WorldWideScience

Sample records for coolants nuclear reactors

  1. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor coolant channel is described that is suitable for sub-cooled reactors as in pressurised water reactors as well as for bulk boiling, as in boiling water reactors and steam generating nuclear reactors. The arrangement aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel elements and the coolant. Full constructional details are given. See also other similar patents by the author. (U.K.)

  2. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to coolant channels for pressurised water and boiling water reactors and the arrangement described aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel rods and the coolant. Baffle means extending axially within the channel are provided and disposed relative to the fuel rods so as to restrict flow oscillations occurring within the coolant from being propagated transversely to the axis of the channel. (UK)

  3. Nuclear reactor coolant and cover gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.A.; Redding, A.H.; Tower, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    A core cooling system is disclosed for a nuclear reactor of the type utilizing a liquid coolant with a cover gas above free surfaces of the coolant. The disclosed system provides for a large inventory of reactor coolant and a balanced low pressure cover gas arrangement. A flow restricting device disposed within a reactor vessel achieves a pressure of the cover gas in the reactor vessel lower than the pressure of the reactor coolant in the vessel. The low gas pressure is maintained over all free surfaces of the coolant in the cooling system including a coolant reservoir tank. Reactor coolant stored in the reservoir tank allows for the large reactor coolant inventory provided by the invention

  4. Reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.; Richter, G.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement is proposed concerning the easier disengagement of the coupling at the reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor transporting a pressurized coolant. According to the invention the disengaging coupling consists of two parts separated by screws. At least one of the screws contains a propellent charge ananged within a bore and provided with a speed-dependent ignition device in such a way that by separation of the screws at overspeeds the coupling is disengaged. The sub-claims are concerned with the kind of ignition ot the propellent charge. (UWI) [de

  5. Selection of nuclear reactor coolant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Lisheng; Wang Bairong

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear material is nuclear material or materials used in nuclear industry, the general term, it is the material basis for the construction of nuclear power, but also a leader in nuclear energy development, the two interdependent and mutually reinforcing. At the same time, nuclear materials research, development and application of the depth and breadth of science and technology reflects a nation and the level of the nuclear power industry. Coolant also known as heat-carrier agent, is an important part of the heart nuclear reactor, its role is to secure as much as possible to the economic output in the form fission energy to heat the reactor to be used: the same time cooling the core, is controlled by the various structural components allowable temperature. This paper described the definition of nuclear reactor coolant and characteristics, and then addressed the requirements of the coolant material, and finally were introduced several useful properties of the coolant and chemical control. (authors)

  6. Coolant clean up system in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Fumio; Iwami, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the amount of main steams and improve the plant heat efficiency by the use of condensated water as coolants for not-regenerative heat exchangers in a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: In a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor, a portion of condensates is transferred to the shell of a non-regenerative heat exchanger by way of a condensate pump for non-regenerative heat exchanger through a branched pipeway provided to the outlet of a condensate desalter for using the condensates as the coolants for the shell of the heat exchanger and the condensates are then returned to the inlet of a feedwater heater after the heat exchange. The branched flow rate of the condensates is controlled by the flow rate control valve mounted in the pipeway. Condensates passed through the heat exchanger and the condensates not passed through the heat exchanger are mixed and heated in a heater and then fed to the nuclear reactor. In a case where no feedwater is necessary to the nuclear reactor such as upon shutdown of the reactor, the condensates are returned by way of feedwater bypass pipeway to the condensator. By the use of the condensates as the coolants for the heat exchanger, the main steam loss can be decreased and the thermal load for the auxiliary coolant facility can be reduced. (Kawakami, Y.)

  7. Coolant cleanup method in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Masayoshi; Nishimura, Shigeoki; Takahashi, Sankichi; Izumi, Kenkichi; Motojima, Kenji.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose : To effectively adsorb to remove low molecular weight organic substances from iron exchange resins for use in the removal of various radioactive nucleides contained in reactor coolants. Method : Reactor coolants are recycled by a main recyling pump in a nuclear reactor and a portion of the coolants is cooled and, thereafter, purified in a coolant desalter. While on the other hand, high pressure steams generated from the reactor are passed through a turbine, cooled in a condensator, eliminated with claddings or the likes by the passage through a filtration desalter using powderous ion exchange resins and then further passed through a desalter (filled with granular ion exchange resins). For instance, an adsorption and removing device for organic substances (resulted through the decomposition of ion exchange resins) precoated with activated carbon powder or filled with granular activated carbon is disposed at the downstream for each of the desalters. In this way, the organic substances in the coolants are eliminated to prevent the reduction in the desalting performance of the ion exchange resins caused by the formation of complexes between organic substances and cobalt in the coolants, etc. In this way, the coolant cleanup performance is increased and the amount of wasted ion exchange resins can be decreased. (Horiuchi, T.)

  8. Requirements of coolants in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abass, O. A. M.

    2014-11-01

    This study discussed the purposes and types of coolants in nuclear reactors to generate electricity. The major systems and components associated with nuclear reactors are cooling system. There are two major cooling systems utilized to convert the heat generated in the fuel into electrical power. The primary system transfers the heat from the fuel to the steam generator, where the secondary system begins. The steam formed in the steam generator is transferred by the secondary system to the main turbine generator, where it s converted into electricity after passing through the low pressure turbine. There are various coolants used in nuclear reactors-light water, heavy water and liquid metal. The two major types of water-cooled reactors are pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR) but pressurized water reactors are more in the world. Also discusses this study the reactors and impact of the major nuclear accidents, in the April 1986 disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine was the product operators, and in the March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan was the product of earthquake of magnitude 9.0, the accidents caused the largest uncontrolled radioactive release into the environment.(Author)

  9. Reactor coolant pumps for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harand, E.; Richter, G.; Tschoepel, G.

    1975-01-01

    A brake for the pump rotor of a main coolant pump or a shutoff member on the pump are provided in order to prevent excess speeds of the pump rotor. Such excess speeds may occur in PWR type reactors with water at a pressure below, e.g., 150 bars if there is leakage from a coolant line associated with the main coolant pump. As a brake, a centrifugal brake depending upon the pump speed or a brake ring arranged on the pump housing and acting on the pump rotor, which ring would be activated by pressure differentials in the pump, may be used. If the pressure differences between suction and pressure sockets are very small, a controlled hydraulic increase of the pressure force on the brake may also be provided. Furthermore, a turbine brake may be provided. A slide which is automatically movable in closing position along the pump rotor axis is used as a shutoff element. It is of cylindrical configuration and is arranged concentrically with the rotor axis. (DG) [de

  10. Coolant inlet device for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Hiroshi; Abe, Yasuhiro; Iwabuchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji.

    1969-01-01

    Herein disclosed is a coolant inlet device for liquid-metal cooled reactors which employs a coolant distributor serving also as a supporting means for the reactor core. The distributor is mounted within the reactor vessel so as to slide horizontally on supporting lugs, and is further slidably connected via a junction pipe to a coolant inlet conduit protruding through the floor of the vessel. The distributor is adapted to uniformly disperse the highly pressured coolant over the reactor core so as to reduce the stresses sustained by the reactor vessel as well as the supporting lugs. Moreover, the slidable nature of the distributor allows thermal shock and excessive coolant pressures to be prevented or alleviated, factors which posed major difficulties in conventional coolant inlet devices. (Owens, K. J.)

  11. Coolant processing device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizawa, Hideo; Funakoshi, Toshio; Izumoji, Yoshiaki

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce an entire facility cost by concentrating and isolating tritium accumulated in coolants, removing the tritium out of the system, and returning hydrogen gas generated at a reactor accident to a recombiner in a closed loop by the switching of a valve. Constitution: Coolant from a reactor cooling system processed by a chemical volume control system facility (CVCS) and coolant drain from various devices processed by a liquid waste disposing system facility (LWDS) are fed to a tritium isolating facility, in which they are isolated into concentrated tritium water and dilute tritium water. The concentrated tritium water is removed out of the system and stored. The dilute tritium water is reused as supply water for coolant. If an accident occurs to cause hydrogen to be generated, a closed loop is formed between the containment vessel and the recombiner, the hydrogen is recombined with oxygen in the air of the closed loop to be thus returned to water. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Nuclear reactor of pressurized liquid coolant type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, D.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor comprises a vertical concrete pressure vessel, a bell-housing having an open lower end and disposed coaxially with the interior of the pressure vessel so as to delimit therewith a space filled with gas under pressure for the thermal insulation of the internal vessel wall, a pressurizing device for putting the coolant under pressure within the bell-housing and comprising a volume of control gas in contact with a large free surface of coolant in order that an appreciable variation in volume of liquid displaced within the coolant circuit inside the bell-housing should correspond to a small variation in pressure of the control gas. 9 claims, 3 drawing figures

  13. Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Ernest

    1986-01-01

    A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

  14. Steam generator for a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, H.J.; Berger, W.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a steam generator which has a vertical cylindrical housing having a steam output outlet, a horizontal tube sheet closing the lower end of this housing, and an inverted U-shaped tube bundle inside of the housing and having vertical inlet and outlet legs with their ends mounted in the tube sheet. Beneath the tube sheet there are inlet and outlet manifolds for the respective ends of the tube bundle so that pressurized-water coolant from a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor can be circulated through the tube bundle

  15. Coolant cleaning facility for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuboniwa, Takao; Konno, Yasuhiro; Kumaya, Shin; Osumi, Katsumi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To remove cation of radioactive cobalt 60 produced in a reactor water during the ordinary operation of the reactor and chlorine when sea water is leaked in a condenser as well as to suppress an increase in iron clad containing radioactive cobalt 60 in the reactor water when the reactor is stopped. Constitution: A large flow rate high temperature cleaning system having an electromagnetic filter capable of removing radioactive substance in a reactor water, a low temperature cleaning system having a desalting unit using ion exchanger resin, a turbidity meter for measuring the turbidity of the reactor water and a conductivity meter for measuring the conductivity are provided. Further, flow rate control means are provided in the high and low temperature cleaning systems. The flow rate control means of the high temperature cleaning system is controlled by a measured signal of the turbidity meter, and the flow rete control means of the low temperature cleaning system is controlled by the measured signal of the conductivity meter. (Aizawa, K.)

  16. Physical properties of organic nuclear reactor coolants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elberg, S.; Friz, G.

    1963-03-15

    Diphenyl and terphenyls with different high-boiler content were studied up to temperatures of 450 deg C. Data from high boiler reactors show viscosity (strong influence), thermal conductivity (medium influence), density and specific heat (small influence). The vapor pressure is rn the most affected property (important influence of low boilers). Also viscosity shows an effect. Some data for pure highboilers are also presented. New results were obtained with direct measurements of the latent heat ot vaporization. (P.C.H.)

  17. Coolant cleanup system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Atsushi; Usui, Naoshi; Yamamoto, Michiyoshi; Osumi, Katsumi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the electric conductivity of reactor water lower and to minimize the heat loss in the cleanup system by providing a low temperature cleanup system and a high temperature cleanup system together. Constitution: A low temperature cleanup system using ion exchange resins as filter aids and a high temperature cleanup system using inorganic ion exchange materials as filter aids are provided in combination. A part of the reactor water in a reactor pressure vessel is passed through a conductivity meter, one portion of which flows into the high temperature cleanup system having no heat exchanger and filled with inorganic ion exchange materials by way of a first flow rate control valve and the other portion of which flows into the low temperature cleanup system having heat exchangers and filled with the ion exchange materials by way of a second control valve. The first control valve is adjusted so as to flow, for example, about more than 15% of the feedwater flow rate to the high temperature cleanup system and the second control valve is adjusted with its valve opening degree depending on the indication of the conductivity meter so as to flow about 2 - 7 % of the feedwater flow rate into the low temperature cleanup system, to thereby control the electric conductivity to between 0.055 - 0.3 μS/cm. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. Analysis of Coolant Options for Advanced Metal Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Can, Levent

    2006-01-01

    .... The overall focus of this study is the build up of induced radioactivity in the coolant of metal cooled reactors as well as the evaluation of other physical and chemical properties of such coolants...

  19. Coolant clean-up system in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuburaya, Hirobumi; Akita, Minoru; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Okura, Minoru; Tsuji, Akio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To ensure a sufficient urging pressure at the inlet of a coolant clean-up system pump in a nuclear reactor and eliminate radioactive contaminations to the pump. Constitution: Coolant clean-up system (CUW) pump in a nuclear reactor is disposed to the downstream of a filtration desalter and, for compensating the insufficiency of the urging pressure at the pump inlet, the reactor water intake port to the clean-up system is disposed to the downstream of the after-heat removing pump and the heat exchanger. By compensating the net positive suction head (NPSH) of the clean-up system from the residual heat removing system, the problems of insufficient NPSH for the CUW pump upon reactor shut-down can be dissolved and, accordingly, the reactor clean-up system can be arranged in the order of the heat exchanger, clean-up device and pump. Thus, the CUW pump acts on reactor water after cleaned-up in the clean-up device to reduce the radioactivity contamination to the pump. (Kawakami, Y.)

  20. Coolant clean-up system in the primary coolant circuit for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Michio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the quality of coolants at a prescribed level by distillating coolants in the primary coolant circuit for a BWR type reactor to remove impurities therefrom, taking out the condensates from the top of the distillation column and extracting impurities in a concentrated state from the bottom. Constitution: Coolant water for cooling the core is recycled by a recycling pump by way of a recycling pipeway in a reactor. The coolants extracted from an extraction pipeway connected to the recycling pipeway are fed into a distillation column, where distillation is taken place. Impurities in the coolants, that is, in-core corrosion products, fission products generated in the reactor core, etc. are separated by the distillation, concentrated and solidified in the bottom of the distillation column. While on the other hand, condensates removed with the impurities, that is, coolants cleaned-up are recycled to the coolant water for cooling the reactor core. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. Pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, H.; Schroder, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor steam generator having a vertical housing for the steam generating water and containing an upstanding heat exchanger to which the pressurized-water coolant passes and which is radially surrounded by a guide jacket supporting a water separator on its top. By thermosiphon action the steam generating water flows upward through and around the heat exchanger within the guide chamber to the latter's top from which it flows radially outwardly and downwardly through a down draft space formed between the outside of the jacket and the housing. The water separator discharges separated water downwardly. The housing has a feedwater inlet opening adjacent to the lower portion of the heat exchanger, providing preheating of the introduced feedwater. This preheated feedwater is conveyed by a duct upwardly to a location where it mixes with the water discharged from the water separator

  2. Sound velocity in the coolant of boiling nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakov, K.N.; Parshin, D.A.; Novikov, K.S.; Galivec, E.Yu.

    2009-01-01

    To prevent resonant interaction between acoustic resonance and natural frequencies of FE, FA and RI oscillations, it is necessary to determine the value of EACPO. Based on results of calculations of EACPO and natural frequencies of FR, FA and RI oscillations values, it would be possible to reveal the dynamical loadings on metal that are dangerous for the initiation of cracking process in the early stage of negative condition appearance. To calculate EACPO it is necessary to know the Speed Velocity in Coolant. Now we do not have any data about real values of such important parameter as pressure pulsations propagation velocity in two phase environments, especially in conditions with variations of steam content along the length of FR, with taking into account the type of local resistances, flow geometry etc. While areas of resonant interaction of the single-phase liquid coolant with equipment and internals vibrations are estimated well enough, similar estimations in the conditions of presence of a gas and steam phase in the liquid coolant are inconvenient till now. Paper presents results of calculation of velocity of pressure pulsations distribution in two-phase flow formed in core of RBMK-1000 reactors. Feature of the developed techniques is that not only thermodynamic factors and effect of a speed difference between water and steam in a two phase flow but also geometrical features of core, local resistance, non heterogeneity in the two phase environment and power level of a reactor are considered. Obtained results evidence noticeable decreasing of velocity propagation of pressure pulsations in the presence of steam actions in the liquids. Such estimations for real RC of boiling nuclear reactors with steam-liquid coolant are obtained for the first time. (author)

  3. Fatigue check of nuclear safety class 1 reactor coolant pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qing; Fang Yonggang; Chu Qibao; Xu Yu; Li Hailong

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue and thermal ratcheting analyses of nuclear safety Class 1 reactor coolant pipe in a nuclear power plant were independently carried out in this paper. The software used for calculation is ROCOCO, which is based on RCC-M code. The difference of nuclear safety Class 1 pipe fatigue evaluation between RCC-M code and ASME code was compared. The main aspects of comparison include the calculation scoping of fatigue design, the calculation method of primary plus secondary stress intensity, the elastic-plastic correction coefficient calculation, and the dynamic load combination method etc. By correcting inconsistent algorithm of ASME code within ROCOCO, the fatigue usage factor and thermal ratcheting design margin of 65 mm and 55 mm wall thickness of the pipe were obtained. The results show that the minimum wall thickness of the pipe must exceed 55 mm and the design value of the thermal ratcheting of 55 mm wall thickness reaches 95% of the allowable value. (authors)

  4. Use of Russian technology of ship reactors with lead-bismuth coolant in nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrodnikov, A.V.; Chitaykin, V.I.; Gromov, B.F.; Grigoryv, O.G.; Dedoul, A.V.; Toshinsky, G.I.; Dragunov, Yu.G.; Stepanov, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    The experience of using lead-bismuth coolant in Russian nuclear submarine reactors has been presented. The fundamental statements of the concept of using the reactors cooled by lead-bismuth alloy in nuclear power have been substantiated. The results of developments for using lead bismuth coolant in nuclear power have been presented. (author)

  5. Measurement of delayed neutron-emitting fission products in nuclear reactor coolant water during reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The method covers the detection and measurement of delayed neutron-emitting fission products contained in nuclear reactor coolant water while the reactor is operating. The method is limited to the measurement of the delayed neutron-emitting bromine isotope of mass 87 and the delayed neutron-emitting iodine isotope of mass 137. The other delayed neutron-emitting fission products cannot be accurately distinguished from nitrogen 17, which is formed under some reactor conditions by neutron irradiation of the coolant water molecules. The method includes a description of significance, measurement variables, interferences, apparatus, sampling, calibration, standardization, sample measurement procedures, system efficiency determination, calculations, and precision

  6. Reactor coolant and associated systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Guide outlines the design requirements for the reactor coolant and associated systems (RCAS) and the features required in order to achieve their safety functions. It covers design considerations for various reactor types and encompasses the safety aspects of the functions of the RCAS both during normal operation and following postulated initiating events, and to some extent also for decommissioning

  7. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of nuclear reactor primary coolant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffell, B.F. Jr.; Macek, R.W.; Thompson, T.R.; Lippert, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    The ADINA computer code is utilized to perform mechanical response analysis of pressurized reactor primary coolant systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) loadings. Specifically, three plant analyses are performed utilizing the geometric and material nonlinear analysis capabilities of ADINA. Each reactor system finite element model represents the reactor vessel and internals, piping, major components, and component supports in a single coupled model. Material and geometric nonlinear capabilities of the beam and truss elements are employed in the formulation of each finite element model. Loadings applied to each plant for LOCA dynamic analysis include steady-state pressure, dead weight, strain energy release, transient piping hydraulic forces, and reactor vessel cavity pressurization. Representative results are presented with some suggestions for consideration in future ADINA code development

  8. Technological status of reactor coolant pumps in generation III+ pressurized nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, Bernhard; Bross, Stephan [KSB Aktiengesellschaft, Frankenthal (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    KSB has been developing and producing pumps for thermal power plants for nearly 90 years. Consequently, KSB also started to develop and manufacture pumps for all kinds of nuclear power plants from the very beginning of the civil use of nuclear energy. This is especially true for reactor coolant pumps for pressurized water reactors. For the generation of advanced evolutionary reactors (Generation III+ reactors), KSB developed an advanced shaft seal system which is also able to fulfill the requirements of station blackout conditions. The tests in the KSB test rigs, which were successfully completed in December 2015, proved the full functionality of the new design. For generation III+ passive plant reactors KSB developed a new reactor coolant pump type called RUV, which is based on the experience of classic reactor coolant pumps and reactor internal pumps. It is a very compact, hermetically sealed vertical pump-motor unit with a wet winding motor. A full scale prototype successfully passed the 1st stage qualification test program in October 2015.

  9. Improvements to secondary coolant circuits of a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachet, Alain.

    1981-01-01

    This invention concerns improvements to secondary coolant-systems for sodium cooled nuclear reactors. It further concerns a protective device for a free level mechanical pump which prevents any gas bubbles due to leaks of the working gas of the pump from entering the secondary system of the nuclear reactor [fr

  10. Ageing of coolant channels in nuclear reactors (PHWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, T.L.; Chowdhury, M.K.; Gupta, R.K.; Pandarinathan, P.R.; Seth, V.K.

    1994-01-01

    In PHWRs, ageing of various components takes place due to factors like fast neutron flux, temperature, stress, environment etc. In coolant channel, the most severely affected component due to ageing is pressure tube, though other components like end fitting, calandria tube, garter spring spacer also show ageing to a limited extent. Ageing effects in pressure tube are seen in the form of diametral and axial creep, corrosion, delayed hydrogen cracking and irradiation hardening. In calandria tube and garter spring spacer, creep and hardening are seen though these are not of concern in PHWRs. In end fitting, irradiation embrittlement and abrasion of sealing faces are the areas of concern. Ageing process in these components are the areas of concern. Ageing process in these components are effectively retarded by taking measures like selection of proper material, manufacturing process, control of environmental chemistry, and design modifications. Experience and information gained in various Indian and foreign reactors have been used to improve upon the design in 220 MWe reactors and have formed the basis of design for 500 MWe reactors. (author). 3 refs., 5 figs

  11. Method of suppressing the deposition of Co-60 to primary coolant pipeways in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Michio; Tachikawa, Enzo; Goto, Satoshi; Sagawa, Chiaki; Yonezawa, Chushiro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the deposition of Co-60 to primary coolant pipeways in a nuclear reactor. Method: To reduce the accumulation of Co-60 by causing chemical species of extremely similar chemical property with soluble Co-60 to be present together in coolants and replacing the deposition of Co-60 to the primary coolant pipeways in a nuclear reactor with that of the coexistent chemical spacies. Ni or Zn is used as the coexistet chemical spacies of similar chemical property with Co-60. The coexistent amount is from 5 to 10 times of the soluble Co-60 in the primary coolants. Ni or Zn solution adjusted with concentration is poured into and mixed with the coolants from a water feed source by using a high pressure constant volume pump. The amount of Co-60 taken into the pipeways caused by corrosion due to high temperature coolant is reduced to about 1/5 as compared with the case of Co-60 alone if 1 ppb of soluble Co-60 is present in water and 5 ppb of soluble Ni or Zn is added and, reduced to 1/12 if the amount of Ni or Zn is 10 ppb. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Two-phase coolant pump model of pressurized light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.A. dos; Freitas, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase coolant pump model of pressurized light water nuclear reactors is an important point for the loss of primary coolant accident analysis. The homologous curves set up the complete performance of the pump and are input for accidents analysis thermal-hydraulic codes. This work propose a mathematical model able to predict the two-phase homologous curves where it was incorporated geometric and operational pump condition. The results were compared with the experimental tests data from literature and it has showed a good agreement. (author)

  13. Apparatus for controlling coolant level in a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor which has a thermal liner spaced inwardly of the pressure vessel and includes means for passing bypass coolant through the annulus between the thermal liner and the pressure vessel to insulate the pressure vessel from hot outlet coolant includes control ports in the thermal liner a short distance below the normal operating coolant level in the reactor and an overflow nozzle in the pressure vessel below the control ports connected to an overflow line including a portion at an elevation such that overflow coolant flow is established when the coolant level in the reactor is above the top of the coolant ports. When no makeup coolant is added, bypass flow is inwardly through the control ports and there is no overflow; when makeup coolant is being added, coolant flow through the overflow line will maintain the coolant level.

  14. Apparatus for controlling coolant level in a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor which has a thermal liner spaced inwardly of the pressure vessel and includes means for passing bypass coolant through the annulus between the thermal liner and the pressure vessel to insulate the pressure vessel from hot outlet coolant includes control ports in the thermal liner a short distance below the normal operating coolant level in the reactor and an overflow nozzle in the pressure vessel below the control ports connected to an overflow line including a portion at an elevation such that overflow coolant flow is established when the coolant level in the reactor is above the top of the coolant ports. When no makeup coolant is added, bypass flow is inwardly through the control ports and there is no overflow; when makeup coolant is being added, coolant flow through the overflow line will maintain the coolant level

  15. Spectrographic determination of metallic impurities in organic coolants for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Munoz, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, F.

    1969-01-01

    A spectrochemical method for determining metallic impurities in organic coolants for nuclear reactors is given. The organic matter in solid samples is eliminated by controlled distillation and dry ashing in the presence of magnesium oxide as carrier. Liquid, samples are vacuum distillated. The residue is analyzed by carrier distillation and by total burning techniques. The analytical results are discussed and compared with those obtained destroying the organic matter without carrier and using the copper spark technique. (Author) 12 refs

  16. Behaviour of a pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant during loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.; Carl, H.; Kubis, K.

    1979-01-01

    Starting from the foundation of the design basis accident in a PWR-type nuclear power plant - Loss of Coolant Accident -the actual status of the processes to be expected in the reactor are described. Operating behaviour of the heat removal system and efficiency of the safety systems are evaluated. Final considerations are concerned with the overall behaviour of the plant under such conditions. Probable failures, shut down times and possibilities of repair are estimated. (author)

  17. Automatic welding processes for reactor coolant pipes used in PWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, T.; Nakamura, A.; Nagura, Y.; Sakamoto, N.

    1979-01-01

    The authors developed automatic welding processes (submerged arc welding process and TIG welding process) for application to the welding of reactor coolant pipes which constitute the most important part of the PWR type nuclear power plant. Submerged arc welding process is suitable for flat position welding in which pipes can be rotated, while TIG welding process is suitable for all position welding. This paper gives an outline of the two processes and the results of tests performed using these processes. (author)

  18. Design of the reactor coolant system and associated systems in nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for establishing safety standards for nuclear power plants. The basic requirements for the design of safety systems for nuclear power plants are established in the Safety Requirements publication, Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-1 on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, which it supplements. This Safety Guide describes how the requirements for the design of the reactor coolant system (RCS) and associated systems in nuclear power plants should be met. 1.2. This publication is a revision and combination of two previous Safety Guides, Safety Series No. 50-SG-D6 on Ultimate Heat Sink and Directly Associated Heat Transport Systems for Nuclear Power Plants (1981), and Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13 on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (1986), which are superseded by this new Safety Guide. 1.3. The revision takes account of developments in the design of the RCS and associated systems in nuclear power plants since the earlier Safety Guides were published in 1981 and 1986, respectively. The other objectives of the revision are to ensure consistency with Ref., issued in 2000, and to update the technical content. In addition, an appendix on pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) has been included

  19. Transient flow characteristics of nuclear reactor coolant pump in recessive cavitation transition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiuli; Yuan Shouqi; Zhu Rongsheng; Yu Zhijun

    2013-01-01

    The numerical simulation calculation of the transient flow characteristics of nuclear reactor coolant pump in the recessive cavitation transition process in the nuclear reactor coolant pump impeller passage is conducted by CFX, and the transient flow characteristics of nuclear reactor coolant pump in the transition process from reducing the inlet pressure at cavitation-born conditions to NPSHc condition is studied and analyzed. The flow field analysis shows that, in the recessive cavitation transition process, the speed diversification at the inlet is relative to the bubble increasing, and makes the speed near the blade entrance increase when the bubble phase region becomes larger. The bubble generation and collapse will affect the the speed fluctuation near the entrance. The vorticity close to the blade entrance gradually increasing is influenced by the bubble phase, and the collapse of bubble generated by cavitation will reduce the vorticity from the collapse to impeller outlet. Pump asymmetric structure causes the asymmetry of the flow, velocity and outlet pressure distribution within every impeller flow passage, which cause the asymmetry of the transient radial force. From the dimensionless t/T = 0.6, the bubble phase starts to have impact on the impeller transient radial force, and results in the irregular fluctuations. (authors)

  20. Some experimental justifications of constructions of nuclear reactors with the use of solid coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniskin, V.; Nalivaev, V.; Fedik, I.; Vishnevski, U.; Dmitriev, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The work that has been conducted so far justifies a possibility of constructing a reactor with a non-traditional coolant to develop radically new reactors and their cycles with perfect architecture. A solid coolant, for example, the carbon-based one, allows to design the primary circuit of nuclear reactor without excess pressure. Such coolant withstands temperatures up to ∼4000 deg. K without a collapse. The analysis of theory and experiments produced requirements to be met by a solid coolant used in the primary circuit of nuclear reactor. One of the most important requirements is the arrangements for a continuous and homogeneous gravity flow of the coolant through all core sections taking into account the dust caused by wear and some amount of fractured particles. Therefore, the idea is that the mass of particles should resemble a liquid to a certain extend. The particles should be sphere like with average diameter from 0.5 to 2.0 mm and nonsphericity rate not more than 10%. 'Angle of repose' of particles to the horizon can be utilised as a validity criterion of particles which should not exceed 25 deg. The heat transfer coefficient should be increased up to the practical maximum value. In 1996 - 1997 the system of experimental facilities were built in the Scientific and Research Institute 'Luch' to prove the possibility to reliably cool a nuclear reactor with a flow of solid particles and to obtain a minimum set of data for the conceptual design of such reactor with solid coolant. The facility allows the research of the flow stability, heat mass transfer in the core, lifetime wearing of particles of the solid coolant. In 1994-1999 5 batches of particles of different size were fabricated in accordance to different technologies. Four batches were graphite-based and one was aluminium oxide-based (Al 2 O 3 ). The purpose was to verify how the heat transfer coefficient was changing as the particle size varied. The average diameter of graphite particles

  1. Sodium as a reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, S.B.G.

    1989-01-01

    This work is related to the use of sodium as a reactor coolant, to the advantages and problems related to its use, its mechanical, thermophysics, eletronical, magnetic and nuclear properties. It is mainly a bibliographic review, with the aim of gathering the necessary information to persons initiating in the study of sodium and also as reference source. (author) [pt

  2. Vertical reactor coolant pump instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation conducted at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant to determine and correct increasing vibrations in the vertical reactor coolant pumps is described. Diagnostic procedures to determine the vibration causes and evaluate the corractive measures taken are also described

  3. Integral nuclear power reactor with natural coolant circulation. Investigation of passive RHR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samoilov, O.B.; Kuul, V.S.; Malamud, V.A.; Tarasov, G.I.

    1996-01-01

    The development of a small power (up to 240 MWe) integral PWR for nuclear co-generation power plants has been carried out. The distinctive features of this advanced reactor are: primary circuit arrangement in a single pressure vessel; natural coolant circulation; passive safety systems with self-activated control devices; use of a second (guard) vessel housing the reactor; favourable conditions for the most severe accident management. A passive steam condensing channel has been developed which is activated by the direct action of the primary circuit pressure without an automatic controlling action or manual intervention for emergency cooling of an integral reactor with an in-built pressurizer. In an emergency situation as pressure rises in the reactor a self-activated device blows out non-condensable gases from the condenser tube bundle and returns them in the steam-condensing mode of the operation with the returing primary coolant condensate into the reactor. The thermo-physical test facility is constructed and the experimental development of the steam-condensing channels is performed aiming at the verification of mathematical models for these channels operation in integral reactors both at loss-of-heat removal and LOCA accidents. (orig.)

  4. Reactor coolant cleanup device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Noboru.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to introduce reactor water at high temperature and high pressure as it is, as well as effectively adsorb to eliminate cobalt in reactor water. Constitution: The coolant cleanup device comprises a vessel main body inserted to coolant pipeway circuits in a water cooled reactor power plant and filters contained within the vessel main body. The filters are prepared by coating and baking powder of metal oxides such as manganese ferrite having a function capable of adsorbing cobalt in the coolants onto the surface of supports made of metals or ceramics resistant to strong acids and alkalies in the form of three-dimensional network structure, for example, zircaloy-2, SUS 303 and the zirconia (baking) to form a basic filter elements. The basic filter elements are charged in plurality to the vessel main body. (Kawaiami, Y.)

  5. Method and apparatus for suppressing water-solid overpressurization of coolant in nuclear reactor power apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aanstad, O.J.; Sklencar, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    A reactor-coolant relief valve is opened for increase in mass influx if the rate of change of coolant pressure exceeds a setpoint during a predetermined interval, if, during this interval, the coolant temperature is less than a setpoint and if the level of the fluid in the pressurizer is above a predetermined setpoint (water-solid state). (author)

  6. Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsbedt, A.; Boardman, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    A dual passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactors is described, comprising the combination of: a reactor vessel for containing a pool of liquid metal coolant with a core of heat generating fissionable fuel substantially submerged therein, a side wall of the reactor vessel forming an innermost first partition; a containment vessel substantially surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation having a side wall forming a second partition; a first baffle cylinder substantially encircling the containment vessel in spaced apart relation having an encircling wall forming a third partition; a guard vessel substantially surrounding the containment vessel and first baffle cylinder in spaced apart relation having a side wall forming a forth partition; a sliding seal at the top of the guard vessel edge to isolate the dual cooling system air streams; a second baffle cylinder substantially encircling the guard vessel in spaced part relationship having an encircling wan forming a fifth partition; a concrete silo substantially surrounding the guard vessel and the second baffle cylinder in spaced apart relation providing a sixth partition; a first fluid coolant circulating flow course open to the ambient atmosphere for circulating air coolant comprising at lent one down comer duct having an opening to the atmosphere in an upper area thereof and making fluid communication with the space between the guard vessel and the first baffle cylinder and at least one riser duct having an opening to the atmosphere in the upper area thereof and making fluid communication with the space between the first baffle cylinder and the containment vessel whereby cooling fluid air can flow from the atmosphere down through the down comer duct and space between the forth and third partitions and up through the space between the third and second partition and the riser duct then out into the atmosphere; and a second fluid coolant circulating flow

  7. Operation diagnostics of the reactor coolant pumps in the Jaslovske Bohunice nuclear power plant, CSSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahna, J.; Jaros, I.; Oksa, G.

    1990-01-01

    The state of the art of the materials basis, the diagnostics methods used, organization of data collection and processing, and some results of routine and specific investigations concerned with diagnosis of the reactor coolant pump in the Jaslovske Bohunice NPP V-1 are presented. Some information is given about the reactor coolant pump monitor developed in the VUJE. (author)

  8. Laser-based sensor for a coolant leak detection in a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.-S.; Park, H.; Ko, K.; Lim, G.; Cha, Y.-H.; Han, J.; Jeong, D.-Y.

    2010-08-01

    Currently, the nuclear industry needs strongly a reliable detection system to continuously monitor a coolant leak during a normal operation of reactors for the ensurance of nuclear safety. In this work, we propose a new device for the coolant leak detection based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) by using a compact diode laser. For the feasibility experiment, we established an experimental setup consisted of a near-IR diode laser with a wavelength of about 1392 nm, a home-made multi-pass cell and a sample injection system. The feasibility test was performed for the detection of the heavy water (D2O) leaks which can happen in a pressurized heavy water reactor (PWHR). As a result, the device based on the TDLS is shown to be operated successfully in detecting a HDO molecule, which is generated from the leaked heavy water by an isotope exchange reaction between D2O and H2O. Additionally, it is suggested that the performance of the new device, such as sensitivity and stability, can be improved by adapting a cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy and a compact DFB diode laser. We presume that this laser-based leak detector has several advantages over the conventional techniques currently employed in the nuclear power plant, such as radiation monitoring, humidity monitoring and FT-IR spectroscopy.

  9. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mysels, K.J.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core consists of a number of fuel regions through each of which regulated coolant flows. The coolant from neighbouring fuel regions is combined in a manner which results in an averaging of the coolant temperature at the outlet of the core. By this method the presence of hot streaks in the reactor is reduced. (UK)

  10. Numerical analysis of coolant mixing in the pressure vessel of WWER-440 type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boros, I.; Aszodi, A.

    2003-01-01

    The precise description of the coolant mixing processes taking place in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of pressurized water nuclear reactors has an essential importance during power operation, as well as in case of incidental or accidental conditions. In this paper the detailed CFD model of the pressure vessel of a WWER-440 type reactor and calculations performed with this RPV model are presented. The CFD model of the pressure vessel contains all the important internal structural elements of the RPV. Sensitivity study on the effect of these elements was also carried out. Both steady-state and transient calculation were performed using the CFD code CFX-5.5.1. The results of the steady-state calculations give the so called mixing factors, i.e. the effect of each single primary loop at the core inlet. The mixing factors can be given for nominal circumstances (i.e. all main coolant pumps are working) or in case of less than six working MCPs. In order to validate the model the calculated mixing factors are compared with the values measured in the Paks NPP (Authors)

  11. Review of nuclear power reactor coolant system leakage events and leak detection requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chokshi, N.C.; Srinivasan, M.; Kupperman, D.S.; Krishnaswamy, P.

    2005-01-01

    In response to the vessel head event at the Davis-Besse reactor, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) formed a Lessons Learned Task Force (LLTF). Four action plans were formulated to respond to the recommendations of the LLTF. The action plans involved efforts on barrier integrity, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), operating experience, and inspection and program management. One part of the action plan on barrier integrity was an assessment to identify potential safety benefits from changes in requirements pertaining to leakage in the reactor coolant system (RCS). In this effort, experiments and models were reviewed to identify correlations between crack size, crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD), and leak rate in the RCS. Sensitivity studies using the Seepage Quantification of Upsets In Reactor Tubes (SQUIRT) code were carried out to correlate crack parameters, such as crack size, with leak rate for various types of crack configurations in RCS components. A database that identifies the leakage source, leakage rate, and resulting actions from RCS leaks discovered in U.S. light water reactors was developed. Humidity monitoring systems for detecting leakage and acoustic emission crack monitoring systems for the detection of crack initiation and growth before a leak occurs were also considered. New approaches to the detection of a leak in the reactor head region by monitoring boric-acid aerosols were also considered. (authors)

  12. Eddy current monitoring of spacers in coolant channel assemblies of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhole, V.M.; Rastogi, P.K.; Kulkarni, P.G.; Vijayaraghavan, R.

    1993-01-01

    An eddy current testing method has been standardised for monitoring spacer springs which are used in coolant channel assemblies of pressurised heavy water nuclear reactors (PHWRs). The standard bobbin coil probe used for monitoring the spacer spring detects only the location but does not monitor the tilt orientation and tilt angle of a tilted spacer spring. The knowledge of location along with the tilt orientation of the spacer spring greatly improves the performance of repositioning methods. A modified probe with angular windings has been developed in laboratory tests for monitoring the location as well as the tilt orientation of the spacer springs. Experimental results are presented showing excellent performance of the modified probe in monitoring the exact location as well as tilt orientation of a spacer spring. The modified probe has also been used successfully in the field during repositioning of spacer springs in PHWRs before commissioning. (Author)

  13. Process and kinetics of the fundamental radiation-electrochemical reactions in the primary coolant loop of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozomara-Maic, S.

    1987-06-01

    In spite of the rather broad title of this report, its major part is devoted to the corrosion problems at the RA reactor, i.e. causes and consequences of the reactor shutdown in 1979 and 1982. Some problems of reactor chemistry are pointed out because they are significant for future reactor operation. The final conclusion of this report is that corrosion processes in the primary coolant circuit of the nuclear reactor are specific and that radiation effects cannot be excluded when processes and reaction kinetics are investigated. Knowledge about the kinetics of all the chemical reactions occurring in the primary coolant loop are of crucial significance for safe and economical reactor operation [sr

  14. Evaluation on Safety of Stainless Steels in Chemical Decontamination Process with Immersion Type of Reactor Coolant Pump for Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Jong; Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Ki Joon

    2011-01-01

    Due to commercialization of nuclear power, most countries have taken interest in decontamination process of nuclear power plant and tried to develop a optimum process. Because open literature of the decontamination process are rare, it is hard to obtain skills on decontamination of foreign country and it is necessarily to develop proper chemical decontamination process system in Korea. In this study, applicable possibility in chemical decontamination for reactor coolant pump (RCP) was investigated for the various stainless steels. The stainless steel (STS) 304 showed the best electrochemical properties for corrosion resistance and the lowest weight loss ratio in chemical decontamination process with immersion type than other materials. However, the pitting corrosion was generated in both STS 415 and STS 431 with the increasing numbers of cycle. The intergranular corrosion in STS 431 was sporadically observed. The sizes of their pitting corrosion also increased with increasing cycle numbers

  15. Single failure effects of reactor coolant system large bore hydraulic snubbers for Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, T.S.; Park, S.H.; Sung, K.K.; Kim, T.W.; Jheon, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    A potential snubber single failure is one of the safety significances identified in General Safety Issue 113 for Large Bore Hydraulic Snubber (LBHS) dynamic qualification. This paper investigates dynamic structural effects of single failures of the steam generator and reactor coolant pump snubbers in Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant by performing the time history dynamic analyses for the reactor coolant system under seismic and postulated pipe break events. The seismic input motions considered are the synthesized ground time histories conforming to SRP 3.7.1, and he postulated pipe break input loadings result from steam generator main seam line and feedwater line pipe breaks which govern pipe breaks remaining after applying LBB to the main coolant line and primary side ranch lines equal to and greater than 12 inch nominal pipe size

  16. System and method for determining coolant level and flow velocity in a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Bruce William; Morris, William Guy; Zheng, Danian; Monk, David James; Fang, Biao; Surman, Cheryl Margaret; Anderson, David Deloyd

    2013-09-10

    A boiling water reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel having a feedwater inlet for the introduction of recycled steam condensate and/or makeup coolant into the vessel, and a steam outlet for the discharge of produced steam for appropriate work. A fuel core is located within a lower area of the pressure vessel. The fuel core is surrounded by a core shroud spaced inward from the wall of the pressure vessel to provide an annular downcomer forming a coolant flow path between the vessel wall and the core shroud. A probe system that includes a combination of conductivity/resistivity probes and/or one or more time-domain reflectometer (TDR) probes is at least partially located within the downcomer. The probe system measures the coolant level and flow velocity within the downcomer.

  17. The dynamic pressure measurements of the nuclear reactor coolant for condition-based maintenance of the reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Es-Saheb, M.H.H.

    1990-01-01

    The condition-based maintenance of the nuclear reactor, by monitoring and measuring the instantaneous dynamic pressure distribution of the coolant (water) impact on the solid surfaces of the reactor during operation is presented. The behaviour of water domes (jets) produced by underwater explosions of small changes of P.E.T.N. at various depths in two different size cylindrical containers, which simulate the nuclear reactor, is investigated. Water surface domes (jets) from the underwater explosions are photographed. Depending on the depth of the charge, curved and flat top jets of up to 455 mm diameter and impact speeds of up to 70 m/sec. are observed. The instabilities in the dome surfaces are observed and the instantaneous profiles are analysed. It is found that, in all cases tested, the maximum pressure takes place at the center of the jet and could reach up to 3.0 times the on-dimensional impact pressure value. The use of their measurements, as online monitoring for condition-based maintenance and design-out maintenance is discussed. 18 refs

  18. Spectrographic determination of metallic impurities in organic coolants for nuclear reactors; Determinacion espectrografica de impurezas metalicas en refrigerantes organicos para reactores nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Munoz, M; Alvarez Gonzalez, F

    1969-07-01

    A spectrochemical method for determining metallic impurities in organic coolants for nuclear reactors is given. The organic matter in solid samples is eliminated by controlled distillation and dry ashing in the presence of magnesium oxide as carrier. Liquid, samples are vacuum distillated. The residue is analyzed by carrier distillation and by total burning techniques. The analytical results are discussed and compared with those obtained destroying the organic matter without carrier and using the copper spark technique. (Author) 12 refs.

  19. Design of the reactor coolant system and associated systems in nuclear power plants. Safety guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for establishing safety standards for nuclear power plants. The basic requirements for the design of safety systems for nuclear power plants are established in the Safety Requirements publication, Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-1 on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, which it supplements. This Safety Guide describes how the requirements for the design of the reactor coolant system (RCS) and associated systems in nuclear power plants should be met. This publication is a revision and combination of two previous Safety Guides, Safety Series No. 50-SG-D6 on Ultimate Heat Sink and Directly Associated Heat Transport Systems for Nuclear Power Plants (1982), and Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13 on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (1987), which are superseded by this new Safety Guide. The revision takes account of developments in the design of the RCS and associated systems in nuclear power plants since the earlier Safety Guides were published in 1982 and 1987, respectively. The other objectives of the revision are to ensure consistency with Ref., issued in 2004, and to update the technical content. In addition, an appendix on pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) has been included.

  20. Fluid-Structure Interaction for Coolant Flow in Research-type Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Franklin G.; Ekici, Kivanc; Freels, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is scheduled to undergo a conversion of the fuel used and this proposed change requires an extensive analysis of the flow through the reactor core. The core consists of 540 very thin and long fuel plates through which the coolant (water) flows at a very high rate. Therefore, the design and the flow conditions make the plates prone to dynamic and static deflections, which may result in flow blockage and structural failure which in turn may cause core damage. To investigate the coolant flow between fuel plates and associated structural deflections, the Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) module in COMSOL will be used. Flow induced flutter and static deflections will be examined. To verify the FSI module, a test case of a cylinder in crossflow, with vortex induced vibrations was performed and validated.

  1. A device for monitoring the coolant in a nuclear reactor tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    The invention deals with a gamma thermometer where the gamma absorber (stainless steel) is in heat conducting connection with an external casing located in the coolant in a reactor tank. A heat sink for the gamma absorber heated by gamma irradiation from reactor fuel is thereby established. The most sensitive joint in the thermocouple of the gamma thermometer is mounted vertically above the other joint. A differential voltage with a certain polarity will be generated between the two joints during uniform cooling of the external casing. If the coolant falls to a level under the most sensitive joint, the resulting polarity change can be utilized for the activation of alarm systems. The same gamma thermometer may simultaneously be used as a sensor for measurement of local power distribution

  2. Experimental distribution of coolant in the IPR-R1 Triga nuclear reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Tecnologia de Reatores; Palma, Daniel A.P., E-mail: dapalma@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN/RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria A.F.; Reis, Patricia A.L., E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.b, E-mail: dora@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    The IPR-R1 is a typical TRIGA Mark I light-water and open pool type reactor. The core has an annular configuration of six rings and is cooled by natural circulation. The core coolant channels extend from the bottom grid plate to the top grid plate. The cooling water flows through the holes in the bottom grid plate, passes through the lower unheated region of the element, flows upwards through the active region, passes through the upper unheated region, and finally leaves the channel through the differential area between a triangular spacer block on the top of the fuel element and a round hole in the grid. Direct measurement of the flow rate in a coolant channel is difficult because of the bulky size and low accuracy of flow meters. The flow rate through the channel may be determined indirectly from the heat balance across the channel using measurements of the water inlet and outlet temperatures. This paper presents the experiments performed in the IPR-R1 reactor to monitoring some thermo-hydraulic parameters in the core coolant channels, such as: the radial and axial temperature profile, temperature, velocity, mass flow rate, mass flux and Reynolds's number. Some results were compared with theoretical predictions, as it was expected the variables follow the power distribution (or neutron flux) in the core. (author)

  3. Experimental distribution of coolant in the IPR-R1 Triga nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Amir Z.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria A.F.; Reis, Patricia A.L.

    2011-01-01

    The IPR-R1 is a typical TRIGA Mark I light-water and open pool type reactor. The core has an annular configuration of six rings and is cooled by natural circulation. The core coolant channels extend from the bottom grid plate to the top grid plate. The cooling water flows through the holes in the bottom grid plate, passes through the lower unheated region of the element, flows upwards through the active region, passes through the upper unheated region, and finally leaves the channel through the differential area between a triangular spacer block on the top of the fuel element and a round hole in the grid. Direct measurement of the flow rate in a coolant channel is difficult because of the bulky size and low accuracy of flow meters. The flow rate through the channel may be determined indirectly from the heat balance across the channel using measurements of the water inlet and outlet temperatures. This paper presents the experiments performed in the IPR-R1 reactor to monitoring some thermo-hydraulic parameters in the core coolant channels, such as: the radial and axial temperature profile, temperature, velocity, mass flow rate, mass flux and Reynolds's number. Some results were compared with theoretical predictions, as it was expected the variables follow the power distribution (or neutron flux) in the core. (author)

  4. A review of flow analysis methods for determination of radionuclides in nuclear wastes and nuclear reactor coolants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanowicz, Marek; Kołacińska, Kamila; Grate, Jay W

    2018-06-01

    The safety and security of nuclear power plant operations depend on the application of the most appropriate techniques and methods of chemical analysis, where modern flow analysis methods prevail. Nevertheless, the current status of the development of these methods is more limited than it might be expected based on their genuine advantages. The main aim of this paper is to review the automated flow analysis procedures developed with various detection methods for the nuclear energy industry. The flow analysis methods for the determination of radionuclides, that have been reported to date, are primarily focused on their environmental applications. The benefits of the application of flow methods in both monitoring of the nuclear wastes and process analysis of the primary circuit coolants of light water nuclear reactors will also be discussed. The application of either continuous flow methods (CFA) or injection methods (FIA, SIA) of the flow analysis with the β-radiometric detection shortens the analysis time and improves the precision of determination due to mechanization of certain time-consuming operations of the sample processing. Compared to the radiometric detection, the mass spectrometry (MS) detection enables one to perform multicomponent analyses as well as the determination of transuranic isotopes with much better limits of detection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fast instrumentation for loss of coolant accident (LOCA) experimental studies pertaining to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat Raj, V.; Sreenivas Rao, G.; Belokar, D.G.; Dolas, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    The loss of coolant accident (LOCA) which involves a breach in the pressure boundary of the primary coolant system (PCS) is one of the postulated accident conditions against which the safety of the reactor system is to be ensured. Mathematical models have been developed to analyse this kind of transients. However, because of the extremely complicated nature of the phenomena involved, it is necessary to validate the analytical models with appropriate experimental data. Many parameters are to be measured during the experiments, out of which temperature, pressure, void fraction and two-phase mass flow rate are the most important parameters. Since the phenomenon is very fast, special fast response instruments are required. This paper deals with the considerations that govern the selection of appropriate instruments and the development of suitable instruments for transient two-phase flow and void fraction measurements. The requirements of the associated fast data acquisition system are also discussed. (author). 4 figs

  6. Seismic analysis of the reactor coolant system of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsoi, L.; Sollogoub, P.

    1986-01-01

    For safety considerations, seismic analyses are performed of the Reactor Coolant System (R.C.S.) of PWR Plants. After a brief description of the R.C.S. and R.C.S. operation, the paper presents the two types of analysis used to determine the effect of earthquake on the R.C.S.: modal spectral analysis and nonlinear time history analysis. The paper finally shows how seismic loadings are combined with other types of loadings and illustrates how the consideration of seismic loads affects R.C.S. design [fr

  7. Channel type reactors with supercritical water coolant. Russian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Y.N.; Gabaraev, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    Transition to coolant of supercritical parameters allows for principle engineering-andeconomic characteristics of light-water nuclear power reactors to be substantially enhanced. Russian experience in development of channel-type reactors with supercritical water coolant has demonstrated advantages and practical feasibility of such reactors. (author)

  8. Radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb: New coolant and neutron moderator for innovative nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmelev, A. N.; Kulikov, G. G.; Kryuchkov, E. F.; Apse, V. A.; Kulikov, E. G. [National Research Nuclear Univ. MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse, 31, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    The advantages of radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb as a reactor coolant with respect to natural lead are caused by unique nuclear properties of {sup 208}Pb which is a double-magic nucleus with closed proton and neutron shells. This results in significantly lower micro cross section and resonance integral of radiative neutron capture by {sup 208}Pb than those for numerous light neutron moderators. The extremely weak ability of {sup 208}Pb to absorb neutrons results in the following effects. Firstly, neutron moderating factor (ratio of scattering to capture cross sections) is larger than that for graphite and light water. Secondly, age and diffusion length of thermal neutrons are larger than those for graphite, light and heavy water. Thirdly, neutron lifetime in {sup 208}Pb is comparable with that for graphite, beryllium and heavy water what could be important for safe reactor operation. The paper presents some results obtained in neutronics and thermal-hydraulics evaluations of the benefits from the use of radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb instead of natural lead as a coolant of fast breeder reactors. The paper demonstrates that substitution of radiogenic lead for natural lead can offer the following benefits for operation of fast breeder reactors. Firstly, improvement of the reactor safety thanks to the better values of coolant temperature reactivity coefficient and, secondly, improvement of some thermal-hydraulic reactor parameters. Radiogenic lead can be extracted from thorium sludge without isotope separation as {sup 208}Pb is a final isotope in the decay chain of {sup 232}Th. (authors)

  9. Reactor coolant pump transportation incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noce, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on an incident, which occurred on August 27, 1991, in which a Reactor Coolant Pump motor en route from Surry Power Station to Westinghouse repair facilities struck the overpass at the junction of Interstate 64 and Jefferson Avenue in Newport News, Virginia. The transport container that housed the reactor coolant pump motor failed to clear the overpass. The force of the impact dislodged the container and motor from the truck bed, and it landed on the acceleration land and road shoulder. Upon impact, the container broke open and exposed the reactor coolant pump motor. Incidental radioactively contaminated water that remained in the motor coolers drained onto the road, contaminating the aggregate as well as the underlying gravel

  10. One-phase and two-phase homologous curves for coolant pumps of the pressurized light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.A. dos.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase coolant pump model of pressurized light water nuclear reactors is an important point for the loss of primary coolant accident analysis. The single-phase pump characteristics are an essential feature for operational transients studies, for example, the shut-down and start-up of pump. These parameters, in terms of the homologous curves, set up the complete performance of the pump and are input for transients and accidents analysis thermal-hydraulic codes. This work propose a mathematical model able to predict the single-phase and two-phase homologous curves where it was incorporated geometric and operational pump condition. The results were compared with the experimental tests data from literature and it has showed a good agreement. (author)

  11. Direct potentiometric control of chloride-ion content in water coolant of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, L.N.; Vilkov, N.Ya.; Krasnoperov, V.M.; Epimakhova, L.V.

    1979-01-01

    The work of automatic chloride measuring device designed for continuous determination of chloride-ion concentration in water coolants of nuclear power plants is investigated. A series of experiments have been performed to investigate a device with sensitive element in the form of potentiometric cell with two flowing porous metal silver electrodes (PSE), placed in series. A calibration circuit of chloride measuring devices and PSE is described. A comparison is made between the results obtained by means of automatic chloride measuring device and results of manual control of samples. A conclusion is drawn that automatic chloride measuring devices meet the requirements of nuclear power plants for methods and instruments of control of chloride-ions microconcentration. The development and implantation of automatic chloride-ion analizers will make the analytical control on nuclear power plants easier and make it possible to obtain more reliable information

  12. Pressure behavior in nuclear reactor containment following a loss of coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khattab, M; Ibrahim, N A; Bedrose, C D [Reactors department, nuclear research center, atomic energy authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    The scenarios of pressure variation following a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) inside the containment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) have been investigated. Critical mass flow rushing out from high pressure leg through pipe break is used to calculate the rate of coolant. The energy added to the containment atmosphere is determined to specify the rate of growth of pressure and temperature. The seniors of small, medium and large LOCA at 2%, 15%, and 25% flow released are investigated. Safety water spray system is initiated as the pressure reaches the containment design safety limit at about 3 bar to depressurise and to cooldown the system and thereby to reduce the concentration of radioactivity release in the containment atmosphere. The pressure response before and after operation of safety spray system is predicted in each size of LOCA using a typical design of westinghouse PWR system. The heat removal from the containment environment is rejected into the sump by drop-wise condensation mechanism. The effect of initial droplets diameters injected from the nozzles of the spray system is investigated. The results show that the droplet diameter of 3 mm gives best performance. 6 figs.

  13. Pressure behavior in nuclear reactor containment following a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.; Ibrahim, N.A.; Bedrose, C.D.

    1995-01-01

    The scenarios of pressure variation following a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) inside the containment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) have been investigated. Critical mass flow rushing out from high pressure leg through pipe break is used to calculate the rate of coolant. The energy added to the containment atmosphere is determined to specify the rate of growth of pressure and temperature. The seniors of small, medium and large LOCA at 2%, 15%, and 25% flow released are investigated. Safety water spray system is initiated as the pressure reaches the containment design safety limit at about 3 bar to depressurise and to cooldown the system and thereby to reduce the concentration of radioactivity release in the containment atmosphere. The pressure response before and after operation of safety spray system is predicted in each size of LOCA using a typical design of westinghouse PWR system. The heat removal from the containment environment is rejected into the sump by drop-wise condensation mechanism. The effect of initial droplets diameters injected from the nozzles of the spray system is investigated. The results show that the droplet diameter of 3 mm gives best performance. 6 figs

  14. Pressure behaviour in a nuclear reactor containment following a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KHattab, M.S.; Ibrahim, N.A.; Bedrose, S.D.

    1994-01-01

    The scenarios of pressure variation following a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) inside the containment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) have been investigated. Critical mass flow rushing out from high pressure leg through pipe break, is used to calculate the rate of coolant. The energy added to the containment atmosphere is determined to specify the rate of growth of pressure and temperature. The scenarios of small, medium and large LOCA at 2%, 15% and 25% flow released are investigated. Safety water spray system is initiated as the pressure reaches the containment design safety limit at about 3 bar to depressurise and to cooldown the system and thereby to reduce the concentration of radioactivity release in the containment atmosphere. The pressure response before and after operation of safety spray system is predicted in each size of LOCA using a typical design of westinghouse PWR system. The results of large LOCA showed good agreement with westinghouse calculations of the same design. The heat removal from the containment environment is rejected into the sump by drop-wise condensation mechanism. The effect of initial droplets diameters injected from the nozzles of the spray system is investigated. The results show that the droplet diameter of 3 mm gives best performance. 6 figs., 1 tab

  15. Prospects for development of an innovative water-cooled nuclear reactor for supercritical parameters of coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyakin, S. G.; Kirillov, P. L.; Baranaev, Yu. D.; Glebov, A. P.; Bogoslovskaya, G. P.; Nikitenko, M. P.; Makhin, V. M.; Churkin, A. N.

    2014-08-01

    The state of nuclear power engineering as of February 1, 2014 and the accomplished elaborations of a supercritical-pressure water-cooled reactor are briefly reviewed, and the prospects of this new project are discussed based on this review. The new project rests on the experience gained from the development and operation of stationary water-cooled reactor plants, including VVERs, PWRs, BWRs, and RBMKs (their combined service life totals more than 15 000 reactor-years), and long-term experience gained around the world with operation of thermal power plants the turbines of which are driven by steam with supercritical and ultrasupercritical parameters. The advantages of such reactor are pointed out together with the scientific-technical problems that need to be solved during further development of such installations. The knowledge gained for the last decade makes it possible to refine the concept and to commence the work on designing an experimental small-capacity reactor.

  16. Deposition of hematite particles on alumina seal faceplates of nuclear reactor coolant pumps: Laboratory experiments and industrial feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Lefèvre, Grégory; Živković, Ljiljana S.; Jaubertie, Anne

    2012-01-01

    In the primary circuit of pressurized water reactors (PWR), the dynamic sealing system in reactor coolant pumps is ensured by mechanical seals whose ceramic parts are in contact with the cooling solution. During the stretch-out phase in reactor operation, characterized by low boric acid concentration, the leak-off flow has been observed to abnormally evolve in industrial plants. The deposition of hematite particles, originating from corrosion, on alumina seals of coolant pumps is suspec...

  17. Prospects for and problems of using light-water supercritical-pressure coolant in nuclear reactors in order to increase the efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, P. N.; Semchenkov, Yu. M.; Sedov, A. A.; Subbotin, S. A.; Chibinyaev, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    Trends in the development of the power sector of the Russian and world power industries both at present time and in the near future are analyzed. Trends in the rise of prices for reserves of fossil and nuclear fuels used for electricity production are compared. An analysis of the competitiveness of electricity production at nuclear power plants as compared to the competitiveness of electricity produced at coal-fired and natural-gas-fired thermal power plants is performed. The efficiency of the open nuclear fuel cycle and various versions of the closed nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. The requirements on light-water reactors under the scenario of dynamic development of the nuclear power industry in Russia are determined. Results of analyzing the efficiency of fuel utilization for various versions of vessel-type light-water reactors with supercritical coolant are given. Advantages and problems of reactors with supercritical-pressure water are listed.

  18. Continuous control of pH value and chloride concentration in a water coolant of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, L.N.; Krasnoperov, V.M.; Fokina, K.G.; Vilkov, N.Ya.

    1975-01-01

    Potentiometry method with the use of flowing cells with two identical electrodes is the simplest and most safe for continuous pH value and chloride control in nuclear reactor circulating circuits. The constant potential on the comparison electrode may be provided by supplying the analyzed solution to it through the ion resin filter of mixed operation. The pos--sibility of a continuous pH value monitoring in a flowing cell with two glass electrodes in parallel is considered. To monitor clorides a cell with two porous chlorine-silver electrodes positioned in series is used. The cells of the design described are shown to be workable in water simulating coolants for water-cooled reactors

  19. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, P.; Davidson, D.F.; Thatcher, G.

    1980-01-01

    The cooling system of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor of the pool kind is described. It has an intermediate heat exchange module comprising a tube-in-shell heat exchanger and an electromagnetic flow coupler in the base region of the module. Primary coolant is flowed through the heat exchanger being driven by electromagnetic interaction with secondary liquid metal coolant flow effected by a mechanical pump. (author)

  20. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batheja, P.; Huber, R.; Rau, P.

    1985-01-01

    Particularly for nuclear reactors of small output, the reactor pressure vessel contains at least two heat exchangers, which have coolant flowing through them in a circuit through the reactor core. The circuit of at least one heat exchanger is controlled by a slide valve, so that even for low drive forces, particularly in natural circulation, the required even loading of the heat exchanger is possible. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Loss of coolant accident (LOCA) analysis for McMaster Nuclear Reactor through probabilistic risk assessment (PRA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, T.; Garland, W.J. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Engineering Physics, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: hats@mcmaster.ca

    2006-07-01

    A probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) was conducted for the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) sequence in the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR). A level 1 PRA was completed including event sequence modeling, system modeling, and quantification. To support the quantification of the accident sequence identified, data analysis using the Bayesian method and human reliability analysis (HRA) using the ASEP approach were performed. Since human performance in research reactors is significantly different from that in power reactors, a different time-oriented HRA model was proposed and applied for the estimation of the human error probability (HEP) of core relocation. This HEP estimate was less than that by the ASEP approach by a factor of about 2. These two HEP estimates were used for sensitivity analysis, and modeling uncertainty in the PRA models was quantified. This showed the necessity of appropriate human reliability models in PRA for research reactors. This method could be implemented for the operators' actions which require extensive manual execution with little cognitive load, as might be the case for some maintenance operations in power reactors. (author)

  2. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the 13 N content in the containment atmosphere. 13 N is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/ 13 N+ 4 He. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium 13 N concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  3. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/Nl3+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  4. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1979-08-01

    The present paper deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process H1+016 → N13+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m -3 and 7 kBq m -3 for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge (Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. (Auth.)

  5. CFD analysis of multiphase coolant flow through fuel rod bundles in advanced pressure tube nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catana, A.; Turcu, I.; Prisecaru, I.; Dupleac, D.; Danila, N.

    2010-01-01

    The key component of a pressure tube nuclear reactor core is pressure tube filled with a stream of fuel bundles. This feature makes them suitable for CFD thermal-hydraulic analysis. A methodology for CFD analysis applied to pressure tube nuclear reactors is presented in this paper, which is focused on advanced pressure tube nuclear reactors. The complex flow conditions inside pressure tube are analysed by using the Eulerian multiphase model implemented in FLUENT CFD computer code. Fuel rods in these channels are superheated but the liquid is under high pressure, so it is sub-cooled in normal operating conditions on most of pressure tube length. In the second half of pressure tube length, the onset of boiling occurs, so the flow consists of a gas liquid mixture, with the volume of gas increasing along the length of the channel in the direction of the flow. Limited computer resources enforced us to use CFD analysis for segments of pressure tube. Significant local geometries (junctions, spacers) were simulated. Main results of this work are: prediction of main thermal-hydraulic parameters along pressure tube including CHF evaluation through fuel assemblies. (authors)

  6. Analysis of Pressure Pulsation Induced by Rotor-Stator Interaction in Nuclear Reactor Coolant Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The internal flow of reactor coolant pump (RCP is much more complex than the flow of a general mixed-flow pump due to high temperature, high pressure, and large flow rate. The pressure pulsation that is induced by rotor-stator interaction (RSI has significant effects on the performance of pump; therefore, it is necessary to figure out the distribution and propagation characteristics of pressure pulsation in the pump. The study uses CFD method to calculate the behavior of the flow. Results show that the amplitudes of pressure pulsation get the maximum between the rotor and stator, and the dissipation rate of pressure pulsation in impellers passage is larger than that in guide vanes passage. The behavior is associated with the frequency of pressure wave in different regions. The flow rate distribution is influenced by the operating conditions. The study finds that, at nominal flow, the flow rate distribution in guide vanes is relatively uniform and the pressure pulsation amplitude is the smallest. Besides, the vortex shedding or backflow from the impeller blade exit has the same frequency as pressure pulsation but there are phase differences, and it has been confirmed that the absolute value of phase differences reflects the vorticity intensity.

  7. Application of TEMPPC code to the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor core hydrothermal calculations operating at 2 MW for determining the minimal coolant flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frajndlich, R.; Sousa, J.A. de.

    1985-01-01

    A thermohydraulic study of the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor core on steady-state operating condition and forced convection, is presented. The objective of this calculation is to obtain the minimal flow rate of coolant necessary at the reactor core, limited by the temperature associated to the beginning of nucleate boiling over the fuel plates at a normal operating power (2MW) for a certain inlet coolant temperature. The coolant system safety level is also calculated in this paper, which is divided in three steps: thermohydraulic calculation, without using the uncertainty factors and, after that, considering these factor by two methods: the statistical and the conventional ones. Whichever the method accepted, the results obtained by the program TEMPPC show a great safety margin with respect to the termohydraulic parameters from the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor. (Author) [pt

  8. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, K.G.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to auxiliary means of cooling the nuclear fuel clusters used in light or heavy water cooled nuclear reactors. One method is to provide one or more spray cooling tubes. From holes in the side walls of those tubes coolant water may be sprayed laterally into the cluster against the rods. The flow of main coolant may thus be supplemented or even replaced by the auxiliary coolant. A difficulty, however, is that only those fuel rods close to a spray cooling tube can readily be reached by the auxiliary coolant. In the arrangement described, where the fuel rods are spaced apart by transverse grids, at least one of the interspaces between the grids is provided with an axially extending auxiliary coolant conduit having lateral holes through which an auxiliary coolant is sprayed into the cluster. A deflector is provided that extends from a transverse grid into a position in front of the holes and deflects auxiliary coolant on to parts of the fuel rods otherwise inaccessible to the auxiliary coolant. The construction of the deflector is described. (U.K.)

  9. A system for the discharge of gas bubbles from the coolant flow of a nuclear reactor cooled by forced circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markfort, D.; Kaiser, A.; Dohmen, A.

    1975-01-01

    In a reactor cooled by forced circulation the gas bubbles carried along with the coolant flow are separated before entering the reactor core or forced away into the external zones. For this purpose the coolant is radially guided into a plenum below the core and deflected to a tangential direction by means of flow guide elements. The flow runs spirally downwards. On the bubbles, during their dwell time in this channel, the buoyant force and a force towards the axis of symmetry of the tank are exerted. The major part of the coolant is directed into a radial direction by means of a guiding apparatus in the lower section of the channel and guided through a chimney in the plenum to the center of the reactor core. This inner chimney is enclosed by an outer chimney for the core edge zones through which coolant with a small share of bubbles is taken away. (RW) [de

  10. Metallic sodium as a coolant of high speed nuclear reactors, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atsumo, Hideo

    1975-01-01

    Tables are given on all the sodium loops in Japan and most of the sodium loops all over the world. Name and purpose of the loops, time of establishment, highest temperature, amount of sodium, flow rate, the materials used for the construction of the loops, and the diameter of the main pipings are given. Also, the problems related with these loops are discussed. For example, the high temperature sodium facility at HEDL-WADCO was made for the FFTF component test and instrument test, and uses 50,000 gallons of metallic sodium. The highest temperature is 590 0 C. The sodium flows at the rate of 60 g/m. The body is made of Type 304 stainless steel. Main data of existing sodium-cooled reactors in the world are also tabulated. The data include thermal output, electric output, the structure of the reactor cores, the dimensions of the cores, fuel used, the highest temperature in the reactors, the temperature of sodium at the inlet and outlet, the rate of multiplication, the amount of sodium used, number of control rods, number of heat exchangers, and the pressure of steam. The Monju type nuclear reactor in Japan uses 1,800 ton of sodium. (Fukutomi, T.)

  11. APPLICATION OF MULTIHOLE PRESSURE PROBE FOR RESEARCH OF COOLANT VELOCITY PROFILE IN NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ASSEMBLIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Dmitriev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of heat and mass transfer intensifiers is a major engineering task in the design of new and modernization of existing fuel assemblies. These devices create lateral mass flow of coolant. Design of intensifiers affects both the coolant mixing and the hydraulic resistance. The aim of this work is to develop a methodology of measuring coolant local velocity in the fuel assembly models with different mixing grids. To solve the problems was manufactured and calibrated multihole pressure probe. The air flow velocity measuring method with multihole pressure probe was used in the experimental studies on the coolant local hydrodynamics in fuel assemblies with mixing grids. Analysis of the coolant lateral velocity vector fields allowed to study the formation of the secondary vortex flows behind the mixing grids, and to determine the basic laws of coolant flow in experimental models. Quantitative data on the coolant flow velocity distribution obtained with a multihole pressure probe make possible to determine the magnitude of the flow lateral velocities in fuel rod gaps, as well as to determine the distance at which damping occurs during mixing. 

  12. Numerical Simulation of Three-Dimensional Flow Through Full Passage and Performance Prediction of Nuclear Reactor Coolant Pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ying; Zhou Wenxia; Zhang Jige; Wang Dezhong

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve the level of self-design and domestic manufacture of the reactor coolant pump (nuclear main pump), the software FLUENT was used to simulate the three-dimensional flow through full passage of one nuclear main pump basing on RNG κ-ε turbulence model and SIMPLE algorithm. The distribution of pressure and velocity of the flow in the impeller's surface was analyzed in different working conditions. Moreover, the performance of the pump was predicted based on the simulation results. The results show that the distributions of pressure and velocity are reasonable in both the working and back face of the blade in the steady working condition. The pressure of the flow is increased from the inlet to the outlet of the pump, and shows the maximal value in the impeller region. Comparatively satisfactory efficiency and head value were obtained in the condition of the pump design. The shaft power of the nuclear main pump is gradually increased with the increase of the flow flux. These results are helpful in understanding the change of the internal flow field in the nuclear main pump, which is of some importance for the pre-exploration and theoretical research on the domestic manufacture of the nuclear main pump. (authors)

  13. Principal Physical and Technical Advantages from the Use of Radiogenic Lead as a Coolant of Power Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulikov, G.G. [International Science and Technology Center (ISTC), Krasnoproletarskaya ulitsa 32-34, Moscow, 127473 (Russian Federation); Shmelev, A.N.; Apse, V.A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), Kashirskoe shosse 31, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation); Artisyuk, V.V. [Obninsk State Technical University of Nuclear Power Engineering, Obninsk, Kaluzhskaya reg. 249040 (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    )-fuel could be proliferation-protected at an isotopic level by creating favorable conditions for intense generation of even Pu isotopes. These conditions could be created if radiogenic lead is used as a coolant and graphite - as a structural material and neutron moderator. In this case, transition from hard to softened neutron spectrum results in substantial worsening of {sup 239}Pu neutron capture properties while those of {sup 233}U undergo quite insignificant changes. In addition, Pu proliferation protection at an isotopic level is provided under high rate of secondary fuel breeding (mainly of {sup 233}U) just due to weak neutron absorption by radiogenic lead and graphite. Publications on large deposits of thorium and uranium ores [2-3] show that radiogenic lead mainly consists of {sup 208}Pb (useful isotope with low cross-sections of neutron capture). If necessary, {sup 208}Pb may be extracted from already available tailing stocks of uranium and uranium-thorium ore processing mills as a by-product. So, radiogenic lead as a coolant of power nuclear reactors can improve their operation safety, provide proliferation protection of fissionable materials and intensify fuel breeding. In addition to energy generation, radiogenic lead-cooled reactors could be used for hydrogen production and some other kinds of artificial fuel, for production of high-temperature heat and for effective transmutation of radioactive isotopes with extremely low cross-sections of neutron capture reaction. Radiogenic lead opens new opportunities for improving the neutron physical parameters of nuclear reactors and for widening the areas of their future application. References: 1. A.N. Shmelev, et al. Radiowaste Transmutation in Nuclear Reactors. Proceedings of a Specialist Meeting 'Use of Fast Reactors for Actinide Transmutation', September 22-24, 1992, Obninsk, Russia, IAEATECHDOC- 693, IAEA, March 1993, pp.77-86. 2. Jose Marcus Godoy, et al. Aronne. Application of Inductively Coupled Plasma

  14. Coolant cleanup system for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Araki, Hidefumi.

    1993-01-01

    The cleanup system of the present invention removes impurity ions and floating materials accumulated in a reactor during evaporation of coolants in the nuclear reactor. That is, coolants pass pipelines from a pressure vessel using pressure difference between a high pressure in the pressure vessel and a low pressure at the upstream of a condensate filtration/desalting device of a condensate/feed water system as a driving source, during which cations and floating materials are removed in a high temperature filtration/desalting device and coolants flow into the condensate/feedwater system. Impurities containing anions are removed here by the condensates filtration/desalting device. Then, they return to the pressure vessel while pressurized and heated by a condensate pump, a feed water pump and a feed water heater. At least pumps, a heat exchanger for heating, a filtration/desalting device for removing anions and pipelines connecting them used exclusively for the coolant cleanup system are no more necessary. (I.S.)

  15. Continuous radiochemical analysis of fission products in a nuclear reactor water coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, L.N.; Zakharov, L.K.; Leont'ev, G.G.; Mel'nikov, V.A.; Orlenkov, I.S.; Slutskij, G.K.

    1975-01-01

    Method for continuous radiochemical analysis of I, Cs, Ba, Sr and Ce isotopes in a reactor water heat-transfer agent was developed. A continuous two-dimensional chromatographic process of complex mixtures separation of substances proved to be feasible on several parallel sorbent layers, which moved at constant velocities and separated by stationary intermediate collectors. Tests on model solutions containing I, Ce, Cs and Ba isotopes and on heat-carrier samples showed quantitative separation of elements. The results were indicative of a basic possibility of using multisorbent chromatographs for continuous control of multicomponent mixtures, particularly for control of radioactive fission product compositions in water heat-transfer agents in nuclear power plants. A diagram is shown for a two-dimensional chromatographic separation of a multicomponent mixture. Also shown is a flow chart of an installation for continuous control of iodine and cesium isotope activities

  16. Coolant monitoring systems for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzhnov, A.M.; Morozov, V.V.; Tsypin, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    The ways of improving information capacity of existing monitoring systems and the necessity of designing new ones for coolant monitoring are reviewed. A wide research program on development of coolant monitoring systems in PWR reactors is analyzed. The possible applications of in-core and out-of-core detectors for coolant monitoring are demonstrated

  17. A numerical approach to the simulation of one-phase and two phase reactor coolant flow around nuclear fuel spacers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stosic, Z.V.; Stevanovic, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    A methodology for the simulation and analysis of one-phase and two-phase coolant flows around one or a row of spacers is presented. It is based on the multidimensional two-fluid mass, momentum and energy balance equations and application of adequate turbulence models. Necessary closure laws for interfacial transfer processes are presented. The stated general approach enables simulation and analyses of reactor coolant flow around spacers on different scale levels of the rod bundle geometry: detailed modelling of coolant flow around spacers and investigation of the influence of spacer's geometry on the coolant thermal-hydraulics, as well as prediction of global thermal-hydraulic parameters within the whole rod bundle with the investigation of the influence of rows of spacers on the bulk thermal-hydraulic processes. Sample problems are included illustrating these different modelling approaches. (author)

  18. Nuclear data needs for subcritical reactors with heavy-metal coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatyuk, A.V.

    2001-01-01

    Requests on improvement of evaluated data files for minor actinides (MA) are briefly reviewed. New evaluations of neutron cross sections for Np-237, Am-241 and Am-243 after the corresponding tests and verifications should satisfy the required accuracies of data for developing MA-burners. More difficult problems arise for curium isotopes, evaluated data of which are strongly divergent. International expertise of available evaluations could be very desirable. Needs in data improvements for perspective heavy-metal liquid coolants are outlined. (author)

  19. Mathematical model of the reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozuh, M.

    1989-01-01

    The mathematical model of reactor coolant pump is described in this paper. It is based on correlations for centrifugal reactor coolant pumps. This code is one of the elements needed for the simulation of the whole NPP primary system. In subroutine developed according to this model we tried in every possible detail to incorporate plant specific data for Krsko NPP. (author)

  20. Composition and concentration of soluble and particulate matter in the coolant of the reactor primary cooling system of the Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, Mauricio; Garcia Rodenas, Luis; La Gamma, Ana M.; Villegas, Marina; Fernandez, Alberto N.; Allemandi, Walter; Manera, Raul; Rosales, Hugo

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power plants type PWR and PHWR (pressurized water reactor and pressurized heavy water reactor) have three coolant circuits which only exchange energy among them. The primary circuit, whose coolant extracts the reactor energy, the secondary circuit or water-steam cycle and the tertiary circuit which could be lake, river or sea water. The chemistry of the primary and secondary coolants is carefully controlled with the aim of minimizing the corrosion of structural materials. However, very low rates of corrosion are inevitable and one of the consequences of the corrosion processes is the presence of soluble and particulate matter in the coolant from where several problems associated with mass transfer arisen. In this way radioactive nuclides are transported out of the core to the steam generators, hydraulic resistance increases and heat transfer capability degrades. In the present paper some alternative techniques are proposed for the quantification of both, the particulate and soluble matter present in the coolant and their correspondent composition. Some results are also included and discussed. (author)

  1. Reactor having coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Tadashi; Karatsuka, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Hajime.

    1991-01-01

    In a coolant recycling pump for an LMFBR type reactor, vertical grooves are formed to a static portion which surrounds a pump shaft as far as the lower end thereof. Sodium mists present in an annular gap of the pump shaft form a rotational flow, lose its centrifugal force at the grooved portion and are collected positively to the grooved portion. Further, since the rotational flow in the grooved channel is in a state of a cavity flow, the pressure is released in the grooved portion and a secondary eddy current is formed thereby providing a depressurized state. Accordingly, by a synergestic effect of the centrifugal force and the cavity flow, sodium mists can be recovered completely. (T.M.)

  2. Calorimetric and reactor coolant system flow uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, L.; McLean, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for the quantification of errors associated with the determination of a feedwater flow, secondary power, and Reactor Coolant System (RCS) flow used at the Trojan Nuclear Plant to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. The sources of error in Plant indications and process measurement are identified and tracked, using examples, through the mathematical processes necessary to calculate the uncertainty in the RCS flow measurement. An error of approximately 1.4 percent is calculated for secondary power. This error results, along with the consideration of other errors, in an uncertainty of approximately 3 percent in the RCS flow determination

  3. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor core of nuclear reactors usually is composed of individual elongated fuel elements that may be vertically arranged and through which coolant flows in axial direction, preferably from bottom to top. With their lower end the fuel elements gear in an opening of a lower support grid forming part of the core structure. According to the invention a locking is provided there, part of which is a control element that is movable along the fuel element axis. The corresponding locking element is engaged behind a lateral projection in the opening of the support grid. The invention is particularly suitable for breeder or converter reactors. (orig.) [de

  4. Steam--water mixing in nuclear reactor safety loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naff, S.A.; Schwarz, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    Computer models used to predict the response of reactors to hypothesized accidents necessarily incorporate approximating assumptions. To verify the models by comparing predicted and measured responses in test facilities, these assumptions must be confirmed to be realistic. Recent experiments in facilities capable of repeatedly duplicating the transient behavior of a pressurized water reactor undergoing a pipe rupture show that the assumption of complete water-steam mixing during the transient results in the predicted decompression being faster than that observed. Water reactor safety studies currently in progress include programs aimed at the verification of computer models or ''codes'' used to predict reactor system responses to various hypothesized accidents. The approach is to compare code predictions of transients with the actual test transients in experimental facilities. The purpose of this paper is to explain an important instance in which predictions and data are not in complete agreement and to indicate the significance to water reactor safety studies

  5. Radiation leakage monitoring method and device from primary to secondary coolant systems in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajiri, Yoshiaki; Umehara, Toshihiro; Yamada, Masataka.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention monitors radiation leaked from any one of primary cooling systems to secondary cooling systems in a plurality of steam generators. That is, radiation monitoring means each corresponding to steam each generators are disposed to the upstream of a position where main steam pipes are joined. With such a constitution, since the detection object of each of radiation monitoring means is secondary coolants before mixing with secondary coolants of other secondary loops or dilution, lowering of detection accuracy can be avoided. Except for the abnormal case, that is, a case neither of radiation leakage nor of background change, the device is adapted as a convenient measuring system only with calculation performance. Once abnormality occurs, a loop having a value exceeding a standard value is identified by a single channel analyzer function. The amount of radiation leakage from the steam generator belonging to the specified loop is monitored quantitatively by a multichannel analyzer function. According to the method of the present invention, since specific spectrum analysis is conducted upon occurrence of abnormality, presence of radiation leakage and the scale thereof can be judged rapidly. (I.S.)

  6. Reactor coolant pump seal leakage monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, D.M.; Spencer, J.W.; Morris, D.J.; James, W.; Shugars, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    Problems with reactor coolant pump seals have historically accounted for a large percentage of unscheduled outages. Studies performed for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have shown that the replacement of coolant pump seals has been one of the leading causes of nuclear plant unavailability over the last ten years. Failures of coolant pump seals can lead to primary coolant leakage rates of 200-500 gallons per minute into the reactor building. Airborne activity and high surface contamination levels following these failures require a major cleanup effort and increases the time and personnel exposure required to refurbish the pump seals. One of the problems in assessing seal integrity is the inability to accurately measure seal leakage. Because seal leakage flow is normally very small, it cannot be sensed directly with normal flow instrumentation, but must be inferred from several other temperature and flow measurements. In operating plants the leakage rate has been quantified with a tipping-bucket gauge, a device which indicates when one quart of water has been accumulated. The tipping-bucket gauge has been used for most rainfall-intensity monitoring. The need for a more accurate and less expensive gauge has been addressed. They have developed a drop-counter precipitation sensor has been developed and optimized. The applicability of the drop-counter device to the problem of measuring seal leakage is being investigated. If a review of system specification and known drop-counter performance indicates that this method is feasible for measuring seal leak rates, a drop-counter gauge will be fabricated and tested in the laboratory. If laboratory tests are successful the gauge will be demonstrated in a pump test loop at Ontario Hydro and evaluated under simulated plant conditions. 3 references, 2 figures

  7. Behavior of antimony isotopes in the primary coolant of WWER-1000-type nuclear reactors in NPP Kozloduy during operation and shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrevski, Ivan D.; Zaharieva, Neli N.; Minkova, Katia F.; Gerchev, Nikolay B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the behavior of the antimony isotopes 122 Sb and 124 Sb in the coolant of the WWER reactors in the nuclear power plant Kozloduy (Bulgaria) during operation and shutdown. It is concluded that the chemical properties of their actual precursor, the isotope 121 Sb, determine the behavior of 122 Sb and 124 Sb during operation, load fluctuations, and shutdown as well as during the reactor coolant purification process. It is supposed that differences between the reactor bulk and the core fuel cladding surface chemistry as well as the presence of sub-cooled nucleate boiling at the fuel cladding may create conditions under which a local oxidizing environment may come into existence. (orig.)

  8. Primary coolant circuits in FBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutani, Masushiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the requirement of a pump for the forcive circulation of primary coolants and avoid the manufacturing difficulty of equipments. Constitution: In primary coolant circuits of an LMFBR type reactor having a recycling path forming a closed loop between a reactor core and a heat exchanger, coolants recycled through the recycling path are made of a magnetic fluid comprising liquid sodium incorporated with fine magnetic powder, and an electromagnet is disposed to the downstream of the heat exchanger. In the above-mentioned structure, since the magnetic fluid as the primary coolants losses its magnetic property when heated in the reactor core but recovers the property at a lower temperature after the completion of the heat exchange, the magnetic fluid can forcively be flown through the recycling path under the effect of the electromagnet disposed to the down stream of the heat exchanger to thereby forcively recycle the primary coolants. (Kawakami, Y.)

  9. Nuclear reactor shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangus, J.D.; Cooper, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shutdown system is described comprising a temperature sensitive device connected to control the electric power supply to a magnetic latch holding a body of a neutron absorbing material. The temperature sensitive device is exposed to the reactor coolant so that when the reactor coolant temperature rises above a specific level, the temperature sensitive device will cause deenergization of the magnetic latch to allow the body of neutron absorbing material to enter the reactor core. (author)

  10. Design of the reactor coolant system and associated systems in nuclear power plants. Safety guide (Spanish Edition); Diseno del sistema de refrigeracion del reactor y los sistemas asociados en las centrales nucleares. Guia de seguridad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for establishing safety standards for nuclear power plants. The basic requirements for the design of safety systems for nuclear power plants are established in the Safety Requirements publication, Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-1 on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, which it supplements. This Safety Guide describes how the requirements for the design of the reactor coolant system (RCS) and associated systems in nuclear power plants should be met. This publication is a revision and combination of two previous Safety Guides, Safety Series No. 50-SG-D6 on Ultimate Heat Sink and Directly Associated Heat Transport Systems for Nuclear Power Plants (1982), and Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13 on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (1987), which are superseded by this new Safety Guide. The revision takes account of developments in the design of the RCS and associated systems in nuclear power plants since the earlier Safety Guides were published in 1982 and 1987, respectively. The other objectives of the revision are to ensure consistency with Ref., issued in 2004, and to update the technical content. In addition, an appendix on pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) has been included.

  11. The study of flow resistance in nuclear reactor Maria under coolant boiling condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerski, P.

    1999-01-01

    This study describes an analysis of experiments carried out in the WIW-300 installation located in the Institute of Atomic Energy (Swierk, Poland). The flow, simulated in the annular gap of test section, was similar to the flow in Maria reactor fuel channel. Experimental character of the work lead to the conclusions related to the physical nature of the hydrodynamic phenomena investigated as well as to the practical aspects of future research. A hypothesis defining a cause of pressure changes was formulated and specific problems related to the mathematical model were defined. The analysis shows that hydrodynamic phenomena studies are of basic significance for the prediction of burnout effects and that heat exchange is very often determined by local phenomena. All described observations are the base for further research on thermodynamic aspects of investigated phenomena. (author)

  12. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor (e.g. one having coolant down-flow through a core to a hearth below) thermal insulation (e.g. of a floor of the hearth) comprises a layer of bricks and a layer of tiles thereon, with smaller clearances between the tiles than between the bricks but with the bricks being of reduced cross-section immediately adjacent the tiles so as to be surrounded by interconnected passages, of relatively large dimensions, constituting a continuous chamber extending behind the layer of tiles. By this arrangement, lateral coolant flow in the inter-brick clearances is much reduced. The reactor core is preferably formed of hexagonal columns, supported on diamond-shaped plates each supported on a pillar resting on one of the hearth-floor tiles. Each plate has an internal duct, four upper channels connecting the duct with coolant ducts in four core columns supported by the plate, and lower channels connecting the duct to a downwardly-open recess common to three plates, grouped to form a hexagon, at their mutually-adjacent corners. This provides mixing, and temperature-averaging, of coolant from twelve columns

  13. Reactor coolant pump seals: improving their performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pothier, N.E.; Metcalfe, R.

    1986-06-01

    Large CANDU plants are benefitting from transient-resistant four-year reliable reactor coolant pump seal lifetimes, a direct result of AECL's 20-year comprehensive seal improvement program involving R and D staff, manufacturers, and plant designers and operators. An overview of this program is presented, which covers seal modification design, testing, post-service examination, specialized maintenance and quality control. The relevancy of this technology to Light Water Reactor Coolant Pump Seals is also discussed

  14. The study of two-phase critical flow characteristics in nuclear reactor coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Chang, Seok Kyu

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the physical characteristics of two-phase critical flow whcih can be occured in a light water nuclear power plant during LOCA and also reviews the critical flow models and their applications in detail. The existing experimental data base are reviewed and classified. The typical critical flow models which have been applied to the computer code for the accident are also reviewed. Some suggestions are presented for the development of advanced analytical models and the extension of useful experimental database. (Author)

  15. Analyzing the loss of coolant accident in PWR nuclear reactors with elevation change in cold leg by RELAP5/MOD3.2 system code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheshtpaz, H.; Alison, C.

    2006-01-01

    As, the Russian designed VVER-1000 reactor of the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant by taking into account the change from German technology to that of Russian technology, and with the design of elevation change in the cold legs has been developed; therefore safety assessment of these systems for loss of coolant accident in elevation change in the cold legs and comparison results for non change elevation in the cold legs for a typical reactor (normal design of nuclear reactors) is the main important factor to be considered for the safe operation. In this article, the main objective is the simulation of the loss of coolant accident scenario by the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code in two different cases; first, the elevation change in the cold legs, and the second, non change in it. After comparing and analyzing these two code calculations the results have been generalized for a new design feature of Bushehr reactor. The design and simulation of the elevation change in the cold legs process with RELAP5/MOD3.2 code for PWR reactor is performed for the first time in the country, where it is introducing several important results in this respect

  16. Methodology for Identification of the Coolant Thermalhydraulic Regimes in the Core of Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharaevsky, L.G.; Sharaevskaya, E.I.; Domashev, E.D.; Arkhypov, A.P.; Kolochko, V.N.

    2002-01-01

    The paper deals with one of the acute for the nuclear energy problem of accident regimes of NPPs recognition diagnostics using noise signal diagnostics methodology. The methodology intends transformation of the random noise signals of the main technological parameters at the exit of a nuclear facility (neutron flow, dynamic pressure etc.) which contain the important information about the technical status of the equipment. The effective algorithms for identification of random processes wore developed. After proper transformation its were considered as multidimensional random vectors. Automatic classification of these vectors in the developed algorithms is realized on the basis of the probability function in particular Bayes classifier and decision functions. Till now there no mathematical models for thermalhydraulic regimes of fuel assemblies recognition on the acoustic and neutron noises parameters in the core of nuclear facilities. The two mathematical models for analysis of the random processes submitted to the automatic classification is proposed, i.e. statistical (using Bayes classifier of acoustic spectral density diagnosis signals) and geometrical (on the basis of formation in the featured space of dividing hyper-plane). The theoretical basis of the bubble boiling regimes in the fuel assemblies is formulated as identification of these regimes on the basis of random parameters of auto spectral density of acoustic noise (ASD) measured in the fuel assemblies (dynamic pressure in the upper plenum in the paper). The elaborated algorithms allow recognize realistic status of the fuel assemblies. For verification of the proposed mathematical models the analysis of experimental measurements was carried out. The research of the boiling onset and definition of the local values of the flow parameters in the seven-beam fuel assembly (length of 1.3 m, diameter of 6 mm) have shown the correct identification of the bubble boiling regimes. The experimental measurements on

  17. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor containment vessel faced internally with a metal liner is provided with thermal insulation for the liner, comprising one or more layers of compressible material such as ceramic fiber, such as would be conventional in an advanced gas-cooled reactor and also a superposed layer of ceramic bricks or tiles in combination with retention means therefor, the retention means (comprising studs projecting from the liner, and bolts or nuts in threaded engagement with the studs) being themselves insulated from the vessel interior so that the coolant temperatures achieved in a High-Temperature Reactor or a Fast Reactor can be tolerated with the vessel. The layer(s) of compressible material is held under a degree of compression either by the ceramic bricks or tiles themselves or by cover plates held on the studs, in which case the bricks or tiles are preferably bedded on a yielding layer (for example of carbon fibers) rather than directly on the cover plates

  18. Deposition of hematite particles on alumina seal faceplates of nuclear reactor coolant pumps: Laboratory experiments and industrial feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefèvre Grégory

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the primary circuit of pressurized water reactors (PWR, the dynamic sealing system in reactor coolant pumps is ensured by mechanical seals whose ceramic parts are in contact with the cooling solution. During the stretch-out phase in reactor operation, characterized by low boric acid concentration, the leak-off flow has been observed to abnormally evolve in industrial plants. The deposition of hematite particles, originating from corrosion, on alumina seals of coolant pumps is suspected to be the cause. As better understanding of the adhesion mechanism is the key factor in the prevention of fouling and particle removal, an experimental study was carried out using a laboratory set-up. With model materials, hematite and sintered alumina, the adhesion rate and surface potentials of the interacting solids were measured under different chemical conditions (solution pH and composition in analogy with the PWR ones. The obtained results were in good agreement with the DLVO (Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey- Overbeek theory and used as such to interpret this industrial phenomenon.

  19. Analysis of loss-of-coolant accident for a fast-spectrum lithium-cooled nuclear reactor for space-power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, G. E.; Petrik, E. J.; Kieffer, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    A two-dimensional, transient, heat-transfer analysis was made to determine the temperature response in the core of a conceptual space-power nuclear reactor following a total loss of reactor coolant. With loss of coolant from the reactor, the controlling mode of heat transfer is thermal radiation. In one of the schemes considered for removing decay heat from the core, it was assumed that the 4 pi shield which surrounds the core acts as a constant-temperature sink (temperature, 700 K) for absorption of thermal radiation from the core. Results based on this scheme of heat removal show that melting of fuel in the core is possible only when the emissivity of the heat-radiating surfaces in the core is less than about 0.40. In another scheme for removing the afterheat, the core centerline fuel pin was replaced by a redundant, constant temperature, coolant channel. Based on an emissivity of 0.20 for all material surfaces in the core, the calculated maximum fuel temperature for this scheme of heat removal was 2840 K, or about 90 K less than the melting temperature of the UN fuel.

  20. Nuclear reactor core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core catcher is described for containing debris resulting from an accident causing core meltdown and which incorporates a method of cooling the debris by the circulation of a liquid coolant. (U.K.)

  1. Leak detection device for reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Koichiro.

    1990-01-01

    In a light water cooled reactor, if reactor coolants are leaked from pipelines in a pipeline chamber, activated products (N-16) are diffused together to an atmosphere in the pipeline chamber. N-16 is sucked from an extracting tube which is always sucking the atmosphere in the pipeline chamber to a sucking blower. Then, β-rays released from N-16 are monitored by a radiation monitor in a measuring chamber which is radiation-shielded from the pipeline chamber. Accordingly, since the radiation monitor can detect even slight leakage, the slight leakage of reactor coolants in the pipelines can be detected at an early stage. (I.N.)

  2. Iron crud supply device to reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Takao.

    1993-01-01

    In a device for supplying iron cruds into reactor coolants in a BWR type power plant, a system in which feed water containing iron cruds is supplied to the reactor coolants after once passing through an ion exchange resin is disposed. As a result, iron cruds having characteristics similar with those of naturally occurring iron cruds in the plant are obtained and they react with ionic radioactivity, to form composite oxides. Then, iron cruds having high performance of being secured to the surface of a fuel cladding tube can be supplied to the reactor coolants, thereby enabling to greatly reduce the density of reactor water ionic radioactivity. In its turn, dose rate on the surface of pipelines can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce operators' radiation exposure dose in the plant. Further, contamination of a condensate desalting device due to iron cruds can be prevented, and further, the density of the iron cruds supplied can easily be controlled. (N.H.)

  3. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  4. Power supplyer for reactor coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, Hiroshi; Okinaka, Yo.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a variable voltage/variable frequency static power source (static power source) used as a power source for a coolants recycling pump motor of a nuclear power plant. That is, during lower power operation such as start up or shutdown in which stoppage of the power source gives less effect to a reactor core, power is supplied from a power system, a main power generator connected thereto or a high voltage bus in the plant or a common high voltage bus to the static power source. However, during rated power operation, power is supplied from the output of an axially power generator connected with a main power generator having an extremely great inertia moment to the static power device. With such a constitution, the static power device is not stopped by the lowering of the voltage due to a thunderbolt falling accident or the like to a power-distribution line suddenly occurred in the power system. Accordingly, reactor core flowrate is free from rapid decrease caused by the reduction of rotation speed of the recycling pump. Accordingly, disadvantgages upon operation control in the reactor core is not caused. (I.S.)

  5. Continuous surveillance of reactor coolant circuit integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Continuous surveillance is important to assuring the integrity of a reactor coolant circuit. It can give pre-warning of structural degradation and indicate where off-line inspection should be focussed. These proceedings describe the state of development of several techniques which may be used. These involve measuring structural vibration, core neutron noise, acoustic emission from cracks, coolant leakage, or operating parameters such as coolant temperature and pressure. Twenty three papers have been abstracted and indexed separately for inclusion in the data base

  6. Nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, R F; George, B V; Baglin, C J

    1978-05-10

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given.

  7. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given. (UK)

  8. Nuclear reactor instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncombe, E.; McGonigal, G.

    1975-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor is described which has an equal number of fuel sub-assemblies and sensing instruments. Each instrument senses temperature and rate of coolant flow of a coolant derived from a group of three sub-assemblies so that an abnormal value for one sub-assembly will be indicated on three instruments thereby providing for redundancy of up to two of the three instruments. The abnormal value may be a precurser to unstable boiling of coolant

  9. The installation welding of pressure water reactor coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Feng

    2010-01-01

    Large pressure water reactor nuclear power plants are constructing in our country. There are three symmetry standard loops in reactor coolant system. Each loop possesses a steam generator and a primary poop, in which one of the loops is equipped with a pressurizer. These components are connected with reactor pressure vessel by installation welding of the coolant piping. The integrity of reactor coolant pressure boundary is the second barrier to protect the radioactive substance from release to outside, so the safe operation of nuclear power plant is closely related to the quality of coolant piping installation welding. The heavy tube with super low carbon content austenitic stainless steel is selected for coolant piping. This kind of material has good welding behavior, but the poor thermal conductivity, the big liner expansion coefficient and the big welding deformation will cause bigger welding stress. To reduce the welding deformation, to control the dimension precision, to reduce the residual stress and to ensure the welding quality the installation sequence should be properly designed and the welding technology should be properly controlled. (authors)

  10. Probabilistic analyses of failure in reactor coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    LLNL is performing probabilistic reliability analyses of PWR and BWR reactor coolant piping for the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Specifically, LLNL is estimating the probability of a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) in the reactor coolant loop piping in PWR plants, and in the main stream, feedwater, and recirculation piping of BWR plants. In estimating the probability of DEGB, LLNL considers two causes of pipe break: pipe fracture due to the growth of cracks at welded joints (direct DEGB), and pipe rupture indirectly caused by the seismically-induced failure of critical supports or equipment (indirect DEGB)

  11. Effect of parameter variation of reactor coolant pump on loss of coolant accident consequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Gaojian; Huang Daishun; Gao Yingxian; He Xiaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the analyses were carried out on Ling'ao nuclear power station phase II to study the consequence of the loss of coolant accident when the homologous characteristic curves and free volumes of the reactor coolant pump changed. Two different pumps used in the analysis were 100D (employed on Ling'ao nuclear power station phase II) and ANDRITZ. The thermal characteristics in the large break LOCA accident were analyzed using CATHRE GB and CONPATE4, and the reactor coolant system hydraulics load during blow-clown phase of LOCA accident was analyzed using ATHIS and FORCET. The calculated results show that the homologous characteristic curves have great effect on the thermal characteristics of reactor core during the reflood phase of the large break LOCA accident. The maximum cladding surface temperatures are quite different when the pump's homologous characteristic curves change. On the other hand, the pump's free volume changing results in the variation of the LOCA rarefaction wave propagation, and therefore, the reactor coolant system hydraulic load in LOCA accident would be different. (authors)

  12. Reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, R.M.; Gross, K.C.; Walsh, M.; Humenik, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    In order to reliably and safely operate a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to continuously monitor the performance of numerous subsystems to confirm that the plant state is within its prescribed limits. An important function of a properly designed monitoring system is the detection of incipient faults in all subsystems (with the avoidance of false alarms) coupled with an information system that provides the operators with fault diagnosis, prognosis of fault progression and recommended (either automatic or prescriptive) corrective action. In this paper, such a system is described that has been applied to reactor coolant pumps. This system includes a sensitive pattern-recognition technique based upon the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) that detects incipient faults from validated signals, an expert system embodying knowledge bases on pump and sensor performance, extensive hypertext files containing operating and emergency procedures as well as pump and sensor information and a graphical interface providing the operator with easily perceived information on the location and character of the fault as well as recommended corrective action. This system is in the prototype stage and is currently being validated utilizing data from a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor (EBR-II). 3 refs., 4 figs

  13. Integral forged pump casing for the primary coolant circuit of a nuclear reactor: Development in design, forging technology, and material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austel, W.; Korbe, H.

    1986-01-01

    Developments in the forging of large casings for primary circuit coolant pumps for light water reactors in Germany are demonstrated beginning with the multiple forging fabricated version and ending with the integral forged type. This version is the result of the joint efforts of the pump manufacturer and the forgemaster after a cost-gain evaluation and represents an optimum solution in view of its functional and economical performance and also considering the high requirements for mechanical-technological properties, including homogeneity of the material. The development from 22 NiMoCr 3 7/A 508 Class 2 to 20 MnMoNi 5 5/A 508 Class 3 and their optimization will be demonstrated. This development is based mainly on minimizing the sulfur content and on vacuum carbon deoxidation (VCD), which results in a reduction of the A-segregations, in improving fracture toughness and isotropy, and in the desired fine-grain structure

  14. Full reactor coolant system chemical decontamination qualification programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Corrosion and wear products are found throughout the reactor coolant system (RCS), or primary loop, of a PWR power plant. These products circulate with the primary coolant through the reactor where they may become activated. An oxide layer including these activated products forms on the surfaces of the RCS (including the fuel elements). The amount of radioactivity deposited on the different surface varies and depends primarily on the corrosion rate of the materials concerned, the amount of cobalt in the coolant and the chemistry of the coolant. The oxide layer, commonly called crud, on the surfaces of nuclear plant systems leads to personnel radiation exposure. The level of the radiation fields from the crud increases with time from initial plant startup and typically levels off after 4 to 6 cycles of plant operation. Thereafter, significant personnel radiation exposure may be incurred whenever major maintenance is performed. Personnel exposure is highest during refueling outages when routine maintenance on major plant components, such as steam generators and reactor coolant pumps, is performed. Administrative controls are established at nuclear plants to minimize the exposure incurred by an individual and the plant workers as a whole.

  15. Transient behaviour of main coolant pump in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delja, A.

    1986-01-01

    A basic concept of PWR reactor coolant pump thermo-hydraulic modelling in transient and accident operational condition is presented. The reactor coolant pump is a component of the nuclear steam supply system which forces the coolant through the reactor and steam generator, maintaining design heat transfer condition. The pump operating conditions have strong influence on the flow and thermal behaviour of NSSS, both in the stationary and nonstationary conditions. A mathematical model of the reactor coolant pump is formed by using dimensionless homologous relations in the four-quadrant regimes: normal pump, turbine, dissipation and reversed flow. Since in some operational regimes flow of mixture, liquid and steam may occur, the model has additional correction members for two-phase homologous relations. Modular concept has been used in developing computer program. The verification is performed on the simulation loss of offsite power transient and obtained results are presented. (author)

  16. Characterization of reactor coolant by XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legreid, G.; Beverskog, B. [OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway)

    2002-07-01

    The analyzes of membrane filters is of utmost importance in characterizing the coolant chemistry in nuclear power plants. Traditional analyzes of filters includes oxidative digestion followed by instrumental analyzes. XRF (X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry) can analyze without digestion of the filters. The method is much faster and demands only a cutting step as sample preparation. By use of XRF the analytical laboratory at the Halden Reactor Project will get increased capacity, which makes it possible to analyze more samples and improve the characterization of the water. The method has shown to give more stable results than other methods in use, and has proved to have good precision. New calibration methods have been developed and tested successfully against other methods. A round robin test, attending seven laboratories from nuclear power plants, was initiated by the Halden Project to verify the instrument. The test of standard cation exchange filters showed that conventional filter digestion results in too low values. The XRF methodology shows very good agreement with the standard values. The round robin test for particle filters could not confirm that filter digestion results in too low values. This was mainly due to lack of standard particle filters and large scatter in the reported data. (author)

  17. Characterization of reactor coolant by XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legreid, G.; Beverskog, B.

    2002-01-01

    The analyzes of membrane filters is of utmost importance in characterizing the coolant chemistry in nuclear power plants. Traditional analyzes of filters includes oxidative digestion followed by instrumental analyzes. XRF (X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry) can analyze without digestion of the filters. The method is much faster and demands only a cutting step as sample preparation. By use of XRF the analytical laboratory at the Halden Reactor Project will get increased capacity, which makes it possible to analyze more samples and improve the characterization of the water. The method has shown to give more stable results than other methods in use, and has proved to have good precision. New calibration methods have been developed and tested successfully against other methods. A round robin test, attending seven laboratories from nuclear power plants, was initiated by the Halden Project to verify the instrument. The test of standard cation exchange filters showed that conventional filter digestion results in too low values. The XRF methodology shows very good agreement with the standard values. The round robin test for particle filters could not confirm that filter digestion results in too low values. This was mainly due to lack of standard particle filters and large scatter in the reported data. (author)

  18. Experimental investigation of boiling-water nuclear-reactor parallel-channel effects during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, W.M.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    This report describes an experimental study of the influence of parallel channel effects (PCE) on the distribution of emergency core spray cooling water in a Boiling Water Nuclear Reactor (BWR) following a postulated design basis loss of coolant accident (LCA). The experiments were conducted in a scaled test section in which the reactor coolant was simulated by Freon-114 at conditions similar to those postulated to occur in the reactor vessel shortly after a LOCA. A BWR/4 was simulated by a (PCE) test section which contained three parallel heated channels to simulate fuel assemblies; a core bypass channel, and a jet pump channel. The test section also inlcuded scaled regions to simulate the lower and upper plena, downcomer, and steam separation regions of a BWR. A series of nine transient experiments were conducted, in which the lower plenum vaporization rate and heater rod power were varied while the core spray flow rate was held constant to simulate that of a BWR/4. During these experiments the flow distribution and heat transfer phenomena were observed and measured

  19. Comparative analysis of coolants for FBR of future nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshinsky, G.I.; Grigoryev, O.G.; Pylchenkov, E.H.; Skorikov, D.E.; Komkova, O.I.

    2001-01-01

    Selection of a fast reactor (FR) coolant for future nuclear reactors is a complex task that has not a single solution. Safety requirements are expected to grow in the future. The requirements to FR are reconsidered. Gradual transition from the FR as a builder up of plutonium to the FR as an economically effective energy source, is taking place. Among all types of coolants viable for FR, LMC (light molten salt coolants) cover the most complete range of requirements to advanced reactors and have a complete database. Sodium and lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) are selected because there is a complete package of technologies for their handling. Heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC), being at a disadvantage of heat transfer rate in relation to sodium, make it possible to give the inherent safety properties to the reactor and, as a result, to simplify essentially the reactor design and its safety systems. This results in capital and costs reduction. Neutronic characteristics of HLMC cooled reactors make possible to transmute their own minor actinides (MA) safely, and LBC cooled reactors are able to transmute LWR'MA with high safety characteristics. Basing on the comparison carried out, it can be concluded, that both LBC and sodium are perspective coolants for future FR

  20. Comparative analysis of coolants for FBR of future nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshinsky, G.I.; Grigoryev, O.G.; Pylchenkov, E.H.; Skorikov, D.E.; Komkova, O.I. [State Scientific Center of Russian Federation, Institute for Physics and Power Engineering named after Academician A.I. Leipusky, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    Selection of a fast reactor (FR) coolant for future nuclear reactors is a complex task that has not a single solution. Safety requirements are expected to grow in the future. The requirements to FR are reconsidered. Gradual transition from the FR as a builder up of plutonium to the FR as an economically effective energy source, is taking place. Among all types of coolants viable for FR, LMC (light molten salt coolants) cover the most complete range of requirements to advanced reactors and have a complete database. Sodium and lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) are selected because there is a complete package of technologies for their handling. Heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC), being at a disadvantage of heat transfer rate in relation to sodium, make it possible to give the inherent safety properties to the reactor and, as a result, to simplify essentially the reactor design and its safety systems. This results in capital and costs reduction. Neutronic characteristics of HLMC cooled reactors make possible to transmute their own minor actinides (MA) safely, and LBC cooled reactors are able to transmute LWR'MA with high safety characteristics. Basing on the comparison carried out, it can be concluded, that both LBC and sodium are perspective coolants for future FR.

  1. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor is described, wherein coolant is arranged to be flowed upwardly through a fuel assembly and having one or more baffles located above the coolant exit of the fuel assembly, the baffles being arranged so as to convert the upwardly directed motion of liquid metal coolant leaving the fuel assembly into a substantially horizontal motion. (author)

  2. Device for extracting steam or gas from the primary coolant line leading from a reactor pressure vessel to a straight through boiler or from the top primary boiler chamber of a water-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, K.

    1982-01-01

    In such a nuclear reactor, a steam or gas cushion can form when the primary system is refilled, which can cause blocking of the natural circulation or filling of the system in the area of the hot primary coolant pipe or in the top primary boiler chamber. In order to remove such a steam or gas cushion, a ventilation pipe starting from the bend of the primary coolant line is connected to the feed pipe for introducing water into the primary system. The feed pipe is designed on the principle of the vacuum pump in the area of the opening of the ventilation pipe. There is a sub-pressure in the ventilation pipe, which makes it possible to extract the steam or gas. After mixing in the area of the opening, the steam condenses or is distributed with the gas in the primary coolant. (orig.) [de

  3. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  4. Reactor Coolant Temperature Measurement using Ultrasonic Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, JaeCheon [KEPCO International Nuclear graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, YongSun; Bechue, Nicholas [Krohne Messtechnik GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    In NPP, the primary piping temperature is detected by four redundant RTDs (Resistance Temperature Detectors) installed 90 degrees apart on the RCS (Reactor Coolant System) piping circumferentially. Such outputs however, if applied to I and C systems would not give balanced results. The discrepancy can be explained by either thermal stratification or improper arrangement of thermo-wells and RTDs. This phenomenon has become more pronounced in the hot-leg piping than in the cold-leg. Normally, the temperature difference among channels is in the range of 1°F in Korean nuclear power Plants. Consequently, a more accurate pipe average temperate measurement technique is required. Ultrasonic methods can be used to measure average temperatures with relatively higher accuracy than RTDs because the sound wave propagation in the RCS pipe is proportional to the average temperature around pipe area. The inaccuracy of RCS temperature measurement worsens the safety margin for both DNBR and LPD. The possibility of this discrepancy has been reported with thermal stratification effect. Proposed RCS temperature measurement system based on ultrasonic technology offers a countermeasure to cope with thermal stratification effect on hot-leg piping that has been an unresolved issue in NPPs. By introducing ultrasonic technology, the average internal piping temperature can be measured with high accuracy. The inaccuracy can be decreased less than ±1℉ by this method.

  5. Nuclear reactor installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, W.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor installation includes a pressurized-water coolant reactor vessel and a concrete biological shield surrounding this vessel. The shield forms a space between it and the vessel large enough to permit rapid escape of the pressurized-water coolant therefrom in the event the vessel ruptures. Struts extend radially between the vessel and shield for a distance permitting normal radial thermal movement of the vessel, while containing the vessel in the event it ruptures, the struts being interspaced from each other to permit rapid escape of the pressurized-water coolant from the space between the shield and the vessel

  6. Reactor coolant pump shaft seal behavior during blackout conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mings, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has classified the problem of reactor coolant pump seal failures as an unresolved safety issue. This decision was made in large part due to experimental results obtained from a research program developed to study shaft seal performance during station blackout and reported in this paper. Testing and analysis indicated a potential for pump seal failure under postulated blackout conditions leading to a loss of primary coolant with a concomitant danger of core uncovery. The work to date has not answered all the concerns regarding shaft seal failure but it has helped scope the problem and focus future research needed to completely resolve this issue

  7. Radiolysis of the VVER-1000 reactor coolant: An experimental study and mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, O.P.; Bugaenko, V.L.; Kabakchi, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Variations in the composition of the coolant for the primary circuit of a VVER-1000 reactor of the Kalinin nuclear power plant upon transition from power-level operation to shutdown was studied experimentally. The data obtained were used for verification of the MORAVA-H2 program developed earlier for simulation of the coolant state in pressurized-water power reactors

  8. Design technology development of the main coolant pump for an integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. S.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. I.

    2004-01-01

    All of the reactor coolant pump currently used in commercial nuclear power plant were imported from foreign country. Now, the developing program of design technology for the reactor coolant pump will be started in a few future by domestic researchers. At this stage, the design technology of the main coolant pump for an integral reactor is developed based on the regulation of domestic nuclear power plant facilities. The main coolant pump is a canned motor axial pump, which accommodates all constraints required from the integral reactor system. The main coolant pump does not have mechanical seal device because the rotor of motor and the shaft of impeller are the same one. There is no flywheel on the rotating shaft of main coolant pump so that the coastdown duration time is short when the electricity supply is cut off

  9. Challenges Related to the Use of Liquid Metal and Molten Salt Coolants in Advanced Reactors. Report of the collaborative project COOL of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-05-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was launched in 2000, based on a resolution by the IAEA General Conference (GC(44)/RES/21). INPRO aims at helping to ensure that nuclear energy is available in the twenty-first century in a sustainable manner, and seeks to bring together all interested Member States, both technology holders and technology users, to jointly consider actions to achieve desired innovations. INPRO is taking care of the specific needs of developing countries. One of the aims of INPRO is to develop options for enhanced sustainability through promotion of technical and institutional innovations in nuclear energy technology through collaborative projects among IAEA Member States. Collaboration among INPRO members is fostered on selected innovative nuclear technologies to bridge technology gaps. Collaborative projects have been selected so that they complement other national and international R and D activities. The INPRO Collaborative Project COOL on Investigation of Technological Challenges Related to the Removal of Heat by Liquid Metal and Molten Salt Coolants from Reactor Cores Operating at High Temperatures investigated the technological challenges of cooling reactor cores that operate at high temperatures in advanced fast reactors, high temperature reactors and accelerator driven systems by using liquid metals and molten salts as coolants. The project was initiated in 2008 and was led by India; experts from Brazil, China, Germany, India, Italy and the Republic of Korea participated and provided chapters of this report. The INPRO Collaborative Project COOL addressed the following fields of research regarding liquid metal and molten salt coolants: (i) survey of thermophysical properties; (ii) experimental investigations and computational fluid dynamics studies on thermohydraulics, specifically pressure drop and heat transfer under different operating conditions; (iii) monitoring and control of coolant

  10. Thorium Fuel Utilization Analysis on Small Long Life Reactor for Different Coolant Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permana, Sidik

    2017-07-01

    A small power reactor and long operation which can be deployed for less population and remote area has been proposed by the IAEA as a small and medium reactor (SMR) program. Beside uranium utilization, it can be used also thorium fuel resources for SMR as a part of optimalization of nuclear fuel as a “partner” fuel with uranium fuel. A small long-life reactor based on thorium fuel cycle for several reactor coolant types and several power output has been evaluated in the present study for 10 years period of reactor operation. Several key parameters are used to evaluate its effect to the reactor performances such as reactor criticality, excess reactivity, reactor burnup achievement and power density profile. Water-cooled types give higher criticality than liquid metal coolants. Liquid metal coolant for fast reactor system gives less criticality especially at beginning of cycle (BOC), which shows liquid metal coolant system obtains almost stable criticality condition. Liquid metal coolants are relatively less excess reactivity to maintain longer reactor operation than water coolants. In addition, liquid metal coolant gives higher achievable burnup than water coolant types as well as higher power density for liquid metal coolants.

  11. Water vapor as a perspective coolant for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalafati, D.D.; Petrov, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    Based on analysis of foreign projects of nuclear power plants with steam-cooled fast reactors, it is shown that low breeding ratio and large doubling time were caused by using nickel alloys, high vapor pressure and small volume heat release. The possibility is shown of obtaining doubling time in the necessary limits of T 2 =10-12 years when the above reasons for steam-cooled reactors are eliminated. Favourable combination of thermophysical and thermodynamic properties of water vapor makes it perspective coolant for power fast reactors

  12. Leak detection in the primary reactor coolant piping of nuclear power plant by applying beam-microphone technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Yoshimitsu; Shimanskiy, Sergey; Naoi, Yosuke; Kanazawa, Junichi

    2004-01-01

    A microphone leak detection method was applied to the inlet piping of the ATR-prototype reactor, Fugen. Statistical analysis results showed that the cross-correlation method provided the effective results for detection of a small leakage. However, such a technique has limited application due to significant distortion of the signals on the reactor site. As one of the alternative methods, the beam-microphone provides necessary spatial selectivity and its performance is less affected by signal distortion. A prototype of the beam-microphone was developed and then tested at the O-arai Engineering Center of the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). On-site testing of the beam-microphone was carried out in the inlet piping room of an RBMK reactor of the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (LNPP) in Russia. A leak sound imitator was used to simulate the leakage sound under the leakage flow condition of 1-3 gpm (0.23-0.7 m 3 /h). Analysis showed that signal distortion does not seriously affect the performance of this method, and that sound reflection may result in the appearance of ghost sound sources. The test results showed that the influences of sound reflection and background noise were smaller at the high frequencies where the leakage location could be estimated with an angular accuracy of 5deg which is the range of localization accuracy required for the leak detection system. (author)

  13. N13 - based reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Marbaeck, L.; Sandell, S.; Svansson, L.

    1980-05-01

    A system for the monitoring of leakage of coolant from the reactor coolant pressure boundary and auxiliary systems to the reactor containment, based on the detection of the N13 content in the atmosphere, has been tested. N13 is produced from the oxyegen of the reactor water via the recoil photon nuclear process H1 + 016 + He4. The generation of N13 is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. In the US AEC regulatory guide 1.45 has a leakage increase of 4 liter/ min been suggested as the response limit. The experiments carried out in Ringhals indicate, that with the accomplishment of minor improvements in the installation, a 4 liter/min leakage to the containment will give rise to a signal with a random error range of +- 0.25 liter/min, 99.7 % confidence level. (author)

  14. The failure diagnoses of nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Huanxing.

    1986-01-01

    The earlier period failure diagnoses can raise the safety and efficiency of nuclear reactors. This paper first describes the process abnormality monitoring of core barrel vibration in PWR, inherent noise sources in BWR, sodium boiling in LMFBR and nuclear reactor stability. And then, describes the plant failure diagnoses of primary coolant pumps, loose parts in nuclear reactors, coolant leakage and relief valve location

  15. Multi-objective optimization of the reactor coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lei; Yan Changqi; Wang Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Weight and size are important criteria in evaluating the performance of a nuclear power plant. It is of great theoretical value and engineering significance to reduce the weight and volume of the components for a nuclear power plant by the optimization methodology. Purpose: In order to provide a new method for the optimization of nuclear power plant multi-objective, the concept of the non-dominated solution was introduced. Methods: Based on the parameters of Qinshan I nuclear power plant, the mathematical models of the reactor core, the reactor vessel, the main pipe, the pressurizer and the steam generator were built and verified. The sensitivity analyses were carried out to study the influences of the design variables on the objectives. A modified non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm was proposed and employed to optimize the weight and the volume of the reactor coolant system. Results: The results show that the component mathematical models are reliable, the modified non-dominated sorting generic algorithm is effective, and the reactor inlet temperature is the most important variable which influences the distribution of the non-dominated solutions. Conclusion: The optimization results could provide a reference to the design of such reactor coolant system. (authors)

  16. Nuclear reactors. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiron, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the 'nuclear reactors' volume of the Engineers Techniques collection. It gives a general presentation of the different articles of the volume which deal with: the physical basis (neutron physics and ionizing radiations-matter interactions, neutron moderation and diffusion), the basic concepts and functioning of nuclear reactors (possible fuel-moderator-coolant-structure combinations, research and materials testing reactors, reactors theory and neutron characteristics, neutron calculations for reactor cores, thermo-hydraulics, fluid-structure interactions and thermomechanical behaviour of fuels in PWRs and fast breeder reactors, thermal and mechanical effects on reactors structure), the industrial reactors (light water, pressurized water, boiling water, graphite moderated, fast breeder, high temperature and heavy water reactors), and the technology of PWRs (conceiving and building rules, nuclear parks and safety, reactor components and site selection). (J.S.)

  17. The operating reliability of the reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grancy, W.

    1996-01-01

    There is a strong tendency among operating companies and manufacturers of nuclear power stations to further increase safety and operating availability of the plant and of its components. This applies also and particularly to reactor coolant pumps for the primary circuit of nuclear power stations of the type PWR. For 3 decades, ANDRITZ has developed and built such pumps and has attached great importance to the design of the complete pump rotor and of its essential surrounding elements, such as bearing and shaft seal. Apart from questions connected with design functioning of the pump there is one question of top priority: the operating reliability of the reactor coolant pump. The pump rotor (together with the rotor of the drive motor) is the only component within the primary system that permanently rotates at high speed during operation of the reactor plant. Many questions concerning design and configuration of such components cannot be answered purely theoretically, or they can only be answered partly. Therefore comprehensive development work and testing was necessary to increase the operating reliability of the pump rotor itself and of its surrounding elements. This contribution describes the current status of development and, as a focal point, discusses shaft sealing solutions elaborated so far. In this connection also a sealing system will be presented which aims for the first time at using a two-stage mechanical seal in reactor coolant pumps

  18. Control of reactor coolant flow path during reactor decay heat removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsbedt, Anstein N.

    1988-01-01

    An improved reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system for a sodium cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The sodium cooled nuclear reactor is of the type having a reactor vessel liner separating the reactor hot pool on the upstream side of an intermediate heat exchanger and the reactor cold pool on the downstream side of the intermediate heat exchanger. The improvement includes a flow path across the reactor vessel liner flow gap which dissipates core heat across the reactor vessel and containment vessel responsive to a casualty including the loss of normal heat removal paths and associated shutdown of the main coolant liquid sodium pumps. In normal operation, the reactor vessel cold pool is inlet to the suction side of coolant liquid sodium pumps, these pumps being of the electromagnetic variety. The pumps discharge through the core into the reactor hot pool and then through an intermediate heat exchanger where the heat generated in the reactor core is discharged. Upon outlet from the heat exchanger, the sodium is returned to the reactor cold pool. The improvement includes placing a jet pump across the reactor vessel liner flow gap, pumping a small flow of liquid sodium from the lower pressure cold pool into the hot pool. The jet pump has a small high pressure driving stream diverted from the high pressure side of the reactor pumps. During normal operation, the jet pumps supplement the normal reactor pressure differential from the lower pressure cold pool to the hot pool. Upon the occurrence of a casualty involving loss of coolant pump pressure, and immediate cooling circuit is established by the back flow of sodium through the jet pumps from the reactor vessel hot pool to the reactor vessel cold pool. The cooling circuit includes flow into the reactor vessel liner flow gap immediate the reactor vessel wall and containment vessel where optimum and immediate discharge of residual reactor heat occurs.

  19. Reactor Coolant Pump seal issues and their applicability to new reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruger, C.J.; Higgins, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCPs) of various types are used to circulate the primary coolant through the reactor in most reactor designs. RCPs generally contain mechanical seals to limit the leakage of pressurized reactor coolant along the pump drive shaft into the containment. The relatively large number of RCP seal and seal auxiliary system failures experienced at US operating plants during the 1970's and early 1980's raised concerns from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) that gross failures may lead to reactor core uncovery and subsequent core damage. Some seal failure events resulted in a loss of primary coolant to the containment at flow rates greater than the normal makeup capacity of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plants. This is an example of RCP seal failures resulting in a small Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). This paper discusses observed and potential causes of RCP seal failure and the recommendations for limiting the likelihood of a seal induced small LOCA. Issues arising out of the research supporting these recommendations and subsequent public comments by the utility industry on them, serve as lessons learned, which are applicable to the design of new reactor plants

  20. Reactor coolant pump seal issues and their applicability to new reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruger, C.J.; Higgins, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCPs) of various types are used to circulate the primary coolant through the reactor in most reactor designs. RCPs generally contain mechanical seals to limit the leakage of pressurized reactor coolant along the pump drive shaft into the containment. The relatively large number of RCP seal and seal auxiliary system failures experienced at U.S. operating plants during the 1970's and early 1980's raised concerns from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) that gross failures may lead to reactor core uncovery and subsequent core damage. Some seal failure events resulted in a loss of primary coolant to the containment at flow rates greater than the normal makeup capacity of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plants. This is an example of RCP seal failures resulting in a small Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). This paper discusses observed and potential causes of RCP seal failure and the recommendations for limiting the likelihood of a seal induced small LOCA. Issues arising out of the research supporting these recommendations and subsequent public comments by the utility industry on them, serve as lessons learned, which are applicable to the design of new reactor plants

  1. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this invention is the provision of improved seals for reactor vessels in which fuel assemblies are located together with inlets and outlets for the circulation of a coolant. The object is to provide a seal arrangement for the rotatable plugs of nuclear reactor closure heads which has good sealing capacities over a wide gap during operation of the reactor but which also permits uninhibited rotation of the plugs for maintenance. (U.K.)

  2. Real-time reactor coolant system pressure/temperature limit system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, D.G.; Schemmel, R.R.; Van Scooter, W.E. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an system, used in controlling the operating of a nuclear reactor coolant system, which automatically calculates and displays allowable reactor coolant system pressure/temperature limits within the nuclear reactor coolant system based upon real-time inputs. It comprises: means for producing signals representative of real-time operating parameters of the nuclear reactor cooling system; means for developing pressure and temperature limits relating the real-time operating parameters of the nuclear reactor coolant system, for normal and emergency operation thereof; means for processing the signals representative of real-time operating parameters of the nuclear reactor coolant system to perform calculations of a best estimate of signals, check manual inputs against permissible valves and test data acquisition hardware for validity and over/under range; and means for comparing the representative signals with limits for the real-time operating parameters to produce a signal for a real-time display of the pressure and temperature limits and of the real-time operating parameters use an operator in controlling the operation of the nuclear reactor coolant system

  3. Nuclear reactor cavity streaming shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, R.J.; Stephen, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    The upper portion of a nuclear reactor vessel supported in a concrete reactor cavity has a structure mounted below the top of the vessel between the outer vessel wall and the reactor cavity wall which contains hydrogenous material which will attenuate radiation streaming upward between vessel and the reactor cavity wall while preventing pressure buildup during a loss of coolant accident

  4. Coolant degassing device for PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Takezawa, Kazuaki; Minemoto, Masaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently decrease the rare gas concentration in primary coolants, as well as shorten the degassing time required for the periodical inspection in the waste gas processing system of a PWR type reactor. Constitution: Usual degassing method by supplying hydrogen or nitrogen to a volume control tank is replaced with a method of utilizing a degassing tower (method of flowing down processing liquid into the filled tower from above while uprising streams from the bottom of the tower thereby degassing the gases dissolved in the liquid into the steams). The degassing tower is combined with a hydrogen separator or hydrogen recombiner to constitute a waste gas processing system. (Ikeda, J.)

  5. Station blackout with reactor coolant pump seal leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evinay, A.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) amended its regulations in 10CFR50 with the addition of a new section, 50.63, open-quotes Loss of All Alternating Current Power.close quotes The objective of these requirements is to ensure that all nuclear plants have the capability to withstand a station blackout (SBO) and maintain adequate reactor core cooling and containment integrity for a specified period of time. The NRC also issued Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.155, open-quotes Station Blackout,close quotes to provide guidance for meeting the requirements of 10CFR50.63. Concurrent with RG-1.155, the Nuclear Utility Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) has developed NUMARC 87-00 to address SBO-coping duration and capabilities at light water reactors. Licensees are required to submit a topical report based on NUMARC 87-00 guidelines, to demonstrate compliance with the SBO rule. One of the key compliance criteria is the ability of the plant to maintain adequate reactor coolant system (RCS) inventory to ensure core cooling for the required coping duration, assuming a leak rate of 25 gal/min per reactor coolant pump (RCP) seal in addition to technical specification (TS) leak rate

  6. Design of Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Online Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ah, Sang Ha; Chang, Soon Heung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Song Kyu [Korea Power Engineering Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    As a part of a Department of Korea Power Engineering Co., (KOPEC) Project, Statistical Quality Control techniques have been applied to many aspects of industrial engineering. An application to nuclear power plant maintenance and control is also presented that can greatly improve plant safety. As a demonstration of such an approach, a specific system is analyzed: the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) and the fouling resistance of heat exchanger. This research uses Shewart X-bar, R charts, Cumulative Sum charts (CUSUM), and Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) to analyze the process for the state of statistical control. And the Control Chart Analyzer (CCA) has been made to support these analyses that can make a decision of error in process. The analysis shows that statistical process control methods can be applied as an early warning system capable of identifying significant equipment problems well in advance of traditional control room alarm indicators. Such a system would provide operators with enough time to respond to possible emergency situations and thus improve plant safety and reliability. RCP circulates reactor coolant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. RCP seals are in the pressure part of reactor coolant system, so if it breaks, it can cause small break LOCA. And they are running on high pressure, and high temperature, so they can be easily broken. Since the reactor coolant pumps operate within the containment building, physical access to the pumps occurs only during refueling outages. Engineers depend on process variables transmitted to the control room and through the station's data historian to assess the pumps' condition during normal operation.

  7. Design of Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Online Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ah, Sang Ha; Chang, Soon Heung; Lee, Song Kyu

    2008-01-01

    As a part of a Department of Korea Power Engineering Co., (KOPEC) Project, Statistical Quality Control techniques have been applied to many aspects of industrial engineering. An application to nuclear power plant maintenance and control is also presented that can greatly improve plant safety. As a demonstration of such an approach, a specific system is analyzed: the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) and the fouling resistance of heat exchanger. This research uses Shewart X-bar, R charts, Cumulative Sum charts (CUSUM), and Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) to analyze the process for the state of statistical control. And the Control Chart Analyzer (CCA) has been made to support these analyses that can make a decision of error in process. The analysis shows that statistical process control methods can be applied as an early warning system capable of identifying significant equipment problems well in advance of traditional control room alarm indicators. Such a system would provide operators with enough time to respond to possible emergency situations and thus improve plant safety and reliability. RCP circulates reactor coolant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. RCP seals are in the pressure part of reactor coolant system, so if it breaks, it can cause small break LOCA. And they are running on high pressure, and high temperature, so they can be easily broken. Since the reactor coolant pumps operate within the containment building, physical access to the pumps occurs only during refueling outages. Engineers depend on process variables transmitted to the control room and through the station's data historian to assess the pumps' condition during normal operation

  8. In-operation diagnostic system for reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Mitsunobu; Hasegawa, Ichiro; Kitahara, Hiromichi; Shimamura, Kazuo; Yasuda, Chiaki; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Kida, Yasuo.

    1996-01-01

    A reactor coolant pump (RCP) is one of the most important rotating machines in the primary loop nuclear power plants. To improve the reliability and of nuclear power plants, a new diagnostic system that enables early detection of RCP faults has been developed. This system is based on continuous monitoring of vibration and other process data. Vibration is an important indicator of mechanical faults providing information on physical phenomena such as changes in dynamic characteristics and excitation forces changes that signal failure or incipient failure. This new system features comparative vibration analysis and simulation to anticipate equipment failure. (author)

  9. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Mikio; Yamauchi, Koki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the channel stability and the reactor core stability in a spontaneous circulation state of coolants. Constitution: A reactor core stabilizing device comprising a differential pressure automatic ON-OFF valve is disposed between each of a plurality of jet pumps arranged on a pump deck. The stabilizing device comprises a piston exerted with a pressure on the lower side of the pump deck by way of a pipeway and a valve for flowing coolants through the bypass opening disposed to the pump deck by the opening and closure of the valve ON-OFF. In a case where the jet pumps are stopped, since the differential pressure between the upper and the lower sides of the pump deck is removed, the valve lowers gravitationally into an opened state, whereby the coolants flow through the bypass opening to increase the spontaneous circulation amount thereby improve the stability. (Yoshino, Y.)

  10. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  11. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, T; Grunwald, G

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of PWRs during cold water or boron dilution transients is strongly influenced by the distribution of coolant temperature and boron concentration at the core inlet. This distribution is the needed input to 3-dimensional neutron kinetics to calculate the power distribution in the core. It mainly depends on how the plugs of cold or unborated water formed in a single loop are mixed in the downcomer and in the lower plenum. To simulate such mixture phenomena requires the application of 3-dimensional CFD (computational fluid dynamics) codes. The results of the simulation have to be validated against mixture experiments at scaled facilities. Therefore, in the framework of a research project funded by BMBF, the institute creates a 1:5 mixture facility representing first the geometry of a German pressurized water reactor and later the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) geometry. The calculations are based on the CFD Code CFX-4. (orig.)

  12. Reactor coolant flow measurements at Point Lepreau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenciaglia, G.; Gurevich, Y.; Liu, G.

    1996-01-01

    The CROSSFLOW ultrasonic flow measurement system manufactured by AMAG is fully proven as reliable and accurate when applied to large piping in defined geometries for such applications as feedwater flows measurement. Its application to direct reactor coolant flow (RCF) measurements - both individual channel flows and bulk flows such as pump suction flow - has been well established through recent work by AMAG at Point Lepreau, with application to other reactor types (eg. PWR) imminent. At Point Lepreau, Measurements have been demonstrated at full power; improvements to consistently meet ±1% accuracy are in progress. The development and recent customization of CROSSFLOW to RCF measurement at Point Lepreau are described in this paper; typical measurement results are included. (author)

  13. Reactor coolant system and containment aqueous chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Fission products released from fuel during reactor accidents can be subject to a variety of environments that will affect their ultimate behavior. In the reactor coolant system (RCS), for example, neutral or reducing steam conditions, radiation, and surfaces could all have an effect on fission product retention and chemistry. Furthermore, if water is encountered in the RCS, the high temperature aqueous chemistry of fission products must be assessed to determine the quantity and chemical form of fission products released to the containment building. In the containment building, aqueous chemistry will determine the longer-term release of volatile fission products to the containment atmosphere. Over the past few years, the principles of physical chemistry have been rigorously applied to the various chemical conditions described above. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge and discusses the future directions of chemistry research relating to the behavior of fission products in the RCS and containment

  14. LOFT advanced densitometer for nuclear loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.O.; Lassahn, G.D.; Wood, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    A ''nuclear hardened'' gamma densitometer, a device which uses radiation attenuation to measure fluid density in the presence of a background radiation field, is described. Data from the nuclear hardened gamma densitometer are acquired by time sampling the coolant fluid piping and fluid attenuated source energy spectrum. The data are used to calculate transient coolant fluid cross sectional average density to analyze transient mass flow and other thermal-hydraulic characteristics during the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) loss-of-coolant experiments. The nuclear hardened gamma densitometer uses a pulse height analysis or energy discrimination, pulse counting technique which makes separation of the gamma radiation source signal from the reactor generated gamma radiation background noise signal possible by processing discrete pulses which retain their pulse amplitude information

  15. Method of injecting iron ion into reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kazuyuki; Sawa, Toshio; Nishino, Yoshitaka; Adachi, Tetsuro; Osumi, Katsumi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To form iron ions stably and inject them into nuclear reactor coolants with no substantial degradation of the severe water quality conditions for reactor coolants. Method: Iron ions are formed by spontaneous corrosion of iron type materials and electroconductivity is increased with the iron ions. Then, the liquids are introduced into an electrolysis vessel using iron type material as electrodes and, thereafter, incorporation of newly added ions other than the iron ions are prevented by supplying electric current. Further, by retaining the iron type material in the packing vessel by the magnetic force therein, only the iron ions are flow out substantially from the packing vessel while preventing the discharge of iron type materials per se or solid corrosion products and then introduced into the electrolysis vessel. Powdery or granular pure iron or carbon steel is used as the iron type material. Thus, iron ions and hydroxides thereof can be injected into coolants by using reactor water at low electroconductivity and incapable of electrolysis. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. A Study on thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the coolant materials for the transmutation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chang Hyun; You, Young Woo; Cho, Jae Seon; Kim, Ju Youl; Kim, Do Hyoung; Kim, Yoon Ik; Yang, Hui Chang [Seoul National University, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this study is to provide the direction of transmutation reactor design in terms of thermal hydraulics especially through the analysis of thermal hydraulic characteristics of various candidate materials for the transmutation reactor coolant. In this study, the characteristics of coolant materials used in current nuclear power plants and candidate materials for transmutation reactor are analyzed and compared. To evaluate the thermal hydraulic characteristics, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic calculation is performed for the candidate coolant materials of transmutation reactor. An analysis of thermal-hydraulic characteristics of transmutation reactor. An analysis of thermal-hydraulic characteristics of Sodium, Lead, Lead-Bismuth, and Lead-Lithium among the liquid metals considered as the coolant of transmutation reactor is performed by using computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT, and SIMPLER algorithm. (author). 50 refs., 40 figs., 30 tabs.

  17. Development of lead-bismuth coolant technology for nuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamata, Kin-ya; Kitano, Teruaki; Ono, Mikinori

    2004-01-01

    Liquid lead-bismuth is a promising material as a future fast reactor coolant or an intensive neutron source material for accelerator driven transmutation system (ADS). To develop nuclear plants and their installations using lead-bismuth coolant for practical use, both coolant technologies, inhabitation process of steels and quality control of coolant, and total operation system for liquid lead-bismuth plants are required. Based on the experience of liquid metal coolant, Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. (MES) has completed the liquid lead-bismuth forced circulation loop and has acquired various engineering data on main components including economizer. As a result of tis operation, MES has developed key technologies of lead-bismuth coolant such as controlling of oxygen content in lead-bismuth and a purification of lead-bismuth coolant. MES participated in the national project, ''The Development of Accelerator Driven Transmutation System'', together with JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) and started corrosion test for beam window of ADS. (author)

  18. Probabilistic risk assessment for a loss of coolant accident in McMaster Nuclear Reactor and application of reliability physics model for modeling human reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Taesung

    A probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) was conducted for a loss of coolant accident, (LOCA) in the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR). A level 1 PRA was completed including event sequence modeling, system modeling, and quantification. To support the quantification of the accident sequence identified, data analysis using the Bayesian method and human reliability analysis (HRA) using the accident sequence evaluation procedure (ASEP) approach were performed. Since human performance in research reactors is significantly different from that in power reactors, a time-oriented HRA model (reliability physics model) was applied for the human error probability (HEP) estimation of the core relocation. This model is based on two competing random variables: phenomenological time and performance time. The response surface and direct Monte Carlo simulation with Latin Hypercube sampling were applied for estimating the phenomenological time, whereas the performance time was obtained from interviews with operators. An appropriate probability distribution for the phenomenological time was assigned by statistical goodness-of-fit tests. The human error probability (HEP) for the core relocation was estimated from these two competing quantities: phenomenological time and operators' performance time. The sensitivity of each probability distribution in human reliability estimation was investigated. In order to quantify the uncertainty in the predicted HEPs, a Bayesian approach was selected due to its capability of incorporating uncertainties in model itself and the parameters in that model. The HEP from the current time-oriented model was compared with that from the ASEP approach. Both results were used to evaluate the sensitivity of alternative huinan reliability modeling for the manual core relocation in the LOCA risk model. This exercise demonstrated the applicability of a reliability physics model supplemented with a. Bayesian approach for modeling human reliability and its potential

  19. Radionuclide buildup in BWR [boiling water reactor] reactor coolant recirculation piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duce, S.W.; Marley, A.W.; Freeman, A.L.

    1989-12-01

    Since the spring of 1985, thermoluminescent dosimeter, dose rate, and gamma spectral data have been acquired on the contamination of boiling water reactor primary coolant recirculation systems as part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission funded study. Data have been gathered for twelve facilities by taking direct measurements and/or obtaining plant and vendor data. The project titled, ''Effectiveness and Safety Aspects of Selected Decontamination Processes'' (October 1983) initially reviewed the application of chemical decontamination processes on primary coolant recirculation system piping. Recontamination of the system following pipe replacement or chemical decontamination was studied as a second thrust of this program. During the course of this study, recontamination measurements were made at eight different commercial boiling water reactors. At four of the reactors the primary coolant recirculation system piping was chemically decontaminated. At the other four the piping was replaced. Vendor data were obtained from two boiling water reactors that had replaced the primary coolant recirculation system piping. Contamination measurements were made at two newly operating boiling water reactors. This report discusses the results of these measurements as they apply to contamination and recontamination of boiling water reactor recirculation piping. 16 refs., 29 figs., 9 tabs

  20. Coolant radiolysis studies in the high temperature, fuelled U-2 loop in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, A.J.; Stuart, C.R.

    2008-06-01

    An understanding of the radiolysis-induced chemistry in the coolant water of nuclear reactors is an important key to the understanding of materials integrity issues in reactor coolant systems. Significant materials and chemistry issues have emerged in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) and CANDU reactors that have required a detailed understanding of the radiation chemistry of the coolant. For each reactor type, specific computer radiolysis models have been developed to gain insight into radiolysis processes and to make chemistry control adjustments to address the particular issue. In this respect, modelling the radiolysis chemistry has been successful enough to allow progress to be made. This report contains a description of the water radiolysis tests performed in the U-2 loop, NRU reactor in 1995, which measured the CHC under different physical conditions of the loop such as temperature, reactor power and steam quality. (author)

  1. Natural circulation in reactor coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Reactor coolant system (RCS) natural circulation in a PWR is the buoyancy-driven coolant circulation between the core and the upper-plenum region (in-vessel circulation) with or without a countercurrent flow in the hot leg piping between the vessel and steam generators (ex-vessel circulation). This kind of multidimensional bouyancy-driven flow circulation serves as a means of transferring the heat from the core to the structures in the upper plenum, hot legs, and possibly steam generators. As a result, the RCS piping and other pressure boundaries may be heated to high temperatures at which the structural integrity is challenged. RCS natural circulation is likely to occur during the core uncovery period of the TMLB' accident in a PWR when the vessel upper plenum and hot leg are already drained and filled with steam and possibly other gaseous species. RCS natural circulation is being studied for the Surry plant during the TMLB' accident in which station blackout coincides with the loss of auxiliary feedwater and no operator actions. The effects of the multidimensional RCS natural circulation during the TMLB' accident are discussed

  2. Fuel gases generation in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in a nuclear power plant with reactor type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaices, M.; Salaices, E.; Ovando, R.; Esquivias, J.

    2011-11-01

    During an accident design base of coolant loos, the hydrogen gas can accumulate inside the primary contention as a result of several generation mechanisms among those that are: 1) the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant, 2) the metals corrosion for the solutions used in the emergency cooling and dew of the contention, and 3) the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency. In this work the contribution of each generation mechanism to the hydrogen total in the primary contention is analyzed, considering typical inventories of zirconium, zinc, aluminum and fission products in balance cycle of a reactor type BWR. In the analysis the distribution model of fission products and hydrogen production proposed in the regulator guide 1.7, Rev. 2 of the US NRC was used. The results indicate that the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation at the end of a period of 24 hours of initiate the accident is the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency continued by the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding with the reactor coolant, and lastly the aluminum and zinc oxidation present in the primary contention. However, the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant is the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation in the first moments after the accident. This study constitutes the first part of the general analysis of the generation, transport and control of fuel gases in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in BWRs. (Author)

  3. Automated surveillance of reactor coolant pump performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, K.C.; Singer, R.M.; Humenik, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    An artificial intelligence based expert system has been developed for continuous surveillance and diagnosis of centrifugal-type reactor coolant pump (RCP) performance and operability. The expert system continuously monitors digitized signals from a variety of physical variables (speed, vibration level, motor power, discharge pressure) associated with RCP performance for annunciation of the incipience or onset of off-normal operation. The system employs an extremely sensitive pattern-recognition technique, the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) for rapid identification of pump operability degradation. The sequential statistical analysis of the signal noise has been shown to provide the theoretically shortest sampling time to detect disturbances and thus has the potential of providing incipient fault detection information to operators sufficiently early to avoid forced plant shutdowns. The sensitivity and response time of the expert system are analyzed in this paper using monte carlo simulation techniques

  4. Nuclear reactor control column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachovchin, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest crosssectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor

  5. Loss of coolant accident at boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez G, R.

    1975-01-01

    A revision is made with regard to the methods of thermohydraulic analysis which are used at present in order to determine the efficiency of the safety systems against loss of coolant at boiling water reactors. The object is to establish a program of work in the INEN so that the personnel in charge of the safety of the nuclear plants in Mexico, be able to make in a near future, independent valuations of the safety systems which mitigate the consequences of the above mentioned accident. (author)

  6. Reactor coolant pump shaft seal stability during station blackout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, D.B.; Hill, R.C.; Wensel, R.G.

    1987-05-01

    Results are presented from an investigation into the behavior of Reactor Coolant Pump shaft seals during a potential station blackout (loss of all ac power) at a nuclear power plant. The investigation assumes loss of cooling to the seals and focuses on the effect of high temperature on polymer seals located in the shaft seal assemblies, and the identification of parameters having the most influence on overall hydraulic seal performance. Predicted seal failure thresholds are presented for a range of station blackout conditions and shaft seal geometries

  7. Reactor coolant pump shaft seal stability during station blackout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, D B; Hill, R C; Wensel, R G

    1987-05-01

    Results are presented from an investigation into the behavior of Reactor Coolant Pump shaft seals during a potential station blackout (loss of all ac power) at a nuclear power plant. The investigation assumes loss of cooling to the seals and focuses on the effect of high temperature on polymer seals located in the shaft seal assemblies, and the identification of parameters having the most influence on overall hydraulic seal performance. Predicted seal failure thresholds are presented for a range of station blackout conditions and shaft seal geometries.

  8. Nuclear reactor cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Masaya; Makihara, Yoshiaki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the heat transfer performance, as well as reducing and simplifying the structure while preventing the intrusion of primary coolants to utilization systems. Constitution: Heat transfer from the primary coolant circuit to the utilization circuits is conducted by means of heat pipe type heat exchangers. The heat exchanger comprises a tightly closed vessel divided by a partition wall, through which a plurality of heat pipes are passed. The primary coolants receiving the heat from the nuclear reactor enter the first chamber of the heat exchanger to heat the evaporating portion of the heat pipes. The heated flow of steams in the heat pipes transfer to the condensating portion in the second chamber to conduct heat exchange with the utilization system. In this way, since secondary coolant circuits are saved, the heat transfer performance can be improved significantly and the risk of failure can be reduced. (Kamimura, M,)

  9. Reactor auxiliary cooling facility and coolant supplying method therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1996-06-07

    A reactor auxiliary cooling facility of the present invention comprises a coolant recycling line for recycling coolants by way of a reactor auxiliary coolant pump and a cooling load, a gravitational surge tank for supplying coolants to the coolant recycling line and a supplemental water supplying line for supplying a supply the supplemental water to the tank. Then, a pressurization-type supply water surge tank is disposed for operating the coolant recycling line upon performing an initial system performance test in parallel with the gravitational surge tank. With such a constitution, the period of time required from the start of the installation of reactor auxiliary cooling facilities to the completion of the system performance test can be shortened at a reduced cost without enlarging the scale of the facility. (T.M.)

  10. Reactor auxiliary cooling facility and coolant supplying method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro.

    1996-01-01

    A reactor auxiliary cooling facility of the present invention comprises a coolant recycling line for recycling coolants by way of a reactor auxiliary coolant pump and a cooling load, a gravitational surge tank for supplying coolants to the coolant recycling line and a supplemental water supplying line for supplying a supply the supplemental water to the tank. Then, a pressurization-type supply water surge tank is disposed for operating the coolant recycling line upon performing an initial system performance test in parallel with the gravitational surge tank. With such a constitution, the period of time required from the start of the installation of reactor auxiliary cooling facilities to the completion of the system performance test can be shortened at a reduced cost without enlarging the scale of the facility. (T.M.)

  11. State-of-the-art for liquid-level measurements applied to in-vessel coolant level for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The TMI-2 accident indicated that a direct indication of the liquid level in the reactor vessel would have told the operators that the core was being uncovered. This state-of-the-cost survey covered the following methods: heated thermocouple, differential pressure, ultrasonic, capacitance, microwave, time-domain reflectometry, and externally mounted radiation detectors

  12. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The seals described are for use in a nuclear reactor where there are fuel assemblies in a vessel, an inlet and an outlet for circulating a coolant in heat transfer relationship with the fuel assemblies and a closure head on the vessel in a tight fluid relationship. The closure head comprises rotatable plugs which have mechanical seals disposed in the annulus around each plug while allowing free rotation of the plug when the seal is not actuated. The seal is usually an elastomer or copper. A means of actuating the seal is attached for drawing it vertically into the annulus for sealing. When the reactor coolant is liquid sodium, contact with oxygen must be avoided and argon cover gas fills the space between the bottom of the closure head and the coolant liquid level and the annuli in the closure head. (U.K.)

  13. Nuclear reactor installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, A.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor metal pressure vessel is surrounded by a concrete wall forming an annular space around the vessel. Thermal insulation is in this space and surrounds the vessel, and a coolant-conductive layer is also in this space surrounding the thermal insulation, coolant forced through this layer reducing the thermal stress on the concrete wall. The coolant-conductive layer is formed by concrete blocks laid together and having coolant passages, these blocks being small enough individually to permit them to be cast from concrete at the reactor installation, the thermal insulation being formed by much larger sheet-metal clad concrete segments. Mortar is injected between the interfaces of the coolant-conductive layer and concrete wall and the interfaces between the fluid-conductive layer and the insulation, a layer of slippery sheet material being interposed between the insulation and the mortar. When the pressure vessel is thermally expanded by reactor operation, the annular space between it and the concrete wall is completely filled by these components so that zero-excursion rupture safeguard is provided for the vessel. 4 claims, 1 figure

  14. Nuclear power plant with several reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishanin, E I; Ilyunin, V G; Kuznetsov, I A; Murogov, V M; Shmelev, A N

    1972-05-10

    A design of a nuclear power plant suggested involves several reactors consequently transmitting heat to a gaseous coolant in the joint thermodynamical circuit. In order to increase the power and the rate of fuel reproduction the low temperature section of the thermodynamical circuit involves a fast nuclear reactor, whereas a thermal nuclear reactor is employed in the high temperature section of the circuit for intermediate heating and for over-heating of the working body. Between the fast nuclear and the thermal nuclear reactors there is a turbine providing for the necessary ratio between pressures in the reactors. Each reactor may employ its own coolant.

  15. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor coolant system and systems decontamination. Summary status report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerge, D.H.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

    1986-05-01

    This document summarizes information relating to the decontamination and restoration of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor coolant system and other plant systems. Data have been collected from activity reports, reactor containment entry records, and other sources and entered in a computerized data system which permits extraction/manipulation of specific data which can be used in planning for recovery from a loss of coolant event similar to that experienced by the Three Mile Island Unit 2 on March 28, 1979. This report contains a summary of radiation exposures, manpower, and time spent in radiation areas during the referenced period. Support activities conducted outside of radiation areas are not included. Computer reports included are: A chronological listing of all activities related to decomtamination and restoration of the reactor coolant system and other plant systems for the period of April 5, 1979, through December 19, 1984; a summary of labor and exposures by department for the same time period; and summary reports for each major task undertaken in connection with this specific work scope during the referenced time period

  16. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehne, T.; Grunwald, G.; Rohde, U.

    1998-10-01

    For the analysis of boron dilution transients and main steam like break scenarios the modelling of the coolant mixing inside the reactor vessel is important. The reactivity insertion due to overcooling or deboration depends strongly on the coolant temperature and boron concentration. The three-dimensional flow distribution in the downcomer and the lower plenum of PWR's was calculated with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (CFX-4). Calculations were performed for the PWR's of SIEMENS KWU, Westinghouse and VVER-440 / V-230 type. The following important factors were identified: exact representation of the cold leg inlet region (bend radii etc.), extension of the downcomer below the inlet region at the PWR Konvoi, obstruction of the flow by the outlet nozzles penetrating the downcomer, etc. The k-ε turbulence model was used. Construction elements like perforated plates in the lower plenum have large influence on the velocity field. It is impossible to model all the orifices in the perforated plates. A porous region model was used to simulate perforated plates and the core. The porous medium is added with additional body forces to simulate the pressure drop through perforated plates in the VVER-440. For the PWR Konvoi the whole core was modelled with porous media parameters. The velocity fields of the PWR Konvoi calculated for the case of operation of all four main circulation pumps show a good agreement with experimental results. The CFD-calculation especially confirms the back flow areas below the inlet nozzles. The downcomer flow of the Russian VVER-440 has no recirculation areas under normal operation conditions. By CFD calculations for the downcomer and the lower plenum an analytical mixing model used in the reactor dynamic code DYN3D was verified. The measurements, the analytical model and the CFD-calculations provided very well agreeing results particularly for the inlet region. The difficulties of analytical solutions and the uncertainties of turbulence

  17. Analyses of Decrease in Reactor Coolant Flow Rate in SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Rae; Bae, Kyoo Hwan; Choi, Suhn

    2011-01-01

    SMART is a small integral reactor, which is under development at KAERI to get the standard design approval by the end of 2011. SMART works like a pressurized light-water reactor in principle though it is more compact than large commercial reactors. SMART houses major components such as steam generators, a pressurizer, and reactor coolant pumps inside the reactor pressure vessel. Due to its compact design, SMART adopts a canned-motor type reactor coolant pump which has much smaller rotational inertia than the ones used in commercial reactors. As a consequence, the reactor coolant pump has very short coastdown time and reactor coolant flow rate decreases more severely compared to commercial reactors. The transients initiated by reduction of reactor coolant flow rate have been analyzed to ensure that SMART can be safely shutdown on such transients. The design basis events in this category are complete loss of flow, single pump locked rotor with loss of offsite power, and single pump shaft break with loss of offsite power

  18. Flow rate control systems for coolants for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yoko; Kato, Naoyoshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase spontaneous recycling flow rate of coolants in BWR type reactors when the water level in the reactor decreases, by communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum. Constitution: An opening is provided to the back plate disposed at the lower end of a reactor core shroud for communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum, and an ON-OFF valve actuated by an operation rod is provided to the opening. When abnormal water level or pressure in the reactor is detected by a level metal or pressure meter, the operation rod is driven to open the ON-OFF valve, whereby coolants fed from a jet pump partially flows through the opening to increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants. This can increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants upon spontaneous recycling operation, thereby maintaining the reactor safety and the fuel soundness. (Moriyama, K.)

  19. Reactor coolant pump seal response to loss of cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, T.; Metcalfe, R.; Burchett, P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a test done to determine the performance of a reactor coolant pump seal for a water cooled nuclear reactor under loss of all cooling conditions. Under these conditions, seal faces can lose their liquid lubricating film and elastomers can rapidly degrade. Temperatures in the seal-cartridge tester reached 230 o C in three hours, at which time the tester was stopped and the temperature increased to 265 o C for a further five hours before cooling was restored. Seal leakage was 'normal' throughout the test. Parts sustained minor damage with no effect on seal integrity. Plant operators were shown to have ample margin beyond their 15 minute allowable reaction time. (author)

  20. Coolant make-up device for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a coolant make-up device, an opening of a pressure equalizing pipeline in a pressure vessel is disposed in coolants above a reactor core and below a usual fluctuation range of a reactor vessel water level. Further, a float check valve is disposed to the pressure equalizing pipeline for preventing coolants in the pressure vessel flowing into the pipeline. If the water level in the pressure vessel is lowered than the setting position for the float check valve, the float drops by its own weight to open the opening of the pressure equalizing pipeline. Then, steams in the pressure vessel are flown into the pipeline, to equalize the pressure between a coolant storage tank and the pressure vessel of the reactor. Coolants in the coolant storage tank is injected to the pressure vessel by way of the water injection pipeline due to the difference of the pressure head between the water level in the coolants storage tank and the water level in the pressure vessel. If the coolants are lowered than the setting position for the float check value, the float check valve does not close unless the water level is recovered to the setting position for the float valve and, accordingly, the coolant make-up is continued. (N.H.)

  1. Nuclear reactor refueling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, E.E.

    1978-01-01

    A system for transferring fuel assemblies between a nuclear reactor core and a fuel storage area while the fuel assembies remain completely submerged in a continuous body of coolant is described. The system comprises an in-vessel fuel transfer machine located inside the reactor vessel and an ex-vessel fuel transfer machine located in a fuel storage tank. The in-vessel fuel transfer machine comprises two independently rotatable frames with a pivotable fuel transfer apparatus disposed on the lower rotatable frame. The ex-vessel fuel transfer machine comprises one frame with a pivotable fuel transfer apparatus disposed thereon. The pivotable apparatuses are capable of being aligned with each other to transfer a fuel assembly between the reactor vessel and fuel storage tank while the fuel assembly remains completely submerged in a continuous body of coolant. 9 claims, 7 figures

  2. Device for preventing coolant outflow in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Mochizuki, Keiichi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent outflow of coolant from a reactor vessel even in an occurrence of leaking trouble at a low position in a primary cooling system or the like in the reactor vessel. Structure: An inlet at the foremost end of a coolant inlet pipe inserted into a reactor vessel is arranged at a level lower than a core, and a check valve is positioned at a level higher than the core in a rising portion of the inlet. In normal condition, the check valve is pushed up by discharge pressure of a main circulating pump and remains closed, and hence, producing no flow loss of coolant, sodium. However, when a trouble such as rupture occurs at the lower position in the primary cooling system, the attractive force for allowing the coolant to back-flow outside the reactor vessel and the load force of the coolant within the reactor vessel cause the check valve to actuate, as a consequence of which a liquid level of the coolant downwardly moves to the position of the check valve to intake the cover gases into a gas intake, thereby cutting off a flow passage of the coolant to stop outflow thereof. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Liquid metal coolant disposal from UKAEA reactors at Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.R.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the United Kingdom's Fast Reactor Development programme two reactors were built and operated at Dounreay in the North of Scotland. DFR (Dounreay Fast Reactor) was operated from 1959-1977 and PFR (Prototype Fast Reactor) was operated from 1974-1994. Both reactors are currently undergoing Stage 1 Decommissioning and are installing plant to dispose of the bulk coolant (DFR ∼ 60 tonne; PFR ∼ 1500 tonne). The coolant (NaK) remaining at DFR is mainly in the primary circuit which contains in excess of 500 TBq of Cs137. Disposal of 40 tonnes of secondary coolant has already been carried out. The paper will describe the processes used to dispose of this secondary circuit coolant and how it is intended the remaining primary circuit coolant will be handled. The programme to process the primary coolant will also be described which involves the conversion of the liquid metal to caustic and its decontamination. No PFR coolant Na has been disposed off to date. The paper will describe the current decommissioning programme activities relating to liquid metal disposal and treatment describing the materials to be disposed of and the issue of decontamination of the effluents. (author)

  4. Transient two-phase performance of LOFT reactor coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.H.; Modro, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Performance characteristics of Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor coolant pumps under transient two-phase flow conditions were obtained based on the analysis of two large and small break loss-of-coolant experiments conducted at the LOFT facility. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the transient two-phase flow effects on the LOFT reactor coolant pump performance during the first quadrant operation. The measured pump characteristics are presented as functions of pump void fraction which was determined based on the measured density. The calculated pump characteristics such as pump head, torque (or hydraulic torque), and efficiency are also determined as functions of pump void fractions. The importance of accurate modeling of the reactor coolant pump performance under two-phase conditions is addressed. The analytical pump model, currently used in most reactor analysis codes to predict transient two-phase pump behavior, is assessed

  5. Fast reactors in nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazachkovskii, O

    1981-02-01

    The possible applications are discussed of fast reactor nuclear power plants. Basic differences are explained in fast and thermal reactors, mainly with a view to nuclear fuel utilization. Discussed in more detail are the problems of nuclear fuel reproduction and the nost important technical problems of fast reactors. Flow charts are shown of heat transfer for fast reactors BN-350 (loop design) and BN-600 (integral coolant circuit design). Main specifications are given for demonstration and power fast reactors in operation, under construction and in project-stage.

  6. Fusion-reactor blanket and coolant material compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Keough, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fusion reactor blanket and coolant compatibility tests are being conducted to aid in the selection and design of safe blanket and coolant systems for future fusion reactors. Results of scoping compatibility tests to date are reported for blanket material and water interactions at near operating temperatures. These tests indicate the quantitative hydrogen release, the maximum temperature and pressures produced and the rates of interactions for selected blanket materials

  7. Sloshing of coolant in a seismically isolated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.S.; Guildys, J.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    During a seismic event, the liquid coolant inside the reactor vessel has sloshing motion which is a low-frequency phenomenon. In a reactor system incorporated with seismic isolation, the isolation frequency usually is also very low. There is concern on the potential amplification of sloshing motion of the liquid coolant. This study investigates the effects of seismic isolation on the sloshing of liquid coolant inside the reactor vessel of a liquid metal cooled reactor. Based on a synthetic ground motion whose response spectra envelop those specified by the NRC Regulator Guide 1.60, it is found that the maximum sloshing wave height increases from 18 in. to almost 30 in. when the system is seismically isolated. Since higher sloshing wave may introduce severe impact forces and thermal shocks to the reactor closure and other components within the reactor vessel, adequate design considerations should be made either to suppress the wave height or to reduce the effects caused by high waves

  8. Standardized sampling system for reactor coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Munson, L.F.; Nelson, J.L.; McDowell, R.L.; Jankowski, M.W.

    1982-09-01

    A three-pronged approach was developed to reach the objectives of acceptable coolant sampling, assessment of occupational exposure from corrosion products, and model development for the transport and buildup of corrosion products. Emphasis is on sampler design

  9. Radioactivity analysis of KAMINI reactor coolant from regulatory perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, T.K.; Sulthan, Bajeer; Sarangapani, R.; Jose, M.T.; Venkatraman, B.; Thilagam, L.

    2016-01-01

    KAMINI (a 30kWt) research reactor is operated for neutron radiography of fuel subassemblies and pyro devices and activation analysis of various samples. The reactor is fueled by 233 U and DM water is used as the coolant. During reactor operation, fission product noble gasses (FPNGs) such as 85m Kr, 87 Kr, 88 Kr, 135 Xe, 135m Xe and 138 Xe are detected in the coolant water. In order to detect clad failure, the water is sampled during reactor operation at regular intervals as per the technical specifications. In the present work, analysis of measured activities in coolant samples collected during reactor operation at 25 kWt are presented and compared with computed values obtained using ORIGEN (Isotope Generation) code

  10. Triboengineering problems of lead coolant in innovative fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznosov, A.V.; Novozhilova, O.O.; Shumilkov, A.I.; Lvov, A.V.; Bokova, T.A.; Makhov, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Models of experimental sites for research of processes tribology in heavy liquid metal coolant. -- Highlights: • The contact a pair of heavy liquid metal coolant for reactors on fast neutrons. • The hydrostatic bearings main circulation pumps. • Oxide coating and degree of wear of friction surfaces in heavy liquid metal coolant. -- Abstract: So far, there are plenty of works dedicated to studying the phenomenon of friction. However, there are none dedicated to functioning of contact pairs in heavy liquid-metal coolants for fast neutron, reactor installations (Kogaev and Drozdov, 1991; Modern Tribology, 2008; Drozdov et al., 1986). At the Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University, such research is conducted in respect to friction, bearings of main circulating pumps, interaction of sheaths of neutron absorber rods with their covers, of the reactor control and safety system, refueling systems, and interaction of coolant flows with, channel borders. As a result of experimental studies, the characteristic of friction pairs in the heavy, liquid metal coolant shows the presence dependences of oxide film on structural materials of the wear. The inapplicability of existing calculation methods for assessing the performance of the bearing nodes, in the heavy liquid metal coolant is shown

  11. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor construction comprising a reactor core submerged in a pool of liquid metal coolant in a primary vessel which is suspended from the roof structure of a containment vault. Control rods supported from the roof structure are insertable in the core which is carried on a support structure from the wall of the primary vessel. To prevent excessive relaxation of the support structure whereby the control rods would be displaced relative to the core, the support structure incorporates a normally inactive secondary structure designed to become effective in bracing the primary structure against further relaxation beyond a predetermined limit. (author)

  12. Reactor coolant pump shaft seal behavior during station blackout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittmer, C.A.; Wensel, R.G.; Rhodes, D.B.; Metcalfe, R.; Cotnam, B.M.; Gentili, H.; Mings, W.J.

    1985-04-01

    A testing program designed to provide fundamental information pertaining to the behavior of reactor coolant pump (RCP) shaft seals during a postulated nuclear power plant station blackout has been completed. One seal assembly, utilizing both hydrodynamic and hydrostatic types of seals, was modeled and tested. Extrusion tests were conducted to determine if seal materials could withstand predicted temperatures and pressures. A taper-face seal model was tested for seal stability under conditions when leaking water flashes to steam across the seal face. Test information was then used as the basis for a station blackout analysis. Test results indicate a potential problem with an elastomer material used for O-rings by a pump vendor; that vendor is considering a change in material specification. Test results also indicate a need for further research on the generic issue of RCP seal integrity and its possible consideration for designation as an unresolved safety issue

  13. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising a cluster of fuel elements supported by transversal grids so that their axes are parallel to and at a distance from each other, in order to establish interstices for the axial flow of a coolant. At least one of the interstices is occupied by an axial duct reserved for an auxiliary cooling fluid and is fitted with side holes through which the auxiliary cooling fluid is sprayed into the cluster. Deflectors extend as from a transversal grid in a position opposite the holes to deflect the cooling fluid jet towards those parts of the fuel elements that are not accessible to the auxiliary coolant. This assembly is intended for reactors cooled by light or heavy water [fr

  14. Device for preventing coolant in a reactor from being lost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent all of coolant from being lost from the core at the time of failure in rupture of pipe in a recirculation system to cool the core with the coolant remained within the reactor. Structure: A valve, which will be closed when a water level of the coolant within the core is in a level less than a predetermined level, is provided on a recirculating water outlet nozzle in a pressure vessel to thereby prevent the coolant from being lost when the pipe is broken, thus cooling the core by means of reduced-pressure boiling of coolant remained within the core and boiling due to heat, and restraining core reactivity by means of void produced at that time. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. Nuclear reactors: physics and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadigaroglu, G

    2005-07-01

    In the form of a tutorial addressed to non-specialists, the article provides an introduction to nuclear reactor technology and more specifically to Light Water Reactors (LWR); it also shows where materials and chemistry problems are encountered in reactor technology. The basics of reactor physics are reviewed, as well as the various strategies in reactor design and the corresponding choices of materials (fuel, coolant, structural materials, etc.). A brief description of the various types of commercial power reactors follows. The design of LWRs is discussed in greater detail; the properties of light water as coolant and moderator are put in perspective. The physicochemical and metallurgical properties of the materials impose thermal limits that determine the performance and the maximum power a reactor can deliver. (author)

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilliette, Z.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor and especially a high-temperature reactor in which provision is made within a pressure vessel for a main cavity containing the reactor core and a series of vertical cylindrical pods arranged in spaced relation around the main cavity and each adapted to communicate with the cavity through two collector ducts or headers for the primary fluid which flows downwards through the reactor core. Each pod contains two superposed steam-generator and circulator sets disposed in substantially symmetrical relation on each side of the hot primary-fluid header which conveys the primary fluid from the reactor cavity to the pod, the circulators of both sets being mounted respectively at the bottom and top ends of the pod

  17. Fuel, structural material and coolant for an advanced fast micro-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Jamil A. do; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Ono, Shizuca

    2011-01-01

    The use of nuclear reactors in space, seabed or other Earth hostile environment in the future is a vision that some Brazilian nuclear researchers share. Currently, the USA, a leader in space exploration, has as long-term objectives the establishment of a permanent Moon base and to launch a manned mission to Mars. A nuclear micro-reactor is the power source chosen to provide energy for life support, electricity for systems, in these missions. A strategy to develop an advanced micro-reactor technologies may consider the current fast reactor technologies as back-up and the development of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials. The next generation reactors (GEN-IV) for terrestrial applications will operate with high output temperature to allow advanced conversion cycle, such as Brayton, and hydrogen production, among others. The development of an advanced fast micro-reactor may create a synergy between the GEN-IV and space reactor technologies. Considering a set of basic requirements and materials properties this paper discusses the choice of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials for a fast micro-reactor. The chosen candidate materials are: nitride, oxide as back-up, for fuel, lead, tin and gallium for coolant, ferritic MA-ODS and Mo alloys for core structures. The next step will be the neutronic and burnup evaluation of core concepts with this set of materials. (author)

  18. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Toshihisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent cladding tube injuries due to thermal expansion of each of the pellets by successively extracting each of the control rods loaded in the reactor core from those having less number of notches, as well as facilitate the handling work for the control rods. Constitution: A recycle flow control device is provided to a circulation pump for forcibly circulating coolants in the reactor container and an operational device is provided for receiving each of the signals concerning number of notches for each of the control rods and flow control depending on the xenon poisoning effect obtained from the signals derived from the in-core instrument system connected to the reactor core. The operational device is connected with a control rod drive for moving each of the control rods up and down and a recycle flow control device. The operational device is set with a pattern for the aimed control rod power and the sequence of extraction. Upon extraction of the control rods, they are extracted successively from those having less notch numbers. (Moriyama, K.)

  19. First Study of Helium Gas Purification System as Primary Coolant of Co-Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piping Supriatna

    2009-01-01

    The technological progress of NPP Generation-I on 1950’s, Generation-II, Generation-III recently on going, and Generation-IV which will be implemented on next year 2025, concept of nuclear power technology implementation not only for generate electrical energy, but also for other application which called cogeneration reactor. Commonly the type of this reactor is High Temperature Reactor (HTR), which have other capabilities like Hydrogen production, desalination, Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR), etc. The cogeneration reactor (HTR) produce thermal output higher than commonly Nuclear Power Plant, and need special Heat Exchanger with helium gas as coolant. In order to preserve heat transfer with high efficiency, constant purity of the gas must be maintained as well as possible, especially contamination from its impurities. In this report has been done study for design concept of HTR primary coolant gas purification system, including methodology by sampling He gas from Primary Coolant and purification by using Physical Helium Splitting Membrane. The examination has been designed in physical simulator by using heater as reactor core. The result of study show that the of Primary Coolant Gas Purification System is enable to be implemented on cogeneration reactor. (author)

  20. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND... function of these systems. High point vents are not required for the tubes in U-tube steam generators...

  1. Mechanical and Radiological Characterization of Different parts of an Irradiation Coolant Channel Tube from Atucha I Nuclear Plant; Caracterizacion Mecanica y Radiologica de Partes de Canales Refrigerantes Irradiados Extraidos del Reactor de la Central Nuclear Atucha I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piquin, Ruben [Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    The widespread replacement of reactor internals has generated a substantial volume of active material. It is essential to work with these components at least in a partial way before the next planned stop, which will take place during the second semester of the year 2002. Due to the fact that the reactor internals pool and the storage pool for irradiated nuclear fuel have limited capacities, it has been proposed to compact an experimental shift of 50 irradiated coolant channels, that are currently placed in storage pools. Basically the processed waste will be put in baskets at the bottom pools.The alternative choice proposes to divide an irradiation coolant channel tube into different parts: stainless steel section, zircaloy-4 section and stainless steel section with hardened zones with cobalt alloys named Estelite-6. The person in charge has already planned the constructive and operative solutions but the mechanical characterization of the different parts of the channel tube is necessary in order to dimension the compaction tool needed for the semi-industrial installation.In the present special report, two well-differentiated actions will be described. The necessary compacted strength of the irradiation coolant channel tube will be estimated for the stainless steel section and the zircaloy-4 section starting from experiment with unirradiated material and considering effects of radiation damage and hydrides on the ductility.These results will be used to design the necessary compacted tools for the semi-industrial installation. The necessary equipment for the radiological characterization of the different material sections already specified will be described and the most important emitting particles of radiation that could be detected will be mentioned. Also the decontamination process to use including the radiological characterization of every stage of the process will be described in order to establish the decontamination factor. Finally the most important

  2. Research on physical and chemical parameters of coolant in Light-Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Isabela C.; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: icr@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEM-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The coolant radiochemical monitoring of light-water reactors, both power reactor as research reactors is one most important tasks of the system safe operation. The last years have increased the interest in the coolant chemical studying to optimize the process, to minimize the corrosion, to ensure the primary system materials integrity, and to reduce the workers exposure radiation. This paper has the objective to present the development project in Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), which aims to simulate the primary water physical-chemical parameters of light-water-reactors (LWR). Among these parameters may be cited: the temperature, the pressure, the pH, the electric conductivity, and the boron concentration. It is also being studied the adverse effects that these parameters can result in the reactor integrity. The project also aims the mounting of a system to control and monitoring of temperature, electric conductivity, and pH of water in the Installation of Test in Accident Conditions (ITCA), located in the Thermal-Hydraulic Laboratory at CDTN. This facility was widely used in the years 80/90 for commissioning of several components that were installed in Angra 2 containment. In the test, the coolant must reproduce the physical and chemical conditions of the primary. It is therefore fundamental knowledge of the main control parameters of the primary cooling water from PWR reactors. Therefore, this work is contributing, with the knowledge and the reproduction with larger faithfulness of the reactors coolant in the experimental circuits. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Akio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate and accelerate a leakage test of valves of a main steam pipe by adding a leakage test partition valve thereto. Constitution: A leakage testing partition valve is provided between a pressure vessel for a nuclear reactor and the most upstream side valve of a plurality of valves to be tested for leakage, a testing branch pipe is communicated with the downstream side of the partition valve, and the testing water for preventing leakage is introduced thereto through the branch pipe. Since main steam pipe can be simply isolated by closing the partition valve in the leakage test, the leakage test can be conducted without raising or lowering the water level in the pressure vessel, and since interference with other work in the reactor can be eliminated, the leakage test can be readily conducted parallel with other work in the reactor in a short time. Clean water can be used without using reactor water as the test water. (Yoshihara, H.)

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  5. Nuclear reactor auxiliary heat removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.E.; Pierce, B.L.

    1977-01-01

    An auxiliary heat removal system to remove residual heat from gas-cooled nuclear reactors is described. The reactor coolant is expanded through a turbine, cooled in a heat exchanger and compressed by a compressor before reentering the reactor coolant. The turbine powers both the compressor and the pump which pumps a second fluid through the heat exchanger to cool the reactor coolant. A pneumatic starter is utilized to start the turbine, thereby making the auxiliary heat removal system independent of external power sources

  6. Definition of parameters for a test section for the analysis of natural convection and coolant loss in the AP1000 nuclear reactor by similarity laws and fractional scaling analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadiz, Luis Felipe S.; Bezerra, Mario Augusto [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Lima, Fernando Roberto A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PB), Recife, PB (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The present work develops and analyzes the main parameters of a test section for natural convection in case of a failure of the pumping system as much as the loss of coolant in refrigeration accidents. For this realization, a combination of laws of basic similarity and an innovative scale methodology, known as Fractional Scaling Analysis (FSA), was developed. The depressurizing is analyzed when a rupture occurs in one of the primary system piping of the AP1000 nuclear reactor. This reactor is developed by Westinghouse Electric Co., which is a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) with an electric power equal to 1000MW. Such a reactor is provided with a passive safety system that promotes considerable improvements in the safety, reliability, protection and reduction of costs of a nuclear power plant. The FSA is based on two concepts: fractional scale and hierarchy. It is used to provide experimental data that generate quantitative evaluation criteria as well as operational parameters in thermal and hydraulic processes of nuclear power plants. The results were analyzed with the use of computational codes. (author)

  7. Modular core component support for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, L.M.; Anthony, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The core of a nuclear reactor is made up of a plurality of support modules for containing components such as fuel elements, reflectors and control rods. Each module includes a component support portion located above a grid plate in a low-pressure coolant zone and a coolant inlet portion disposed within a module receptacle which depends from the grid plate into a zone of high-pressure coolant. Coolant enters the module through aligned openings within the receptacle and module inlet portion and flows upward into contact with the core components. The modules are hydraulically balanced within the receptacles to prevent expulsion by the upward coolant forces. (U.S.)

  8. High-temperature process heat reactor with solid coolant and radiant heat exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, A.M.; Bulkin, Yu.M.; Vasil'ev, S.I.

    1984-01-01

    The high temperature graphite reactor with the solid coolant in which heat transfer is realized by radiant heat exchange is described. Neutron-physical and thermal-technological features of the reactor are considered. The reactor vessel is made of sheet carbon steel in the form of a sealed rectangular annular box. The moderator is a set of graphite blocks mounted as rows of arched laying Between the moderator rows the solid coolant annular layings made of graphite blocks with high temperature nuclear fuel in the form of coated microparticles are placed. The coolant layings are mounted onto ring movable platforms, the continuous rotation of which is realizod by special electric drives. Each part of the graphite coolant laying consecutively passes through the reactor core neutron cut-off zones and technological zone. In the core the graphite is heated up to the temperature of 1350 deg C sufficient for effective radiant heat transfer. In the neutron cut-off zone the chain reaction and further graphite heating are stopped. In the technological zone the graphite transfers the accumulated heat to the walls of technological channels in which the working medium moves. The described reactor is supposed to be used in nuclear-chemical complex for ammonia production by the method of methane steam catalytic conversion

  9. A New Application of Support Vector Machine Method: Condition Monitoring and Analysis of Reactor Coolant Pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Qinghu; Meng Qingfeng; Feng Wuwei

    2012-01-01

    Fukushima nuclear power plant accident caused huge losses and pollution and it showed that the reactor coolant pump is very important in a nuclear power plant. Therefore, to keep the safety and reliability, the condition of the coolant pump needs to be online condition monitored and fault analyzed. In this paper, condition monitoring and analysis based on support vector machine (SVM) is proposed. This method is just to aim at the small sample studies such as reactor coolant pump. Both experiment data and field data are analyzed. In order to eliminate the noise and useless frequency, these data are disposed through a multi-band FIR filter. After that, a fault feature selection method based on principal component analysis is proposed. The related variable quantity is changed into unrelated variable quantity, and the dimension is descended. Then the SVM method is used to separate different fault characteristics. Firstly, this method is used as a two-kind classifier to separate each two different running conditions. Then the SVM is used as a multiple classifier to separate all of the different condition types. The SVM could separate these conditions successfully. After that, software based on SVM was designed for reactor coolant pump condition analysis. This software is installed on the reactor plant control system of Qinshan nuclear power plant in China. It could monitor the online data and find the pump mechanical fault automatically.

  10. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, M.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement of the accessibility of that part of a nuclear reactor serving for biological shield is proposed. It is intended to provide within the biological shield, distributed around the circumference of the reactor pressure vessel, several shielding chambers filled with shielding material, which are isolated gastight from the outside by means of glass panes with a given bursting strength. It is advantageous that, on the one hand, inspection and maintenance will be possible without great effort and, on the other, a large relief cross section will be at desposal if required. (UWI) [de

  11. Recirculation system for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H. E.; Dollard, W. J.; Tower, S. N.

    1980-01-01

    A recirculation system for use in pressurized water nuclear reactors to increase the output temperature of the reactor coolant, thereby achieving a significant improvement in plant efficiency without exceeding current core design limits. A portion of the hot outlet coolant is recirculated to the inlets of the peripheral fuel assemblies which operate at relatively low power levels. The outlet temperature from these peripheral fuel assemblies is increased to a temperature above that of the average core outlet. The recirculation system uses external pumps and introduces the hot recirculation coolant to the free space between the core barrel and the core baffle, where it flows downward and inward to the inlets of the peripheral fuel assemblies. In the unlikely event of a loss of coolant accident, the recirculation system flow path through the free space and to the inlets of the fuel assemblies is utilized for the injection of emergency coolant to the lower vessel and core. During emergency coolant injection, the emergency coolant is prevented from bypassing the core through the recirculation system by check valves inserted into the recirculation system piping

  12. Method of eliminating cruds in the primary coolants of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Takaaki.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate cruds in the primary coolants by using rind of onions or peanuts. Method: Since cruds contained in the reactor primary coolants increase the radioactive exposure to reactor operators, they have been intended to remove by ion exchange resins. In this invention, rind of onions or peanuts are crushed into an adequate particle size and packed into an absorption column instead of ion exchange resins into which primary coolants are circulated. The powderous onions or peanuts rind contain glucoside such as cosmosiin and has an effect of cationic exchanger, they satisfactorily catch heavy metals such as Fe and Cu. They have an excellent filtering effect even under a high pH condition and are excellent in economical point of view. They can be decrease the volume of the absorption column, reduce their devolume after use through corrosion and easily subjected to waste procession through oxidizing combustion in liquid. (Nakamoto, H.)

  13. Nuclear reactor containment device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the volume of a containment shell and decrease the size of a containment equipment for BWR type reactors by connecting the containment shell and a suppression pool with slanted vent tubes to thereby shorten the vent tubes. Constitution: A pressure vessel containing a reactor core is installed at the center of a building and a containment vessel for the nuclear reactor that contains the pressure vessel forms a cabin. To a building situated below the containment shell, is provided a suppression chamber in which cooling water is charged to form a suppression pool. The suppression pool is communicated with vent tubes that pass through the partition wall of the containment vessel. The vent tubes are slanted and their lower openings are immersed in coolants. Therefore, if accident is resulted and fluid at high temperature and high pressure is jetted from the pressure vessel, the jetting fluid is injected and condensated in the cooling water. (Moriyama, K.)

  14. Statistical analysis of the Ft. Calhoun reactor coolant pump system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising, Carolyn D.

    1998-01-01

    In engineering science, statistical quality control techniques have traditionally been applied to control manufacturing processes. An application to commercial nuclear power plant maintenance and control is presented that can greatly improve plant safety. As a demonstration of such an approach to plant maintenance and control, a specific system is analyzed: the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) of the Ft. Calhoun nuclear power plant. This research uses capability analysis, Shewhart X-bar, R-charts, canonical correlation methods, and design of experiments to analyze the process for the state of statistical control. The results obtained show that six out of ten parameters are under control specifications limits and four parameters are not in the state of statistical control. The analysis shows that statistical process control methods can be applied as an early warning system capable of identifying significant equipment problems well in advance of traditional control room alarm indicators Such a system would provide operators with ample time to respond to possible emergency situations and thus improve plant safety and reliability. (author)

  15. Statistical analysis of the Ft. Calhoun reactor coolant pump system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Bimal; Heising, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    In engineering science, statistical quality control techniques have traditionally been applied to control manufacturing processes. An application to commercial nuclear power plant maintenance and control is presented that can greatly improve plant safety. As a demonstration of such an approach, a specific system is analyzed: the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) of the Ft. Calhoun nuclear power plant. This research uses capability analysis, Shewhart X-bar, R charts, canonical correlation methods, and design of experiments to analyze the process for the state of statistical control. The results obtained show that six out of ten parameters are under control specification limits and four parameters are not in the state of statistical control. The analysis shows that statistical process control methods can be applied as an early warning system capable of identifying significant equipment problems well in advance of traditional control room alarm indicators. Such a system would provide operators with ample time to respond to possible emergency situations and thus improve plant safety and reliability. (Author)

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the nuclear reactor availability by enabling to continuously exchange fuels in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region during operation. Constitution: A control rod is withdrawn to the midway of a highly enriched uranium region by means of control rod drives and the highly enriched uranium region is burnt to maintain the nuclear reactor always at a critical state. At the same time, fresh uranium-slightly enriched uranium is continuously supplied gravitationally from a fresh fuel reservoir through fuel reservoir to each of fuel pipes in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region. Then, spent fuels reduced with the reactivity by the burn up are successively taken out from the bottom of each of the fuel pipes through an exit duct and a solenoid valve to the inside of a spent fuel reservoir and the burn up in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region is conducted continuously. (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. Corrosion particles in the primary coolant of VVER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajda, N.; Molnar, Z.; Macsik, Z.; Szeles, E.; Hargittai, P.; Csordas, A.; Pinter, T.; Pinter, T.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion and activity build-up processes are of major concern in ageing and life-extension of nuclear power reactors. Researches to study the migration of radioactive corrosion particles have been initiated at Paks Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), Hungary in order to better understand the corrosion of the primary circuit surfaces, the transport and activation of the particles of corrosion origin and their deposition on in-core and out-of-core surfaces. Radioactive corrosion particles were collected from the primary coolant and the steam generator surfaces of the 4 reactor units and subjected to detailed microanalytical and radioanalytical investigations. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX) were used to study the morphology and the composition of the matrix elements in the particles and the deposited corrosion layers. Particles identified by SEM-EDX were re-located under optical microscope by means of a coordinate transformation algorithm and were separated with a micromanipulator for further studies. Activities of γ emitting radionuclides were determined by high resolution γ spectrometry, and those of β decaying isotopes were measured by liquid scintillation (LS) spectrometry after radiochemical processing. High sensitivity of the nuclear measuring techniques allowed us to determine the low activity concentrations of the long-lived radionuclides, i.e. 60 Co, 54 Mn, 63 Ni, 55 Fe in the individual particles. Finally, high resolution sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) was applied to determine the ultralow concentrations of Co, Fe, Ni in the same particles. Specific activities of 60 Co/Co, 54 Mn/Fe, 55 Fe/Fe and 63 Ni/Ni were derived from the measured activity and concentration data. Specific activities of the radioactive corrosion products reveal the history of activity buildup processes in the particle. Typically, Fe-Cr-Ni oxide particles formed as a result of corrosion of the steel

  18. Nuclear reactor core safety device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    The danger of a steam explosion from a nuclear reactor core melt-down can be greatly reduced by adding a gasifying agent to the fuel that releases a large amount of gas at a predetermined pre-melt-down temperature that ruptures the bottom end of the fuel rod and blows the finely divided fuel into a residual coolant bath at the bottom of the reactor. This residual bath should be equipped with a secondary cooling loop

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irion, L.; Tautz, J.; Ulrych, G.

    1976-01-01

    This additional patent complements the arrangement of non-return valves to prevent loss of cooling water on fracture of external tubes in the main coolant circuit (according to PS 24 24 427.7) by ensuring that the easily movable valves only operate in case of a fault, but do not flutter in operation, because the direction of flow is not the same at each location where they are installed. The remedy for this undesirable effect consists of allocating 1 non-return valve unit with 5 to 10 valves to each (of several) ducts for the cooling water intake. These units are installed in the annular space between the reactor vessel and the pressure vessel below the inlet of the ducts. Due to flow guidance surfaces in the same space, the incoming cooling water is deflected downwards and as the guiding surfaces are closed at the sides, must pass parallel to the valves of the non-return valve unit. On fracture of the external cooling water inlet pipe concerned, all valves of this unit close due to reversal of flow on the outlet side. (TK) [de

  20. Improvements of primary coolant shutdown chemistry and reactor coolant system cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudard, G.; Gilles, B.; Mesnage, F.; Cattant, F.

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of a radiation exposure management program entitled >, EDF aims at decreasing the mass dosimetry of nuclear power plants workers. So, the annual dose per unit, which has improved from 2.44 m.Sv in 1991 to 1.08 in 2000, should target 0.8 mSv in the year 2005 term in order to meet the results of the best nuclear operators. One of the guidelines for irradiation source term reduction is the optimization of operation parameters, including reactor coolant system (RCS) chemistry in operation, RCS shutdown chemistry and RCS cleanup improvement. This paper presents the EDF strategy for the shutdown and start up RCS chemistry optimization. All the shutdown modes have been reviewed and for each of them, the chemical specifications will be fine tuned. A survey of some US PWRs shutdown practices has been conducted for an acid and reducing shutdown chemistry implementation test at one EDF unit. This survey shows that deviating from the EPRI recommended practice for acid and reducing shutdown chemistry is possible and that critical path impact can be minimized. The paper also presents some investigations about soluble and insoluble species behavior and characterization; the study focuses here on 110m Ag, 122 Sb, 124 Sb and iodine contamination. Concerning RCS cleanup improvement, the paper presents two studies. The first one highlights some limited design modifications that are either underway or planned, for an increased flow rate during the most critical periods of the shutdown. The second one focuses on the strategy EDF envisions for filters and resins selection criteria. Matching the study on contaminants behavior with the study of filters and resins selection criteria should allow improving the cleanup efficiency. (authors)

  1. Phenomena occuring in the reactor coolant system during severe core damage accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    The reactor coolant system (RCS) of a nuclear power plant consists of the reactor pressure vessel and the piping and associated components that are required for the continuous circulation of the coolant which is used to maintain thermal equilibrium throughout the system. This paper discusses, how in the event of an accident, the RCS also serves as one of several barriers to the escape of radiotoxic material into the biosphere. The physical and chemical processes occurring within the RCS during normal operation of the reactor are relatively uncomplicated and are reasonably well understood. When the flow of coolant is properly adjusted, the thermal energy resulting from nuclear fission (or, in the shutdown mode, from radioactive decay processes) and secondary inputs, such as pumps, are exactly balanced by thermal losses through the RCS boundaries and to the various heat sinks that are employed to effect the conversion of heat to electrical energy. Because all of the heat and mass fluxes remain sensibly constant with time, mathematical descriptions of the thermophysical processes are relatively straightforward, even for boiling water reactor (BWR) systems. Although the coolant in a BWR does undergo phase changes, the phase boundaries remain well-defined and time-invariant

  2. Composition and concentration of soluble and particulate matter in the coolant of the reactor primary cooling system of the Embalse nuclear power plant; Composicion y concentracion del material soluble y particulado en el refrigerante del SPTC de la central nuclear Embalse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chocron, Mauricio; Garcia Rodenas, Luis; La Gamma, Ana M; Villegas, Marina [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica; Fernandez, Alberto N; Allemandi, Walter; Manera, Raul; Rosales, Hugo [Nucleoelectrica Argentina SA (NASA), Embalse (Argentina). Central Nuclear Embalse

    2000-07-01

    Nuclear power plants type PWR and PHWR (pressurized water reactor and pressurized heavy water reactor) have three coolant circuits which only exchange energy among them. The primary circuit, whose coolant extracts the reactor energy, the secondary circuit or water-steam cycle and the tertiary circuit which could be lake, river or sea water. The chemistry of the primary and secondary coolants is carefully controlled with the aim of minimizing the corrosion of structural materials. However, very low rates of corrosion are inevitable and one of the consequences of the corrosion processes is the presence of soluble and particulate matter in the coolant from where several problems associated with mass transfer arisen. In this way radioactive nuclides are transported out of the core to the steam generators, hydraulic resistance increases and heat transfer capability degrades. In the present paper some alternative techniques are proposed for the quantification of both, the particulate and soluble matter present in the coolant and their correspondent composition. Some results are also included and discussed. (author)

  3. Independent modification on water lubrication loop of radial-axial bearing of Russian reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yingbin

    2012-01-01

    Water lubrication was used for radial-axial bearings of 1391M reactor coolant pumps at both units of Tianwan Nuclear Power Plant Phase I Project, which was the first trial on large commercial pressurized water reactors in the world. As a prototype, there were inherent deficiencies leading to a series of operational events. Jiangsu Nuclear Power Corporation conducted the independent innovative technical modification to cope with the defects, and succeeded in reducing heat removal rate of the radial-axial bearings of the reactor coolant pumps, mitigating or preventing the cavitation abrasion of the bearings and improving the cooling effects. This paper illustrates the reasons of the innovative modification, the design and implementation preparation of modification program, the implementation process and evaluation of modification effect, including detailed follow-up work program. (author)

  4. Nuclear reactors with auxiliary boiler circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, B.V.; Cook, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    A gas-cooled nuclear reactor has a main circulatory system for the gaseous coolant incorporating one or more main energy converting units, such as gas turbines, and an auxiliary circulatory system for the gaseous coolant incorporating at least one steam generating boiler arranged to be heated by the coolant after its passage through the reactor core to provide steam for driving an auxiliary steam turbine, such an arrangement providing a simplified start-up procedure also providing emergency duties associated with long term heat removal on reactor shut down

  5. Radiolytic reactions in the coolant of helium cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, G.L.; Morgan, W.C.

    1975-01-01

    The success of helium cooled reactors is dependent upon the ability to prevent significant reaction between the coolant and the other components in the reactor primary circuit. Since the thermal reaction of graphite with oxidizing gases is rapid at temperatures of interest, the thermal reactions are limited primarily by the concentration of impurity gases in the helium coolant. On the other hand, the rates of radiolytic reactions in helium are shown to be independent of reactive gas concentration until that concentration reaches a very low level. Calculated steady-state concentrations of reactive species in the reactor coolant and core burnoff rates are presented for current U. S. designed, helium cooled reactors. Since precise base data are not currently available for radiolytic rates of some reactions and thermal reaction rate data are often variable, the accuracy of the predicted gas composition is being compared with the actual gas compositions measured during startup tests of the Fort Saint Vrain high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The current status of these confirmatory tests is discussed. 12 references

  6. Reactor coolant purification system circulation pumps (CUW pumps)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, Toshiaki

    1979-01-01

    Coolant purification equipments for BWRs have been improved, and the high pressure purifying system has become the main type. The quantity of purifying treatment also changed to 2% of the flow rate of reactor feed water. As for the circulation pumps, canned motor pumps are adopted recently, and the improvements of reliability and safety are attempted. The impurities carried in by reactor feed water and the corrosion products generated in reactors and auxiliary equipments are activated by neutron irradiation or affect heat transfer adversely, adhering to fuel claddings are core structures. Therefore, a part of reactor coolant is led to the purification equipments, and returned to reactors after the impurities are eliminated perfectly. At the time of starting and stopping reactors, excess reactor water and the contaminated water from reactors are transferred to main condenser hot wells or waste treatment systems. Thus the prescribed water quality is maintained. The operational modes of and the requirements for the CUW pumps, the construction and the features of the canned motor type CUW pumps are explained. Recently, a pump operated for 11 months without any maintenance has been disassembled and inspected, but the wear of bearings has not been observed, and the high reliability of the pump has been proved. (Kako, I.)

  7. Measuring device for the coolant flowrate in a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Toshihiko.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the operation performance by enabling direct and accurate measurement for the reactor core recycling flowrate. Constitution: A control rod guide is disposed to the upper end of a control rod drive mechanism housing passing through the bottom of a reactor pressure vessel and it is inserted into the through hole of a reactor core support plate. A water flow passage is formed through the reactor core support plate for the flowrate measurement of coolants recycled within the reactor core. The static pressure difference between the upper and the lower sides of the reactor core support plate is measured by a pressure difference detector of a pressure difference measuring mechanism, and an output signal from the pressure different detector is inputted to a calculation means, in which the amount of the coolants passing through the water flow passage is calculated based on the output signal corresponding to the pressure difference. Then, the total recycling flowrate in the reactor core is determined in the calculation means based on the relation between the measured flowrate and a predetermined total reactor core recycling flowrate. (Horiuchi, T.)

  8. The solid coolant and prospects of its use in innovative reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, A.M.; Deniskin, V.P.

    2010-01-01

    The progress of nuclear power demands consideration and development of innovative projects of the reactors having the increased level of safety due to their immanent properties allowing to provide high parameters. One of interesting and perspective offers is the use of a solid substance as a coolant. Use of the solid coolant of a nuclear reactor core has significant advantages among which an opportunity of movement of the coolant in the core under action of gravities and absence of necessity to have superfluous pressure in the jacket, that in turn means small metal consumption of construction, decrease in risk of emergency and its consequences. Cooling of the core with the help of solid substance is possible at performance of the certain conditions connected to features of the solid coolant. The major requirements are: the uniform continuous movement and minimal fluctuation of its density on every site of the core; high mechanical durability and wear resistance of particles; as well as good parameters of heat exchange, i.e. high heat conductivity and thermal capacity of the coolant material at the core operating conditions

  9. Neutron Physics aspects of using lead as a coolant in Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefhaber, E.

    1991-02-01

    The use of lead as a coolant for fast reactors is being considered as an attractive alternative in the USSR, especially with respect to its inherent safety features. In order to come to an own assessment at KfK, some investigations have been performed concerning a comparison of the nuclear characteristics of fast reactors with lead and sodium cooling. The studies have shown, that the nuclear and thermal hydraulic design calculations do not face special problems and that the nuclear characteristics of both types of cores do not differ essentially, except for the coolant density or void effect, which is more favourable for smaller sized lead cooled cores. A proper safety assessment of lead cooled cores will however require more detailed safety studies. Crucial points of lead cooling are the strong corrosion of austenitic steels in lead and the unknown behavior of ferritic steels in lead and under irradiation

  10. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; McLaughlin, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    In the pressure vessel of the water-cooled nuclear reactor there is provided an internal flange on which the one- or two-part core barrel is hanging by means of an external flange. A cylinder is extending from the reactor vessel closure downwards to a seat on the core cupport structure and serves as compression element for the transmission of the clamping load from the closure head to the core barrel (upper guide structure). With the core barrel, subject to tensile stress, between the vessel internal flange and its seat on one hand and the compression of the cylinder resp. hold-down element between the closure head and the seat on the other a very strong, elastic sprung structure is obtained. (DG) [de

  11. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleite, W.; Bock, H.W.; Struensee, S.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the use of burnable poisons in a nuclear reactor, especially in PWRs, in order to improve the controllability of the reactor. An unsymmetrical arrangement in the lattice is provided, if necessary also by insertion of special rods for these additions. It is proposed to arrange the burnable poisons in fuel elements taken over from a previous burn-up cycle and to distribute them, going out from the side facing the control rods, over not more than 20% of the lenth of the fuel elements. It seems sufficient, for the burnable poisons to bind an initial reactivity of only 0.1% and to become ineffective after normal operation of 3 to 4 months. (ORU) [de

  12. Reactor water chemistry relevant to coolant-cladding interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The report is a summary of the work performed in a frame of a Coordinated Research Program organized by the IAEA and carried out from 1981 till 1986. It consists of a survey on our knowledge on coolant-cladding interaction: the basic phenomena, the relevant parameters, their control and the modelling techniques implemented for their assessment. Based upon the results of this Coordinated Research Program, the following topics are reviewed on the report: role of water chemistry in reliable operation of nuclear power plants; water chemistry specifications and their control; behaviour of fuel cladding materials; corrosion product behaviour and crud build-up in reactor circuits; modelling of corrosion product behaviour. This report should be of interest to water chemistry supervisors at the power plants, to experts in utility engineering departments, to fuel designers, to R and D institutes active in the field and to the consultants of these organizations. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 3 papers included in the Annex of this document. Refs, figs, tabs

  13. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  14. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Gruber, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor with control rods in channels between fuel assemblies wherein the fuel assemblies incorporate guide rods which protrude outwardly into the control rod channels to prevent the control rods from engaging the fuel elements. The guide rods also extend back into the fuel assembly such that they are relatively rigid members. The guide rods are tied to the fuel assembly end or support plates and serve as structural members which are supported independently of the fuel element. Fuel element spacing and support means may be attached to the guide rods. 9 claims

  15. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications.

  16. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications

  17. Primary coolant recycling device for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru; Tokiwai, Moriyasu

    1998-01-01

    A primary coolants (liquid sodium) recycling device comprises a plurality of recycling pumps. The recycling pumps are operated while using, as a power source, electric power generated by a thermoelectric power generation system by utilizing heat stored in the coolants. The thermoelectric power generation system comprises a thermo-electric conversion module, heat collecting heat pipes as a high temperature side heat conduction means and heat dissipating pipes as a low temperature side heat conduction means. The heat of coolants is transferred to the surface of the high temperature side of each thermo-electric conversion elements of the thermal power generation system by the heat collecting heat pipes. The heat on the low temperature side of each of the thermo-electric conversion elements is removed by the heat dissipating pipes. Accordingly, temperature difference is caused between both surfaces of the thermo-electric conversion elements. Even upon loss of a main power source due to stoppage of electricity, electric power is generated by utilizing heat of coolants, so that the recycling pumps circulate coolants to cool a reactor core continuously. (I.N.)

  18. Nuclear Research Center IRT reactor dynamics calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman Fernandez, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The main features of the code DIRT, for dynamical calculations are described in the paper. With the results obtained by the program, an analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the Research Reactor IRT of the Nuclear Research Center (CIN) is performed. Different transitories were considered such as variation of the system reactivity, coolant inlet temperature variation and also variations of the coolant velocity through the reactor core. 3 refs

  19. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Michiko.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain an optimum structural arrangement of IRM having a satisfactory responsibility to the inoperable state of a nuclear reactor and capable of detecting the reactor power in an averaged manner. Constitution: As the structural arrangement of IRM, from 6 to 16 even number of IRM are bisected into equial number so as to belong two trip systems respectively, in which all of the detectors are arranged at an equal pitch along a circumference of a circle with a radius rl having the center at the position of the central control rod in one trip system, while one detector is disposed near the central control rod and other detectors are arranged substantially at an equal pitch along the circumference of a circle with a radius r2 having the center at the position for the central control rod in another trip system. Furthermore, the radius r1 and r2 are set such that r1 = 0.3 R, r2 = 0.5 R in the case where there are 6 IRM and r1 = 0.4 R and R2 = 0.8 R where there are eight IRM where R represents the radius of the reactor core. (Kawakami, Y.)

  20. Experimental analysis of upward vertical two-phase flow in four-cusp channels simulating the conditions of a typical nuclear reactor channel, degraded by a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assad, A.C.A.

    1984-01-01

    The present work deals with an experimental analysis of upward vertical two-phase flow in channels with circular and four-cusp cross-sections. The latter simulates the conditions of a typical nuclear reactor channel, degraded by a loss of coolant accident. Simultaneous flow of air and water has been employed to simulate adiabatic steam-water flow. The installation of air-water separators helped eliminate instabilities during pressure-drop measurements. The gamma ray attenuation was utilized for the void fraction determination. For the four-cusp geommetry, new criteria for two-phase flow regime transitions have been determined, as well as new correlatins for pressure drop and void fraction, as function of the Lockhart-Martinelli factor and vapour mass-fraction, respectively. (Author) [pt

  1. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheson, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor has an upper and a lower grid plate. Protrusions project from the upper grid plate. Fuel assemblies having end fittings fit between the grid plates. An arrangement is provided for accepting axial forces generated during the operation of the nuclear reactor by the flow of the cooling medium and thermal expansion and irradiation-induced growth of the fuel assembly, which comprises rods. Each fuel assembly rests on the lower grid plate and its upper end is elastically supported against the upper grid plate by the above-mentioned arrangement. The arrangement comprises four (for example) torsion springs each having a torsion tube and a torsion bar nested within the torsion tube and connected at one end thereto. The other end of the torsion bar is connected to an associated one of four lever arms. The torsion tube is rigidly connected to the other end fitting and the springs are disposed such that the lever arms are biassed against the protrusions. (author)

  2. Containment vessel for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanari, Sh.; Horiuchi, T.; Sugisaki, T.; Tominaga, K.

    1985-01-01

    A containment vessel for a nuclear reactor having a dry well for mounting therein a pressure vessel for containing the nuclear reactor, a pressure suppressing chamber having a pool of coolant therein, and a vent pipe device for releasing therethrough into the pool of coolant within the pressure suppressing chamber steam which will be produced as a result of the occurrence of an accident and escape into the dry well. The vent pipe device includes a plurality of vent pipe members inserted in the pool of coolant within the pressure suppressing chamber and each having at least one exhaust port opening in the coolant. The vent pipe members are divided into a plurality of groups in such a manner that the vent pipe members of different groups differ from one another in the length of submerged portions of the vent pipe members interposed between the liquid of the coolant within the pressure suppressing chamber and the exhaust ports of the vent pipe members

  3. Fuel cladding interaction with water coolant in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    Water coolant chemistry and corrosion processes are important factors in reliable operation of NPP's, as at elevated temperatures water is aggressive towards structural materials. Water regimes for commercial Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors were developed and proved to be satisfactory. Nevertheless, studies of operation experience continue and an amount of new Research and Development work is being conducted for further improvements of technology and better understanding of the physicochemical nature of those processes. In this report information is presented on the IAEA programme on fuel element cladding interaction with water coolant. Some results of this survey and recommendations made by the group of consultants who participated in this work are given as well as recommendations for continuation of this study. Separate abstracts were prepared for 6 papers of this report

  4. Application of damage function analysis to reactor coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, D.D.

    2002-01-01

    The application of deterministic models for simulating stress corrosion cracking phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor primary coolant circuits is described. The first generation code, DAMAGE-PREDICTOR, has been used to model the radiolysis of the coolant, to estimate the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), and to calculate the crack growth rate (CGR) at fixed state points during reactor operation in about a dozen plants worldwide. This code has been validated in ''double-blind'' comparisons between the calculated and measured hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and ECP in the recirculation system of the Leibstadt BWR in Switzerland, as well as through less formal comparisons with data from other plants. Second generation codes have now been developed, including REMAIN for simulating BWRs with internal coolant pumps and the ALERT series for modeling reactors with external pumps. One of this series, ALERT, yields the integrated damage function (IDF), which is the crack length versus time, on a component-by-component basis for a specified future operating scenario. This code therefore allows one to explore proposed future operating protocols, with the objective of identifying those that are most cost-effective and which minimizes the risk of failure of components in the coolant circuit by stress corrosion cracking. The application of this code is illustrated by exploring the benefits of partial hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for an actual reactor, in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater over only limited periods during operation. The simulations show that the benefits, in terms of reduction in the IDFs for various components, are sensitive to when HWC was initiated in the plant life and to the length of time over which it is applied. (author)

  5. Application of damage function analysis to reactor coolant circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, D.D. [Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The application of deterministic models for simulating stress corrosion cracking phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor primary coolant circuits is described. The first generation code, DAMAGE-PREDICTOR, has been used to model the radiolysis of the coolant, to estimate the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), and to calculate the crack growth rate (CGR) at fixed state points during reactor operation in about a dozen plants worldwide. This code has been validated in ''double-blind'' comparisons between the calculated and measured hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and ECP in the recirculation system of the Leibstadt BWR in Switzerland, as well as through less formal comparisons with data from other plants. Second generation codes have now been developed, including REMAIN for simulating BWRs with internal coolant pumps and the ALERT series for modeling reactors with external pumps. One of this series, ALERT, yields the integrated damage function (IDF), which is the crack length versus time, on a component-by-component basis for a specified future operating scenario. This code therefore allows one to explore proposed future operating protocols, with the objective of identifying those that are most cost-effective and which minimizes the risk of failure of components in the coolant circuit by stress corrosion cracking. The application of this code is illustrated by exploring the benefits of partial hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for an actual reactor, in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater over only limited periods during operation. The simulations show that the benefits, in terms of reduction in the IDFs for various components, are sensitive to when HWC was initiated in the plant life and to the length of time over which it is applied. (author)

  6. Structural integrity analysis of reactor coolant pump flywheel(I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Jin

    1986-01-01

    A reactor coolant pump flywheel is an important machine element to provide the necessary rotational inertia in the event of loss of power to the pumps. This paper attempts to assess the influence of keyways on flywheel stresses and fracture behaviour in detail. The finite element method was used to determine stresses near keyways, including residual stresses, and to establish stress intensity factors for keyway cracks for use in fracture mechanics assessments. (Author)

  7. Trends and experiences in reactor coolant pump motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the requirements and features of these motors is given as background along with a discussion of trends and experiences. Included are a discussion of thrust bearings and a review of safety related requirements and design features. Primary coolant pump motors are vertical induction motors for pumps that circulate huge quantities of water through the reactor core to carry the heat generated there to steam generator heat exchangers. 4 refs

  8. Vibration monitoring/diagnostic techniques, as applied to reactor coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sculthorpe, B.R.; Johnson, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    With the increased awareness of reactor coolant pump (RCP) cracked shafts, brought about by the catastrophic shaft failure at Crystal River number3, Florida Power and Light Company, in conjunction with Bently Nevada Corporation, undertook a test program at St. Lucie Nuclear Unit number2, to confirm the integrity of all four RCP pump shafts. Reactor coolant pumps play a major roll in the operation of nuclear-powered generation facilities. The time required to disassemble and physically inspect a single RCP shaft would be lengthy, monetarily costly to the utility and its customers, and cause possible unnecessary man-rem exposure to plant personnel. When properly applied, vibration instrumentation can increase unit availability/reliability, as well as provide enhanced diagnostic capability. This paper reviews monitoring benefits and diagnostic techniques applicable to RCPs/motor drives

  9. Primary coolant system of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Hidefumi; Takahashi, Masanori; Aoki, Yasuko

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a water quality control system for preventing corrosion and for extending working life of structural materials of a BWR-type reactor. Namely, a sensor group 1 and a sensor group 2 are disposed at different positions such as in a feedwater system, a recycling system, main steam pipes, and a pressure vessel, respectively. Each sensor group can record and generate alarms independently. The sensor group 1 for usual monitoring is connected to a calculation device by way of a switch to confirm that the monitored values are within a proper range by the injection of a water quality moderating agent. The sensor group 2 is caused to stand alone or connected with the calculation device by way of a switch optionally. When abnormality should occur in the sensor group 1, the sensor group 2 determines the limit for the increase/decrease of controlling amount of the moderating agent at a portion where the conditions are changed to the most severe direction by using data base. The moderating agent is injected and controlled based on the controlling amount. The system of the present invention can optionally cope with a new sensor and determination for new water quality standards. Then the evaluation/control accuracy of the entire system can be improved while covering up the errors of each sensor. (I.S.)

  10. Nuclear reactor apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H.E.; Bonnet, H.P.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor and its containment, instead of being supported on a solid concrete pad, are supported on a truss formed of upper and lower reinforced horizontal plates and vertical walls integrated into a rigid structure. The plates and walls from chambers within which the auxiliary components of the reactor, such as valves, pumping equipment and various tanks, are disposed. Certain of the chambers are also access passages for personnel, pipe chases, valve chambers and the like. In particular the truss includes an annular chamber. This chamber is lined and sealed by a corrosion-resistant liner and contains coolant and serves as a refueling cooling storage tank. This tank is directly below the primary-coolant conductor loops which extend from the reactor above the upper plate. The upper plate includes a sump connected to the tank through which coolant flows into the tank in the event of the occurrence of a loss-of-coolant accident. The truss extends beyond the containment and has chambers in the extending annulus. Pumps for circulating the coolant between the refueling coolant storage tank and the reactor are provided in certain of these chambers. The pumps are connected to the reactor by relatively short coolant conductors. Access to these pumps is readily afforded through hatches in the extending annulus

  11. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, F.; Glahe, E.

    1976-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor of the kind which is charged with spherical reaction elements and in which control rods are arranged to be thrust directly into the charge, each control rod has at least one screw thread on its external surface so that as the rod is thrust into the charge it is caused to rotate and thus make penetration easier. The length of each control rod may have two distinct portions, a latter portion which carries a screw thread and a lead-in portion which is shorter than the latter portion and which may carry a thread of greater pitch than that on the latter portion or may have a number of axially extending ribs instead of a thread

  12. Fuel Fabrication and Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    The uranium from the enrichment plant is still in the form of UF6. UF6 is not suitable for use in a reactor due to its highly corrosive chemistry as well as its phase diagram. UF6 is converted into UO2 fuel pellets, which are in turn placed in fuel rods and assemblies. Reactor designs are variable in moderators, coolants, fuel, performance etc.The dream of energy ‘too-cheap to meter’ is no more, and now the nuclear power industry is pushing ahead with advanced reactor designs.

  13. Research on organic liquids as reactor coolants. Status report from Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, I.

    1967-01-01

    The organic-moderated and cooled nuclear reactor concept has stimulated extensive activities in numerous different areas of research. Investigations started in Hungary in 1958 do not cover all topics of interest in organic reactors and so far no projects have been started to build such a reactor. Since OMRE and other organic reactor experiments have already shown the potential use of organic materials as reactor coolants and moderators, efforts have been focused rather on the investigation and solution of certain specific particular problems and also on economic aspects. One of the most important objectives seems to be a better knowledge of the radiolytic heat transfer and neutron physics behaviour of organic liquids. In Hungary the following topics were selected for investigation: Radiation stability of organic compounds and their mixtures; Heat-transfer studies; Investigations on the moderating parameters of organic liquids; Economic analysis of the possible use of organic reactors for process heat application

  14. Research on organic liquids as reactor coolants. Status report from Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiss, I [Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest (Hungary)

    1967-01-01

    The organic-moderated and cooled nuclear reactor concept has stimulated extensive activities in numerous different areas of research. Investigations started in Hungary in 1958 do not cover all topics of interest in organic reactors and so far no projects have been started to build such a reactor. Since OMRE and other organic reactor experiments have already shown the potential use of organic materials as reactor coolants and moderators, efforts have been focused rather on the investigation and solution of certain specific particular problems and also on economic aspects. One of the most important objectives seems to be a better knowledge of the radiolytic heat transfer and neutron physics behaviour of organic liquids. In Hungary the following topics were selected for investigation: Radiation stability of organic compounds and their mixtures; Heat-transfer studies; Investigations on the moderating parameters of organic liquids; Economic analysis of the possible use of organic reactors for process heat application.

  15. Nuclear reactor monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihashi, Ishi; Honma, Hitoshi.

    1993-01-01

    The monitoring device of the present invention comprises a reactor core/reactor system data measuring and controlling device, a radioactivity concentration calculation device for activated coolants for calculating a radioactivity concentration of activated coolants in a main steam and reactor water by using an appropriate physical model, a radioactivity concentration correlation and comparison device for activated coolants for comparing correlationship with a radiation dose and an abnormality alarm device. Since radioactivity of activated primary coolants is monitored at each of positions in the reactor system and occurrence of leakage and the amount thereof from a primary circuit to a secondary circuit is monitored if the reactor has secondary circuit, integrity of the reactor system can be ensured and an abnormality can be detected rapidly. Further, radioactivity concentration of activated primary circuit coolants, represented by 16 N or 15 C, is always monitored at each of positions of PWR primary circuits. When a heat transfer pipe is ruptured in a steam generator, leakage of primary circuit coolants is detected rapidly, as well as the amount of the leakage can be informed. (N.H.)

  16. An Investigation into Water Chemistry in Primary Coolant Circuit of an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bing-Jhen; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Wang, Mei-Ya; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2012-09-01

    To ensure operation safety, an optimization on the coolant chemistry in the primary coolant circuit of a nuclear reactor is essential no matter what type or generation the reactor belongs to. For a better understanding toward the water chemistry in an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR), such as the one being constructed in the northern part of Taiwan, and for a safer operation of this ABWR, we conducted a proactive, thorough water chemistry analysis prior to the completion of this reactor in this study. A numerical simulation model for water chemistry analyses in ABWRs has been developed, based upon the core technology we established in the past. This core technology for water chemistry modeling is basically an integration of water radiolysis, thermal-hydraulics, and reactor physics. The model, by the name of DEMACE - ABWR, is an improved version of the original DEMACE model and was used for radiolysis and water chemistry prediction in the Longmen ABWR in Taiwan. Predicted results pertinent to the water chemistry variation and the corrosion behavior of structure materials in the primary coolant circuit of this ABWR under rated-power operation were reported in this paper. (authors)

  17. Conceptual design of the integral test loop (I): Reactor coolant system and secondary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chul Hwa; Lee, Seong Je; Kwon, Tae Soon; Moon, Sang Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of the primary coolant system and the secondary system of the Integral Test Loop (ITL) which simulates overall thermal hydraulic phenomena of the primary system of a nuclear power plant during postulated accidents or transients. The design basis for the primary coolant system and secondary system is as follows ; Reference plant: Korean Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP), Height ratio : 1/1, Volume ratio : 1/200, Power scale : Max. 15% of the scaled nominal power, Temperature, Pressure : Real plant conditions. The primary coolant system includes a reactor vessel, which contains a core simulator, a steam generator, a reactor coolant pump simulator, a pressurizer and piping, which consists of two hot legs, four cold legs and four intermediate legs. The secondary system consists of s steam discharge system, a feedwater supply system and a steam condensing system. This conceptual design report describes general configuration of the reference plant, and major function and operation of each system of the plant. Also described is the design philosophy of each component and system of the ITL, and specified are the design criteria and technical specifications of each component and system of the ITL in the report. 17 refs., 43 figs., 51 tabs. (Author)

  18. Nuclear reactor core assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.

    1978-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to provide a fast reactor core assembly design for use with a fluid coolant such as liquid sodium or carbon monoxide incorporating a method of increasing the percentage of coolant flow though the blanket elements relative to the total coolant flow through the blanket and fuel elements during shutdown conditions without using moving parts. It is claimed that deterioration due to reactor radiation or temperature conditions is avoided and ready modification or replacement is possible. (U.K.)

  19. Nuclear reactor refuelable in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Buden, D.; Mims, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a gas cooled nuclear reactor suitable for use in space. It comprises a lightweight structure comprising a plurality of at least three sections, each sector comprising a container for a reactor core separate and distinct from the reactor cores of the other sectors, each sector being capable of operating on its own and in cooperation with one or more of the other sectors and each sector having a common juncture with every other structure; and means associated with each sector independently introducing gas coolant into and extracting coolant from each sector to cool the core therein, wherein in event of failure of the cooling system of a core in a sector, one or more of the other sectors comprise means for conducting heat away from the failed sector core and means for convecting the heat away, and wherein operation of the one or more other sectors is maintained

  20. On the transient pressure build-up in the full pressure safety shell of watercooled nuclear reactors after a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfeld, G.

    1979-08-01

    The thermo-and fluid-dynamic processes in a multichamber full pressure safety containment during a loss of coolant accident have been investigated. Comparison of the calculations carried out with the computer programs, in which ZOCO VI was used as being representative of similar programs, with the experimental results pointed out discrepancies in the determination of time dependent pressure, pressure difference and temperature curves. This led to the development of a new theoretical model and a program COFLOW which pays particular attention to the fluid dynamic processes in the initial phase of a loss of coolant accident. It can also be used to determine the maximum containment pressure towards the end of a loss of coolant accident. Comparison of the COFLOW results with experiments has shown that COFLOW provides a model and a procedure by which the physical processes in a multichamber full pressure safety containment can be simulated satisfactorily

  1. Reactor coolant pump testing using motor current signatures analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burstein, N.; Bellamy, J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes reactor coolant pump motor testing carried out at Florida Power Corporation`s Crystal River plant using Framatome Technologies` new EMPATH (Electric Motor Performance Analysis and Trending Hardware) system. EMPATH{trademark} uses an improved form of Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA), technology, originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories, for detecting deterioration in the rotors of AC induction motors. Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA) is a monitoring tool for motor driven equipment that provides a non-intrusive means for detecting the presence of mechanical and electrical abnormalities in the motor and the driven equipment. The base technology was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a means for determining the affects of aging and service wear specifically on motor-operated valves used in nuclear power plant safety systems, but it is applicable to a broad range of electric machinery. MCSA is based on the recognition that an electric motor (ac or dc) driving a mechanical load acts as an efficient and permanently available transducer by sensing mechanical load variations, large and small, long-term and rapid, and converting them into variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. The motor current variations, resulting from changes in load caused by gears, pulleys, friction, bearings, and other conditions that may change over the life of the motor, are carried by the electrical cables powering the motor and are extracted at any convenient location along the motor lead. These variations modulate the 60 Hz carrier frequency and appear as sidebands in the spectral plot.

  2. Containment for low temperature district nuclear-heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Shuyan; Dong Duo

    1992-03-01

    Integral arrangement is adopted for Low Temperature District Nuclear-heating Reactor. Primary heat exchangers, control rod drives and spent fuel elements are put in the reactor pressure vessel together with reactor core. Primary coolant flows through reactor core and primary heat exchangers in natural circulation. Primary coolant pipes penetrating the wall of reactor pressure vessel are all of small diameters. The reactor vessel constitutes the main part of pressure boundary of primary coolant. Therefore the small sized metallic containment closed to the wall of reactor vessel can be used for the reactor. Design principles and functions of the containment are as same as the containment for PWR. But the adoption of small sized containment brings about some benefits such as short period of manufacturing, relatively low cost, and easy for sealing. Loss of primary coolant accident would not be happened during the rupture accident of primary coolant pressure boundary inside the containment owing to its intrinsic safety

  3. Rapid thermal transient in a reactor coolant channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherubini, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report deals with the problem of one-dimensional thermo-fluid-dynamics in a reactor coolant channel, with the aim of determining the evolution in time of the coolant (H*L2O), in one-and/or two-phase regimes, subjected to a great and rapid increase in heat flux (accident conditions). To this aim, the following are set out: a) the physical model used; b) the equations inherent in the above model; c) the numerical methods employed to solve them by means of a computer programme called CABO (CAnale BOllente). Next a typical problem of rapid thermal transient resolved by CABO is reported. The results obtained, expressed in form of graphs, are fully discussed. Finally comments on possible developments of CABO follow

  4. Loss-of-coolant accident analysis of the Savannah River new production reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloney, K.J.; Pryor, R.J.

    1990-11-01

    This document contains the loss-of-coolant accident analysis of the representative design for the Savannah River heavy water new production reactor. Included in this document are descriptions of the primary system, reactor vessel, and loss-of-coolant accident computer input models, the results of the cold leg and hot leg loss-of-coolant accident analyses, and the results of sensitivity calculations for the cold leg loss-of-coolant accident. 5 refs., 50 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Organic coolants and their applications to fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierszewski, P.; Hollies, B.

    1986-08-01

    Organic coolants offer a unique set of characteristics for fusion applications. Their advantages include high-temperature (670 K or 400 degrees C) but low-pressure (2 MPa) operation, limited reactivity with lithium and lithium-lead, reduced corrosion and activation, good heat-transfer capabilities, no magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects, and an operating temperature range that extends to room temperature. The major disadvantages are decomposition and flammability. However, organic coolants have been extensively studied in Canada, including nineteen years with an operating 60-MW organic-cooled reactor. Proper attention to design and coolant chemistry controlled these potential problems to acceptable levels. This experience provides an extensive data base for design under fusion conditions. The organic fluid characteristics are described in sufficient detail to allow fusion system designers to evaluate organic coolants for specific applications. To illustrate and assess the potential applications, analyses are presented for organic-cooled blankets, first walls, high heat flux components and thermal power cycles. Designs are identified that take advantage of organic coolant features, yet have fluid decomposition related costs that are a small fraction of the overall cost of electricity. For example, organic-cooled first walls make lithium/ferritic steel blankets possible in high-field, high-surface-heat-flux tokamaks, and organic-cooled limiters (up to about 8 MW/m 2 surface heating) are a safer alternative to water cooling for liquid metal blanket concept. Organics can also be used in intermediate heat exchanger loops to provide efficient heat transfer with low reactivity and a large tritium barrier. 55 refs

  6. Modeling the spatial distribution of the parameters of the coolant in the reactor volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the approach to the question about the spatial distribution of the parameters of the coolant in-reactor volume. To describe the in-core space is used specially developed preprocessor. When the work of the preprocessor in the first place, is recreated on the basis of available information (mostly-the original drawings) with high accuracy three-dimensional description of the structures of the reactor volume and, secondly, are prepared on this basis blocks input to the nodal system code improved estimate ATHLET, allows to take into account the hydrodynamic interaction between the spatial control volumes. As an example the special case of solutions of international standard problem on the reconstruction of the transition process in the third unit of the Kalinin nuclear power plant, due to the shutdown of one of the four Main Coolant Pumps in operation at the rated capacity (first download). Model-core area consists of approximately 58 000 control volumes and spatial relationships. It shows the influence of certain structural units of the core to the distribution of the mass floe rate of its height. It is detected a strong cross-flow coolant in the area over the baffle. Moreover, we study the distribution of the coolant temperature at the assembly head of WWER-1000 reactor. It is shown that in the region of the top of the assembly head, where we have installation of thermocouples, the flow coolant for internal assemblies core is formed by only from guide channel Reactor control and protected system Control rod flow, or a mixture of the guide channel flow and flow from the area in front of top grid head assembly (the peripheral assemblies). It is shown that the magnitude of the flow guide channels affects not only the position of control rods, but also the presence of a particular type of measuring channels (Self powered neutron detector sensors or Temperature control sensors) in the cassette. (Author)

  7. Detection of coolant void in lead-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolniewicz, Peter; Håkansson, Ane; Jansson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We model the ALFRED LFR using different Monte-Carlo codes. • We study the impact on coolant void on the fission cross section in fission chambers. • We develop a methodology to detect coolant void. • We study the impact of detector fissile coating burn-up. • We conclude that the developed methodology may be an attractive complement to LFR monitoring. - Abstract: Previous work (Wolniewicz et al., 2013) has indicated that using fission chambers coated with 242 Pu and 235 U, respectively, can provide the means of detecting changes in the neutron flux that are connected to coolant density changes in a small lead-cooled fast reactor. Such density changes may be due to leakages of gas into the coolant, which, over time, may coalesce to large bubbles implying a high risk of causing severe damage of the core. By using the ratio of the information provided by the two types of detectors a quantity is obtained that is sensitive to these density changes and, to the first order approximation, independent of the power level of the reactor. In this work we continue the investigation of this proposed methodology by applying it to the Advanced LFR European Demonstrator (ALFRED) and using realistic modelling of the neutron detectors. The results show that the methodology may be used to detect density changes indicating the initial stages of a coalescence process that may result in a large bubble. Also, it is shown that under certain circumstances, large bubbles passing through the core could be detected with this methodology

  8. Coolant circuit water chemistry of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilky, Peter; Doma, Arpad

    1985-01-01

    The numerous advantages of the proper selection of water chemistry parameters including low corrosion rate of the structural materials, hence the low-level activity build-up, depositions, radiation doses were emphasized. Major characteristics of water chemistry applied to the primary coolant of pressurized water reactors including neutral, slightly basic and strong basic ones are discussed. Boric acid is widely used to control reactivity. Primary coolant water chemistry of WWER type reactors which is based on the addition of ammonia and potassium hydroxide to boric acid is compared with that of other reactors. The demineralization of the total condensate of the steam turbines became a general trend in the water chemistry of the secondary coolant circuits. (V.N.)

  9. Loss of coolant analysis for the tower shielding reactor 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radcliff, T.D.; Williams, P.T.

    1990-06-01

    The operational limits of the Tower Shielding Reactor-2 (TSR-2) have been revised to account for placing the reactor in a beam shield, which reduces convection cooling during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A detailed heat transfer analysis was performed to set operating time limits which preclude fuel damage during a LOCA. Since a LOCA is survivable, the pressure boundary need not be safety related, minimizing seismic and inspection requirements. Measurements of reactor component emittance for this analysis revealed that aluminum oxidized in water may have emittance much higher than accepted values, allowing higher operating limits than were originally expected. These limits could be increased further with analytical or hardware improvements. 5 refs., 7 figs

  10. Molten fuel-coolant interactions resulting from power transients in aluminium plate/water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storr, G.J.

    1989-08-01

    The behaviour of two reactors SL1 and SPERT D12, which underwent fast nuclear power transients prior to core destruction by a molten fuel-coolant interaction (MFCI) has been analysed and the results compared with measured data. The calculated spatial melt distribution and the mechanical work done during the events leads to high (∼ 250 kJ/kg) conversion efficiencies for this type of interaction when compared with molten drop experiments. A simple model for the steam explosion, using static thermodynamic properties of high temperature and pressure steam is used to calculate the dynamics of the reactors following the MFCI. 26 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Small-break loss-of-coolant accidents in the updated PIUS 600 advanced reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyack, B.E.; Steiner, J.L.; Harmony, S.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The PIUS advanced reactor is a 640-MWe pressurized water reactor developed by Asea Brown Boveri (ABB). A unique feature of the PIUS concept is the absence of mechanical control and shutdown rods. Reactivity is normally controlled by coolant boron concentration and the temperature of the moderator coolant. ABB submitted the PIUS design to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for preapplication review, and Los Alamos supported the NRC`s review effort. Baseline analyses of small-break initiators at two locations were performed with the system neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis code TRAC-PF1/MOD2. In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to explore the robustness of the PIUS concept to severe off-normal conditions having a very low probability of occurrence.

  12. Reactor primary coolant system pipe rupture study. Progress report No. 33, January--June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    The pipe rupture study is designed to extend the understanding of failure-causing mechanisms and to provide improved capability for evaluating reactor piping systems to minimize the probability of failures. Following a detailed review to determine the effort most needed to improve nuclear system piping (Phase 1), analytical and experimental efforts (Phase 2) were started in 1965. This progress report summarizes the recent accomplishments of a broad program in (a) basic fatigue crack growth rate studies focused on LWR primary piping materials in a simulated BWR primary coolant environment, (b) at-reactor tests of the effect of primary coolant environment on the fatigue behavior of piping steels, (c) studies directed at quantifying weld sensitization in Type 304 stainless steel, (d) support studies to characterize the electrochemical potential behavior of a typical BWR primary water environment and (e) special tests related to simulation of fracture surfaces characteristic of IGSCC field failures

  13. Report on the Survey of the Design Review of New Reactor Applications. Volume 4: Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downey, Steven; Monninger, John; Nevalainen, Janne; Joyer, Philippe; Koley, Jaharlal; Kawamura, Tomonori; Chung, Yeon-Ki; Haluska, Ladislav; Persic, Andreja; Reierson, Craig; Monninger, John; Choi, Young-Joon; )

    2017-01-01

    At the tenth meeting of the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) Working Group on the Regulation of New Reactors (WGRNR) in March 2013, the Working Group agreed to present the responses to the Second Phase, or Design Phase, of the licensing process survey as a multi-volume text. As such, each report will focus on one of the eleven general technical categories covered in the survey. The general technical categories were selected to conform to the topics covered in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Guide GS-G-4.1. This report provides a discussion of the survey responses related to the Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems category. The Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems category includes the following technical topics: overpressure protection, reactor coolant pressure boundary, reactor vessel, and design of the reactor coolant system. For each technical topic, the member countries described the information provided by the applicant, the scope and level of detail of the technical review, the technical basis for granting regulatory authorisation, the skill sets required and the level of effort needed to perform the review. Based on a comparison of the information provided by the member countries in response to the survey, the following observations were made: - Although the description of the information provided by the applicant differs in scope and level of detail among the member countries that provided responses, there are similarities in the information that is required. - All of the technical topics covered in the survey are reviewed in some manner by all of the regulatory authorities that provided responses. - It is common to consider operating experience and lessons learnt from the current fleet during the review process. - The most commonly and consistently identified technical expertise needed to perform design reviews related to this category are mechanical engineering and materials engineering. The complete survey

  14. Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA): Study of CAREM Reactor Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Jose; Gimenez, Marcelo

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the neutronic and thermohydraulic response of CAREM25 reactor and the safety systems involved in a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA).This parametric analysis considers several break diameters (1/2inch, 3/4inch, 1inch, 1.1/2inch and 2inches) in the vapor zone of the Reactor Pressure Vessel.For each accidental sequence, the successful operation of the following safety systems is modeled: Second Safety System (SSS), Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) and Safety Injection System (SIS). Availability of only one module is postulated for each system.On the other hand, the unsuccessful operation of all safety systems is postulated for each accidental sequence.In both cases the First Shutdown System (FSS) actuates, and the loss of Steam Generator secondary flow and Chemical and Control of Volume System (CCVS) unavailability are postulated.Maximum loss of coolant flow, reactor power and time for safety systems operation are analyzed, as well as its set point parameters.We verified that safety systems are dimensioned to satisfy the 48 hours cooling criteria

  15. Specificities of reactor coolant pumps units with lead and lead-bismuth coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznosov, A.V.; Anotonenkov, M.A.; Bokov, P.A.; Baranova, V.S.; Kustov, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis results of impact of lead and lead-bismuth coolants specific properties on the coolants flow features in flow channels of the main and auxiliary circulating pumps are presented. Impossibility of cavitation initiation in flow channels of vane pumps pumping lead and lead-bismuth coolants was demonstrated. The experimental research results of discontinuity of heavy liquid metal coolant column were presented and conditions of gas cavitation initiation in coolant flow were discussed. Invalidity of traditional calculation methods of water and sodium coolants circulation pumps calculations for lead and lead-bismuth coolants circulation pumps was substantiated [ru

  16. Coolant voiding analysis following SGTR for an HLMC reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Concepts are under development at Argonne National Laboratory for a small, modular, proliferation-resistant nuclear power steam supply system. Of primary interest here is the simplified system design, featuring steam generators that are directly immersed in the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant of the primary system. To support the safety case for this design approach, model development and analysis of transient coolant voiding during a postulated guillotine-type steam generator tube rupture event has been carried out. For the current design, the blowdown will occur from the steam generator shell into the ruptured 12.7-mm-inside-diameter tube through which the LBE coolant passes. The steam will expand biaxially in the tube, with a portion of the flow vented upward to eventually expand into the cover-gas region, while the balance of the flow is vented downward as a jet into the surrounding downward-flowing LBE. Coolant freezing is not an issue in this case because of high feedwater temperature in relation to the freezing point of the LBE. The specific objectives of the current work are to (a) determine the penetration behavior of the steam jet into the lower cold-leg region, (b) characterize the resultant void behavior in terms of coherent bubble versus breakup into a size distribution of small bubbles, and (c) characterize the motion of the bubbles with regard to rise to the cover-gas region (via the liner-to-coolant vessel gap) versus downward transport with the flowing LBE and subsequent upflow through the core to the cover-gas region

  17. PUMP: analog-hybrid reactor coolant hydraulic transient model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandia, M.R.

    1976-03-01

    The PUMP hybrid computer code simulates flow and pressure distribution; it is used to determine real time response to starting and tripping all combinations of PWR reactor coolant pumps in a closed, pressurized, four-pump, two-loop primary system. The simulation includes the description of flow, pressure, speed, and torque relationships derived through pump affinity laws and from vendor-supplied pump zone maps to describe pump dynamic characteristics. The program affords great flexibility in the type of transients that can be simulated

  18. COPDIRC - calculation of particle deposition in reactor coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeks, M.W.

    1982-06-01

    A description is given of a computer code COPDIRC intended for the calculation of the deposition of particulate onto smooth perfectly sticky surfaces in a gas cooled reactor coolant. The deposition is assumed to be limited by transport in the boundary layer adjacent to the depositing surface. This implies that the deposition velocity normalised with respect to the local friction velocity, is an almost universal function of the normalised particle relaxation time. Deposition is assumed similar to deposition in an equivalent smooth perfectly absorbing pipe. The deposition is calculated using 2 models. (author)

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garabedian, G.

    1988-01-01

    A liquid reactor is described comprising: (a) a reactor vessel having a core; (b) one or more satellite tanks; (c) pump means in the satellite tank; (d) heat exchanger means in the satellite tank; (e) an upper liquid metal conduit extending between the reactor vessel and the satellite tank; (f) a lower liquid metal duct extending between the reactor vessel and satellite tanks the upper liquid metal conduit and the lower liquid metal duct being arranged to permit free circulation of liquid metal between the reactor vessel core and the satellite tank by convective flow of liquid metal; (g) a separate sealed common containment vessel around the reactor vessel, conduits and satellite tanks; (h) the satellite tank having space for a volume of liquid metal that is sufficient to dampen temperature transients resulting from abnormal operating conditions

  20. Compartmentalized safety coolant injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    A safety coolant injection system for nuclear reactors wherein a core reflood tank is provided to afford more reliable reflooding of the reactor core in the event of a break in one of the reactor coolant supply loops. Each reactor coolant supply loop is arranged in a separate compartment in the containment structure to contain and control the flow of spilled coolant so as to permit its use during emergency core cooling procedures. A spillway allows spilled coolant in the compartment to pass into the emergency water storage tank from where it can be pumped back to the reactor vessel. (author)

  1. Sodium coolant of fast reactors: Experience and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, F.A.; Volchkov, L.G.; Drobyshev, A.V.; Nikulin, M.P.; Kochetkov, L.A.; Alexeev, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    In present report the following subjects are considered: state of the coolant and sodium systems under normal operating condition as well as under decommissioning, disclosing of sodium circuits and liquidation of its consequences, cleaning from sodium and decontamination under repairing works of equipment and circuits. Cleaning of coolant and sodium systems under normal operating conditions and under accident contamination. Cleaning of the equipment under repairing works and during decommissioning from sodium and products of its interaction with water and air. Treatment of sodium waste, taking into account a possibility of sodium fires. It is shown that the state of coolant, cover gas, surfaces of constructive materials which are in contact with them, cleaning systems, formed during installation operation require development of specific technologies. Developed technologies ensured safety operation of sodium cooled installations as in normal operating conditions so in abnormal situations. R and D activities in this field and experience gained provided a solid base for coping with problems arising during decommissioning. Prospective research problems are emphasized where the future efforts should be concentrated in order to improve characteristics of sodium cooled reactors and to make their decommissioning optimal and safe. (author)

  2. Thermohydraulic modeling of very high temperature reactors in regimes with loss of coolant using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Uebert G.; Dominguez, Dany S. [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilh´eus, BA (Brazil). Programa de P´os-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional em Ciencia e Tecnologia; Mazaira, Leorlen Y.R.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Hernandez, Carlos R.G., E-mail: uebert.gmoreira@gmail.com, E-mail: dsdominguez@gmail.com, E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologas y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2017-07-01

    The nuclear energy is a good alternative to meet the continuous increase in world energy demand. In this perspective, VHTRs (Very High Temperature Reactors) are serious candidates for energy generation due to its inherently safe performance, low power density and high conversion efficiency. However, the viability of these reactors depends on an efficient safety system in the operation of nuclear plants. The HTR (High Temperature Reactor)-10 model, an experimental reactor of the pebble bed type, is used as a case study in this work to perform the thermohydraulic simulation. Due to the complex patterns flow that appear in the pebble bed reactor core, and advances in computational capacity, CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) techniques are used to simulate these reactors. A realistic approach is adopted to simulate the central annular column of the reactor core, which each pebble bed element is modeled in detail. As geometrical model of the fuel elements was selected the BCC (Body Centered Cubic) arrangement. Previous works indicate this arrangement as the configuration that obtain higher fuel temperatures inside the core. Parameters considered for reactor design are available in the technical report of benchmark issues by IAEA (TECDOC-1694). Among the results obtained, we obtained the temperature profiles with different mass flow rates for the coolant. In general, the temperature distributions calculated are consistent with phenomenological behaviour. Even without consider the reactivity changes to reduce the reactor power or other safety procedures, the maximum temperatures do not exceed the recommended limits for fuel elements. (author)

  3. Thermohydraulic modeling of very high temperature reactors in regimes with loss of coolant using CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Uebert G.; Dominguez, Dany S.

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear energy is a good alternative to meet the continuous increase in world energy demand. In this perspective, VHTRs (Very High Temperature Reactors) are serious candidates for energy generation due to its inherently safe performance, low power density and high conversion efficiency. However, the viability of these reactors depends on an efficient safety system in the operation of nuclear plants. The HTR (High Temperature Reactor)-10 model, an experimental reactor of the pebble bed type, is used as a case study in this work to perform the thermohydraulic simulation. Due to the complex patterns flow that appear in the pebble bed reactor core, and advances in computational capacity, CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) techniques are used to simulate these reactors. A realistic approach is adopted to simulate the central annular column of the reactor core, which each pebble bed element is modeled in detail. As geometrical model of the fuel elements was selected the BCC (Body Centered Cubic) arrangement. Previous works indicate this arrangement as the configuration that obtain higher fuel temperatures inside the core. Parameters considered for reactor design are available in the technical report of benchmark issues by IAEA (TECDOC-1694). Among the results obtained, we obtained the temperature profiles with different mass flow rates for the coolant. In general, the temperature distributions calculated are consistent with phenomenological behaviour. Even without consider the reactivity changes to reduce the reactor power or other safety procedures, the maximum temperatures do not exceed the recommended limits for fuel elements. (author)

  4. Preliminary design of reactor coolant pump canned motor for AC600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Shaowen

    1998-01-01

    The reactor coolant pump canned motor of AC600 PWR is the kind of shielded motors with high moment of inertia, high reliability, high efficiency and nice starting performance. The author briefly presents the main feature, design criterion and technical requirements, preliminary design, computation results and analysis of performance of AC600 reactor coolant pump canned motor, and proposes some problems to be solved for study and design of AC600 reactor coolant pump canned motor

  5. Cooling nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.H.L.

    1975-01-01

    Reference is made to water or water/steam cooled reactors of the fuel cluster type. In such reactors it is usual to mount the clusters in parallel spaced relationship so that coolant can pass freely between them, the coolant being passed axially from one end of the cluster in an upward direction through the cluster and being effective for cooling under normal circumstances. It has been suggested, however, that in addition to the main coolant flow an auxiliary coolant flow be provided so as to pass laterally into the cluster or be sprayed over the top of the cluster. This auxiliary supply may be continuously in use, or may be held in reserve for use in emergencies. Arrangements for providing this auxiliary cooling are described in detail. (U.K.)

  6. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.) [pt

  7. Removal of tritium from gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, R.

    1976-01-01

    Tritium contained in the coolant gas in the primary circuit of a gas cooled nuclear reactor together with further tritium adsorbed on the graphite used as a moderator for the reactor is removed by introducing hydrogen or a hydrogen-containing compound, for example methane or ammonia, into the coolant gas. The addition of the hydrogen or hydrogen-containing compound to the coolant gas causes the adsorbed tritium to be released into the coolant gas and the tritium is then removed from the coolant gas by passing the mixture of coolant gas and hydrogen or hydrogen-containing compound through a gas purification plant before recirculating the coolant gas through the reactor. 14 claims, 1 drawing figure

  8. Determination of temperature distributions in fast reactor core coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillman, M.

    1975-04-01

    An analytical method of determination of a temperature distribution in the coolant medium in a fuel assembly of a liquid-metal-fast-breeder-reactor (LMFBR) is presented. The temperature field obtained is applied for a constant velocity (slug flow) fluid flowing, parallel to the fuel pins of a square and hexagonal array assembly. The coolant subchannels contain irregular boundaries. The geometry of the channel due to the rod adjacent to the wall (edge rod) differs from the geometry of the other channels. The governing energy equation is solved analytically, assuming series solutions for the Poisson and diffusion equations, and the total solution is superposed by the two. The boundary conditions are specified by symmetry considerations, assembly wall insulation and a continuity of the temperature field and heat fluxes. The initial condition is arbitrary. The method satisfies the boundary conditions on the irregular boundaries and the initial condition by a least squares technique. Computed results are presented for various geometrical forms, with ratio of rod pitch-to-diameter typical for LMFBR cores. These results are applicable for various fast-reactors, and thus the influence of the transient solution (which solves the diffusion equation) on the total depends on the core parameters. (author)

  9. Reactor Coolant Pump Motor Maintenance Experience in Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, J.; Besirevic, A.; Boljat, Z.

    2016-01-01

    After thirty years of service as well as maintenance in Krsko NPP both original Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) motors are remanufactured by original vendor Westinghouse and a new one was purchased. Design function of the RCP motor is to drive Reactor Coolant Pump and for coast-down feature during Design Basis Accident. This paper will give a view on maintenance issues of RCP motor during the thirty years of service and maintenance in Krsko NPP to be kept functionally operational. During the processes of remanufacturing inspection and disassembly it was made possible to get a deeper perspective in the motor condition and the wear or fatigue of the motor parts. Parameters like bearing & winding temperature, absolute and relative vibration greatly affect motor operation if not kept inside design margins. Rotational speed causes heat generation at the bearings which is then associated with oil temperatures and as a consequence bearing temperatures. That is why the most critical parts of the motor are the components of upper and lower bearing assembly. The condition of motor stator and rotor assembly technical characteristics shall be explained with respect to influence of demanding environmental conditions that the motor is exposed. Assessment shall be made how does the wear of critical RCP motor parts can influence reliable performance of the motor if not maintained in proper way. Information on upgrades that were done on RCP motor shall be shared: Oil Spillage Protection System (OSPS), Stator upgrades, Dynamic Port, etc. (author).

  10. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, I.; Gutscher, E.

    1980-01-01

    The core contains a critical mass of UN or U 2 N 3 in the form of a noncritical solution with melted Sn being kept below a N atmosphere. The lining of the reactor core consists of graphite. If fission progresses part of the melted metal solution is removed and cleaned from fission products. The reactor temperatures lie in the range of 300 to 2000 0 C. (Examples and tables). (RW) [de

  11. Loss of coolant acident analyses on Osiris research reactor using the RELAP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Humberto Vitor; Costa, Antonella Lombardi; Lima, Claubia Pereira Bezerra; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora Fortini

    2011-01-01

    RELAP5/MOD 3.3 code is widely used for thermal hydraulic studies of commercial nuclear power plants. However, several current investigations have shown that RELAP5 code can also be applied for thermal hydraulic analysis of nuclear research systems with good predictions. In this paper, a nodalization of the core and the most important components of the primary cooling system of the OSIRIS reactor developed for RELAP5 thermal hydraulic code are presented as well as results of steady state and transient simulations. OSIRIS has thermal power of 70 MW and it is an open pool type research reactor moderated and cooled by water. The OSIRIS reactor characteristics have been used as a base for the development of a model for the Multipurpose Brazilian Reactor (RMB). The aim of the present work is to investigate the behavior of the core during a loss of coolant accident and the possible damage of the fuel elements due an inadequate heat removal. Although the core coolant reached the saturation point due the large break, the fuel element conditions were out of the damage zone. (author)

  12. Bandwidth of reactor internals vibration resonance with coolant pressure oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakov, K.N.; Novikov, K.S.; Galivec, E.Yu.

    2009-01-01

    In a few decades a significant increase in a part of an electricity development on the NPP will require NPP to be operated in non full capacity modes and increase in operation time in transitive modes. Operating in such conditions as compared to the operation on a constant mode will lead to the increase in cyclic dynamical loading. In water cooled water moderated reactors these loading are realized as low-cyclic and high-cyclic loadings. High-cyclic loadings increases are caused by a raised vibration in non stationary modes of operation. It is known, that in some modes of a non full capacity reactor high-cyclic dynamic loadings can increase. It is obvious, that the development of management technologies is necessary for the life time management operation. In the context of this problem one of the main tasks are revealing and the prevention of the conditions of the occurrence of the operation leading to the resonant interaction of the coolant fluctuations and the equipment, reactor vessel (RV), fuel assemblies (FA) and reactor internals (RI) vibration. To prevent the appearance of the conditions for resonance interaction between the fluid flow and the equipments, it is necessary to provide the different frequencies for the self oscillations in the separated elements of the circulating system and also in the parts of the system formed by the comprising of these elements. While solving these problems it is necessary to have a theoretical and settlement substantiation of an oscillation frequency band of coolant outside of which there is no resonant interaction. The presented work is devoted to finding the solution of this problem. There are results of theoretical an estimation of width of such band as well as the examples of a preliminary quantitative estimation of Q - factors of coolant acoustic oscillatory circuit formed by the equipment of the NPP. The accordance of results had been calculated with had been measured are satisfied for practical purposes. These

  13. Design of an organic simplified nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvan, Koroush [Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Forrest, Eric [Primary Standards Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Numerous advanced reactor concepts have been proposed to replace light water reactors ever since their establishment as the dominant technology for nuclear energy production. While most designs seek to improve cost competitiveness and safety, the implausibility of doing so with affordable materials or existing nuclear fuel infrastructure reduces the possibility of near-term deployment, especially in developing countries. The organic nuclear concept, first explored in the 1950s, offers an attractive alternative to advanced reactor designs being considered. The advent of high temperature fluids, along with advances in hydrocracking and reforming technologies driven by the oil and gas industries, make the organic concept even more viable today. We present a simple, cost-effective, and safe small modular nuclear reactor for offshore underwater deployment. The core is moderated by graphite, zirconium hydride, and organic fluid while cooled by the organic fluid. The organic coolant enables operation near atmospheric pressure and use of plain carbon steel for the reactor tank and primary coolant piping system. The core is designed to mitigate the coolant degradation seen in early organic reactors. Overall, the design provides a power density of 40 kW/L, while reducing the reactor hull size by 40% compared with a pressurized water reactor while significantly reducing capital plant costs.

  14. Design of an Organic Simplified Nuclear Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Shirvan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous advanced reactor concepts have been proposed to replace light water reactors ever since their establishment as the dominant technology for nuclear energy production. While most designs seek to improve cost competitiveness and safety, the implausibility of doing so with affordable materials or existing nuclear fuel infrastructure reduces the possibility of near-term deployment, especially in developing countries. The organic nuclear concept, first explored in the 1950s, offers an attractive alternative to advanced reactor designs being considered. The advent of high temperature fluids, along with advances in hydrocracking and reforming technologies driven by the oil and gas industries, make the organic concept even more viable today. We present a simple, cost-effective, and safe small modular nuclear reactor for offshore underwater deployment. The core is moderated by graphite, zirconium hydride, and organic fluid while cooled by the organic fluid. The organic coolant enables operation near atmospheric pressure and use of plain carbon steel for the reactor tank and primary coolant piping system. The core is designed to mitigate the coolant degradation seen in early organic reactors. Overall, the design provides a power density of 40 kW/L, while reducing the reactor hull size by 40% compared with a pressurized water reactor while significantly reducing capital plant costs.

  15. Mixing Characteristics during Fuel Coolant Interaction under Reactor Submerged Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S. W.; Na, Y. S.; Hong, S. H.; Song, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    A molten material is injected into an interaction chamber by free gravitation fall. This type of fuel coolant interaction could happen to operating plants. However, the flooding of a reactor cavity is considered as SAM measures for new PWRs such as APR-1400 and AP1000 to assure the IVR of a core melt. In this case, a molten corium in a reactor is directly injected into water surrounding the reactor vessel without a free fall. KAERI has carried out fuel coolant interaction tests without a free fall using ZrO 2 and corium to simulate the reactor submerged conditions. There are four phases in a steam explosion. The first phase is a premixing phase. The premixing is described in the literature as follows: during penetration of melt into water, hydrodynamic instabilities, generated by the velocities and density differences as well as vapor production, induce fragmentation of the melt into particles; the particles fragment in turn into smaller particles until they reach a critical size such that the cohesive forces (surface tension) balance exactly the disruptive forces (inertial); and the molten core material temperature (>2500 K) is such that the mixing always occurs in the film boiling regime of the water: It is very important to qualify and quantify this phase because it gives the initial conditions for a steam explosion This paper mainly focuses on the observation of the premixing phase between a case with 1 m free fall and a case without a free fall to simulate submerged reactor condition. The premixing behavior between a 1m free fall case and reactor case submerged without a free fall is observed experimentally. The average velocity of the melt front passing through 1m water pool; - Case without a free fall: The average velocity of corium, 2.7m/s, is faster than ZrO 2 , 2.3m/s, in water. - Cases of with a 1 m free fall and without a free fall : The case without a free fall is about two times faster than a case with a 1 m free fall. Bubble characteristics; - Case

  16. The sodium coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    2004-01-01

    The sodium is the best appropriate coolant for the fast neutrons reactors technology. Thus the fast neutrons reactors development is intimately bound to the sodium technology. This document presents the sodium as a coolant point of view: atomic structure and characteristics, sodium impacts on the fast neutron reactors technology, chemical properties of the sodium and the consequences, quality control in a nuclear reactor, sodium treatment. (A.L.B.)

  17. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilroy, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved cover structure for liquid metal cooled fast breeder type reactors is described which it is claimed reduces the temperature differential across the intermediate grid plate of the core cover structure and thereby reduces its subjection to thermal stresses. (UK)

  18. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sekine, Katsuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the thickness of a reactor container and reduce the height and the height and plate thickness of a roof slab without using mechanical vibration stoppers. Constitution: Earthquake proofness is improved by filling fluids such as liquid metal between a reactor container and a secondary container and connecting the outer surface of the reactor container with the inner surface of the secondary container by means of bellows. That is, for the horizontal seismic vibrations, horizontal loads can be supported by the secondary container without providing mechanical vibration stoppers to the reactor container and the wall thickness can be reduced thereby enabling to simplify thermal insulation structure for the reduction of thermal stresses. Further, for the vertical seismic vibrations, verical loads can be transmitted to the secondary container thereby enabling to reduce the wall thickness in the same manner as for the horizontal load. By the effect of transferring the point of action of the container load applied to the roof slab to the outer circumferential portion, the intended purpose can be attained and, in addition, the radiation dose rate at the upper surface of the roof slab can be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Emergency cooling system for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, E.; Andrews, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    Upon the occasion of loss of coolant in a nuclear reactor as when a coolant supply or return line breaks, or both lines break, borated liquid coolant from an emergency source is supplied in an amount to absorb heat being generated in the reactor even after the control rods have been inserted. The liquid coolant flows from pressurized storage vessels outside the reactor to an internal manifold from which it is distributed to unused control rod guide thimbles in the reactor fuel assemblies. Since the guide thimbles are mounted at predetermined positions relative to heat generating fuel elements in the fuel assemblies, holes bored at selected locations in the guide thimble walls, sprays the coolant against the reactor fuel elements which continue to dissipate heat but at a reduced level. The cooling water evaporates upon contacting the fuel rods thereby removing the maximum amount of heat (970 BTU per pound of water) and after heat absorption will leave the reactor in the form of steam through the break which is the cause of the accident to help assure immediate core cooldown

  20. Method for operating nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumu; Uchida, Shunsuke

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: In order to judge the fuel failures, if any, without opening a reactor container for BWR type reactors, a method has been described for measuring the difference between the temperature dependent iodine spike value and the pressure dependent iodine spike value in the pressure vessel. Method: After the scram of a nuclear reactor, steam generated by decay heat is condensed in a remaining heat exchanger and cooling water is returned through a recycling pipe line to a reactor core. At the same time, a control rod drive system pump is operated, the reactor core is filled with the cooling water. Then, the coolant is taken from the recycling pipe line to cool the reactor core. After applying the temperature fluctuation, the cooling water is sampled at a predetermined time interval at a sampling point to determine the changes with time in the radioactive concentration of iodine. When the radioactivity of iodine in the cooling water is lowered sufficiently by a reactor purifying system, the nuclear reactor vessel is depressurized. After applying pressure fluctuation, iodine spike value is determined. (Kawakami, Y.)

  1. Control of reactor coolant flow path during reactor decay heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsbedt, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a sodium cooled reactor of the type having a reactor hot pool, a slightly lower pressure reactor cold pool and a reactor vessel liner defining a reactor vessel liner flow gap separating the hot pool and the cold pool along the reactor vessel sidewalls and wherein the normal sodium circuit in the reactor includes main sodium reactor coolant pumps having a suction on the lower pressure sodium cold pool and an outlet to a reactor core; the reactor core for heating the sodium and discharging the sodium to the reactor hot pool; a heat exchanger for receiving sodium from the hot pool, and removing heat from the sodium and discharging the sodium to the lower pressure cold pool; the improvement across the reactor vessel liner comprising: a jet pump having a venturi installed across the reactor vessel liner, the jet pump having a lower inlet from the reactor vessel cold pool across the reactor vessel liner and an upper outlet to the reactor vessel hot pool

  2. Nuclear reactors; graphical symbols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This standard contains graphical symbols that reveal the type of nuclear reactor and is used to design graphical and technical presentations. Distinguishing features for nuclear reactors are laid down in graphical symbols. (orig.) [de

  3. Guidebook to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V. Jr.

    1976-05-01

    A general introduction to reactor physics and theory is followed by descriptions of commercial nuclear reactor types. Future directions for nuclear power are also discussed. The technical level of the material is suitable for laymen

  4. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    Between a PWR's reactor pressure vessel made of steel and the biological shield made of concrete there is a gap. This gap is filled up with a heat insulation facting the reactor pressure vessel, for example with insulating concrete segments jacketed with sheet steel and with an additional layer. This layer serves for smooth absorption of compressive forces originating in radial direction from the reactor pressure vessel. It consists of cylinder-segment shaped bricks made of on situ concrete, for instance. The bricks have cooling agent ports in one or several rows which run parallel to the wall of the pressure vessel and in alignment with superposed bricks. Between the layer of bricks and the biological shield or rather the heat insulation, there are joints which are filled, however, with injected mortar. That guarantees a smooth series of connected components resistant tom compression. Besides, a slip foil can be set between the heat insulation and the joining joint filled with mortar for the reduction of the friction at thermal expansions. (TK) [de

  5. Conceptual design of primary coolant purification system using cylindrical membrane for nuclear energy system base on HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piping Supriatna

    2011-01-01

    The recent progress of reactor technology design for next generation reactor will be implemented on cogeneration reactor, which the aim of reactor operation not only for generating electrical energy, but also for other application like desalination, industrial manufacturing process, hydrogen production, Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR), etc. The cogeneration reactor concept developed for generate energy effectively, efficiently and sustainable, which reserve of uranium and thorium nuclear fuel for cogeneration reactor is supply able for world energy demand until next thousand years. The cogeneration reactor produce temperature output higher than commonly Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), and need special Heat Exchanger with helium gas as coolant. In order to preserve heat transfer with high efficiency, constant purity of the gas must be maintained as well as possible, especially contamination from its impurities. In this research has been designed modeling and assessment of primary coolant gas purification system with purify and fill up helium gas continuously, by using Cylindrical Helium Splitting Membrane and helium gas inventory system. The result of flow rate helium assessment for the purification system is 0.844x10 -3 kg/sec, where helium flow rate of reactor primary coolant is 120 kg/sec. The result of study show that the Primary Coolant Gas Purification System is enable to be implemented on Cogeneration Reactor HTGR200C. (author)

  6. Leak rate analysis of the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, T.; Jeanmougin, N.; Lofaro, R.; Prevost, J.

    1985-07-01

    An independent analysis was performed by ETEC to determine what the seal leakage rates would be for the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) during a postulated station blackout resulting from loss of ac electric power. The object of the study was to determine leakage rates for the following conditions: Case 1: All three seals function. Case 2: No. 1 seal fails open while Nos. 2 and 3 seals function. Case 3: All three seals fail open. The ETEC analysis confirmed Westinghouse calculations on RCP seal performance for the conditions investigated. The leak rates predicted by ETEC were slightly lower than those predicted by Westinghouse for each of the three cases as summarized below. Case 1: ETEC predicted 19.6 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 21.1 gpm. Case 2: ETEC predicted 64.7 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 75.6 gpm. Case 3: ETEC predicted 422 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 480 gpm. 3 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Fast reactors bulk sodium coolant disposal NOAH process application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magny, E. de; Berte, M.

    1997-01-01

    Within the frame of the fast reactors decommissioning, the becoming of contaminated sodium coolant from primary, secondary and auxiliary circuits is an important aspect. The 'NOAH' sodium disposal process, developed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), is presented as the only process, for destroying large quantities of contaminated sodium, that has attained industrial status. The principles and technical options of the process are described and main advantages such as safety , operating simplicity and compactness of the plant are put forward. The process has been industrially validated in 1993/1994 by successfully reacting the 37 metric tons of primary contaminated sodium from the French Rapsodie experimental reactor. The main outstanding aspects and experience gained from this so called 'DESORA' operation (DEstruction of SOdium from RApsodie) are recalled. Another industrial application concerns the current project for destroying more than 1500 metric tons of contaminated sodium from the British PFR (Prototype Fast Reactor) in Scotland. Although the design is in the continuity of DESORA, it has taken into account the specific requirements of PFR application and the experience feed back from Rapsodie. The main technical options and performances of the PFR sodium reaction unit are presented while mentioning the design evolution. (author)

  8. Neutronic design analyses for a dual-coolant blanket concept: Optimization for a fusion reactor DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palermo, I.; Gómez-Ros, J.M.; Veredas, G.; Sanz, J.; Sedano, L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dual-Coolant He/Pb15.7Li breeding blanket for a DEMO fusion reactor is studied. ► An iterative process optimizes neutronic responses minimizing reactor dimension. ► A 3D toroidally symmetric geometry has been generated from the CAD model. ► Overall TBR values support the feasibility of the conceptual model considered. ► Power density in TF coils is below load limit for quenching. - Abstract: The generation of design specifications for a DEMO reactor, including breeding blanket (BB), vacuum vessel (VV) and magnetic field coils (MFC), requires a consistent neutronic optimization of structures between plasma and MFC. This work targets iteratively to generate these neutronic specifications for a Dual-Coolant He/Pb15.7Li breeding blanket design. The iteration process focuses on the optimization of allowable space between plasma scrapped-off-layer and VV in order to generate a MFC/VV/BB/plasma sustainable configuration with minimum global system volumes. Two VV designs have been considered: (1) a double-walled option with light-weight stiffeners and (2) a thick massive one. The optimization process also involves VV materials, looking to warrant radiation impact operational limits on the MFC. The resulting nuclear responses: peak nuclear heating in toroidal field (TF) coil, tritium breeding ratio (TBR), power amplification factor and helium production in the structural material are provided.

  9. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, R.

    1979-01-01

    The support grid for the fuel rods of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor has a regular hexagonal contour and contains a large number of unit cells arranged honeycomb fashion. The totality of these cells make up a hexagonal shape. The grid contains a number of strips of material, and there is a window in each of three sidewalls staggered by one sidewall. The other sidewalls have embossed protrusions, thus generating a guide lining or guide bead. The windows reduce the rigidity of the areas in the middle between the ends of the cells. (DG) [de

  10. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baddley, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    A method of constructing a radiation shielding plug for use in the roof of the coolant containment vault of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described. The construction allows relative movement of that part of service cables and pipes which are carried by the fixed roof and that part which is carried by the rotatable plug. (U.K.)

  11. Research of impact of kind resuperheat and structure of system regenerative feed water to thermodynamic efficiency of cycle with steam-coolant reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maykova Svetlana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The first key problems of modern nuclear reactors are inability of closed nuclear cycle, problems with spent nuclear fuel, poor effectiveness of nuclear fuel and heat-exchange equipment usage. Dealing with problems consists in usage of fast-neutron reactors with steam coolant. Scientific men analyzed neutron-physical processes in steam-cooled fast reactor and consulted that creation of the reactor is viable. In consequence of low steam activation a single-loop steam cycle may be create. The cycle is easy and fool-proof. Core thermomechanical equipment has mastered and has relatively low metal content. Results of calculation are showing that nuclear unit with steam-coolant fast neutron reactor is more efficient than widely used unit with reactor VVER. Usage of simple scheme with four regenerative feedwater heaters the absolute efficiency ratio is more than 43%.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF LOCAL HYDRODYNAMICS AND MASS EXCHANGE PROCESSES OF COOLANT IN FUEL ASSEMBLIES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Dmitriev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental studies of local hydrodynamics and mass exchange of coolant flow behind spacer and mixing grids of different structural versions that were developed for fuel assemblies of domestic and foreign nuclear reactors are presented in the article. In order to carry out the study the models of the following fuel assemblies have been fabricated: FA for VVER and VBER, FA-KVADRAT for PWR-reactor and FA for KLT-40C reactor. All the models have been fabricated with a full geometrical similarity with full-scale fuel assemblies. The study was carried out by simulating the flow of coolant in a core by air on an aerodynamic test rig. In order to measure local hydrodynamic characteristics of coolant flow five-channel Pitot probes were used that enable to measure the velocity vector in a point by its three components. The tracerpropane method was used for studying mass transfer processes. Flow hydrodynamics was studied by measuring cross-section velocities of coolant flow and coolant rates according to the model cells. The investigation of mass exchange processes consisted of a study of concentration distribution for tracer in experimental model, in determination of attenuation lengths of mass transfer processes behind mixing grids, in calculating of inter-cellar mass exchange coefficient. The database on coolant flow in fuel assemblies for different types of reactors had been accumulated that formed the basis of the engineering substantiation of reactor cores designs. The recommendations on choice of optimal versions of mixing grids have been taken into consideration by implementers of the JSC “OKBM Afrikantov” when creating commissioned fuel assemblies. The results of the study are used for verification of CFD-codes and CFD programs of detailed cell-by-cell calculation of reactor cores in order to decrease conservatism for substantiation of thermal-mechanical reliability.

  13. Liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.

    1979-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor has a core comprising a plurality of fuel assemblies supported on a diagrid and submerged in a pool of liquid metal coolant within a containment vessel, the diagrid being of triple component construction and formed of a short cylindrical plenum mounted on a conical undershell and loosely embraced by a fuel store carrier. The plenum merely distributes coolant through the fuel assemblies, the load of the assemblies being carried by the undershell by means of struts which penetrate the plenum. The reactor core, fuel store carrier and undershell provide secondary containment for the plenum. (UK)

  14. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Weber, R.; Bauer, A.

    1975-01-01

    The refuelling of a PWR power reactor of about 1,200 MWe is performed by a transport pipe in the containment leading from an external to an internal fuel pit. A wagon to transport the fuel elements can go from a vertical loading position to an also vertical deloading position in the inner fuel pit via guide rollers. The necessary horizontal movement is effected by means of a cable line through the transport pipe which is inclined at least 10 0 . Gravity thus helps in the movement to the deloading position. The cable line with winch is fastened outside the containment. Swivelling devices tip the wagon from the horizontal to the vertical position or vice versa. Loading and deloading are done laterally. (TK/LH) [de

  15. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    In the system described the fuel elements are arranged vertically in groups and are supported in such a manner as to tend to tilt them towards the center of the respective group, the fuel elements being urged laterally into abutment with one another. The elements have interlocking bearing pads, whereby lateral movement of adjacent elements is resisted; this improves the stability of the reactor core during refuelling operations. Fuel elements may comprise clusters of parallel fuel pins enclosed in a wrapper of hexagonal cross section, with bearing pads in the form of spline-like ribs located on each side of the wrapper and extending parallel to the longitudinal axis of the fuel element, being interlockable with ribs on pads of adjacent fuel elements. The arrangement is applicable to a reactor core in which fuel elements and control rod guide tubes are arranged in modules each of which comprises a cluster of at least three fuel elements, one of which is rigidly supported whilst the others are resiliently tilted towards the center of the cluster so as to lean on the rigidly supported element. It is also applicable to modules comprising a cluster of six fuel elements, each resiliently tilted towards a central void to form a circular arch. The modules may include additional fuel elements located outside the clusters and also resiliently tilted towards the central voids, the latter being used to accommodate control rod guide tubes. The need for separate structural members to act as leaning posts is thus avoided. Such structural members are liable to irradiation embrittlement, that could lead to core failure. (U.K.)

  16. Electricity generation by nuclear fission reactor and closed cycle gas turbines, with core automatically shut down by coolant flow failure and dropped out of plant for sealing if temperature is excessive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrick, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    A reactor system is described in which if there is a failure of coolant flow the core automatically drops down to its control rods, so that criticality is reduced, but if the temperature of the core still stays dangerously high the core is allowed to drop down a deep shaft. Concrete blocks automatically come together after the ejected reactor core has moved past them to prevent the escape of radiation or radioactive material, until such time that the core temperature has dropped to a level that it can, with safety, be returned to its normal position in the plant. (U.K.)

  17. Predicted Variations of Water Chemistry in the Primary Coolant Circuit of a Supercritical Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Wang, Mei-Ya; Liu, Hong-Ming; Lee, Min

    2012-09-01

    In response to the demand over a higher efficiency for a nuclear power plant, various types of Generation IV nuclear reactors have been proposed. One of the new generation reactors adopts supercritical light water as the reactor coolant. While current in-service light water reactors (LWRs) bear an average thermal efficiency of 33%, the thermal efficiency of a supercritical water reactor (SCWR) could generally reach more than 44%. For LWRs, the coolants are oxidizing due to the presence of hydrogen peroxide and oxygen, and the degradation of structural materials has mainly resulted from stress corrosion cracking. Since oxygen is completely soluble in supercritical water, similar or even worse degradation phenomena are expected to appear in the structural and core components of an SCWR. To ensure proper designs of the structural components and suitable selections of the materials to meet the requirements of operation safety, it would be of great importance for the design engineers of an SCWR to be fully aware of the state of water chemistry in the primary coolant circuit (PCC). Since SCWRs are still in the stage of conceptual design and no practical data are available, a computer model was therefore developed for analyzing water chemistry variation and corrosion behavior of metallic materials in the PCC of a conceptual SCWR. In this study, a U.S. designed SCWR with a rated thermal power of 3575 MW and a coolant flow rate of 1843 kg/s was selected for investigating the variations in redox species concentration in the PCC. Our analyses indicated that the [H 2 ] and [H 2 O 2 ] at the core channel were higher than those at the other regions in the PCC of this SCWR. Due to the self-decomposition of H 2 O 2 , the core channel exhibited a lower [O 2 ] than the upper plenum. Because the middle water rod region was in parallel with the core channel region with relatively high dose rates, the [H 2 ] and [H 2 O 2 ] in this region were higher than those in the other regions

  18. CFD analysis of flow distribution of reactor core and temperature rise of coolant in fuel assembly for VVER reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Daiquan; Zeng Xiaokang; Xiong Wanyu; Yang Xiaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Flow field of VVER-1000 reactor core was investigated by using computational fluid dynamics code CFX, and the temperature rise of coolant in hot assembly was calculated. The results show that the maximum value of flow distribution factor is 1.12 and the minimum value is 0.92. The average value of flow distribution factor in hot assembly is 0.97. The temperature rise in hot assembly is higher than current warning limit value ΔT t under the deviated operation condition. The results can provide reference for setting ΔT t during the operation of nuclear power plant. (authors)

  19. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  20. Method of reducing radioactivity in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshino, Yasuo

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent increase of radiation dose ratio in primary coolant circuit pipeways of nuclear reactor and reduce operators' exposure dose upon periodical inspection, etc. Method: β-diketone such as acetylacetone is added in a predetermined amount to reactor cooling water. β-diketone dissolves to catch metal ions and iron oxides as the main ingredient of cruds. The resultant β-diketone complex of metals is slightly water soluble neutron molecule, and the total metal amount in the reactor coolant is at a concentration of less than 10 ppb and completely dissolved in water. Accordingly, deposition of clads in the coolant to pipeways can be prevented thereby enabling to prevent the increase in the radiation dose ratio in the pipeways and thus reduce the operators' exposure dose. (Takahashi, M.)

  1. Recommended reactor coolant water chemistry requirements for WWER-1000 units with 235U higher enriched fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrevski, I.; Zaharieva, N.

    2011-01-01

    The last decade worldwide experience of PWRs and WWERs confirms the trends for the improvement of the nuclear power industry electricity production through the implementation of high burn-up or high fuel duty, which are usually accompanied with the usage of UO 2 fuel with higher content of 235 U - 4.0% - 4.5% (5.0%). It was concluded that the onset of sub-cooled nucleate boiling (SNB) on the fuel cladding surfaces and the initial excess reactivity of the core are the primary and basic factors accompanying the implementation of uranium fuel with higher 235 U content, aiming extended fuel cycles and higher burn-up of the fuel in Pressurized Water Reactors. As main consequences of the presence of these factors the modifications of chemical / electrochemical environments of nuclear fuel cladding- and reactor coolant system- surfaces are evaluated. These conclusions are the reason for: 1) The determination of the choices of the type of fuel cladding materials in respect with their enough corrosion resistance to the specific fuel cladding environment, created by the presence of SNB; 2) The development and implementation of primary circuit water chemistry guidelines ensuring the necessary low corrosion rates of primary circuit materials and limitation of cladding deposition and out-of-core radioactivity buildup; 3) Implementation of additional neutron absorbers which allow enough decrease of the initial concentration of H 3 BO 3 in coolant, so that its neutralization will be possible with the permitted alkalising agent concentrations. In this paper the specific features of WWER-1000 units in Bulgarian Nuclear Power Plant; use of 235 U higher enriched fuel in the WWER-1000 reactors in the Kozloduy NPP; coolant water chemistry and radiochemistry plant data during the power operation period of the Kozloduy NPP Unit 5, 15 th fuel cycle; evaluation of the approaches and results by the conversion of the WWER-1000 Units at the Kozloduy NPP to the uranium fuel with 4.3% 235 U as

  2. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  3. Verification Test of Hydraulic Performance for Reactor Coolant Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Jae Shin; Ryu, In Wan; Ko, Bok Seong; Song, Keun Myung [Samjin Ind. Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    According to this project, basic design for prototype pump and model pump of reactor coolant pump and test facilities has been completed. Basic design for prototype pump to establish structure, dimension and hydraulic performance has been completed and through primary flow analysis by computational fluid dynamics(CFD), flow characteristics and hydraulic performance have been established. This pump was designed with mixed flow pump having the following design requirements; specific velocity(Ns); 1080.9(rpm{center_dot}m{sup 3}/m{center_dot}m), capacity; 3115m{sup 3}/h, total head ; 26.3m, pump speed; 1710rpm, pump efficiency; 77.0%, Impeller out-diameter; 349mm, motor output; 360kw, design pressure; 17MPaG. The features of the pump are leakage free due to no mechanical seal on the pump shaft which insures reactor's safety and law noise level and low vibration due to no cooling fan on the motor which makes eco-friendly product. Model pump size was reduced to 44% of prototype pump for the verification test for hydraulic performance of reactor coolant pump and was designed with mixed flow pump and canned motor having the following design requirements; specific speed(NS); 1060.9(rpm{center_dot}m{sup 3}/m{center_dot}m), capacity; 539.4m{sup 3}/h, total head; 21.0m, pump speed; 3476rpm, pump efficiency; 72.9%, Impeller out-diameter; 154mm, motor output; 55kw, design pressure; 1.0MPaG. The test facilities were designed for verification test of hydraulic performance suitable for pump performance test, homologous test, NPSH test(cavitation), cost down test and pressure pulsation test of inlet and outlet ports. Test tank was designed with testing capacity enabling up to 2000m{sup 3}/h and design pressure 1.0MPaG. Auxiliary pump was designed with centrifugal pump having capacity; 1100m{sup 3}/h, total head; 42.0m, motor output; 190kw

  4. Condensation During Nuclear Reactor Loca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rihan, Y.; Teamah, M.; Sorour, M.; Soliman, S.

    2008-01-01

    Two-phase channel flow with condensation is a common phenomenon occurs in a number of nuclear reactor accident scenarios. It also plays an important role during the operation of the safety coolant injection systems in advanced nuclear reactors. Semiempirical correlations and simple models based on the analogy between heat and mass transfer processes have been previously applied. Rigorous models, compatible with the state-of-the-art numerical algorithms used in thermal-hydraulic computer codes, are scare, and are of great interest. The objective of this research is to develop a method for modeling condensation, with noncondensable gases, compatible with the state-of-the-art numerical methods for the solution of multi-phase field equations. A methodology for modeling condensation, based on the stagnant film theory, and compatible with the reviewed numerical algorithms, is developed. The model treats the coupling between the heat and mass transfer processes, and allows for an implicit treatment of the mass and momentum exchange terms as the gas-liquid interphase, without iterations. The developed model was used in the application of loss of coolant in pressurized water reactor accidents

  5. Fuel element for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwell, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The invention concerns a fuel element for nuclear reactors with fuel rods and control rod guide tubes, where the control rod guide tubes are provided with flat projections projecting inwards, in the form of local deformations of the guide tube wall, in order to reduce the radial play between the control rod concerned and the guide tube, and to improve control rod movement. This should ensure that wear on the guide tubes is largely prevented which would be caused by lateral vibration of the control rods in the guide tubes, induced by the flow of coolant. (orig.) [de

  6. High temperature properties of nuclear reactor coolants and thermodynamic power cycle working fluids. Technical progress report, December 1, 1977--November 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonilla, C.F.; Holder, G.P.

    1978-09-01

    The program to determine the surface tension of sodium to high temperatures has been soundly commenced with the completion and calibration of a new all-molybdenum maximum-bubble-pressure apparatus suitable to some 1900 0 K. This property bears on boiling, condensing and two-phase flow phenomena, also related to LMFBR analysis. This same apparatus will be useful with lithium, of interest in fusion reactor cooling. Reduction of prior maximum bubble pressure results on potassium by the Schroedinger method has been repeated by the more precise but time-consuming Sugden procedure, which has increased the resulting surface tension values by an average of 0.27%. Thus the Sugden method will be employed to reduce the data for sodium and lithium

  7. Nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilibin, K.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor having a reactor core and a reactor coolant flowing therethrough, a temperature responsive, self-actuated nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly, comprising: an upper drive line terminating at its lower end with a substantially cylindrical wall member having inner and outer surfaces; a lower drive line having a lower end adapted to be attached to a neutron absorber; a ring movable disposed about the outer surface of the wall member of the upper drive line; thermal actuation means adapted to be in heat exchange relationship with coolant in an associated reactor core and in contact with the ring, and balls located within the openings in the upper drive line. When reactor coolant approaches a predetermined design temperature the actuation means moves the ring sufficiently so that the balls move radially out from the recess and into the space formed by the second portion of the ring thereby removing the vertical support for the lower drive line such that the lower drive line moves downwardly and inserts an associated neutron absorber into an associated reactor core resulting in automatic reduction of reactor power

  8. Reactor pressure vessel and reactor coolant circuit cast duplex stainless steel components contribution of the expertise for life management studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezdikian, Georges

    2006-09-01

    The life management of French Nuclear Power Plants is a major stake from an economic and a technical point of view considering the aging management assessment of the key components of the plant. The actual life evaluation is the result of prediction of life assessment from important program of expertise for the 3-loop PWR and 4-loop PWR plants in operation. To optimize the strategic policy in order to achieve the best possible performance and to prepare the technical and economical choice and decision, the paper presents the association of life management strategy and the program of expertise considering: - the identification of degradation for different components and prediction criteria proposed; - the large database from cast reactor coolant and component removed from nuclear power plants and expertise studies to confirm the prediction; - the life evaluation of RPV with radiation surveillance program based on the expertise of irradiation capsules, it is particularly shown how the expertise is in the center of the strategic choice. The French utility has organized the life management of nuclear plant as a function of several programs of expertise of knowledge on the long term experience feedback and the maintenance program for life. This paper shows updated on RPV and reactor coolant equipment activities engaged by utility on: - periodic maintenance and volume of expertise; - Alternative maintenance actions; - Large volume of expertise and how are managed these results to predict the aging management. (author)

  9. An introduction to the engineering of fast nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Anthony M

    2014-01-01

    An invaluable resource for both graduate-level engineering students and practising nuclear engineers who want to expand their knowledge of fast nuclear reactors, the reactors of the future! This book is a concise yet comprehensive introduction to all aspects of fast reactor engineering. It covers topics including neutron physics; neutron flux spectra; flux distribution; Doppler and coolant temperature coefficients; the performance of ceramic and metal fuels under irradiation, structural changes, and fission-product migration; the effects of irradiation and corrosion on structural materials, irradiation swelling; heat transfer in the reactor core and its effect on core design; coolants including sodium and lead-bismuth alloy; coolant circuits; pumps; heat exchangers and steam generators; and plant control. The book includes new discussions on lead-alloy and gas coolants, metal fuel, the use of reactors to consume radioactive waste, and accelerator-driven subcritical systems.

  10. Activity transport in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimhan, S.V.

    2000-01-01

    The chemistry of the primary coolant is such that the general material loss is immeasurably low. However, the generation of radioactive corrosion products in the coolant, their transportation and distribution to different out of core surfaces occur irrevocably through the life cycle of the reactor. This phenomena leading to the build up of radiation field, which is unique to the nuclear reactor systems, is the only major problem of any significance. Minimization of this phenomenon can be done by many ways. The processes involved in the mechanism of activity transport are quite complex and are not at all thoroughly understood. The codes that have been developed so far use many empirical coefficients for some of the rate processes, which are either partially justified by simulated experimental studies or supported theoretically. In a multi-metal system like that of the reactor, the corrosion rates or release rates need not be similar especially in reactors like PHWRs. The mechanisms involved in the formation of protective oxide coating are quite complex to model in a simplified manner. The paper brings out some these features involved in the activity transport modeling and analyses the need for extensive field related experimental work to substantiate the model. (author)

  11. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.; Allbeson, K.F.

    1984-01-01

    In a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor with a nuclear fuel assembly in a coolant-containing primary vessel housed within a concrete containment vault, there is thermal insulation to protect the concrete, the insulation being disposed between vessel and concrete and being hung from metal structure secured to and projecting from the concrete, the insulation consisting of a plurality of adjoining units each unit incorporating a pack of thermal insulating material and defining a contained void co-extensive with said pack and situated between pack and concrete, the void of each unit being connected to the voids of adjoining units so as to form continuous ducting for a fluid coolant. (author)

  12. Fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Tower, S.N.; Huckestein, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor comprises a 5x5 array of guide tubes in a generally 20x20 array of fuel elements, the guide tubes being arranged to accommodate either control rods or water displacer rods. The fuel assembly has top and bottom Inconel (Registered Trade Mark) grids and intermediate Zircaloy grids in engagement with the guide tubes and supporting the fuel elements and guide tubes while allowing flow of reactor coolant through the assembly. (author)

  13. Bond graph modeling of nuclear reactor dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylee, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    A tenth-order linear model of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is developed using bond graph techniques. The model describes the nuclear heat generation process and the transfer of this heat to the reactor coolant. Comparisons between the calculated model response and test data from a small-scale PWR show the model to be an adequate representation of the actual plant dynamics. Possible application of the model in an advanced plant diagnostic system is discussed

  14. Nuclear Reactor Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2001-02-01

    An authoritative textbook and up-to-date professional's guide to basic and advanced principles and practices Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering, and as the first comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics to appear in a quarter century, this book fills a large gap in the professional literature. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a textbook for students new to the subject, for others who need a basic understanding of how nuclear reactors work, as well as for those who are, or wish to become, specialists in nuclear reactor physics and reactor physics computations. It is also a valuable resource for engineers responsible for the operation of nuclear reactors. Dr. Weston Stacey begins with clear presentations of the basic physical principles, nuclear data, and computational methodology needed to understand both the static and dynamic behaviors of nuclear reactors. This is followed by in-depth discussions of advanced concepts, including extensive treatment of neutron transport computational methods. As an aid to comprehension and quick mastery of computational skills, he provides numerous examples illustrating step-by-step procedures for performing the calculations described and chapter-end problems. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a useful textbook and working reference. It is an excellent self-teaching guide for research scientists, engineers, and technicians involved in industrial, research, and military applications of nuclear reactors, as well as government regulators who wish to increase their understanding of nuclear reactors.

  15. Phenomena occurring in the reactor coolant system during severe core damage accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.

    1989-01-01

    The reactor coolant system (RCS) of a nuclear power plant consists of the reactor pressure vessel and the piping and associated components that are required for the continuous circulation of the coolant which is used to maintain thermal equilibrium throughout the system. In the event of an accident, the RCS also serves as one of several barriers to the escape of radiotoxic material into the biosphere. In contrast to normal operating conditions, severe core damage accidents are characterized by significant temporal and spatial variations in heat and mass fluxes, and by eventual geometrical changes within the RCS. Furthermore, the difficulties in describing the system in the severe accident mode are compounded by the occurrence of chemical reactions. These reactions can influence both the thermal and the mass transport behavior of the system. In addition, behavior of the reactor vessel internals and of materials released from the core region (especially the radioactive fission products) in the course of the accident likewise become of concern to the analyst. This report addresses these concerns. 9 refs., 1 tab

  16. Physics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This course gives an introduction to Nuclear Reactor Physics. The first chapter explains the most important parameters and concepts in nuclear reactor physics such as fission, cross sections and the effective multiplication factor. Further on, in the second chapter, the flux distributions in a stationary reactor are derived from the diffusion equation. Reactor kinetics, reactor control and reactor dynamics (feedback effects) are described in the following three chapters. The course concludes with a short description of the different types of existing and future reactors. (author)

  17. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Tooru; Murase, Michio; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Hidaka, Masataka; Sumita, Isao; Tominaga, Kenji.

    1992-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor container, a chamber in communication with a wet well of a pressure suppression chamber is disposed and situated to such a position that the temperature is lower than a chamber containing pool water upon occurrence of loss of coolant accident. In addition, the inner surface of the pressure suppression chamber is constituted with steel walls in contact with pool water, and an outer circumferential pool is disposed at the outer circumferential surface thereof. Further, a circulation channel is disposed, and a water intake port is disposed at a position higher than an exit to the pool water, and a water discharge port is opened in the pool water at a position lower than the exit to the pool water. With such a constitution, the allowable temperature of the pressure suppression pool water can be elevated to a saturated steam temperature corresponding to the resistant pressure of the container, so that the temperature difference between the pressure suppression pool and the outer side thereof is increased by so much, to improve thermal radiation performance. Accordingly, it can be utilized as a pressure suppression means for a plant of greater power. Further, thermal conduction efficiency from the pool water region of the pressure suppression chamber to the outer circumferential pool water is improved, or thermal radiation area is enlarged due to the circulation channel, to improve the heat radiation performance. (N.H.)

  18. Evaluation of tests for coastdown of reactor coolant flow and measure of primary circuit flow of Angra-1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galetti, M.R.S.; Camargo, C.T.M.; Pontedeiro, A.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant first reload license was issued after several technical discussions among CNEN, FURNAS and KWU. During the license process CNEN has established that the plant could return to anormal operation if the requirements described in the letter CNEN-DExL-C 06/86 were satisfied. The requirements according to the CNEN Transient and Thermohydraulic Group Analysis were to do again the following tests: 'Primary Flow Measurement' to check if the excess flow measured in the first cycle was held; and Pump Coastdown' to check if the Westinghouse and KWU fuel elements are thermo-hydraulicaly compatibles during transients. The mixed core must keep at least the same safety margin presented on Angra 1 FSAR for the original core. The tests and the analysis of results are described. (Author) [pt

  19. Reactor coolant pump service life evaluation for current life cycle optimization and license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshuk, B.W.; Berto, D.S.; Robles, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that as part of the plant life cycle management and license renewal program, Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BG and E) has completed a service life evaluation of their reactor coolant pumps, funded jointly by EPRI and performed by ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Power. Two of the goals of the BG and E plant life cycle management and license renewal program, and of this current evaluation, are to identify actions which would optimize current plant operation, and ensure that license renewal remains a viable option. The reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) at BG and E's Calvert Cliffs Units 1 and 2 are Byron Jackson pumps with a diffuser and a single suction. This pump design is also used in many other nuclear plants. The RCP service life evaluation assessed the effect of all plausible age-related degradation mechanisms (ARDMs) on the RCP components. Cyclic fatigue and thermal embrittlement were two ARDMs identified as having a high potential to limit the service life of the pump case. The pump case is a primary pressure boundary component. Hence, ensuring its continued structural integrity is important

  20. Determination of mean molecular weights in organic reactor coolants. III. Differential cryoscopy with thermoelectric thermometer; Determinacion de masas moleculares medias en refrigerantes nucleares organicos. III-Crioscopia diferencial con termometro termoelectrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becerro, E; Carreira, M

    1968-07-01

    The solubility problems raised by some components of the polymeric residue of irradiated polyphenolic coolants, which make it necessary to operate with very small samples, have been solved by means of a differential cryoscopic technique using a thermoelectric thermometer (thermal) as sensitive element. The method is based on the direct measurement of the difference between the freezing points of the investigated solution and of a reference solution whose concentration may be changed at will. The change of {delta} V (mV) versus c(molal) is linear, the equivalent point being determined either analytically or graphically depending on the required accuracy. The method has been tested by measurements on pure polyphenyls, using diphenyl ether as solvent. It has been also applied to the main prospective coolants for the DON reactor. Working with 10{sup 2} molal solutions the accuracy is better than {+-} 2 per cent. (Author) 2 refs.

  1. Specification of technical means for implementation of supervisory algorithms of the status of a nuclear reactor and of the main coolant pump of a NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirsa, P.

    2000-11-01

    Inclusion into the programming of inputs of the supervisory algorithm (data collection from the monitoring system, transmission of diagnostic output fro other system and transmission of technological data), of the supervisory process proper based on the data obtained (data analysis) and of the output (presentation of the results to the operator, communication with the master and archiving systems, etc.) requires knowledge of the format of the data transmitted, their availability, communication network protocols, operating system, etc. Hence, the environment for which the algorithm will be developed should be specified, roughly at least. The following topics are addressed: Description of technical means of Czech nuclear power plants (Dukovany, Temelin, Mochovce), and Proposal for technical means to implement the monitoring algorithm (Requirements related to the monitoring systems, Identification of the reference system, Parameters of the selected system). Since no domestic manufacturer of HW for monitoring and diagnostic systems exists, a novel system of the Brueel and Kjaer company for on-line diagnosis and monitoring, COMPASS, was selected as a model model system for the implementation of the supervisory algorithms. (P.A.)

  2. Study on the VFD (Variable Frequency Drive) for RCP (Reactor Coolant Pump) Motors of APR1400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Ha; Robert, M. Field; Kim, Tae Ryong [Department of NPP Engineering, KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Most industrial facilities are continually searching for ways to reduce energy costs while increasing or maintaining current production. In terms of electric motors, Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) units represent a critical opportunity for energy savings. Currently, VFDs are used on about ten (10) percent of industrial process motors, and this percentage is increasing every year. Properly applied VFDs have been documented to save as much as fifty percent of the energy consumed by certain industrial processes. Nuclear Power - Power plants in general and Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) in particular are slow to adopt new technology. The nuclear power industry requires a nearly absolute demonstration through operating experience in other industries in which the new approach will result in a net improvement in plant reliability without any surprises. Only recently has the nuclear industry begun to adapt VFD units for large motors. Specifically, there are several examples in the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fleet of replacing Motor-Generator (M-G) sets with VFD units for Reactor Recirculation (RR) pump motor service. At one station, VFD units were introduced upstream of the Circulating Water (CWP) pump motors to address environmental issues. They units are taking advantage of VFD technology whose benefits include increased reliability, reduction in electrical house load, improved flow control, and reduced maintenance. RCP Application - In the case of new generation, it has been reported that the Westinghouse AP1000 will make use of VFD units for the Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) motors.

  3. Study on severe accident induced by large break loss of coolant accident for pressureized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Longfei; Zhang Dafa; Wang Shaoming

    2007-01-01

    Using the best estimate computer code SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 and taking US Westinghouse corporation Surry nuclear power plant as the reference object, a typical three-loop pressurized water reactor severe accident calculation model was established and 25 cm large break loss of coolant accident (LBLOCA) in cold and hot leg of primary loop induced core melt accident was analyzed. The calculated results show that core melt progression is fast and most of the core material melt and relocated to the lower plenum. The lower head of reactor pressure vessel failed at an early time and the cold leg break is more severe than the hot leg break in primary loop during LBLOCA. (authors)

  4. Turbulent heat transfer in a coolant channel of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Saha, Arun K.; Munshi, Prabhat

    2016-01-01

    Exact predictions in nuclear reactors are more crucial, because of the safety aspects. It necessitates the appropriate modeling of heat transfer phenomena in the reactors core. A two-dimensional thermal-hydraulics model is used to study the detailed analysis of the coolant region of a fuel pin. Governing equations are solved using Marker and Cell (MAC) method. Standard wall functions k-ε turbulence model is incorporated to consider the turbulent behaviour of the flow field. Validation of the code and a few results for a typical PWR running at normal operating conditions reported earlier. There were some discrepancies in the old calculations. These discrepancies have been resolved and updated results are presented in this work. 2D thermal-hydraulics model results have been compared with the 1D thermal-hydraulics model results and conclusions have been drawn. (author)

  5. Reactor Primary Coolant System Pipe Rupture Study. Progress report No. 32, July--December 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-03-01

    The pipe rupture study is designed to extend the understanding of failure-causing mechanisms and to provide improved capability for evaluating reactor piping systems to minimize the probability of failures. Following a detailed review to determine the effort most needed to improve nuclear system piping (Phase I), analytical and experimental efforts (Phase II) were started in 1965. This progress report summarizes the recent accomplishments of a broad program in (a) basic fatigue studies focused on Elastic/Plastic ASME Code Design Rules, (b) at-reactor tests of the effect of primary coolant environment on the fatigue behavior of piping steels, and (c) studies directed at quantifying weld sensitization in T-304 stainless steel. (auth)

  6. Experiments for simulating a great leak in the primary coolant circuit of a PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebig, E.

    1977-01-01

    A loss of coolant accident is to be simulated on a high pressure test rig. The accident is initiated by an externally induced rupture of a pair of rupture-disks installed in a coolant ejection device. Several problems of simulating leaks in the primary coolant circuit of PWR type reactors are dealt with. The selection of appropriate rupture-disks for such experiments is described

  7. Examination of a failed reactor coolant pump rotating assembly from Crystal River Unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayner, G.O.; Lubnow, T.; Clary, M.

    1990-01-01

    On January 18, 1989, the A reactor coolant pump rotating assembly at the Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Power Plant failed during operation. A rotating assembly from this pump had previously failed in 1986. The reactor coolant pump was fabricated by Byron Jackson Pump Division of Borg-Warner Ind. Products, Inc. from UNS S66286 superalloy (Alloy A286). A root cause failure analysis examination was performed on the pump shaft and other components. The failure analysis included shaft vibrational mode and stress analyses, pump clearance and alignment analyses, and detailed destructive examination of the shaft and hydrostatic bearing assemblies. Based on the detailed physical examination of the shaft it was concluded that cracks initiated in the pump shaft at two sites approximately 180 0 apart in a band of shallow, thermally induced fatigue cracks. The cracks initiated at the bottom edge of the motor end shrink fit pad under the shrink fit sleeve supporting the hydrostatic bearing journal. The band of thermally induced fatigue cracks was apparently caused by mixing of cold seal injection water and hot reactor coolant in gaps between the pump shaft and sleeve. The motor end shrink fit was apparently not effective in preventing introduction of the seal injection water to this area. Initial crack propagation occurred by fatigue due to lateral vibration; however, the majority of crack propagation occurred by abnormal torsional fatigue loading induced by contact and sticking between the rotating and stationary portions of the hydrostatic bearing. Final fracture of the shaft occurred by torsional overload. Metallurgical characteristics and mechanical properties of the shaft were within design specification and probably did not significantly influence the cracking process

  8. Control for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, E.B.; Bernath, L.; Facha, J.V.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is provided with several hydraulically-supported spherical bodies having a high neutron absorption cross section, which fall by gravity into the core region of the reactor when the flow of supporting fluid is shut off. (auth)

  9. An evaluation of debris mobility within a PWR reactor coolant system during the recirculation mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreychek, T.S.

    1987-01-01

    To provide for the long-term cooling of the nuclear core of a Pressurized Water Rector (PWR) following a hypothetical Loss-of-Coolant Accidnet (LOCA), water is drawn from the containment sump and pumped into the reactor coolant system (RCS). It has been postulated that debris from the containment, such as dirt, sand, and paint from containment walls and in-containment equipment, could be carried into the containment sump due to the action of the RCS coolant that escapes from the breach in the piping and then flows to the sump. Once in the sump, this debris could be pumped into the Safety Injection System (SIS) and ultimately the RCS itself, causing the performance of the SIS to be degraded. Of particular interest is the potential for core blockage that may occur due to debris transport into the core region by the recirculating flow. This paper presents a method of evaluating the potential for debris from the sump to form core blockages under recirculating flow conditions following a hypothetical LOCA for a PWR

  10. Nuclear reactor instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncombe, E.; McGonigal, G.

    1976-01-01

    Reference is made to the instrumentation of liquid metal cooled fast reactors. In order to ensure the safe operation of such reactors it is necessary to constantly monitor the coolant flowing through the fuel assemblies for temperature and rate of flow, requiring a large number of sensors. An improved and simplified arrangement is claimed in which the fuel assemblies feed a fraction of coolant to three instrument units arranged to sense the temperature and rate of flow of samples of coolant. Each instrument unit comprises a sleeve housing a sensing unit and has a number of inlet ducts arranged for receiving coolant from a fuel assembly together with a single outlet. The sensing unit has three thermocouple hot junctions connected in series, the hot junctions and inlet ducts being arranged in pairs. Electromagnetic windings around an inductive core are arranged to sense variation in flow of liquid metal by flux distortion. Fission product sensing means may also be provided. Full constructional details are given. (U.K.)

  11. Technical findings related to Generic Issue 23: Reactor coolant pump seal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruger, C.J.; Luckas, W.J. Jr.

    1989-03-01

    Reactor coolant pumps contain mechanical seals to limit the leakage of pressurized coolant from the reactor coolant system to the containment. These seals have the potential to leak, and a few have degraded and even failed resulting in a small break loss of coolant accident (LOCA). As a result, ''Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Failure,'' Generic Issue 23 was established. This report summarizes the findings of a technical investigation generated as part of the program to resolve this issue. These technical findings address the various fact-finding issue tasks developed for the action plan associated with the generic issue, namely background information on seal failure, evaluation of seal cooling, and mechanical- and maintenance-induced failure mechanisms. 46 refs., 15 figs., 14 tabs

  12. Inspection of the Sizewll 'B' reactor coolant pump flywheels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNulty, A.L.; Cheshire, A.

    1992-01-01

    The Sizewell ''B'' safety case has categorised some primary circuit items as components for which failure is considered to be incredible. These Incredibility of Failure (IOF) components are particularly critical in their safety function, and specially stringent and all embracing provisions are made in their design, manufacture, inspection and operation. These provisions are such as to limit the probability of failure to levels which are so low that it does not have to be taken into account and no steps are necessary to control the consequences. The reactor coolant pump flywheel is considered to be an IOF component. Consequently there is a need for rigorous inspection during both manufacture and in service (ISI). The ISI requirement results in the need for an automated inspection. There is therefore a prerequisite to perform a Pre-Service Inspection (PSI) for baseline fingerprinting purposes. Furthermore there is a requirement that the inspection procedure, the inspection equipment and the operators are validated at the Inspection Validation Centre (IVC) of the AEA Technology laboratories at Risley. Development work is described. (author)

  13. Assessment of Candidate Molten Salt Coolants for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.F.

    2006-03-24

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a novel reactor design that utilizes the graphite-matrix high-temperature fuel of helium-cooled reactors, but provides cooling with a high-temperature fluoride salt. For applications at temperatures greater than 900 C the AHTR is also referred to as a Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very High-Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR). This report provides an assessment of candidate salts proposed as the primary coolant for the AHTR based upon a review of physical properties, nuclear properties, and chemical factors. The physical properties most relevant for coolant service were reviewed. Key chemical factors that influence material compatibility were also analyzed for the purpose of screening salt candidates. Some simple screening factors related to the nuclear properties of salts were also developed. The moderating ratio and neutron-absorption cross-section were compiled for each salt. The short-lived activation products, long-lived transmutation activity, and reactivity coefficients associated with various salt candidates were estimated using a computational model. Table A presents a summary of the properties of the candidate coolant salts. Certain factors in this table, such as melting point, vapor pressure, and nuclear properties, can be viewed as stand-alone parameters for screening candidates. Heat-transfer properties are considered as a group in Sect. 3 in order to evaluate the combined effects of various factors. In the course of this review, it became apparent that the state of the properties database was strong in some areas and weak in others. A qualitative map of the state of the database and predictive capabilities is given in Table B. It is apparent that the property of thermal conductivity has the greatest uncertainty and is the most difficult to measure. The database, with respect to heat capacity, can be improved with modern instruments and modest effort. In general, ''lighter'' (low-Z) salts tend to

  14. Determination of average molecular weights on organic reactor coolants. I.- Freezing-point depression method for benzene solutions; Determinaciond e masas moleculares medias en refrigerantes nucleares organicos. I.- Crioscopia de disolucion bencenicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreira, M

    1965-07-01

    As a working method for determination of changes in molecular mass that may occur by irradiation (pyrolytic-radiolytic decomposition) of polyphenyl reactor coolants, a cryoscopic technique has been developed which associated the basic simplicity of Beckman's method with some experimental refinements taken out of the equilibrium methods. A total of 18 runs were made on samples of napthalene, biphenyl, and the commercial mixtures OM-2 (Progil) and Santowax-R (Monsanto), with an average deviation from the theoretical molecular mass of 0.6%. (Author) 7 refs.

  15. Determination of average molecular weights on organic reactor coolants. I.- Freezing-point depression method for benzene solutions; Determinaciond e masas moleculares medias en refrigerantes nucleares organicos. I.- Crioscopia de disolucion bencenicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreira, M.

    1965-07-01

    As a working method for determination of changes in molecular mass that may occur by irradiation (pyrolytic-radiolytic decomposition) of polyphenyl reactor coolants, a cryoscopic technique has been developed which associated the basic simplicity of Beckman's method with some experimental refinements taken out of the equilibrium methods. A total of 18 runs were made on samples of napthalene, biphenyl, and the commercial mixtures OM-2 (Progil) and Santowax-R (Monsanto), with an average deviation from the theoretical molecular mass of 0.6%. (Author) 7 refs.

  16. UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} utilization in high temperature engineering test reactor with helium coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waris, Abdul, E-mail: awaris@fi.itb.ac.id; Novitrian,; Pramuditya, Syeilendra; Su’ud, Zaki [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Aji, Indarta K. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    High temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is one of high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) types which has been developed by Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The HTTR is a graphite moderator, helium gas coolant, 30 MW thermal output and 950 °C outlet coolant temperature for high temperature test operation. Original HTTR uses UO{sub 2} fuel. In this study, we have evaluated the use of UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} in form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in HTTR. The reactor cell calculation was performed by using SRAC 2002 code, with nuclear data library was derived from JENDL3.2. The result shows that HTTR can obtain its criticality condition if the enrichment of {sup 235}U in loaded fuel is 18.0% or above.

  17. Study of a loss of coolant accident of a PWR reactor through a Full Scope Simulator and computational code RELAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Alexandre de Souza

    2014-01-01

    The present paper proposes a study of a loss of coolant accident of a PWR reactor through a Full Scope Simulator and computational code RELAP. To this end, it considered a loss of coolant accident with 160 cm 2 breaking area in cold leg of 20 circuit of the reactor cooling system of nuclear power plant Angra 2, with the reactor operating in stationary condition, to 100% power. It considered that occurred at the same time the loss of External Power Supply and the availability of emergency cooling system was not full. The results obtained are quite relevant and with the possibility of being used in the planning of future activities, given that the construction of Angra 3 is underway and resembles the Angra 2. (author)

  18. Nuclear reactor recyclation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigawa, Yukio; Chuma, Kazuto

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the unevenness for the coolant flow rate even when abnormality occurs to one of recycling pumps. Constitution: A plurality of jet pumps disposed at an interval around the reactor core are divided circumferentially into two sets, and a pipeway is disposed to the outside of each pair including recycling pumps corresponding to each of the sets. The pipeway is connected to the recycling inlet of the jet pump by way of a manifold. The discharge portion of the recycling pumps of the loop pipeway are connected with each other by way of communication pipes, and a normally closed valve is disposed to the communication pipe and the normally closed valve of the communication pipe is opened upon detecting abnormality for one of the recycling pumps. Thus, if either one of the pair of recycling pumps shows abnormal state, coolants flows from the other of pipeway to the outside of the loop pipeway and coolants are supplied from all the jet pumps to the reactor core portion and, accordingly, the not-uniform flow rate can be prevented to eliminate undesired effect on the reactor core. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Review of nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connelly, J.W.; Storr, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    Two types of severe reactor accidents - loss of coolant or coolant flow and transient overpower (TOP) accidents - are described and compared. Accidents in research reactors are discussed. The 1961 SL1 accident in the US is used as an illustration as it incorporates the three features usually combined in a severe accident - a design flaw or flaws in the system, a circumvention of safety circuits or procedures, and gross operator error. The SL1 reactor, the reactivity accident and the following fuel-coolant interaction and steam explosion are reviewed. 3 figs

  20. Analysis of events related to cracks and leaks in the reactor coolant pressure boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesteros, Antonio, E-mail: Antonio.Ballesteros-Avila@ec.europa.eu [JRC-IET: Institute for Energy and Transport of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Postbus 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Sanda, Radian; Peinador, Miguel; Zerger, Benoit [JRC-IET: Institute for Energy and Transport of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Postbus 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Negri, Patrice [IRSN: Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (France); Wenke, Rainer [GRS: Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • The important role of Operating Experience Feedback is emphasised. • Events relating to cracks and leaks in the reactor coolant pressure boundary are analysed. • A methodology for event investigation is described. • Some illustrative results of the analysis of events for specific components are presented. - Abstract: The presence of cracks and leaks in the reactor coolant pressure boundary may jeopardise the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Analysis of cracks and leaks related events is an important task for the prevention of their recurrence, which should be performed in the context of activities on Operating Experience Feedback. In response to this concern, the EU Clearinghouse operated by the JRC-IET supports and develops technical and scientific work to disseminate the lessons learned from past operating experience. In particular, concerning cracks and leaks, the studies carried out in collaboration with IRSN and GRS have allowed to identify the most sensitive areas to degradation in the plant primary system and to elaborate recommendations for upgrading the maintenance, ageing management and inspection programmes. An overview of the methodology used in the analysis of cracks and leaks related events is presented in this paper, together with the relevant results obtained in the study.

  1. Nuclear reactor with coolant circulation pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peck, D.A.; Stolecki, W.E.

    1975-01-01

    Thermally induced movement of a pump or a heat exchanger in the primary circuit of a PWR is made possible by a suspension device. This device must however be, so rigid that it does not yield in cases of emergency. For this purpose, in the case of the pump a lower ring is provided carrying the pump by means of four columns. The columns are flexibly supported on the ring and a fixed constuction. Turned about 90% from these columns, two additional horizontal bars are flexibly mounted on the ring and on the motor housing of the pump as well as on the fixed construction. At the upper end of the motor housing, two shock absorbers are hinged in the same way. The joints are shaped as ball- and socket hinges. (DG) [de

  2. Nuclear reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2007-09-01

    This textbook is composed of two parts. Part 1 'Elements of Nuclear Reactor Theory' is composed of only elements but the main resource for the lecture of nuclear reactor theory, and should be studied as common knowledge. Much space is therefore devoted to the history of nuclear energy production and to nuclear physics, and the material focuses on the principles of energy production in nuclear reactors. However, considering the heavy workload of students, these subjects are presented concisely, allowing students to read quickly through this textbook. (J.P.N.)

  3. Thermodynamic Data to Model the Interaction Between Coolant and Fuel in Gen IV Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinsdale, Alan; Gisby, John; Davies, Hugh; Konings, Rudy; Benes, Ondrej

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of nuclear fuels in various environments is vital to the design and safe operation of nuclear reactors. While this is true if the reactor is operating within its design specification, it is even more so if accidents occur and the fuel is exposed to unexpected temperatures, pressures or chemical environments. It is clearly hazardous and costly to explore all such scenarios experimentally and therefore it is necessary to undertake modelling where possible using well-grounded theoretical approaches. This paper will show examples of where calculations of chemical and phase equilibria have been applied successfully to the long term storage of nuclear waste, phase formation during core meltdown and prediction of fission product release into the atmosphere. It will also highlight the development of thermodynamic data carried out during the European Metrology Research Project Metrofission required to model the potential interaction between the coolant, nuclear fuel, containment materials and atmosphere of a sodium cooled fast reactor. (authors)

  4. Calculation models for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashanii, Ahmed Ali

    2010-01-01

    Determination of different parameters of nuclear reactors requires neutron transport calculations. Due to complicity of geometry and material composition of the reactor core, neutron calculations were performed for simplified models of the real arrangement. In frame of the present work two models were used for calculations. First, an elementary cell model was used to prepare cross section data set for a homogenized-core reactor model. The homogenized-core reactor model was then used to perform neutron transport calculation. The nuclear reactor is a tank-shaped thermal reactor. The semi-cylindrical core arrangement consists of aluminum made fuel bundles immersed in water which acts as a moderator as well as a coolant. Each fuel bundle consists of aluminum cladded fuel rods arranged in square lattices. (author)

  5. Design of channel experiment equipment for measuring coolant velocity of innovative research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Subekti; Endiah Puji Hastuti; Dedi Heriyanto

    2014-01-01

    The design of innovative high flux research reactor (RRI) requires high power so that the capability core cooling requires to be improved by designing the faster core coolant velocity near to the critical velocity limit. Hence, the critical coolant velocity as the one of the important parameter of the reactor safety shall be measured by special equipment to the velocity limit that may induce fuel element degradation. The research aims is to calculate theoretically the critical coolant velocity and to design the special experiment equipment namely EXNal for measuring the critical coolant velocity in fuel element subchannel of the RRI. EXNal design considers the critical velocity calculation result of 20.52 m/s to determine the variation of flow rate of 4.5-29.2 m 3 /h, in which the experiment could simulate the 1-4X standard coolant velocity of RSG-GAS as well as destructive test of RRI's fuel plate. (author)

  6. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)

  7. Refuelling nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, J.; Webb, J.; White, W.P.; McLaren, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor refuelling machine is described which can be left in the reactor vault to reduce the off-load refuelling time for the reactor. The system comprises a gripper device rangeable within a tubular chute, the gripper device being movable by a pantograph. (U.K.)

  8. Simulation of coolant mixing in pressure vessel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehne, T.

    2003-06-01

    The work was aimed at the experimental investigation and numerical simulation of coolant mixing in the downcomer and the lower plenum of PWRs. Generally, the coolant mixing is of relevance for two classes of accident scenarios - boron dilution and cold water transients. For the investigation of the relevant mixing phenomena, the Rossendorf test facility ROCOM has been designed. ROCOM is a 1:5 scaled Plexiglas trademark model of the PWR Konvoi allowing conductivity measurements by wire mesh sensors and velocity measurements by the LDA technique. The CFD calculations were carried out with the CFD-code CFX-4. For the design of the facility, calculations were performed to analyze the scaling of the model. It was found, that the scaling of 1:5 to the prototype meets both: physical and economical demands. Flow measurements and the corresponding CFD calculations in the ROCOM downcomer under steady state conditions showed a Re number independency at nominal flow rates. The flow field is dominated by recirculation areas below the inlet nozzles. Transient flow measurements with high performance LDA-technique showed in agreement with CFX-4 results, that in the case of the start up of a pump after a laminar stage large vortices dominate the flow. In the case of stationary mixing, the maximum value of the averaged mixing scalar at the core inlet was found in the sector below the inlet nozzle, where the tracer was injected. At the start-up case of one pump due to a strong impulse driven flow at the inlet nozzle the horizontal part of the flow dominates in the downcomer. The injection is distributed into two main jets, the maximum of the tracer concentration at the core inlet appears at the opposite part of the loop where the tracer was injected. Additionally, the stationary three-dimensional flow distribution in the downcomer and the lower plenum of a VVER-440/V-230 reactor was calculated with CFX-4. The comparison with experimental data and an analytical mixing model showed a

  9. Numerical and experimental investigation of surface vortex formation in coolant reservoirs of reactor safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandazis, Peter [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany); Babcsany, Boglarka [Budapest Univ. of Technology and Economics (Hungary). Inst. of Nuclear Techniques

    2016-11-15

    The reliable operation of the emergency coolant pumps and passive gravitational injection systems are an important safety issue during accident scenarios with coolant loss in pressurized water reactors. Because of the pressure drop and flow disturbances surface vortices develops at the pump intakes if the water level decreasing below a critical value. The induced swirling flow and gas entrainment lead to flow limitation and to pump failures and damages. The prediction of the critical submergence to avoid surface vortex building is difficult because it depends on many geometrical and fluid dynamical parameters. An alternative and new method has been developed for the investigation of surface vortices. The method based on the combination of CFD results with the analytical vortex model of Burgers and Rott. For further investigation the small scale experiments from the Institute of Nuclear Techniques of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics are used which were inspired from flow limitation problems during the draining of the bubble condenser trays at a VVER type nuclear power plants.

  10. Assessment of Loss-of-Coolant Effect on Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Young; Park, Joo Hwan; Kim, Bong Ghi

    2009-01-01

    A CANDU reactor is a heavy-water-moderated, natural uranium fuelled reactor with a pressure tube. The reactor contains a horizontal cylindrical vessel (calandria) and each pressure tube is isolated from the heavy-water moderator in a calandria. This allows the moderator system to be operated of a high-pressure and of a high-temperature coolant in pressure tube. This causes the pressurized liquid coolant in the channel to void and therefore give rise to a reactivity transient in the event of a break or fault in the coolant circuit. In particular, all CANDU reactors are well known to have a positive void reactivity coefficient and thus this phenomenon may lead to a positive feedback, which can cause a large power pulse. We assess the loss-of-coolant effect by coolant void reactivity versus fuel burnup, four factor parameters for fresh fuel and equilibrium fuel, reactivity change due to the change of coolant density and reactivity change in the case of half- and full-core coolant

  11. The measurement of moisture in nuclear coolant gases. Experience and new developments within the CEGB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiorns, D.S.; Stallard, M.D.

    1982-06-01

    Humidity measurements on nuclear reactor coolant gases are required for many reasons, for instance to detect and locate water leakages from the boilers and to monitor the chemical composition of the coolant for normal operation and during commissioning and maintenance, and the assessment of the performance of driers. For leak detection sensitivity and rapid response are important whereas for routine monitoring drift may be a prime criterion. Some coolants include methane for chemical control that decomposes to water so the levels of moisture that normally exist in the coolant vary with reactor types. No one measurement technique or hygrometer system currently available can be expected to meet all these requirements and in the CEGB it has proved necessary to concentrate on finding a solution to each separately. This paper reviews CEGB experience with numerous hygrometer systems that have been used on both Magnox and AGR coolant gases and highlights some of the problems that have arisen. New development work in the important and demanding area of boiler leak detection and location is also included where a number of new approaches are being investigated, including:- (i) An improved 'first-up' system based on coulometric moisture analysers. (ii) A differential system based on the piezo-electric hygrometer. (iii) A microprocessor controlled system using capacitance probes. Whilst work on the development of new instruments and the design of approved systems is proceeding at different locations within the CEGB it is being reported, together with the latest operational experiences, through the CEGB Chemical Measuring Instruments Advisory Group, on whose behalf this paper is presented. (author)

  12. Nuclear reactors safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Francois; Seiler, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    fuels as well as the applied methodologies. The IRSN proceeds in a relevant and independent assessment of the submitted safety reports. To achieve this goal and maintain over time an independent and relevant assessment capability, the IRSN relies on the excellence of its experts and on state of art techniques and knowledge. The IRSN contributes by its work in key area to cutting edge research and development in order to drive nuclear industry towards making the best use of scientific and technological progress for improving safety, environmental protection and health. To maintain at all times the state of the art knowledge and the operational expertise necessary to deal efficiently with major nuclear accident consequences, the IRSN carries out, on the one hand, its own research and development programs to gain accurate knowledge on still unknown phenomena for safety analysis. On the other hand, the IRSN works out its own scientific calculation methodologies involving industrial calculation chain. Concerning more particularly the 'two-phase flows' thematic, The ISRN must correctly simulate the primary fluid behavior in the reactor in normal operation as well as in accidental situations, to estimate if, in such situations, the core reactor state is fully safe and any safety risk is undergone The research and development programs launched at the ISRN on two-phase flows gather work on advanced thermohydraulic configurations encounter in various reactor states (normal operation or accidental situations), in particular: (i)The estimation of the margin to the critical heat flux in normal operation (DNBR), (ii) The pressurized thermal shock, which is due to mechanical important constraints in the reactor vessel resulting from the injection of a cold fluid in case of emergency cooling (PTS), (iii) The reactivity insertion accident (RIA), (iv) The loss of coolant accident (LOCA), (vi) The accidents in spent-fuel pools and (vii) The severe accident, which could lead to core

  13. Effects of Coolant Temperature Changes on Reactivity for Various Coolants in a Liquid Salt Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casino, William A. Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform an investigation into the relative merit of various salts and salt compounds being considered for use as coolants in the liquid salt cooled very high temperature reactor platform (LS-VHTR). Most of the non-nuclear properties necessary to evaluate these salts are known, but the neutronic characteristics important to reactor core design are still in need of a more extensive examination. This report provides a two-fold approach to further this investigation. First, a list of qualifying salts is assembled based upon acceptable non-nuclear properties. Second, the effect on system reactivity for a secondary system transient or an off-normal or accident condition is examined for each of these salt choices. The specific incident to be investigated is an increase in primary coolant temperature beyond normal operating parameters. In order to perform the relative merit comparison of each candidate salt, the System Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity is calculated for each candidate salt at various state points throughout the core burn history. (author)

  14. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction comprising: (a) a nuclear reactor core having a bottom platform support structure; (b) a reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core; (c) a containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and having a sidewall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and having a base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall; (d) a central small diameter post anchored to the containment structure base mat and extending upwardly to the reactor vessel to axially fix the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and provide a center column support for the lower end of the reactor core; (e) annular support structure disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall and extending about the lower end of the core; (f) structural support means disposed between the containment structure base mat and bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and cooperating for supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event; (g) a bed of insulating material disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall; freely expand radially from the central post as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof; (h) a deck supported upon the wall of the containment vessel above the top open end of the reactor vessel; and (i) extendible and retractable coupling means extending between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnecting the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck

  15. Advancement in reactor coolant chemistry management programs and related technology development in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.S.; Lin, Chien C.

    2000-01-01

    Taiwan Power Company (TPC) has three nuclear power plants in operation with a total capacity of 51 GWe, contributing about 30% of electricity generation in Taiwan. The first two plants, Chinshan (CSNPP) and Kuosheng (KSNPP), are boiling water reactor plants, and the third one, Maanshan (MASNPP), is a pressurized water reactor plant. Each plant has two identical reactors. As many nuclear power plant operators worldwide, TPC is committed to operate the plants efficiently, economically, and safely. TPC has developed and implemented several chemistry improvement programs in recent years to improve the coolant chemistry in order to ( l ) protect structure materials from corrosion, (2) reduce radiation exposures to workers and (3) reduce radwaste production and radiation release to the environment. This paper describes TPC's experience in some water chemistry management, radwaste reduction and radiation exposure control programs. Future programs under planning, including implementation of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) in BWRs, installation of condensate pre-filters, and development of on-line water chemistry monitoring system, are also be briefly discussed. In addition, some material related research and development programs will also be presented. (author)

  16. RELAP5/MOD 3.3 analysis of Reactor Coolant Pump Trip event at NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencik, V.; Debrecin, N.; Foretic, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the paper the results of the RELAP5/MOD 3.3 analysis of the Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) Trip event at NPP Krsko are presented. The event was initiated by an operator action aimed to prevent the RCP 2 bearing damage. The action consisted of a power reduction, that lasted for 50 minutes, followed by a reactor and a subsequent RCP 2 trip when the reactor power was reduced to 28 %. Two minutes after reactor trip, the Main Steam Isolation Valves (MSIV) were isolated and the steam dump flow was closed. On the secondary side the Steam Generator (SG) pressure rose until SG 1 Safety Valve (SV) 1 opened. The realistic RELAP5/MOD 3.3 analysis has been performed in order to model the particular plant behavior caused by operator actions. The comparison of the RELAP5/MOD 3.3 results with the measurement for the power reduction transient has shown small differences for the major parameters (nuclear power, average temperature, secondary pressure). The main trends and physical phenomena following the RCP Trip event were well reproduced in the analysis. The parameters that have the major influence on transient results have been identified. In the paper the influence of SG 1 relief and SV valves on transient results was investigated more closely. (author)

  17. Nuclear Reactor Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Ropers, J.

    1976-01-01

    A pressurized-water reactor pressure vessel connects via a main coolant pipe loop including a main coolant pump, with the lower portion of at least one vertical steam generator horizontally offset from the pressure vessel. This equipment is contained by a concrete structure entirely enclosing the pressure vessel and forming a generator room horizontally enclosing the generator and the loop and extending upwardly to an open top closed by a horizontal ceiling. The concrete structure is completely surrounded by a spherical steel containment shell designed to withstand any internal fluid pressure which might result from an accidental release of the coolant inside of this shell, and the shell forms a large space above the entire concrete structure. The ceiling above the generator room is a horizontal steel gridlike construction defining a plurality of vertical openings which are normally closed by horizontal sheet metal plates which are hinged to the gridlike construction and are light enough in weight to be forced upwardly, to open the openings, when the plates receive upward force from fluid pressure below them resulting from the loop, or other equipment in the generator room, accidentally permitting a sudden release of the pressurized-water coolant. The high fluid pressure that would otherwise develop within the concrete generator room, is in this way almost immediately relieved via the openings of the grid-like construction, by the plates being forced upwardly, the pressure being then dissipated upwardly in the large space above the top of the concrete structure, provided by the steel containment shell. This prevents the upstanding wall portions of the generator room from being stressed, and possibly damaged, by any sudden release of coolant in the generator room. Other features are disclosed

  18. A study of the tritium behavior in coolant and moderator system of heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. P.; Song, S. S.; Chae, K. S. and others [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-15

    The objectives of this report is to present a regulatory policy on the environmental impact and personnel exposure by understanding the generation, accumulation, environmental release and management of tritium in heavy water reactors. By estimating the tritium concentration at Wolsong nuclear plant site by estimating and forecasting the generation and accumulation of tritium in coolant and moderator systems at Wolsong unit 1, we will study the management and release of tritium at Wolsong units 3 and 4 which are ready for construction. The major activities of this study are as follows : tritium generation and accumulation in heavy water reactor, a quantitative assessment of the accumulation and release of tritium at Wolsong nuclear plant site, heavy water management at Wolsong nuclear plants. The tritium concentration and accumulation trends in the systems at Wolsong unit 1 was estimated. A quantitative assessment of the tritium accumulation and release for Wolsong 2, 3 and 4 based on data from Wolsong 1 was performed. The tritium removal schemes and its long-term management plan were made.

  19. Nuclear reactor with several cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swars, H.

    1977-01-01

    Several sodium-cooled cores in separate vessels with removable closures are placed in a common reactor tank. Each individual vessel is protected against the consequences of an accident in the relevant core. Maintenance devices and inlet and outlet pipes for the coolant are also arranged within the reactor tank. The individual vessels are all enclosed by coolant in a way that in case of emergency cooling or refuelling each core can be continued to be cooled by means of the coolant loops of the other cores. (HP) [de

  20. Test facility for investigation of heat transfer of promising coolants for the nuclear power industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, I. A.; Sviridov, V. G.; Batenin, V. M.; Biryukov, D. A.; Nikitina, I. S.; Manchkha, S. P.; Pyatnitskaya, N. Yu.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, E. V.

    2017-11-01

    The results are presented of experimental investigations into liquid metal heat transfer performed by the joint research group consisting of specialist in heat transfer and hydrodynamics from NIU MPEI and JIHT RAS. The program of experiments has been prepared considering the concept of development of the nuclear power industry in Russia. This concept calls for, in addition to extensive application of water-cooled, water-moderated (VVER-type) power reactors and BN-type sodium cooled fast reactors, development of the new generation of BREST-type reactors, fusion power reactors, and thermonuclear neutron sources. The basic coolants for these nuclear power installations will be heavy liquid metals, such as lead and lithium-lead alloy. The team of specialists from NRU MPEI and JIHT RAS commissioned a new RK-3 mercury MHD-test facility. The major components of this test facility are a unique electrical magnet constructed at Budker Nuclear Physics Institute and a pressurized liquid metal circuit. The test facility is designed for investigating upward and downward liquid metal flows in channels of various cross-sections in a transverse magnetic field. A probe procedure will be used for experimental investigation into heat transfer and hydrodynamics as well as for measuring temperature, velocity, and flow parameter fluctuations. It is generally adopted that liquid metals are the best coolants for the Tokamak reactors. However, alternative coolants should be sought for. As an alternative to liquid metal coolants, molten salts, such as fluorides of lithium and beryllium (so-called FLiBes) or fluorides of alkali metals (so-called FLiNaK) doped with uranium fluoride, can be used. That is why the team of specialists from NRU MPEI and JIHT RAS, in parallel with development of a mercury MHD test facility, is designing a test facility for simulating molten salt heat transfer and hydrodynamics. Since development of this test facility requires numerical predictions and verification

  1. Program of chemical research organic moderators and coolants in regard with the project of the Spanish DON-Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Cellini, R

    1961-07-01

    In order to select the most suitable mixtures for cooling the Reactor DON, in project, within the group of polyphenyl compounds, which at present time prevails in organic nuclear power reactor philosophy, the following subjects are going to be studied: 1. Static and dynamic experiences of thermal and radiolytic stability of commercial polyphenyl mixtures. 2. Studies on purification of the damaged coolant and search for possible applications of the residual polymers. 3. Analytical control and measurement of the physical constants of the polyphenyl mixtures. (Author)

  2. Program of chemical research on organic moderators and coolants in regard with the project of the Spanish DON-Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.

    1961-01-01

    In order to select the most suitable mixtures for cooling the Reactor DON, in project, within the group of polyphenyl compounds, which at present time prevails in organic nuclear power reactor philosophy, the following subjects are going to be studied: 1. Static and dynamic experiences of thermal and radiolytic stability of commercial polyphenyl mixtures. 2. Studies on purification of the damaged coolant and search for possible applications of the residual polymers. 3. Analytical control and measurement of the physical constants of the polyphenyl mixtures. (Author)

  3. Loss of coolant analysis for CIRENE-LATINA heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiantore, B.; Dubbini, M.; Proto, G.

    1978-01-01

    CIRENE is a heavy-water moderated, boiling water cooled pressure tube reactor. Fuel is natural uranium. A variety of breaks in the primary coolant system have been postulated for the analysis of the CIRENE Latina Plant (now under construction) such as double-end break of inlet header, downcomer, steam line and inlet feeders. The basic tool for analysis is the TILT-N Code which has been purposely developed for simulating the nuclear, thermal and hydrodynamic behaviour of the CIRENE core and associated heat transport system. An extensive full-scale test programme has been carried out by CNEN and CISE which fully confirms the adequacy of the model. The main results of the analysis show that maximum temperatures are far from those leading to significant fuel damage and that adequate core cooling is provided over the whole transient. (author)

  4. Preliminary evaluation of the stress analysis reports for Angra I reactor coolant loop - part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, S.V.G.; Andrade, J.E.L. de

    1980-03-01

    A methodology that will allow CNEN to approve the stress analysis reports of the components of the Brazilian nuclear power plants, was developed. The reactor coolant loop (RCL)of Angra I was checkd. This is the first part of the complete report and consists of the approval of the design documents, the approval of the equipment support models and the aproval of the steam generator dynamic model. The second part of this work is under way now and should contain the approval of the RCL stress and fatigue analysis according to ASME code section III. As shown in section 7 it appears necessary additional information from Westinghouse about the design of the RCL. (Author) [pt

  5. Development of a reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostic system. Progress report, June 1982-July 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D.J.; Sommerfield, G.A.

    1983-12-01

    The quality of operating data has been insufficient to allow proper evaluation of theoretical reactor coolant (RC) pump seal failure mechanisms. The RC pump monitoring and diagnostic system being developed and installed at Toledo Edison's Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station will examine the relationship between seal failures and three other variables: The rotordynamic behavior of the pump shaft and related components, the internal conditions and performance of the seals, and the plant or pump operating environment (controlled by the plant operator). Interrelationships between these areas will be developed during the data collection task, scheduled to begin in October 1983 (for a full fuel cycle at Davis-Besse). This report describes system software and hardware development, testing, and installation work performed during this period. Also described is a parallel effort being conducted by a B and W/Byron Jackson/Utility group to improve pump seal performance

  6. Loss-of-coolant accident for large pipe breaks in light water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keusenhoff, J.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) and their control for nuclear reactor safety is explained. Showing the cooling circuits and emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) of both, PWR and BWR, the possible break spectrum and the general sequence of events is discussed. The governing physical phenomena for the different LOCA phases are pointed out in more detail. Special emphasis is taken on rules, regulations and failure criteria for licensing purposes. Analysis methods and codes for both, evaluation and best-estimate model are compared under deterministic and probabilistic approach, respectively. Some insight in present integral and separate effect tests demonstrates the interdependency of analysis and experiment. Results of LOCA analysis and experiments show the present state of the art. (orig.)

  7. Development of a reactor-coolant-pump monitoring and diagnostic system. Semi-annual progress report, December 1981-May 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D.J.; Gabler, H.C.

    1982-10-01

    Reactor coolant (RC) pump seal failures have resulted in excessive leakage of primary coolant into reactor containment buildings. In some cases, high levels of airborne activity and surface contamination following these failures have necessitated extensive cleanup efforts and personnel radiation exposure. Unpredictable pump seal performance has also caused forced outages and frequent maintenance. The quality of operating data has been insufficient to allow proper evaluation of theoretical RC pump seal failure mechanisms. The RC pump monitoring and diagnostic system being developed and installed at Toledo Edison's Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station will examine the relationship between seal failures and three other variables. This report describes system software and hardware development, testing, and installation work performed during the period of December 1981 through May 1982. Also described herein is a parallel effort being conducted by a B and W/Byron Jackson/Utility group to improve pump seal performance

  8. Estimation of the mechanical behavior of irradiated coolant channels at a nuclear plant for its decomissing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piquin, Ruben; Zanni, Pablo

    2003-01-01

    The widespread replacement of reactor internals generates a substantial volume of active material.It is essential to work with these components at least in a partial way before the next planned stop.Due to the fact that the reactor internals pool and the storage pools for irradiated nuclear fuel have limited capacities, it has been proposed to compact an experimental shift of 50 irradiated coolant channels, that are currently placed in storage pools.Basically the processed waste will be put in baskets at the bottom of the storage pools.The alternative choice proposes to divide an irradiation coolant channel tube into different parts: stainless steel section, zircaloy-4 section and stainless steel section with hardened zones with cobalt alloys named Estelite-6.Having planned the constructive and operative solutions, the mechanical characterization of the different parts of the channel tube remains to be done.In the present paper, the necessary compacted strength of the irradiation coolant channel tube will be estimated for the stainless steel section and for the zircaloy-4 section, starting from experiment with unirradiated material and considering effects of radiation damage and hydrides on the ductility.These results will be used to design the necessary compacted tools for the semi-industrial installation

  9. Design, construction and testing of replacement nuclear coolant pump stators to meet today's equipment reliability expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fostier, L.; Howell, D.

    2005-01-01

    The reliability expectations of equipment and components in today's nuclear power plant are much greater than three or more decades ago when nuclear plants were first constructed due to economic impact of a failure. Very few components in a pressurized water reactor plant can have as much impact of the plants capacity factor as a catastrophic failure of a reactor coolant pump winding. This paper describes the maintenance approach taken by one North American utility in attempt to preclude such failures. The paper will discuss the challenges of the reactor coolant pump application and the enhancements made in the winding design and construction by the supplier to address failure mechanisms so as to better meet present reliability expectations in accordance with dedicated specifications. The paper will also present the in-process and final testing requirements and limits imposed in an attempt to ensure quality of the machine windings, along with selected test results from the stators that have been designed and constructed to these specifications to date. (author)

  10. Nuclear reactor internals arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, E.; Andrews, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor internals arrangement is disclosed which facilitates reactor refueling. A reactor vessel and a nuclear core is utilized in conjunction with an upper core support arrangement having means for storing withdrawn control rods therein. The upper core support is mounted to the underside of the reactor vessel closure head so that upon withdrawal of the control rods into the upper core support, the closure head, the upper core support and the control rods are removed as a single unit thereby directly exposing the core for purposes of refueling

  11. Indian advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    For sustainable development of nuclear energy, a number of important issues like safety, waste management, economics etc. are to be addressed. To do this, a number of advanced reactor designs as well as fuel cycle technologies are being pursued worldwide. The advanced reactors being developed in India are the AHWR and the CHTR. Both the reactors use thorium based fuel and have many passive features. This paper describes the Indian advanced reactors and gives a brief account of the international initiatives for the sustainable development of nuclear energy. (author)

  12. Reactors. Nuclear propulsion ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fribourg, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    This article has for object the development of nuclear-powered ships and the conception of the nuclear-powered ship. The technology of the naval propulsion P.W.R. type reactor is described in the article B.N.3 141 'Nuclear Boilers ships'. (N.C.)

  13. Liquid metal reactor development. Development of LMR coolant technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, H. Y.; Choi, S. K.; Hwang, J. s.; Lee, Y. B.; Choi, B. H.; Kim, J. M.; Kim, Y. G.; Kim, M. J.; Lee, S. D.; Kang, Y. H.; Maeng, Y. Y.; Kim, T. R.; Park, J. H.; Park, S. J.; Cha, J. H.; Kim, D. H.; Oh, S. K.; Park, C. G.; Hong, S. H.; Lee, K. H.; Chun, M. H.; Moon, H. T.; Chang, S. H.; Lee, D. N.

    1997-07-15

    Following studies have been performed during last three years as the 1.2 phase study of the mid and long term nuclear technology development plan. First, the small scale experiments using the sodium have been performed such as the basic turbulent mixing experiment which is related to the design of a compact reactor, the flow reversal characteristics experiment by natural circulation which is necessary for the analysis of local flow reversal when the electromagnetic pump is installed, the feasibility test of the decay heat removal by wall cooling and the operation of electromagnetic pump. Second, the technology of operation mechanism of sodium facility is developed and the technical analysis and fundamental experiments of sodium measuring technology has been performed such as differential pressure measuring experiment, local flow rate measuring experimenter, sodium void fraction measuring experiment, under sodium facility, the free surface movement experiment and the side orifice pressure drop experiment. A new bounded convection scheme was introduced to the ELBO3D thermo-hydraulic computer code designed for analysis of experimental result. A three dimensional computer code was developed for the analysis of free surface movement and the analysis model of transmission of sodium void fraction was developed. Fourth, the small scale key components are developed. The submersible-in-pool type electromagnetic pump which can be used as primary pump in the liquid metal reactor is developed. The SASS which uses the Curie-point electromagnet and the mock-up of Pantograph type IVTM were manufactured and their feasibility was evaluated. Fifth, the high temperature characteristics experiment of stainless steel which is used as a major material for liquid metal reactor and the material characteristics experiment of magnet coil were performed. (author). 126 refs., 98 tabs., 296 figs.

  14. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  15. Solution of heat removal from nuclear reactors by natural convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zitek Pavel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the basis for the solution of heat removal by natural convection from both conventional nuclear reactors and reactors with fuel flowing coolant (such as reactors with molten fluoride salts MSR.The possibility of intensification of heat removal through gas lift is focused on. It might be used in an MSR (Molten Salt Reactor for cleaning the salt mixture of degassed fission products and therefore eliminating problems with iodine pitting. Heat removal by natural convection and its intensification increases significantly the safety of nuclear reactors. Simultaneously the heat removal also solves problems with lifetime of pumps in the primary circuit of high-temperature reactors.

  16. Thermionic reactors for space nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homeyer, W. G.; Merrill, M. H.; Holland, J. W.; Fisher, C. R.; Allen, D. T.

    1985-01-01

    Thermionic reactor designs for a variety of space power applications spanning the range from 5 kWe to 3 MWe are described. In all of these reactors, nuclear heat is converted directly to electrical energy in thermionic fuel elements (TFEs). A circulating reactor coolant carries heat from the core of TFEs directly to a heat rejection radiator system. The recent design of a thermionic reactor to meet the SP-100 requirements is emphasized. Design studies of reactors at other power levels show that the same TFE can be used over a broad range in power, and that design modifications can extend the range to many megawatts. The design of the SP-100 TFE is similar to that of TFEs operated successfully in test reactors, but with design improvements to extend the operating lifetime to seven years.

  17. A new fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, F.

    1986-01-01

    A new nuclear reactor design based on the fluidized bed concept is proposed. A current design utilizes spherical fuel of slightly enriched Zircaloy-clad uranium dioxide fluidized by light water under pressure. The reactor is modular in system; therefore, any size reactor can be constructed from the basic standard modul. The reactor physics calculations show that reactivity increases with porosity to a maximum value and thereafter decreases. This produces inherent safety and eliminates the need for control rods and burnable poisons. The heat transfer calculations show that the maximum power extracted from the reactor core is not limited to the material temperature limits but to the maximum mass flow of coolant, which corresponds to the desired operating porosity. Design simplicity and inherent safety make it an attractive small reactor design. (Author) [pt

  18. Overview of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Nhi Dien; Nguyen Thai Sinh; Luong Ba Vien

    2016-01-01

    The present reactor called Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) has been reconstructed from the former TRIGA Mark II reactor which was designed by General Atomic (GA, San Diego, California, USA), started building in early 1960s, put into operation in 1963 and operated until 1968 at nominal power of 250 kW. In 1975, all fuel elements of the reactor were unloaded and shipped back to the USA. The DNRR is a 500-kW pool-type research reactor using light water as both moderator and coolant. The reactor is used as a neutron source for the purposes of: (1) radioactive isotope production; (2) neutron activation analysis; and (3) research and training

  19. Spectral shift reactor control method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impink, A.J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A method of operating a nuclear reactor having a core and coolant displacer elements arranged in the core wherein is established a reator coolant temperature set point at which it is desired to operate said reactor and first reactor coolant temperature band limits are provided within which said set point is located and it is desired to operate said reactor charactrized in that said reactor coolant displacer elements are moved relative to the reactor core for adjusting the volume of reactor coolant in said core as said reactor coolant temperature approaches said first band limits thereby to maintain said reactor coolant temperature near said set point and within said first band limits

  20. Radioactive corrosion products in circuit of fast reactor loop with dissociating coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgov, V.M.; Katanaev, A.O.

    1982-01-01

    The results of experimental investigation into depositions of radionuclides of corrosion origin on the surfaces of a reactor-in-pile loop facility with a dissociating coolant are presented. It is stated that the ratio of radionuclides in fixed depositions linearly decreases with decrease of the coolant temperature at the core-condenser section. The element composition of non-fixed compositions quantitatively and qualitatively differs from the composition of structural material, and it is more vividly displayed for the core-condenser section. The main mechanism of circuit contamination with radioactive corrosion products is substantiated: material corrosion in the zones of coolant phase transfer, their remove by the coolant in the core, deposition, activation and wash-out by the coolant from the core surfaces

  1. Liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncombe, E.; Thatcher, G.

    1979-01-01

    The invention described relates to a liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor in which the fuel assembly has an inner zone comprised mainly of fissile material and a surrounding outer zone comprised mainly of breeder material. According to the invention the sub-assemblies in the outer zone include electro-magnetic braking devices (magnets, pole pieces and armature) for regulating the flow of coolant through the sub-assemblies. The magnetic fields of the electro-magnetic breaking devices are temperature sensitive so that as the power output of the breeder sub-assemblies increases the electro-magnetic resistance to coolant flow is reduced thereby maintaining the temperature of the coolant outlets from the sub-assemblies substantially constant. (UK)

  2. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    An array of rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurised water reactor is claimed. The helium gas pressure within each rod differs substantially from that of its closest neighbours

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    The fuel elements for a pressurised water reactor comprise arrays of rods of zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets. The helium gas pressure within each rod differs substantially from that of its closest neighbours

  4. Analyses for passive safety of fusion reactor during ex-vessel loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takuro; Okazaki, Takashi; Maki, Koichi; Uda, Tatuhiko; Seki, Yasushi; Aoki, Isao; Kunugi, Tomoaki.

    1995-01-01

    Passive safety of nuclear fusion reactors during ex-vessel Loss-of-Coolant Accidents (LOCAs) in the divertor cooling system has been investigated using a hybrid code, which can treat the interaction of the plasma and plasma facing components (PFCs). The code has been modified to include the impurity emission from PFCs with a diffusion model at the edge plasma. We assumed an ex-vessel LOCA of the divertor cooling system during the ignited operation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), in which a carbon-copper brazed divertor plate was employed in the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). When a double-ended break occurs at the cold leg of the divertor cooling system, the impurity density in the main plasma becomes about twice within 2s after the LOCA due to radiation enhanced sublimation of graphite PFCs. The copper cooling tube of the divertor begins to melt at about 3s after the LOCA, even though the plasma is passively shut down at about 4s due to the impurity accumulation. It is necessary to apply other PFC materials, which can shorten the time period for passive shutdown, or an active shutdown system to keep the reactor structures intact for such rapid transient accident. (author)

  5. Fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1979-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel assembly, hollow guide posts protrude into a fuel assembly and fitting grill from a biased spring pad with a plunger that moves with the spring pad plugging one end of each of the guide posts. A plate on the end fitting grill that has a hole for fluid discharge partially plugs the other end of the guide post. Pressurized water coolant that fills the guide post volume acts as a shock absorber and should the reactor core receive a major seismic or other shock, the fuel assembly is compelled to move towards a pad depending from a transversely disposed support grid. The pad bears against the spring pad and the plunger progressively blocks the orifices provided by slots in the guide posts thus gradually absorbing the applied shock. After the orifice has been completely blocked, controlled fluid discharge continues through a hole coil spring cooperating in the attenuation of the shock. (author)

  6. Nuclear reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, Vinicius Damas

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Simulator was projected to help the basic training in the formation of the Nuclear Power Plants operators. It gives the trainee the opportunity to see the nuclear reactor dynamics. It's specially indicated to be used as the support tool to NPPT (Nuclear Power Preparatory Training) from NUS Corporation. The software was developed to Intel platform (80 x 86, Pentium and compatible ones) working under the Windows operational system from Microsoft. The program language used in development was Object Pascal and the compiler used was Delphi from Borland. During the development, computer algorithms were used, based in numeric methods, to the resolution of the differential equations involved in the process. (author)

  7. Space Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    We needed to find a space reactor concept that could be attractive to NASA for flight and proven with a rapid turnaround, low-cost nuclear test. Heat-pipe-cooled reactors coupled to Stirling engines long identified as the easiest path to near-term, low-cost concept.

  8. Loss-of-coolant accident analyses of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Yoder, G.L.; Wendel, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    Currently in the conceptual design stage, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) will operate at a high heat flux, a high mass flux, an a high degree of coolant subcooling. Loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) analyses using RELAP5 have been performed as part of an early evaluation of ANSR safety issues. This paper discusses the RELAP5 ANSR conceptual design system model and preliminary LOCA simulation results. Some previous studies were conducted for the preconceptual design. 12 refs., 7 figs

  9. Nonlinear Dynamic Model of Power Plants with Single-Phase Coolant Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmer, H.

    1968-12-01

    The traditional way of developing dynamic models for a specific nuclear power plant and for specific purpose seems rather uneconomical, as much of the information often can not be utilized if the plant design or the required accuracy of the calculation is desired to be changed. It is therefore suggested that the model development may be made more systematic, general and flexible by - applying the 'box of bricks' system, where the main components of a nuclear power plant are treated separately and combined afterwards according to a given flow scheme, - a dynamic determination of the components which is as general as possible without taking into account those details which have a minor influence on the overall dynamics, - providing approximations of the more rigorous solution sufficient to meet the user s requirements on accuracy, - proper use of computers. A dynamic model for single-phase coolant reactor plants is established along these lines. By separation of the nonlinear and linear parts of the system, application of Laplace transformation and proper approximations, and the use of a hybrid computer it seems possible to determine the (nonlinear) dynamic behaviour of such a plant for perturbations which are not so large that phase changes of physical parameters occur, e. g. fuel does not melt. The model is applied to a steam cooled fast reactor power plant

  10. Nonlinear Dynamic Model of Power Plants with Single-Phase Coolant Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, H

    1968-12-15

    The traditional way of developing dynamic models for a specific nuclear power plant and for specific purpose seems rather uneconomical, as much of the information often can not be utilized if the plant design or the required accuracy of the calculation is desired to be changed. It is therefore suggested that the model development may be made more systematic, general and flexible by - applying the 'box of bricks' system, where the main components of a nuclear power plant are treated separately and combined afterwards according to a given flow scheme, - a dynamic determination of the components which is as general as possible without taking into account those details which have a minor influence on the overall dynamics, - providing approximations of the more rigorous solution sufficient to meet the user s requirements on accuracy, - proper use of computers. A dynamic model for single-phase coolant reactor plants is established along these lines. By separation of the nonlinear and linear parts of the system, application of Laplace transformation and proper approximations, and the use of a hybrid computer it seems possible to determine the (nonlinear) dynamic behaviour of such a plant for perturbations which are not so large that phase changes of physical parameters occur, e. g. fuel does not melt. The model is applied to a steam cooled fast reactor power plant.

  11. Improved nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. A generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounds the reactor vessel and a central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and supports the bottom wall of the reactor vessel and the reactor core. The periphery of the reactor vessel bore is supported by an annular structure which allows thermal expansion but not seismic motion of the vessel, and a bed of thermally insulating material uniformly supports the vessel base whilst allowing expansion thereof. A guard ring prevents lateral seismic motion of the upper end of the reactor vessel. The periphery of the core is supported by an annular structure supported by the vessel base and keyed to the vessel wall so as to be able to expand but not undergo seismic motion. A deck is supported on the containment structure above the reactor vessel open top by annular bellows, the deck carrying the reactor control rods such that heating of the reactor vessel results in upward expansion against the control rods. (author)

  12. Effect of ionite decomposition products on the reactor coolant pH in a boiling-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredikhin, V.Ya.; Moskvin, L.N.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of products resulting from thermal radiolysis of ionites on water-chemical regime of NPP with RBMK is considered basing on investigations conducted in a boiling type experimental reactor. Data are presented on dynamics of changes in the specific electric conductivity and pH of the coolant following destruction of ion exchange groups and ionite matrix under the effect of reactor radiation. The authors draw a conclusion that radiation destruction of ionito fine disperse suspension or high-molecular soluble compounds in the reactor are, probably, one of the main reasons for variations in pH values of the coolant at NPP in non-correction water chemical regime

  13. Core performance of equilibrium fast reactors for different coolant materials and fuel types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Parametric studies with several coolant and fuel materials in the equilibrium state are performed for fast reactors in which natural uranium is fed and all of the actinides are confined. Sodium, sodium-potassium, lead, lead-bismuth and helium coolant materials, and oxide, nitride and metal fuels are employed to compare the neutronic characteristics in the equilibrium state. As to the criticality performance, sodium-potassium shows the best performance among the liquid metal coolants and the metallic fuel indicates the best performance

  14. Analysis of an Advanced Test Reactor Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident with an Engineered Safety Feature to Automatically Trip the Primary Coolant Pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polkinghorne, Steven T.; Davis, Cliff B.; McCracken, Richard T.

    2000-01-01

    A new engineered safety feature that automatically trips the primary coolant pumps following a low-pressure reactor scram was recently installed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The purpose of this engineered safety feature is to prevent the ATR's surge tank, which contains compressed air, from emptying during a small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA). If the surge tank were to empty, the air introduced into the primary coolant loop could potentially cause the performance of the primary and/or emergency coolant pumps to degrade, thereby reducing core thermal margins. Safety analysis performed with the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic code and the SINDA thermal analyzer shows that adequate thermal margins are maintained during an SBLOCA with the new engineered safety feature installed. The analysis also shows that the surge tank will not empty during an SBLOCA even if one of the primary coolant pumps fails to trip

  15. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To allow sufficient removal of radioactive substance released in the reactor containment shell upon loss of coolants accidents thus to sufficiently decrease the exposure dose to human body. Constitution: A clean-up system is provided downstream of a heat exchanger and it is branched into a pipeway to be connected to a spray nozzle and further connected by way of a valve to a reactor container. After the end of sudden transient changes upon loss of coolants accidents, the pool water stored in the pressure suppression chamber is purified in the clean-up system and then sprayed in the dry-well by way of a spray nozzle. The sprayed water dissolves to remove water soluble radioactive substances floating in the dry-well and then returns to the pressure suppression chamber. Since radioactive substances in the dry-well can thus removed rapidly and effectively and the pool water can be reused, public hazard can also be decreased. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Neutronic Analysis on Coolant Options in a Hybrid Reactor System for High Level Waste Transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Hee; Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A fusion-fission hybrid reactor (FFHR) which is a combination of plasma fusion tokamak as a fast neutron source and a fission reactor as of fusion blanket is another potential candidate. In FFHR, fusion plasma machine can supply high neutron-rich and energetic 14.1MeV (D, T) neutrons compared to other options. Therefore it has better capability in HLW incineration. While, it has lower requirements compared to pure fusion. Much smaller-sized tokamak can be achievable in a near term because it needs relatively low plasma condition. FFHR has also higher safety potential than fast reactors just as ADSR because it is subcritical reactor system. FFHR proposed up to this time has many design concepts depending on the design purpose. FFHR may also satisfy many design requirement such as energy multiplication, tritium production, radiation shielding for magnets, fissile breeding for self-sustain ability also waste transmutation. Many types of fuel compositions and coolant options have been studied. Effect of choices for fuel and coolant was studied for the transmutation purpose FFHR by our team. In this study LiPb coolant was better than pure Li coolant both for neutron multiplication and tritium breeding. However, performance of waste transmutation was reduced with increased neutron absorption at coolant caused by tritium breeding. Also, LiPb as metal coolant has a problem of massive MHD pressure drop in coolant channels. Therefore, in a previous study, waste transmutation performance was evaluated with light water coolant option which may be a realistic choice. In this study, a neutronic analysis was done for the various coolant options with a detailed computation. One of solutions suggested is to use the pressure tubes inside of first wall and second wall In this work, performance of radioactive waste transmutation was compared with various coolant options. On the whole, keff increases with all coolants except for FLiBe, therefore required fusion power is decreased. In

  17. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  18. Nuclear reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    A safety system for shutting down a nuclear reactor under overload conditions is described. The system includes a series of parallel-connected computer memory type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular reactor parameter and in each of which a precalculated functional value for that parameter is stored indicative of the percentage of maximum reactor load that the parameter contributes. The various functional values corresponding to the actual measured parameters are added together to provide a control signal used to shut down the reactor under overload conditions. (U.K.)

  19. RETRAN code analysis of Tsuruga-2 plant chemical volume control system (CVCS) reactor coolant leakage incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, H.

    2001-01-01

    JAPC purchased RETRAN, a program for transient thermal hydraulic analysis of complex fluid flow system, from the U.S. Electric Power Research Institute in 1992. Since then, JAPC has been utilizing RETRAN to evaluate safety margins of actual plant operation, in coping with troubles (investigating trouble causes and establishing countermeasures), and supporting reactor operation (reviewing operational procedures etc.). In this paper, a result of plant analysis performed on a CVCS reactor primary coolant leakage incident which occurred at JAPC's Tsuruga-2 plant (4-loop PWR, 3423 MWt, 1160 MW) on July 12 of 1999 and, based on the result, we made a plan to modify our operational procedure for reactor primary coolant leakage events in order to make earlier plant shutdown and this reduced primary coolant leakage. (author)

  20. Compatibility of structural materials with fusion reactor coolant and breeder fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVan, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Fusion reactors are characterized by a lithium-containing blanket, a heat transfer medium that is integral with the blanket and first wall, and a heat engine that couples to the heat transfer medium. A variety of lithium-containing substances have been identified as potential blanket materials, including molten lithium metal, molten LiF-BeF 2 , Pb-Li alloys, and solid ceramic compounds such as Li 2 O. Potential heat transfer media include liquid lithium, liquid sodium, molten nitrates, water, and helium. Each of these coolants and blankets requires a particular set of chemical and mechanical properties with respect to the associated reactor and heat engine structural materials. This paper discusses the materials factors that underlie the selection of workable combinations of blankets and coolants. It also addresses the materials compatibility problems generic to those blanket-coolant combinations currently being considered in reactor design studies. (orig.)

  1. Energy from nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hospe, J.

    1977-01-01

    This VDI-Nachrichten series has the target to provide a technical-objective basis for the discussion of the pros and cons of nuclear power. The first part deals with LWR-type reactors which so far have prevailed in nuclear power generation. (orig.) [de

  2. Method of nuclear reactor control using a variable temperature load dependent set point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.J.; Rambo, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for controlling a nuclear reactor in response to a variable average reactor coolant temperature set point is disclosed. The set point is dependent upon percent of full power load demand. A manually-actuated ''droop mode'' of control is provided whereby the reactor coolant temperature is allowed to drop below the set point temperature a predetermined amount wherein the control is switched from reactor control rods exclusively to feedwater flow

  3. HIGH TEMPERATURE, HIGH POWER HETEROGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R.P.; Wykoff, W.R.; Busey, H.M.

    1960-06-14

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor is designed comprising a stationary housing and a rotatable annular core being supported for rotation about a vertical axis in the housing, the core containing a plurality of radial fuel- element supporting channels, the cylindrical empty space along the axis of the core providing a central plenum for the disposal of spent fuel elements, the core cross section outer periphery being vertically gradated in radius one end from the other to provide a coolant duct between the core and the housing, and means for inserting fresh fuel elements in the supporting channels under pressure and while the reactor is in operation.

  4. Hold-down device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, J.; Bonnamour, M.

    1984-01-01

    The present device can be used in nuclear reactors and more particularly in pressurized water reactors consisting of coupled fuel assemblies, certain of which are equipped with non-displaceable elements carried by an unsertable member. The device comprises the unsertable member provided with at least two sets of springs which transmit the load of an upper structure common to the fuel assemblies ajacent that which supports the unsertable member. The device is used to hold-down fuel assemblies which are subjected to the forces of circulating coolant [fr

  5. Thermally-insulating layer for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The thermally-insulating layer has been designed both for insulating surfaces within the core of a nuclear reactor and transmitting loads such as the core-weight. Said layer comprises a layer of bricks and a layer of tiles with smaller clearance between the tiles than between the bricks, the latter having a reduced cross-section against the tiles so as to be surrounded by relatively large interconnected ducts forming a continuous chamber behind the tile-layer in order to induce a substantial decreases in the transverse flow of the reactor-core coolant. The core preferably comprises hexagonal columns supported by rhomb-shaped plates, with channels distributed so as to mix the coolant of twelve columns. The plates are separated from support-tiles by means of pillars [fr

  6. A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Schively, D.P.

    1983-01-01

    The valve has a first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics which are different. The valve parts are positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system. (author)

  7. Regulatory analysis for Generic Issue 23: Reactor coolant pump seal failure. Draft report for comment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaukat, S K; Jackson, J E; Thatcher, D F

    1991-04-01

    This report presents the regulatory/backfit analysis for Generic Issue 23 (GI-23), 'Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Failure'. A backfit analysis in accordance with 10 CFR 50.109 is presented in Appendix E. The proposed resolution includes quality assurance provisions for reactor coolant pump seals, instrumentation and procedures for monitoring seal performance, and provisions for seal cooling during off-normal plant conditions involving loss of all seal cooling such as station blackout. Research, technical data, and other analyses supporting the resolution of this issue are summarized in the technical findings report (NUREG/CR-4948) and cost/benefit report (NUREG/CR-5167). (author)

  8. Determination of two dimensional axisymmetric finite element model for reactor coolant piping nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S. N.; Kim, H. N.; Jang, K. S.; Kim, H. J.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine a two dimensional axisymmetric model through a comparative study between a three dimensional and an axisymmetric finite element analysis of the reactor coolant piping nozzle subject to internal pressure. The finite element analysis results show that the stress adopting the axisymmetric model with the radius of equivalent spherical vessel are well agree with that adopting the three dimensional model. The radii of equivalent spherical vessel are 3.5 times and 7.3 times of the radius of the reactor coolant piping for the safety injection nozzle and for the residual heat removal nozzle, respectively

  9. Nuclear reactors to come

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, M.

    2002-01-01

    The demand for nuclear energy will continue to grow at least till 2050 because of mainly 6 reasons: 1) the steady increase of the world population, 2) China, India and Indonesia will reach higher social standard and their energy consumption will consequently grow, 3) fossil energy resources are dwindling, 4) coal will be little by little banned because of its major contribution to the emission of green house effect gas, 5) renewable energies need important technological jumps to be really efficient and to take the lead, and 6) fusion energy is not yet ready to take over. All these reasons draw a promising future for nuclear energy. Today 450 nuclear reactors are operating throughout the world producing 17% of the total electrical power demand. In order to benefit fully of this future, nuclear industry has to improve some characteristics of reactors: 1) a more efficient use of uranium (it means higher burnups), 2) a simplification and automation of reprocessing-recycling chain of processes, 3) efficient measures against proliferation and against any misuse for terrorist purposes, and 4) an enhancement of safety for the next generation of reactors. The characteristics of fast reactors and of high-temperature reactors will likely make these kinds of reactors the best tools for energy production in the second half of this century. (A.C.)

  10. Improvements in liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, S.

    1980-01-01

    Improvements in the design of the thermally insulating material used to shield the concrete containment walls in liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors are described in detail. The insulating material is composed of two layers and is placed between the primary vessel (usually steel) and the steel lined concrete containment vault. The outer layer, which clads the inner wall surface of the vault, is generally impervious to liquid metal coolant whilst the inner layer is pervious to the coolant. In normal operation, both layers protect the concrete from heat radiated from the reactor. In the event of a breach of the containment vessel, the resulting leakage of liquid metal coolant permeates the inner layer of insulating material, provides a means of heat transfer by conduction and hence reduces the overall insulating properties of the two layers. The outer layer continues to protect the wall surface of the vault from substantial direct contact with the liquid metal. Thus the two apparently conflicting requirements of good thermal insulation during normal operation and of heat transfer during loss of coolant accidents are satisfied by this novel design. Suggestions are given for possible materials for use as the insulating layers. (U.K.)

  11. An improved water cooled nuclear reactor and pressuriser assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, F.J.; Strong, R.

    1991-01-01

    A water cooled nuclear reactor is described which comprises a reactor core, a primary water coolant circuit and a pressuriser arranged as an integral unit in a pressure vessel. The pressure vessel is divided into an upper and a lower chamber by a casing. The reactor core and primary water coolant circuit are arranged in the lower chamber and the pressuriser is arranged in the upper chamber. A plurality of spray pipes interconnect a steam space of the pressuriser with the downcomer of the primary water coolant circuit below a heat exchanger. A plurality of surge ports interconnect a water space of the pressuriser with the primary water coolant circuit. The surge ports have hydraulic diodes so that there is a low flow resistance for water from the water space of the pressuriser to the primary water coolant circuit and high flow resistance in the opposite direction. The spray pipes provide a desuperheating spray of cooled water into the pressuriser during positive volume surges of the primary water coolant. The pressuriser arrangement may also be applied to integral water cooled reactors with separate pressurisers and to dispersed pressurised water reactors. The surge ports also allow water to flow by gravity to the core in an emergency. (author)

  12. Model for cobalt 60/58 deposition on primary coolant piping in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehollander, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    A first principles model for deposition of radioactive metals into the corrosion films of primary coolant piping is proposed. It is shown that the predominant mechanism is the inclusion of the radioactive species such as Cobalt 60 into the spinel structure of the corrosion film during the act of active corrosion. This deposition can occupy only a defined fraction of the available plus 2 valence sites of the spinel. For cobalt ions, this ratio is roughly 4.6 x 10 -3 of the total iron sites. Since no distinction is made between Cobalt 60, Cobalt 58, and Cobalt 59 in this process, the radioactivity associated with this inclusion is a function of the ratio of the radioactive species to the nonradioactive species in the water causing the corrosion of the pipe metal. The other controlling parameter is the corrosion rate of the pipe material. This can be a function of time, for example, and it shown that freshly descaled metal when exposed to the cobalt containing water can incorporate as much as 10 x 10 -3 cobalt ions per iron atom in the initial corrosion period. This has implications for the problem of decontaminating nuclear reactor piping. Equations and selected observations are presented without reference to any specifically identified reactor or utility, so as to protect any proprietary interest

  13. Reactor hydrodynamics during the reflood phase of a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    The thermohydraulics of a nuclear reactor during the reflood phase of a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident can be represented by moving control volume methodology in which six control volumes are used to represent the downcomer, lower plenum, and reactor core. The one-dimensional, homogeneous, equilibrium constitutive equations for two-phase steam/water flow are solved in each control volume and connecting junctions. One of the three core control volumes represents the quench region; it changes size and position based on the axial location of the clad quench temperature and the condensed liquid level in the flow channel. The lengths of the remaining two core control volumes are determined by the position of the quench region. Simulation of actual reflood experiments demonstrates that the methodology predicts reflood-like flow oscillations and reproduces the correct trends in experimental data. The moving control volume methodology has proven itself as a valid concept for reflood hydrodynamics, but further development of the existing EFLOD code is required for simulation of actual reflood experiments

  14. Optimization of reactor coolant shutdown chemistry practices for crud inventory management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellers, B.; Barnette, J.; Stevens, J.; Perkins, D.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes reactor coolant shutdown chemistry control practices at Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES, TXU-Generation, USA). The shutdown evolution is managed from a process control perspective to achieve conditions most favorable to crud decomposition and to avoiding re-precipitation of metals. The report discusses the evolution of current industry practices and the necessity for greater emphasis on shutdown chemistry control in response to Axial Offset Anomaly and growth of ex-core radiation fields during outage conditions. Nuclear Industry experience with axial offset anomaly (AOA), radiation field growth and unexpected behavior of crud during reactor shutdowns has encouraged the refinement of chemistry control practices during plant shutdown and startup. The strong implication of nickel rich crud as a cause of AOA and unexpected crud behavior has resulted in a focus on nickel inventory management. The goals for Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES) include maintaining solubility of metals and radioisotopes, maximizing nickel removal and effective cleanup with demineralizers. This paper provides results and lessons learned from long term efforts to optimize the shutdown process. (authors)

  15. Return momentum effect on reactor coolant water level distribution during mid-loop conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jae Kwang; Yang, Jae Young; Park, Goon Cherl

    2001-01-01

    An accurate prediction of the Reactor Coolant System( RCS) water level is of importance in the determination of the allowable operating range to ensure safety during mid-loop operations. However, complex hydrualic phenomena induced by the Shutdown Cooling System (SCS) return momentum causes different water levels from those in the loop where the water level indicators are located. This was apparently observed at the pre-core cold hydro test of the Younggwang Nuclear Unit 3 (YGN 3) in Korea. In this study, in order to analytically understand the effect of the SCS return momentum on the RCS water level distribution, a model using a one-dimensional momentum and energy conservation for cylindrical channel, hydraulic jump in operating cold leg, water level build-up at the Reactor Vessel (RV) inlet nozzle, Bernoulli constant in downcomer region, and total water volume conservation has been developed. The model predicts the RCS water levels at various RCS locations during the mid-loop conditions and the calculation results were compared with the test data. The analysis shows that the hydraulic jump in the operating cold legs, in conjuction with the pressure drop throughout the RCS, is the main cause creating the water level differences at various RCS locations. The prediction results provide good explanations for the test data and show the significant effect of the SCS return momentum on the RCS water levels

  16. Numerical study on coolant flow distribution at the core inlet for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin; Peng, Min Jun; Xia, Genglei; Lv, Xing; Li, Ren [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2017-02-15

    When an integral pressurized water reactor is operated under low power conditions, once-through steam generator group operation strategy is applied. However, group operation strategy will cause nonuniform coolant flow distribution at the core inlet and lower plenum. To help coolant flow mix more uniformly, a flow mixing chamber (FMC) has been designed. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics methods have been used to investigate the coolant distribution by the effect of FMC. Velocity and temperature characteristics under different low power conditions and optimized FMC configuration have been analyzed. The results illustrate that the FMC can help improve the nonuniform coolant temperature distribution at the core inlet effectively; at the same time, the FMC will induce more resistance in the downcomer and lower plenum.

  17. The corrosion products in the coolant circuits of pressurized water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darras, R.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of the corrosion products formed in the primary and secondary coolant circuits of light-water pressurized reactors are reviewed. The problem induced by the pollution of coolants and metallic surface are examined. Then, the recommendations to follow to minimize the disturbing effects of this pollution by the corrosion products are indicated [fr

  18. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterfield, C.E.; Waite, E.

    1982-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  19. Nuclear reactor monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, C.N.; Bybee, R.T.; Mason, F.L.; Worsham, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    The invention pertains to an improved monitoring system for the neutron flux in a nuclear reactor. It is proposed to combine neutron flux detectors, a thermoelement, and a background radiation detector in one measuring unit. The spatial arrangement of these elements is fixed with great exactness; they are enclosed by an elastic cover and are brought into position in the reactor with the aid of a bent tube. The arrangement has a low failure rate and is easy to maintain. (HP) [de

  20. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosaka, Seiichi.

    1988-01-01

    Cables coverd with non-halogen covering material are used as electric wire cables wired for supplying electric power to a reactor recycling pump. Silicone rubber having specified molecular formula is used for the non-halogen covering material. As a result, formation of chlorine in a nuclear reactor container can be eliminated and increase in the deposited salts to SUS pipeways, etc. can be prevented, to avoid the occurrence of stress corrosion cracks. (H.T.)

  1. Technology of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravelet, F.

    2016-01-01

    This academic report for graduation in engineering first presents operation principles of a nuclear reactor core. It presents core components, atomic nuclei, the notions of transmutation and radioactivity, quantities used to characterize ionizing radiations, the nuclear fission, statistical aspects of fission and differences between fast and slow neutrons, a comparison between various heat transfer fluids, the uranium enrichment process, and different types of reactor (boiling water, natural uranium and heavy water, pressurized water, and fourth generation). Then, after having recalled the French installed power, the author proposes an analysis of a typical 900 MWe nuclear power plant: primary circuit, reactor, fuel, spent fuel, pressurizer and primary pump, secondary circuit, aspects related to control-command, regulation, safety and exploitation. The last part proposes a modelling of the thermodynamic cycle of a pressurized water plant by using an equivalent Carnot cycle, a Rankine cycle, and a two-phase expansion cycle with drying-overheating

  2. Zinc corrosion after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors – Physicochemical effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryk, Holger, E-mail: h.kryk@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Hoffmann, Wolfgang [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Kästner, Wolfgang; Alt, Sören; Seeliger, André; Renger, Stefan [Hochschule Zittau/Görlitz, Institute of Process Technology, Process Automation and Measuring Technology, Theodor-Körner-Allee 16, D-02763 Zittau (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Physicochemical effects due to post-LOCA zinc corrosion in PWR were elucidated. • Decreasing solubility of corrosion products with increasing temperature was found. • Solid corrosion products may be deposited on hot surfaces and/or within hot-spots. • Corrosion products precipitating from coolant were identified as zinc borates. • Depending on coolant temperature, different types of zinc borate are formed. - Abstract: Within the framework of the reactor safety research, generic experimental investigations were carried out aiming at the physicochemical background of possible zinc corrosion product formation, which may occur inside the reactor pressure vessel during the sump circulation operation after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors. The contact of the boric acid containing coolant with hot-dip galvanized steel containment internals causes corrosion of the corresponding materials resulting in dissolution of the zinc coat. A retrograde solubility of zinc corrosion products with increasing temperature was observed during batch experiments of zinc corrosion in boric acid containing coolants. Thus, the formation and deposition of solid corrosion products cannot be ruled out if the coolant containing dissolved zinc is heated up during its recirculation into hot regions within the emergency cooling circuit (e.g. hot-spots in the core). Corrosion experiments at a lab-scale test facility, which included formation of corrosion products at a single heated cladding tube, proved that dissolved zinc, formed at low temperatures in boric acid solution by zinc corrosion, turns into solid deposits of zinc borates when contacting heated zircaloy surfaces during the heating of the coolant. Moreover, the temperature of formation influences the chemical composition of the zinc borates and thus the deposition and mobilization behavior of the products.

  3. Zinc corrosion after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors – Physicochemical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryk, Holger; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Kästner, Wolfgang; Alt, Sören; Seeliger, André; Renger, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Physicochemical effects due to post-LOCA zinc corrosion in PWR were elucidated. • Decreasing solubility of corrosion products with increasing temperature was found. • Solid corrosion products may be deposited on hot surfaces and/or within hot-spots. • Corrosion products precipitating from coolant were identified as zinc borates. • Depending on coolant temperature, different types of zinc borate are formed. - Abstract: Within the framework of the reactor safety research, generic experimental investigations were carried out aiming at the physicochemical background of possible zinc corrosion product formation, which may occur inside the reactor pressure vessel during the sump circulation operation after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors. The contact of the boric acid containing coolant with hot-dip galvanized steel containment internals causes corrosion of the corresponding materials resulting in dissolution of the zinc coat. A retrograde solubility of zinc corrosion products with increasing temperature was observed during batch experiments of zinc corrosion in boric acid containing coolants. Thus, the formation and deposition of solid corrosion products cannot be ruled out if the coolant containing dissolved zinc is heated up during its recirculation into hot regions within the emergency cooling circuit (e.g. hot-spots in the core). Corrosion experiments at a lab-scale test facility, which included formation of corrosion products at a single heated cladding tube, proved that dissolved zinc, formed at low temperatures in boric acid solution by zinc corrosion, turns into solid deposits of zinc borates when contacting heated zircaloy surfaces during the heating of the coolant. Moreover, the temperature of formation influences the chemical composition of the zinc borates and thus the deposition and mobilization behavior of the products

  4. Water quality control device and water quality control method for reactor primary coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yoichi; Ibe, Eishi; Watanabe, Atsushi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is suitable for preventing defects due to corrosion of structural materials in a primary coolant system of a BWR type reactor. Namely, a concentration measuring means measures the concentration of oxidative ingredients contained in a reactor water. A reducing electrode is disposed along a reactor water flow channel in the primary coolant system and reduces the oxidative ingredients. A reducing counter electrode is disposed along the reactor water flow channel in the primary coolant system, and electrically connected to the reducing electrode. The reactor structural materials are used as a reference electrode providing a reference potential to the reducing electrode and the reducing counter electrode. A potential control means controls the potential of the reducing electrode relative to the reference potential based on the signals from the concentration measuring means. A stable reference potential in a region where an effective oxygen concentration is stable can be obtained irrespective of the change of operation conditions by using the reactor structural materials disposed to a boiling region in the reactor core as a reference electrode. As a result, the water quality can be controlled at high accuracy. (I.S.)

  5. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  6. Nuclear reactor buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Shoji; Kato, Ryoichi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the cost of reactor buildings and satisfy the severe seismic demands in tank type FBR type reactors. Constitution: In usual nuclear reactor buildings of a flat bottom embedding structure, the flat bottom is entirely embedded into the rock below the soils down to the deck level of the nuclear reactor. As a result, although the weight of the seismic structure can be decreased, the amount of excavating the cavity is significantly increased to inevitably increase the plant construction cost. Cross-like intersecting foundation mats are embedded to the building rock into a thickness capable withstanding to earthquakes while maintaining the arrangement of equipments around the reactor core in the nuclear buildings required by the system design, such as vertical relationship between the equipments, fuel exchange systems and sponteneous drainings. Since the rock is hard and less deformable, the rigidity of the walls and the support structures of the reactor buildings can be increased by the embedding into the rock substrate and floor responsivity can be reduced. This enables to reduce the cost and increasing the seismic proofness. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a safety system for a nuclear reactor which uses a parallel combination of computer type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular parameter (from transducers located in the reactor system) and each of which produces the functional counterpart of that particular parameter. The various functional counterparts are then added together to form a control signal for shutting down the reactor. The functional counterparts are developed by analysis of experimental thermal and hydraulic data, which are used to form expressions that define safe conditions

  8. Generalities about nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, C.; Beroux, P.

    2012-01-01

    From Zoe, the first nuclear reactor, till the current EPR, the French nuclear industry has always advanced by profiting from the feedback from dozens of years of experience and operations, in particular by drawing lessons from the most significant events in its history, such as the Fukushima accident. The new generations of reactors must improve safety and economic performance so that the industry maintain its legitimacy and its share in the production of electricity. This article draws the history of nuclear power in France, gives a brief description of the pressurized water reactor design, lists the technical features of the different versions of PWR that operate in France and compares them with other types of reactors. The feedback experience concerning safety, learnt from the major nuclear accidents Three Miles Island (1979), Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) is also detailed. Today there are 26 third generation reactors being built in the world: 4 EPR (1 in Finland, 1 in France and 2 in China); 2 VVER-1200 in Russia, 8 AP-1000 (4 in China and 4 in the Usa), 8 APR-1400 (4 in Korea and 4 in UAE), and 4 ABWR (2 in Japan and 2 in Taiwan)

  9. Early detection of coolant boiling in research reactors with MTR-type fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozma, R.; Turkcan, E.; Verhoef, J.P.

    1992-10-01

    A reactor core monitoring system having the function of early detection of boiling in the coolant channels of research reactors with MTR-type fuel is introduced. The system is based on the on-line analysis of signals of various ex-core and in-core neutron detectors. Early detection of coolant boiling cannot be accomplished by the evaluation of the DC components of these detectors in a number of practically important cases of boiling anomaly. It is shown that the noise component of the available neutron detector signals can be used for the detection of boiling in these cases. Experiments have been carried out at a boiling setup in the research reactor HOR of the Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Technical University of Delft, The Netherlands. (author). 8 refs., 11 figs

  10. Spectral analysis of coolant activity from a commercial nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swann, J.D.; Lewis, B.J.; Ip, M.

    2008-01-01

    In support of the development of a real-time on-line fuel failure monitoring system for the CANDU reactor, actual gamma spectroscopy data files from the gaseous fission product (GFP) monitoring system were acquired from almost four years of operation at a commercial Nuclear Generating Station (NGS). Several spectral analysis techniques were used to process the data files. Radioisotopic activity from the plant information (PI) system was compared to an in-house C++ code that was used to determine the photopeak area and to a separate analysis with commercial software from Canberra-Aptec. These various techniques provided for a calculation of the coolant activity concentration of the noble gas and iodine species in the primary heat transport system. These data were then used to benchmark the Visual DETECT code, a user friendly software tool which can be used to characterize the defective fuel state based on a coolant activity analysis. Acceptable agreement was found with the spectral techniques when compared to the known defective bundle history at the commercial reactor. A more generalized method of assessing the fission product release data was also considered with the development of a pre-processor to evaluate the radioisotopic release rate from mass balance considerations. The release rate provided a more efficient means to characterize the occurrence of a defect and was consistent with the actual defect situation at the power plant as determined from in-bay examination of discharged fuel bundles. (author)

  11. Impact of mechanical- and maintenance-induced failures of main reactor coolant pump seals on plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azarm, M.A.; Boccio, J.L.; Mitra, S.

    1985-12-01

    This document presents an investigation of the safety impact resulting from mechanical- and maintenance-induced reactor coolant pump (RCP) seal failures in nuclear power plants. A data survey of the pump seal failures for existing nuclear power plants in the US from several available sources was performed. The annual frequency of pump seal failures in a nuclear power plant was estimated based on the concept of hazard rate and dependency evaluation. The conditional probability of various sizes of leak rates given seal failures was then evaluated. The safety impact of RCP seal failures, in terms of contribution to plant core-melt frequency, was also evaluated for three nuclear power plants. For leak rates below the normal makeup capacity and the impact of plant safety were discussed qualitatively, whereas for leak rates beyond the normal make up capacity, formal PRA methodologies were applied. 22 refs., 17 figs., 19 tabs

  12. Analysis of the effects of the pressure wave generated in loss of coolant accidents in reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valero Martinez, M.

    1980-01-01

    The increasing demands in the field of ''Nuclear Safety'', obliges to a perfect knowledge of the causes and effects of every possible accident in a nuclear power plant. In this paper will be analysed the effects of the pressure wave appearing in a LOCA (Loss of collant accident). The pressure wave could deform the following structures: core barrel wall, cover and bottom, control rods and safety coolant system. Any change of the geometry of these structures could provoke and incorrect system reaction after the accident has happened. The basis and hypothesis for the theoretical analysis will be exposed. The structures are considered to be rigid. A typical boiling water be analysed and the developed theory will be verified in comparations with experimental results and the results obtained with some others models. Due to the easy application and short calculation time of the created programmes, they are recommended for parametrical calculations in the analysis of the pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. (author)

  13. On Line Neutron Flux Mapping in Fuel Coolant Channels of a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbot, Loic; Domergue, Christophe; Villard, Jean-Francois; Destouches, Christophe; Braoudakis, George; Wassink, David; Sinclair, Bradley; Osborn, John-C.; Wu, Huayou; Blandin, C.; Thevenin, Mathieu; Corre, Gwenole; Normand, Stephane

    2013-06-01

    This work deals with the on-line neutron flux mapping of the OPAL research reactor. A specific irradiation device has been set up to investigate fuel coolant channels using subminiature fission chambers to get thermal neutron flux profiles. Experimental results are compared to first neutronic calculations and show good agreement (C/E ∼0.97). (authors)

  14. Probabilistic analysis of fuel pin behaviour during an eventual loss of coolant in PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    Brief description of the development of the coolant loss incident in a pressurized water reactor and analysis of its significance for the behaviour of the fuel rods. Description of a probalistic method for estimating the effects of the accident on the fuel rods and results obtained [fr

  15. Heavy water moderated tubular type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohashi, Masahisa.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to effectively change the volume of heavy water per unit fuel lattice in heavy water moderated pressure tube type nuclear reactors. Constitution: In a nuclear reactor in which fuels are charged within pressure tubes and coolants are caused to flow between the pressure tubes and the fuels, heavy water tubes for recycling heavy water are disposed to a gas region formed to the outside of the pressure tubes. Then, the pressure tube diameter at the central portion of the reactor core is made smaller than that at the periphery of the reactor core. Further, injection means for gas such as helium is disposed to the upper portion for each of the heavy water tubes so that the level of the heavy water can easily be adjusted by the control for the gas pressure. Furthermore, heavy water reflection tubes are disposed around the reactor core. In this constitution, since the pitch for the pressure tubes can be increased, the construction and the maintenance for the nuclear reactor can be facilitated. Also, since the liquid surface of the heavy water in the heavy water tubes can be varied, nuclear properties is improved and the conversion ratio is improved. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. Dynamic Analysis of Coolant Channel and Its Internals of Indian 540 MWe PHWR Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rama Rao

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The horizontal coolant channel is one of the important parts of primary heat transport system in PHWR type of reactors. There are in all 392 channels in the core of Indian 540 MWe reactor. Each channel houses 13 natural uranium fuel bundles and shielding and sealing plugs one each on either side of the channel. The heavy water coolant flows through the coolant channel and carries the nuclear heat to outside the core for steam generation and power production in the turbo-generator. India has commissioned one 540 MWe PHWR reactor in September 2005 and another similar unit will be going into operation very shortly. For a complete dynamic study of the channel and its internals under the influence of high coolant flow, experimental and modeling studies have been carried out. A good correlation has been achieved between the results of experimental and analytical models. The operating life of a typical coolant channel typically ranges from 10 to 15 full-power years. Towards the end of its operating life, its health monitoring becomes an important activity. Vibration diagnosis plays an important role as a tool for life management of coolant. Through the study of dynamic characteristics of the coolant channel under simulated loading condition, an attempt has been made to develop a diagnostics to monitor the health of the coolant channel over its operating life. A study has been also carried out to characterize the fuel vibration under different flow condition.

  17. Nuclear reactor core and fuel element therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortescue, P.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor core. This core consists of vertical columns of disengageable fuel elements stacked one atop another. These columns are arranged in side-by-side relationship to form a substantially continuous horizontal array. Each of the fuel elements include a block of refractory material having relatively good thermal conductivity and neutron moderating characteristics. The block has a pair of parallel flat top and bottom end faces and sides which are substantially prependicular to the end faces. The sides of each block is aligned vertically within a vertical column, with the sides of vertically adjacent blocks. Each of the blocks contains fuel chambers, including outer rows containing only fuel chambers along the sides of the block have nuclear fuel material disposed in them. The blocks also contain vertical coolant holes which are located inside the fuel chambers in the outer rows and the fuel chambers which are not located in the outer rows with the fuel chambers and which extend axially completely through from end face to end face and form continuous vertical intracolumn coolant passageways in the reactor core. The blocks have vertical grooves extending along the sides of the blocks form interblock channels which align in groups to form continuous vertical intercolumn coolant passsageways in the reactor core. The blocks are in the form of a regular hexagonal prism with each side of the block having vertical gooves defining one half of one of the coolant interblock channels, six corner edges on the blocks have vertical groves defining one-third of an interblock channel, the vertical sides of the blocks defining planar vertical surfaces

  18. Failure probability of PWR reactor coolant loop piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, T.; Woo, H.H.; Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1984-02-01

    This paper describes the results of assessments performed on the PWR coolant loop piping of Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering plants. For direct double-ended guillotine break (DEGB), consideration was given to crack existence probability, initial crack size distribution, hydrostatic proof test, preservice inspection, leak detection probability, crack growth characteristics, and failure criteria based on the net section stress failure and tearing modulus stability concept. For indirect DEGB, fragilities of major component supports were estimated. The system level fragility was then calculated based on the Boolean expression involving these fragilities. Indirect DEGB due to seismic effects was calculated by convolving the system level fragility and the seismic hazard curve. The results indicate that the probability of occurrence of both direct and indirect DEGB is extremely small, thus, postulation of DEGB in design should be eliminated and replaced by more realistic criteria

  19. Reactor coolant pump type RUV for Westinghouse Electric Company LLC reactor AP1000 TM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgarten, S.; Brecht, B.; Bruhns, U.; Fehring, P.

    2010-01-01

    The RUV is a reactor coolant pump, specially designed for the Westinghouse Electric Company LLC AP1000 TM reactor. It is a hermetically sealed, wet winding motor pump. The RUV is a very compact, vertical pump/motor unit, designed to fit into the compartment next to the reactor pressure vessel. Each of the two steam generators has two pump casings welded to the channel head by the suction nozzle. The pump/motor unit consists of a pump part, where a semi-axial impeller/diffuser combination is mounted in a one-piece pump casing. Computational Fluid Dynamics methods combined with various hydraulic tests in a 1:2 scale hydraulic test assure full compliance with the specific customer requirements. A short and rigid shaft, supported by a radial bearing, connects the impeller with the high inertia flywheel. This flywheel consists of a one-piece forged stainless steel cylinder, with an option for several smaller heavy metal cylinders inside. The flywheel is located inside the thermal barrier, which forms part of the pressure boundary. A specific arrangement of cooling water circuits guarantees a homogeneous temperature distribution in and around the flywheel, minimizes the friction losses of the flywheel and protects the motor from hot coolant. The driving torque is transmitted by the motor shaft, which itself is supported by two radial bearings. A three-phase, high-voltage squirrel-cage induction motor generates the driving torque. Due to the wet winding concept it is possible to achieve positive effects regarding motor lifetime. The cooling water is forced through the stator windings and the gap between rotor and stator by an auxiliary impeller. Furthermore, this wet winding motor concept has higher efficiency as compared to a canned motor since there are no eddy current losses. As part of the design process and in addition to the hydraulic scale model, a complete half scale model pump was built. It was used to verify the calculations performed like coast

  20. Coolant void effect investigation - case of a na-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glinatsis, G.; Gugiu, D.

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of the last EURATOM-FP7 Program, a large sized Sodium-cooled FR (SFR) has been studied. Mixed carbides fuel (U, Pu)C has been adopted for the backup core solution and important work has been also performed in order to obtain an ''optimised'' backup configuration ''close'' to the reference one, which is fueled by mixed oxides fuel (U, Pu)Ox. The peculiarity of both core designs (the reference configuration and the optimised backup configuration) is the adoption of a 60 cm Plenum zone in the upper part of each fuel assembly (FA), that is filled by coolant, in order to mitigate (when emptied) the core positive coolant void effect. This paper presents some results of a detailed study of the coolant void effect for the above SFR with mixed carbides core. Many aspects, like geometric heterogeneity, the burnup state, the operating conditions, etc., have been taken into consideration in order to obtain information about the ''propagation'' and the behaviour of the coolant void effect itself. The performed study investigates also the coolant void effect consequences on some reactivity coefficients, which are important for a safe behaviour of the reactor. The investigation consisted in the steady state simulations of the reactor on different operating conditions in Monte Carlo approach. (authors)

  1. Generic aging management programs for license renewal of BWR reactor coolant systems components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  2. Generic Aging Management Programs for License Renewal of BWR Reactor Coolant System Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  3. Nuclear rocket engine reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-07-01

    Covers a new technology of nuclear reactors and the related materials aspects. Integrates physics, materials science and engineering Serves as a basic book for nuclear engineers and nuclear physicists. The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  4. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Y.; Tashima, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies arranged in the form of a lattice wherein there is attached to the interface of one of two adjacent fuel assemblies a plate spring having a concave portion curved toward said interface and to the interface of the other fuel assembly a plate spring having a convex portion curved away from said interface

  5. Materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.; Kamath, H.S.

    2005-01-01

    The improved performance of present generation nuclear reactors and the realization of advanced reactor concepts, both, require development of better materials. Physical metallurgy/materials science principles which have been exploited in meeting the exacting requirements of nuclear reactor materials (fuels and structural materials), are outlined citing a few specific examples. While the incentive for improvement of traditional fuels (e.g., UO 2 fuel) is primarily for increasing the average core burn up, the development of advanced fuels (e.g., MOX, mixed carbide, nitride, silicide and dispersion fuels) are directed towards better utilization of fissile and fertile inventories through adaptation of innovative fuel cycles. As the burn up of UO 2 fuel reaches higher levels, a more detailed and quantitative understanding of the phenomena such as fission gas release, fuel restructuring induced by radiation and thermal gradients and pellet-clad interaction is being achieved. Development of zirconium based alloys for both cladding and pressure tube applications is discussed with reference to their physical metallurgy, fabrication techniques and in-reactor degradation mechanisms. The issue of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is covered drawing a comparison between the western and eastern specifications of RPV steels. The search for new materials which can stand higher rates of atomic displacement due to radiation has led to the development of swelling resistant austenitic and ferritic stainless steels for fast reactor applications as exemplified by the development of the D-9 steel for Indian fast breeder reactor. The presentation will conclude by listing various materials related phenomena, which have a strong bearing on the successful development of future nuclear energy systems. (author)

  6. Nuclear reactor assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, H.; Scholz, M.; Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear reactor assembly includes a reactor pressure tank having a substantially cylindrical side wall surrounded by the wall of a cylindrical cavity formed by a biological shield. A rotative cylindrical wall is interposed between the walls and has means for rotating it from outside of the shield, and a probe is carried by the rotative wall for monitoring the pressure tank's wall. The probe is vertically movable relative to the rotative cylindrical wall, so that by the probe's vertical movement and rotation of the rotative cylinder, the reactor's wall can be very extensively monitored. If the reactor pressure tank's wall fails, it is contained by the rotative wall which is backed-up by the shield cavity wall. (Official Gazette)

  7. CANDU nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakaria, B. K.

    1994-01-01

    AECL has over 40 years of experience in the nuclear field. Over the past 20 years, this unique Canadian nuclear technology has made a worldwide presence, In addition to 22 CANDU reactors in Canada, there are also two in India, one in Pakistan, one in Argentina, four in Korea and five in Romania. CANDU advancements are based on evolutionary plant improvements. They consist of system performance improvements, design technology improvements and research and development in support of advanced nuclear power. Given the good performance of CANOU plants, it is important that this CANDU operating experience be incorporated into new and repeat designs

  8. A new advanced safe nuclear reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, Farhang

    1999-01-01

    The reactor design is based on fluidized bed concept and utilizes pressurized water reactor technology. The fuel is automatically removed from the reactor by gravity under any accident condition. The reactor demonstrates the characteristics of inherent safety and passive cooling. Here two options for modification to the original design are proposed in order to increase the stability and thermal efficiency of the reactor. A modified version of the reactor involves the choice of supercritical steam as the coolant to produce a plant thermal efficiency of about 40%. Another is to modify the shape of the reactor core to produce a non-fluctuating bed and consequently guarantee the dynamic stability of the reactor. The mixing of Tantalum in the fuel is also proposed as an additional inhibition to power excursion. The spent fuel pellets may not be considered nuclear waste since they are in the shape and size that can easily be used as a a radioactive source for food irradiation and industrial applications. The reactor can easily operate with any desired spectrum by varying the porosity in order to be a plutonium burner or utilize a thorium fuel cycle. (author)

  9. Investigation of coolant mixture in pressurized water reactors at the Rossendorf mixing test facility ROCOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, G.; Hoehne, T.; Prasser, H.M.; Richter, K.; Weiss, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    During the so-called boron dilution or cold water transients at pressurized water reactors too weakly borated water or too cold water, respectively, might enter the reactor core. This results in the insertion of positive reactivity and possibly leads to a power excursion. If the source of unborated or subcooled water is not located in all coolant loops but in selected ones only, the amount of reactivity insertion depends on the coolant mixing in the downcomer and lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Such asymmetric disturbances of the coolant temperature or boron concentration might e.g. be the result of a failure of the chemical and volume control system (CVCS) or of a main steam line break (MSLB) that does only affect selected steam generators (SG). For the analysis of boron dilution or MSLB accidents coupled neutron kinetics/thermo-hydraulic system codes have been used. To take into account coolant mixing phenomena in these codes in a realistic manner, analytical mixing models might be included. These models must be simple and fast running on the one hand, but must well describe the real mixing conditions on the other hand. (orig.)

  10. Simulation of small break loss of coolant accident in pressurized water reactor (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abass, N. M. N.

    2012-02-01

    A major safety concern in pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) design is the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA),in which a break in the primary coolant circuit leads to depressurization, boiling of the coolant, consequent reduced cooling of the reactor core, and , unless remedial measures are taken, overheating of the fuel rods. This concern has led to the development of several simulators for safety analysis. This study demonstrates how the passive and active safety systems in conventional and advanced PWR behave during the small break loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA). The consequences of SBOLOCA have been simulated using IAEA Generic pressurized Water Reactor Simulator (GPWRS) and personal Computer Transient analyzer (PCTRAN) . The results were presented and discussed. The study has confirmed the major safety advantage of passive plants versus conventional PWRs is that the passive safety systems provide long-term core cooling and decay heat removal without the need for operator actions and without reliance on active safety-related system. (Author)

  11. Moderator for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgram, M.S.; Dunn, J.T.; Hart, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a moderator for a nuclear reactor and more specifically, to a composite moderator. A moderator is designed to slow down, or thermalize, neutrons which are released during nuclear reactions in the reactor fuel. Pure or almost pure materials like light water, heavy water, beryllium or graphite are used singly as moderators at present. All these materials, are used widely. Graphite has a good mechanical strength at high temperatures encountered in the nuclear core and therefore is used as both the moderator and core structural material. It also exhibits a low neutron-capture cross section and high neutron scattering cross section. However, graphite is susceptible to attach by carbon dioxide and/or oxygen where applicable, and releases stress energy under certain circumstances, although under normal operating conditions these reactions can be controlled. (author). 1 tab

  12. Addition of soluble and insoluble neutron absorbers to the reactor coolant system of TMI-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, R.F.; Silverman, J.; Queen, S.P.; Ryan, R.F.; Austin, W.E.

    1984-07-01

    The physical and chemical properties of six elements were studied and combined with cost estimates to determine the feasibility of adding them to the TMI-2 reactor coolant to depress k/sub eff/ to less than or equal to 0.95. Both soluble and insoluble forms of the elements B, Cd, Gd, Li, Sm, and Eu were examined. Criticality calculations were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the absorber concentration required to meet the 0.95 k/sub eff/ criterion. The conclusion reached is that all elements with the exception of boron have overriding disadvantages which preclude their use in this reactor. Solubility experiments in the reactor coolant show that boron solubility is the same as that of boron in pure aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide and boric acid; consequently, solubility is not a limiting factor in reaching the k/sub eff/ criterion. Examination of the effect of pH on sodium requirements and costs for processing to remove radionuclides revealed a sharp dependence; small decreases in pH lead to a large decrease in both sodium requirements and processing costs. Boron addition to meet any contemplated reactor safety requirements can be accomplished with existing equipment; however, this addition must be made with the reactor coolant system filled and pressurized to ensure uniform boron concentration

  13. A dynamic model of the reactor coolant system flow for KMRR plant simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, B.W.; Noh, T.W.; Park, C.; Sim, B.S.; Oh, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    To support computer simulation studies for reactor control system design and performance evaluation, a dynamic model of the reactor coolant system (RCS) and reflector cooling system has been developed. This model is composed of the reactor coolant loop momentum equation, RCS pump dynamic equation, RCS pump characteristic equation, and the energy equation for the coolant inside the various components and piping. The model is versatile enough to simulate the normal steady-state conditions as well as most of the anticipated flow transients without pipe rupture. This model has been successfully implemented as the plant simulation code KMRRSIM for the Korea Multi-purpose Research Reactor and is now under extensive validation testing. The initial stage of validation has been comparison of its result with that of already validated, more detailed reactor system transient codes such as RELAP5. The results, as compared to the predictions by RELAP5 simulation, have been generally found to be very encouraging and the model is judged to be accurate enough to fulfill its intended purpose. However, this model will continue to be validated against other plant's data and eventually will be assessed by test data from KMRR

  14. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method of constructing the diagrid used to support fuel assemblies of liquid metal fast breeder reactors, is described. The functions of fuel assembly support and coolant plenum are performed by discrete components of the diagrid each of which can serve the function of the other in the event of failure of one of the components. (U.K.)

  15. Nuclear reactor instrumentation at research reactor renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baers, B.; Pellionisz, P.

    1981-10-01

    The paper overviews the state-of-the-art of research reactor renewals. As a case study the instrumentation reconstruction of the Finnish 250 kW TRIGA reactor is described, with particular emphasis on the nuclear control instrumentation and equipment which has been developed and manufactured by the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest. Beside the presentation of the nuclear instrument family developed primarily for research reactor reconstructions, the quality assurance policy conducted during the manufacturing process is also discussed. (author)

  16. Filtering device for primary coolant circuits in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Fumio; Yamamoto, Tetsuo.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a filtering device with a large filtering area and requiring less space. Constitution: A condensate inlet for introducing condensates to be filtered of primary coolant circuits, a filtrate exit, a backwash water exit and a bent tube are disposed to a container, and a plurality of hollow thread membrane modules are suspended in the container. The condensates are caused to flow through the condensate inlet, filtered through the hollow thread membrane and then discharged from the filtrate exit. When the filtering treatment is proceeded to some extent, since solid contents captured in the hollow thread membranes are accumulated, a differential pressure is produced between the condensate inlet and the filtrate exit. When the differential pressure reaches a predetermined value, the backwash is conducted to discharge the liquid cleaning wastes through the backwash exit. The bent tube disposed to the container body is used for water and air draining. The hollow thread membranes are formed with porous resin such as of polyethylene. (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. Integrated main coolant pumps for pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, R.

    1975-01-01

    The efficiency of an integrated main coolant pump for PWR's is increased. For this purpose, the pump is installed eccentric relative to the vertical axis of the U-type steam generator in the three-section HP chamber in such a way that its impeller wheel and the shell of the latter penetrate into the outlet chamber. The axis of the pump lies in the vertical plane of symmetry of the outlet chamber of the steam generator. The suction tube is arranged in the outlet chamber. To allow it to be installed, it is manufactured out of several parts. The diffusor tube, which is also made of several components, is attached to the horizontal separation plate between the outlet chamber and the pressure chamber so as to penetrate into it. To improve the outflow conditions at the diffusor tube, a plowshare-shaped baffle shield is installed between the diffusor tube and the HP chamber. Moreover, in order to improve the outflow conditions from the pump and from the pressure chamber, the outflow opening of the pressure chamber is put into the cylindrical shell of the HP chamber. In this way, the tensioning anchor is located between the pump and the outlet opening. (DG/RF) [de

  18. Technical meeting on 'Primary coolant pipe rupture event in liquid metal cooled fast reactors'. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In Liquid Metal cooled Fast Reactors (LMFR) or in accelerator driven sub-critical systems (ADS) with LMFR like sub-critical cores, the primary coolant pipes (PCP) connect the primary coolant pumps to the grid plate. A rupture in one of these pipes could cause significant loss of coolant flow to the core with severe consequences. In loop type reactors, all primary pipelines are provided with double envelopes and inter-space coolant leak monitoring systems that permit leak detection before break. Thus, the PCP rupture event can be placed in the beyond design basis event (BDBE) category. Such an arrangement is difficult to incorporate for pool type reactors, and hence it could be argued that the PCP rupture event needs to be analysed in detail as a design basis event (DBE, category 4 event). The primary coolant pipes are made of ductile austenitic stainless steel material and operate at temperatures of the cold pool and at comparatively low pressures. For such low stressed piping with negligible creep and embrittlement effects, it is of interest to discuss under what design provisions, for pool type reactors, the guillotine rupture of PCP could be placed in the BDBE category. The topical Technical Meeting (TM) on 'Primary Coolant Pipe Rupture Event in Liquid Metal Cooled Reactors' was called to enable the specialists to present the philosophy and analyses applied on this topic in the various Member States for different LMFRs. The scope of the Technical Meeting was to provide a global forum for information exchange on the philosophy applied in the various participating Member States and the analyses performed for different LMFRs with regard to the primary coolant pipe rupture event. More specifically, the objectives of the Technical Meeting were to review the safety philosophy for the PCP rupture event in pool type LMFR, to assess the structural reliability of the PCP and the probability of rupture under different conditions (with/without in-service inspection), to

  19. Cooling of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curet, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    The improvement of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels comprising flow dividers providing separate and distinct passages for the flow of core coolant water from each coolant water inlet, the flow dividers being vertically disposed in the annular flow areas provided by the walls of the vessel, the thermal shield (if present), and the core barrel is described. In the event of rupture of one of the coolant water inlet lines, water, especially emergency core coolant water, in the intact lines is thus prevented from by-passing the core by circumferential flow around the outermost surface of the core barrel and is instead directed so as to flow vertically downward through the annulus area between the vessel wall and the core barrel in a more normal manner to increase the probability of cooling of the core by the available cooling water in the lower plenum, thus preventing or delaying thermal damage to the core, and providing time for other appropriate remedial or damage preventing action by the operator

  20. Fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) phenomena in reactor safety. Current understanding and future research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speis, T.P. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States); Basu, S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an account of the current understanding of fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) phenomena in the context of reactor safety. With increased emphasis on accident management and with emerging in-vessel core melt retention strategies for advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, recent interest in FCI has broadened to include an evaluation of potential threats to the integrity of reactor vessel lower head and ex-vessel structural support, as well as the role of FCI in debris quenching and coolability. The current understanding of FCI with regard to these issues is discussed, and future research needs to address the issues from a risk perspective are identified. (author)