improvised explosive devices. The range of military applications anticipated for composite armours covers a broad spectrum of materials and designs. Materials of composite armours include graphite epoxy, glass epoxy and aramid fiber composites. The composites that have been examined can include a variety of defects, such as ballistic impacts, embedded defects, manufacturing defects, thermal damage, moisture ingress and other induced defects. Methods for testing ballistic protection of light armours are known and used. First of all they consist of checking armours resistance against the bullets where the bullet velocity is known. Moreover the V50 velocity is defined during the test. In this method the V 50 velocity of a round or standard fragment is defined (according to STANAG 2920) as the velocity at which armour is penetrated at the probability 50%. The distribution of points hit by bullets or fragments on the surface of an armour is also important. In fact, only correct distribution of these points provides a guaranty for an impartial assessment of tested designs. After hitting by a bullet, shape and size of an area of damage in composite armours depends on the type and design of armour, and type of reinforcing material is particularly important. Knowledge of damage characteristics allows to arrange hitting points to avoid overlapping of damaged areas. Nondestructive testing by using IR thermography methods is very useful in evaluation of internal defects. In the paper we present the dependence between the energy of fragments/or bullets and the dimension of internal defects. (author)

  20. Material characterization of a novel new armour steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bester, J. N.; Stumpf, W. E.

    2012-08-01

    The material characterization of a novel new armour steel with comparison to a leading commercial benchmark alloy is presented. Direct ballistic and experimental comparison is drawn. The 5.56 × 45 mm [M193] and 7.62 × 51 mm [NATO Ball] projectiles were used in a cartridge type high pressure barrel configuration to evaluate the superior plugging resistance of the new steel over a range of plate thicknesses. To characterize the dynamic plasticity of the materials, quasi-static, notched and high temperature tensile tests as well as Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests in tension and compression were performed. The open source explicit solver, IMPACT (sourceforge.net) is used in an ongoing numerical and sensitivity analysis of ballistic impact. A simultaneous multi variable fitting algorithm is planned to evaluate several selected numerical material models and show their relative correlation to experimental data. This study as well as micro-metallurgical investigation of adiabatic shear bands and localized deformation zones should result in new insights in to the underlying metallurgical and physical behavior of armour plate steels during ballistic perforation.

  1. Material characterization of a novel new armour steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stumpf W.E.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The material characterization of a novel new armour steel with comparison to a leading commercial benchmark alloy is presented. Direct ballistic and experimental comparison is drawn. The 5.56 × 45 mm [M193] and 7.62 × 51 mm [NATO Ball] projectiles were used in a cartridge type high pressure barrel configuration to evaluate the superior plugging resistance of the new steel over a range of plate thicknesses. To characterize the dynamic plasticity of the materials, quasi-static, notched and high temperature tensile tests as well as Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests in tension and compression were performed. The open source explicit solver, IMPACT (sourceforge.net is used in an ongoing numerical and sensitivity analysis of ballistic impact. A simultaneous multi variable fitting algorithm is planned to evaluate several selected numerical material models and show their relative correlation to experimental data. This study as well as micro-metallurgical investigation of adiabatic shear bands and localized deformation zones should result in new insights in to the underlying metallurgical and physical behavior of armour plate steels during ballistic perforation.

  2. Development and optimisation of tungsten armour geometry for ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhankov, A.; Mazul, I.; Safronov, V.; Yablokov, N.

    1998-01-01

    The plasma facing components (PFC) of the future thermonuclear reactor in great extend determine the time of non-stop operation of the reactor. In current ITER project the most of the divertor PFC surfaces are covered by tungsten armour. Therefore selection of tungsten grade and attachment scheme for joining the tungsten armour to heat sink is a matter of great importance. Two attachment schemes for highly loaded components (up to 20 MW/m 2 ) are described in this paper. The small size mock-ups were manufactured and successfully tested at heat fluxes up to 30 MW/m 2 in screening test and up to 20 MW/m 2 at thermal fatigue test. One mock-up with four different tungsten grades was tested by consequent thermal shock (15 MJ/m 2 at 50 μs) and thermal cycling loading (15 MW/m 2 ). The damages that could lead to mock-up failure were not found but the behaviour of tungsten grades was quite different. (author)

  3. Genetics of body shape and armour variation in threespine sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, T; Cano, J M; Merilä, J

    2011-01-01

    Patterns of genetic variation and covariation can influence the rate and direction of phenotypic evolution. We explored the possibility that the parallel morphological evolution seen in threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) populations colonizing freshwater environments is facilitated by patterns of genetic variation and covariation in the ancestral (marine) population. We estimated the genetic (G) and phenotypic (P) covariance matrices and directions of maximum additive genetic (g(max) ) and phenotypic (p(max) ) covariances of body shape and armour traits. Our results suggest a role for the ancestral G in explaining parallel morphological evolution in freshwater populations. We also found evidence of genetic constraints owing to the lack of variance in the ancestral G. Furthermore, strong genetic covariances and correlations among traits revealed that selective factors responsible for threespine stickleback body shape and armour divergence may be difficult to disentangle. The directions of g(max) and p(max) were correlated, but the correlations were not high enough to imply that phenotypic patterns of trait variation and covariation within populations are very informative of underlying genetic patterns. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2010 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  4. The structure and mechanical design of rhinoceros dermal armour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadwick, R E; Russell, A P; Lauff, R F

    1992-09-29

    The collagenous dermis of the white rhinoceros forms a thick, protective armour that is highly specialized in its structure and material properties compared with other mammalian skin. Rhinoceros skin is three times thicker than predicted allometrically, and it contains a dense and highly ordered three-dimensional array of relatively straight and highly crosslinked collagen fibres. The skin of the back and flanks exhibits a steep stress-strain curve with very little 'toe' region, a high elastic modulus (240 MPa), a high tensile strength (30 MPa), a low breaking strain (0.24) and high breaking energy (3 MJm-3) and work of fracture (78 kJm-2). By comparison, the belly skin is somewhat less stiff, weaker, and more extensible. In compression, rhinoceros skin withstands average stresses and strains of 170 MPa and 0.7, respectively, before yielding. As a biological material, rhinoceros dorsolateral skin has properties that are intermediate between those of 'normal' mammalian skin and tendons. This study shows that the dermal armour of the rhinoceros is very well adapted to resist blows from the horns of conspecifics, as might occur during aggressive behaviour, due to specialized material properties as well as its great thickness.

  5. Armour Materials for the ITER Plasma Facing Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, V.; Federici, G.; Matera, R.; Raffray, A. R.; ITER Home Teams,

    The selection of the armour materials for the Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a trade-off between multiple requirements derived from the unique features of a burning fusion plasma environment. The factors that affect the selection come primarily from the requirements of plasma performance (e.g., minimise impurity contamination in the confined plasma), engineering integrity, component lifetime (e.g., withstand thermal stresses, acceptable erosion, etc.) and safety (minimise tritium and radioactive dust inventories). The current selection in ITER is to use beryllium on the first-wall, upper baffle and on the port limiter surfaces, carbon fibre composites near the strike points of the divertor vertical target and tungsten elsewhere in the divertor and lower baffle modules. This paper provides the background for this selection vis-à-vis the operating parameters expected during normal and off-normal conditions. The reasons for the selection of the specific grades of armour materials are also described. The effects of the neutron irradiation on the properties of Be, W and carbon fibre composites at the expected ITER conditions are briefly reviewed. Critical issues are discussed together with the necessary future R&D.

  6. Bagworm bags as portable armour against invertebrate predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Some animals have evolved the use of environmental materials as "portable armour" against natural enemies. Portable bags that bagworm larvae (Lepidoptera: Psychidae) construct using their own silk and plant parts are generally believed to play an important role as a physical barrier against natural enemies. However, no experimental studies have tested the importance of bags as portable armour against predators. To clarify the defensive function, I studied the bagworm Eumeta minuscula and a potential predator Calosoma maximoviczi (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Under laboratory conditions, all bagworm larvae were attacked by carabid adults, but successfully defended themselves against the predators' mandibles using their own bags. The portable bags, which are composed mainly of host plant twigs, may function as a physical barrier against predator mandibles. To test this hypothesis, I removed the twig bags and replaced some with herb leaf bags; all bag-removed larvae were easily caught and predated by carabids, while all bag-replaced larvae could successfully defend themselves against carabid attacks. Therefore, various types of portable bags can protect bagworm larvae from carabid attacks. This is the first study to test the defensive function of bagworm portable bags against invertebrate predators.

  7. Armour materials for the ITER plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabash, V.; Federici, G.; Matera, R.; Raffray, A.R.

    1999-01-01

    The selection of the armour materials for the plasma facing components (PFCs) of the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) is a trade-off between multiple requirements derived from the unique features of a burning fusion plasma environment. The factors that affect the selection come primarily from the requirements of plasma performance (e.g., minimise impurity contamination in the confined plasma), engineering integrity, component lifetime (e.g., withstand thermal stresses, acceptable erosion, etc.) and safety (minimise tritium and radioactive dust inventories). The current selection in ITER is to use beryllium on the first-wall, upper baffle and on the port limiter surfaces, carbon fibre composites near the strike points of the divertor vertical target and tungsten elsewhere in the divertor and lower baffle modules. This paper provides the background for this selection vis-a-vis the operating parameters expected during normal and off-normal conditions. The reasons for the selection of the specific grades of armour materials are also described. The effects of the neutron irradiation on the properties of Be, W and carbon fibre composites at the expected ITER conditions are briefly reviewed. Critical issues are discussed together with the necessary future R and D. (orig.)

  8. Cooling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, S.P.

    1994-01-01

    After an introduction to the general concepts of cooling of charged particle beams, some specific cooling methods are discussed, namely stochastic, electron and laser cooling. The treatment concentrates on the physical ideas of the cooling methods and only very crude derivations of cooling times are given. At the end three other proposed cooling schemes are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  9. The effects of military body armour on trunk and hip kinematics during performance of manual handling tasks (.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Gavin; Aisbett, Brad; Neesham-Smith, Daniel; Carvajal, Alvaro; Netto, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are reported as burdening the military. An identified risk factor for injury is carrying heavy loads; however, soldiers are also required to wear their load as body armour. To investigate the effects of body armour on trunk and hip kinematics during military-specific manual handling tasks, 16 males completed 3 tasks while wearing each of 4 body armour conditions plus a control. Three-dimensional motion analysis captured and quantified all kinematic data. Average trunk flexion for the weightiest armour type was higher compared with control during the carry component of the ammunition box lift (p armour types compared with control during the ammunition box place component (p armour occurred independent of armour design. In order to optimise armour design, manufacturers need to work with end-users to explore how armour configurations interact with range of personal and situational factors in operationally relevant environments. Practitioner Summary: Musculoskeletal injuries are reported as burdening the military and may relate to body armour wear. Body armour increased trunk flexion and reduced trunk rotation during military-specific lifting and carrying tasks. The altered kinematics may contribute to injury risk, but more research is required.

  10. Siege-shield and scale armour. Reciprocal predominance and common evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Backer, Fabrice De

    2011-01-01

    As it appears on the earliest depictions of military materials, Early Dynastic people used a huge shield during the sieges of cities, in order to protect their archers shooting at the defenders. In the meantime, the neck, chest and sides of these besieging soldiers were protected with the primitive models of the scale-armour. The shield has seen a fascinating evolution in the ancient Near East as a defensive armour, dominating the light, thin armour for centuries. Then, the spoked-wheel chari...

  11. Light armoured reconnaissance vehicle system S-LOV-CBRN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomek, M.; Kare, J.; Cuda, P.; Fisera, O.; Res, B

    2014-01-01

    Light armoured reconnaissance vehicle system S-LOV-CBRN is intended mainly for CBRN reconnaissance and CBRN monitoring of areas of interest. The vehicle is designed to fulfil the missions according to military CBRN scenarios and to support effectively the first responders' teams during their response to the extent CBRN incident.The vehicle is equipped with a chemical (C) and a biological (B) detection system, as well as with a radiation and nuclear (RN) detection system consisting of the control unit with an internal dosimetric probe and of two external ones which are mounted on the right and left side of the vehicle. In this abstract the vehicle system S-LOV-CBRN is shortly described. (authors)

  12. Fracture modelling of a high performance armour steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoglund, P.; Nilsson, M.; Tjernberg, A.

    2006-08-01

    The fracture characteristics of the high performance armour steel Armox 500T is investigated. Tensile mechanical experiments using samples with different notch geometries are used to investigate the effect of multi-axial stress states on the strain to fracture. The experiments are numerically simulated and from the simulation the stress at the point of fracture initiation is determined as a function of strain and these data are then used to extract parameters for fracture models. A fracture model based on quasi-static experiments is suggested and the model is tested against independent experiments done at both static and dynamic loading. The result show that the fracture model give reasonable good agreement between simulations and experiments at both static and dynamic loading condition. This indicates that multi-axial loading is more important to the strain to fracture than the deformation rate in the investigated loading range. However on-going work will further characterise the fracture behaviour of Armox 500T.

  13. Graphite limiter and armour damage in Doublet III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKelvey, T.; Taylor, T.; Trester, P.

    1983-01-01

    Graphite coated with TiC has been used extensively in Doublet III for limiters and neutral beam armour. Performance of these components has been superior to that of the metal components previously used. Damage to the coated graphite has occurred and can be classified into three categories: (1) gross failure of the graphite due to thermal stresses induced by the combination of high applied energy fluxes and mechanical restraint, (2) surface failure of the graphite due to runaway electron impingement, and (3) loss of TiC coating due to arcing, sputtering, vaporization and spalling, primarily during plasma disruptions and other abnormal plasma conditions. Design improvements are being continually implemented to minimize this damage and its consequences. (author)

  14. Impact of police body armour and equipment on mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paddy C; Handcock, Phil J; Rehrer, Nancy J

    2013-11-01

    Body armour is used widely by law enforcement and other agencies but has received mixed reviews. This study examined the influence of stab resistant body armour (SRBA) and mandated accessories on physiological responses to, and the performance of, simulated mobility tasks. Fifty-two males (37 ± 9.2 yr, 180.7 ± 6.1 cm, 90.2 ± 11.6 kg, VO2max 50 ± 8.5 ml kg(-1) min(-1), BMI 27.6 ± 3.1, mean ± SD) completed a running VO2max test and task familiarisation. Two experimental sessions were completed (≥4 days in between) in a randomised counterbalanced order, one while wearing SRBA and appointments (loaded) and one without additional load (unloaded). During each session participants performed five mobility tasks: a balance task, an acceleration task that simulated exiting a vehicle, chin-ups, a grappling task, and a manoeuvrability task. A 5-min treadmill run (zero-incline at 13 km·h(-1), running start) was then completed. One min after the run the five mobility tasks were repeated. There was a significant decrease in performance during all tasks with loading (p tasks; completed fewer chin-ups; and had greater physiological cost (↑ %HRmax, ↑ %VO2max, ↑ RER) and perceptual effort (↑ RPE) during the 5-min run. Mean performance decreases ranged from 13 to 42% while loaded, with further decreases of 6-16% noted after the 5-min run. Unloaded task performance was no different between phases. Wearing SRBA and appointments significantly reduced mobility during key task elements and resulted in greater physiological effort. These findings could have consequences for optimal function in the working environment and therefore officer and public safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Relative abundance estimations of Chengal trees in a tropical rainforest by using modified canopy fractional cover (mCFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N

    2014-01-01

    Tree species composition estimations are important to sustain forest management. This study estimates relative abundance of useful timber tree species (chengal) using Hyperion EO-1 satellite data. For the estimation, modified Canopy Fractional Cover (mCFC) was developed using Canopy Fractional Cover (CFC). mCFC was more sensitive to estimate relative abundance of chengal trees rather than Mixture Tuned Matched Filtering (MTMF). Meanwhile, MTMF was more sensitive to estimate the relative abundance of undisturbed forest. Accuracy suggests that the mCFC model is better to explain relative abundance of chengal trees than MTMF. Therefore, it can be concluded that relative abundance of tree species extracted from Hyperion EO-1 satellite data using modified Canopy Fractional Cover is an obtrusive approach used for identifying tree species composition

  16. Relative abundance estimations of chengal tree in a tropical rainforest by using modified Canopy Fractional Cover (mCFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N

    2014-01-01

    Tree species composition estimations are important to sustain forest management. This study challenged estimates of relative abundance of useful timber tree species (chengal) using Hyperion EO-1 satellite data. For the estimation, modified Canopy Fractional Cover (mCFC) was developed using Canopy Fractional Cover (CFC). mCFC was more sensitive to estimate relative abundance of chengal trees rather than Mixture Tuned Matched Filtering (MTMF). Meanwhile, MTMF was more sensitive to estimate the relative abundance of undisturbed forest. Accuracy suggests that the mCFC model is better to explain relative abundance of chengal trees than MTMF. Therefore, it can be concluded that relative abundance of trees species extracted from Hyperion EO-1 satellite data using modified Canopy Fractional Cover is an obtrusive approach used for identifying trees species composition

  17. EGF-CFC proteins are essential coreceptors for the TGF-β signals Vg1 and GDF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Simon K.; Olale, Felix; Bennett, James T.; Brivanlou, Ali H.; Schier, Alexander F.

    2003-01-01

    The TGF-β signals Nodal, Activin, GDF1, and Vg1 have been implicated in mesoderm induction and left-right patterning. Nodal and Activin both activate Activin receptors, but only Nodal requires EGF-CFC coreceptors for signaling. We report that Vg1 and GDF1 signaling in zebrafish also depends on EGF-CFC proteins, but not on Nodal signals. Correspondingly, we find that in Xenopus Vg1 and GDF1 bind to and signal through Activin receptors only in the presence of EGF-CFC proteins. These results establish that multiple TGF-β signals converge on Activin receptor/EGF-CFC complexes and suggest a more widespread requirement for coreceptors in TGF-β signaling than anticipated previously. PMID:12514096

  18. Molecular and clinical characterization of cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome: overlapping clinical manifestations with Costello syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narumi, Yoko; Aoki, Yoko; Niihori, Tetsuya; Neri, Giovanni; Cave, Helene; Verloes, Alain; Nava, Caroline; Kavamura, Maria Ines; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Kurosawa, Kenji; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Wilson, Louise C.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Lapunzina, Pablo; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Makita, Yoshio; Kondo, Ikuko; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Ito, Etsuro; Sameshima, Kiyoko; Kato, Kumi; Kure, Shigeo; Matsubara, Yokhi

    2007-01-01

    Cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome characterized by heart defects, a distinctive facial appearance, ectodermal abnormalities and mental retardation. Clinically, it overlaps with both Noonan syndrome and Costello syndrome, which are

  19. Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are used in a number of applications, and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s. However, in the mid-1980s, it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFSs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of these alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects in the form of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential heating and cooling, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air-conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. The discussion in this paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to refrigeration and air-conditioning. In general the use of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reduction in total equivalent warming impact (TEWI), lifetime equivalent CO 2 emission. Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. The Damage To The Armour Layer Due To Extreme Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztunali Ozbahceci, Berguzar; Ergin, Aysen; Takayama, Tomotsuka

    2010-05-01

    The sea waves are not regular but random and chaotic. In order to understand this randomness, it is common to make individual wave analysis in time domain or spectral analysis in frequency domain. Characteristic wave heights like Hmax, H%2,H1-10, H1-3, Hmean are obtained through individual wave analysis in time domain. These characteristic wave heights are important because they are used in the design of different type of coastal structures. It is common to use significant wave height, H1-3,for the design of rubble mound structures. Therefore, only spectrally derived or zero-crossing significant wave height is usually reported for the rubble mound breakwaters without any information on larger waves. However, even the values of H1-3are similar; some train of irregular waves may exhibit a large fluctuation of instantaneous wave energy, while another train may not show such a fluctuation (Goda, 1998). Moreover, freak or rogue wave, simply defined as the wave exceeding at least twice the significant wave height may also occur. Those larger waves were called as extreme waves in this study and the effect of extreme waves on the damage to the armour layer of rubble mound breakwaters was investigated by means of hydraulic model experiment. Rock armored rubble mound breakwater model with 1:1.5 slope was constructed in the wave channel of Hydraulics Laboratory of the Disaster Prevention Research Institute of Kyoto University, Japan. The model was consisted of a permeable core layer, a filter and armour layer with two stones thicknesses. Size of stones were same for both of the slopes as Dn50(armour)=0.034m, Dn50(filter)=0.021m and Dn50(core)=0.0148m for armour, filter and core layers, respectively. Time series which are approximately equal to 1000 waves, with similar significant wave height but different extreme wave height cases were generated. In order to generate necessary time series in the wave channel, they were firstly computed by numerically. For the numerical

  1. Tungsten coatings electro-deposited on CFC substrates from oxide molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Ningbo; Zhang, Yingchun, E-mail: zycustb@163.com; Lang, Shaoting; Jiang, Fan; Wang, Lili

    2014-12-15

    Tungsten is considered as plasma facing material in fusion devices because of its high melting point, its good thermal conductivity, its low erosion rate and its benign neutron activation properties. On the other hand, carbon based materials like C/C fiber composites (CFC) have been used for plasma facing materials (PFMs) due to their high thermal shock resistance, light weight and high strength. Tungsten coatings on CFC substrates are used in the JET divertor in the frame of the JET ITER-like wall project, and have been prepared by plasma spray (PS) and other techniques. In this study, tungsten coatings were electro-deposited on CFC from Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}–WO{sub 3} molten salt under various deposition parameters at 900 °C in air. In order to obtain tungsten coatings with excellent performance, the effects of pulse duration ratio and pulse current density on microstructures and crystal structures of tungsten coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Rigaku Industrial Co., Ltd., D/MAX-RB) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM, JSM 6480LV). It is found that the pulsed duration ratio and pulse current density had a significant influence on tungsten nucleation and electro-crystallization phenomena. SEM observation revealed that intact, uniform and dense tungsten coatings formed on the CFC substrates. Both the average grain size and thickness of the coating increased with the pulsed current density. The XRD results showed that the coatings consisted of a single phase of tungsten with the body centered cubic (BCC) structure. The oxygen content of electro-deposited tungsten coatings was lower than 0.05%, and the micro-hardness was about 400 HV.

  2. Replacement of CFCs in thermodynamical systems; Remplacement des C.F.C. dans les systemes thermodynamiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleurance, M.

    1996-12-31

    Following the Montreal protocol and the withdrawal of the CFC-type refrigerating fluids, York France company has developed and adapted its equipments to new refrigerants. Each user will have to know how to define the best option for his installation: opting for or ignoring the withdrawal of CFCs, confining the installations, changing for new intermediate substitutes (HCFC-type), or changing or replacing with new long term substitutes (HFCs). (J.S.)

  3. Development and testing of CFC-copper high heat flux elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitteau, R.; Chappuis, P.; Deschamps, P.; Schlosser, J.; Viallet, H.; Vieider, G.

    1994-01-01

    In the frame of high heat flux development for plasma facing components, CEA has designed, fabricated and tested over twenty specimens, with some of them for the NET divertor application. Several Carbon Fibre Composites (CFC) and copper grades have been used with flat tile or macro bloc configuration. All the mock-ups were tested in the electron beam facility EB200, for steady-state flux and fatigue up to 1000 cycles. The best four are presented. (author) 3 refs.; 11 figs

  4. Accuracy of CFC groundwater dating in a crystalline bedrock aquifer: Data from a site in southern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockgård, Niclas; Rodhe, Allan; Olsson, K. A.

    The concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) and tritium were determined in groundwater in fractured crystalline bedrock at Finnsjön, Sweden. The specific goal was to investigate the accuracy of CFC dating in such an environment, taking potential degradation and mixing of water into consideration. The water was sampled to a depth of 42 m in three boreholes along an 800-m transect, from a recharge area to a local discharge area. The CFC-113 concentration was at the detection limit in most samples. The apparent recharge date obtained from CFC-11 was earlier than from CFC-12 for all samples, with a difference of over 20 years for some samples. The difference was probably caused by degradation of CFC-11. The CFC-12 dating of the samples ranged from before 1945 to 1975, with the exception of a sample from the water table, which had a present-day concentration. Conclusions about flow paths or groundwater velocity could not be drawn from the CFCs. The comparison between CFC-12 and tritium concentrations showed that most samples could be unmixed or mixtures of waters with different ages, and the binary mixtures that matched the measured concentrations were determined. The mixing model approach can be extended with additional tracers. Précision de la datation au CFC dans un aquifère rocheux-fracturé: données d'un site du sud de la Suède. Les concentrations en chlorofluorocarbones (CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113) et entritium ont été déterminées dans l'eau souterraine d'un massif fracturé à Finnsjön en Suède. Le but de cette étude est de mieux cerner la précision de la méthode de datation au CFC dans ce type d'environnement hydrogéologique, tout en considérant d'éventuels phénomènes de dégradation et de mélange d'eaux. L'eau a été échantillonnée à une profondeur de 42 mètres dans trois forages alignés sur 800 mètres entre une zone de recharge et une zone de déversement. Les concentrations en CFC-113 sont dans la plupart

  5. Issues and recommendations related to replacement of CFC-114 at the uranium enrichment gaseous diffusion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, B.L.; Banaghan, E.

    1993-01-01

    The operating uranium enrichment gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) in Portsmouth, Ohio and Paducah, Kentucky, which are operated for the United States Department for Energy by Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES), currently use a chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-114) as the primary process stream coolant. Due to recent legislation embodied in the Clean Air Act, the production of this and other related chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) are to be phased out with no production occurring after 1995. Since the plants lose approximately 500,000 pounds per year of this process stream coolant through various leaks, the GDPs are faced with the challenge of identifying a replacement coolant that will allow continued operation of the plants. MMES formed the CFC Task Team to identify and solve the various problems associated with identifying and implementing a replacement coolant. This report includes a review of the work performed by the CFC Task Team, and recommendations that were formulated based on this review and upon original work. The topics covered include; identifying a replacement coolant, coolant leak detection and repair efforts, coolant safety concerns, coolant level sensors, regulatory issues, and an analytical decision analysis

  6. The hardness of synthetic products obtained from cooled and crystallized basaltic melts (in Romanian)

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Ogrean

    2001-01-01

    The Hardness of Synthetic Products Obtained from Cooled and Crystallized Basaltic Melts. Hardness is one of the main properties of the products obtained from cooled and crystallized basaltic melts under a controlled thermal regime. It influences the abrasion tear resistance of the resulted material. The microhardness measurements on the samples (bricks, boards, gutters, armour plates, tubes) indicated Vickers hardness value between 757–926 for the materials obtained from Şanovita basalts (Tim...

  7. High thermal load component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuse, Toshiaki; Tachikawa, Nobuo.

    1996-01-01

    A cooling tube made of a pure copper is connected to the inner portion of an armour (heat resistant member) made of an anisotropic carbon/carbon composite (CFC) material. The CFC material has a high heat conductivity in longitudinal direction of fibers and has low conductivity in perpendicular thereto. Fibers extending in the armour from a heat receiving surface just above the cooling tube are directly connected to the cooling tube. A portion of the fibers extending from a heat receiving surface other than portions not just above the cooling tube is directly bonded to the cooling tube. Remaining fibers are disposed so as to surround the cooling tube. The armour and the cooling tube are soldered using an active metal flux. With such procedures, high thermal load components for use in a thermonuclear reactor are formed, which are excellent in a heat removing characteristic and hardly causes defects such as crackings and peeling. (I.N.)

  8. Three-Dimensional Model Test Study of a CUBIPOD Armoured Roundhead

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Aldama, J. M. Urrutia

    ‐crested wave tests were performed as well. One objective of the tests was to compare the stability of CUBIPOD armoured roundheads to the stability of cube armoured roundheads. This could be done by choosing a model test setup identical to that previous used in a study of the stability of a cube armoured......The present report presents results from a three‐dimensional model test study carried out at Aalborg University in the period September 2008 - December 2008. The model tests were carried out to study the stability of a CUBIPOD armoured roundhead under short‐crested wave attack. Few long...... roundhead for the Punta Langosteira breakwater at La Coruna. To have a direct comparison some of the new test series were reproduced with cubes also. This was done with identical steering signals send to the paddles....

  9. Fiducial-based monocular 3D displacement measurement of breakwater armour unit models.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vieira, R

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fiducial-based approach to monitoring the movement of breakwater armour units in a model hall environment. Target symbols with known dimensions are attached to the physical models, allowing the recovery of three...

  10. Erosion simulation of first wall beryllium armour under ITER transient heat loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazylev, B.; Janeschitz, G.; Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S.; Loarte, A.

    2009-04-01

    The beryllium is foreseen as plasma facing armour for the first wall in the ITER in form of Be-clad blanket modules in macrobrush design with brush size about 8-10 cm. In ITER significant heat loads during transient events (TE) are expected at the main chamber wall that may leads to the essential damage of the Be armour. The main mechanisms of metallic target damage remain surface melting and melt motion erosion, which determines the lifetime of the plasma facing components. Melting thresholds and melt layer depth of the Be armour under transient loads are estimated for different temperatures of the bulk Be and different shapes of transient loads. The melt motion damages of Be macrobrush armour caused by the tangential friction force and the Lorentz force are analyzed for bulk Be and different sizes of Be-brushes. The damage of FW under radiative loads arising during mitigated disruptions is numerically simulated.

  11. Erosion simulation of first wall beryllium armour under ITER transient heat loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazylev, B. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: bazylev@ihm.fzk.de; Janeschitz, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Fusion, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Loarte, A. [ITER Organisation, Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2009-04-30

    The beryllium is foreseen as plasma facing armour for the first wall in the ITER in form of Be-clad blanket modules in macrobrush design with brush size about 8-10 cm. In ITER significant heat loads during transient events (TE) are expected at the main chamber wall that may leads to the essential damage of the Be armour. The main mechanisms of metallic target damage remain surface melting and melt motion erosion, which determines the lifetime of the plasma facing components. Melting thresholds and melt layer depth of the Be armour under transient loads are estimated for different temperatures of the bulk Be and different shapes of transient loads. The melt motion damages of Be macrobrush armour caused by the tangential friction force and the Lorentz force are analyzed for bulk Be and different sizes of Be-brushes. The damage of FW under radiative loads arising during mitigated disruptions is numerically simulated.

  12. The Finite Element Modelling and Dynamic Characteristics Analysis about One Kind of Armoured Vehicles’ Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Ge, Zhishang; Zhai, Weihao; Tan, Shiwang; Zhang, Feng

    2018-01-01

    The static and dynamic characteristics of fuel tank are studied for the armoured vehicle in this paper. The CATIA software is applied to build the CAD model of the armoured vehicles’ fuel tank, and the finite element model is established in ANSYS Workbench. The finite element method is carried out to analyze the static and dynamic mechanical properties of the fuel tank, and the first six orders of mode shapes and their frequencies are also computed and given in the paper, then the stress distribution diagram and the high stress areas are obtained. The results of the research provide some references to the fuel tanks’ design improvement, and give some guidance for the installation of the fuel tanks on armoured vehicles, and help to improve the properties and the service life of this kind of armoured vehicles’ fuel tanks.

  13. On the Determination of Concrete Armour Unit Stress including Specific Results related to Dolosse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Howell, G.L.; Liu, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Failures of rubble mound breakwaters armoured with complex types of unreinforced concrete armour units are often due to breakage. This happens when the stresses exceed the material strength. Sufficient parametric studies of the stresses are not yet available to produce design diagrams for structu......Failures of rubble mound breakwaters armoured with complex types of unreinforced concrete armour units are often due to breakage. This happens when the stresses exceed the material strength. Sufficient parametric studies of the stresses are not yet available to produce design diagrams...... and scale effects. Moreover, some results from the Crescent City Prototype Dolosse study are presented and related to results from small-de model tests. A preliminary design diagram for Dolosse ir presented as well....

  14. Erosion simulation of first wall beryllium armour under ITER transient heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazylev, B.; Janeschitz, G.; Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S.; Loarte, A.

    2009-01-01

    The beryllium is foreseen as plasma facing armour for the first wall in the ITER in form of Be-clad blanket modules in macrobrush design with brush size about 8-10 cm. In ITER significant heat loads during transient events (TE) are expected at the main chamber wall that may leads to the essential damage of the Be armour. The main mechanisms of metallic target damage remain surface melting and melt motion erosion, which determines the lifetime of the plasma facing components. Melting thresholds and melt layer depth of the Be armour under transient loads are estimated for different temperatures of the bulk Be and different shapes of transient loads. The melt motion damages of Be macrobrush armour caused by the tangential friction force and the Lorentz force are analyzed for bulk Be and different sizes of Be-brushes. The damage of FW under radiative loads arising during mitigated disruptions is numerically simulated.

  15. The Influence of Waist Thickness of Dolosse on the Hydraulic Stability of Dolosse Armour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Brejnegaard-Nielsen, Torben

    1987-01-01

    stability was studied. A low packing density of approximately 0.65 was used corresponding to a two-layer armour with high porosity. From the results it is concluded that the hydraulic stability of Dolos armour is not very sensitive to variations in the waist to height ratio. Only for damage levels exceeding...... displacement of approximately 5% of the armour blocks in the most exposed area there seems to be a significant decrease in hydraulic stability with increasing waist to height ratio. Thus the waist ratio only influences the residual hydraulic stability. Based on a short discussion of stressed in armour units...... underlines the need for adoption of more restrictive safety factors than generally used in rubble mound breakwater design. It also supports the idea of a probabilistic approach in the design process....

  16. QUANTITATIVE PHASE ANALYSIS OF ARMOUR STEEL WELDED JOINT BY X-RAY DIFFRACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Cvetinov, Miroslav; Čabrilo, Aleksandar; Gerić, Katarina; Stojanović, Maja; Klisurić, Olivera

    2017-01-01

    Ultra-high tensile strength ischaracteristic of armour steel and in order to preserve this strength itswelding process is of paramount importance. Austenitic filler material istraditionally used for welding of armour steel, yet it has lower mechanicalproperties than the base material, i.e. the filler material is the weakestpoint of the welded joint. Moreover, due to the plastic deformation at thecrack tip austenitic filler material gets transformed into martensite duringfatigue crack propagat...

  17. Performance of kevlar fibre-reinforced rubber composite armour against shaped-charge jet penetration

    OpenAIRE

    Zu,Xu-dong; Huang,Zheng-xiang; Zhai,Wen

    2015-01-01

    AbstractThe protective capability of the Kevlar fibre-reinforced rubber composite armour (KFRRCA) at different obliquities is studied using depth-of-penetration experiments method against a 56 mm-diameter standard-shaped charge. Efficiency factors are calculated to evaluate the protection capability of the KFRRCA at different obliquities. Meanwhile, an X-ray experiment is used to observe the deformation, fracture, and scatter of the shaped-charge jet as it penetrates the composite armour. Fin...

  18. Qualitative Observations on the Design of Sports Bras for Wear Under Body Armour

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Niemczyk, Sara; Arnold, Lyndon; Wang, Lijing

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of preliminary research designed to explore in depth the design, fit and comfort of selected sports bras for large breasted women worn under soft body armour. Female armed personnel need to feel safe and protected in soft armour vests, giving them physiological comfort to perform their duties daily. Troublesome physical and additional physiological problems in relation to the female body are frequently caused due to the poor design of various bra components. Di...

  19. Surface particle sizes on armoured gravel streambeds: Effects of supply and hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter J. Whiting; John G. King

    2003-01-01

    Most gravel-bed streams exhibit a surface armour in which the median grain size of the surface particles is coarser than that of the subsurface particles. This armour has been interpreted to result when the supply of sediment is less than the ability of the stream to move sediment. While there may be certain sizes in the bed for which the supply is less than the...

  20. Marketingový výzkum znalosti a image značky Under Armour

    OpenAIRE

    Koubík, Vojtěch

    2012-01-01

    Title: Marketing research of the brand knowledge and image of the brand Under Armour Annotation: The main objective of the bachelor thesis is to find out what the knowledge and image of the Under Armour brand is like using marketing research. The terms brand and image are explained in the first part of the thesis which include theoretical basis from various literary and electronic sources. The methodology section describes marketing research, its process and its types. The analytical part pre...

  1. Influence of Material Properties on the Ballistic Performance of Ceramics for Personal Body Armour

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufmann, Christian; Cronin, Duane; Worswick, Michael; Pageau, Gilles; Beth, Andre

    2003-01-01

    In support of improved personal armour development, depth of penetration tests have been conducted on four different ceramic materials including alumina, modified alumina, silicon carbide and boron carbide. These experiments consisted of impacting ceramic tiles bonded to aluminum cylinders with 0.50 caliber armour piercing projectiles. The results are presented in terms of ballistic efficiency, and the validity of using ballistic efficiency as a measure of ceramic performance was examined. In...

  2. Hybrid Composite Tensile Armour Wires in Flexible Risers: A Multi-scale Model

    OpenAIRE

    Gautam, Mayank; Katnam, Kali-Babu; Potluri, Venkata; Jha, Vivekanand; Latto, J.; Dodds, NI

    2017-01-01

    Traditional carbon-steel armour wires pose limitations (e.g. long spans, weight reduction, corrosion and fatigue) for flexible risers to operate in demanding and deeper water environments. In this context, an alternative to carbon-steel tensile armour wires is proposed recently by the authors (Gautam et al. [1]), comprising of hexagonally packed polymer composite rods with uni-directional fibres and an over-braided (i.e. bi-axial braid with high performance fibres) sleeve. These hybrid compos...

  3. Using an analytical model of simulation in the design of light-weight armours

    OpenAIRE

    Zaera Polo, Ramón Eulalio; Sánchez Gálvez, Vicente

    1998-01-01

    9 pages, 13 figures. This paper presents a model for the simulation of the impact of projectiles of high kinetic energy on lightweight ceramic/metal armours. The work was financed jointly by the Defence Ministries of Spain, Italy, Holland and Denmark as part of a project among nations for the development of tools for the design of this type of armour. The model consists of a series of differential equations incorporating the most essential phenomena of the impact process, formulated after ...

  4. A note on the behind armour effects from perforated alumina/aluminium targets

    OpenAIRE

    Hazell, P. J.; Fellows, N. A.; Hetherington, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    A thin, ceramic-faced armour, separated from a thick metal block, has been subjected to high-velocity impact by a 6.35 mm diameter steel sphere. Experimental work was carried out which compared firings into ceramic-faced aluminium armour, separated from thick aluminium witness blocks, with firings into the thick aluminium blocks alone. The depth of penetration and the area of damage were measured and an estimated percentage weight saving due to the inclusion of the ceramic-f...

  5. On the Determination of Concrete Armour Unit Stress including Specific Results related to Dolosse

    OpenAIRE

    Burcharth, H. F.; Howell, G.L.; Liu, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Failures of rubble mound breakwaters armoured with complex types of unreinforced concrete armour units are often due to breakage. This happens when the stresses exceed the material strength. Sufficient parametric studies of the stresses are not yet available to produce design diagrams for structural integrity. The paper presents a general discussion of the problems related to stress etermination and describes the results and the analyses of model tests with 200 kg and 200 g load-cell instrume...

  6. Performance of carbon fiber reinforced rubber composite armour against shaped charge jet penetration

    OpenAIRE

    Yue Lian-yong; Li Wei; Zu Xu-dong; Huang Zheng-xiang; Gao Zhen-yu

    2016-01-01

    Natural rubber is reinforced with carbon fiber; the protective performances of the carbonfiber reinforced rubber composite armour to shaped charge jet have been studied based on the depth of penetration experiments. The craters on the witness blocks, the nature rubber based composite plates’ deformation and the Scanning Electron Microscopy for the hybrid fiber reinforced rubber plate also is analyzed. The results showed that the composite armour can affect the stability of the jet and made pa...

  7. Establishing a Reliability Evaluation of the Toe Berm and Armour Layer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiani, E.; Burcharth, H. F.; Sørensen, Jørgen S.

    1995-01-01

    Failure of various sections of a rubble mound breakwater can be crucial for the stability of the rubble mound breakwater as a whole. This is illustrated in Fig 1, showing a series of failure modes for a rubble mound structure. Ensuring static stability of the armour layer and toe berm and crown......, enables stability of the primary sections of a rubble mound breakwater. The combined static stability of the armour layer and toe berm will be investigated....

  8. CuPb rheocast alloy as joining material for CFC composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, M.; Lemoine, P.; Ferraris, M.; Appendino Montorsi, M.; Matera, R.

    1995-10-01

    High heat flux components for future use in thermonuclear fusion reactors are designed as layered structures. The assembling of the different parts (armour, heat sink and external structure) requires a joint which could withstand large heat loads and thermal stresses. In this paper we examined a 50 wt% PbCu rheocast alloy (RCA) as joining material for the armour/heat sink joint. The alloy was prepared in vacuum in a rotational furnace and was characterized by SEM-EDS analysis and heating microscopy. The obtained microstructure was globular as foreseen and it remained after prolonged heating at 650°C. The alloy showed very good ductility: sheets of about 200 μm were rolled starting from about 1 × 1 × 1 cm 3 cubes. The alloy was successful in joining both the armour and the heat sink materials, respectively, carbon fibre reinforced composites and copper. Initial mechanical testing shows that the technique is viable for the foreseen applications in the field of thermonuclear fusion reactors.

  9. Cu-Pb rheocast alloy as joining material for CFC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvo, M.

    1995-01-01

    High heat flux components for future use in thermonuclear fusion reactors are designed as layered structures. The assembling of the different parts (armour, heat sink and external structure) requires a joint which could withstand large heat loads and thermal stresses. In this paper we examined a 50 wt% Pb-Cu rheocast alloy (RCA) as joining material for the armour/heat sink joint. The alloy was prepared in vacuum in a rotational furnace and was characterized by SEM-EDS analysis and heating microscopy. The obtained microstructure was globular as foreseen and it remained after prolonged heating at 650 C. The alloy showed very good ductility: sheets of about 200 μm were rolled starting from about 1x1x1 cm 3 cubes. The alloy was successful in joining both the armour and the heat sink materials, respectively, carbon fibre reinforced composites and copper. Initial mechanical testing shows that the technique is viable for the foreseen applications in the field of thermonuclear fusion reactors. (orig.)

  10. Environmental aspects of the district cooling system application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitrakovski, Dragan

    2006-01-01

    The use of air-conditioning equipment based on CFC and HCFC fluids has a direct influence on the occurrence of the greenhouse effect and damage of the ozone layer. Besides the obligatory shift og HCF cooling fluids, the reduction of such negative influences may also be achieved by the application of the district cooling system to the air-conditioning plants in the area. The paper includes example of the application of the district system, with positive effect regarding the ozone layer protection and greenhouse effect prevention. (Author)

  11. On dangerous ground: the evolution of body armour in cordyline lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeckhoven, Chris; El Adak, Yousri; Hui, Cang; Van Damme, Raoul; Stankowich, Theodore

    2018-06-13

    Animal body armour is often considered an adaptation that protects prey against predatory attacks, yet comparative studies that link the diversification of these allegedly protective coverings to differential predation risk or pressure are scarce. Here, we examine the evolution of body armour, including spines and osteoderms, in Cordylinae, a radiation of southern African lizards. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we attempt to identify the ecological and environmental correlates of body armour that may hint at the selective pressures responsible for defensive trait diversification. Our results show that species inhabiting arid environments are more likely to possess elaborated body armour, specifically osteoderms. We did not find any effect of estimated predation pressure or risk on the degree of body armour. These findings suggest that body armour might not necessarily evolve in response to direct interactions with predators, but rather as a result of increased habitat-mediated predation risk. Furthermore, we discuss the possibility that osteoderms might have been shaped by factors unrelated to predation. © 2018 The Author(s).

  12. Wave Overtopping over Crown Walls and Run-up on Rubble Mound Breakwaters with Kolos Armour under Random Waves

    OpenAIRE

    A. Arunjith; S.A. Sannasiraj; V. Sundar

    2013-01-01

    The design of rubble mound structures like breakwaters and seawalls are influenced by the wave run-up and overtopping over them. The above phenomena largely depend on the type of the armour units as they directly interact with the incident waves. The hydrodynamic characteristics of various concrete armour units have been established by several researchers. A new armour block, ‘Kolos’, a modified version of Dolos, is considered in this study for a detailed investigation. An attempt is made to ...

  13. Effects of ELMs and disruptions on ITER divertor armour materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Zhitlukhin, A.; Arkhipov, N.; Giniyatulin, R.; Klimov, N.; Landman, I.; Podkovyrov, V.; Safronov, V.; Loarte, A.; Merola, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the response of plasma facing components manufactured with tungsten (macro-brush) and CFC to energy loads characteristic of Type I ELMs and disruptions in ITER, in experiments conducted (under an EU/RF collaboration) in two plasma guns (QSPA and MK-200UG) at the TRINITI institute. Targets were exposed to a series of repetitive pulses in QSPA with heat loads in a range of 1-2 MJ/m 2 lasting 0.5 ms. Moderate tungsten erosion, of less than 0.2 μm per pulse, was found for loads of ∼1.5 MJ/m 2 , consistent with ELM erosion being determined by tungsten evaporation and not by melt layer displacement. At energy densities of ∼1.8 MJ/m 2 a sharp growth of tungsten erosion was measured together with intense droplet ejection. MK-200UG experiments were focused on studying mainly vapor plasma production and impurity transport during ELMs. The conditions for removal of thin metal deposits from a carbon substrate were characterized

  14. Effects of ELMs and disruptions on ITER divertor armour materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, G.; Zhitlukhin, A.; Arkhipov, N.; Giniyatulin, R.; Klimov, N.; Landman, I.; Podkovyrov, V.; Safronov, V.; Loarte, A.; Merola, M.

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes the response of plasma facing components manufactured with tungsten (macro-brush) and CFC to energy loads characteristic of Type I ELMs and disruptions in ITER, in experiments conducted (under an EU/RF collaboration) in two plasma guns (QSPA and MK-200UG) at the TRINITI institute. Targets were exposed to a series of repetitive pulses in QSPA with heat loads in a range of 1-2 MJ/m 2 lasting 0.5 ms. Moderate tungsten erosion, of less than 0.2 μm per pulse, was found for loads of ˜1.5 MJ/m 2, consistent with ELM erosion being determined by tungsten evaporation and not by melt layer displacement. At energy densities of ˜1.8 MJ/m 2 a sharp growth of tungsten erosion was measured together with intense droplet ejection. MK-200UG experiments were focused on studying mainly vapor plasma production and impurity transport during ELMs. The conditions for removal of thin metal deposits from a carbon substrate were characterized.

  15. [Armourer and mad cow disease: images of veterinarians in music].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäffer, J

    2001-01-01

    This contribution is not about animals in music; it rather attempts to describe how veterinary medicine as a discipline and veterinarians as representatives of the profession are perceived of and portrayed in music. Aside from Gioacchino Rossini's "Barber of Seville", in which Count Almaviva impersonates a veterinarian of the day, the most sympathetic veterinarian character ever created by a lyricist or composer in surely Hans Stadinger, the "armourer" and vet in Albert Lortzings opera. In other musical genres such as artsongs and folksongs, the only such figure worthy of musical interpretation seems to have been those masters of the fiery forge who were also wise in the veterinary healing arts. In the past 20 years vets and veterinary medicine have been included in new musical trends: There are musicals and radio plays in which even the youngest members of the audience are exposed to the veterinarian profession. A number of pop groups are also to be mentioned here. For example, animal welfare has been thematized by punk rockers, and a pop group for Hamburg has put a medieval horse blessing to music. Last but not least, a number of vets in Berlin turn their everyday troubles and worries into musical parodies.

  16. Influence of Polish Arms, Armour and Militaria on Western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenkiewicz, Z. S.

    1980-12-01

    Full Text Available Up to approximately the 15th century the arms and the armament of a Polish knight were very similar in style to those used in the west: heavy Armour, heavy sword, and heavy horse. However, in the face of the continuous attacks by Tartars, and later on Turks, on Polish territories, the enemy consisting of very light cavalry, on small but very quick and manageable horses, the heavy knights were of little use. Long before the 15th century the armament and the tactics had to be slowly modified and adapted to the enemy's armament and stratagems.

    Hasta antes del siglo XV, las armas y armamento de los caballeros polacos eran muy similares en estilo a los utilizados en Occidente: una pesada armadura, una pesada espada, un pesado caballo. Sin embargo, frente a los contínuos ataques al territorio polaco, primero de los tártaros y posteriormente de los turcos, utilizando una caballería muy ligera montando caballos de pequeño tamaño pero muy rápidos y manejables, los caballeros tan pesadamente armados eran de poca utilidad. Tácticas y armamento hubieron de adaptarse a las del enemigo. [traducido por la redacción

  17. Bagworm bags as portable armour against invertebrate predators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Sugiura

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Some animals have evolved the use of environmental materials as “portable armour” against natural enemies. Portable bags that bagworm larvae (Lepidoptera: Psychidae construct using their own silk and plant parts are generally believed to play an important role as a physical barrier against natural enemies. However, no experimental studies have tested the importance of bags as portable armour against predators. To clarify the defensive function, I studied the bagworm Eumeta minuscula and a potential predator Calosoma maximoviczi (Coleoptera: Carabidae. Under laboratory conditions, all bagworm larvae were attacked by carabid adults, but successfully defended themselves against the predators’ mandibles using their own bags. The portable bags, which are composed mainly of host plant twigs, may function as a physical barrier against predator mandibles. To test this hypothesis, I removed the twig bags and replaced some with herb leaf bags; all bag-removed larvae were easily caught and predated by carabids, while all bag-replaced larvae could successfully defend themselves against carabid attacks. Therefore, various types of portable bags can protect bagworm larvae from carabid attacks. This is the first study to test the defensive function of bagworm portable bags against invertebrate predators.

  18. Characterization of impact behaviour of armour plate materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassim, M. N.; Bolduc, M.; Nazimuddin, G.; Delorme, J.; Polyzois, I.

    2012-08-01

    Three armour plate materials, including two steels, namely HHA and Mars 300, and an aluminium alloy 5083, were studied under impact loading to determine their behaviour and the mechanisms of deformation that lead to failure. The experimental testing was carried out using either a direct impact compression Split Hopkinson Bar or a torsion Hopkinson Bar. The impact properties and stress-strain cures were obtained as a function of the impact momentum in compression and the angle of twist in torsion. It was found that at the high strain rates developed in the specimen during the tests, the deformation occurs by the formation of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) which may lead to the formation of cracks within the bands and the ultimate failure of the specimens. It was also found that below a certain impact momentum, the deformation is more uniform and no ASBs are formed. Also, ASBs are more likely to form in the BCC metals such as the two steels while diffuse ASBs associated with plastic flow are exhibited in the 5083 aluminum alloy. Microstructural techniques ranging from optical microscopy to atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to study the topography of the ASBs. Also, modelling of the formation was performed. The results provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of ASBs in the failure of these materials.

  19. Vascularised endosteal bone tissue in armoured sauropod dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinsamy, Anusuya; Cerda, Ignacio; Powell, Jaime

    2016-04-26

    The presence of well-vascularised, endosteal bone in the medullary region of long bones of nonavian dinosaurs has been invoked as being homologous to medullary bone, a specialised bone tissue formed during ovulation in birds. However, similar bone tissues can result as a pathological response in modern birds and in nonavian dinosaurs, and has also been reported in an immature nonavian dinosaur. Here we report on the occurrence of well-vascularised endosteally formed bone tissue in three skeletal elements of armoured titanosaur sauropods from the Upper Cretaceous of Argentina: i) within the medullary cavity of a metatarsal, ii) inside a pneumatic cavity of a posterior caudal vertebra, iii) in intra-trabecular spaces in an osteoderm. We show that considering the criteria of location, origin (or development), and histology, these endosteally derived tissues in the saltasaurine titanosaurs could be described as either medullary bone or pathological bone. Furthermore, we show that similar endosteally formed well-vascularised bone tissue is fairly widely distributed among nondinosaurian Archosauriformes, and are not restricted to long bones, but can occur in the axial, and dermal skeleton. We propose that independent evidence is required to verify whether vascularised endosteal bone tissues in extinct archosaurs are pathological or reproductive in nature.

  20. Characterization of impact behaviour of armour plate materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazimuddin G.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Three armour plate materials, including two steels, namely HHA and Mars 300, and an aluminium alloy 5083, were studied under impact loading to determine their behaviour and the mechanisms of deformation that lead to failure. The experimental testing was carried out using either a direct impact compression Split Hopkinson Bar or a torsion Hopkinson Bar. The impact properties and stress-strain cures were obtained as a function of the impact momentum in compression and the angle of twist in torsion. It was found that at the high strain rates developed in the specimen during the tests, the deformation occurs by the formation of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs which may lead to the formation of cracks within the bands and the ultimate failure of the specimens. It was also found that below a certain impact momentum, the deformation is more uniform and no ASBs are formed. Also, ASBs are more likely to form in the BCC metals such as the two steels while diffuse ASBs associated with plastic flow are exhibited in the 5083 aluminum alloy. Microstructural techniques ranging from optical microscopy to atomic force microscopy (AFM were used to study the topography of the ASBs. Also, modelling of the formation was performed. The results provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of ASBs in the failure of these materials.

  1. Generation, transport and preservation of armoured mudballs in an ephemeral gully system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Anne; Stokes, Martin; Pirrie, Duncan; Hartley, Richard

    2008-08-01

    Armoured mudballs have been reported from modern fluvial catchments and preserved in ancient (Quaternary and older) sedimentary sequences. Despite many descriptions of mudballs in the literature there is little systematic analysis of their physical properties, genesis, transport and deposition within alluvial sequences. This study uses two adjacent catchments developed on identical geology in southeast Spain that offer a unique opportunity to examine the key controls on armoured mudball development as one catchment produces armoured mudball whilst the second does not. Field survey using a Total Station together with laboratory tests for material composition and aggregate stability were used to examine the catchment and the armoured mudballs. The results show that the generation of the armoured mudballs is heavily dependent on the correct sediment supply (suitable aggregates to act as mudball 'seeds', and suitable fragments to source the armour) and good slope-channel coupling within the catchment. Coupling is facilitated by steep gully sides which deliver the weathered blocks of marl (mudball 'seeds') to the gully floor. The 'seeds' form the core of the mudballs in the 'mudball factory' zone. If the 'seeds' are subjected to sealing by moisture from rainfall the mudball will hold together through negative pore pressures and can be transported by the ensuing gully flow. As the mudball rolls it picks up a surface armour which becomes embedded into the mudball. With longer transport paths the turbulent nature of the flow creates spherical mudballs which are size sorted downstream by the hydraulics of the flow rather than attrition. Armoured mudball deposition occurs within unit braid bars in areas of waning flow (due to transmission losses), within vegetated, point or mid-channel bars. The armoured mudballs are preferentially deposited within the coarser bar head of these depositional units, with smaller marl fragments forming the finer bar tail. Trenching of the bars

  2. Carbohydrate management, anaerobic metabolism, and adenosine levels in the armoured catfish, Liposarcus pardalis (castelnau), during hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccormack, Tyson James; Lewis, Johanne Mari; Almeida-Val, Vera Maria Fonseca; Val, Adalberto Luis; Driedzic, William Robert

    2006-04-01

    The armoured catfish, Liposarcus pardalis, tolerates severe hypoxia at high temperatures. Although this species can breathe air, it also has a strong anaerobic metabolism. We assessed tissue to plasma glucose ratios and glycogen and lactate in a number of tissues under "natural" pond hypoxia, and severe aquarium hypoxia without aerial respiration. Armour lactate content and adenosine in brain and heart were also investigated. During normoxia, tissue to plasma glucose ratios in gill, brain, and heart were close to one. Hypoxia increased plasma glucose and decreased tissue to plasma ratios to less than one, suggesting glucose phosphorylation is activated more than uptake. High normoxic white muscle glucose relative to plasma suggests gluconeogenesis or active glucose uptake. Excess muscle glucose may serve as a metabolic reserve since hypoxia decreased muscle to plasma glucose ratios. Mild pond hypoxia changed glucose management in the absence of lactate accumulation. Lactate was elevated in all tissues except armour following aquarium hypoxia; however, confinement in aquaria increased armour lactate, even under normoxia. A stress-associated acidosis may contribute to armour lactate sequestration. High plasma lactate levels were associated with brain adenosine accumulation. An increase in heart adenosine was triggered by confinement in aquaria, although not by hypoxia alone.

  3. Continued increase of CFC-113a (CCl3CF3) mixing ratios in the global atmosphere: emissions, occurrence and potential sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcock, Karina E.; Reeves, Claire E.; Gooch, Lauren J.; Leedham Elvidge, Emma C.; Ashfold, Matthew J.; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Chou, Charles; Fraser, Paul J.; Langenfelds, Ray L.; Hanif, Norfazrin Mohd; O'Doherty, Simon; Oram, David E.; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Moi Phang, Siew; Abu Samah, Azizan; Röckmann, Thomas; Sturges, William T.; Laube, Johannes C.

    2018-04-01

    Atmospheric measurements of the ozone-depleting substance CFC-113a (CCl3CF3) are reported from ground-based stations in Australia, Taiwan, Malaysia and the United Kingdom, together with aircraft-based data for the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Building on previous work, we find that, since the gas first appeared in the atmosphere in the 1960s, global CFC-113a mixing ratios have been increasing monotonically to the present day. Mixing ratios of CFC-113a have increased by 40 % from 0.50 to 0.70 ppt in the Southern Hemisphere between the end of the previously published record in December 2012 and February 2017. We derive updated global emissions of 1.7 Gg yr-1 on average between 2012 and 2016 using a two-dimensional model. We compare the long-term trends and emissions of CFC-113a to those of its structural isomer, CFC-113 (CClF2CCl2F), which still has much higher mixing ratios than CFC-113a, despite its mixing ratios and emissions decreasing since the 1990s. The continued presence of northern hemispheric emissions of CFC-113a is confirmed by our measurements of a persistent interhemispheric gradient in its mixing ratios, with higher mixing ratios in the Northern Hemisphere. The sources of CFC-113a are still unclear, but we present evidence that indicates large emissions in East Asia, most likely due to its use as a chemical involved in the production of hydrofluorocarbons. Our aircraft data confirm the interhemispheric gradient as well as showing mixing ratios consistent with ground-based observations and the relatively long atmospheric lifetime of CFC-113a. CFC-113a is the only known CFC for which abundances are still increasing substantially in the atmosphere.

  4. Exposures of EU W-CFC combined targets with QSPA Kh-50 plasma streams simulating ITER ELM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhlaj, V.A.; Garkusha, I.E.; Tereshin, V.I.; Bandura, A.N.; Chebotarev, V.V.; Staltsov, V.V.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.

    2009-01-01

    Repeated load tests of special combined W-CFC samples were performed with QSPA plasma streams either resulting in strong melting of W surface layer or below the melting, but above the cracking threshold. Experiments show that in result of target exposures with heat load of 0.4 MJ/m 2 (no melting) only cracks formation was found on both tungsten and CFC surfaces. It is obtained that enhanced evaporation of CFC results in additional shielding of tungsten surface by C cloud and protects W surface from evaporation even for essentially increased energy density in impacting plasma. Exposures of combined target with heat loads of 0.82 MJ/m 2 resulted in strong melting of tungsten. Meshes of macro-cracks and micro-cracks as well as ripple structures are appeared on the resolidified surface

  5. Cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boernke, F.

    1975-01-01

    The need for the use of cooling systems in power plant engineering is dealt with from the point of view of a non-polluting form of energy production. The various cooling system concepts up to the modern natural-draught cooling towers are illustrated by examples. (TK/AK) [de

  6. Development of refrigerator insulation with reduced CFC-11. Reizokoyo flon sakugen uretan dannetsuzai no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, H.; Fukuda, K.; Yoshioka, M. (Sharp Corp., Osaka (Japan))

    1992-11-10

    Polyurethane thermal insulator in which the usage of CFC-11 is 50% reduced by increasing the percentage of water has been developed for the purpose of reducing polyurethane-foaming CFC-11 used as thermal insulator of refrigerators. In this new water-intensive feedstock system, the overall OH-value in polyol was lowered; the usage of aromatic amines was curtailed; and the amount of sorbits was increased so as to secure adhesiveness at the foaming jig temperature of 35[degree]C. As for the improvement of fluidity, a combination of four kinds of polyols offered viscosity in the same level as in the conventional ones. Thermal conductivity was worsened, but the rate of its drop could be controlled below 3% by some measures such as homogenization of stock materials, choice of a suface-active agent which makes foam bubbles minute, etc. Concerning curing property which has a large effect on productivity, a reaction type amine-based catalyst delaying thickening behaviour at the time of foaming was selected and a gelling promotive tertiary amine-based catalyst which can develop foam curing promptly was combinedly used to reduce curing property from five minutes in the past to four minutes. 2 refs., 6 figs., 14 tabs.

  7. Angled shots onto body armour using 9 mm ammunition: the effect on potential blunt injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyall, Alison; Carr, D J; Lankester, C; Malbon, C

    2017-02-01

    Some military specialists wear body armour that is more similar to police armour and provides protection from ammunition fired from pistols. During ballistic testing, these armours are mounted on a standardised type of modelling clay and the back face signature (BFS; depth of depression) formed as a result of the non-perforating impact event on to the armour is measured. This study investigated the effect of impact angle on the BFS and on the deformation of the bullet. Two commonly worn types of armour (HG1/A+KR1 and HG1+KR1) were considered that provide protection from pistol ammunition and sharp weapons. Armours were tested against two types of pistol ammunition (9 mm full metal jacket and 9 mm hollow point) at eight different impact angles (0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 70°, 75° and 80°). Increased impact angles resulted in smaller BFSs. Impact angle also affected whether bullets were retained in the armour; as the impact angle increased, the probability of a round exiting the side of the armour increased. Bullet deformation was affected by impact angle. Understanding the deformation of bullets may assist with recreating a shooting incident and interpreting forensic evidence. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. View Problems with Driving the YPR-765 Under Armour (Uitzichtproblemen bij onderluiks besturen van de YPR-765).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-17

    Through interviews with drivers and instructors of the YPR-765, an inventory was made of view problems with driving under armour . Problems with...beginning drivers was worse if executed under armour . Suggestions for improvement are given. The problems signalled appear to conflict with the

  9. Pressure-induced forces and shear stresses on rubble mound breakwater armour layers in regular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne; Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results from an experimental investigation of the pressure-induced forces in the core material below the main armour layer and shear stresses on the armour layer for a porous breakwater structure. Two parallel experiments were performed which both involved pore pressure...... structure i.e. no additional filter layers were applied. For both experiments, high-speed video recordings were synchronised with the pressure measurements for a detailed investigation of the coupling between the run-up and run-down flow processes and the measured pressure variations. Outward directed...... and turbulence measurements showed that the large outward directed pressure gradients in general coincide, both in time and space, with the maximum bed-shear stresses on the armour layer based on the Reynolds-stresses. The bed-shear stresses were found to result in a Shields parameter in the same order...

  10. Two-material optimization of plate armour for blast mitigation using hybrid cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, J.; Tan, H.; Renaud, J.; Tovar, A.

    2012-08-01

    With the increased use of improvised explosive devices in regions at war, the threat to military and civilian life has risen. Cabin penetration and gross acceleration are the primary threats in an explosive event. Cabin penetration crushes occupants, damaging the lower body. Acceleration causes death at high magnitudes. This investigation develops a process of designing armour that simultaneously mitigates cabin penetration and acceleration. The hybrid cellular automaton (HCA) method of topology optimization has proven efficient and robust in problems involving large, plastic deformations such as crash impact. Here HCA is extended to the design of armour under blast loading. The ability to distribute two metallic phases, as opposed to one material and void, is also added. The blast wave energy transforms on impact into internal energy (IE) inside the solid medium. Maximum attenuation occurs with maximized IE. The resulting structures show HCA's potential for designing blast mitigating armour structures.

  11. On modelling of lateral buckling failure in flexible pipe tensile armour layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Niels Højen; Lyckegaard, Anders; Andreasen, Jens H.

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, a mathematical model which is capable of representing the physics of lateral buckling failure in the tensile armour layers of flexible pipes is introduced. Flexible pipes are unbounded composite steel–polymer structures, which are known to be prone to lateral wire buckling...... when exposed to repeated bending cycles and longitudinal compression, which mainly occurs during pipe laying in ultra-deep waters. On the basis of multiple single wire analyses, the mechanical behaviour of both layers of tensile armour wires can be determined. Since failure in one layer destabilises...... the torsional equilibrium which is usually maintained between the layers, lateral wire buckling is often associated with a severe pipe twist. This behaviour is discussed and modelled. Results are compared to a pipe model, in which failure is assumed not to cause twist. The buckling modes of the tensile armour...

  12. Erosion simulation of first wall beryllium armour after ITER transient heat loads and runaway electrons action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazylev, B., E-mail: boris.bazylev@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IHM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Igitkhanov, Yu.; Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IHM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Loarte, A. [ITER Organisation, Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-10-01

    Beryllium is foreseen as plasma facing armour for the first wall (FW) in ITER in form of Be-clad blanket modules in macrobrush design with brush size about 8-10 cm. In ITER significant heat loads during transient events (TE) and runaway electrons impact are expected at the main chamber wall that may leads to the essential damage of the Be armour. The main mechanisms of metallic target damage remain surface melting, evaporation, and melt motion, which determine the life-time of the plasma facing components. The melt motion damages of Be macrobrush armour caused by the tangential friction force and the J x B forces are analyzed for bulk Be and different sizes of Be-brushes. The damage of the FW due to heat loads caused by runaway electrons is numerically simulated.

  13. Erosion simulation of first wall beryllium armour after ITER transient heat loads and runaway electrons action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazylev, B.; Igitkhanov, Yu.; Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S.; Loarte, A.

    2011-01-01

    Beryllium is foreseen as plasma facing armour for the first wall (FW) in ITER in form of Be-clad blanket modules in macrobrush design with brush size about 8-10 cm. In ITER significant heat loads during transient events (TE) and runaway electrons impact are expected at the main chamber wall that may leads to the essential damage of the Be armour. The main mechanisms of metallic target damage remain surface melting, evaporation, and melt motion, which determine the life-time of the plasma facing components. The melt motion damages of Be macrobrush armour caused by the tangential friction force and the J x B forces are analyzed for bulk Be and different sizes of Be-brushes. The damage of the FW due to heat loads caused by runaway electrons is numerically simulated.

  14. 40 CFR Appendix E to Subpart B of... - The Standard for Automotive Refrigerant Recycling Equipment Intended for Use With Both CFC-12 and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Refrigerant Recycling Equipment Intended for Use With Both CFC-12 and HFC-134a E Appendix E to Subpart B of... Appendix E to Subpart B of Part 82—The Standard for Automotive Refrigerant Recycling Equipment Intended for... Intended for Use With Both CFC-12 and HFC-134a Foreword The purpose of this standard is to establish...

  15. On Methods of Establishing Design Diagrams for Structural Integrity of Slender Complex Types of Breakwater Armour Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Howell, Gary J.

    1988-01-01

    Many of the recent dramatic failures of a number of large rubble mound breakwaters armoured with Dolosse and Tetrapods were caused by breakage of the concrete armour units. Breakage took place before the hydraulic stability of intact units in the armour layers expired. Thus there was not a balance...... between the strength (structural integrity) of the units and the hydraulic stability (resistance to displacements) of the armour layer. Although the relative strength of the units decreases with increasing size (Burcharth 1980) the shape of the units was kept constant and not related to the size...... of the units and the size was not increased beyond the demand dictated by the hydraulic stability.While the hydraulic stability can be roughly estimated by formulae and further evaluated in conventional hydraulic model tests, it is much more complicated to assess the structural integrity of the armour units...

  16. Influence Analysis of Coupling between Tension and Torque in Single Armoured Cables

    OpenAIRE

    Malm, Joacim

    2016-01-01

    When single armoured cables are under tension they will start to twist in direction depending on the lay angle of the armour wires on the cable. The cables start to twist due to the induced torque that appear within the cable and this induced torque can in the worst-case cause loops and kinks on the cable. These negative consequences are the subject to exploration by implementing a known analytical solution developed by Lanteigne (1985), into an external function in OrcaFlex which is a finite...

  17. Laser cut hole matrices in novel armour plate steel for appliqué battlefield vehicle protection

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    During this research, experimental rolled homogeneous armour steel was cast, annealed and laser cut to form an appliqué plate. This Martensitic–Bainitic microstructure steel grade was used to test a novel means of engineering lightweight armour. It was determined that a laser cutting speed of 1200 mm/min produced optimum hole formations with limited distortion. The array of holes acts as a double-edged solution, in that they provide weight saving of 45%, providing a protective advantage and i...

  18. Steady State Modelling of Three-core Wire Armoured Submarine Cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baù, Matteo; Viafora, Nicola; Hansen, Chris Skovgaard

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces Finite Element Method mod-elling techniques applied to wire armoured submarine three-core cables, whose nominal voltages range from 36 to 245 kV. The analysis is focused on the implementation of the net voltage cancellation principle in a 2D environment. The model is utilised...... confirm that the wire armour stranding is not accounted for, but also suggest that the ampacity underrating might be due to other inaccuracies in the IEC modelling indications. Overall, the difference in terms of current rating between the FEM and the IEC approach is found to be voltage dependent and more...

  19. Improving the ballistic immunity of armour steel weldments by plasma transferred arc (PTA) hardfacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Balasubramanian, T.S.

    2010-01-01

    This investigation describes about improving the ballistic immunity of armour steel joints which are fabricated by sandwiching of plasma transferred arc (PTA) hardfaced interlayers in between soft austenitic stainless steel (ASS) welds. From the results, the welds with sandwiched interlayer stopped all the projectiles successfully, irrespective of processes used, whereas welds without sandwiched interlayer were failed. In order to know the cause of failure, a detailed metallographic examination was carried out. The variation in microstructure and hardness at various zones of the weld are discussed. For the first time, it was found that the armour steel could be hardfaced by the PTA process with tungsten carbide powder.

  20. Effect of tempering time on the ballistic performance of a high strength armour steel

    OpenAIRE

    Jena, Pradipta Kumar; Senthil P., Ponguru; K., Siva Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The investigation describes and analyses the effect of tempering time on the mechanical and ballistic performance of a high strength armour steel. The steel is subjected to tempering at 300 °C for 2, 24 and 48 h. A marginal variation in strength and hardness is observed with increase in tempering time, whereas ductility and Charpy impact values are found to be decreasing. Ballistic performance of the samples are evaluated by impacting 7.62 mm and 12.7 mm armour piercing projectiles at 0° angl...

  1. Influence of Material Properties on the Ballistic Performance of Ceramics for Personal Body Armour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kaufmann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In support of improved personal armour development, depth of penetration tests have been conducted on four different ceramic materials including alumina, modified alumina, silicon carbide and boron carbide. These experiments consisted of impacting ceramic tiles bonded to aluminum cylinders with 0.50 caliber armour piercing projectiles. The results are presented in terms of ballistic efficiency, and the validity of using ballistic efficiency as a measure of ceramic performance was examined. In addition, the correlation between ballistic performance and ceramic material properties, such as elastic modulus, hardness, spall strength and Hugoniot Elastic Limit, has been considered.

  2. Breakup and reestablishment of the armour layer in a large gravel-bed river below dams: The lower Ebro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vericat, Damia; Batalla, Ramon J.; Garcia, Celso

    2006-06-01

    Changes in armour layer during floods under supply limited conditions are little known. This paper describes the breakup and the reestablishment of the bed armour layer in the regulated gravel-bed Ebro River during a flooding period. The study was conducted over a 28-km study reach from 2002 to 2004. The surface, subsurface and bed load grain size distribution constitute the bases for the analysis of bed-armouring dynamics. The results indicate that the magnitude of floods controlled the degree of armouring of the river bed. The initial mean armouring ratio was 2.3, with maximum values reaching 4.4. Floods in the winter of 2002-2003 ( Q8) caused the breakup of the armour layer in several sections. This resulted in the erratic bed load pattern observed during the December 2002 flushing flow and in the increase in bed load transport during successive events. Most grain size classes were entrained and transported, causing river bed incision. The mean armouring ratio decreased to 1.9. In contrast, during low magnitude floods in 2003-2004 ( Q2), the coarsest fractions (64 mm) did not take part in the bed load while finer particles were winnowed, thus surface deposits coarsened. As a result, the armour layer was reestablished (i.e., the mean armouring ratio increased to 2.3), and the supply of subsurface sediment decreased. The supply and transport of bed material appear to be in balance in the river reach immediately below the dam. In contrast, the transport of medium and finer size classes in the downstream reaches was higher than their supply from upstream, a phenomenon that progressively reduced their availability in the river bed surface, hence the armour layer reworking.

  3. Spray cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollin, Philippe.

    1975-01-01

    Spray cooling - using water spraying in air - is surveyed as a possible system for make-up (peak clipping in open circuit) or major cooling (in closed circuit) of the cooling water of the condensers in thermal power plants. Indications are given on the experiments made in France and the systems recently developed in USA, questions relating to performance, cost and environmental effects of spray devices are then dealt with [fr

  4. Infrared radiation parameterizations for the minor CO2 bands and for several CFC bands in the window region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, David P.; Chou, Ming-Dah; Yan, Michael M.-H.

    1993-01-01

    Fast and accurate parameterizations have been developed for the transmission functions of the CO2 9.4- and 10.4-micron bands, as well as the CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-22 bands located in the 8-12-micron region. The parameterizations are based on line-by-line calculations of transmission functions for the CO2 bands and on high spectral resolution laboratory measurements of the absorption coefficients for the CFC bands. Also developed are the parameterizations for the H2O transmission functions for the corresponding spectral bands. Compared to the high-resolution calculations, fluxes at the tropopause computed with the parameterizations are accurate to within 10 percent when overlapping of gas absorptions within a band is taken into account. For individual gas absorption, the accuracy is of order 0-2 percent. The climatic effects of these trace gases have been studied using a zonally averaged multilayer energy balance model, which includes seasonal cycles and a simplified deep ocean. With the trace gas abundances taken to follow the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Low Emissions 'B' scenario, the transient response of the surface temperature is simulated for the period 1900-2060.

  5. Partitioning sources of recharge in environments with groundwater recirculation using carbon-14 and CFC-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Sarah A.; Cook, Peter G.; Dogramaci, Shawan; Kipfer, Rolf

    2015-06-01

    Groundwater recirculation occurs when groundwater is pumped from an aquifer onto the land surface, and a portion of that water subsequently infiltrates back to the aquifer. In environments where groundwater is recirculated, differentiation between various sources of recharge (e.g. natural rainfall recharge vs. recirculated water) can be difficult. Groundwater age indicators, in particular transient trace gases, are likely to be more sensitive tracers of recharge than stable isotopes or chloride in this setting. This is because, unlike stable isotopes or chloride, they undergo a process of equilibration with the atmosphere, and historical atmospheric concentrations are known. In this paper, groundwater age indicators (14C and CFC-12) were used as tracers of recharge by surplus mine water that is discharged to streams. Ternary mixing ratios were calculated based on 14C and CFC-12 concentrations measured along three transects of piezometers and monitoring wells perpendicular to the creeks, and from dewatering wells. Uncertainty in calculated mixing ratios was estimated using a Monte Carlo approach. Ternary mixing ratios in dewatering wells suggest that recharge by mine water accounted for between 10% and 87% of water currently abstracted by dewatering wells. The calculated mixing ratios suggest that recharge by mine water extends to a distance of more than 550 m from the creeks. These results are supported by seepage flux estimates based on the water and chloride balance along the creeks, which suggest that 85-90% of mine water discharged to the creeks recharges the aquifer and recharge by mine water extends between 110 and 730 m from the creeks. Mixing calculations based on gaseous groundwater age indicators could also be used to partition recharge associated with agricultural irrigation or artificial wetland supplementation.

  6. Polyurethanes for potential use in transparent armour investigated using DSC and DMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekeren, P.J. van; Carton, E.P.

    2011-01-01

    A material combination that may be applied as transparent armour is glass-clad polyurethane. These are comprised of a relatively thin glass strike face and a relatively thick (transparent) polyurethane backing layer. Three transparent polyurethane samples were investigated using differential

  7. Spatial variation in armouring in a channel with high sediment supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. E. Lisle; M. A. Madej

    1992-01-01

    Abstract - Recent advances in our understanding of the origin and function of armouring in gravel-bed rivers have not addressed the role of non-uniformity and unsteadiness of flow. These flow attributes have important influences on both the surface and subsurface bed material size distributions which are observed at low flow, from which we commonly make inferences...

  8. ARMOUR – A Rice miRNA: mRNA Interaction Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeti Sanan-Mishra

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ARMOUR was developed as ARice miRNA:mRNA interaction resource. This informative and interactive database includes the experimentally validated expression profiles of miRNAs under different developmental and abiotic stress conditions across seven Indian rice cultivars. This comprehensive database covers 689 known and 1664 predicted novel miRNAs and their expression profiles in more than 38 different tissues or conditions along with their predicted/known target transcripts. The understanding of miRNA:mRNA interactome in regulation of functional cellular machinery is supported by the sequence information of the mature and hairpin structures. ARMOUR provides flexibility to users in querying the database using multiple ways like known gene identifiers, gene ontology identifiers, KEGG identifiers and also allows on the fly fold change analysis and sequence search query with inbuilt BLAST algorithm. ARMOUR database provides a cohesive platform for novel and mature miRNAs and their expression in different experimental conditions and allows searching for their interacting mRNA targets, GO annotation and their involvement in various biological pathways. The ARMOUR database includes a provision for adding more experimental data from users, with an aim to develop it as a platform for sharing and comparing experimental data contributed by research groups working on rice.

  9. ARMOUR - A Rice miRNA: mRNA Interaction Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanan-Mishra, Neeti; Tripathi, Anita; Goswami, Kavita; Shukla, Rohit N; Vasudevan, Madavan; Goswami, Hitesh

    2018-01-01

    ARMOUR was developed as A Rice miRNA:mRNA interaction resource. This informative and interactive database includes the experimentally validated expression profiles of miRNAs under different developmental and abiotic stress conditions across seven Indian rice cultivars. This comprehensive database covers 689 known and 1664 predicted novel miRNAs and their expression profiles in more than 38 different tissues or conditions along with their predicted/known target transcripts. The understanding of miRNA:mRNA interactome in regulation of functional cellular machinery is supported by the sequence information of the mature and hairpin structures. ARMOUR provides flexibility to users in querying the database using multiple ways like known gene identifiers, gene ontology identifiers, KEGG identifiers and also allows on the fly fold change analysis and sequence search query with inbuilt BLAST algorithm. ARMOUR database provides a cohesive platform for novel and mature miRNAs and their expression in different experimental conditions and allows searching for their interacting mRNA targets, GO annotation and their involvement in various biological pathways. The ARMOUR database includes a provision for adding more experimental data from users, with an aim to develop it as a platform for sharing and comparing experimental data contributed by research groups working on rice.

  10. Filling in the Gaps: Conservation and Reconstruction of Archaeological Mail Armour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Mail armour is made of many interlinking metal rings. It has been a popular type of defensive gear through the centuries, and this popularity has in part been due to mail armour’s flexibility. However, this very flexibility today hinders its conservation, interpretation and display. Mail pieces

  11. Experimental studies on tungsten-armour impact on nuclear responses of solid breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Satoshi; Nakao, Makoto; Verzilov, Yury; Ochiai, Kentaro; Wada, Masayuki; Kubota, Naoyoshi; Kondo, Keitaro; Yamauchi, Michinori; Nishitani, Takeo

    2005-01-01

    In order to experimentally evaluate the tungsten armour impact on tritium production of the solid breeding blanket being developed by JAERI for tokamak-type DEMO reactors, neutronics integral experiments have been performed using DT neutrons at the Fusion Neutron Source facility of JAERI. Solid breeding blanket mockups relevant to the DEMO blanket have been applied in this study. The mockups are made of a set of layers consisting of 0-25.2 mm thick tungsten, 16 mm thick F82H, 12 mm thick Li 2 TiO 3 and 100-200 mm thick beryllium with a cross-section of 660 x 660 mm in maximum. Pellets of Li 2 CO 3 are embedded in the Li 2 TiO 3 layers to measure the tritium production rate. By installing the 5 mm, 12.6 mm and 25.2 mm thick tungsten armours, the sum of the integrated tritium productions at the pellets are reduced by about 2.1%, 2.5% and 6.1% relative to the case without the armour, respectively. Numerical calculations have been conducted using the Monte Carlo code. In the case of the mockups with the tungsten armour, calculation results for the sum of the integrated tritium productions agree well with the experimental data within 4% and 19% in the experiments without and with a neutron reflector, respectively

  12. Experimental research on the stability of armour and secondary layer in a single layered Tetrapod breakwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, W.; Verhagen, H.J.; Olthof, J.

    2004-01-01

    Physical model tests were done on an armour of Tetrapods, placed in a single layer. The objective of the investigations was to study the stability of the secondary layer, and to see if the material of this secondary layer could be washed out through the single layer of Tetrapods. It was concluded

  13. Biology of two species of Microcera associated with armoured scales on citrus in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microcera coccophila has been regarded as an entomopathogen of armoured scales in Australia since the late 1800s. We confirmed its identity using morphological and molecular data. In addition, we report the related species M. larvarum for the first time in Australia. The sexual and asexual states of...

  14. Three-Dimensional Model Test Study of Xbloc Armoured Breakwaters at Punta Catalina, Dominican Republic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, Mads Sønderstrup; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    The present report presents results from a three-dimensional model test study carried out at Aalborg University in the period June 2015 – August 2015. The objectives of the model tests were to study the stability of the Xbloc armoured breakwaters at Punta Catalina under short-crested wave attack...

  15. Influence of explosive sharge treating on armour piercing of cumulative jet by γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishkin, A.M.; Davydov, V.Yu.; Feodoritov, M.I.; Mikhajlova, T.N.; Levshina, Yu.A.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reviews a method for changing physical structure of an explosive charge (EC) - exposure of the TNT-PDX cast ECs were used for this purpose at 40/60 ratios. It is shown that impact of γ-radiation on the shaped charge results in a deeper armour pierciny due to improved EC detonation characteristics in narrow sections of the charge

  16. Defeating the RPG7 threat by using electric power in reactive armour applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorde, M.J. van der; Burgt, J.J.A. van der; Jagt-Deutekom, M.J. van der

    2007-01-01

    Shaped charges are considered to be a big threat. The Dutch army frequently encounters shaped charges like RPG7 while operating in countries like Afghanistan and Iraq. Conventional armour offers only limited protection against these types of threats, within the weight restrictions. One possible

  17. Experimental studies on tungsten-armour impact on nuclear responses of solid breeding blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Satoshi; Nakao, Makoto; Verzilov, Yury; Ochiai, Kentaro; Wada, Masayuki; Kubota, Naoyoshi; Kondo, Keitaro; Yamauchi, Michinori; Nishitani, Takeo

    2005-07-01

    In order to experimentally evaluate the tungsten armour impact on tritium production of the solid breeding blanket being developed by JAERI for tokamak-type DEMO reactors, neutronics integral experiments have been performed using DT neutrons at the Fusion Neutron Source facility of JAERI. Solid breeding blanket mockups relevant to the DEMO blanket have been applied in this study. The mockups are made of a set of layers consisting of 0-25.2 mm thick tungsten, 16 mm thick F82H, 12 mm thick Li2TiO3 and 100-200 mm thick beryllium with a cross-section of 660 × 660 mm in maximum. Pellets of Li2CO3 are embedded in the Li2TiO3 layers to measure the tritium production rate. By installing the 5 mm, 12.6 mm and 25.2 mm thick tungsten armours, the sum of the integrated tritium productions at the pellets are reduced by about 2.1%, 2.5% and 6.1% relative to the case without the armour, respectively. Numerical calculations have been conducted using the Monte Carlo code. In the case of the mockups with the tungsten armour, calculation results for the sum of the integrated tritium productions agree well with the experimental data within 4% and 19% in the experiments without and with a neutron reflector, respectively.

  18. Air breathing and aquatic gas exchange during hypoxia in armoured catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Graham R; Matey, Victoria; Mendoza, Julie-Anne; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Perry, Steve F; Almeida-Val, Vera M F; Val, Adalberto L

    2017-01-01

    Air breathing in fish is commonly believed to have arisen as an adaptation to aquatic hypoxia. The effectiveness of air breathing for tissue O 2 supply depends on the ability to avoid O 2 loss as oxygenated blood from the air-breathing organ passes through the gills. Here, we evaluated whether the armoured catfish (Hypostomus aff. pyreneusi)-a facultative air breather-can avoid branchial O 2 loss while air breathing in aquatic hypoxia, and we measured various other respiratory and metabolic traits important for O 2 supply and utilization. Fish were instrumented with opercular catheters to measure the O 2 tension (PO 2 ) of expired water, and air breathing and aquatic respiration were measured during progressive stepwise hypoxia in the water. Armoured catfish exhibited relatively low rates of O 2 consumption and gill ventilation, and gill ventilation increased in hypoxia due primarily to increases in ventilatory stroke volume. Armoured catfish began air breathing at a water PO 2 of 2.5 kPa, and both air-breathing frequency and hypoxia tolerance (as reflected by PO 2 at loss of equilibrium, LOE) was greater in individuals with a larger body mass. Branchial O 2 loss, as reflected by higher PO 2 in expired than in inspired water, was observed in a minority (4/11) of individuals as water PO 2 approached that at LOE. Armoured catfish also exhibited a gill morphology characterized by short filaments bearing short fused lamellae, large interlamellar cell masses, low surface area, and a thick epithelium that increased water-to-blood diffusion distance. Armoured catfish had a relatively low blood-O 2 binding affinity when sampled in normoxia (P 50 of 3.1 kPa at pH 7.4), but were able to rapidly increase binding affinity during progressive hypoxia exposure (to a P 50 of 1.8 kPa). Armoured catfish also had low activities of several metabolic enzymes in white muscle, liver, and brain. Therefore, low rates of metabolism and gill ventilation, and a reduction in branchial gas

  19. Defining the essential anatomical coverage provided by military body armour against high energy projectiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, John; Lewis, E A; Fryer, R; Hepper, A E; Mahoney, Peter F; Clasper, Jon C

    2016-08-01

    Body armour is a type of equipment worn by military personnel that aims to prevent or reduce the damage caused by ballistic projectiles to structures within the thorax and abdomen. Such injuries remain the leading cause of potentially survivable deaths on the modern battlefield. Recent developments in computer modelling in conjunction with a programme to procure the next generation of UK military body armour has provided the impetus to re-evaluate the optimal anatomical coverage provided by military body armour against high energy projectiles. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to identify those anatomical structures within the thorax and abdomen that if damaged were highly likely to result in death or significant long-term morbidity. These structures were superimposed upon two designs of ceramic plate used within representative body armour systems using a computerised representation of human anatomy. Those structures requiring essential medical coverage by a plate were demonstrated to be the heart, great vessels, liver and spleen. For the 50th centile male anthropometric model used in this study, the front and rear plates from the Enhanced Combat Body Armour system only provide limited coverage, but do fulfil their original requirement. The plates from the current Mark 4a OSPREY system cover all of the structures identified in this study as requiring coverage except for the abdominal sections of the aorta and inferior vena cava. Further work on sizing of plates is recommended due to its potential to optimise essential medical coverage. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Beryllium armoured target for extreme heat and neutron loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazul, I.; Gervash, A.; Giniyatulin, R.

    2004-01-01

    Beryllium is a primary candidate as a target material for high-energy protons conversion into neutrons used for different applications. In order to get higher neutron flux the conversion area has to be minimized - in our case the target is limited by 1-2 liter volume. This target generates about 5·10 13 fast neutrons per second and removes of 150 kW thermal power deposited by proton beam (30 mA, 5 MeV), coming from linac. The operational condition of the converter is close to the condition of Be-armored components in fusion reactors: high thermal and neutron fluxes and active cooling. Therefore achievements in development of water-cooled high heat flux components for fusion application can be used for design of Be converter and vice versa. However for medical application the using of high-activated heat sink materials such as Cu and SS is strongly limited. So, new materials (Be, Al, Zr) and new joining technologies in comparison with the achievements in fusion area have to be used for construction of such Be converter. In order to reduce amount of heat sink materials in the target saddle-block geometry for Be armor is suggested and developed. Results of R and D works on the development of water cooled Be target for converter are presented, including data on selected materials, technological trials and mockups high heat flux testing. Preliminary design of Be neutron converter for medical applications based on R and D results is presented. (author)

  1. Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Kolokotroni, Maria

    This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state-of-the-art of ventil......This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state......-of-the-art of ventilative cooling potentials and limitations, its consideration in current energy performance regulations, available building components and control strategies and analysis methods and tools. In addition, the report provides twenty six examples of operational buildings using ventilative cooling ranging from...

  2. Wave Overtopping over Crown Walls and Run-up on Rubble Mound Breakwaters with Kolos Armour under Random Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arunjith

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The design of rubble mound structures like breakwaters and seawalls are influenced by the wave run-up and overtopping over them. The above phenomena largely depend on the type of the armour units as they directly interact with the incident waves. The hydrodynamic characteristics of various concrete armour units have been established by several researchers. A new armour block, ‘Kolos’, a modified version of Dolos, is considered in this study for a detailed investigation. An attempt is made to establish empirical relationships for the estimation of wave overtopping discharges over crown wall and run-up on Kolosarmoured slope exposed to random wave from the results of a comprehensive experimental program. Further, the results are compared with that of a tested section with natural rocks as armour layer and with that of other investigators.

  3. Erosion simulation of first wall beryllium armour under ITER transient heat loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazylev, B.; Janeschitz, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, FZK, Karlsruhe (Germany); Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S. [FZK-Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association Euratom-FZK, Technik und Umwelt, Karlsruhe (Germany); Loarte, A. [EFDA Close Support Unit Garching, Garching bei Munchen(Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Operation of ITER at high fusion gain is assumed to be the H-mode. A characteristic feature of this regime is the transient release of energy from the confined plasma onto divertor and the first wall by multiple ELMs (about 10{sup 4} ELMs per ITER discharge), which can play a determining role in the erosion rate and lifetime of these components. It is expected that about 50-70 % of the ELM energy releases onto divertor armour and the rest is dumped onto the First Wall (FW) armour. The expected energy heat loads on the ITER divertor and FW during Type I ELM are in range 0.5 - 4 MJ/m{sup 2} in timescales of 0.3-0.6 ms. In case of the ITER disruptions the material evaporated from the divertor expands into the SOL and generates significant radiation heating of the FW armour up to several GW/m2 during a few milliseconds that can also lead to the its melting and noticeable damage. Beryllium macro-brush armour (Be-brushes) is foreseen as plasma FW facing component (PFC) in ITER. During the intense transient events in ITER the surface melting, melt motion, melt splashing and evaporation are seen as the main mechanisms of Be-erosion. The expected erosion of the ITER plasma facing components under transient energy loads can be properly estimated by numerical simulations using the codes MEMOS and PHEMOBRID validated against experimental data obtained at the plasma gun facilities QSPA-T, MK-200UG and QSPA-Kh50 that provide a way to simulate the energy loads expected in ITER in laboratory experiments. The numerical simulations were carried out for the expected ITER ELMs for the heat loads in the range 0.5 - 3.0 MJ/m{sup 2} and the timescale up 0.6 ms and ITER disruptions for the heat loads in the range 2 - 13 MJ/m{sup 2} in timescales of 1-5 ms. Radiation heat loads at the FW armour from the vapour expanded into the SOL were calculated using the codes FOREV-2 and TOKES for both ITER ELM and ITER disruption scenarios. Melt layer damage of the Be

  4. Erosion simulation of first wall beryllium armour under ITER transient heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazylev, B.; Janeschitz, G.; Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S.; Loarte, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Operation of ITER at high fusion gain is assumed to be the H-mode. A characteristic feature of this regime is the transient release of energy from the confined plasma onto divertor and the first wall by multiple ELMs (about 10 4 ELMs per ITER discharge), which can play a determining role in the erosion rate and lifetime of these components. It is expected that about 50-70 % of the ELM energy releases onto divertor armour and the rest is dumped onto the First Wall (FW) armour. The expected energy heat loads on the ITER divertor and FW during Type I ELM are in range 0.5 - 4 MJ/m 2 in timescales of 0.3-0.6 ms. In case of the ITER disruptions the material evaporated from the divertor expands into the SOL and generates significant radiation heating of the FW armour up to several GW/m2 during a few milliseconds that can also lead to the its melting and noticeable damage. Beryllium macro-brush armour (Be-brushes) is foreseen as plasma FW facing component (PFC) in ITER. During the intense transient events in ITER the surface melting, melt motion, melt splashing and evaporation are seen as the main mechanisms of Be-erosion. The expected erosion of the ITER plasma facing components under transient energy loads can be properly estimated by numerical simulations using the codes MEMOS and PHEMOBRID validated against experimental data obtained at the plasma gun facilities QSPA-T, MK-200UG and QSPA-Kh50 that provide a way to simulate the energy loads expected in ITER in laboratory experiments. The numerical simulations were carried out for the expected ITER ELMs for the heat loads in the range 0.5 - 3.0 MJ/m 2 and the timescale up 0.6 ms and ITER disruptions for the heat loads in the range 2 - 13 MJ/m 2 in timescales of 1-5 ms. Radiation heat loads at the FW armour from the vapour expanded into the SOL were calculated using the codes FOREV-2 and TOKES for both ITER ELM and ITER disruption scenarios. Melt layer damage of the Be FW macro

  5. A combined wear-fatigue design methodology for fretting in the pressure armour layer of flexible marine risers

    OpenAIRE

    O'Halloran, S.M.; Shipway, P.H.; Connaire, A.D.; Leen, Sean B.; Harte, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a combined experimental and computational methodology for fretting wear-fatigue prediction of pressure armour wire in flexible marine risers. Fretting wear, friction and fatigue parameters of pressure armour material have been characterised experimentally. A combined fretting wear-fatigue finite element model has been developed using an adaptive meshing technique and the effect of bending-induced tangential slip has been characterised. It has been shown that a surface dama...

  6. The Application of Load-cell Technique in the Study of Armour Unit Responses to Impact Loads

    OpenAIRE

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Zhou

    1994-01-01

    The slender, complex types of armour units, such as Tetrapods and Dolosse arewidely used for rubble mound breakwaters. Many of the recent failures of such structures were caused by unforeseen early breakage of the units, thus revealing an inbalance between the strength (structural integrity) of the units and the hydraulic stability (resistance to displacements) of the armour layers. Breakage is caused by stresses from static, pulsating and impact loads. Impact load generated stresses are diff...

  7. The Application of Load-cell Technique in the Study of Armour Unit Responses to Impact Loads Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The slender, complex types of armour units, such as Tetrapods and Dolosse arewidely used for rubble mound breakwaters. Many of the recent failures of suchstructures were caused by unforeseen early breakage of the units, thus revealingan in balance between the strength (structural integrity) of the units and thehydraulic stability (resistance to displacements) of the armour layers. Breakageis caused by stresses from static, pulsating and impact loads. Impact load generated stresses are difficu...

  8. Iron Documents. Interdisciplinary studies on the technology of late medieval european plate armour production between 1350 and 1500

    OpenAIRE

    Goll, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to find out details on the production of late medieval European plate-armour for the field-use. Therefore, the author first collected thousands of extant objects in a database. With this stock of data he then was able to cluster and to structure the armour parts by various typological and technological aspects. To ease the access to the topic, the author defined an understandable and standardized terminology and typology for the different variations of...

  9. CFCI3 (CFC-11): UV Absorption Spectrum Temperature Dependence Measurements and the Impact on Atmospheric Lifetime and Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2014-01-01

    CFCl3 (CFC-11) is both an atmospheric ozone-depleting and potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95 - 230 nm) and temperature (216 - 296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using a 2-D model and the spectrum parameterization developed in this work. The obtained global annually averaged lifetime was 58.1 +- 0.7 years (2 sigma uncertainty due solely to the spectrum uncertainty). The lifetime is slightly reduced and the uncertainty significantly reduced from that obtained using current spectrum recommendations

  10. Concept and numerical simulations of a reactive anti-fragment armour layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hušek, Martin; Kala, Jiří; Král, Petr; Hokeš, Filip

    2017-07-01

    The contribution describes the concept and numerical simulation of a ballistic protective layer which is able to actively resist projectiles or smaller colliding fragments flying at high speed. The principle of the layer was designed on the basis of the action/reaction system of reactive armour which is used for the protection of armoured vehicles. As the designed ballistic layer consists of steel plates simultaneously combined with explosive material - primary explosive and secondary explosive - the technique of coupling the Finite Element Method with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics was used for the simulations. Certain standard situations which the ballistic layer should resist were simulated. The contribution describes the principles for the successful execution of numerical simulations, their results, and an evaluation of the functionality of the ballistic layer.

  11. Early byzantine lamellar armour from Carthago Spartaria (Cartagena, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vizcaíno Sánchez, Jaime

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an Early Byzantine lamellar armour, retrieved in the excavations at the quarter built over the Roman Theatre of Cartagena. The armour has close parallels with contemporary known material from the central and eastern Mediterranean or other sites, and it is an important find which increases the body of archeological evidence about Byzantine presence in Spania.

    Este artículo presenta una coraza laminar protobizantina hallada en las excavaciones del barrio construido sobre el teatro romano de Cartagena. La coraza tiene estrechos paralelos con materiales contemporáneos del Mediterráneo Central y Oriental u otros lugares, y es un importante hallazgo que incrementa la nómina de evidencias arqueológicas acerca de la presencia bizantina en Spania.

  12. Development of a Centrifugal Technique for the Microbial Bioburden Analysis of Freon (CFC-11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benardini, James N.; Koukol, Robert C.; Kazarians, Gayane A.; Morales, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    NASA Procedural Requirement 8020.12C entitled "Planetary Protection Provisions for Robotic Extraterrestrial Missions" states that the source-specific encapsulated microbial density for encapsulated organisms (div(0)) in nonmetallic materials ranges from 1-30 spores/cubic cm. The standard laboratory procedure, NASA Standard Procedures for the Microbial Examination of Space Hardware, NHB 5340.1B, does not provide any direction into the methodologies to understand the bioburden within such a fluid as CFC-11 (Freon). This general specification value for the Freon would be applicable to the Freon charged within the Mars Science Laboratory fs (MSL fs) Heat Rejection System. Due to the large volume required to fill this system, MSL could not afford to conservatively allocate 55.8% of the total spore budget of the entire laboratory system (rover, descent stage, cruise stage, and aeroshell) of 5.00 X 10(exp 5) spores at launch. A novel filtration approach was developed to analyze the Freon employing a 50 kDa molecular weight cutoff (MCO) filter, followed by 0.22-micron pore-size filter to establish a calculated microbial bioburden.

  13. Tritiated thymidine and deoxycytidine suicide of mouse hemopoietic colony forming cells (CFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uyeki, E.M.; Wierzba, K.; Bisel, T.U.

    1981-01-01

    Significant enhancement of tritiated dCyd suicide occurred when unlabelled dThd was added to cultures of mouse monocytic colony-forming cells. Incorporation experiments supported the suicide experiments in that incorporation of tritiated dCyd into DNA was significantly increased. One hundred micromolar dCyd significantly reduced the radiotoxicity of 0.3 μCi of tritiated dThd; incorporation experiments indicated a dose-related reduction in the incorporation of tritiated dThd into DNA with the addition of 1-100 μM unlabelled dCyd. The addition of 1 μM aminopterin reversed the effect of 100 μM deoxycytidine; viz., incorporation of dThd into DNA was 90% of controls. Aminopterin had a similar effect on deoxyuridine reversal of tritiated dThd incorporation into DNA. Aminopterin had no effect on the reduction of tritiated dThd incorporation into DNA due to the addition of 100 μM unlabelled thymidine. Unlabelled ribonucleosides, Urd and Cyd, did not significantly affect the suicide pattern of tritiated dThd or dCyd when they were added to CFC cultures. Unlabelled deoxyribonucleosides, dThd or dCyd, did not significantly affect the suicide pattern of either tritiated Cyd or Urd when they were added to cultures containing tritiated ribonucleosides. Unlabelled Urd or Cyd was effective in reversing the suicide due to tritiated Urd or Cyd. (author)

  14. Cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korik, L.; Burger, R.

    1992-01-01

    What is the effect of 0.6C (1F) temperature rise across turbines, compressors, or evaporators? Enthalpy charts indicate for every 0.6C (1F) hotter water off the cooling tower will require an additional 2 1/2% more energy cost. Therefore, running 2.2C (4F) warmer due to substandard cooling towers could result in a 10% penalty for overcoming high heads and temperatures. If it costs $1,250,000.00 a year to operate the system, $125,000.00 is the energy penalty for hotter water. This paper investigates extra fuel costs involved in maintaining design electric production with cooling water 0.6C (1F) to 3C (5.5F) hotter than design. If design KWH cannot be maintained, paper will calculate dollar loss of saleable electricity. The presentation will conclude with examining the main causes of deficient cold water production. State-of-the-art upgrading and methodology available to retrofit existing cooling towers to optimize lower cooling water temperatures will be discussed

  15. The behaviour of flexible riser tensile armour in the region of an end fitting

    OpenAIRE

    Martindale, H. G. A.

    2006-01-01

    This is a study of axial and transverse slip in helically wound armour wires on flexible pipe under the influence of end restraint. Analysis of steel strip layers in order to find the effect of end restraint prompted the development of a new model to describe their behaviour. This avoids the shortfalls of adapting previous models designed either for similar but different structures or for application away from any end fitting restraint. Previous analytical solutions concerning flexible pipe t...

  16. The Introduction and Development of Plate Armour in Medieval Western Europe c. 1250-1350

    OpenAIRE

    Dowen, Keith

    2017-01-01

    European underwent a period of rapid development and experimentation in the century after c. 1250. Whilst very little physical material has survived from this time, artistic depictions, wills, inventories and contemporary accounts attest to the use of metal plate defences much earlier than has commonly been assumed. By the turn of the 14th century, all the major elements of plate armour had been developed; with the subsequent half century seeing an increase in the quantity of plate worn on th...

  17. Melt layer erosion of metallic armour targets during off-normal events in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazylev, B.; Wuerz, H.

    2002-01-01

    Melt layer erosion by melt motion is the dominating erosion mechanism for metallic armours under high heat loads. A 1-D fluid dynamics simulation model for calculation of melt motion was developed and validated against experimental results for tungsten from the e-beam facility JEBIS and beryllium from the e-beam facility JUDITH. The driving force in each case is the gradient of the surface tension. Due to the high velocity which develops in the Be melt considerable droplet splashing occurs

  18. Melt layer erosion of metallic armour targets during off-normal events in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazylev, B.; Wuerz, H.

    2002-12-01

    Melt layer erosion by melt motion is the dominating erosion mechanism for metallic armours under high heat loads. A 1-D fluid dynamics simulation model for calculation of melt motion was developed and validated against experimental results for tungsten from the e-beam facility JEBIS and beryllium from the e-beam facility JUDITH. The driving force in each case is the gradient of the surface tension. Due to the high velocity which develops in the Be melt considerable droplet splashing occurs.

  19. The remote maintenance of mechanically attached first wall armour tiles in NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, T.; Shaw, R.; Suppan, A.; Haferkamp, B.

    1991-01-01

    Protection of a substantial proportion of the NET First Wall (FW) with low-Z armour is envisaged for at least the early operating period of the machine. This armour will take the form of carbon tiles directly attached to the FW. Complete coverage of the FW will require the installation of 20 000-40 000 tiles. The uncertainties existing in FW operating conditions make it difficult to predict the lifetime of the armour components. However, based on present experience, a number of component failures is to be expected in addition to the general wear by plasma erosion. Bearing in mind the hostile environment within the machine, the remote maintainability of these components is thus of fundamental importance and has strongly influenced their design. Mechanical attachment is considered to be the only viable approach for remotely maintainable armour tiles. A series of tools for mounting and demounting such tiles is currently under development at KfK, Karlsruhe. Handling trials are being carried out on a local FW mock-up to optimise the tile attachment designs for efficient remote handling, to provide input to the overall system design and to facilitate the progressive evolution of effective remote handling tools. Such, tools will subsequently be tested in conjunction with The NET Articulated Boom prototype articulated boom transporter to prove their fitness for purpose. The paper reports the current status of this work and outlines the design and principles of operation of the tools developed. The results and conclusions of the investigations to date, including any practical modifications considered necessary to either the original tile attachment arrangements or the preliminary tool designs, are presented. The philosophy behind the attachment and detachment procedures envisaged is also described. (orig.)

  20. Heat strain evaluation of overt and covert body armour in a hot and humid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyke, Andrew J; Costello, Joseph T; Stewart, Ian B

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the thermophysiological effects of wearing lightweight non-military overt and covert personal body armour (PBA) in a hot and humid environment. Eight healthy males walked on a treadmill for 120 min at 22% of their heart rate reserve in a climate chamber simulating 31 °C (60%RH) wearing either no armour (control), overt or covert PBA in addition to a security guard uniform, in a randomised controlled crossover design. No significant difference between conditions at the end of each trial was observed in core temperature, heart rate or skin temperature (P > 0.05). Covert PBA produced a significantly greater amount of body mass change (-1.81 ± 0.44%) compared to control (-1.07 ± 0.38%, P = 0.009) and overt conditions (-1.27 ± 0.44%, P = 0.025). Although a greater change in body mass was observed after the covert PBA trial; based on the physiological outcome measures recorded, the heat strain encountered while wearing lightweight, non-military overt or covert PBA was negligible compared to no PBA. The wearing of bullet proof vests or body armour is a requirement of personnel engaged in a wide range of occupations including police, security, customs and even journalists in theatres of war. This randomised controlled crossover study is the first to examine the thermophysiological effects of wearing lightweight non-military overt and covert personal body armour (PBA) in a hot and humid environment. We conclude that the heat strain encountered while wearing both overt and covert lightweight, non-military PBA was negligible compared to no PBA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Invasion of South American suckermouth armoured catfishes Pterygoplichthys spp. (Loricariidae) in Kerala, India - a case study

    OpenAIRE

    A. Bijukumar; R. Smrithy; U. Sureshkumar; S. George

    2015-01-01

    This paper documents the occurrence of the exotic South American suckermouth armoured catfishes (Loricariidae) of the genus Pterygoplichthys spp. in the drainages of Thiruvananthapuram City, Kerala.  The morphological taxonomy revealed that the specimens are closely related to Pterygoplichthys disjunctivus (Weber, 1991) and P. pardalis (Castelnau, 1855), in addition to intermediary forms of unknown identity.  DNA barcoding using the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome c oxidase 1 (CO1) also failed t...

  2. Rock armour for birds and their prey: ecological enhancement of coastal engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Naylor, Larissa A.; MacArthur, Mairi; Hampshire, Stephanie; Bostock, Kieran; Coombes, Martin A.; Hansom, Jim; Byrne, Rowan; Folland, Tristan

    2017-01-01

    The authors present key design, construction and ecological enhancement criteria for sustainable coastal defence structures at Hartlepool, UK, a high-energy wave climate. Such ‘ecologically favourable’ coastal defences fulfil the habitats directive and key engineering and cost criteria. Bird, rocky intertidal ecological and biogeomorphological data underpin recommendations for ‘passive’ enhancement mitigation to maximise ecological potential involving rock armour material choice (partially en...

  3. ARMOUR – A Rice miRNA: mRNA Interaction Resource

    OpenAIRE

    Neeti Sanan-Mishra; Anita Tripathi; Kavita Goswami; Rohit N. Shukla; Madavan Vasudevan; Hitesh Goswami

    2018-01-01

    ARMOUR was developed as ARice miRNA:mRNA interaction resource. This informative and interactive database includes the experimentally validated expression profiles of miRNAs under different developmental and abiotic stress conditions across seven Indian rice cultivars. This comprehensive database covers 689 known and 1664 predicted novel miRNAs and their expression profiles in more than 38 different tissues or conditions along with their predicted/known target transcripts. The understanding of...

  4. Preparation of novel film-forming armoured latexes using silica nanoparticles as a pickering emulsion stabiliser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraz, Hana; Peake, Simon J; Davey, Tim; Cameron, Neil R; Tabor, Rico F

    2018-05-15

    Film-forming polymer latex particles of diameter acrylate (BA) as co-monomers, potassium persulphate (KPS) as an initiator and a commercially available colloidal nano-silica (Ludox®-TM40). It was found that pH control before polymerisation using methacrylic acid (MAA) facilitated the formation of armoured latexes, and mechanistic features of this process are discussed. An alternative, more robust protocol was developed whereby addition of vinyltriethoxysilane (VTES) to control wettability resulted in latexes completely armoured in colloidal nano-silica. The latexes were characterised using SEM, cryo-TEM and AFM imaging techniques. The mechanism behind the adsorption was investigated through surface pressure and contact angle measurements to understand the factors that influence this irreversible adsorption. Results indicate that nanoparticle attachment (but intriguingly not latex size) is dependent on particle wettability, providing new insight into the formation of nanoparticle-armoured latexes, along with opportunities for further development of diversely functionalized inorganic/organic polymer composite particles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of beryllium as first wall armour for ITER primary, baffle and limiter modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardella, A.; Barabash, V.; Ioki, K.; Yamada, M.; Mazul, I.; Merola, M.; Strebkov, Y.

    2000-01-01

    During the engineering design activities of the ITER project, beryllium has been selected as the armour material for the first wall of the primary, baffle and limiter blanket modules. These components have different requirements according to their function, so the armour design and its joining technology has been developed in order to withstand different operating and loading conditions. Extensive R and D has been performed to develop, select and characterise the beryllium material and the joining techniques. In parallel, beryllium plasma spray coating has been developed, mainly as a possible in situ repair method for locally damaged areas. For the reduced technical objectives / reduced cost (RTO/RC) ITER project, it is proposed to maintain Be as the reference armour material and to optimise the manufacturing technologies in order to minimise costs. The paper presents the rationale of the design choices for the application of beryllium to the blanket first wall and gives an overview of the R and D performed and the results achieved. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Armour Wires in Flexible Pipes, Power Cables and Umbilicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiying

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of armour wires in flexible pipes, power cables and umbilicals is a major concern with the development of oil and gas fields and wind farms in harsh environments. Hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of steel armour wires used in deep-water and ultra-deep-water has been evaluated. Simulated tests have been carried out in simulated sea water, under conditions where the susceptibility is the highest, i.e. at room temperature, at the maximum negative cathodic potential and at the maximum stress level expected in service for 150 hours. Examinations of the tested specimens have not revealed cracking or blistering, and measurement of hydrogen content has confirmed hydrogen charging. In addition, sulphide stress cracking (SSC) and chloride stress cracking (CSC) of nickel-based alloy armour wires used in harsh down-hole environments has been evaluated. Simulated tests have been carried out in simulated solution containing high concentration of chloride, with high hydrogen sulphide partial pressure, at high stress level and at 120 °C for 720 hours. Examinations of the tested specimens have not revealed cracking or blistering. Subsequent tensile tests of the tested specimens at ambient pressure and temperature have revealed properties similar to the as-received specimens.

  7. Impact of ballistic body armour and load carriage on walking patterns and perceived comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Huiju; Branson, Donna; Petrova, Adriana; Peksoz, Semra; Jacobson, Bert; Warren, Aric; Goad, Carla; Kamenidis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of weight magnitude and distribution of body armour and carrying loads on military personnel's walking patterns and comfort perceptions. Spatio-temporal parameters of walking, plantar pressure and contact area were measured while seven healthy male right-handed military students wore seven different garments of varying weight (0.06, 9, 18 and 27 kg) and load distribution (balanced and unbalanced, on the front and back torso). Higher weight increased the foot contact time with the floor. In particular, weight placement on the non-dominant side of the front torso resulted in the greatest stance phase and double support. Increased plantar pressure and contact area observed during heavier loads entail increased impact forces, which can cause overuse injuries and foot blisters. Participants reported increasingly disagreeable pressure and strain in the shoulder, neck and lower back during heavier weight conditions and unnatural walking while wearing unbalanced weight distributed loads. This study shows the potentially synergistic impact of wearing body armour vest with differential loads on body movement and comfort perception. This study found that soldiers should balance loads, avoiding load placement on the non-dominant side front torso, thus minimising mobility restriction and potential injury risk. Implications for armour vest design modifications can also be found in the results.

  8. Cooling tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norbaeck, P; Heneby, H

    1976-01-22

    Cooling towers to be transported on road vehicles as a unit are not allowed to exceed certain dimensions. In order to improve the efficiency of such a cooling tower (of cross-flow design and box-type body) with given dimensions, it is proposed to arrange at least one of the scrubbing bodies displaceable within a module or box. Then it can be moved out of the casing into working position, thereby increasing the front surface available for the inlet of air (and with it the efficiency) by nearly a factor of two.

  9. Stochastic cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisognano, J.; Leemann, C.

    1982-03-01

    Stochastic cooling is the damping of betatron oscillations and momentum spread of a particle beam by a feedback system. In its simplest form, a pickup electrode detects the transverse positions or momenta of particles in a storage ring, and the signal produced is amplified and applied downstream to a kicker. The time delay of the cable and electronics is designed to match the transit time of particles along the arc of the storage ring between the pickup and kicker so that an individual particle receives the amplified version of the signal it produced at the pick-up. If there were only a single particle in the ring, it is obvious that betatron oscillations and momentum offset could be damped. However, in addition to its own signal, a particle receives signals from other beam particles. In the limit of an infinite number of particles, no damping could be achieved; we have Liouville's theorem with constant density of the phase space fluid. For a finite, albeit large number of particles, there remains a residue of the single particle damping which is of practical use in accumulating low phase space density beams of particles such as antiprotons. It was the realization of this fact that led to the invention of stochastic cooling by S. van der Meer in 1968. Since its conception, stochastic cooling has been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. The earliest experiments were performed at the ISR in 1974, with the subsequent ICE studies firmly establishing the stochastic cooling technique. This work directly led to the design and construction of the Antiproton Accumulator at CERN and the beginnings of p anti p colliding beam physics at the SPS. Experiments in stochastic cooling have been performed at Fermilab in collaboration with LBL, and a design is currently under development for a anti p accumulator for the Tevatron

  10. What doesn't kill you might make you stronger: functional basis for variation in body armour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeckhoven, Chris; Diedericks, Genevieve; Mouton, P le Fras N

    2015-09-01

    1. Predation has been proposed to be a selective agent in the evolution of morphological antipredator strategies in prey. Among vertebrates, one of the morphological traits that evolved multiple times is body armour, including carapaces, thickened keratinized scales and plates of dermal bone. 2. It has been generally assumed that body armour provides protection against a predatory attack; yet, few explicit tests of the hypothesis exist. Cordylidae, a relatively small family of southern African lizards, show considerable variation in the degree of body armour. Hence, this family provides an opportunity to test the hypothesis that body armour serves as protection against predators. 3. Experiments were conducted to test whether the bite forces of four species of mammalian predators were high enough to penetrate the skins of Karusasaurus polyzonus, Namazonurus peersi, Cordylus cordylus and Cordylus macropholis, as well as those of Ouroborus cataphractus individuals originating from three localities that differed in their predator diversity. Furthermore, histological techniques were used to test whether variation in skin toughness was associated with concomitant changes in the degree of epidermal (i.e. β-keratin) and dermal (i.e. osteoderm) armour. 4. The skin toughness values for four out of five cordylid lizards tested in this study were well below the bite forces of the mammalian predators. In contrast, the thick osteoderms in the dermis of O. cataphractus can withstand bites from several mongoose species. However, the significant variation in body armour that is present between the three populations of O. cataphractus does not seem to be related to predator diversity. 5. It is concluded that body armour can serve as protection against predation in O. cataphractus, but that alternative selection pressures, such as thermoregulation or predation by snakes, presumably underlie variation in defensive morphology in the other cordylid lizards. © 2015 The Authors. Journal

  11. A very cool cooling system

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The NA62 Gigatracker is a jewel of technology: its sensor, which delivers the time of the crossing particles with a precision of less than 200 picoseconds (better than similar LHC detectors), has a cooling system that might become the precursor to a completely new detector technique.   The 115 metre long vacuum tank of the NA62 experiment. The NA62 Gigatracker (GTK) is composed of a set of three innovative silicon pixel detectors, whose job is to measure the arrival time and the position of the incoming beam particles. Installed in the heart of the NA62 detector, the silicon sensors are cooled down (to about -20 degrees Celsius) by a microfluidic silicon device. “The cooling system is needed to remove the heat produced by the readout chips the silicon sensor is bonded to,” explains Alessandro Mapelli, microsystems engineer working in the Physics department. “For the NA62 Gigatracker we have designed a cooling plate on top of which both the silicon sensor and the...

  12. Developments toward the use of tungsten as armour material in plasma facing components promoted by Euratom-CEA Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitteau, R.; Missiaen, J.M.; Brustolin, P.

    2006-01-01

    Tungsten is increasingly considered as a prime candidate armour material facing the plasma in fusion experiments (ASDEX, JET, ITER). This material is, however, a challenge for the engineers due to its brittleness at room temperature. Its bonding to structural or cooled substrates is a critical issue. The Euratom-CEA Association promotes the development of evolutionary techniques aiming to produce high performance assemblies between tungsten and various substrates. These are 1) functionally graded tungsten to copper, 2) direct electron beam welding of tungsten to Mo-alloy TZM and 3) the characterisation of tungsten coatings deposited on carbon fibre composite by high energy deposition processes. 1) A functionally graded material eliminates the singular point which weakens the heterogeneous assembly, reducing the stresses and allowing a better behaviour. The sintering of submicronic W-Cu powders is investigated. The green shape is processed from W-CuO powder, which is reduced by a hydrogen flow. The compaction and sintering of layers of various compositions (10 to 30 % Cu) produces an assembly (density of ∼ 94%) with a good cohesion. However, the gradient is not effectively controlled, because of the migration of melt copper during the sintering. Future work aims to improve the process by using spark or microwave assisted sintering. 2) Electron beam welding of Mo-alloy TZM is investigated, to produce high temperature components required by radiation cooled PFCs. They require only mechanical properties and no vacuum sealing. The driving line is to use simple tungsten shapes to reduce the milling cost. In spite of low weldable properties of the refractory alloys, a good bonding up to a depth of 5 mm is obtained. Hardness measurements show that the melt area and the heat affected zone are harder than TZM, the weakest materials at 230 Hv. Quench tests in water from up to 2000 o C are done without apparent crack formation. 3) Finally, characterisation techniques are

  13. Treatment of cooling appliances. Interrelations between environmental protection, resource conservation, and recovery rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laner, David; Rechberger, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of cooling appliances in Austria is primarily influenced by two factors. On the one hand is their changing composition and on the other hand the ordinance on Waste Prevention, Collection and Treatment of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE ordinance), which stipulates a minimum recycling rate of 75% for cooling appliances. This paper investigates whether this recycling rate leads to optimal treatment practices for cooling appliances with respect to resource conservation and environmental protection. Two different treatment technologies which achieve recycling rates between 50-60% and 80-90%, respectively, are compared both for cooling appliances containing Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and for appliances containing Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC). Materials and energy balances are developed for each model. To evaluate resource consumption, expenditures as well as savings of energy and materials are incorporated via the Cumulative Energy Demand (CED). In order to analyse the environmental impact of the different practices, balances for CFC, CO 2 , HF, HCl and solid residues are established. The results show that the treatment type aiming for a maximum of materials recycling contributes more to resource conservation than the other treatment type. But for CFC appliances the former is associated with substantial CFC emissions, which turn out to be most relevant when treating these appliances. Generally, it is found that the optimum recycling rate is a function of the composition of the appliance and the technologies applied, both in recycling and in primary production. A high recycling rate per se does not automatically result in an optimal solution with regard to resource conservation and environmental protection. (author)

  14. Cooling pancakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, J.R.; Wilson, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    In theories of galaxy formation with a damping cut-off in the density fluctuation spectrum, the first non-linear structures to form are Zeldovich pancakes in which dissipation separates gas from any collisionless dark matter then present. One-dimensional numerical simulations of the collapse, shock heating, and subsequent thermal evolution of pancakes are described. Neutrinos (or any other cool collisionless particles) are followed by direct N-body methods and the gas by Eulerian hydrodynamics with conduction as well as cooling included. It is found that the pressure is relatively uniform within the shocked region and approximately equals the instantaneous ram pressure acting at the shock front. An analytic theory based upon this result accurately describes the numerical calculations. (author)

  15. Cool Sportswear

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    New athletic wear design based on the circulating liquid cooling system used in the astronaut's space suits, allows athletes to perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated. Techni-Clothes gear incorporates packets containing a heat-absorbing gel that slips into an insulated pocket of the athletic garment and is positioned near parts of the body where heat transfer is most efficient. A gel packet is good for about one hour. Easily replaced from a supply of spares in an insulated container worn on the belt. The products, targeted primarily for runners and joggers and any other athlete whose performance may be affected by hot weather, include cooling headbands, wrist bands and running shorts with gel-pack pockets.

  16. Cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutant, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    Progress on the thermal effects project is reported with regard to physiology and distribution of Corbicula; power plant effects studies on burrowing mayfly populations; comparative thermal responses of largemouth bass from northern and southern populations; temperature selection by striped bass in Cherokee Reservoir; fish population studies; and predictive thermoregulation by fishes. Progress is also reported on the following; cause and ecological ramifications of threadfin shad impingement; entrainment project; aquaculture project; pathogenic amoeba project; and cooling tower drift project

  17. Atmospheric lifetimes, infrared absorption spectra, radiative forcings and global warming potentials of NF3 and CF3CF2Cl (CFC-115

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Totterdill

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluorinated compounds such as NF3 and C2F5Cl (CFC-115 are characterised by very large global warming potentials (GWPs, which result from extremely long atmospheric lifetimes and strong infrared absorptions in the atmospheric window. In this study we have experimentally determined the infrared absorption cross sections of NF3 and CFC-115, calculated the radiative forcing and efficiency using two radiative transfer models and identified the effect of clouds and stratospheric adjustment. The infrared cross sections are within 10 % of previous measurements for CFC-115 but are found to be somewhat larger than previous estimates for NF3, leading to a radiative efficiency for NF3 that is 25 % larger than that quoted in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. A whole atmosphere chemistry–climate model was used to determine the atmospheric lifetimes of NF3 and CFC-115 to be (509 ± 21 years and (492 ± 22 years, respectively. The GWPs for NF3 are estimated to be 15 600, 19 700 and 19 700 over 20, 100 and 500 years, respectively. Similarly, the GWPs for CFC-115 are 6030, 7570 and 7480 over 20, 100 and 500 years, respectively.

  18. Fiscal 1994 survey report. Survey of recent trends in CFC phaseout measures overseas; 1994 nendo shogaikoku ni okeru freon taisaku saishin doko ni kansuru chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    Technical literature is referred to for the survey of recent trends in CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) phaseout in various countries overseas. The European Union will totally abolish CFC by the end of 1994 while other developed countries will totally abolish the same by the end of 1995 in compliance with the Montreal protocol. Many of the developing countries are actively striving to reduce CFC use with the help of the Multilateral Fund of Montreal. China and India have production facilities in themselves, and have not announced a phaseout program. There is a proposition for accelerating the regulation of HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons), but reliable substitutes for them are not yet available and their ozone layer restoring capability if used will be slight. It is feared that such will on the contrary retard CFC phaseout in developing countries. Accordingly, any abrupt acceleration of CFC phaseout implementation is inappropriate. Introduced in this report as fluorine-containing greenhouse gas-related information are a summary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the history of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change activities. According to an American survey, the aluminum industry emits 30,000 tons of CF{sub 4} and C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, and the semiconductor manufacturing industry 2,000-3,000 tons. As for SF{sub 6}, 5,000-8,000 tons are emitted mainly by the power industry. Measures for inhibiting them are being taken. (NEDO)

  19. Measurements of heat transfer coefficients at low contact pressures for actively cooled bolted armour concepts in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipa, M.; Chappuis, Ph.; Dufayet, A.

    2000-01-01

    For the future upgrade of inner vessel components (CIEL project) a guard limiter for plasma ramp-up and disruption protection will be installed on the high field side of the vacuum vessel. Among transient heat loads, this structure has to sustain a moderate heat flux in the range of ≤0.5 MW/m 2 during quasi steady state operation (1000 s). A bolted carbon-carbon (C-C) tile is preferred compared with a brazed tile solution due to the expected moderate heat fluxes, costs and the possibility of rapid replacement of individual tiles. Large flat tile assemblies require a sufficient soft and conductive compliant layer enclosed between tile and heat sink in order to avoid thermal contact loss of the assembly during heat loads and therefore minimising the tile surface temperature. The global heat transfer coefficient (H gl ) under vacuum at low contact pressures (0.5-1.5 MPa) between C-C and CuCrZr heat sink substrata has been measured in the experimental device, installation of contact heat transfer measurements (ITTAC), using different compliant materials. It appears that the best compliant layer is a graphite sheet (PAPYEX), compared with copper-felt/foam material. As an example, a H gl number of ∼10 4 W/m 2 K at an average contact pressure of 0.5 MPa has been measured near room temperature between C-C (SEP N11) and CuCrZr substrata using a 0.5-mm thick PAPYEX layer. Thermohydraulic calculations (2D) of the guard limiter design show an expected tile surface temperature of about 550 deg. C in steady state regime for an incident heat flux of 0.5 MW/m 2

  20. The Application of Load-cell Technique in the Study of Armour Unit Responses to Impact Loads Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The slender, complex types of armour units, such as Tetrapods and Dolosse are widely used for rubble mound breakwaters. Many of the recent failures of such structures were caused by unforeseen early breakage of the units, thus revealing an in balance between the strength (structural integrity......) of the units and the hydraulic stability (resistance to displacements) of the armour layers. Breakage is caused by stresses from static, pulsating and impact loads. Impact load generated stresses are difficult to investigate due to non-linear scaling laws. The paper describes a method by which impact loads on....... slender armour units can be studied. by load-cell technique. Moreover, the paper presents DoJos design diagrams for the prediction of both breakage and hydraulic stability...

  1. Experimental and numerical analysis of stress wave propagation in polymers and the role of interfaces in armour systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwade, Chandragupt V.; Ashcroft, Ian A.; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.; Hughes, Foz T. R.; Swallowe, Gerry M.

    2012-12-01

    Advanced polymeric materials are finding an increasing range of industrial and defence applications. These materials have the potential to improve combat survivability, whilst reducing the cost and weight of armour systems. In this paper the results from a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) test of a high density polyethylene (HDPE) sample involving multiple stress waves is discussed with aid of a finite element model of the test. It is seen that the phenomenon of impedance mismatch at interfaces plays an important role in the levels of stress and deformation seen in the sample. A multi-layer armour system is then investigated using the finite element model. This case study illustrates the role of impedance mismatch and interface engineering in the design and optimisation of armour solutions.

  2. An ultrasensitive strain sensor with a wide strain range based on graphene armour scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Fan; Tao, Lu-Qi; Pang, Yu; Tian, He; Ju, Zhen-Yi; Wu, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2018-06-12

    An ultrasensitive strain sensor with a wide strain range based on graphene armour scales is demonstrated in this paper. The sensor shows an ultra-high gauge factor (GF, up to 1054) and a wide strain range (ε = 26%), both of which present an advantage compared to most other flexible sensors. Moreover, the sensor is developed by a simple fabrication process. Due to the excellent performance, this strain sensor can meet the demands of subtle, large and complex human motion monitoring, which indicates its tremendous application potential in health monitoring, mechanical control, real-time motion monitoring and so on.

  3. Understanding the ballistic event : Methodology and observations relevant to ceramic armour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Adam

    The only widely-accepted method of gauging the ballistic performance of a material is to carry out ballistic testing; due to the large volume of material required for a statistically robust test, this process is very expensive. Therefore a new test, or suite of tests, that employ widely-available and economically viable characterisation methods to screen candidate armour materials is highly desirable; in order to design such a test, more information on the armour/projectile interaction is required. This work presents the design process and results of using an adapted specimen configuration to increase the amount of information obtained from a ballistic test. By using a block of ballistic gel attached to the ceramic, the fragmentation generated during the ballistic event was captured and analysed. In parallel, quasi-static tests were carried out using ring-on-ring biaxial disc testing to investigate relationships between quasi-static and ballistic fragment fracture surfaces. Three contemporary ceramic armour materials were used to design the test and to act as a baseline; Sintox FA alumina, Hexoloy SA silicon carbide and 3M boron carbide. Attempts to analyse the post-test ballistic sample non-destructively using X-ray computed tomography (XCT) were unsuccessful due to the difference in the density of the materials and the compaction of fragments. However, the results of qualitative and quantitative fracture surface analysis using scanning electron microscopy showed similarities between the fracture surfaces of ballistic fragments at the edges of the tile and biaxial fragments; this suggests a relationship between quasi-static and ballistic fragments created away from the centre of impact, although additional research will be required to determine the reason for this. Ballistic event-induced porosity was observed and quantified on the fracture surfaces of silicon carbide samples, which decreased as distance from centre of impact increased; upon further analysis this

  4. Determining the dimensions of essential medical coverage required by military body armour plates utilising Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, J; Lewis, E A; Fryer, R

    2016-09-01

    Military body armour is designed to prevent the penetration of ballistic projectiles into the most vulnerable structures within the thorax and abdomen. Currently the OSPREY and VIRTUS body armour systems issued to United Kingdom (UK) Armed Forces personnel are provided with a single size front and rear ceramic plate regardless of the individual's body dimensions. Currently limited information exists to determine whether these plates overprotect some members of the military population, and no method exists to accurately size plates to an individual. Computed Tomography (CT) scans of 120 male Caucasian UK Armed Forces personnel were analysed to measure the dimensions of internal thoraco-abdominal anatomical structures that had been defined as requiring essential medical coverage. The boundaries of these structures were related to three potential anthropometric landmarks on the skin surface and statistical analysis was undertaken to validate the results. The range of heights of each individual used in this study was comparable to previous anthropometric surveys, confirming that a representative sample had been used. The vertical dimension of essential medical coverage demonstrated good correlation to torso height (suprasternal notch to iliac crest) but not to stature (r(2)=0.53 versus 0.04). Horizontal coverage did not correlate to either measure of height. Surface landmarks utilised in this study were proven to be reliable surrogate markers for the boundaries of the underlying anatomical structures potentially requiring essential protection by a plate. Providing a range of plate sizes, particularly multiple heights, should optimise the medical coverage and thus effectiveness of body armour for UK Armed Forces personnel. The results of this work provide evidence that a single width of plate if chosen correctly will provide the essential medical coverage for the entire military population, whilst recognising that it still could overprotect the smallest individuals

  5. Two-phase flows during draining of liquefied gases initially undersaturated. Validation by water and CFC11; Ecoulements diphasiques lors de la vidange de gaz liquifies initialement sous satures. Validation par l`eau et le CFC11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, L.

    1996-12-11

    In petroleum industry, the safety studies require to estimate the two-phase flow during accidental draining of pressurized liquefied gas storages. Meanwhile the mass flow strongly depends of initial conditions. Then it is primordial to be able to reckon it in the case where it is the highest, that is to say when the fluid is initially undersaturated. An experimental installation has been carried out. The used fluids are water and CFC11. The experimental measures show that the thermodynamic conditions at the inlet of the pipe (P at +/- 15 mbar and T at +/- 0.15 degrees Celsius) are well controlled. The measured mass flows are compared to different models. The frictions in the monophase domain have been taken into account. It has been shown that the extensive H.E.M. model perfectly estimates the mass flow (as well as for water than for CFC11) for large deviations to saturation. In order to correctly predict the domain of weak variation to saturation, D.E.M. (out of equilibrium) models or H.R.M. (homogeneous model of relaxation) models have to be used. (O.M.) 50 refs.

  6. A preliminary study into injuries due to non-perforating ballistic impacts into soft body armour over the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Rosalind M; Malbon, Chris; Brock, Fiona; Harrisson, Stuart; Carr, Debra J

    2018-05-22

    The UK Home Office test method for ballistic protective police body armours considers anterior torso impacts to be the worst-case scenario and tests rear armour panels to the same standards as front panels. The aim of this paper was to examine the injuries from spinal behind armour blunt trauma (BABT) impacts. This study used a cadaveric 65 kg, female pig barrel and 9 mm Luger ammunition (9 × 19 mm, FMJ Nammo Lapur Oy) into HG1/A + KR1 soft armour panels over the spine. Injuries were inspected and sections removed for x-radiography and micro-CT assessment. All shots over the spine resulted in deep soft tissue injuries from pencilling of the armour and the shirt worn under the armour. The wounds had embedded fabric debris which would require surgery to remove resulting in increased recovery time over injuries usually seen in anterior torso BABT impacts, which are typically haematoma and fractured ribs. The shot with the deepest soft tissue wound (41 mm) also resulted in a fractured spinous process. Shots were also fired at the posterior and anterior rib area of the pig barrel, for comparison to the spine. Similar wounds were seen on the shots to the posterior rib area while shallower, smaller wounds were seen on the anterior and one anterior rib shot resulted in a single, un-displaced rib fracture. The anatomical differences between pigs and humans would most likely mean that injury to a human from these impacts would be more serious. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Characteristics of martensite as a function of the Ms temperature in low-carbon armour steel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maweja, Kasonde; Stumpf, Waldo; Berg, Nic van der

    2009-01-01

    The microstructure, morphology, crystal structure and surface relief of martensite in a number of experimental armour steel plates with different M s temperatures were analysed. Atomic force microscopy, thin foil transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy allowed the identification of three groups of low-carbon martensitic armour steels. The investigation showed that the size of individual martensite products (plates or packets, laths or blocks) increases as the M s temperature increases. Comparison of ballistic performances suggests that the morphology (plate or lath) and size of the individual martensite products dictate the effective 'grain size' in resisting fracture or perforation due to ballistic impact.

  8. Characteristics of martensite as a function of the M{sub s} temperature in low-carbon armour steel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maweja, Kasonde, E-mail: mawejak@yahoo.fr [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, CSIR, Materials Science and Manufacturing, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Stumpf, Waldo [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Berg, Nic van der [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2009-08-30

    The microstructure, morphology, crystal structure and surface relief of martensite in a number of experimental armour steel plates with different M{sub s} temperatures were analysed. Atomic force microscopy, thin foil transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy allowed the identification of three groups of low-carbon martensitic armour steels. The investigation showed that the size of individual martensite products (plates or packets, laths or blocks) increases as the M{sub s} temperature increases. Comparison of ballistic performances suggests that the morphology (plate or lath) and size of the individual martensite products dictate the effective 'grain size' in resisting fracture or perforation due to ballistic impact.

  9. Two-Dimensional Model Test Verification of the New Cubipod Armoured Western Breakwater for the Port of Hanstholm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Mads Røge; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    The present report presents results from a two-dimensional model test study carried out at Aalborg University in December 2017 with the proposed trunk section for the new cubipod armoured western breakwater in Port of Hanstholm as proposed by the contractor Aarsleff and their consultant Cowi....... The objectives of the model tests were to study the stability of the armour layer, toe erosion, overtopping and transmission. The scale used for the model tests was 1:44.6. Initially the model was created on a scale 1:47, but model was adapted to 1:44.6 due to a mismatch in density of rented cupipods. Unless...

  10. The damage of ozone layer from the influence of CFC fluids and their contribution on the greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciconkov, Risto

    1995-01-01

    The first vapor compression refrigeration systems and the problems with the used refrigerants are discussed. A result of the research were CFC fluids which are nontoxic, nonflammable, stable and inert. The excellent characteristics of CFC were a good reason for an enlarged expanding use in other applications, such as aerosols, polyurethane foam, solvent etc. After the discovery that CFCs damage the protective ozone layer in the stratosphere, Montreal protocol is signed (1987), which foresees a cutback in the production and use of CFCs. The phase out in the production of aerosols, foams and solvents is very effective and fast, but in the refrigeration systems is very slow because of their complex requirements and conflict of interests. The newest regulations from UNEAP are: the ban in the production and use of CFCs from 01 January, 1996. The long life of CFCs in the atmosphere contributes to the greenhouse effect and increase the average temperature on earth. The effect is mainly caused by carbon dioxide emissions (50%), while the contribution of CFCs is about 20 to 25%. The well known companies offer on the market new alternative fluids for refrigeration systems, mainly HFC fluids, but their influence upon the environment is still not proved. We already have the lesson of history. (author)

  11. Laser cut hole matrices in novel armour plate steel for appliqué battlefield vehicle protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available During this research, experimental rolled homogeneous armour steel was cast, annealed and laser cut to form an appliqué plate. This Martensitic–Bainitic microstructure steel grade was used to test a novel means of engineering lightweight armour. It was determined that a laser cutting speed of 1200 mm/min produced optimum hole formations with limited distortion. The array of holes acts as a double-edged solution, in that they provide weight saving of 45%, providing a protective advantage and increasing the surface area. Data collected were used to generate laser cut-edge hole projections in order to identify the optimum cutting speed, edge condition, cost and deformation performance. These parameters resulted in the generation of a surface, with less stress raising features. This can result in a distribution of stress across the wider surface. Provided that appropriate process parameters are used to generate laser cut edges, then the hardness properties of the surface can be controlled. This is due to compressive residual stresses produced in the near edge region as a result of metallurgical transformations. This way the traverse cutting speed parameter can be adjusted to alter critical surface characteristics and microstructural properties in close proximity to the cut-edge. A relationship was identified between the width of the laser HAZ and the hardness of the cut edge. It is the thickness of the HAZ that is affected by the laser process parameters which can be manipulated with adjusting the traverse cutting speed.

  12. Synergistic effects of surface erosion on tritium inventory and permeation in metallic plasma facing armours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, G.; Holland, D. F.; Matera, R.

    1996-10-01

    In the next generation of DT fuelled tokamaks, i.e., the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) implantation of energetic DT particles on some portions of the plasma facing components (PFCs) will take place along with significant erosion of the armour surfaces. As a result of the simultaneous removal of material from the front surface, the build-up of tritium inventory and the start of permeation originating in the presence of large densities of neutron-induced traps is expected to be influenced considerably and special provisions could be required to minimise the consequences on the design. This paper reports on the results of a tritium transport modelling study based on a new model which describes the migration of implanted tritium across the bulk of metallic plasma facing materials containing neutron-induced traps which can capture it and includes the synergistic effects of surface erosion. The physical basis of the model is summarised, but emphasis is on the discussion of the results of a comparative study performed for beryllium and tungsten armours for ranges of design and operation conditions similar to those anticipated in the divertor of ITER.

  13. Strong and consistent natural selection associated with armour reduction in sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LE Rouzic, Arnaud; Østbye, Kjartan; Klepaker, Tom O; Hansen, Thomas F; Bernatchez, Louis; Schluter, Dolph; Vøllestad, L Asbjørn

    2011-06-01

    Measuring the strength of natural selection is tremendously important in evolutionary biology, but remains a challenging task. In this work, we analyse the characteristics of selection for a morphological change (lateral-plate reduction) in the threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus. Adaptation to freshwater, leading with the reduction or loss of the bony lateral armour, has occurred in parallel on numerous occasions in this species. Completely-plated and low-plated sticklebacks were introduced into a pond, and the phenotypic changes were tracked for 20 years. Fish from the last generation were genotyped for the Ectodysplasin-A (Eda) locus, the major gene involved in armour development. We found a strong fitness advantage for the freshwater-type fish (on average, 20% fitness advantage for the freshwater morph, and 92% for the freshwater genotype). The trend is best explained by assuming that this fitness advantage is maximum at the beginning of the invasion and decreases with time. Such fitness differences provide a quantifiable example of rapid selection-driven phenotypic evolution associated with environmental change in a natural population. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Comparison of armoured laryngeal mask airway with endotracheal tube for adenotonsillectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, L.; Bashir, K.

    2006-01-01

    To assess the reliability of armoured laryngeal mask airway for adenotonsillectomy and to compare the haemodynamic changes during anaesthesia with those of endotracheal tube. A total of 100 patients undergoing adenotonsillectomy between ages 10-35 years and ASA I status were enrolled for the study. Two groups with 50 patients in each group were formed. Group I patients underwent surgery with armoured laryngeal mask airway while group II underwent surgery with endotracheal intubation. Baseline heart rate, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were noted pre-operatively, one minute after insertion and every five minutes after induction in both the groups. A change in all these haemodynamic parameters from the baseline was noted. The effect of Boyle Davis Gag and adequacy of surgical access were also noted. Occurrence of cough, laryngospasm and stridor were noted at the time of recovery in both the groups. Baseline variables in both groups were identical. Surgical access was adequate in 48/50 patients in group I while it was adequate in 49/50 patients in group II. The frequencies of cough, laryngeal spasm and stridor were lower in group I. In group I, there was insignificant change from baseline in heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure at one, five and ten minutes after induction. In group II, significant change from baseline was observed in heart rate (p <0.01), systolic blood pressure (p <0.05) and diastolic blood pressure (p <0.05). (author)

  15. Rapid formation of rock armour for soil - rock fragment mixture during simulated rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poultney, E.; McGrath, G. S.; Hinz, C.

    2009-04-01

    Preventing erosion is an important issue in disturbed semi-arid and arid landscapes. This is in particular of highest importance for mining companies while undertaking land rehabilitation. An onsite investigation of the impact of surface rock fragments on erosion was conducted at Telfer goldmine in the Great Sandy Desert, Western Australia. The study site is a waste rock dump designed to mimic the concave slope of a natural mesa to both discourage erosion and blend in with its natural surroundings. Four treatments were used to construct the slope: two are topsoil mixed with rock fragments, and two are unmixed topsoil. A field study investigating erosion rills, particle size distribution, rock fragment coverage surface roughness and vegetation was carried out to determine changes down and across slope. The treatments constructed by mixing topsoil and rock fragments are more stable and show rock fragment distributions that more closely resemble patterns found on natural mesas surrounding Telfer. A controlled study using trays of topsoil mixed with rock fragment volumes of 50%, 60%, 70% and 80% were used to investigate how varying mixtures of rock fragments and topsoil erode using rainfall intensities between 20 and 100 mm h-1. Two runs of 25 minutes each were used to assess the temporal evolution of rock armouring. Surface coverage results converged for the 50%, 60% and 70% mixtures after the first run to coverage of about 90%, suggesting that fine sediment proportion does not affect rate and degree of rock armouring.

  16. Simulation of tungsten armour cracking due to small ELMs in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestchanyi, S.; Garkusha, I.; Landman, I.

    2010-01-01

    Simulations of tungsten armour cracking under small ELM-like plasma heat load, which does not cause surface melting, have been performed using the PEGASUS-3D code. A dedicated series of experiments have been performed in the QSPA-Kh50 facility for measurements of the unknown tungsten thermophysical properties and for verification of the PEGASUS-3D simulation results. The simulations revealed that a cellular crack network with average mesh size Λ ∼ 0.5 mm formed after first ELMs and the pattern does not change further. With increasing number of repetitive ELMs loads, the average crack width Δ(n) has a maximum value Δ m . The ratio of Δ m /Λ is equal to the tungsten thermal expansion at the maximum surface temperature. Δ(n) tends to this value exponentially. The number of ELMs n m needed for Δ stabilization depends on the ELMs energy density and time duration, n m ∼ 300 for the simulated ELMs of 0.45 MJ/m 2 and 0.25 ms duration. The PEGASUS-3D code is prepared for simulations of tungsten armour damage under action of ELMs of various energy deposition and time duration. These parameters of ELMs depend on ITER regimes of operation and on how successful will be the efforts on ELMs mitigation.

  17. Synergistic effects of surface erosion on tritium inventory and permeation in metallic plasma facing armours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Holland, D.F.; Matera, R.

    1996-01-01

    In the next generation of DT fuelled tokamaks, i.e., the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) implantation of energetic DT particles on some portions of the plasma facing components (PFCs) will take place along with significant erosion of the armour surfaces. As a result of the simultaneous removal of material from the front surface, the build-up of tritium inventory and the start of permeation originating in the presence of large densities of neutron-induced traps is expected to be influenced considerably and special provisions could be required to minimise the consequences on the design. This paper reports on the results of a tritium transport modelling study based on a new model which describes the migration of implanted tritium across the bulk of metallic plasma facing materials containing neutron-induced traps which can capture it and includes the synergistic effects of surface erosion. The physical basis of the model is summarised, but emphasis is on the discussion of the results of a comparative study performed for beryllium and tungsten armours for ranges of design and operation conditions similar to those anticipated in the divertor of ITER. (orig.)

  18. Aspect of use of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (uhmwpe) as biomaterial and as armour material (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuzail, M.

    2011-01-01

    Among the known polymeric materials, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has unique properties as a biomaterial as well as armour material. Its high strength and very high modulus makes it an alternate candidate as body armour for example bullet proof vest. The drawn fibers from this material are best known for their break strength and compete with the steel and carbon fibers. On the other hand, its extremely high molar mass imparts outstanding wear resistance and impact toughness better than any other polymer which makes it a better choice as biomaterial used in hip and knee transplants. As a biomaterial, when body transplants are gamma sterilized, their shelf life depends upon the number and nature of free radicals produced during sterilization. These long-lived radicals ultimately affect the wear properties of hip and knee transplants. The Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) technique used to determine the concentration and nature of free radicals in about 16 years old powder, fibers and ram-extruded bar samples shows that at low microwave power (0.01 mW), polyenyl radicals become prominent while at high microwave power (160 mW), oxygen-centered radicals show their identity. The ESR study also exhibits that the concentration of free radicals depends upon the crystallinities of different morphologies known i.e powder, extruded bars and drawn fibers. Differential scanning calorimetry shows the order of crystallinity as: fiber > extruded bars > powder. (author)

  19. Characterization of the dynamic behaviour of ALGOTUF armour steel during impact and in torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassim, Nabil; Boakye-Yiadom, Solomon; Toussaint, Genevieve; Bolduc, Manon

    2015-09-01

    Algotuf is a new steel which is proposed as a candidate for armour material. To assess this application, a study of the impact properties of this steel was conducted at the University of Manitoba using two types of Hopkinson Bar systems, namely a torsional bar equipment and a direct impact system capable of producing high strain rates and large strains. Stress strain curves for the steels were obtained in pure shear and in compression. Temperatures of 25 ∘C, 200 ∘C and 500 ∘C were used in the testing. Following the testing, a microstructural examination of the specimens tested was carried out to investigate the effect of microstructure on the mechanism of failure of this material. It was found that, above a value of impact momentum corresponding to a high strain rate, adiabatic shear bands are formed. The microscopic examination showed that the initiation of these shear bands corresponded at locations where martensitic laths were present and around regions of maximum shear stresses. Generally, the shear bands act as precursors to the formation of microcracks that may lead to failure. On the other hand, the high strength and formability of the steel makes it suitable for use as an armour material.

  20. Simulation of tungsten armour cracking due to small ELMs in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestchanyi, S., E-mail: sergey.pestchanyi@ihm.fzk.de [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM (Germany); Garkusha, I. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Landman, I. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Simulations of tungsten armour cracking under small ELM-like plasma heat load, which does not cause surface melting, have been performed using the PEGASUS-3D code. A dedicated series of experiments have been performed in the QSPA-Kh50 facility for measurements of the unknown tungsten thermophysical properties and for verification of the PEGASUS-3D simulation results. The simulations revealed that a cellular crack network with average mesh size {Lambda} {approx} 0.5 mm formed after first ELMs and the pattern does not change further. With increasing number of repetitive ELMs loads, the average crack width {Delta}(n) has a maximum value {Delta}{sub m}. The ratio of {Delta}{sub m}/{Lambda} is equal to the tungsten thermal expansion at the maximum surface temperature. {Delta}(n) tends to this value exponentially. The number of ELMs n{sub m} needed for {Delta} stabilization depends on the ELMs energy density and time duration, n{sub m} {approx} 300 for the simulated ELMs of 0.45 MJ/m{sup 2} and 0.25 ms duration. The PEGASUS-3D code is prepared for simulations of tungsten armour damage under action of ELMs of various energy deposition and time duration. These parameters of ELMs depend on ITER regimes of operation and on how successful will be the efforts on ELMs mitigation.

  1. Characterization of the dynamic behaviour of ALGOTUF armour steel during impact and in torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassim Nabil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Algotuf is a new steel which is proposed as a candidate for armour material. To assess this application, a study of the impact properties of this steel was conducted at the University of Manitoba using two types of Hopkinson Bar systems, namely a torsional bar equipment and a direct impact system capable of producing high strain rates and large strains. Stress strain curves for the steels were obtained in pure shear and in compression. Temperatures of 25 ∘C, 200 ∘C and 500 ∘C were used in the testing. Following the testing, a microstructural examination of the specimens tested was carried out to investigate the effect of microstructure on the mechanism of failure of this material. It was found that, above a value of impact momentum corresponding to a high strain rate, adiabatic shear bands are formed. The microscopic examination showed that the initiation of these shear bands corresponded at locations where martensitic laths were present and around regions of maximum shear stresses. Generally, the shear bands act as precursors to the formation of microcracks that may lead to failure. On the other hand, the high strength and formability of the steel makes it suitable for use as an armour material.

  2. Cool snacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G; Brock, Steen; Brunsø, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Young people snack and their snacking habits are not always healthy. We address the questions whether it is possible to develop a new snack product that adolescents will find attractive, even though it is based on ingredients as healthy as fruits and vegetables, and we argue that developing...... such a product requires an interdisciplinary effort where researchers with backgrounds in psychology, anthropology, media science, philosophy, sensory science and food science join forces. We present the COOL SNACKS project, where such a blend of competences was used first to obtain thorough insight into young...... people's snacking behaviour and then to develop and test new, healthier snacking solutions. These new snacking solutions were tested and found to be favourably accepted by young people. The paper therefore provides a proof of principle that the development of snacks that are both healthy and attractive...

  3. Cool visitors

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Pictured, from left to right: Tim Izo (saxophone, flute, guitar), Bobby Grant (tour manager), George Pajon (guitar). What do the LHC and a world-famous hip-hop group have in common? They are cool! On Saturday, 1st July, before their appearance at the Montreux Jazz Festival, three members of the 'Black Eyed Peas' came on a surprise visit to CERN, inspired by Dan Brown's Angels and Demons. At short notice, Connie Potter (Head of the ATLAS secretariat) organized a guided tour of ATLAS and the AD 'antimatter factory'. Still curious, lead vocalist Will.I.Am met CERN physicist Rolf Landua after the concert to ask many more questions on particles, CERN, and the origin of the Universe.

  4. Effect of Bainitic Microstructure on Ballistic Performance of Armour Steel Weld Metal Using Developed High Ni-Coated Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanick, A. K.; Das, H.; Reddy, G. M.; Ghosh, M.; Nandy, S.; Pal, T. K.

    2018-05-01

    Welding of armour steel has gained significant importance during the past few years as recent civilian and military requirements demand weld metal properties matching with base metal having good ballistic performance along with high strength and toughness at - 40 °C as per specification. The challenge of armour steel welding therefore lies in controlling the weld metal composition which is strongly dependent on welding electrode/consumables, resulting in desired weld microstructure consisting of lower bainite along with retained austenite. The performance of butt-welded armour steel joints produced by the developed electrodes was evaluated using tensile testing, ballistic testing, impact toughness at room temperature and subzero temperature. Microstructures of weld metals are exclusively characterized by x-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscopy with selected area diffraction pattern. Experimental results show that weld metal with relatively lower carbon, higher manganese and lower nickel content was attributed to lower bainite with film type of retained austenite may be considered as a most covetable microstructure for armour steel weld metal.

  5. The Application of Load-cell Technique in the Study of Armour Unit Responses to Impact Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Zhou

    1994-01-01

    The slender, complex types of armour units, such as Tetrapods and Dolosse are widely used for rubble mound breakwaters. Many of the recent failures of such structures were caused by unforeseen early breakage of the units, thus revealing an inbalance between the strength (structural integrity) of ...

  6. South German Inspirations in the Armour of Late Medieval Combatants from the Silesian-Lusatian-Brandenburg-Polish Borderland. Iconographic Examples

    OpenAIRE

    Michalak, Arkadiusz

    2017-01-01

    There are visible tendencies in the late medieval iconography from the Silesian-Lusatian-Brandenburg-Polish borderland, indicating strong South German inspiration in depicted armour. The presence of this kind of protection on works of art from this region can most likely be connected with political, family and artistic reasons.

  7. Effect of Bainitic Microstructure on Ballistic Performance of Armour Steel Weld Metal Using Developed High Ni-Coated Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanick, A. K.; Das, H.; Reddy, G. M.; Ghosh, M.; Nandy, S.; Pal, T. K.

    2018-04-01

    Welding of armour steel has gained significant importance during the past few years as recent civilian and military requirements demand weld metal properties matching with base metal having good ballistic performance along with high strength and toughness at - 40 °C as per specification. The challenge of armour steel welding therefore lies in controlling the weld metal composition which is strongly dependent on welding electrode/consumables, resulting in desired weld microstructure consisting of lower bainite along with retained austenite. The performance of butt-welded armour steel joints produced by the developed electrodes was evaluated using tensile testing, ballistic testing, impact toughness at room temperature and subzero temperature. Microstructures of weld metals are exclusively characterized by x-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscopy with selected area diffraction pattern. Experimental results show that weld metal with relatively lower carbon, higher manganese and lower nickel content was attributed to lower bainite with film type of retained austenite may be considered as a most covetable microstructure for armour steel weld metal.

  8. Divertor cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Tadakazu; Hayashi, Katsumi; Handa, Hiroyuki

    1993-01-01

    Cooling water for a divertor cooling system cools the divertor, thereafter, passes through pipelines connecting the exit pipelines of the divertor cooling system and the inlet pipelines of a blanket cooling system and is introduced to the blanket cooling system in a vacuum vessel. It undergoes emission of neutrons, and cooling water in the divertor cooling system containing a great amount of N-16 which is generated by radioactivation of O-16 is introduced to the blanket cooling system in the vacuum vessel by way of pipelines, and after cooling, passes through exit pipelines of the blanket cooling system and is introduced to the outside of the vacuum vessel. Radiation of N-16 in the cooling water is decayed sufficiently with passage of time during cooling of the blanket, thereby enabling to decrease the amount of shielding materials such as facilities and pipelines, and ensure spaces. (N.H.)

  9. WORKSHOP: Beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Cooling - the control of unruly particles to provide well-behaved beams - has become a major new tool in accelerator physics. The main approaches of electron cooling pioneered by Gersh Budker at Novosibirsk and stochastic cooling by Simon van der Meer at CERN, are now complemented by additional ideas, such as laser cooling of ions and ionization cooling of muons

  10. Condensation of refrigerant CFC 11 in horizontal microfin tubes. Proposal of a correlation equation for frictional pressure gradient; Reibai CFC11 no microfin tsuki suihei kannai gyoshuku. Atsuryoku koka no jikkenshiki no teian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozu, S [Univ. of Okayama Prefecture, Okayama (Japan); Katayama, H [Mitsubishi Chemical Co., Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Nakata, H [Daikin Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Honda, H [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Institute of Advanced Material Study

    1996-09-25

    Local heat transfer and pressure drop measurements were made during condensation of CFC 11 in microfin tubes. A smooth tube and two microfin tubes with different fin dimensions were used. Flow observation study with use of an industrial bore-scope revealed that the condensate swirled along the grooves, and a thick condensate film covered fins in the lower part of the tube in the low quality region. Static pressure gradients in the microfin tubes were up to 70 percent larger than that in a smooth tube. A correlation equation for the local frictional pressure gradient was derived, in which the effect of refrigerant mass velocity was introduced on the basis of the flow regime consideration. The measured frictional pressure gradient data were found by the present method to have a mean absolute deviation of 8.3 percent. 24 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. MD simulation: determination of the physical properties and surface vaporization analysis of beryllium armours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinzio, M. Di; Aquaro, D.

    2006-01-01

    The erosion of the divertor and of the first wall determined on the base of the anticipated operating conditions, is a critical issue that could affect the performance and the operating schedule of the nuclear fusion reactor ITER. This paper deals with the analysis of beryllium thermal properties by means of MD simulations, in order to better predict thermal behaviour of beryllium armoured PFCs in fusion devices. The importance of this analysis is clearly connected to thermal response evaluation of PFCs to high heat flux exposure, during off-normal events and Edge Localized Modes. The ensuing strong over-heating, in fact, produces material ablation through vaporization of surface material layers and possible loss of melting material. The overall PFCs erosion has bearings on plasma contamination, due to eroded material transport, and components lifetime, due to armour thickness reduction. An important feature of beryllium is its high vapour pressure. During thermal transients the strong vaporization keeps surface temperature relatively low but eroded thickness results high as well. Small changes in beryllium vapour pressure produce not negligible differences in thermal analyses results. On the basis of available force fields, classical Molecular Dynamics simulations have been carried out in order to better understand surface vaporization in tokamak conditions and to evaluate the effect of beryllium oxides formation. This effect has been successfully modelled by MD simulation, carried out with Moldy code. Morse stretching and bending potential for Be-O bond simulation have been used, and partial charges method, accounting for molecular polarity, has been employed. Since during short thermal transients, such as ELMs, only a few microns of Be armour will be overheated and reach melting threshold, the effective thermal conductivity is very important in determining the temperature evolution of surface layers and the ensuing erosion. Thermal conductivity can be evaluated

  12. 40 CFR Appendix F to Subpart B of... - Standard for Recover-Only Equipment That Extracts a Single, Specific Refrigerant Other Than CFC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... does not recycle, any single, specific automotive refrigerant other than CFC-12 or HFC-134a, including... or equivalent new product specifications before reuse in a mobile air-conditioning system.” The... capable of ensuring removal of refrigerant from the system being serviced by reducing the system pressure...

  13. The manufacture of carbon armoured plasma-facing components for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schedler, B.; Huber, T.; Zabernig, A.; Rainer, F.; Scheiber, K.H.; Schedle, D.

    2001-01-01

    Within the last decade Plansee has been active in the development and manufacture of different plasma-facing-components for nuclear fusion experiments consisting in a tungsten or CFC-armor joined onto metallic substrates like TZM, stainless steel or copper-alloys. The manufacture of these components requires unique joining technologies in order to obtain reliable thermo mechanical stable joints able to withstand highest heat fluxes without any deterioration of the joint. In an overview the different techniques will be presented by some examples of components already manufactured and successfully tested under high heat flux conditions. Furthermore an overview will be given on the manufacture of different high heat flux components for TORE SUPRA, Wendelstein 7-X and ITER. (author)

  14. A General Discussion of Problems Related to the Determination of Concrete Armour Unit Stresses Including Specific Results related to Static and Dynamic Stresses in Dolosse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Zhou

    1989-01-01

    Recent breakwater failures revealed the shortcomings of the traditional design procedures for concrete armour units. This paper deals with one of them, which can be expressed as the "lack of balance between the hydraulic stability of the armour layer and the mechanical strength or integrity...... of the units". This problem is related mainly to the slender types of armour units. The paper discusses the various types of loads, and the practical determination of the wave and gravity induced loads and stresses, especially the model test technique and its restrictions. Examples related to Dolosse...

  15. Renewable Heating And Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  16. The time goes by: R 134a and R 32, important substances for the substitution of CFC and HCFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckitt, J.W.; Harris, M.R.; Weissenborn, P.

    1993-01-01

    In this article an interview with representatives of a world-wide leading producer of refrigerants is given. Already five or six years ago they took the decision - which has already today proven to be correct - to find substituents which have a low toxicity, a low greenhouse potential and which do not deplete the ozone layer. R 134a turned out to be a promising substance. On the part of the producers it was stressed that tight regulations play an important role in the phase-out of CFC as only legal pressure will force the users to act. Also the establishment of an effective recycling system contributes to a better acceptance. (BWI) [de

  17. POSSIBILITIES OF INCREASING THE DURABILITY OF CHAIN WHEELS OF ARMOURED-FACE CONVEYORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej N. WIECZOREK

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the study was to demonstrate the possibility of replacing the materials of domestic and foreign production currently used for chain drums with alternative materials. ADIs were selected as materials that may replace the cast steels used so far. L35GSM cast steel, commonly used for mining chain wheels and austempered ductile iron, conforming with the requirements of EN-GJS-1400-1 quality grade were subjected to wear tests. On the basis of the experimental studies it has been observed that for almost all the combinations of destructive factors considered, the ADI in question was characterised by a wear resistance better than that in the case of the L35GSM cast steel used so far. In addition, it has been found that the ADI has favourable features predestining it for use in the production of chain drums for armoured-face conveyors.

  18. Strain rate effects on mechanical properties in tension of aluminium alloys used in armour applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoni, E.; Dotta, M.; Forni, D.; Bianchi, S.; Kaufmann, H.

    2012-08-01

    The mechanical properties in tension of two aluminium alloys (AA5059-H131 and AA7039-T651) used in armour applications were determined from tests carried out over a wide range of strain-rates on round specimens. The experimental research was developed in the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The target strain rates were set at the following four levels: 10-3, 30, 300 and 1000s-1. The quasi-static tests were performed with a universal electromechanical machine, whereas a hydro-pneumatic machine and a Split Hopkinson Tensile Bar apparatus were used for medium and high strain-rates respectively. The required parameters by the Johnson-Cook constitutive law were also determined.

  19. Micro-thermomechanical constitutive model of transformation induced plasticity and its application on armour steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, C.Y. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)], E-mail: suncy@me.ustb.edu.cn; Fang, G.; Lei, L.P.; Zeng, P. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-01-15

    Based on the crystallographic theory of martensitic transformation and internal variable constitutive theory, a micromechanical constitutive model of martensitic transformation induced plasticity was developed. Plastic strains of product and parent phases as well as the volume fraction of each martensitic variant were considered as internal variables describing the microstructure evolution. The plasticity flow both in austenite and martensitic variants domain is described by J{sub 2} flow theory. The thermodynamic driving force acting on these internal variables was obtained through the determination of the intrinsic dissipation due to plastic flow and the growth of martensitic domains. The evolution laws of the internal variables are derived, furthermore macroscopic response due to the change of internal variables is obtained. Thermomechanical behavior of armour steel under uniaxial loading was tested which showed a good agreement with experimental results.

  20. Micro-thermomechanical constitutive model of transformation induced plasticity and its application on armour steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, C.Y.; Fang, G.; Lei, L.P.; Zeng, P.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the crystallographic theory of martensitic transformation and internal variable constitutive theory, a micromechanical constitutive model of martensitic transformation induced plasticity was developed. Plastic strains of product and parent phases as well as the volume fraction of each martensitic variant were considered as internal variables describing the microstructure evolution. The plasticity flow both in austenite and martensitic variants domain is described by J 2 flow theory. The thermodynamic driving force acting on these internal variables was obtained through the determination of the intrinsic dissipation due to plastic flow and the growth of martensitic domains. The evolution laws of the internal variables are derived, furthermore macroscopic response due to the change of internal variables is obtained. Thermomechanical behavior of armour steel under uniaxial loading was tested which showed a good agreement with experimental results

  1. Mechanical adaptability of the Bouligand-type structure in natural dermal armour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schaible, Eric; Dave, Neil K. N.; Yang, Wen; Meyers, Marc A.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2013-10-01

    Arapaima gigas, a fresh water fish found in the Amazon Basin, resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armour. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in distinct lamellae. Here we show how the Bouligand-type (twisted plywood) arrangement of collagen fibril lamellae has a key role in developing their unique protective properties, by using in situ synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering during mechanical tensile tests to observe deformation mechanisms in the fibrils. Specifically, the Bouligand-type structure allows the lamellae to reorient in response to the loading environment; remarkably, most lamellae reorient towards the tensile axis and deform in tension through stretching/sliding mechanisms, whereas other lamellae sympathetically rotate away from the tensile axis and compress, thereby enhancing the scale’s ductility and toughness to prevent fracture.

  2. Mechanical characterization of W-armoured plasma-facing components after thermal fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serret, D; Richou, M; Missirlian, M; Loarer, T

    2011-01-01

    The future fusion device ITER is aimed at demonstrating the scientific and technical feasibility of fusion power. Tens of thousands of W-armoured plasma-facing components (PFCs) will be installed in the vertical targets of the ITER divertor and subjected to a high heat flux. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of mechanical and microstructural characterization of tungsten PFCs after thermal fatigue tests. On each component, Vickers hardness measurements are made. In parallel, the mean grain diameter in the corresponding zone of tungsten material is determined. The empirical Hall-Petch relation was adapted to experimental data. However, due to the plateau effect on recrystallization hardness, this relation does not seem to be relevant once recrystallization is complete: a new approach is proposed for predicting the margin to the tungsten melting onset.

  3. Modelling of fracture processes in the ballistic impact on ceramic armours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaera, R.; Sanchez-Galvez, V.

    1997-01-01

    This work examines the essential physical processes in the perforation of metal backed ceramic armours which include projectile erosion, fracture of the ceramic tile and ductile deformation of the metal backing plate. The impact of projectiles onto alumina and aluminium nitride ceramic materials is studied experimentally and numerically. Observations were performed using an X-ray shadowgraph technique to obtain accurate data of the penetration process at different times. From the examination of computer simulations and corresponding impact experiments a simple analytical model is developed by assuming some hypotheses simplifying the actual mechanisms of the penetration process. Material description is simplified by using simple equations and a few material parameters easily obtained experimentally, such as the elastic modulus, the compressive and tensile strength and the rupture strain. (orig.)

  4. Comparative study on the processing of armour steels with various unconventional technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herghelegiu, E.; Schnakovszky, C.; Radu, M. C.; Tampu, N. C.; Zichil, V.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the current paper is to analyse the suitability of three unconventional technologies - abrasive water jet (AWJ), plasma and laser - to process armour steels. In view of this, two materials (Ramor 400 and Ramor 550) were selected to carry out the experimental tests and the quality of cuts was quantified by considering the following characteristics: width of the processed surface at the jet inlet (Li), width of the processed surface at the jet outlet (Lo), inclination angle (a), deviation from perpendicularity (u), surface roughness (Ra) and surface hardness. It was fond that in terms of cut quality and environmental impact, the best results are offered by abrasive water jet technology. However, it has the lowest productivity comparing to the other two technologies.

  5. The Allison V. Armour / William Henry Holmes 1895 Expedition to Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Haskin

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available The foundation of the Field Museum's reputation as a place where serious science is practiced was laid by Allison V. Armour and William Henry Holmes in 1895, a little more than a year after the Museum was established. Looking back after a career of almost 60 years as an anthropologist, and having twice been honored as the outstanding practitioner in the field, Holmes described the trip to Mexico (the only expedition he led during his brief tenure as the Museum's first Curator of An­thropology as "one of the most gratifying and important events of my life." It was also one of the most important events in the history of anthropology at the Museum.

  6. Invasion of South American suckermouth armoured catfishes Pterygoplichthys spp. (Loricariidae in Kerala, India - a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bijukumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents the occurrence of the exotic South American suckermouth armoured catfishes (Loricariidae of the genus Pterygoplichthys spp. in the drainages of Thiruvananthapuram City, Kerala.  The morphological taxonomy revealed that the specimens are closely related to Pterygoplichthys disjunctivus (Weber, 1991 and P. pardalis (Castelnau, 1855, in addition to intermediary forms of unknown identity.  DNA barcoding using the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome c oxidase 1 (CO1 also failed to establish the identity of the invaded species.  There may be possible hybridisation in aquariums or in fish farms or in the wild, but this needs to be found out aided by detailed studies incorporating different molecular markers and with sequences of topotypes.  The possible threats due to Pterygoplichthys spp. invasion and management options are discussed in the paper. 

  7. Restaurant food cooling practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura Green; Ripley, Danny; Blade, Henry; Reimann, Dave; Everstine, Karen; Nicholas, Dave; Egan, Jessica; Koktavy, Nicole; Quilliam, Daniela N

    2012-12-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study.

  8. Ballistic Limit of High-Strength Steel and Al7075-T6 Multi-Layered Plates Under 7.62-mm Armour Piercing Projectile Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, N. A.; Abdullah, S.; Zamri, W. F. H.; Abdullah, M. F.; Omar, M. Z.; Sajuri, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the computational-based ballistic limit of laminated metal panels comprised of high strength steel and aluminium alloy Al7075-T6 plate at different thickness combinations to necessitate the weight reduction of existing armour steel plate. The numerical models of monolithic configuration, double-layered configuration and triple-layered configuration were developed using a commercial explicit finite element code and were impacted by 7.62 mm armour piercing projectil...

  9. Cooled Water Production System,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The invention refers to the field of air conditioning and regards an apparatus for obtaining cooled water . The purpose of the invention is to develop...such a system for obtaining cooled water which would permit the maximum use of the cooling effect of the water -cooling tower.

  10. Process fluid cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farquhar, N.G.; Schwab, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A system of heat exchangers is disclosed for cooling process fluids. The system is particularly applicable to cooling steam generator blowdown fluid in a nuclear plant prior to chemical purification of the fluid in which it minimizes the potential of boiling of the plant cooling water which cools the blowdown fluid

  11. Armoured mud balls as a result of ephemeral fluvial flood in a humid climate: Modern example from Guizhou Province, South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard H. Bachmann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Armoured mud balls were observed after rainfall and a short flood in the otherwise dry Xiaohe (small river valley of Guanling County, Guizhou Province, South China, approximately 30 km southwest of Guanling City. Armoured mud balls are most common in semiarid climates, but rather unusual in a humid climate as in Guizhou. A number of well-rounded mud balls, 2–20 cm in diameter, were found lying on the gravel of the Xiaohe gully floor. The mud balls consist of sticky, light brown and slightly mottled clay without carbonate content. The surfaces of the mud balls were studded with rims of sand- or gravel-size limestone clasts, collected during bedload transport, as is typical for armoured mud balls. The mud balls originated from alluvial mudstone deposits of the valley floor and cliff that are most likely derived from the weathering and karstification of bedrock limestones. Such mudstones with high clay content seem to be especially well suited for forming armoured mud balls. As flood events are rather common in the area, the formation of armoured mud balls should be very frequent in the Xiaohe valley and similar valleys nearby, giving the possibility for further and more detailed studies. To the best of our knowledge this is the first description of armoured mud balls in China.

  12. Integrating a hip belt with body armour reduces the magnitude and changes the location of shoulder pressure and perceived discomfort in soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Gavin K; Doyle, Tim L A; Saxby, David J; Billing, Dan; Higgs, Jeremy; Lloyd, David G

    2018-04-01

    Soldiers carry heavy loads that may cause general discomfort, shoulder pain and injury. This study assessed if new body armour designs that incorporated a hip belt reduced shoulder pressures and improved comfort. Twenty-one Australian soldiers completed treadmill walking trials wearing six different body armours with two different loads (15 and 30 kg). Contact pressures applied to the shoulders were measured using pressure pads, and qualitative assessment of comfort and usability were acquired from questionnaires administered after walking trials. Walking with hip belt compared to no hip belt armour resulted in decreased mean and maximum shoulder pressures (p armour and backpack designs should integrate a hip belt and distribute load closer to shoulder midline to reduce load carriage discomfort and, potentially, injury risk. Practitioner Summary: Soldiers carry heavy loads that increase their risk of discomfort and injury. New body armour designs are thought to ease this burden by transferring the load to the hips. This study demonstrated that designs incorporating a hip belt reduced shoulder pressure and shoulder discomfort compared to the current armour design.

  13. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  14. In-situ change and repairing method of armour tile made of carbon fiber composite material in divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Shintaro.

    1994-01-01

    A joint portion of a damaged armour tile of a carbon fiber composite material and a divertor substrate is locally heated spontaneously to re-melt the soldering. Then, the damaged tile is removed and the portion where the tile is removed is heated again to melt the soldering, then a tile for exchange is joined. Alternatively, a thermosetting type adhesive is coated on the surface of the damaged armour tile made of carbon fiber composite material on the divertor, and a tile for repairing is adhered thereon then the joint surface is locally heated to cure the adhesive. For local heating, for example, high frequency heating or dielectric heating is used. It is preferably conducted by remote handling by using robot arms under vacuum in an vacuum vessel of the thermonuclear device. The operations of the heating and pressurization for the joint surface are preferably repeated for several times. (N.H.)

  15. Rubble-mound breakwater armour units displacement analysis by means of digital images processing methods in scale models

    OpenAIRE

    Courela, J.M.; Carvalho, R.; Lemos, R.; Fortes, C. J. E. M.; Leandro, J.

    2015-01-01

    Rubble-mound structures are commonly used for coastal and port protection and needs a properly design as well as inspection and maintenance during its lifetime. The design of such breakwaters usually requires a physical scale model to be tested under different irregular incident wave and tide conditions in order to evaluate its hydraulic and structural behaviour, namely the stability of the proposed design. Armour units displacement and fall analysis in physical models are then a ...

  16. Numerical simulation of projectile impact on mild steel armour plates using LS-DYNA, Part II: Parametric studies

    OpenAIRE

    Raguraman, M; Deb, A; Gupta, NK; Kharat, DK

    2008-01-01

    In Part I of the current two-part series, a comprehensive simulation-based study of impact of Jacketed projectiles on mild steel armour plates has been presented. Using the modelling procedures developed in Part I, a number of parametric studies have been carried out for the same mild steel plates considered in Part I and reported here in Part II. The current investigation includes determination of ballistic limits of a given target plate for different projectile diameters and impact velociti...

  17. Numerical Simulation of Projectile Impact on Mild Steel Armour Platesusing LS-DYNA, Part II: Parametric Studies

    OpenAIRE

    M. Raguraman; A. Deb; N. K. Gupta; D. K. Kharat

    2008-01-01

    In Part I of the current two-part series, a comprehensive simulation-based study of impact of jacketed projectiles on mild steel armour plates has been presented. Using the modelling procedures developed in Part I, a number of parametric studies have been carried out for the same mild steel plates considered in Part I and reported here in Part II. The current investigation includes determination of ballistic limits of a given target plate for different projectile diameters and impact velociti...

  18. Non-invasive PGAA, PIXE and ToF-ND analyses on Hungarian Bronze Age defensive armour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marianne Moedlinger; Imre Kovacs; Zoltan Szoekefalvi-Nagy; Ziad El Morr

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive, archaeometric analyses on selected Hungarian Bronze Age defensive armour is presented here: three greaves, three helmets two shields as well as one vessel fragment were analysed with PIXE, PGAA and TOF-ND. The detected alloy elemental and phase composition as well as its intergranular or spatial concentration distribution reveals important insights into the alloys used and the manufacturing techniques applied c. 1200-950 BC, and allows to reconstruct the production techniques used during the Late Bronze Age. (author)

  19. Preliminary study into the skeletal injuries sustained to the spine from posterior non-perforating ballistic impacts into body armour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Rosalind M; Malbon, C; Brock, F; Harrisson, S E; Carr, D J

    2018-05-21

    The aim of this paper was to examine any injuries from posterior behind armour blunt trauma ballistic impacts directly over the spine onto typical hard body armours. Due to the spine being close to the surface of the skin and a lack of any previous specific research into this topic, this study was designed to gain preliminary insight into the mechanisms involved and injuries caused. Pigs were chosen as the closest representative of human spine, tissue and skin, although their spines are deeper under the surface than humans. Baseline spine and ribs shots were conducted to ensure that the study was effective. This study used a 65 kg cadaveric pig eviscerated torso and 7.62 NATO ammunition (7.62×51; L2A2; mean velocity=838 m/s, SD=4 m/s) impacting hard body armour plates over the spine. Injuries were inspected, and sections were removed for X-ray and micro-CT assessment. There was no visible soft tissue damage under the impact point on the armour over the spine, and no bony injuries were reported. Baseline rib shots resulted in multiple rib fractures; some showed minimal displacement of the bone. Baseline spine shot resulted in damage across the spine involving spinal cord and bone. No injuries were noted from the spinal impacts, and the rib shots resulted in injuries consistent with those previously reported. The anatomical differences between pigs and humans does not preclude that bony injuries could occur in a human from these types of spinal ballistic impacts. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Investigation on energy absorption efficiency of each layer in ballistic armour panel for applications in hybrid design

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yanfei; Chen, Xiaogang

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to reveal different energy absorption efficiency of each layer when armour panel is under ballistic impact. Through Finite Element (FE) modelling and ballistic tests, it is found that when fabrics are layered up in a panel, energy absorption efficiency is only 30%–60% of an individual fabric layer with free boundary condition. In addition, fabric layers in front, middle, and back exhibit different ballistic characteristics. Therefore, a new hybrid design principle has been pro...

  1. Validity of the use of the neutron reduction factor in assessing displacement damage to electronics in armoured vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousins, T.; Jamieson, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    To predict the degree of protection afforded to electronics by armoured vehicles exposed to neutron irradiation, the ratio of outside to inside tissue kermas has often been used as an approximation. This report examines the validity of this approximation by using the computer code VPF2 to generate neutron fields to be expected in a number of battlefield scenarios. The performance of 2 neutron dosimeters in these fields is also examined.

  2. Stratospheric cooling and polar ozone loss due to H2 emissions of a global hydrogen economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feck, T.; Grooß, J.-U.; Riese, M.; Vogel, B.

    2009-04-01

    "Green" hydrogen is seen as a major element of the future energy supply to reduce greenhouse gas emissions substantially. However, due to the possible interactions of hydrogen (H2) with other atmospheric constituents there is a need to analyse the implications of additional atmospheric H2 that could result from hydrogen leakage of a global hydrogen infrastructure. Emissions of molecular H2 can occur along the whole hydrogen process chain which increase the tropospheric H2 burden. Across the tropical tropopause H2 reaches the stratosphere where it is oxidised and forms water vapour (H2O). This causes increased IR-emissions into space and hence a cooling of the stratosphere. Both effects, the increase of stratospheric H2O and the cooling, enhances the potential of chlorine activation on liquid sulfate aerosol and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), which increase polar ozone destruction. Hence a global hydrogen economy could provoke polar ozone loss and could lead to a substantial delay of the current projected recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer. Our investigations show that even if 90% of the current global fossil primary energy input could be replaced by hydrogen and approximately 9.5% of the product gas would leak to the atmosphere, the ozone loss would be increased between 15 to 26 Dobson Units (DU) if the stratospheric CFC loading would retain unchanged. A consistency check of the used approximation methods with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) shows that this additional ozone loss can probably be treated as an upper limit. Towards more realistic future H2 leakage rate assumptions (< 3%) the additional ozone loss would be rather small (? 10 DU). However, in all cases the full damage would only occur if stratospheric CFC-levels would retain unchanged. Due to the CFC-prohibition as a result of the Montreal Protocol the forecasts suggest a decline of the stratospheric CFC loading about 50% until 2050. In this case our calculations

  3. Investigation of fretting behaviour in pressure armour layers of flexible pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don Rasika Perera, Solangarachchige

    The incidence of fretting damage in the pressure armour wires of flexible pipes used in offshore oil explorations has been investigated. A novel experimental facility which is capable of simulating nub and valley contact conditions of interlocking wire winding with dynamic slip, representative of actual pipe loading, has been developed. The test set-up is equipped with a state of the art data acquisition system and a controller with transducers to measure and control the normal load, slip amplitude and friction force at the contact, in addition to the hoop stress in the wire. Tests were performed with selected loading and the fretted regions were examined using optical microscopy techniques. Results show that the magnitude of contact loading and the slip amplitude have a distinct influence on surface damage. Surface cracks originated from a fretting scar were observed at high contact loads in mixed slip sliding while surface damage predominantly due to wear was observed under gross slip. The position of surface cracks and the wear profile have been related to the contact pressure distribution. The evolution of friction force and surface damage under different slip and normal pressure conditions has been analysed. A fracture mechanics based numerical procedure has been developed to analyse the fretting damage behaviour. A severity parameter is proposed in order to ascertain whether the crack growth is in mode I or mode II cracking. The analysis show the influence of mode II cracking in the early stages of crack growth following which the crack deviates in the mode I direction making mode I the dominant crack propagation mechanism. The crack path determined by the numerical procedure correlates well with the experimental results. A numerical analysis was carried out for the fretting fatigue condition where a cyclic bulk stress superimposes with the friction force. The analysis correlates well with short crack growth behaviour. The analysis confirms that fretting is a

  4. Restaurant Food Cooling Practices†

    Science.gov (United States)

    BROWN, LAURA GREEN; RIPLEY, DANNY; BLADE, HENRY; REIMANN, DAVE; EVERSTINE, KAREN; NICHOLAS, DAVE; EGAN, JESSICA; KOKTAVY, NICOLE; QUILLIAM, DANIELA N.

    2017-01-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study. PMID:23212014

  5. Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies for foam building insulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) have been used as blowing agents in foam insulation, as the working fluids in cooling and refrigeration equipment, and as solvents in general and precision cleaning applications since their introduction in the 1930s. The number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s, but in the mid-1980s it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric zone and that they are the primary cause of the CFCs have also been found to be second only to carbon dioxide as a factor causing increased greenhouse warming. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of those alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential building insulation, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. This paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to building insulation. In general the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact, lifetime equivalent C0 2 emissions (TEWI). Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use

  6. Simulation of tokamak armour erosion and plasma contamination at intense transient heat fluxes in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, I. S.; Bazylev, B. N.; Garkusha, I. E.; Loarte, A.; Pestchanyi, S. E.; Safronov, V. M.

    2005-03-01

    For ITER, the potential material damage of plasma facing tungsten-, CFC-, or beryllium components during transient processes such as ELMs or mitigated disruptions are simulated numerically using the MHD code FOREV-2D and the melt motion code MEMOS-1.5D for a heat deposition in the range of 0.5-3 MJ/m 2 on the time scale of 0.1-1 ms. Such loads can cause significant evaporation at the target surface and a contamination of the SOL by the ions of evaporated material. Results are presented on carbon plasma dynamics in toroidal geometry and on radiation fluxes from the SOL carbon ions obtained with FOREV-2D. The validation of MEMOS-1.5D against the plasma gun tokamak simulators MK-200UG and QSPA-Kh50, based on the tungsten melting threshold, is described. Simulations with MEMOS-1.5D for a beryllium first wall that provide important details about the melt motion dynamics and typical features of the damage are reported.

  7. Experimental assessment of the effects of ELMs and disruptions on ITER divertor armour materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhitlukhin, A.; Federici, G.; Giniyatulin, R.; Landman, I.; Linke, J.; Loarte, A.; Merola, M.; Podkovyrov, V.; Safronov, V.

    2005-01-01

    The response of plasma protection materials to thermal energy deposited during simulated Type I Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) and disruptions was studied. The paper describes the design and manufacture of special CFC and tungsten macrobrush targets, the experimental conditions achievable at simulating facilities and results of selected experiments. Experiments are conducted primarily under an EU/RF research collaboration in two plasma guns (QSPA and MK-200UG) located in TRINITI, Troitsk, Russia. The targets were exposed to a large number of repetitive pulses in QSPA plasma gun with heat loads varying in a range of 1-2 MJ/m 2 lasting 0.1-0.5 ms, with the purpose to determine the total expected erosion rate in ITER. MK-200UG experiments were focused on studying mainly vapour plasma production and impurity transport during ELMs. Moderate tungsten erosion less than 0.3 microns per shot was demonstrated for 1.5 MJ/m 2 energy densities. Energy density increasing up to 1.8 MJ/m 2 resulted in sharp growth of tungsten erosion, caused by intensive droplet ejection from irradiated tungsten surface. The program of further experiments is discussed. (author)

  8. An Investigation into the Mechanics of Windblown Dust Entrainment from Nickel Slag Surfaces Resembling Armoured Desert Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Robert Steven

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the dynamics of PM 10 emission from a nickel slag stockpile that closely resembles a desert pavement in physical characteristics. In the field, it was observed that slag surfaces develop by natural processes into a well-armoured surface over some period of time. The surface then consists of two distinct layers; a surficial armour layer containing only non-erodible gravel and cobble-sized clasts, and an underlying dust-laden layer, which contains a wide size range of slag particles, from clay-sized to cobble-sized. This surficial armour layer protects the underlying fines from wind entrainment, at least under typical wind conditions; however, particle emissions still do occur under high wind speeds. The dynamics of particle entrainment from within these surfaces are investigated herein. It is shown that the dynamics of the boundary layer flow over these lag surfaces are influenced by the inherent roughness and permeability of the surficial armour layer, such that the flow resembles those observed over and within vegetation canopies, and those associated with permeable gravel-bed river channels. Restriction of air flow within the permeable surface produces a high-pressure zone within the pore spaces, resulting in a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability, which triggers coherent motions in the form of repeating burst-sweep cycles. Using Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA), it is demonstrated that the lower boundary layer is characterized by both Q4 sweeping motions and Q2 bursting motions, while the upper boundary layer is dominated by Q2 bursts. Pore air motions within the slag material were measured using buried pressure ports. It is shown that the mean pressure gradient which forms within the slag material results in net upward displacement of air, or wind pumping. However, this net upward motion is a result of rapid oscillatory motions which are directly driven by coherent boundary layer motions. It is also demonstrated that

  9. Energy savings with the effect of magnetic field using R290/600a mixture as substitute for CFC12 and HFC134a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Kolandavel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study on the replacement of CFC12 and HFC134a by the new R290/R600a refrigerant mixture as drop-in replacement refrigerant with and without the effect of magnetic field. Without any modification to the system components drop-in experimental tests were performed on a vapour compression refrigeration system with a reciprocating compressor, which was originally designed to operate with CFC12.The test results with no magnets showed that the refrigerant R290/R600a had 19.9-50.1% higher refrigerating capacity than R12 and 28.6-87.2% than R134a. The mixture R290/R600a consumed 6.8- -17.4% more energy than R12. The coefficient of performance of R290/R600a mixture increases from 3.9-25.1% than R12 at lower evaporating temperatures and 11.8-17.6% at higher evaporating temperatures. The effect of magnetic field force reduced the compressor energy consumption by 1.5-2.5% than with no magnets. The coefficient of performance of the system was higher in the range 1.5-2.4% with the effect of magnetic field force. The R290/600a (68/32 by wt.% mixture can be considered as an excellent alternative refrigerant for CFC12 and HFC134a systems.

  10. The hardness of synthetic products obtained from cooled and crystallized basaltic melts (in Romanian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ogrean

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hardness of Synthetic Products Obtained from Cooled and Crystallized Basaltic Melts. Hardness is one of the main properties of the products obtained from cooled and crystallized basaltic melts under a controlled thermal regime. It influences the abrasion tear resistance of the resulted material. The microhardness measurements on the samples (bricks, boards, gutters, armour plates, tubes indicated Vickers hardness value between 757–926 for the materials obtained from Şanovita basalts (Timiş district and between 539–958 respectively, in case of the Racoş basalts (Braşov district. There is a certain variation of the hardness within the same sample, in various measurement points, within the theoretical limits of the hardnesses of the pyroxenes and that of the spinels.

  11. Ti-doped isotropic graphite: A promising armour material for plasma-facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rosales, C.; López-Galilea, I.; Ordás, N.; Adelhelm, C.; Balden, M.; Pintsuk, G.; Grattarola, M.; Gualco, C.

    2009-04-01

    Finely dispersed Ti-doped isotropic graphites with 4 at.% Ti have been manufactured using synthetic mesophase pitch 'AR' as raw material. These new materials show a thermal conductivity at room temperature of ˜200 W/mK and flexural strength close to 100 MPa. Measurement of the total erosion yield by deuterium bombardment at ion energies and sample temperatures for which pure carbon shows maximum values, resulted in a reduction of at least a factor of 4, mainly due to dopant enrichment at the surface caused by preferential erosion of carbon. In addition, ITER relevant thermal shock loads were applied with an energetic electron beam at the JUDITH facility. The results demonstrated a significantly improved performance of Ti-doped graphite compared to pure graphite. Finally, Ti-doped graphite was successfully brazed to a CuCrZr block using a Mo interlayer. These results let assume that Ti-doped graphite can be a promising armour material for divertor plasma-facing components.

  12. Hydrogen induced cold cracking studies on armour grade high strength, quenched and tempered steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magudeeswaran, G.; Balasubramanian, V. [Centre for Materials Joining Research (CEMAJOR), Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002, Tamil Nadu (India); Madhusudhan Reddy, G. [Metal Joining Section, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL), Kanchanbagh (P.O.) Hyderabad 560 058 Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2008-04-15

    Quenched and tempered (Q and T) steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) in the heat affected zone after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS) consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q and T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic (LHF) steel consumables can be used to weld Q and T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. In this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on hydrogen induced cold cracking of armour grade Q and T steel welds by implant testing. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux cored arc welding (FCAW) processes were used for making welds using ASS and LHF welding consumables. ASS welds made using FCAW process offered a higher resistance to HIC than all other welds considered in this investigation. (author)

  13. Ti-doped isotropic graphite: A promising armour material for plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rosales, C. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo de Manuel Lardizabal, 15, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain)], E-mail: cgrosales@ceit.es; Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo de Manuel Lardizabal, 15, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Adelhelm, C.; Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pintsuk, G. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Grattarola, M.; Gualco, C. [Ansaldo Ricerche S.p.A., I-16152 Genoa (Italy)

    2009-04-30

    Finely dispersed Ti-doped isotropic graphites with 4 at.% Ti have been manufactured using synthetic mesophase pitch 'AR' as raw material. These new materials show a thermal conductivity at room temperature of {approx}200 W/mK and flexural strength close to 100 MPa. Measurement of the total erosion yield by deuterium bombardment at ion energies and sample temperatures for which pure carbon shows maximum values, resulted in a reduction of at least a factor of 4, mainly due to dopant enrichment at the surface caused by preferential erosion of carbon. In addition, ITER relevant thermal shock loads were applied with an energetic electron beam at the JUDITH facility. The results demonstrated a significantly improved performance of Ti-doped graphite compared to pure graphite. Finally, Ti-doped graphite was successfully brazed to a CuCrZr block using a Mo interlayer. These results let assume that Ti-doped graphite can be a promising armour material for divertor plasma-facing components.

  14. Ti-doped isotropic graphite: A promising armour material for plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Rosales, C.; Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N.; Adelhelm, C.; Balden, M.; Pintsuk, G.; Grattarola, M.; Gualco, C.

    2009-01-01

    Finely dispersed Ti-doped isotropic graphites with 4 at.% Ti have been manufactured using synthetic mesophase pitch 'AR' as raw material. These new materials show a thermal conductivity at room temperature of ∼200 W/mK and flexural strength close to 100 MPa. Measurement of the total erosion yield by deuterium bombardment at ion energies and sample temperatures for which pure carbon shows maximum values, resulted in a reduction of at least a factor of 4, mainly due to dopant enrichment at the surface caused by preferential erosion of carbon. In addition, ITER relevant thermal shock loads were applied with an energetic electron beam at the JUDITH facility. The results demonstrated a significantly improved performance of Ti-doped graphite compared to pure graphite. Finally, Ti-doped graphite was successfully brazed to a CuCrZr block using a Mo interlayer. These results let assume that Ti-doped graphite can be a promising armour material for divertor plasma-facing components.

  15. The Influence of impact on Composite Armour System Kevlar-29/polyester-Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhan, A. A.; Abu Talib, A. R.; Mohd Rafie, A. S.; Zahari, R.

    2012-09-01

    An experimental investigation of high velocity impact responses of composite laminated plates using a helium gas gun has been presented in this paper. The aim of this study was to develop the novel composite structure that meets the specific requirements of ballistic resistance which used for body protections, vehicles and other applications. Thus the high velocity impact tests were performed on composite Kevlar-29 fiber/polyester resin with alumina powder (Al2O3). The impact test was conducted by using a cylindrical steel projectile of 7.62mm diameter at a velocity range of 160-400 m/s. The results (shown in this work) are in terms of varying plate thickness and the amount of energy absorbed by the laminated plates meanwhile we obtained that the 12mm thickness of composite plate suitable for impact loading up to 200m/s impact velocity. Therefore this composite structure (it is used to reduce the amount of Kevlar) considered most economical armoure products. We used the ANSYS AUTODYN 3D- v.12 software for our simulations. The results have been obtained a4.1% maximum errors with experimental work of energy absorption.

  16. Flower power: the armoured expert in the CanMEDS competency framework?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Cynthia R; Austin, Zubin; Hodges, Brian D

    2011-12-01

    Competency frameworks based on roles definitions are currently being used extensively in health professions education internationally. One of the most successful and widely used models is the CanMEDS Roles Framework. The medical literature has raised questions about both the theoretical underpinnings and the practical application of outcomes-based frameworks, however little empirical research has yet been done examining specific roles frameworks. This study examines the historical development of an important early roles framework, the Educating Future Physicians of Ontario (EFPO) roles, which were instrumental in the development of the CanMEDS roles. Prominent discourses related to roles development are examined using critical discourse analysis methodology. Exploration of discourses that emerged in the development of this particular set of roles definitions highlights the contextual and negotiated nature of roles construction. The discourses of threat and protection prevalent in the EFPO roles development offer insight into the visual construction of a centre of medical expertise surrounded by supporting roles (such as collaborator and manager). Non-medical expert roles may perhaps play the part of 'armour' for the authority of medical expertise under threat. This research suggests that it may not be accurate to consider roles as objective ideals. Effective training models may require explicit acknowledgement of the socially negotiated and contextual nature of roles definitions.

  17. Body armour: the effect of load, exercise and distraction on landing forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paddy C; Handcock, Phil J; Rehrer, Nancy J

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of added load and intense exercise on jump and landing performance and ground reaction force (GRF) during landings where attentional demand was varied. Fifty-two males (37 ± 9.2 years, 180.7 ± 6.1 cm, 90.2 ± 11.6 kg, maximal aerobic fitness (VO(₂max)) 50 ± 8.5 ml (.) kg(-1 .) min(-1), BMI 27.6 ± 3.1, mean ± s) completed a VO(₂max) test. Experimental sessions were completed (≥4 days in between) in a randomised counterbalanced order, one while wearing body armour and appointments (loaded) and one without load (unloaded). A vertical jump, a drop landing concentrating on safe touchdown, a drop jump and a drop landing with an attentional distraction were performed. These were repeated 1 min after a 5-min treadmill run. Mean jump height decreased by 12% (P < 0.001) with loading and a further by 6% following the running task. Peak GRFs were increased by 13-19% with loading (P < 0.001) depending on the landing task demands and a further by 4-9% following intense exercise. The distracted drop landing had significantly higher GRFs compared to all other landings. Results demonstrate that added load impacts on jumping and landing performance, an effect that is amplified by prior intense exercise, and distraction during landing. Such increases in GRF apply to police officer performance in their duties and may increase the risk of injury.

  18. Uncovering three-dimensional gradients in fibrillar orientation in an impact-resistant biological armour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Paris, O.; Terrill, N. J.; Gupta, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    The complex hierarchical structure in biological and synthetic fibrous nanocomposites entails considerable difficulties in the interpretation of the crystallographic texture from diffraction data. Here, we present a novel reconstruction method to obtain the 3D distribution of fibres in such systems. An analytical expression is derived for the diffraction intensity from fibres, explaining the azimuthal intensity distribution in terms of the angles of the three dimensional fibre orientation distributions. The telson of stomatopod (mantis shrimp) serves as an example of natural biological armour whose high impact resistance property is believed to arise from the hierarchical organization of alpha chitin nanofibrils into fibres and twisted plywood (Bouligand) structures at the sub-micron and micron scale. Synchrotron microfocus scanning X-ray diffraction data on stomatopod telson were used as a test case to map the 3D fibre orientation across the entire tissue section. The method is applicable to a range of biological and biomimetic structures with graded 3D fibre texture at the sub-micron and micron length scales.

  19. Filling in the Gaps: Conservation and Reconstruction of Archaeological Mail Armour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn A Wijnhoven

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mail armour is made of many interlinking metal rings. It has been a popular type of defensive gear through the centuries, and this popularity has in part been due to mail armour’s flexibility. However, this very flexibility today hinders its conservation, interpretation and display. Mail pieces retrieved from archaeological contexts are often in such poor state of preservation that their original shape is unrecognizable. This poses a challenge not only for conserving these artefacts, but also for understanding them. This paper describes a conservation technique for flexible mail that involves restoring preserved rings to their original position and filling in the remaining gaps with dummy rings. In addition to stabilizing the mesh of mail, this measure also aids the artefact’s interpretation. The advantages of using this method with archaeological specimens are presented by means of a case-study concerning the remains of a Roman mail coat found near Novae, Bulgaria. The case-study shows that the choice of conservation technique greatly influences the amount of information that researchers can obtain from this material.

  20. Biomechanical properties of predator-induced body armour in the freshwater crustacean Daphnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruppert, Sebastian; Horstmann, Martin; Weiss, Linda C; Witzel, Ulrich; Schaber, Clemens F; Gorb, Stanislav N; Tollrian, Ralph

    2017-08-29

    The freshwater crustacean Daphnia is known for its ability to develop inducible morphological defences that thwart predators. These defences are developed only in the presence of predators and are realized as morphological shape alterations e.g. 'neckteeth' in D. pulex and 'crests' in D. longicephala. Both are discussed to hamper capture, handling or consumption by interfering with the predator's prey capture devices. Additionally, D. pulex and some other daphniids were found to armour-up and develop structural alterations resulting in increased carapace stiffness. We used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to identify predator-induced structural and shape alterations. We found species specific structural changes accompanying the known shape alterations. The cuticle becomes highly laminated (i.e. an increased number of layers) in both species during predator exposure. Using nano- and micro-indentation as well as finite element analysis (FEA) we determined both: the structure's and shape's contribution to the carapace's mechanical resistance. From our results we conclude that only structural alterations are responsible for increased carapace stiffness, whereas shape alterations appear to pose handling difficulties during prey capture. Therefore, these defences act independently at different stages during predation.

  1. The Influence of impact on Composite Armour System Kevlar-29/polyester-Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadhan, A A; Talib, A R Abu; Rafie, A S Mohd; Zahari, R

    2012-01-01

    An experimental investigation of high velocity impact responses of composite laminated plates using a helium gas gun has been presented in this paper. The aim of this study was to develop the novel composite structure that meets the specific requirements of ballistic resistance which used for body protections, vehicles and other applications. Thus the high velocity impact tests were performed on composite Kevlar-29 fiber/polyester resin with alumina powder (Al 2 O 3 ). The impact test was conducted by using a cylindrical steel projectile of 7.62mm diameter at a velocity range of 160-400 m/s. The results (shown in this work) are in terms of varying plate thickness and the amount of energy absorbed by the laminated plates meanwhile we obtained that the 12mm thickness of composite plate suitable for impact loading up to 200m/s impact velocity. Therefore this composite structure (it is used to reduce the amount of Kevlar) considered most economical armoure products. We used the ANSYS AUTODYN 3D- v.12 software for our simulations. The results have been obtained a4.1% maximum errors with experimental work of energy absorption.

  2. Water cooling coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S; Ito, Y; Kazawa, Y

    1975-02-05

    Object: To provide a water cooling coil in a toroidal nuclear fusion device, in which coil is formed into a small-size in section so as not to increase dimensions, weight or the like of machineries including the coil. Structure: A conductor arranged as an outermost layer of a multiple-wind water cooling coil comprises a hollow conductor, which is directly cooled by fluid, and as a consequence, a solid conductor disposed interiorly thereof is cooled indirectly.

  3. The Cool Colors Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, second from left, a sample from the Cool Colors Project, a roof product ) (Jeff Chiu - AP) more Cool Colors make the front page of The Sacramento Bee (3rd highest circulation newspaper in California) on 14 August 2006! Read the article online or as a PDF. The Cool Colors Project

  4. Cooling water distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  5. The design of actively cooled plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheerer, M.; Smid, I.; Bolt, H.; Gervash, A.; Linke, J.

    2001-01-01

    In future fusion devices, like in the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X, the target plates of the divertor will be exposed to heat loads up to power densities of 10 MW/m 2 for 1000 s. For this purpose actively cooled target elements with an internal coolant flow return, made of 2-D CFC armor tiles brazed onto a two tube cooling structure were developed and manufactured at the Forschungszentrum Juelich. Individual bent- and coolant flow reversal elements were used to achieve a high flexibility in the shape of the target elements. A special brazing technology, using a thin layer of plasma-arc deposited titanium was used for the bonding of the cooling structure to the plasma facing armor (PFA). FEM-simulations of the thermal and mechanical behavior show that a detachment of about 25% of the bonded area between the copper tubes and the PFA can be tolerated, without exceeding the critical heat flux at 15 MW/m 2 or a surface temperature of 1400 C at 10 MW/m 2 by using twisted tape inserts with a twist ratio of 2 at a cooling water velocity of 10 m/s. Thermal cycling tests in an electron beam facility up to a power density level 10.5 MW/m 2 show a very good behavior of parts of the target elements, which confirms the performance under fusion relevant conditions. Even defected parts in the bonding interface of the target elements, known from ultrasonic inspections before, show no change in the thermal performance under cycling, which confirms also the structural integrity of partly defected regions. (orig.)

  6. Cooling tower calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonkova, J.

    1988-01-01

    The problems are summed up of the dynamic calculation of cooling towers with forced and natural air draft. The quantities and relations are given characterizing the simultaneous exchange of momentum, heat and mass in evaporative water cooling by atmospheric air in the packings of cooling towers. The method of solution is clarified in the calculation of evaporation criteria and thermal characteristics of countercurrent and cross current cooling systems. The procedure is demonstrated of the calculation of cooling towers, and correction curves and the effect assessed of the operating mode at constant air number or constant outlet air volume flow on their course in ventilator cooling towers. In cooling towers with the natural air draft the flow unevenness is assessed of water and air relative to its effect on the resulting cooling efficiency of the towers. The calculation is demonstrated of thermal and resistance response curves and cooling curves of hydraulically unevenly loaded towers owing to the water flow rate parameter graded radially by 20% along the cross-section of the packing. Flow rate unevenness of air due to wind impact on the outlet air flow from the tower significantly affects the temperatures of cooled water in natural air draft cooling towers of a design with lower demands on aerodynamics, as early as at wind velocity of 2 m.s -1 as was demonstrated on a concrete example. (author). 11 figs., 10 refs

  7. Gas-fired cogeneration and cooling: new study identifies major benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, G.

    2001-01-01

    A research paper- 'Gas Fired Cogeneration and Cooling: Markets, Technologies and Greenhouse Gas Savings'- launched at last month's Australian Gas Association 2001 Convention, reveals that gas cooling could replace 25 PJ of electricity summer demand, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 58 percent compared with electrical technologies. Commissioned by the AGA's Gas Cooling Task Force and supported by the Sustainable Energy Authority of Victoria and the Sustainable Energy Development Authority of NSW, the study examined market opportunities and environmental outcomes for the combined gas cogeneration and cooling technologies. It shows that the penetration of gas into the distributed cooling and power generation market is being driven by the following developments: the uncertainty and volatility of electricity costs, particularly during summer, electricity market structural changes which encourage distributed generation, high and uncertain world oil prices, the relative stability of Australian gas prices, the encouragement of demand and energy management strategies by regulators, greenhouse gas emission reduction policies, indoor air quality issues, product and productivity improvements in industry and CFC phase-out opportunities

  8. Ergonomic assessment of enhanced protection under body armour combat shirt neck collars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, John; Granger, C J; Pearkes, T D; Clasper, J C

    2014-03-01

    Combat neck injury due to explosively propelled fragments is a significant cause of mortality and long-term morbidity in UK soldiers deployed on current operations. Reinforcing the collar of the existing under body armour combat shirt (UBACS) has been suggested as a potential method for reducing the incidence of combat neck injury. 20 soldiers serving in Afghanistan objectively compared three designs of enhanced protection UBACS (EP-UBACS) using 10 representative military tasks against a baseline of a standard UBACS. Each EP-UBACS design was trialled using three constituent materials: two layers of para-aramid felt, one layer of ultra high molecule weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) felt or two layers of a silk fabric. Subjective assessment of these nine configurations in terms of comfort, heat dissipation and overall acceptability were compared with the standard UBACS using a χ² test. All military tasks could be performed with all nine configurations of EP-UBACS. Although silk was the most comfortable material, it was not functionally practical in any of the three designs. Crossover collars incorporating UHMWPE or para-aramid were the only two of the nine configurations to demonstrate similar user acceptability to a standard UBACS. The EP-UBACS has the potential to provide neck protection without reducing performance incorporating materials analogous to either of the felts assessed in this study. The collar should provide stand-off from the skin to improve heat dissipation and comfort, which can be maximised by changing the current UBACS collar shape to one that crosses over at the front. Should a zip be desired, it should be moved to one side of the midline to reduce rubbing on the chin and be covered with ballistic protective material. Additional semi-circles of silk beneath the collar at the front and back would improve protection without affecting comfort.

  9. Inappropriate analysis does not reveal the ecological causes of evolution of stickleback armour: a critique of Spence et al. 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacColl, Andrew D C; Aucott, Beth

    2014-09-01

    In a recent paper in this journal, Spence et al. (2013) sought to identify the ecological causes of morphological evolution in three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus, by examining phenotypic and environmental variation between populations on the island of North Uist, Scotland. However, by using simple qualitative assessments of phenotype and inappropriate measures of environmental variation, Spence et al. have come to a conclusion that is diametrically opposite to that which we have arrived at in studying the same populations. Our criticisms of their paper are threefold: (1) using a binomial qualitative measure of the variation in stickleback armour ("low" versus "minimal" (i.e., "normal" low-plated freshwater sticklebacks versus spineless and/or plateless fish)) does not represent the full range of phenotypes that can be described by quantitative measures of the individual elements of armour. (2) Their use of unspecified test kits, with a probable accuracy of 4 ppm, may not be accurate in the range of water chemistry on North Uist (1 to 30 ppm calcium). (3) Their qualitative assessment of the abundance of brown trout Salmo trutta as the major predator of sticklebacks does not accurately describe the variation in brown trout abundance that is revealed by catch-per-unit-effort statistics. Repeating Spence et al.'s analysis using our own measurements, we find, in direct contradiction to them, that variation in stickleback bony armour is strongly correlated with variation in trout abundance, and unrelated to variation in the concentration of calcium in the lochs in which they live. Field studies in ecology and evolution seldom address the same question in the same system at the same time, and it is salutary that in this rare instance two such studies arrived at diametrically opposite answers.

  10. Laser cooling of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Petrushkin, S V

    2009-01-01

    Laser cooling is an important emerging technology in such areas as the cooling of semiconductors. The book examines and suggests solutions for a range of problems in the development of miniature solid-state laser refrigerators, self-cooling solid-state lasers and optical echo-processors. It begins by looking at the basic theory of laser cooling before considering such topics as self-cooling of active elements of solid-state lasers, laser cooling of solid-state information media of optical echo-processors, and problems of cooling solid-state quantum processors. Laser Cooling of Solids is an important contribution to the development of compact laser-powered cryogenic refrigerators, both for the academic community and those in the microelectronics and other industries. Provides a timely review of this promising field of research and discusses the fundamentals and theory of laser cooling Particular attention is given to the physics of cooling processes and the mathematical description of these processes Reviews p...

  11. Emergency reactor cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Ken.

    1993-01-01

    An emergency nuclear reactor cooling device comprises a water reservoir, emergency core cooling water pipelines having one end connected to a water feeding sparger, fire extinguishing facility pipelines, cooling water pressurizing pumps, a diesel driving machine for driving the pumps and a battery. In a water reservoir, cooling water is stored by an amount required for cooling the reactor upon emergency and for fire extinguishing, and fire extinguishing facility pipelines connecting the water reservoir and the fire extinguishing facility are in communication with the emergency core cooling water pipelines connected to the water feeding sparger by system connection pipelines. Pumps are operated by a diesel power generator to introduce cooling water from the reservoir to the emergency core cooling water pipelines. Then, even in a case where AC electric power source is entirely lost and the emergency core cooling system can not be used, the diesel driving machine is operated using an exclusive battery, thereby enabling to inject cooling water from the water reservoir to a reactor pressure vessel and a reactor container by the diesel drive pump. (N.H.)

  12. Fabrication of mock-up with Be armour tiles diffusion bonded to the CuCrZr heat sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreschi, L.F.; Pizzuto, A.; Alessandrini, I.; Agostini, M.; Visca, E.; Merola, M.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is the manufacture of high heat flux mock-ups with Be armour tiles on a CuCrZr heat sink for fabricating the beryllium section of the divertor vertical target (DVT) in the ITER reactor. Diffusion bonding between the CuCrZr bar and the beryllium tiles was obtained by inserting an aluminium interlayer to accommodate surface irregularities as well as to provide a compliant layer for accommodating thermal mismatches during both manufacturing and operation and cycles

  13. The perceived effects and comfort of various body armour systems on police officers while performing occupational tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schram, B; Hinton, B; Orr, R; Pope, R; Norris, G

    2018-01-01

    The nature of police work often necessitates use of Individual Light Armour Vests (ILAVs) for officer protection. Previous research has demonstrated various biomechanical and physical performance impacts of ILAVs, however, little knowledge exists on the individual officer's perceptions of ILAV. The aim of this study was to investigate officers' perceptions of the impacts of three different ILAVs and normal station wear whilst performing police occupational tasks. A prospective, within subjects, repeated measures design was employed in which 11 serving police officers wore each of three different types of body armour (ILAV A, ILAV B or ILAV C) and normal station wear for a full day while performing tasks including a simulated victim drag, a patrol vehicle exit and a marksmanship shoot. Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE) and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS; - 10 to + 10) were used to examine officer perceptions of each ILAV. Finally, officers were asked to indicate areas of both discomfort and comfort of each ILAV on a mannequin chart. Officers perceived less effort was required for the victim drag whilst wearing ILAV B (RPE = 3.6/10) when compared to ILAV A, ILAV C and even station wear (RPE = 4.7/10, 4.0/10, 3.8/10, respectively). A positive impact on performance was perceived for ILAV B (VAS = + 0.26) when performing a patrol vehicle exit and sprint task but not for the other two ILAVs (VAS = - 3.58, - 0.55, - 0.85, respectively). Officers perceived a positive impact of ILAV B (VAS = + 2.7) and station wear (VAS = + 1.4) and a negative impact of ILAVs A and C (VAS = - 2.1, - 1.7 respectively) on marksmanship. Despite all armour types being criticized for discomfort, ILAV B received lower ratings of discomfort overall, and some positive comments regarding both comfort and performance. Officers perceived ILAV B to have positive effects on task performance. It was also rated more comfortable than the other two, possibly due to a longer

  14. Experimental and numerical analysis of the dynamic behaviour in tension of an armour steel for applications in defence industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadoni Ezio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behaviour of armour steel in tension was investigated over a wide range of strain-rates on round specimens. The experiments were carried out by means of a Split Hopkinson Tensile Bar device and by a Hydro Pneumatic Machine. The target strain rate were set at the following six levels: 10−3, 5, 25, 100, 500 and 1000 s−1. Two material models were calibrated and used to replicate the experiments and to simulate blasting event on steel plate. Finally, the two responses are compared.

  15. Experimental and numerical analysis of the dynamic behaviour in tension of an armour steel for applications in defence industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoni, Ezio; Dotta, Matteo; Forni, Daniele; Riganti, Gianmario; Kaufmann, Hanspeter

    2015-09-01

    The dynamic behaviour of armour steel in tension was investigated over a wide range of strain-rates on round specimens. The experiments were carried out by means of a Split Hopkinson Tensile Bar device and by a Hydro Pneumatic Machine. The target strain rate were set at the following six levels: 10-3, 5, 25, 100, 500 and 1000 s-1. Two material models were calibrated and used to replicate the experiments and to simulate blasting event on steel plate. Finally, the two responses are compared.

  16. Clinical and post mortem analysis of combat neck injury used to inform a novel coverage of armour tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, J; Fryer, R; Hare, J; Delaney, R; Hunt, N C; Lewis, E A; Clasper, J C

    2015-04-01

    There is a requirement in the Ministry of Defence for an objective method of comparing the area of coverage of different body armour designs for future applications. Existing comparisons derived from surface wound mapping are limited in that they can only demonstrate the skin entry wound location. The Coverage of Armour Tool (COAT) is a novel three-dimensional model capable of comparing the coverage provided by body armour designs, but limited information exists as to which anatomical structures require inclusion. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of COAT, in the assessment of neck protection, using clinically relevant injury data. Hospital notes and post mortem records of all UK soldiers injured by an explosive fragment to the neck between 01 Jan 2006 and 31 December 2012 from Iraq and Afghanistan were analysed to determine which anatomical structures were responsible for death or functional disability at one year post injury. Using COAT a comparison of three ballistic neck collar designs was undertaken with reference to the percentage of these anatomical structures left exposed. 13/81 (16%) survivors demonstrated complications at one year, most commonly upper limb weakness from brachial plexus injury or a weak voice from laryngeal trauma. In 14/94 (15%) soldiers the neck wound was believed to have been the sole cause of death, primarily from carotid artery damage, spinal cord transection or rupture of the larynx. COAT objectively demonstrated that despite the larger OSPREY collar having almost double the surface area than the two-piece prototype collar, the percentage area of vulnerable cervical structures left exposed only reduced from 16.3% to 14.4%. COAT demonstrated its ability to objectively quantify the potential effectiveness of different body armour designs in providing coverage of vulnerable anatomical structures from different shot line orientations. To improve its utility, it is recommended that COAT be further developed to enable weapon

  17. Validity of the use of the neutron-reduction factor in assessing displacement damage to electronics in armoured vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousins, T.; Jamieson, T.J.

    1990-02-01

    The degree of protection from neutron irradiation afforded to electronics by armoured vehicles is most currently defined by the outside-to-inside ratio of the 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence for Silicon. It has been proposed that this factor may be approximated by an experimentally measurable parameter - the neutron (tissue kerma) reduction factor. This report examines the validity of this assumption for a variety of realistic nuclear battlefield scenarios, calculated using the computer code VPF2. In addition the response of two neutron dosimeters in the calculated fields is examined.

  18. Mechanical effects of strong measurement: back-action noise and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Keith

    2007-03-01

    Our recent experiments show that it is now possible to prepare and measure mechanical systems with thermal occupation factors of N˜25 and perform continuous position measurements close to the limits required by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle (1). I will discuss our back-action measurements with nanomechanical structures strongly coupled to single electron transistors. We have been able to observe the stochastic back-action forces exerted by the SET as well as a cooling effect which has analogies to cooling in optical cavities. Furthermore, I will discuss progress using optical fields coupled to mechanical modes which show substantial cooling using the pondermotive effects of the photons impacting a flexible dielectric mirror (2). Both of these techniques pave the way to demonstrating the true quantum properties of a mechanical device: squeezed states, superposition states, and entangled states. (1) ``Quantum Measurement Backaction and Cooling Observed with a Nanomechanical Resonator,'' A. Naik, O. Buu, M.D. LaHaye, M.P. Blencowe, A.D. Armour, A.A. Clerk, K.C. Schwab, Nature 443, 193 (2006). (2) ``Self-cooling of a micro-mirror by radiation pressure,'' S. Gigan, H.R. Boehm, M. Patemostro, F. Blaser, G. Langer, J. Hertzberg, K. Schwab, D. Baeuerle, M. Aspelmeyer, A. Zeilinger, Nature 444, 67 (2006).

  19. The armour of the common soldier in the late middle ages. Harnischrödel as sources for the history of urban martial culture

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid Regula

    2017-01-01

    The designation Harnischrödel (rolls of armour) lumps together different kinds of urban inventories. They list the names of citizens and inhabitants together with the armour they owned, were compelled to acquire within their civic obligations, or were obliged to lend to able-bodied men. This contribution systematically introduces Harnischrödel of the 14th and 15th c. as important sources for the history of urban martial culture. On the basis of lists preserved in the archives of Swiss towns, ...

  20. The armour of the common soldier in the late middle ages. "Harnischrödel" as sources for the history of urban martial culture

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Regula

    2017-01-01

    The designation Harnischrödel (rolls of armour) lumps together different kinds of urban inventories. They list the names of citizens and inhabitants together with the armour they owned, were compelled to acquire within their civic obligations, or were obliged to lend to able-bodied men. This contribution systematically introduces Harnischrödel of the 14th and 15th c. as important sources for the history of urban martial culture. On the basis of lists preserved in the archives of Swiss towns, ...

  1. Reflection From Hollow Armour Units / by Fritz Büsching. - COPEDEC V, Cape Town, South Africa, 19-23 April 1999

    OpenAIRE

    Büsching, Fritz

    1999-01-01

    Model investigations are carried out in using irregular and monochromatic waves synchronously acting on 2 sloping structures 1:n = 1:2 in order to demonstrate the advantages of a new designed structure composed from hollow armour units (“Hollow Cubes”) versus a conventional smooth sloping structure. The energy of the water level deflections in front of the hollow armour units piled up to form a stepped-face hollow seawall structure appears to be reduced by about -65% with refer-ence to a smoo...

  2. Radiant Floor Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries, hydronic radiant floor systems are widely used for heating all types of buildings such as residential, churches, gymnasiums, hospitals, hangars, storage buildings, industrial buildings, and smaller offices. However, few systems are used for cooling.This article describes a floor...... cooling system that includes such considerations as thermal comfort of the occupants, which design parameters will influence the cooling capacity and how the system should be controlled. Examples of applications are presented....

  3. The cooling of particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    A review is given of the various methods which can be employed for cooling particle beams. These methods include radiation damping, stimulated radiation damping, ionization cooling, stochastic cooling, electron cooling, laser cooling, and laser cooling with beam coupling. Laser Cooling has provided beams of the lowest temperatures, namely 1 mK, but only for ions and only for the longitudinal temperature. Recent theoretical work has suggested how laser cooling, with the coupling of beam motion, can be used to reduce the ion beam temperature in all three directions. The majority of this paper is devoted to describing laser cooling and laser cooling with beam coupling

  4. Turbine airfoil cooling system with cooling systems using high and low pressure cooling fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jan H.; Messmann, Stephen John; Scribner, Carmen Andrew

    2017-10-25

    A turbine airfoil cooling system including a low pressure cooling system and a high pressure cooling system for a turbine airfoil of a gas turbine engine is disclosed. In at least one embodiment, the low pressure cooling system may be an ambient air cooling system, and the high pressure cooling system may be a compressor bleed air cooling system. In at least one embodiment, the compressor bleed air cooling system in communication with a high pressure subsystem that may be a snubber cooling system positioned within a snubber. A delivery system including a movable air supply tube may be used to separate the low and high pressure cooling subsystems. The delivery system may enable high pressure cooling air to be passed to the snubber cooling system separate from low pressure cooling fluid supplied by the low pressure cooling system to other portions of the turbine airfoil cooling system.

  5. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Philip Albert; Lindberg, Frank A.; Garcen, Walter

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  6. Semioptimal practicable algorithmic cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2011-01-01

    Algorithmic cooling (AC) of spins applies entropy manipulation algorithms in open spin systems in order to cool spins far beyond Shannon's entropy bound. Algorithmic cooling of nuclear spins was demonstrated experimentally and may contribute to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Several cooling algorithms were suggested in recent years, including practicable algorithmic cooling (PAC) and exhaustive AC. Practicable algorithms have simple implementations, yet their level of cooling is far from optimal; exhaustive algorithms, on the other hand, cool much better, and some even reach (asymptotically) an optimal level of cooling, but they are not practicable. We introduce here semioptimal practicable AC (SOPAC), wherein a few cycles (typically two to six) are performed at each recursive level. Two classes of SOPAC algorithms are proposed and analyzed. Both attain cooling levels significantly better than PAC and are much more efficient than the exhaustive algorithms. These algorithms are shown to bridge the gap between PAC and exhaustive AC. In addition, we calculated the number of spins required by SOPAC in order to purify qubits for quantum computation. As few as 12 and 7 spins are required (in an ideal scenario) to yield a mildly pure spin (60% polarized) from initial polarizations of 1% and 10%, respectively. In the latter case, about five more spins are sufficient to produce a highly pure spin (99.99% polarized), which could be relevant for fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  7. Modelling and analysis of material removal rate and surface roughness in wire-cut EDM of armour materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindranadh Bobbili

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The current work presents a comparative study of wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM of armour materials such as aluminium alloy 7017 and rolled homogeneous armour (RHA steel using buckingham pi theorem to model the input variables and thermo-physical characteristics of WEDM on material removal rate (MRR and surface roughness (Ra of Al 7017 and RHA steel. The parameters of the model such as pulse-on time, flushing pressure, input power, thermal diffusivity and latent heat of vaporization have been determined through design of experiment methodology. Wear rate of brass wire increases with rise in input energy in machining Al 7017. The dependence of thermo-physical properties and machining variables on mechanism of MRR and Ra has been described by performing scanning electron microscope (SEM study. The rise in pulse-on time from 0.85μs to 1.25μs causes improvement in MRR and deterioration of surface finish. The machined surface has revealed that craters are found on the machined surface. The propensity of formation of craters increases during WEDM with a higher current and larger pulse-on time.

  8. Effect of welding processes and consumables on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade quenched and tempered steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Magudeeswaran

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quenched and Tempered (Q&T steels are widely used in the construction of military vehicles due to its high strength to weight ratio and high hardness. These steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC in the heat affected zone (HAZ after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q&T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic steel (LHF consumables can be used to weld Q&T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. The use of ASS and LHF consumables will lead to distinct microstructures in their respective welds. This microstructural heterogeneity will have a drastic influence in the fatigue crack growth resistance of armour grade Q&T steel welds. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade Q&T Steel joints. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW and Flux cored arc welding (FCAW were used for fabrication of joints using ASS and LHF consumables. The joints fabricated by SMAW process using LHF consumable exhibited superior fatigue crack growth resistance than all other joints.

  9. Influence of the vacuum resin process, on the ballistic behaviour of lightweight armouring solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, M.; Boussu, F.; Coutellier, D.; Vallee, D.

    2012-08-01

    The armour of vehicles against conventional threats is mainly composed with steel or aluminium panels. Efficient heavy solutions exist, but the involved industries require new lightweight structures. Moreover, unconventional threats as IEDs (Improvised Explosive Devices) may cause severe damages on these structural and protective panel solutions. Thus, combination of aluminium or steel plates with textile composite structures used as a backing, leads to the mass reduction and better performance under delamination behaviour against these new threats. This paper is a part of a study dealing with the impact behaviour of three warp interlocks weaving structures under Fragment Simulating Projectile (FSP) impact. During this research, several parameters has being studied as the influence of the yarns insertions [1-4], the degradation of the yarns during the weaving process [5-7], and the influence of the resin rate on the ballistic behaviour. The resin rate inside composite materials is dependant on the final application. In ballistic protection, we need to control the resin rate in order to have a deformable structure in order to absorb the maximum of energy. However, with the warp interlocks weaving structure, the yarns insertions induce empty spaces between the yarns where the resin takes place without being evacuated. The resin rate inside the warp interlocks structures is in the most of cases less than 50%, which lead to have brittle and hard material during the impact. Contrary to interlocks structures, the existing protection based on prepreg structure have a high fibres ratio around 88% of weight. That leads to have the best ballistic properties during the impact and good deformability of the structure. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the influence of the resin rate on the ballistic results of the composites materials. For that, we have chosen two kinds of warp interlocks fabrics which were infused with epoxy resin following two processes. The first is a

  10. Influence of the vacuum resin process, on the ballistic behaviour of lightweight armouring solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutellier D.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The armour of vehicles against conventional threats is mainly composed with steel or aluminium panels. Efficient heavy solutions exist, but the involved industries require new lightweight structures. Moreover, unconventional threats as IEDs (Improvised Explosive Devices may cause severe damages on these structural and protective panel solutions. Thus, combination of aluminium or steel plates with textile composite structures used as a backing, leads to the mass reduction and better performance under delamination behaviour against these new threats. This paper is a part of a study dealing with the impact behaviour of three warp interlocks weaving structures under Fragment Simulating Projectile (FSP impact. During this research, several parameters has being studied as the influence of the yarns insertions [1–4], the degradation of the yarns during the weaving process [5–7], and the influence of the resin rate on the ballistic behaviour. The resin rate inside composite materials is dependant on the final application. In ballistic protection, we need to control the resin rate in order to have a deformable structure in order to absorb the maximum of energy. However, with the warp interlocks weaving structure, the yarns insertions induce empty spaces between the yarns where the resin takes place without being evacuated. The resin rate inside the warp interlocks structures is in the most of cases less than 50%, which lead to have brittle and hard material during the impact. Contrary to interlocks structures, the existing protection based on prepreg structure have a high fibres ratio around 88% of weight. That leads to have the best ballistic properties during the impact and good deformability of the structure. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the influence of the resin rate on the ballistic results of the composites materials. For that, we have chosen two kinds of warp interlocks fabrics which were infused with epoxy resin following two

  11. Investigation of erosion mechanisms and erosion products in divertor armour materials under conditions relevant to elms and mitigated disruptions in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronov, V.M.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Klimov, N.S.; Kovalenko, D.V.; Moskaleva, A.A.; Podkovyrov, V.L.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.; Landman, I.S.; Poznyak, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon fibre composite (CFC) and tungsten were irradiated by intense plasma streams at plasma gun facilities MK-200UG and QSPA-T. The targets were tested by plasma loads relevant to Edge Localised Modes (ELM) and mitigated disruptions in ITER. Onset condition of material erosion and properties of erosion products have been studied

  12. Single-step brazing process for mono-block joints and mechanical testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casalegno, V.; Ferraris, M.; Salvo, M.; Rizzo, S.; Merola, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Plasma facing components act as actively cooled thermal shields to sustain thermal and particle loads during normal and transient operations in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The plasma-facing layer is referred to as 'armour', which is made of either carbon fibre reinforced carbon composite (CFC) or tungsten (W). CFC is the reference design solution for the lower part of the vertical target of the ITER divertor. The armour is joined onto an actively cooled substrate, the heat sink, made of precipitation hardened copper alloy CuCrZr through a thin pure copper interlayer to decrease, by plastic deformation, the joint interface stresses; in fact, the CFC to Cu joint is affected by the CTE mismatch between the ceramic and metallic material. A new method of joining CFC to copper and CFC/Cu to CuCrZr alloy was effectively developed for the flat-type configuration; the feasibility of this process also for mono-block geometry and the development of a procedure for testing mono-block-type mock-ups is described in this work. The mono-block configuration consists of copper alloy pipe shielded by CFC blocks. It is worth noting that in mono-block configuration, the large thermal expansion mismatch between CFC and copper alloy is more significant than for flat-tile configuration, due to curved interfaces. The joining technique foresees a single-step brazing process: the brazing of the three materials (CFC-Cu-CuCrZr) can be performed in a single heat treatment using the same Cu/Ge based braze. The composite surface was modified by solid state reaction with chromium with the purpose of increasing the wettability of CFC by the brazing alloy. The CFC substrate reacts with Cr which, forming a carbide layer, allows a large reduction of the contact angle; then, the brazing of CFC to pure copper and pure copper to CuCrZr by the same treatment is feasible. This process allows to obtain good joints using a non-active brazing

  13. Single-step brazing process for mono-block joints and mechanical testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casalegno, V.; Ferraris, M.; Salvo, M.; Rizzo, S. [Politecnico di Torino, Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Dept., Torino (Italy); Merola, M. [ITER International Team, llER Joint Work Site, Cadarache, 13 - St Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Plasma facing components act as actively cooled thermal shields to sustain thermal and particle loads during normal and transient operations in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The plasma-facing layer is referred to as 'armour', which is made of either carbon fibre reinforced carbon composite (CFC) or tungsten (W). CFC is the reference design solution for the lower part of the vertical target of the ITER divertor. The armour is joined onto an actively cooled substrate, the heat sink, made of precipitation hardened copper alloy CuCrZr through a thin pure copper interlayer to decrease, by plastic deformation, the joint interface stresses; in fact, the CFC to Cu joint is affected by the CTE mismatch between the ceramic and metallic material. A new method of joining CFC to copper and CFC/Cu to CuCrZr alloy was effectively developed for the flat-type configuration; the feasibility of this process also for mono-block geometry and the development of a procedure for testing mono-block-type mock-ups is described in this work. The mono-block configuration consists of copper alloy pipe shielded by CFC blocks. It is worth noting that in mono-block configuration, the large thermal expansion mismatch between CFC and copper alloy is more significant than for flat-tile configuration, due to curved interfaces. The joining technique foresees a single-step brazing process: the brazing of the three materials (CFC-Cu-CuCrZr) can be performed in a single heat treatment using the same Cu/Ge based braze. The composite surface was modified by solid state reaction with chromium with the purpose of increasing the wettability of CFC by the brazing alloy. The CFC substrate reacts with Cr which, forming a carbide layer, allows a large reduction of the contact angle; then, the brazing of CFC to pure copper and pure copper to CuCrZr by the same treatment is feasible. This process allows to obtain good joints using a non

  14. Actively cooled plasma facing components qualification, commissioning and health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escourbiac, F.; Durocher, A.; Grosman, A.; Courtois, X.; Farjon, J.-L.; Schlosser, J.; Merola, M.; Tivey, R.

    2006-01-01

    In modern steady state magnetic fusion devices, actively cooled plasma facing components (PFC) have to handle heat fluxes in the range of 10-20 MW/m 2 . This generates a number of engineering constraints: the armour materials must be refractory and compatible with plasma wall interaction requirements (low sputtering and/or low atomic number); the heat sink must offer high thermal conductivity, high mechanical resistance and sufficient ductility; the component cooling system -which is generally based on the circulation of pressurized water in the PFC's heat sink - must offer high thermal heat transfer efficiency. Furthermore, the assembling of the refractory armour material onto the metallic heat sink causes generic difficulties strongly depending on thermo-mechanical properties of materials and design requirements. Life time of the PFC during plasma operation are linked to their manufacturing quality, in particular they are reduced by the possible presence of flaw assembling. The fabrication of PFC in an industrial frame including their qualification and their commissioning - which consists in checking the manufacturing quality during and at the end of manufacture - is a real challenge. From experience gained at Tore Supra on carbon fibre composite flat tiles technology components, it was assessed that a set of qualifications activities must be operated during R(and)D and manufacturing phases. Dedicated Non Destructive Technique (NDT) based on advanced active infrared thermography was developed for this purpose, afterwards, correlations between NDT, high heat flux testing and thermomechanical modelling were performed to analyse damage detection and propagation, and define an acceptance criteria valuable for industrial application. Health monitoring using lock-in technique was also recently operated in-situ of the Tore Supra tokamak for detection of possible defect propagation during operations, presence of acoustic precursor for critical heat flux detection induced

  15. Cooling of electronic equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Kristensen, Anders Schmidt

    2003-01-01

    Cooling of electronic equipment is studied. The design size of electronic equipment decrease causing the thermal density to increase. This affect the cooling which can cause for example failures of critical components due to overheating or thermal induced stresses. Initially a pin fin heat sink...

  16. Solar absorption cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    As the world concerns more and more on global climate changes and depleting energy resources, solar cooling technology receives increasing interests from the public as an environment-friendly and sustainable alternative. However, making a competitive solar cooling machine for the market still

  17. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakilian, M.

    1977-05-01

    The present study is the second part of a general survey of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs). In this part, the course of development, overall performance and present development status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTCRs) and advances of HTGR systems are reviewed. (author)

  18. Coherent electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-05-04

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams remains a major challenge in modern accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation is still too feeble, while the efficiency of two other cooling methods, stochastic and electron, falls rapidly either at high bunch intensities (i.e. stochastic of protons) or at high energies (e-cooling). In this talk a specific scheme of a unique cooling technique, Coherent Electron Cooling, will be discussed. The idea of coherent electron cooling using electron beam instabilities was suggested by Derbenev in the early 1980s, but the scheme presented in this talk, with cooling times under an hour for 7 TeV protons in the LHC, would be possible only with present-day accelerator technology. This talk will discuss the principles and the main limitations of the Coherent Electron Cooling process. The talk will describe the main system components, based on a high-gain free electron laser driven by an energy recovery linac, and will present some numerical examples for ions and protons in RHIC and the LHC and for electron-hadron options for these colliders. BNL plans a demonstration of the idea in the near future.

  19. The final cool down

    CERN Multimedia

    Thursday 29th May, the cool-down of the final sector (sector 4-5) of LHC has begun, one week after the start of the cool-down of sector 1-2. It will take five weeks for the sectors to be cooled from room temperature to 5 K and a further two weeks to complete the cool down to 1.9 K and the commissioning of cryogenic instrumentation, as well as to fine tune the cryogenic plants and the cooling loops of cryostats.Nearly a year and half has passed since sector 7-8 was cooled for the first time in January 2007. For Laurent Tavian, AT/CRG Group Leader, reaching the final phase of the cool down is an important milestone, confirming the basic design of the cryogenic system and the ability to operate complete sectors. “All the sectors have to operate at the same time otherwise we cannot inject the beam into the machine. The stability and reliability of the cryogenic system and its utilities are now very important. That will be the new challenge for the coming months,” he explains. The status of the cool down of ...

  20. Reactor core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To safely and effectively cool down the reactor core after it has been shut down but is still hot due to after-heat. Constitution: Since the coolant extraction nozzle is situated at a location higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the coolant sprayed from the nozzle, is free from sucking immediately from the extraction nozzle and is therefore used effectively to cool the reactor core. As all the portions from the top to the bottom of the reactor are cooled simultaneously, the efficiency of the reactor cooling process is increased. Since the coolant extraction nozzle can be installed at a point considerably higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the distance from the coolant surface to the point of the coolant extraction nozzle can be made large, preventing cavitation near the coolant extraction nozzle. Therefore, without increasing the capacity of the heat exchanger, the reactor can be cooled down after a shutdown safely and efficiently. (Kawakami, Y.)