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Sample records for conventional radiotherapy fields

  1. A multileaf collimator field prescription preparation system for conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, M.N.; Yu, C. X.; Symons, M.; Yan, D.; Taylor, R.; Matter, R.C.; Gustafson, G.; Martinez, A.; Wong, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a prescription preparation system for efficient field shaping using a multileaf collimator that can be used in community settings as well as research institutions. The efficiency advantage of the computer-controlled multileaf collimator, over cerrobend blocks, to shape radiation fields has been shown in conformal treatments, which typically require complete volumetric computerized tomographic data for three-dimensional radiation treatment planning--a utility not readily available to the general community. As a result, most patients today are treated with conventional radiation therapy. Therefore, we believe that it is very important to fully use the same efficiency advantage of multileaf collimator as a block replacement in conventional practice. Methods and Material: The multileaf collimator prescription preparation system developed by us acquires prescription images from different sources, including film scanner and radiation treatment planning systems. The multileaf collimator angle and leaf positions are set from the desired field contour defined on the prescription image, by minimizing the area discrepancies. Interactive graphical tools include manual adjustment of collimator angle and leaf positions, and definition of portions of the field edges that require maximal conformation. Data files of the final leaf positions are transferred to the multileaf collimator controller via a dedicated communication link. Results: We have implemented the field prescription preparation system and a network model for integrating the multileaf collimator and other radiotherapy modalities for routine treatments. For routine plan evaluation, isodose contours measured with film in solid water phantom at prescription depth are overlaid on the prescription image. Preliminary study indicates that the efficiency advantage of the MLC over cerrobend blocks in conformal therapy also holds true for conventional treatments. Conclusion: Our

  2. A Dosimetric Evaluation of Conventional Helmet Field Irradiation Versus Two-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, James B.; Shiao, Stephen L.; Knisely, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric differences between conventional two-beam helmet field irradiation (external beam radiotherapy, EBRT) of the brain and a two-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: Ten patients who received helmet field irradiation at our institution were selected for study. External beam radiotherapy portals were planned per usual practice. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy fields were created using the identical field angles as the EBRT portals. Each brain was fully contoured along with the spinal cord to the bottom of the C2 vertebral body. This volume was then expanded symmetrically by 0.5 cm to construct the planning target volume. An IMRT plan was constructed using uniform optimization constraints. For both techniques, the nominal prescribed dose was 3,000 cGy in 10 fractions of 300 cGy using 6-MV photons. Comparative dose-volume histograms were generated for each patient and analyzed. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy improved dose uniformity over EBRT for whole brain radiotherapy. The mean percentage of brain receiving >105% of dose was reduced from 29.3% with EBRT to 0.03% with IMRT. The mean maximum dose was reduced from 3,378 cGy (113%) for EBRT to 3,162 cGy (105%) with IMRT. The mean percent volume receiving at least 98% of the prescribed dose was 99.5% for the conventional technique and 100% for IMRT. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy reduces dose inhomogeneity, particularly for the midline frontal lobe structures where hot spots occur with conventional two-field EBRT. More study needs to be done addressing the clinical implications of optimizing dose uniformity and its effect on long-term cognitive function in selected long-lived patients

  3. Analysis of the efficacy and safety of conventional radiotherapy of chest wall and clavicular field and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in patients after modified radical mastectomy

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    Song-Lin Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the efficacy and safety of conventional radiotherapy of chest wall and clavicular field and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in patients after modified radical mastectomy. Methods: A total of 84 patients who were admitted in our hospital after modified radical mastectomy were included in the study and divided into the conventional radiotherapy group (n=42 and the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy group (n=42 according to different radiotherapy methods. The patients in the conventional radiotherapy group were given conventional radiotherapy of chest wall and clavicular field, while the patients in the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy group were given three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The serum tumor markers and peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets 6-8 weeks after treatment in the two groups were detected. The clinical efficacy, and toxic and side effects in the two groups were evaluated. Results: The serum CA15-3, CA125, CEA, and CK19 levels after treatment in the two groups were significantly reduced when compared with before treatment, CD3 +,CD4 +, and CD4 +/CD8 + were significantly elevated, while CD8 + was significantly reduced when compared with before treatment, but the comparison of the above indicators between the two groups was not statistically significant. The occurrence rate of radioactive skin damage and pneumonia after treatment in the conventional radiotherapy group was significantly higher than that in the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy group. Conclusions: The two kinds of radiotherapy schemes have an equal efficacy, but the toxic and side effects of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy are significantly lower than those by the conventional radiotherapy, with a certain advantage.

  4. Conventional radiotherapy of localized right side breast cancer after radical mastectomy: development of innovative “field in field” technique

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    Goran Marošević

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this paper is to study the distribution of the therapy dosage applied by a modified conventionalfield in field” technique and compare it to the distribution of the dosage applied by the standard conventional technique.Methods: The study included ten patients with right side breast cancer, after they were exposed to radical mastectomy and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy dosage of TD 50 Gy in 25 fractions was applied to the anterolateral side of the right thoracic wall, with two opposite conventional tangential fields by the linear accelerator Elekta Synergy and the energy of 6 megavolts (MV. A delineation of the target volume (CTV – Clinical Target Volume was done within conventional fields. At the XiO system for planning we included additional fields within the existing conventional fields, which was the so called “field in field” technique. On the basis of CTV the Dose Volume  Histogram (DVH was calculated for conventional and “field in field” plans. VD90%, VD95%, VD107%, VD115%, CI and HI were calculated for both techniques. Means were pared with the paired Student's t-test. The results were considered significantly different if p<0.05.Results: VD90% and VD 95% were significantly higher for the “field in field” technique. Therefore, CI also favored the “field in field” technique (p=0.02. There was no difference in VD107% and VD115% between the compared groups. Consequently, there was no statistically significant difference in HI (1.13±0.03 vs.1.13±0.03, p=0.06.Conclusion: Conventional postoperative radiotherapy of localized right side breast cancer by “field in field” technique provides excellent coverage of the target volume by radiotherapy isodose.

  5. Magneto-radiotherapy: using magnetic fields to guide dose deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nettelbeck, H.; Lerch, M.; Takacs, G.; Rosenfeld, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Magneto-radiotherapy is the application of magnetic fields during radiotherapy procedures. It aims to improve the quality of cancer treatment by using magnetic fields to 1 g uide the dose-deposition of electrons in tissue. Monte Carlo (MC) studies have investigated magneto-radiotherapy applied to conventional photon and electron linac beams. In this study, a combination of MC PENELOPE simulations and physical experiments were done to investigate magneto-radiotherapy applied to MRT (Microbeam Radiation Therapy) and conventional linac radiotherapy.

  6. Daily-diary evaluated side-effects of conformal versus conventional prostatic cancer radiotherapy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmark, A.; Fransson, P.; Franzen, L.; Littbrand, B.; Henriksson, R.

    1997-01-01

    Conventional 4-field box radiotherapy technique induces high morbidity for patients with localized prostatic cancer. Using a patient daily diary, the present study compared side-effects after conventional radiotherapy with conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Fifty-eight patients treated with the conventional technique (with or without sucralfate) were compared with 72 patients treated with conformal technique. The patient groups were compared with an age-matched control population. Patients treated with conformal technique were also evaluated regarding acute and late urinary problems. Results showed that patients treated with conformal technique reported significantly fewer side-effects as compared with conventional technique. Patients treated with sucralfate also showed slightly decreased intestinal morbidity in comparison to non-sucralfate group. Acute and late morbidity evaluated by the patients was decreased after conformal radiotherapy as compared with the conventional technique. Sucralfate may be of value if conformal radiotherapy is used for dose escalation in prostatic cancer patients. (orig.)

  7. Conventional external beam radiotherapy for central nervous system malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, E.C.; Burger, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    Fractionated external beam photon radiotherapy is an important component of the clinical management of malignant disease of the central nervous system. The practicing neurologist or neurosurgeon frequently relies on the consultative and treatment skills of a radiotherapist. This article provides a review for the nonradiotherapist of the place of conventional external beam radiotherapy in neuro-oncology. 23 references

  8. Large field radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanasek, J.; Chvojka, Z.; Zouhar, M.

    1984-01-01

    Calculations may prove that irradiation procedures, commonly used in radiotherapy and represented by large-capacity irradiation techniques, do not exceed certain limits of integral doses with favourable radiobiological action on the organism. On the other hand integral doses in supralethal whole-body irradiation, used in the therapy of acute leukemia, represent radiobiological values which without extreme and exceptional further interventions and teamwork are not compatible with life, and the radiotherapeutist cannot use such high doses without the backing of a large team. (author)

  9. 3-Dimentional radiotherapy versus conventional treatment plans for gastric cancer

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    Aghili M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: The current standard of adjuvant management for gastric cancer after curative resection based on the results of intergroup 0116 is concurrent chemoradiation. Current guidelines for designing these challenging fields still include two-dimensional simulation with simple AP-PA parallel opposed design. However, the implementation of radiotherapy (RT remains a concern. Our objective was to compare three-dimensional (3D techniques to the more commonly used AP-PA technique."n"nMethods: A total of 24 patients with stages II-IV adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiation with simple AP-PA technique, using Cobalt-60. Total radiation dose was 50.4Gy. Landmark-based fields were simulated to assess PTV coverage. For each patient, three additional radiotherapy treatment plans were generated using three-dimensional (3D technique. The four treatment plans were then compared for target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues (liver, spinal cord, kidneys using dose volume histogram (DVH analysis."n"nResults: The three-dimensional planning techniques provided 10% superior PTV coverage compared to conventional AP-PA fields (p<0.001. Comparative DVHs for the right kidney, left kidney

  10. Adjuvant radiotherapy for cutaneous melanoma: Comparing hypofractionation to conventional fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Daniel T.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G. M.S.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine locoregional control after adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for cutaneous melanoma and compare outcomes between conventional fractionation and hypofractionation. Methods and Materials: Between January 1980 and June 2004, 56 patients with high-risk disease were treated with adjuvant RT. Indications for RT included: recurrent disease, cervical lymph node involvement, lymph nodes >3 cm, more than three lymph nodes involved, extracapsular extension, gross residual disease, close or positive margins, or satellitosis. Hypofractionation was used in 41 patients (73%) and conventional fractionation was used in 15 patients (27%). Results: The median age was 61 years (21->90). The median follow-up among living patients was 4.4 years (range, 0.6-14.4 years). The primary site was located in the head and neck in 49 patients (87%) and below the clavicles in 7 patients (13%). There were 7 in-field locoregional failures (12%), 3 out-of-field regional failures (5%), and 24 (43%) distant failures. The 5-year in-field locoregional control (ifLRC) and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM) rates were 87% and 43%, respectively. The 5-year cause-specific (CSS) and overall survival (OS) was 57% and 46%, respectively. The only factor associated with ifLRC was satellitosis (p = 0.0002). Nodal involvement was the only factor associated with FFDM (p = 0.0007), CSS (p = 0.0065), and OS (p = 0.016). Two patients (4%) who experienced severe late complications, osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone and radiation plexopathy, and both received hypofractionation (5%). Conclusions: Although surgery and adjuvant RT provides excellent locoregional control, distant metastases remain the major cause of mortality. Hypofractionation and conventional fractionation are equally efficacious

  11. Conventional four-field pelvic radiotherapy technique without computed tomography-treatment planning in cancer of the cervix: potential geographic miss and its impact on pelvic control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Robert Y.; McGinnis, L. Scott; Spencer, Sharon A.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Jennelle, Richard L.S.; Salter, Merle M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of inadequate margins on pelvic control using the conventional four-field pelvic portals without computed tomography (CT)-treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 1991, 34 patients with invasive cancer of the cervix were eligible for outcome study of conventional four-field radiation therapy (10 Stage I, 16 Stage II, 8 Stage III). The eligibility for this study includes four-field pelvic technique, definitive radiation therapy, and diagnostic CT scan of the pelvis. For this study, an inadequate margin is arbitrarily defined as ≤ 1.0 cm of normal tissue around the CT-defined tumor volume. Results: All 34 patients had adequate margins for anterio-posterior/posterio-anterior portals. However, 19 patients had an inadequate margin at the posterior border (S2-S3 interspace) and/or custom-shaped rectal block for lateral pelvic portals. Two patients had inadequate margins at the anterior border (level of symphysis pubis) due to an enlarged uterus. With a median follow-up of 36 months, pelvic control for adequate margins and inadequate margins was 100% and 71% for Stage IB disease and 88% and 50% for Stage IIB disease, respectively. However, pelvic control for Stage IIIB disease was 50% for both groups. There was no difference in total dose to point A or point B between the two groups. Conclusion: Our preliminary data show higher local failure in patients with an inadequate margin. For four-field pelvic radiation therapy, we strongly recommend CT-treatment planning. Otherwise, anterio-posterior/posterio-anterior pelvic therapy is the most reliable treatment for cancer of the uterine cervix

  12. Late bilateral temporal lobe necrosis after conventional radiotherapy. Case report

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    Hoshi, Michio; Hayashi, Toshiyuki; Kagami, Hiroshi; Murase, Ikurou; Nakatsukasa, Masashi [Saiseikai Utsunomiya Hospital (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    A 63-year-old woman presented with radionecrosis in the bilateral temporal lobes manifesting as dementia about 30 years after undergoing conventional radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed edema and cystic lesions in both temporal lobes. The mass in the left temporal lobe was excised. MR imaging 12 days after surgery showed reduced edema. Her dementia had improved. Radionecrosis usually occurs between several months and a few years after radiotherapy. The incidence of radionecrosis is estimated as 5%, but may be higher with longer follow-up periods. Clinical reports have suggested that larger total doses of radiation are associated with earlier onset of delayed necrosis and the fractional dose is the most significant factor causing cerebral radionecrosis. Radionecrosis can occur long after conventional radiotherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery using a linac-based system or a gamma knife unit. (author)

  13. Out-of-field dose measurements in radiotherapy

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    Kaderka, Robert

    2011-07-13

    This thesis describes the results from measurements of the out-of-field dose in radiotherapy. The dose outside the treatment volume has been determined in a water phantom and an anthropomorphic phantom. Measurements were performed with linac photons, passively delivered protons, scanned protons, passively delivered carbon ions as well as scanned carbon ions. It was found that the use of charged particles for radiotherapy reduces the out-of-field dose by up to three orders of magnitude compared to conventional radiotherapy with photons.

  14. Parotid gland function following accelerated and conventionally fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leslie, M.D.; Dische, S.

    1991-01-01

    The function of parotid glands in patients treated by 3 different schedules of radiotherapy was studied 9 months or more after its conclusion. All had received radiotherapy for a malignancy confined to 1 side of the head and neck region and only the gland on the side of the lesion was in the treatment volume; the contralateral gland acted as an internal control. Saliva was selectively collected from the parotid glands and the stimulated flow rate and pH of the saliva determined. Flow rates were expressed in each case as a percentage of that of the contralateral ('untreated') gland. Twelve glands that had received conventionally fractionated radiotherapy to a dose of 60-66 Gy showed a mean percentage flow of 20 percent and a significant fall in the pH of the saliva produced. Six glands that had received CHART (Continuous Hyperfractionated Accelerated RadioTherapy) and 8 conventionally fractionated radiotherapy to a dose of 35-40 Gy showed mean percentage flows of 57 and 65 percent respectively, with only slight and non-significant falls in saliva pH. The results show that in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck the use of CHART can lead to considerable less late change in the function of the parotid gland. (author). 26 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  15. A Comparative Dosimetric Study of Adjuvant 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Operable Stomach Cancer Versus AP-PA Conventional Radiotherapy in NCI-Cairo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hossiny, H.A.; Diab, N.A.; El-Taher, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study was to compare this multiple field conformal technique to the AP-PA technique with respect to target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with stages II-III denocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiotherapy presented to radiotherapy department in National Cancer Institute, Cairo in period between February 2009 to March 2010 using 3D conformal radiotherapy technique that consisted of a mono isocentric arrangement employing 4-6 radiation fields. For each patient, a second radiotherapy treatment plan was done using an antroposterior (AP-PA) fields, the two techniques were then compared using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Results: Comparing different DVHs, it was found that the planning target volume (PTV) was adequately covered in both (3D and 2D) plans while the left kidney and spinal cord demonstrate lower radiation doses on using the conformal technique. The liver doses is higher in the 3D tecq, but still well below liver tolerance. Conclusions: Both 3D conformal radiotherapy and AP-PA conventional techniques doses are within range of normal tissues tolerance. Regarding the left kidney and spinal cord the 3D conformal radiotherapy is superior than the AP-PA conventional techniques but with higher doses to the liver in the 3D conformal radiotherapy compared to the AP-PA conventional techniques

  16. Treating locally advanced lung cancer with a 1.5T MR-Linac - Effects of the magnetic field and irradiation geometry on conventionally fractionated and isotoxic dose-escalated radiotherapy.

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    Bainbridge, Hannah E; Menten, Martin J; Fast, Martin F; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe; McDonald, Fiona

    2017-11-01

    This study investigates the feasibility and potential benefits of radiotherapy with a 1.5T MR-Linac for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) patients. Ten patients with LA NSCLC were retrospectively re-planned six times: three treatment plans were created according to a protocol for conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and three treatment plans following guidelines for isotoxic target dose escalation. In each case, two plans were designed for the MR-Linac, either with standard (∼7mm) or reduced (∼3mm) planning target volume (PTV) margins, while one conventional linac plan was created with standard margins. Treatment plan quality was evaluated using dose-volume metrics or by quantifying dose escalation potential. All generated treatment plans fulfilled their respective planning constraints. For conventionally fractionated treatments, MR-Linac plans with standard margins had slightly increased skin dose when compared to conventional linac plans. Using reduced margins alleviated this issue and decreased exposure of several other organs-at-risk (OAR). Reduced margins also enabled increased isotoxic target dose escalation. It is feasible to generate treatment plans for LA NSCLC patients on a 1.5T MR-Linac. Margin reduction, facilitated by an envisioned MRI-guided workflow, enables increased OAR sparing and isotoxic target dose escalation for the respective treatment approaches. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy significantly reduces xerostomia compared with conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braam, Petra M.; Terhaard, Chris H.J. M.D.; Roesink, Judith M.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Xerostomia is a severe complication after radiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer, as the salivary glands are in close proximity with the primary tumor. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers theoretical advantages for normal tissue sparing. A Phase II study was conducted to determine the value of IMRT for salivary output preservation compared with conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 56 patients with oropharyngeal cancer were prospectively evaluated. Of these, 30 patients were treated with IMRT and 26 with CRT. Stimulated parotid salivary flow was measured before, 6 weeks, and 6 months after treatment. A complication was defined as a stimulated parotid flow rate <25% of the preradiotherapy flow rate. Results: The mean dose to the parotid glands was 48.1 Gy (SD 14 Gy) for CRT and 33.7 Gy (SD 10 Gy) for IMRT (p < 0.005). The mean parotid flow ratio 6 weeks and 6 months after treatment was respectively 41% and 64% for IMRT and respectively 11% and 18% for CRT. As a result, 6 weeks after treatment, the number of parotid flow complications was significantly lower after IMRT (55%) than after CRT (87%) (p = 0.002). The number of complications 6 months after treatment was 56% for IMRT and 81% for CRT (p = 0.04). Conclusions: IMRT significantly reduces the number of parotid flow complications for patients with oropharyngeal cancer

  18. Effects of stimulated repopulation on oral mucositis during conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, W.; Jacubek, A.; Kummermehr, J.; Herrmann, Th.; Doelling-Jochem, I.; Eckelt, U.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of local conditioning of human oral mucosa by silver nitrate solution (3%) on epithelial proliferation rates was tested in 11 healthy volunteers by in vitro labelling of biopsies with tritiated thymidine. Compared to control biopsies from 13 volunteers, stimulation over 3 days, 3 times per day, yielded a significant (p = 0.006) increase in the epithelial labelling index (LI) from 4.75 ± 0.32% to 6.85 ± 0.65%, i.e., by 44%. The increase in the absolute number of labelled cells per mm epithelial length was dependent on the overall cell density at the various intraoral sites and varied between 45% in the maxillary vestibule and 91% at the floor of the mouth. In an analysis of variance, stimulation turned out to be the most important source causing the effect (p = 0.011 for LI and 0.015 for labelled cells per mm). In a radiotherapy trial with conventional postoperative treatment with 5 x 2 Gy/week to a total dose of 60 Gy in 6 weeks, the left buccal mucosa in 10 patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck was conditioned (3% silver nitrate, 3 times per day, 5 days before and the first 2 days of radiotherapy) while the contralateral mucosa, receiving an identical dose, served as individual control. Mucositis scores according to the EORTC/RTOG or the Dische system showed that the time course and severity of the mucosal response was almost identical in both cheeks, which is in clear contrast to a previous clinical study (Maciejewski et al. Radiother. Oncol. 22, 7-11, 1991). Differences in radiation dose intensity, i.e., weekly dose, in these studies are discussed as a tentative explanation for the different clinical findings

  19. A case study of the neuropsychological outcomes following microsurgery, conventional radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy for an adult's recurrent craniopharyngioma.

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    Preece, David; Allan, Alfred; Becerra, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    To examine the neuropsychological outcomes for an adult patient, 2 years after receiving microsurgery and conventional radiotherapy for a recurrent craniopharyngioma; and the impact of a further intervention, stereotactic radiotherapy, on this level of neuropsychological functioning. JD, a 30 year old male whose recurrent craniopharyngioma had 2 years earlier been treated with two operations and conventional radiotherapy. JD was assessed (using standardized clinical tests) before and after a course of stereotactic radiotherapy. Prior to stereotactic radiotherapy (and 2 years after microsurgery and conventional radiotherapy) JD's IQ was intact, but considerable impairments were present in executive functioning, memory, theory of mind and processing speed. Fifteen months after stereotactic radiotherapy, all neuropsychological domains remained largely static or improved, supporting the utility of this treatment option in the neuropsychological domain. However, deficits in executive functioning, memory and processing speed remained. These findings suggest that, even after multiple treatments, substantial cognitive impairments can be present in an adult patient with a recurrent craniopharyngioma. This profile of deficits underlines the inadequacy of relying purely on IQ as a marker for cognitive health in this population and emphasizes the need to include neuropsychological impairments as a focus of rehabilitation with these patients.

  20. Effects of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, indensity modulated radiotherapy, and conventional radiotherapy ON treatment of esophageal cancer

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    Jian-Jun Han

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the irradiation volume, short-term and long-term efficacy of conventional radiotherapy (CR, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, and indensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in the treatment of esophageal cancer. Methods: A retrospective analysis method was adopted. The patients were divided into CR group (n=42, 3D-CRT group (n=45, and IMRT group (n=40. A follow-up visit was paid to collect the short-term and long-term efficacy, and the occurrence of adverse reactions. The gross tumor voluem (GTV, clinical target volume (CTV, planning target volume (PTV, and irradiation volume of organs (bilateral lungs, spinal cord, and heart at risk (OAR in the three groups were compared. Results: It was found by target volume comparison that the mean values of GTV, CTV, and PTV in the three groups were significantly increased (P0.05. The occurrence rate of adverse reactions in 3D-CRT group and IMRT group was significantly lower than that in CR group (P0.05. The difference of 1-year survival rate among the three groups was not statistically significant (P=0.144, but 3-year and 5-year survival rates in 3D-CRT group and IMRT group were significantly higher than those in CR group (P<0.05. Conclusions: 3D-CRT and IMRT can significantly enhance the short-term and long-term efficacy for esophageal cancer patients, and alleviate the radioactive damage; therefore, they are deserved to be widely recommended in the clinic.

  1. Conventionally fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for acoustic neuromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, Martin; Debus, Juergen; Lohr, Frank; Huber, Peter; Rhein, Bernhard; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Wannenmacher, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of local tumor control and functional outcome following conventionally fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for acoustic neuromas. Patients and Methods: From 11/1989 to 9/1999 51 patients with acoustic neuromas have been treated by FSRT. Mean total dose was 57.6 ± 2.5 Gy. Forty-two patients have been followed for at least 12 months and were subject of an outcome analysis. Mean follow-up was 42 months. We analyzed local control, hearing preservation, and facial and trigeminal nerve functional preservation. We evaluated influences of tumor size, age, and association with neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) on outcome and treatment related toxicity. Results: Actuarial 2- and 5-year tumor control rates were 100% and 97.7%, respectively. Actuarial useful hearing preservation rate was 85% at 2 and 5 years. New hearing loss was diagnosed in 4 NF2 patients. Pretreatment normal facial nerve function was preserved in all cases. Two cases of new or impaired trigeminal nerve dysesthesia required medication. No other cranial nerve deficit was observed. In Patients without NF2 tumor size or age had no influence on tumor control and cranial nerve toxicity. Diagnosis of NF2 was associated with higher risk of hearing impairment (p 0.0002), the hearing preservation rate in this subgroup was 60%. Conclusion: FSRT has been shown to be an effective means of local tumor control. Excellent hearing preservation rates and 5th and 7th nerve functional preservation rates were achieved. The results support the conclusion that FSRT can be recommended to patients with acoustic neuromas where special attention has to be taken to preserve useful hearing and normal cranial nerve function. For NF2 patients, FSRT may be the treatment of choice with superior functional outcome compared to treatment alternatives.

  2. Conventional (2D) Versus Conformal (3D) Techniques in Radiotherapy for Malignant Pediatric Tumors: Dosimetric Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.; Attia, G.; Radwan, A.; El-Badawy, S.; El-Ghoneimy, E.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: In pediatric radiotherapy, the enhanced radiosensitivity of the developing tissues combined with the high overall survival, raise the possibility of late complications. The present study aims at comparing two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) planning regarding dose homogeneity within target volume and dose to organs at risk (OARs) to demonstrate the efficacy of 3D in decreasing dose to normal tissue. Material and Methods: Thirty pediatric patients (18 years or less) with different pediatric tumors were planned using 2D and 3D plans. All were CT scanned after proper positioning and immobilization. Structures were contoured; including the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs). Conformal beams were designed and dose distribution analysis was edited to provide the best dose coverage to the PTV while sparing OARs using dose volume histograms (DVHs) of outlined structures. For the same PTVs conventional plans were created using the conventional simulator data (2-4 coplanar fields). Conventional and 3D plans coverage and distribution were compared using the term of V95% (volume of PTV receiving 95% of the prescribed dose), V107% (volume of PTV receiving 107% of the prescribed dose), and conformity index (CI) (volume receiving 90% of the prescribed dose/PTV). Doses received by OARs were compared in terms of mean dose. In children treated for brain lesions, OAR volume received 90% of the dose (V 90%) and OAR score were calculated. Results: The PTV coverage showed no statistical difference between 2D and 3D radiotherapy in terms of V95% or V107%. However, there was more conformity in 3D planning with CI 1.43 rather than conventional planning with CI 1.86 (p-value <0.001). Regarding OARs, 3D planning shows large gain in healthy tissue sparing. There was no statistical difference in mean dose received by each OAR. However, for brain cases, brain stem mean dose and brain V 90% showed better sparing in 3D planning (brain stem mean dose was

  3. Late temporal lobe necrosis after conventional radiotherapy for carcinoma of maxillary sinus.

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    Kanakamedala, Madhava R; Mahta, Ali; Liu, Jianlin; Kesari, Santosh

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral radiation necrosis is a serious late complication after conventional radiotherapy that can present with focal neurologic deficits or with more generalized signs and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure, depending on the location. The incidence and severity of radionecrosis are dose-volume dependent. We report a case of cerebral radiation necrosis 5 years after radiotherapy for a maxillary sinus carcinoma.

  4. Radiotherapy management of brain metastases using conventional linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzenauer, Marcel; Vrana, David; Vlachova, Zuzana; Cwiertka, Karel; Kalita, Ondrej; Melichar, Bohuslav

    2016-09-01

    As treatments for primary cancers continue to improve life expectancy, unfortunately, brain metastases also appear to be constantly increasing and life expectancy for patients with brain metastases is low. Longer survival and improved quality of life may be achieved using localised radiological and surgical approaches in addition to low dose corticosteroids. Stereotactic brain radiotherapy is one rapidly evolving localized radiation treatment. This article describes our experience with stereotactic radiotherapy using a linear accelerator. We reviewed patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy, from the time of its introduction into daily practice in our Department of Oncology in 2014. We collected the data on patient treatment and predicted survival based on prognostic indices and actual patient outcome. A total of 10 patients were treated by stereotactic radiotherapy, in one case in combination with whole brain radiotherapy and hippocampal sparing. There was no significant treatment related toxicity during the treatment or follow-up and due to the small number of fractions, the overall tolerance of the treatment was excellent. The patient intrafractional movement in all cases was under 1 mm suggesting that 1 mm margin around the CTV to create the PTV is sufficient and also that patient immobilization using the thermoplastic mask compared with invasive techniques, is feasible. We also found that prognostic indices such as the Graded Prognostic Assessment provide accurate predictions of patient survival. Based on our current evidence, patients with brain metastases fit enough, should be considered for stereotactic radiotherapy treatment.

  5. Comparison of mucous and cutaneous toxicity of IMRT and of conventional radiotherapy associated with cetuximab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreps, S.; Tamby, E.; Dessard Diana, B.; Berges, O.; Botti, M.; Deberne, M.; Henni, M.; Durdux, C.; Housset, M.; Giraud, P.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a retrospective assessment of acute, cutaneous and mucous toxicity resulting from an association of cetuximab and conventional conformational radiotherapy, and from an intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT). Seven patients presenting nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal tumours have been irradiated with intensity modulation, and seven without. It appears that the association of cetuximab and radiotherapy is not well tolerated and requires a close monitoring. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy allows a significant reduction of dose and of toxicity. However, mucous toxicity remains significant. Short communication

  6. Detention and positioning system for patient Treatment with conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueso Bernad, Nuria; Tirado Porcar, Miriam; Del Castillo Arres, M. Jose; Broseta Tormos, M. Mercedes; Franch Martinez, Silvia; Suarez Dieguez, Raquel; Roures Ramos, M.Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The first step in what we call in radiotherapy S imulation and Planning o f radiation, is the correct choice of patient position and methods to use for this position is maintained along both the simulation and planning as the radiation treatment. The choice of position is directly linked to the choice of immobilizer to be used. (Author)

  7. Use of a Conventional Low Neck Field (LNF) and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT): No Clinical Detriment of IMRT to an Anterior LNF During the Treatment of Head-and Neck-Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turaka, Aruna; Li Tianyu; Nicolaou, Nicos; Lango, Miriam N.; Burtness, Barbara; Horwitz, Eric M.; Ridge, John A.; Feigenberg, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine differences in clinical outcomes using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or a standard low neck field (LNF) to treat low neck. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective, single-institution study. Ninety-one patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with curative intent. According to physician preference, some patients were treated with LNF (Planning Target Volume 3) field using a single anterior photon field matched to the IMRT field. Field junctions were not feathered. The endpoints were time to failure and use of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube (as a surrogate of laryngeal edema causing aspiration), and analysis was done with χ 2 and log-rank tests. Results: Median follow-up was 21 months (range, 2-89 months). Median age was 60 years. Thirty-seven patients (41%) were treated with LNF, 84% were Stage III or IV. A PEG tube was required in 30%, as opposed to 33% without the use of LNF. Node 2 or 3 neck disease was treated more commonly without LNF (38% vs. 24%, p = 0.009). Failures occurred in 12 patients (13%). Only 1 patient treated with LNF failed regionally, 4.5 cm above the match line. The 3-year disease-free survival rate was 87% and 79% with LNF and without LNF, respectively (p = 0.2), and the 3-year LR failure rate was 4% and 21%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Using LNF to treat the low neck did not increase the risk of regional failure 'in early T and early N diseases' or decrease PEG tube requirements.

  8. Late Toxicities after Conventional Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Incidence and Risk Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siala, W.; Mnejja, W.; Elloumi, F.; Daoud, J.; Ghorbel, A.; Mnif, J.; Frikha, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. To determine the incidence and analyze the factors affecting late toxicity for nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with conventional radiotherapy. Patients and Methods. Retrospective analysis was performed on 239 NPC patients treated between 1993 and 2004 in our institution. One hundred and fifty-seven patients were treated with conventional fractionation (2 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week) and eighty-two patients with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (1.6 Gy per fraction twice a day, 5 days per week). One hundred fifty nine patients underwent neoadjuvant cisplatin based chemotherapy. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC score. Results. Xerostomia was the most common related complication (98.7%). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy did not increase late toxicities. Multivariate analyses showed that radiation dose was a significant factor for hearing impairment, younger age for trismus, initial node status for neck fibrosis, and initial dental hygiene for dental complications. Female gender was associated with significantly higher incidence of trismus and hearing impairment. Conclusion. Conventional radiotherapy was associated with a high rate of late toxicities which affect patients’ quality of life. With the development of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy, a reduced incidence of radiation related complications could be expected.

  9. Prospective randomized trail on chrono-chemotherapy + late course three dimensional conformal radio-therapy and conventional chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Feng; Ouyang Jinling; Dong Hongmin; Wu Weili; Chen Haixia; He Zhihui

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the therapeutic effects, toxic side effects of late-course three dimensional conformal radiotherapy plus chrono-chemotherapy (DDP + 5-FU/CF) and conventional radiotherapy plus chemotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Eighty -six NPC patients admitted from Feb. 2001 to Jan. 2002 were divided randomly into two groups: 1. Chrono-chemotherapy + late course three dimensional conformal radiotherapy(CCR) group-44 patients were treated by late course three dimensional conformal radio-therapy plus chrono-chemotherapy, and 2. Routine-chemotherapy-radiotherapy (RCR) group-42 patients were treated by routine chemotherapy plus radiotherapy. The patients in CCR and RCR group were comparable in age, KPS, stage and pathology. All patients were treated by combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy, with chemotherapy stared 2 weeks ahead of radiotherapy. Chemotherapy: Braun pump was used in all drug infusions; 1. CCR group-DDP 80 mg/ m 2 starting from 10:00 until 22:00, 5-Fu 750 mg/d/m 2 starting from 22:00 until 10:00 next day, CF 200 mg/d/m 2 starting from 10:00 every day, infused at normal speed. These drugs were given for 3 days, 14 days as one cycle, totally 2 cycle, and 2. RCR group-with the same drugs at the same total dose, only with the difference being DDP and CF given QD, starting from 10:00 but at the normal speed. 5-Fu was given through-out the day and continuously for 3 days, totally for 2 cycles. Radiotherapy: linear accelerator irradiation was given to either group. Composite facio-cervical field + anterior cervical tangential field to D T 40 Gy/4w, followed by the coned down per-auricular field plus anterior tangential field or β beam irradiation. In CCR group, after D T 40gy/4w, late course 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) was used to add D T 30Gy/3w. In RCR group, routine radiotherapy of 40 Gy/w was supplemented with 30 Gy/3w. The total dose in either group was 70 Gy/7w at the nasopharynx, D T 60-70 Gy/6-7w at the

  10. Comparative evaluation of multiple fractions per day radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy in squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrabi, W.H.; Akhtar, S.; Kharadi, M.Y.; Mushtaq, G.; Zargar, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    Dose fractionated is important in radiotherapy in order to achieve the desired results. There are regimes which are accepted and followed worldwide. Five fractions per week for a full course of treatment is regarded as standard fractionation regimen. Interest has lately been developed to alter this and try regimes like hyper and accelerated fractionations. In the former, smaller doses per fraction than usual are given in several fractions on each treating day, with no change in overall time. In the latter, conventionally sized fractions are given as two or three per day with a shortening of overall time. As the dose fraction in our case is high, we spilt the full course of treatment introducing a gap of one week between the treatment schedules. The results obtained are fairly good in comparison with conventional radiotherapy regimes. (author)

  11. Therapeutic results in ovarian cancer after replacement of conventional radiotherapy by Co-60 irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, H.; Szalay, St.; Weghaupt, K.; Heckenthaler, W.; Vienna Univ.

    1981-01-01

    The use of Co-60 screen and pendular irradiation instead of conventional radiotherapy has brought about an improvement in the 5-year survival rate in patients with more advanced stages of ovarian cancer. Although the general side effects of Co-60 irradiation are considered to be more unpleasant than those of X-ray and radium therapy, severe, reversible or irreversible damage to the urogenital tract and intestinal organs was diminished by accurate planning of Co-60 therapy, so that these complications occurred less frequently than with conventional radiotherapy. (author)

  12. Clinical Outcome in Posthysterectomy Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Cisplatin and Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy: Comparison With Conventional Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, M.-F.; Tseng, C.-J.; Tseng, C.-C.; Kuo, Y.-C.; Yu, C.-Y.; Chen, W.-C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess local control and acute and chronic toxicity with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and February 2006, 68 patients at high risk of cervical cancer after hysterectomy were treated with adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (50 mg/m 2 ) for six cycles every week. Thirty-three patients received adjuvant radiotherapy by IMRT. Before the IMRT series was initiated, 35 other patients underwent conventional four-field radiotherapy (Box-RT). The two groups did not differ significantly in respect of clinicopathologic and treatment factors. Results: IMRT provided compatible local tumor control compared with Box-RT. The actuarial 1-year locoregional control for patients in the IMRT and Box-RT groups was 93% and 94%, respectively. IMRT was well tolerated, with significant reduction in acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities compared with the Box-RT group (GI 36 vs. 80%, p = 0.00012; GU 30 vs. 60%, p = 0.022). Furthermore, the IMRT group had lower rates of chronic GI and GU toxicities than the Box-RT patients (GI 6 vs. 34%, p = 0.002; GU 9 vs. 23%, p = 0.231). Conclusion: Our results suggest that IMRT significantly improved the tolerance to adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with compatible locoregional control compared with conventional Box-RT. However, longer follow-up and more patients are needed to confirm the benefits of IMRT

  13. Conventional megavoltage radiotherapy in the management of malignant epithelial tumours of the parotid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedbois, P.; Bataini, J.P.; Colin, P.; Jaulerry, C.; Brunin, F.; Pontvert, D.; Durand, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    This is an evaluation of definitive conventional megavoltage radiotherapy in a consecutive series of 35 patients presenting malignant epithelial tumours of the parotid gland. In this series, the 5-year actuarial locoregional control rate was 41% with a 5-year crude survival rate of 36%. The results are analyzed according to tumour presentation and tumour doses. Six of 15 patients with tumours larger than 6 cm have had a lasting locoregional control. During the same period 43 other patients received radiotherapy as a post-operative modality. Results obtained in this group confirm the previously published data. While recent studies tend to demonstrate the specific efficacy of high LET radiation in the management of locally advanced salivary gland tumours, radical conventional radiotherapy can still be employed with a curative intent when neutron facilities are not available. (author). 34 refs.; 1 fig.; 5 tabs

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  15. A prospective study of cognitive functions following conventional radiotherapy for supratentorial gliomas in young adults: 4-year results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigliani, Maria-Claudia; Sichez, Nicole; Poisson, Michel; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of limited field conventional cerebral radiotherapy (RT) on cognitive functions of adults. Methods and Materials: A prospective neuropsychological study was performed on 17 patients who underwent conventional limited field RT for a low-grade glioma or for a good-prognosis anaplastic glioma. Results were compared with 14 control patients with low-grade gliomas who did not receive radiotherapy. Results: A transient significant decrease of performances for the Reaction Time test was observed at 6 months in the irradiated group with return to baseline values 12 months post-RT. Subsequently, no other significant changes were observed over a 48-month follow-up period in the irradiated and nonirradiated groups. Nonetheless, when the scores of each patient were considered over time instead of the mean values of the group, one irradiated patient (5.8%) experienced progressive deterioration while two irradiated patients (11.7%) experienced long-lasting improvement. Individual changes did not occur in the control group. Conclusion: This study suggests that a transient early delayed drop of neuropsychological performances at 6 months is frequent following limited field conventional RT, but the risk of long-term cognitive dysfunction after irradiation is low, at least in the first 4 years after RT and when it is administered alone in young adults

  16. Patient costs associated with external beam radiotherapy treatment for localized prostate cancer: the benefits of hypofractionated over conventionally fractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethukavalan, Perakaa; Cheung, Patrick; Tang, Colin I; Quon, Harvey; Morton, Gerard; Nam, Robert; Loblaw, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    To estimate the out-of-pocket costs for patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and calculate the patient-related savings of being treated with a 5-fraction versus a standard 39-fraction approach. Seventy patients accrued to the pHART3 (n = 84) study were analyzed for out-of-pocket patient costs as a result of undergoing treatment. All costs are in Canadian dollars. Using the postal code of the patient's residence, the distance between the hospital and patient home was found using Google Maps. The Canada Revenue Agency automobile allowance rate was then applied to determine the cost per kilometer driven. The average cost of travel from the hospital and pHART3 patient's residence was $246 per person after five trips. In a standard fractionation regimen, pHART3 patients would have incurred an average cost of $1921 after 39 visits. The patients receiving hypofractionated radiotherapy would have paid an average of $38 in parking while those receiving conventional treatment would have paid $293. The difference in out-of-pocket costs for the patients receiving a standard versus hypofractionated treatment was $1930. Medium term prospective data shows that hypofractionated radiotherapy is an effective treatment method for localized prostate cancer. Compared to standard EBRT, hypofractionated radiotherapy requires significantly fewer visits. Due to the long distance patients may have to travel to the cancer center and the expense of parking, the short course treatment saves each patient an average of $1900. A randomized study of standard versus hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy should be conducted to confirm a favorable efficacy and tolerability profile of the shorter fractionation scheme.

  17. Implementation of small field radiotherapy dosimetry for spinal metastase case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofikoh, Wibowo, W. E.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to know dose profile of small field radiotherapy in the spinal metastase case with source axis distance (SAD) techniques. In addition, we evaluated and compared the dose planning of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and conventional techniques to measurements with Exradin A16 and Gafchromic EBT3 film dosimeters. The results showed that film EBT3 had a highest precision and accuracy with the average of the standard deviation of ±1.7 and maximum discrepancy of 2.6 %. In addition, the average value of Full Wave Half Maximum (FWHM) and its largest deviation in small field size of 0.8 x 0.8 cm2 are 0.82 cm and 16.3 % respectively, while it was found around 2.36 cm and 3 % for the field size of 2.4 x 2.4 cm2. The comparison between penumbra width and the collimation was around of 37.1 % for the field size of 0.8 x 0.8 cm2, while it was found of 12.4 % for the field size of 2.4 x 2.4 cm2.

  18. Acute toxicity in pelvic radiotherapy; a randomised trial of conformal versus conventional treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, Diana M.; Nahum, Alan E.; Meyer, Lesley C.; Law, Matthew; Dearnaley, David P.; Horwich, Alan; Mayles, W. Philip; Yarnold, John R.

    1997-01-01

    Background: A prospective, randomized clinical trial to assess the effect of reducing the volume of irradiated normal tissue on acute reactions in pelvic radiotherapy accrued 266 evaluable patients between 1988 and 1993. Purpose: This is the definitive analysis to assess the differences between the conformal and conventional arms of the trial. Materials and methods: In both arms, patients were treated with 6 MV X-rays using a 3-field technique (in all but 5 cases) consisting of an anterior and two wedged lateral or posterior oblique fields; in the conventional arm, rectangular fields were employed, whereas in the conformal arm, the fields were shaped with customized blocks drawn according to the beam's-eye-view of the target volume. The most common dosage was 65 Gy in 2-Gy fractions 5 times a week, although a subgroup (of ca. bladder patients) were treated with 30-36 Gy in once-a-week 6 Gy fractions. Each patient completed a comprehensive acute toxicity scoring questionnaire concentrating on bowel and bladder problems, tiredness and nausea, before the start of treatment, weekly during and for 3 weeks after the end of treatment and then monthly for a further 2 months. Compliance was excellent. Results: There were no differences between the patients in the two arms with respect to age, gender, tumour type (52% prostate, 41% bladder, 5% rectum, 2% other) fractionation/dosage, anterior field size, weight, or baseline symptoms. Substantial differences in normal-tissue volumes (rectum, bladder, etc.) were achieved: median high-dose volume (HDV) of 689 cm 3 for the conformal technique versus 792 cm 3 for the conventional. A clear pattern of an increase in symptoms during RT, followed by a decrease after RT, was observed for the patient group as a whole. However, a very extensive analysis has not revealed any (statistically) significant differences between the two arms in level of symptoms, nor in medication prescribed. The disparity between our findings and those of other

  19. Acute and late side-effects of conventional and conformal pelvic radiotherapy for cervical and endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izmajlowicz, B.; Komafel, J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim of the study. The purpose of this prospective study was to analyze and compare acute and late side-effects observed in patients with cervical and endometrial cancer treated with conventional 2-dimensional (2D) and conformal 3-dimensional (3D) pelvic radiotherapy. Patients and method. 50 patients treated with conventional pelvic radiotherapy and 50 patients treated with conformal pelvic radiotherapy at the Clinical Department of Gynecological Radiotherapy of the Lower Silesian Oncology Center between November 2004 and October 2005 were entered into a prospective study. We assessed Radiotherapy side-effects according to EORTCIRTOG, performance status according to the WHO, Body Mass Index and hematologic parameters during radiotherapy and one year after treatment. Results. Performance status acc. to the WHO was significantly better in the conformal arm. Anemia and nausea were more frequent in the conventional arm. In both the study groups acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary morbidity was more frequent than late morbidity and performance status was better after than before radiotherapy. Mean BMI was lower after radiotherapy than before treatment. Conclusions. Conformal pelvic radiotherapy in patients with cervical and endometrial cancer is less toxic than conventional pelvic radiotherapy which is also confirmed by the performance status. (authors)

  20. Evaluation of surface and shallow depth dose reductions using a Superflab bolus during conventional and advanced external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Xie, Yibo; Zhang, Rui

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a methodology to reduce scatter and leakage radiations to patients' surface and shallow depths during conventional and advanced external beam radiotherapy. Superflab boluses of different thicknesses were placed on top of a stack of solid water phantoms, and the bolus effect on surface and shallow depth doses for both open and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beams was evaluated using thermoluminescent dosimeters and ion chamber measurements. Contralateral breast dose reduction caused by the bolus was evaluated by delivering clinical postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) plans to an anthropomorphic phantom. For the solid water phantom measurements, surface dose reduction caused by the Superflab bolus was achieved only in out-of-field area and on the incident side of the beam, and the dose reduction increased with bolus thickness. The dose reduction caused by the bolus was more significant at closer distances from the beam. Most of the dose reductions occurred in the first 2-cm depth and stopped at 4-cm depth. For clinical PMRT treatment plans, surface dose reductions using a 1-cm Superflab bolus were up to 31% and 62% for volumetric-modulated arc therapy and 4-field IMRT, respectively, but there was no dose reduction for Tomotherapy. A Superflab bolus can be used to reduce surface and shallow depth doses during external beam radiotherapy when it is placed out of the beam and on the incident side of the beam. Although we only validated this dose reduction strategy for PMRT treatments, it is applicable to any external beam radiotherapy and can potentially reduce patients' risk of developing radiation-induced side effects. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. Incidental irradiation of internal mammary lymph nodes in breast cancer: conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy versus conformal three-dimensional radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Elton Trigo Teixeira; Ugino, Rafael Tsuneki; Lopes, Mauricio Russo; Pelosi, Edilson Lopes; Silva, Joao Luis Fernandes da, E-mail: eltontt@gmail.com [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia; Santana, Marco Antonio; Ferreira, Denis Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia

    2016-05-15

    Objective: to evaluate incidental irradiation of the internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLNs) through opposed tangential fields with conventional two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) radiotherapy techniques and to compare the results between the two techniques. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of 80 breast cancer patients in whom radiotherapy of the IMLNs was not indicated: 40 underwent 2D radiotherapy with computed tomography for dosimetric control, and 40 underwent 3D radiotherapy. The total prescribed dose was 50.0 Gy or 50.4 Gy (2.0 or 1.8 Gy/day, respectively). We reviewed all plans and defined the IMLNs following the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recommendations. For the IMLNs, we analyzed the proportion of the volume that received 45 Gy, the proportion of the volume that received 25 Gy, the dose to 95% of the volume, the dose to 50% of the volume, the mean dose, the minimum dose (Dmin), and the maximum dose (Dmax). Results: Left-sided treatments predominated in the 3D cohort. There were no differences between the 2D and 3D cohorts regarding tumor stage, type of surgery (mastectomy, breast-conserving surgery, or mastectomy with immediate reconstruction), or mean delineated IMLN volume (6.8 vs. 5.9 mL; p = 0.411). Except for the Dmin, all dosimetric parameters presented higher mean values in the 3D cohort (p < 0.05). The median Dmax in the 3D cohort was 50.34 Gy. However, the mean dose to the IMLNs was 7.93 Gy in the 2D cohort, compared with 20.64 Gy in the 3D cohort. Conclusion: Neither technique delivered enough doses to the IMLNs to achieve subclinical disease control. However, all of the dosimetric parameters were significantly higher for the 3D technique. (author)

  2. Feasibility of tomotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy. Dosimetry comparison with conventional radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Krafft, Shane P. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Vos, Paul [East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (US). Dept. of Biostatistics] (and others)

    2011-09-15

    To compare the dosimetry of tomotherapy and the conventional half-beam technique (HBT) or non-split beam technique (NSBT) for target coverage and radiation dose to the lacrimal glands and lens. A retrospective review of 7 patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy who had radiotherapy because of disease progression on high steroid dose is reported: 3 patients were treated with tomotherapy and 4 patients with HBT. Compared to HBT, tomotherapy may provide better target coverage and significant reduction of radiation dose to the lacrimal glands and a higher dose to the lens. The NSBT improved target coverage but resulted in significantly higher doses to the lens and lacrimal glands. Tomotherapy may provide better coverage of the target volume and may be more effective in reducing severe exophthalmos compared to the conventional radiotherapy technique. (orig.)

  3. Chemical modification of conventional cancer radiotherapy. Tumor sensitization combined with normal tissue protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagiya, Tsutomu

    2006-01-01

    Nitrotriazole radiosensitizer, Sanazole (AK-2123, N-(2'-methoxyethyl)-2-(3''-nitro-1''-triazolyl) acetamide) developed by Kyoto University group was studied by 18 groups of 7 countries on fundamental aspects and clinical studies by 30 groups of 12 countries, and reported its effects on tumor sensitization of conventional cancer radiotherapy. On the other hand, the glucosides of vitamin C (Ascorbic acid glucoside, (AsAG) and water soluble derivative of vitamin-E (α-tocopherol glucoside, TMG) developed by Kyoto University group were studied fundamentally by 4 groups of 4 countries and clinically by 2 groups of 2 countries, and reported their effects on normal tissue protection in cancer treatments. These two studies of tumor sensitization and normal tissue protection were proposed as an advanced strategy of conventional cancer radiotherapy. (author)

  4. Acute radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis in Japanese breast cancer patients with whole breast hypofractionated radiotherapy compared to conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osako, Tomo; Oguchi, Masahiko; Kumada, Madoka; Nemoto, Keiko; Iwase, Takuji; Yamashita, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate acute morbidity, radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis, of Japanese patients treated with whole breast hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS), compared to conventional RT. Japanese patients who received whole breast RT after BCS between October 2003 and September 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who had selected the conventional or hypofractionated schedule received whole breast irradiation of 50 Gy in 25 fractions plus boost or 40 Gy in 16 fractions plus boost. Radiation dermatitis and symptomatic pneumonitis were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Of 443 consecutive patients, 377 (85%) received the conventional schedule and 66 (15%) received the hypofractionated schedule. Of patients treated with the conventional schedule, Grade 0, 1, 2 and 3 radiation dermatitis were observed in 16 (4%), 278 (74%), 77 (20%) and 6 (2%), respectively. Of patients treated with the hypofractionated schedule, Grade 0, 1, 2 and 3 dermatitis were observed in 11 (17%), 49 (74%), 5 (8%) and 1 (1%), respectively. Grade 2-3 dermatitis by the hypofractionated schedule (9%) was observed less frequently than that by the conventional schedule (22%) (chi-square test; P=0.016). Moreover, of patients treated with the conventional schedule, 4 (1%) had Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis. No patient treated with the hypofractionated schedule had symptomatic pneumonitis. Radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis in Japanese patients treated with the hypofractionated schedule is acceptable. Especially, radiation dermatitis by the hypofractionated schedule is milder than that by the conventional schedule. (author)

  5. Trial study on design of irradiated fields of radiotherapy in cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Zeng Zhifan; Cui Nianji; He Zhichun; Huang Shaomin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To compare three kinds of irradiation treatment plans for cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer, in order to arrived at proper decision for the patient. Methods: From February 2001 to June 2004, 43 such patients were studied with three different simulated treatment plans made including conformal plan, conventional four-field plan and conventional two-field plan for every one. All plans were evaluated with iso- dose curve and dose-volume histogram. Results: GTV on 95% isodose curve was 99.5%, 98.2% and 87.4% in conformal plan, conventional four-field plan and conventional two-field plan, respectively; PTV 1 and PTV 2 on 95% isodose with 97.8%, 97.2%, 94.8% and 95.8%, 86.6%, 73.7%. The volume of > 20 Gy dose of left lung accepted was 18.6%, 17.2% and 32.3%, in conformal plan, conventional four-field plan and conventional two-field plan, respectively; the right lung received 20.5% ,19.9% and 35.5%. Conclusions: Conformal plan is the best in radiotherapy, as it can provide ideal dose distribution of irradiated target with adequate protection of the normal tissues. Conventional four-field plan, being easy to carry, out, can replace the conformal plan in most situations. Conventional two-field has the most uneven dose distribution and largest lung volume irradiated. (authors)

  6. Comparison between conventional and three-dimensional conformal treatment planning for radiotherapy of cerebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudrelier, J.M.; Auliard, A.; Sarrazin, T.; Gibon, D.; Coche-Dequeant, B.; Castelain, B.

    2001-01-01

    Comparison between conventional and three-dimensional conformal treatment planning for radiotherapy of cerebral tumors. Purpose. - We prospectively compared a conventional treatment planning (PT2D) and 3-dimensional conformal treatment planning (PT3D) for radiotherapy of cerebral tumours. Patients and methods.- Patients treated between 1/10/98 and 1/4/99 by irradiation for cerebral tumours were analysed. For each case, we planned PT2D using conventional orthogonal x-ray films, and afterward, PT3D using CT scan. Gross tumor volume, planning target volume and normal tissue volumes were defined. Dose was prescribed according to report 50 of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). We compared surfaces of sagittal view targets defined on PT2D and PT3D and called them S2D and S3D, respectively. Irradiated volumes by 90% isodoses (VE-90%) and normal tissue volumes irradiated by 20, 50, 90% isodoses were calculated and compared using Student's paired t-test. Results. -There was a concordance of 84% of target surfaces defined on PT2D and PT3D. Percentages of target surface under- or-over defined by PT2D were 16 and 13% respectively. VE-90% was decreased by 15% (p = 0.07) with PT3D. Normal brain volume irradiated by 90% isodose was decreased by 27% with PT3D (p = 0.04). Conclusion.- For radiotherapy of cerebral tumors using only coplanar beams, PT3D leads to a reduction of normal brain tissue irradiated. We recommend PT3D for radiotherapy of cerebral tumors, particularly for low-grade or benign tumors (meningiomas, neuromas, etc.). (authors)

  7. A randomised multicentre trial of CHART versus conventional radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dische, Stanley; Saunders, Michele; Barrett, Ann; Harvey, Angela; Gibson, Della; Parmar, Mahesh

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: Continuous, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) has shown promise of improved tumour control and reduced late morbidity in pilot studies and has now been tested in a multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial. Material and methods: Patients with squamous cell cancer in the main sites within the head and neck region with the general exception of early T1 N0 tumours were entered into the study by 11 centres. There was a 3:2 randomisation to either CHART, where a dose of 54 Gy was given in 36 fractions over 12 days, or to conventional therapy where 66 Gy was given in 33 fractions over 6.5 weeks. A total of 918 patients were included over a 5 year period from March 1990. Results: Acute Morbidity: Acute radiation mucositis was more severe with CHART, occurred earlier but settled sooner and was in nearly all cases healed by 8 weeks in both arms. Skin reactions were less severe and settled more quickly in the CHART treated patients. Tumour control and survival: Life table analyses of loco-regional control, primary tumour control, nodal control, disease-free interval, freedom from metastasis and survival showed no evidence of differences between the two arms. In exploratory subgroup analyses there was evidence of a greater response to CHART in younger patients (P = 0.041) and poorly differentiated tumours appeared to fare better with conventional radiotherapy (P = 0.030). In the larynx there was evidence of a trend towards increasing benefit with more advanced T stage (P = 0.002). Late treatment related morbidity: Osteoradionecrosis occurred in 0.4% of patients after CHART and 1.4% of patients after conventional radiotherapy. The incidence of chondritis or cartilage necrosis was similar in both arms. Life table analysis showed evidence of reduced severity in a number of late morbidities in favour of CHART. These were most striking for skin telangiectasia, superficial and deep ulceration of the mucosa and laryngeal oedema

  8. The Outcome of Conventional External Beam Radiotherapy for Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Young [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    The best treatment for advanced esophageal cancer is chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. In spite of the advance of multimodality therapy, most patients with esophageal cancer are treated with radiation therapy alone. This study reports the outcome of the use of conventional external beam radiotherapy alone for the treatment of esophageal cancer. Between January 1998 and December 2005, 30 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus were treated with external beam radiotherapy using a total dose exceeding 40 Gy. Radiotherapy was delivered with a total dose of 44-60 Gy (median dose, 57.2 Gy) over 36 {approx}115 days (median time, 45 days). Thirteen patients (43.3%) had a history of disorders such as diabetes, hypertension, tuberculosis, lye stricture, asthma, cerebral infarct, and cancers. Four patients metachronously had double primary cancers. The most common location of a tumor was the mid-thoracic portion of the esophagus (56.7%). Tumor lengths ranged from 2 cm to 11 cm, with a median length of 6 cm. For AJCC staging, stage III was the most common (63.3%). Five patients had metastases at diagnosis. The median overall survival was 8.3 months. The survival rates at 1-year and 2-years were 33.3% and 18.7%, respectively. The complete response rate 1{approx}3 months after radiotherapy was 20% (6/30) and the partial response rate was 70% (21/30). Sixteen patients (53.3%) had an improved symptom of dysphagia. Significant prognostic factors were age, tumor length, stage, degree of dysphagia at the time of diagnosis and tumor response. Cox regression analysis revealed the aim of treatment, clinical tumor response and tumor length as independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Twenty-eight patients had local failure and another four patients had metastases. Three patients were detected with double primary cancers in this analysis. A complication of esophageal stricture was observed in three patients (10%), and radiation pneumonitis occurred in two

  9. The Outcome of Conventional External Beam Radiotherapy for Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji Young

    2008-01-01

    The best treatment for advanced esophageal cancer is chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. In spite of the advance of multimodality therapy, most patients with esophageal cancer are treated with radiation therapy alone. This study reports the outcome of the use of conventional external beam radiotherapy alone for the treatment of esophageal cancer. Between January 1998 and December 2005, 30 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus were treated with external beam radiotherapy using a total dose exceeding 40 Gy. Radiotherapy was delivered with a total dose of 44-60 Gy (median dose, 57.2 Gy) over 36 ∼115 days (median time, 45 days). Thirteen patients (43.3%) had a history of disorders such as diabetes, hypertension, tuberculosis, lye stricture, asthma, cerebral infarct, and cancers. Four patients metachronously had double primary cancers. The most common location of a tumor was the mid-thoracic portion of the esophagus (56.7%). Tumor lengths ranged from 2 cm to 11 cm, with a median length of 6 cm. For AJCC staging, stage III was the most common (63.3%). Five patients had metastases at diagnosis. The median overall survival was 8.3 months. The survival rates at 1-year and 2-years were 33.3% and 18.7%, respectively. The complete response rate 1∼3 months after radiotherapy was 20% (6/30) and the partial response rate was 70% (21/30). Sixteen patients (53.3%) had an improved symptom of dysphagia. Significant prognostic factors were age, tumor length, stage, degree of dysphagia at the time of diagnosis and tumor response. Cox regression analysis revealed the aim of treatment, clinical tumor response and tumor length as independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Twenty-eight patients had local failure and another four patients had metastases. Three patients were detected with double primary cancers in this analysis. A complication of esophageal stricture was observed in three patients (10%), and radiation pneumonitis occurred in two patients (6

  10. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Results in Significant Decrease in Clinical Toxicities Compared With Conventional Wedge-Based Breast Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsolia, Asif; Kestin, Larry; Grills, Inga; Wallace, Michelle; Jolly, Shruti; Jones, Cortney; Lala, Moinaktar; Martinez, Alvaro; Schell, Scott; Vicini, Frank A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously demonstrated that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a static multileaf collimator process results in a more homogenous dose distribution compared with conventional wedge-based whole breast irradiation (WBI). In the present analysis, we reviewed the acute and chronic toxicity of this IMRT approach compared with conventional wedge-based treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 172 patients with Stage 0-IIB breast cancer were treated with lumpectomy followed by WBI. All patients underwent treatment planning computed tomography and received WBI (median dose, 45 Gy) followed by a boost to 61 Gy. Of the 172 patients, 93 (54%) were treated with IMRT, and the 79 patients (46%) treated with wedge-based RT in a consecutive fashion immediately before this cohort served as the control group. The median follow-up was 4.7 years. Results: A significant reduction in acute Grade 2 or worse dermatitis, edema, and hyperpigmentation was seen with IMRT compared with wedges. A trend was found toward reduced acute Grade 3 or greater dermatitis (6% vs. 1%, p = 0.09) in favor of IMRT. Chronic Grade 2 or worse breast edema was significantly reduced with IMRT compared with conventional wedges. No difference was found in cosmesis scores between the two groups. In patients with larger breasts (≥1,600 cm 3 , n = 64), IMRT resulted in reduced acute (Grade 2 or greater) breast edema (0% vs. 36%, p <0.001) and hyperpigmentation (3% vs. 41%, p 0.001) and chronic (Grade 2 or greater) long-term edema (3% vs. 30%, p 0.007). Conclusion: The use of IMRT in the treatment of the whole breast results in a significant decrease in acute dermatitis, edema, and hyperpigmentation and a reduction in the development of chronic breast edema compared with conventional wedge-based RT

  11. Effects of continuous hyperfractionated accelerated and conventionally fractionated radiotherapy on the parotid and submandibular salivary glands of rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.E.; Ang, K.K.; Stephens, L.C.; Peters, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a major treatment modality for head and neck cancer. It is often not possible to exclude the salivary glands from the treatment fields. The unique susceptibility of the serous cells of the salivary glands to irradiation often results in xerostomia with ensuing secondary complications and discomfort to the patients. Recent reports have suggested that continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) can lead to considerably less reduction in salivary flow of the parotid salivary gland than conventional radiotherapy. This study was undertaken to assess histologic changes of salivary glands induced by CHART and conventional radiation fractionation schedules. The parotid and submandibular salivary glands of adult rhesus monkeys were irradiated with cobalt-60 γ radiation at 50 Gy/20 fractions/4 weeks, 55 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks, or 54 Gy/36 fractions/12 days (CHART). Salivary tissues were harvested at 16 weeks following irradiation and evaluated histopathologically. Microscopically, the glands receiving 50 Gy, 55 Gy, or CHART were virtually indistinguishable. There was severe atrophy and fibrosis of all glands. Quantitative analysis revealed that 50 Gy, 55 Gy, and CHART induced a reduction of serous acini in parotid glands by 86.4%, 84.8%, and 88.8%, respectively. In submandibular glands, serous acini were reduced by 99.4%, 99.0%, and 100%, respectively. The corresponding reduction in mucous acini were 98.4%, 98.4%, and 99.2%, respectively. These histopathologic and quantitative morphologic studies show that the magnitude of serous gland atrophy in the parotid and submandibular salivary glands of rhesus monkeys was similar at 16 weeks after receiving 50 Gy in 20 fractions, 55 Gy in 25 fractions, or CHART

  12. Exploration of the possibility of high LET radiation for non-conventional radiotherapy in cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The report summarizes the results of the researches performed by scientists from six Member States under an Agency-sponsored co-ordinated research programme (CRP) on exploration of the possibility of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for non-conventional radiotherapy in cancer. The projects within the CRP were focused on radiobiological and clinical aspects of neutron beam (3 reports) and neutron capture (2 reports), heavy ion beam (2 reports) and proton (1 report) therapy. A summary report is included. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these reports

  13. Parotid gland-sparing 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy results in less severe dry mouth in nasopharyngeal cancer patients: A dosimetric and clinical comparison with conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, Y.-M.; Shih Rompin; Lin, Y.-S.; Su, W.-F.; Ku, C.-H.; Chang, C.-S.; Shueng, P.-W.; Hwang, J.-M.; Liu, D.-W.; Chao, H.-L.; Lin, H.-Y.; Chang, L.-P.; Shum, W.-Y.; Lin, C.-S.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study examined the efficacy of parotid gland sparing of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) compared with conventional radiotherapy for NPC patients. Both the dose given to the parotids and clinical assessment of dry mouth were conducted. Materials and methods: Dry mouth was assessed for 108 patients treated with conventional technique and 72 treated with 3DCRT. Dose analysis was performed in 48 patients of the 3DCRT group. A dose of 70 Gy was given to the midplane in conventional radiotherapy and to 90% isodose volume in 3DCRT. Prognostic factors affecting the severity of dry mouth were analyzed using Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE). Results: In the 3DCRT group about 50% of the patients' parotid glands received less than 25 Gy. Parallel analysis of dry mouth shows a significant decrease in the incidence of severe xerostomia after 3DCRT. The proportion of patients without dry mouth was also significantly higher in the 3DCRT group than the conventional group at 1-3 years after completion of radiotherapy. Although 3DCRT delivered a higher dose to the tumor, it spared the parotid gland significantly better than the conventional treatment. Late toxicities were mostly similar between the 2 groups while local control in T4 patients and survival were improved for 3DCRT. Conclusion: Dosimetrically and clinically 3DCRT is better than conventional technique regarding parotid gland protection

  14. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost vs. conventional radiotherapy with sequential boost for breast cancer - A preliminary result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Hua; Hou, Ming-Feng; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Huang, Ming-Yii; Tsuei, Le-Ping; Chen, Fang-Ming; Ou-Yang, Fu; Huang, Chih-Jen

    2015-10-01

    This study was aimed to assess the acute dermatological adverse effect from two distinct RT techniques for breast cancer patients. We compared intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB) and conventional radiotherapy followed by sequential boost (CRT-SB). The study population was composed of 126 consecutive female breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery. Sixty-six patients received IMRT-SIB to 2 dose levels simultaneously. They received 50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction to the whole breast and 60.2 Gy at 2.15 Gy per fraction to the tumor bed by integral boost. Sixty patients in the CRT-SB group received 50 Gy in 25 fractions to the whole breast followed by a boost irradiation to tumor bed in 5-7 fractions to a total dose of 60-64 Gy. Acute skin toxicities were documented in agreement with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3 (CTCAE v.3.0). Ninety-eight patients had grade 1 radiation dermatitis while 14 patients had grade 2. Among those with grade 2, there were 3 patients in IMRT-SIB group (4.5%) while 11 in CRT-SB group (18.3%). (P = 0.048) There was no patient with higher than grade 2 toxicity. Three year local control was 99.2%, 3-year disease free survival was 97.5% and 3-year overall survival was 99.2%. A significant reduction in the severity of acute radiation dermatitis from IMRT-SIB comparing with CRT-SB is demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tendency of quality of life in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Weiwei; Lu Taixiang; Li Jiaxin; Liu Qing; Zhao Chong; Han Fei; Wang Hanyu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the tendency of quality of life in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with conventional radiotherapy. Methods: Quality of life in NPC patients was assessed using FACT-H and N and NPC-QOL Patients were divided into nine groups according to the treatment period :before treatment group, 0 -20 Gy group, 20 -50 Gy group, > 50 Gy group, 0 -6 months after treatment group, 6 - 12 mouths group, 1 -2 years group, 2 -3 years group and 3 -5 years group. Scores of FACT-H and N and NPC-QOL were compared between the either two groups. Results: 450 NPC patients were assessed. The total score of FACT-H and N decreased during the treatment and then increased six months after the treatment. The tendencies of physical and functional well-being were similar. The social/family and emotional well-being did not change significantly along with the treatment but the scores of head and neck well-being and NPC-QOL decreased obviously. Xerotomia was aggravated from the initiation of treatment and became the most severe at 6 - 12 months after treatment. 50% - 60% of the patients with disease-free reported severe xerotomia at 3 -5 years after radiotherapy. Incidence of severe trismus increased up to 14% at 3 -5 years after treatment. Conclusions: Quality of life of NPC patients with conventional radiotherapy deteriorates during the treatment period, but recovers to the normal level six months after the treatment. Xerotomia and trismus can affect the quality of life of NPC patients. (authors)

  16. Results of a prospective randomised trial comparing conventional radiotherapy to split course bifractionated radiation therapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daoud, Jamel; Toumi, Nabil; Siala, Wissem; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Drira, Mohamed Mokthar; Frikha, Mounir

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is generally responsive to radiation therapy. However therapeutic results after conventional radiotherapy remain relatively poor especially for patients with locoregional advanced NPC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a split course bifractionated radiotherapy regimen in a phase III randomised trial. Patients and methods: From January 1997 to September 2003, 154 patients with M0 histologically proven NPC were treated in our institution. They were staged according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer - International Union Against Cancer (AJCC-UICC) 1986 TNM classification. Patients with locally advanced nodal disease (N2-N3) received induction chemotherapy. All patients were randomised to receive either conventional radiotherapy at 2 Gy/fraction/day, 5 days/week to 70 Gy/7 weeks or split course bifractionated radiotherapy at 1.6 Gy/fraction, twice daily, 5 days/week to 70.4 Gy/6 weeks. Response and toxicity were evaluated according to the WHO and RTOG criteria. Results: Patients were well balanced between the two arms. The complete remission rate was 91% in conventional radiotherapy arm and 93% in bifractionated radiotherapy arm (p = 0.3). There was more grade II-III skin fibrosis in experimental arm with a 5 year actuarial probability of 66% vs 52% (p = 0.04). Locoregional and distant relapses occurred in 34% of cases in conventional arm and 38% in experimental arm (p = 0.28). With a median follow-up of 56 months, the 5 year overall survival and the disease free survival rates were, respectively (71% and 61%), in conventional arm and (62% and 60%) in bifractionated arm, the difference being statistically non significant. Comments: The present trial comparing conventional radiotherapy to a split course bifractionated radiation therapy failed to demonstrate significant improvement in locoregional control and survival in experimental arm which was associated with more grade II-III skin

  17. Use of a dosimetric system using a SMT phototransistor in the measurement for some dosimetric parameters in conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.O. da; Magalhaes, C.M.S. de; Santos, L.A.P.

    2008-01-01

    For monitoring the delivered dose in the patient undergoing a cancer treatment with high-energy ionizing radiation beams is necessary to use appropriate dosimeters for the beam control quality and if it is possible, to obtain the dose information during the treatment. For this, semiconductor-based devices are used because of their high spatial resolution and to be easy to handle in spite of the ionization chambers. Nowadays the bipolar phototransistors are being proposed as ionizing radiation detectors for presenting, beyond these characteristics, the signal amplification factor (gain). So, the aim of this work is to present the use of a dosimetric system using a SMT phototransistor in the measurement for some dosimetric parameters in conventional radiotherapy: the field factor and the off-axis ratio. The phototransistors readings were compared with ones obtained from a PTW 23343 Markus chamber, under the same conditions. (author)

  18. Spinal cordd biological safety comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy and conventional radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xilinbaoleri; Xu Wanlong; Chen Gang; Liu Hao; Wang Ruozheng; Bai Jingping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the spine intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and the conventional radiation therapy on the beagle spinal cord neurons, in order to prove the biological safety of IMRT of the spinal cord. Methods: Twelve selected purebred beagles were randomly divided into 2 groups. A beagle clinical model of tumor was mimiced in the ninth and tenth thoracic vertebrae. Then the beagles were irradiated by 2 different models of intensity modulated radiotherapy and conventional radiation therapy, with the total irradiation doses of 50 and 70 Gy. The samples of spinal cord were taken out from the same position of the nine and tenth thoracic vertebrae at the third month after radiation.All the samples were observed by the electron microscope, and the Fas and HSP70 expression in spinal cord neurons were evaluated by immunohistochemistry method. Terminal deoxynucleatidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick and labeling (TUNEL) technique was used to examine the apoptotic cells in the spinal cord. Results: The neurons in the spinal cord of IMRT group were mainly reversible injury, and those in the conventional radiation therapy were mainly apoptosis. Compared with the conventional radiation therapy group [50 Gy group, (7.3 ± 1.1)%; 70 Gy group, (11.3 ± 1.4)%], the apoptosis rate of the spinal cord neurons of the intensity modulated radiotherapy group [50 Gy group, (1.2 ± 0.7)%; 70 Gy group (2.5 ± 0.8)%] was much lower[(50 Gy group, t=0.022, P<0.05; 70 Gy group, t=0.017, P<0.05)]. The expression levels of Fas in the IMPT group (50 Gy group, 4.6 ± 0.8; 70 Gy group, 7.4 ± 1.1) were also much lowerthan those in the other group (50 Gy group, 15.1 ± 6.4; 70 Gy group, 19.3 ± 7.6. 50 Gy group, t=0.231, P<0.05; 70 Gy group, t=0.457, P<0.05), while the expression levels of HSP70 in the IMPT group (50 Gy group, 9.1 ± 0.8; 70 Gy group, 7.3 ± 1.4)were much higher than those in the conventional radiation therapy group (50 Gy group, 2.1 ± 0.9; 70 Gy group, 1.7 ± 0

  19. Dosimetric comparison of field in field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique with conformal radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ercan, T.; Alco, G.; Zengin, F.; Atilla, S.; Dincer, M.; Igdem, S.; Okkan, S.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to be able to implement the field-in-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (FiF) technique in our daily practice for breast radiotherapy. To do this, we performed a dosimetric comparison. Treatment plans were produced for 20 consecutive patients. FiF plans and conformal radiotherapy (CRT) plans were compared for doses in the planning target volume (PTV), the dose homogeneity index (DHI), doses in irradiated soft tissue outside the target volume (SST), ipsilateral lung and heart doses for left breast irradiation, and the monitor unit counts (MU) required for treatment. Averaged values were compared using Student's t-test. With FiF, the DHI is improved 7.0% and 5.7%, respectively (P<0.0001) over the bilateral and lateral wedge CRT techniques. When the targeted volumes received 105% and 110% of the prescribed dose in the PTV were compared, significant decreases are found with the FiF technique. With the 105% dose, the SST, heart, and ipsilateral lung doses and the MU counts were also significantly lower with the FiF technique. The FiF technique, compared to CRT, for breast radiotherapy enables significantly better dose distribution in the PTV. Significant differences are also found for soft tissue volume, the ipsilateral lung dose, and the heart dose. Considering the decreased MUs needed for treatment, the FiF technique is preferred over tangential CRT. (author)

  20. Neural Stem Cells: Implications for the Conventional Radiotherapy of Central Nervous System Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barani, Igor J.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Lin, Peck-Sun

    2007-01-01

    Advances in basic neuroscience related to neural stem cells and their malignant counterparts are challenging traditional models of central nervous system tumorigenesis and intrinsic brain repair. Neurogenesis persists into adulthood predominantly in two neurogenic centers: subventricular zone and subgranular zone. Subventricular zone is situated adjacent to lateral ventricles and subgranular zone is confined to the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Neural stem cells not only self-renew and differentiate along multiple lineages in these regions, but also contribute to intrinsic brain plasticity and repair. Ionizing radiation can depopulate these exquisitely sensitive regions directly or impair in situ neurogenesis by indirect, dose-dependent and inflammation-mediated mechanisms, even at doses <2 Gy. This review discusses the fundamental neural stem cell concepts within the framework of cumulative clinical experience with the treatment of central nervous system malignancies using conventional radiotherapy

  1. Dose profile analysis of small fields in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medel B, E. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G.; Romero S, K., E-mail: romsakaren@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue.(Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Small field dosimetry is getting a very important worldwide task nowadays. The use of fields of few centimeters is more common with the introduction of sophisticated techniques of radiation therapy, as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). In our country the implementation of such techniques is just getting started and whit it the need of baseline data acquisition. The dosimetry under small field conditions represents a challenge for the physicists community. In this work, a dose profile analysis was done, using various types of dosimeters for further comparisons. This analysis includes the study of quality parameters as flatness, symmetry, penumbra, and other in-axis measurements. (Author)

  2. Better compliance with hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Results of a single, institutional, retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, Alaa; Hammoud, Mohamed; Abou Ghaida, Salam

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify factors significantly associated with the occurrence of unintended treatment interruptions in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy of the breast or chest wall between March 2014 and August 2016 were evaluated. The radiotherapy regimens and techniques applied were either conventional fractionation (CF; 28 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy or 25 fractions of 2.0 Gy) or hypofractionation (HF; 15 daily fractions of 2.67 Gy) with inverse planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or three-dimensional planned conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with noncompliance. Noncompliance was defined as the missing of at least one scheduled radiotherapy fraction. In all, 19 of 140 (13.6%) patients treated with HF and 39 of 146 (26.7%) treated with CF experienced treatment interruptions. Of 23 factors tested, the fractionation regimen emerged as the only independent significant prognostic factor for noncompliance on multivariate analysis (CF; p = 0.007; odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.2). No statistically significant differences concerning the reasons for treatment interruptions could be detected between patients treated with CF or HF. HF is significantly associated with a better patient compliance with the prescribed radiotherapy schedule compared with CF. The data suggest that this finding is basically related to the shorter overall treatment time of HF. (orig.) [de

  3. Respiratory gating and multi field technique radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Atsushi; Kaidu, Motoki; Tanabe, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of a respiratory gating and multi field technique on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Twenty patients who underwent four-dimensional computed tomography for esophageal cancer were included. We retrospectively created the four treatment plans for each patient, with or without the respiratory gating and multi field technique: No gating-2-field, No gating-4-field, Gating-2-field, and Gating-4-field plans. We compared the DVH parameters of the lung and heart in the No gating-2-field plan with the other three plans.Result In the comparison of the parameters in the No gating-2-field plan, there are significant differences in the Lung V 5Gy , V 20Gy , mean dose with all three plans and the Heart V 25Gy -V 40Gy with Gating-2-field plan, V 35Gy , V 40Gy , mean dose with No Gating-4-field plan and V 30Gy -V 40Gy , and mean dose with Gating-4-field plan. The lung parameters were smaller in the Gating-2-field plan and larger in the No gating-4-field and Gating-4-field plans. The heart parameters were all larger in the No gating-2-field plan. The lung parameters were reduced by the respiratory gating technique and increased by the multi field technique. The heart parameters were reduced by both techniques. It is important to select the optimal technique according to the risk of complications. (author)

  4. The therapeutic effect of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy combined with conventional radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Feng; Lu Zhonghong; Yao Zhijun; Cao Yongzhen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: 78 patients with NPC was treated by radiation schedule in two phases. In the first phase, nasopharyngeal lesions and metastases of all patients were treated by three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) with a fraction of 2-5 Gy daily, 5 day per weeks, total dose 30 Gy. The second phase T1N0 or parts of T2N0 patients were done by Conventional radiotherapy with total dose 55 Gy on two small lateral opposing fields + with total dose 50 Gy on neck on tangential field,adding a 3 cm block. Patients with lymph node metastasis were given 55 Gy on the dacio-neck field (After 40 Gy, two small lateral opposing fields were used to boost the primary tumor while the spinal cord shielded) + with total dose 55 Gy on lower neck on tangential field. The upper bound of designed therapeutic field was set to connect with lower bound of main therapeutic field. Results: Three months after treatment,the rate of CR, PR, SD, PD were 38.5%, 55.1%, 5.1%, 1.3%, Total effective rate (CR+PR) were 93.6%. The 1-year, 2-year, 3-year and 5-year local-regional control rates were 92.3%, 88.5%, 78.2%, 70.5%.The 1-year, 2-year , 3-year and 5-year overall survival rate were 96.2%, 89.7%, 83.3%, 71.8%. Appearing early radiation response is well tolerated and no obviously mouth difficulties and cranial nerve damage observed. Conclusion: Clinical result of early-course three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is good. (authors)

  5. Transitioning from conventional radiotherapy to intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Changing focus from rectal bleeding to detailed quality of life analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Nakamura, Satoaki; Nishimura, Takuya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of modern radiation techniques, we have been able to deliver a higher prescribed radiotherapy dose for localized prostate cancer without severe adverse reactions. We reviewed and analyzed the change of toxicity profiles of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) from the literature. Late rectal bleeding is the main adverse effect, and an incidence of >20% of Grade ≥2 adverse events was reported for 2D conventional radiotherapy of up to 70 Gy. 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) was found to reduce the incidence to ∼10%. Furthermore, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) reduced it further to a few percentage points. However, simultaneously, urological toxicities were enhanced by dose escalation using highly precise external radiotherapy. We should pay more attention to detailed quality of life (QOL) analysis, not only with respect to rectal bleeding but also other specific symptoms (such as urinary incontinence and impotence), for two reasons: (1) because of the increasing number of patients aged >80 years, and (2) because of improved survival with elevated doses of radiotherapy and/or hormonal therapy; age is an important prognostic factor not only for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) control but also for adverse reactions. Those factors shift the main focus of treatment purpose from survival and avoidance of PSA failure to maintaining good QOL, particularly in older patients. In conclusion, the focus of toxicity analysis after radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients is changing from rectal bleeding to total elaborate quality of life assessment. (author)

  6. Conventional and conformal technique of external beam radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer: Dose distribution, tumor response, and side effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutrikah, N.; Winarno, H.; Amalia, T.; Djakaria, M.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare conventional and conformal techniques of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in terms of the dose distribution, tumor response, and side effects in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on cervical cancer patients who underwent EBRT before brachytherapy in the Radiotherapy Department of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. The prescribed dose distribution, tumor response, and acute side effects of EBRT using conventional and conformal techniques were investigated. In total, 51 patients who underwent EBRT using conventional techniques (25 cases using Cobalt-60 and 26 cases using a linear accelerator (LINAC)) and 29 patients who underwent EBRT using conformal techniques were included in the study. The distribution of the prescribed dose in the target had an impact on the patient’s final response to EBRT. The complete response rate of patients to conformal techniques was significantly greater (58%) than that of patients to conventional techniques (42%). No severe acute local side effects were seen in any of the patients (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grades 3-4). The distribution of the dose and volume to the gastrointestinal tract affected the proportion of mild acute side effects (RTOG grades 1-2). The urinary bladder was significantly greater using conventional techniques (Cobalt-60/LINAC) than using conformal techniques at 72% and 78% compared to 28% and 22%, respectively. The use of conformal techniques in pelvic radiation therapy is suggested in radiotherapy centers with CT simulators and 3D Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems (RTPSs) to decrease some uncertainties in radiotherapy planning. The use of AP/PA pelvic radiation techniques with Cobalt-60 should be limited in body thicknesses equal to or less than 18 cm. When using conformal techniques, delineation should be applied in the small bowel, as it is considered a critical organ according to RTOG

  7. Impact of conventional radiotherapy on health-related quality of life and critical functions of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, Nadine P.; Cohen, Stacy B. M.A.; Kammer, Rachael E.; Sullivan, Paula A.; Brewer, Kathryn A.; Hong, Theodore S.; Chappell, Richard J.; Harari, Paul M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Head-and-neck radiotherapy is associated with significant morbidities. Our purpose was to document impact of morbidities by use of multiple objective measures and health-related quality of life (HR-QOL). Methods and Materials: Ten head-and-neck cancer patients were evaluated before receiving conventional head-and-neck radiotherapy and at 1 month and 6 months after treatment. We evaluated weight, saliva production, diet, swallow function, auditory function, and HR-QOL. Results: After radiotherapy, weight was reduced in 89% of subjects. Salivary function was significantly reduced and did not resolve by 6 months. Diet impairment and abnormalities in swallowing function persisted at 6 months. Perception of physical functioning was reduced after treatment, and swallowing, coughing, and dry-mouth symptoms increased. Very few changes were observed in auditory function. Conclusions: Conventional head-and-neck radiotherapy is associated with substantial functional deficits and diminished HR-QOL. Deficits reported here can serve as a baseline for comparison with results derived from new radiotherapy-treatment techniques

  8. Optimisation of radiotherapy for carcinoma of the parotid gland: a comparison of conventional, three-dimensional conformal, and intensity-modulated techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutting, Christopher M.; Rowbottom, Carl G.; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Henk, J. Michael; Dearnaley, David P.; Robinson, Martin H.; Conway, John; Webb, Steve

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare external beam radiotherapy techniques for parotid gland tumours using conventional radiotherapy (RT), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). To optimise the IMRT techniques, and to produce an IMRT class solution. Materials and methods: The planning target volume (PTV), contra-lateral parotid gland, oral cavity, brain-stem, brain and cochlea were outlined on CT planning scans of six patients with parotid gland tumours. Optimised conventional RT and 3DCRT plans were created and compared with inverse-planned IMRT dose distributions using dose-volume histograms. The aim was to reduce the radiation dose to organs at risk and improve the PTV dose distribution. A beam-direction optimisation algorithm was used to improve the dose distribution of the IMRT plans, and a class solution for parotid gland IMRT was investigated. Results: 3DCRT plans produced an equivalent PTV irradiation and reduced the dose to the cochlea, oral cavity, brain, and other normal tissues compared with conventional RT. IMRT further reduced the radiation dose to the cochlea and oral cavity compared with 3DCRT. For nine- and seven-field IMRT techniques, there was an increase in low-dose radiation to non-target tissue and the contra-lateral parotid gland. IMRT plans produced using three to five optimised intensity-modulated beam directions maintained the advantages of the more complex IMRT plans, and reduced the contra-lateral parotid gland dose to acceptable levels. Three- and four-field non-coplanar beam arrangements increased the volume of brain irradiated, and increased PTV dose inhomogeneity. A four-field class solution consisting of paired ipsilateral coplanar anterior and posterior oblique beams (15, 45, 145 and 170 degree sign from the anterior plane) was developed which maintained the benefits without the complexity of individual patient optimisation. Conclusions: For patients with parotid gland tumours

  9. Probe into rational target volume of nasopharyngeal carcinoma having been treated with conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yingjie; Zhao Chong; Lu Lixia; Wu Shaoxiong; Cui Nianji; Chen Fujin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the local control rate and the dosimetric patterns of local recurrence in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients having been treated with standardized conventional radiotherapy and to evaluate the delineation of rational target volume. Methods: From Jan. 2000 to Dec. 2000, 476 patients with untreated NPC were treated by standardized conventional radiotherapy alone at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. The radiation ports were designed on a X-ray simulator. The nasopharyngeal lesion demonstrated by CT scan and the subclinical spread regions adjacent to the nasopharynx were defined as the target volume. Kaplan- Meier method was used to calculate the cumulative local recurrence rate. For patients with local recurrence, the primary and recurrent local tumor volumes(V nx , V recur ) were delineated with three-dimensional treatment planning system(3DTPS), and the dataset of radiation ports and delivered prescription dose to the 3DTPS were transferred according to the first treatment. The dose of radiation received by V recur was calculated and analyzed with dose- volume histogram(DVH). Local recurrence was classified as: 1. 'in-port' with 95% or more of the recurrence volume ( recur V 95 ) was within the 95% isodose; 2. 'marginal' with 20% to 95% of recur V 95 within the 95% isodose; 3. o utside w ith only less than 20% of recur V 95 within the 95% isodose curve. Results: With the median follow- up of 42.5 months (range 8-54 months), 52 patients developed local recurrence. The 1-, 2-, 3 and 4-year cumulative local failure rate was 0.6%, 3.9%, 8.7% and 11.5%, respectively. Among the 42 local recurrent patients who could be analyzed by 3DTPS, 52% were in-port, 40% were marginal and 7% were outside. For most of the marginal recurrence and all the outside recurrence patients, the main reason of recurrence were related to the unreasonable design of the radiation port and inaccuracy in the interpretation image findings. Conclusions: The outcome of

  10. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  11. SU-E-T-501: Normal Tissue Toxicities of Pulsed Low Dose Rate Radiotherapy and Conventional Radiotherapy: An in Vivo Total Body Irradiation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetkovic, D; Zhang, P; Wang, B; Chen, L; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pulsed low dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR) is a re-irradiation technique for therapy of recurrent cancers. We have previously shown a significant difference in the weight and survival time between the mice treated with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and PLDR using total body irradiation (TBI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of PLDR on normal mouse tissues.Materials and Methods: Twenty two male BALB/c nude mice, 4 months of age, were randomly assigned into a PLDR group (n=10), a CRT group (n=10), and a non-irradiated control group (n=2). The Siemens Artiste accelerator with 6 MV photon beams was used. The mice received a total of 18Gy in 3 fractions with a 20day interval. The CRT group received the 6Gy dose continuously at a dose rate of 300 MU/min. The PLDR group was irradiated with 0.2Gyx20 pulses with a 3min interval between the pulses. The mice were weighed thrice weekly and sacrificed 2 weeks after the last treatment. Brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive organs, and sternal bone marrow were removed, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and stained with H and E. Morphological changes were observed under a microscope. Results: Histopathological examination revealed atrophy in several irradiated organs. The degree of atrophy was mild to moderate in the PLDR group, but severe in the CRT group. The most pronounced morphological abnormalities were in the immune and hematopoietic systems, namely spleen and bone marrow. Brain hemorrhage was seen in the CRT group, but not in the PLDR group. Conclusions: Our results showed that PLDR induced less toxicity in the normal mouse tissues than conventional radiotherapy for the same dose and regimen. Considering that PLDR produces equivalent tumor control as conventional radiotherapy, it would be a good modality for treatment of recurrent cancers.

  12. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Compared With Conventional Radiotherapy in Patients Treated With Concurrent Carboplatin and 5-Fluorouracil for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavel, Sebastien, E-mail: sebastien.clavel@umontreal.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen, David H.A.; Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Despres, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Khaouam, Nader [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Guertin, Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, the toxicity and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in patients treated with concomitant carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and December 2007, 249 patients were treated with definitive chemoradiation. One hundred patients had 70 Gy in 33 fractions using IMRT, and 149 received CRT at 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months. Three-year actuarial rates for locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 95.1% vs. 84.4% (p = 0.005), 85.3% vs. 69.3% (p = 0.001), and 92.1% vs. 75.2% (p < 0.001) for IMRT and CRT, respectively. The benefit of the radiotherapy regimen on outcomes was also observed with a Cox multivariate analysis. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with less acute dermatitis and less xerostomia at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Conclusions: This study suggests that simultaneous integrated boost using IMRT is associated with favorable locoregional control and survival rates with less xerostomia and acute dermatitis than CRT when both are given concurrently with chemotherapy.

  13. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Compared With Conventional Radiotherapy in Patients Treated With Concurrent Carboplatin and 5-Fluorouracil for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavel, Sébastien; Nguyen, David H.A.; Fortin, Bernard; Després, Philippe; Khaouam, Nader; Donath, David; Soulières, Denis; Guertin, Louis; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, the toxicity and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in patients treated with concomitant carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and December 2007, 249 patients were treated with definitive chemoradiation. One hundred patients had 70 Gy in 33 fractions using IMRT, and 149 received CRT at 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months. Three-year actuarial rates for locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 95.1% vs. 84.4% (p = 0.005), 85.3% vs. 69.3% (p = 0.001), and 92.1% vs. 75.2% (p < 0.001) for IMRT and CRT, respectively. The benefit of the radiotherapy regimen on outcomes was also observed with a Cox multivariate analysis. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with less acute dermatitis and less xerostomia at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Conclusions: This study suggests that simultaneous integrated boost using IMRT is associated with favorable locoregional control and survival rates with less xerostomia and acute dermatitis than CRT when both are given concurrently with chemotherapy.

  14. Comparing the effects of conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapies on early skin toxicity and cosmetic outcomes after breast cancer conserving surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amouzegar Hashemi F

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The high number of breast cancer patients who receive radiation therapy after surgery has caused many to think about a shorter period of radiotherapy, which can significantly reduce the radiotherapy machine time, labor hours, and fewer patient visits. This study was designed to evaluate the acute skin effects and cosmetic outcomes of short course radiotherapy in early-stage breast cancer in comparison with the conventional treatment method.Methods: Fifty-two patients with operable breast cancer (pT1-3pN0M0 who underwent breast conservation surgery in Tehran Cancer Institute during January 2011 to January 2012, were randomly assigned to undergo radiotherapy by either receiving conventional treatment (dose: 50 Gy in 25 fractions with subsequent electron boost or a short-course hypofractionated radiotherapy (dose: 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions and a subsequent electron boost.Results: There were no skin changes during the first or the second week of treatment in the two groups. Cutaneous complications began after the third week as grade 1 skin toxicity after termination of the short-course radiotherapy but there were no difference in complication rate after four weeks of treatment. Six months and one year after treatment, there were no differences in terms of skin complications or cosmetic outcomes between the two groups.Conclusion: Although the use of a whole-breast irradiation with a hypofractionated schedule was associated with desirable outcomes, in term of skin toxicity and cosmetics, but longer follow-up periods with larger sample sizes are needed to confirm these results.

  15. Peripheral dose measurements with diode and thermoluminescence dosimeters for intensity modulated radiotherapy delivered with conventional and un-conventional linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh; Tambe, Chandrashekhar; Kadam, Sudarshan; Deshpande, Deepak; Gamre, Poonam; Biju, George; Suryaprakash; Magai, C.S.; Shrivastava, Shyam; Dhote, Dipak

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to measure the peripheral dose (PD) with diode and thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with linear accelerator (conventional LINAC), and tomotherapy (novel LINAC). Ten patients each were selected from Trilogy dual-energy and from Hi-Art II tomotherapy. Two diodes were kept at 20 and 25 cm from treatment field edge. TLDs (LiF:MgTi) were also kept at same distance. TLDs were also kept at 5, 10, and 15 cm from field edge. The TLDs were read with REXON reader. The readings at the respective distance were recorded for both diode and TLD. The PD was estimated by taking the ratio of measured dose at the particular distance to the prescription dose. PD was then compared with diode and TLD for LINAC and tomotherapy. Mean PD for LINAC with TLD and diode was 2.52 cGy (SD 0.69), 2.07 cGy (SD 0.88) at 20 cm, respectively, while at 25 cm, it was 1.94 cGy (SD 0.58) and 1.5 cGy (SD 0.75), respectively. Mean PD for tomotherapy with TLD and diode was 1.681 cGy (SD 0.53) and 1.58 (SD 0.44) at 20 cm, respectively. The PD was 1.24 cGy (SD 0.42) and 1.088 cGy (SD 0.35) at 25 cm, respectively, for tomotherapy. Overall, PD from tomotherapy was found lower than LINAC by the factor of 1.2-1.5 PD measurement is essential to find out the potential of secondary cancer. PD for both (conventional LINAC) and novel LINACs (tomotherapy) were measured and compared with each other. The comparison of the values for PD presented in this work and those published in the literature is difficult because of the different experimental conditions. The diode and TLD readings were reproducible and both the detector readings were comparable. (author)

  16. Acute and Late Toxicity in a Randomized Trial of Conventional Versus Hypofractionated Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Fowler, Jack; Gomellini, Sara; Arcangeli, Stefano; Saracino, Biancamaria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Benassi, Marcello; Strigari, Lidia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the toxicity between hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation schedules in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2003 and December 2007, 168 patients were randomized to receive either hypofractionated (62 Gy in 20 fractions within 5 weeks, 4 fractions/wk) or conventionally fractionated (80 Gy in 40 fractions within 8 weeks) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. All patients had undergone a 9-month course of total androgen deprivation, with radiotherapy starting 2 months after initiation of the total androgen deprivation. Results: The median follow-up was 32 and 35 months in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation arms, respectively. For the patients developing acute toxicity, no difference between the two fractionation groups was found in either severity or duration of gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Also, no difference was found in the incidence and severity of late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity between the two treatment schedules, with a 3-year rate of Grade 2 or greater toxicity of 17% and 16% for the hypofractionation arm and 14% and 11% for the conventional fractionation arm, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between acute and late gastrointestinal toxicity was found only in the conventional fractionation group. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the hypofractionation regimen used in our study is safe, with only a slight, nonsignificant increase in tolerable and temporary acute toxicity compared with the conventional fractionation schedule. The severity and frequency of late complications was equivalent between the two treatment groups.

  17. Parotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Preserved parotid function after IMRT on quantitative salivary scintigraphy, and comparison with historical data after conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiung, C.-Y.; Ting, H.-M.; Huang, H.-Y.; Lee, C.-H.; Huang, E.-Y.; Hsu, H.-C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the parotid function after parotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: From March 2003 to May 2004, 16 patients with nonmetastatic NPC underwent parotid-sparing IMRT. Eight of these patients had Stage III or IV NPC based on the 1997 American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system. The post-IMRT parotid function was evaluated by quantitative salivary scintigraphy and represented by the maximal excretion ratio (MER) of the parotid gland after sialogogue stimulation. The parotid function of 16 NPC patients who were previously treated with conventional radiotherapy was reviewed as the historical control. Results: In the parotid-sparing IMRT group, all 16 patients were alive and without cancer at the end of follow-up period (median, 24.2 months). The mean parotid MER was 53.5% before radiotherapy, 10.7% at 1 month post-IMRT, and 23.3% at 9 months post-IMRT. In the conventional radiotherapy group, the mean parotid MER was 0.6% at 6 to 12 months postradiotherapy. The difference was statistically significant (23.3% vs. 0.6%, p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney test). In the IMRT group, the mean parotid doses ranged from 33.2 Gy to 58.8 Gy (average, 43.9 Gy). The correlation between the mean parotid dose and the percentage decrease of parotid MER at 9 months post-IMRT (dMER) was statically significant (p = 0.008, Pearson correlation). Conclusions: Although the mean parotid doses are relatively high, the significant preservation of parotid function is achieved with IMRT for NPC patients. The significant correlation between mean parotid dose and parotid dMER demonstrates the dose-function relationship of the parotid gland

  18. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  19. Value of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy for the local treatment of HIV associated Kaposi's sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saran, F.; Adamietz, I.A.; Mose, S.; Thilmann, C.; Boettcher, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    From June 1991 to June 1993, 43 patients with 111 HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma of the skin or oral cavity were treated. Lesions were irradiated with 5 to 12 MeV electrons or 60Co gamma-rays. The fractionation scheme was 5 times 2 Gy/week for skin and enoral lesions with a total reference dosage of up to 20 Gy. Side effects were assessed during therapy and the therapeutic result 6 weeks after end of treatment. Thirty-eight out of 111 lesions were judged as complete response (CR) (34%), 61/111 as partial response (PR) (55%) and 12/111 were judged as no change (NC) (11%). Overall response (CR + PR) was 89%. Two patients with lesions of oral cavity suffered from RTOG grade-IV mucositis after 10 and 14 Gy. In 71/106 skin lesions (67%), radiation induced RTOG grade-I reactions were observed. Conclusion: In patients with HIV associated Kaposi's sarcoma effective palliation can be achieved by means of radiotherapy with an overall dose of 20 Gy in conventional fractionation. Yet, the fraction of patients with complete responses is with 34 to 47% lower compared with doses above 20 Gy (66 to 100%). With reference to the reported data our results point to a dose-response relationship for Kaposi's sarcoma. Therefore higher total reference doses, e.g. 30 Gy with weekly 5 times 2 Gy or 24 Gy with 5 times 1.6 Gy for mucous lesions, respectively, are suggested as by this mean the complete response rate can be coubled. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Determination of Absorbed Dose in Large 60-Co Fields Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrsak, H.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation in radiotherapy has selective impact on ill and healthy tissue. During the therapy the healthy tissue receives certain amount of dose. Therefore dose calculations in outer radiotherapy must be accurate because too high doses produce damage in healthy tissue and too low doses cannot ensure efficient treatment of cancer cells. A requirement on accuracy in the dose calculations has lead to improvement of detectors, and development of absolute and relative dosimetry. Determination of the dose distribution with use of computer is based on data provided by the relative dosimetry. This paper compares the percentage depth doses in cubic water phantoms of various dimensions with percentage depth doses calculated with use of Mayneord factor from the experimental depth doses measured in water phantom of large dimension. Depth doses in water phantoms were calculated by the model of empirical dosimetrical functions. The calculations were based on the assumption that large 6 0C o photon field exceeds the phantom's limits. The experimental basis for dose calculations by the model of empirical dosimetrical functions were exposure doses measured in air and dose reduction factors because of finite phantom dimensions. Calculations were performed by fortran 90 software. It was found that the deviation of dosimetric model was small in comparison to the experimental data. (author)

  1. Microdosimetric characterisation of radiation fields for modelling tissue response in radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Our overall goal is the development of an approach to model tissue response to radiotherapy in which a tissue is viewed as a statistical ensemble of interacting cells. This involves characterisation of radiation fields on the spatial scale of subcellular structures. On this scale, the spatial distribution of radiation energy imparted to tissue is highly non-uniform and should be characterised in statistical terms. Microdosimetry provides a formalism developed for that purpose. This study addresses limitations of the standard microdosimetric approach to modelling tissue response by introducing two new characteristics that include additional information in a form convenient for this application.Methods: The standard microdosimetric approach is based on the concept of a sensitive volume (SV representing a target volume in the cell. It is considered in isolation from other SVs, implying that energy depositions in different SVs are statistically independent and that individual cells respond to radiation independent of each other. In this study, we examined the latter approximation through analysis of correlation functions. All calculations were performed with Geant4-DNA Monte Carlo code. Results: We found that for some realistic scenarios, spatial correlations of deposited energy can be significant. Two new characteristics of radiation fields are proposed. The first is the specific energy-volume histogram (zVH, which is a microscopic analogue of the dose-volume histogram. The second describes the probability distribution of deposited energies in two SVs without assuming statistical independence between the SVs. Numerical examples for protons and carbon ions of therapeutic energies are presented and discussed.Conclusion: We extended the microdosimetric approach to modelling tissue response by including additional important characteristics and presented them in a more conventional radiotherapy format

  2. Comparison of mucous and cutaneous toxicity of IMRT and of conventional radiotherapy associated with cetuximab; Comparaison de la toxicite muqueuse et cutanee de la RCMI et de la radiotherapie classique associee au cetuximab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreps, S.; Tamby, E.; Dessard Diana, B.; Berges, O.; Botti, M.; Deberne, M.; Henni, M.; Durdux, C.; Housset, M.; Giraud, P. [Hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a retrospective assessment of acute, cutaneous and mucous toxicity resulting from an association of cetuximab and conventional conformational radiotherapy, and from an intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT). Seven patients presenting nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal tumours have been irradiated with intensity modulation, and seven without. It appears that the association of cetuximab and radiotherapy is not well tolerated and requires a close monitoring. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy allows a significant reduction of dose and of toxicity. However, mucous toxicity remains significant. Short communication

  3. Xerostomia and quality of life after intensity-modulated radiotherapy vs. conventional radiotherapy for early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Initial report on a randomized controlled clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pow, Edmond; Kwong, Dora; McMillan, Anne S.; Wong, May; Sham, Jonathan; Leung, Lucullus; Leung, W. Keung

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare directly the effect of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) on salivary flow and quality of life (QoL) in patients with early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with T2, N0/N1, M0 NPC took part in a randomized controlled clinical study and received IMRT or CRT. Stimulated whole (SWS) and parotid (SPS) saliva flow were measured and Medical Outcomes Short Form 36 (SF-36), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core quetionnaire, and EORTC head-and-neck module (QLQ-H and N35) were completed at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 months after radiotherapy. Results: Forty-six patients (88%) were in disease remission 12 months after radiotherapy. At 12 months postradiotherapy, 12 (50.0%) and 20 patients (83.3%) in the IMRT group had recovered at least 25% of preradiotherapy SWS and SPS flow respectively, compared with 1 (4.8%) and 2 patients (9.5%), respectively, in the CRT group. Global health scores showed continuous improvement in QoL after both treatments (p < 0.001). However, after 12 months subscale scores for role-physical, bodily pain, and physical function were significantly higher in the IMRT group, indicating a better condition (p < 0.05). Dry mouth and sticky saliva were problems in both groups 2 months after treatment. In the IMRT group, there was consistent improvement over time with xerostomia-related symptoms significantly less common than in the CRT group at 12 months postradiotherapy. Conclusions: IMRT was significantly better than CRT in terms of parotid sparing and improved QoL for early-stage disease. The findings support the case for assessment of health-related QoL in relation to head-and-neck cancer using a site-specific approach

  4. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  5. Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in Children: Comparison of Conventional and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskar, Siddhartha; Bahl, Gaurav; Muckaden, MaryAnn; Pai, Suresh K.; Gupta, Tejpal; Banavali, Shripad; Arora, Brijesh; Sharma, Dayanand; Kurkure, Purna A.; Ramadwar, Mukta; Viswanathan, Seethalaxhmi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh; Qureshi, Sajid; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Shrivastava, Shyam K.; Dinshaw, Ketayun A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in reducing the acute toxicities associated with conventional RT (CRT) in children with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 children with nonmetastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma, treated at the Tata Memorial Hospital between June 2003 and December 2006, were included in this study. Of the 36 patients, 28 were boys and 8 were girls, with a median age of 14 years; 4 (11%) had Stage II and 10 (28%) Stage III disease at presentation. All patients had undifferentiated carcinoma and were treated with a combination of chemotherapy and RT. Of the 36 patients, 19 underwent IMRT and 17 underwent CRT. Results: After a median follow-up of 27 months, the 2-year locoregional control, disease-free, and overall survival rate was 76.5%, 60.6%, and 71.3%, respectively. A significant reduction in acute Grade 3 toxicities of the skin (p = 0.006), mucous membrane (p = 0.033), and pharynx (p = 0.035) was noted with the use of IMRT. The median time to the development of Grade 2 toxicity was delayed with IMRT (skin, 35 vs. 25 days, p = 0.016; mucous-membrane, 39 vs. 27 days, p = 0.002; and larynx, 50 vs. 28 days, p = 0.009). The duration of RT significantly influenced disease-free survival on multivariate analysis (RT duration >52 days, hazard ratio = 5.49, 95% confidence interval, 1.14-26.45, p = 0.034). The average mean dose to the first and second planning target volume was 71.8 Gy and 62.5 Gy with IMRT compared with 66.3 Gy (p = 0.001) and 64.4 Gy (p = 0.046) with CRT, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that IMRT significantly reduces and delays the onset of acute toxicity, resulting in improved tolerance and treatment compliance for children with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Also, IMRT provided superior target coverage and normal tissue sparing compared with CRT

  6. Long-term mortality from cardiac causes after adjuvant hypofractionated vs. conventional radiotherapy for localized left-sided breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Elisa K; Woods, Ryan; Virani, Sean; Speers, Caroline; Wai, Elaine S; Nichol, Alan; McBride, Mary L; Tyldesley, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing concern remains regarding cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole breast/chest-wall radiotherapy (HF-WBI) compared to conventional radiotherapy (CF-WBI) in left-sided breast cancer patients. The purpose was to determine if cardiac mortality increases with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women with early-stage breast cancer received post-operative radiotherapy to the breast/chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor and treatment factors. Baseline cardiovascular risk factors were identified from hospital administrative records. A propensity-score model balanced risk factors between radiotherapy groups. Cause of death was coded as breast cancer, cardiac or other cause. Cumulative mortality from each cause after radiotherapy was estimated using a competing risk approach. For left-sided cases, median follow-up was 14.2 years. 485 women received CF-WBI, 2221 women received HF-WBI. There was no difference in 15-year mortality from cardiac causes: 4.8% with HF-WBI and 4.2% with CF-WBI (p=0.74), even after propensity-score adjustment (p=0.45). There was no difference in breast cancer mortality or other cause mortality. For right-sided cases, there was no difference in mortality for the three causes of death. At 15-years follow-up, cardiac mortality is not statistically different among left-sided breast cancer patients treated with HF-WBI or CF-WBI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term mortality from cardiac causes after adjuvant hypofractionated vs. conventional radiotherapy for localized left-sided breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Elisa K.; Woods, Ryan; Virani, Sean; Speers, Caroline; Wai, Elaine S.; Nichol, Alan; McBride, Mary L.; Tyldesley, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Ongoing concern remains regarding cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole breast/chest-wall radiotherapy (HF-WBI) compared to conventional radiotherapy (CF-WBI) in left-sided breast cancer patients. The purpose was to determine if cardiac mortality increases with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Materials and methods: Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women with early-stage breast cancer received post-operative radiotherapy to the breast/chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor and treatment factors. Baseline cardiovascular risk factors were identified from hospital administrative records. A propensity-score model balanced risk factors between radiotherapy groups. Cause of death was coded as breast cancer, cardiac or other cause. Cumulative mortality from each cause after radiotherapy was estimated using a competing risk approach. Results: For left-sided cases, median follow-up was 14.2 years. 485 women received CF-WBI, 2221 women received HF-WBI. There was no difference in 15-year mortality from cardiac causes: 4.8% with HF-WBI and 4.2% with CF-WBI (p = 0.74), even after propensity-score adjustment (p = 0.45). There was no difference in breast cancer mortality or other cause mortality. For right-sided cases, there was no difference in mortality for the three causes of death. Conclusions: At 15-years follow-up, cardiac mortality is not statistically different among left-sided breast cancer patients treated with HF-WBI or CF-WBI

  8. Isocentric integration of intensity-modulated radiotherapy with electron fields improves field junction dose uniformity in postmastectomy radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Pauliina; Suilamo, Sami; Lindholm, Paula; Kulmala, Jarmo

    2014-08-01

    In postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT), the dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) with additional margins, including the chest wall, supraclavicular, interpectoral, internal mammary and axillar level I-III lymph nodes, is often compromised. Electron fields may improve the medial dose coverage while maintaining organ at risk (OAR) doses at an acceptable level, but at the cost of hot and cold spots at the electron and photon field junction. To improve PMRT dose coverage and uniformity, an isocentric technique combining tangential intensity-modulated (IM)RT fields with one medial electron field was implemented. For 10 postmastectomy patients isocentric IMRT with electron plans were created and compared with a standard electron/photon mix and a standard tangent technique. PTV dose uniformity was evaluated based on the tolerance range (TR), i.e. the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean dose, a dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the 90% isodose coverage and the hot spot volumes. OAR and contralateral breast doses were also recorded. IMRT with electrons significantly improved the PTV dose homogeneity and conformity based on the TR and DSC values when compared with the standard electron/photon and tangent technique (p < 0.02). The 90% isodose coverage improved to 86% compared with 82% and 80% for the standard techniques (p < 0.02). Compared with the standard electron/photon mix, IMRT smoothed the dose gradient in the electron and photon field junction and the volumes receiving a dose of 110% or more were reduced by a third. For all three strategies, the OAR and contralateral breast doses were within clinically tolerable limits. Based on these results two-field IMRT combined with an electron field is a suitable strategy for PMRT.

  9. Better compliance with hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Results of a single, institutional, retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, Alaa; Hammoud, Mohamed; Abou Ghaida, Salam [Saad Specialist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-05-15

    The aim of the study was to identify factors significantly associated with the occurrence of unintended treatment interruptions in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy of the breast or chest wall between March 2014 and August 2016 were evaluated. The radiotherapy regimens and techniques applied were either conventional fractionation (CF; 28 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy or 25 fractions of 2.0 Gy) or hypofractionation (HF; 15 daily fractions of 2.67 Gy) with inverse planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or three-dimensional planned conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with noncompliance. Noncompliance was defined as the missing of at least one scheduled radiotherapy fraction. In all, 19 of 140 (13.6%) patients treated with HF and 39 of 146 (26.7%) treated with CF experienced treatment interruptions. Of 23 factors tested, the fractionation regimen emerged as the only independent significant prognostic factor for noncompliance on multivariate analysis (CF; p = 0.007; odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.2). No statistically significant differences concerning the reasons for treatment interruptions could be detected between patients treated with CF or HF. HF is significantly associated with a better patient compliance with the prescribed radiotherapy schedule compared with CF. The data suggest that this finding is basically related to the shorter overall treatment time of HF. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Untersuchung war es, Faktoren zu identifizieren, die mit ungeplanten Behandlungsunterbrechungen bei der adjuvanten Strahlentherapie des Mammakarzinoms assoziiert sind. Es wurden Patienten untersucht, die eine adjuvante Strahlentherapie der Mamma oder Brustwand zwischen Maerz 2014 und August 2016 erhielten. Zur Anwendung kamen als Fraktionierungsprotokoll und strahlentherapeutische Technik eine konventionell fraktionierte (CF; 28 Fraktionen mit

  10. Paris Convention on third party liability in the field of nuclear energy and Brussels Convention Supplementary to the Paris Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This new bilingual (English and French) edition of the 1960 Paris Convention and 1963 Brussels Supplementary Convention incorporates the provisions of the Protocols which amended each of them on two occasions, in 1964 and 1982. The Expose des motifs to the Paris Convention, as revised in 1982 is also included in this pubication. (NEA) [fr

  11. Tumor Localization Using Cone-Beam CT Reduces Setup Margins in Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, Anamaria R.; Li, Jonathan G.; Shi Wenyin; Newlin, Heather E.; Chvetsov, Alexei; Liu, Chihray; Palta, Jatinder R.; Olivier, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether setup margins can be reduced using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to localize tumor in conventionally fractionated radiotherapy for lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 22 lung cancer patients were treated with curative intent with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy using daily image guidance with CBCT. Of these, 13 lung cancer patients had sufficient CBCT scans for analysis (389 CBCT scans). The patients underwent treatment simulation in the BodyFix immobilization system using four-dimensional CT to account for respiratory motion. Daily alignment was first done according to skin tattoos, followed by CBCT. All 389 CBCT scans were retrospectively registered to the planning CT scans using automated soft-tissue and bony registration; the resulting couch shifts in three dimensions were recorded. Results: The daily alignment to skin tattoos with no image guidance resulted in systematic (Σ) and random (σ) errors of 3.2-5.6 mm and 2.0-3.5 mm, respectively. The margin required to account for the setup error introduced by aligning to skin tattoos with no image guidance was approximately 1-1.6 cm. The difference in the couch shifts obtained from the bone and soft-tissue registration resulted in systematic (Σ) and random (σ) errors of 1.5-4.1 mm and 1.8-5.3 mm, respectively. The margin required to account for the setup error introduced using bony anatomy as a surrogate for the target, instead of localizing the target itself, was 0.5-1.4 cm. Conclusion: Using daily CBCT soft-tissue registration to localize the tumor in conventionally fractionated radiotherapy reduced the required setup margin by up to approximately 1.5 cm compared with both no image guidance and image guidance using bony anatomy as a surrogate for the target.

  12. Parotid gland sparing effect by computed tomography-based modified lower field margin in whole brain radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Oyeon; Chun, Mi Son; Oh, Young Taek; Kim, Mi Hwa; Park, Hae Jin; Nam, Sang Soo; Heo, Jae Sung; Noh, O Kyu; Park, Sung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Parotid gland can be considered as a risk organ in whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the parotid gland sparing effect of computed tomography (CT)-based WBRT compared to 2-dimensional plan with conventional field margin. From January 2008 to April 2011, 53 patients underwent WBRT using CT-based simulation. Bilateral two-field arrangement was used and the prescribed dose was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. We compared the parotid dose between 2 radiotherapy plans using different lower field margins: conventional field to the lower level of the atlas (CF) and modified field fitted to the brain tissue (MF). Averages of mean parotid dose of the 2 protocols with CF and MF were 17.4 Gy and 8.7 Gy, respectively (p 98% of prescribed dose were 99.7% for CF and 99.5% for MF. Compared to WBRT with CF, CT-based lower field margin modification is a simple and effective technique for sparing the parotid gland, while providing similar dose coverage of the whole brain.

  13. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannenmacher, M.; Debus, J.; Wenz, F.

    2006-01-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  14. Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  15. Thyroid dysfunction as a late effect in childhood medulloblastoma: a comparison of hyperfractionated versus conventionally fractionated craniospinal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricardi, Umberto; Corrias, Andrea; Einaudi, Silvia; Genitori, Lorenzo; Sandri, Alessandro; Cordero Di Montezemolo, Luca; Besenzon, Luigi; Madon, Enrico; Urgesi, Alessandro

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Primary hypothyroidism is a common sequela of craniospinal radiotherapy in the treatment of childhood medulloblastoma. Due to the strong radiobiologic rationale, hyperfractionation can reduce the delayed effects of radiation injury. Methods and Materials: The authors compared the incidence of thyroid dysfunction after conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (Group A, n=20 patients) vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy (Group B, n=12 patients) in a group of pediatric patients with posterior fossa primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). Results: The mean age at the time of tumor diagnosis was 7.4 years in Group A and 8.4 years in Group B. Thyroid function was evaluated yearly, with ultrasonographic examination every 2 years. The patients were followed after diagnosis for a mean of 10.8 years for Group A and 6.0 years for Group B. Approximately 80% of the Group A (16/20) and 33.3% of the Group B (4/12) patients developed primary hypothyroidism within a similar period after irradiation (4.2 vs. 3.5 years, respectively). Analysis by cumulative incidence function demonstrated a significant difference in the risk of developing thyroid dysfunction between these two groups of patients (p<0.05). Ultrasonography showed reduced thyroid volume in 7 Group A patients and structural changes in 21 patients (17 Group A, 4 Group B cases); a thyroid benign nodule was detected in 2 Group A patients. Conclusions: The current study findings suggest that the use of hyperfractionated craniospinal radiotherapy in the treatment of childhood medulloblastoma is associated with a lower risk of these patients' developing late thyroid dysfunction

  16. Effects of persistent insecticides on beneficial soil arthropod in conventional fields compared to organic fields, puducherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbarashan, Padmavathy; Gopalswamy, Poyyamoli

    2013-07-15

    The usage of synthetic fertilizers/insecticides in conventional farming has dramatically increased over the past decades. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of bio-pesticides and insecticides/pesticides on selected beneficial non targeted arthropods. Orders Collembola, Arachinida/Opiliones, Oribatida and Coleoptera were the main groups of arthropods found in the organic fields and Coleoptera, Oribatida, Gamasida and Collembola in conventional fields. Pesticides/insecticides had a significant effect on non-targeted arthropods order- Collembola, Arachinida/Opiliones, Hymenoptera and Thysonoptera were suppressed after pesticides/insecticides spraying. Bio-insecticides in organic fields had a non-significant effect on non targeted species and they started to increase in abundance after 7 days of spraying, whereas insecticide treatment in conventional fields had a significant long-term effect on non targeted arthropods and short term effect on pests/insects, it started to increase after 21 days of the spraying. These results indicate that insecticide treatment kept non targeted arthropods at low abundance. In conclusion, organic farming does not significantly affected the beneficial-non targeted arthropods biodiversity, whereas preventive insecticide application in conventional fields had significant negative effects on beneficial non targeted arthropods. Therefore, conventional farmers should restrict insecticide applications, unless pest densities reach the thresholds and more desirably can switch to organic farming practices.

  17. Cancer of the larynx: the outcomes of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy in prospective and retrospective studies. Is the meaning of conventionality the same?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hliniak, A.; Michalski, W.; Kraszewska, E.; Szutkowski, Z.; Jarzabski, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two studies on the radiotherapy of laryngeal cancer were completed at the Radiotherapy Department of the Cancer Center Warsaw at the end of 1999. One of them was a multicenter randomized clinical trial, and the second one - a retrospective study on patients treated between years 1989 and 1995. An opinion exists that the trial outcomes of the conventional arm correspond to the outcomes of everyday practice. The subject of the study was to evaluate this thesis, and to find out, whether the outcomes of prospective and retrospective studies following the same treatment protocol are comparable. Selection criteria were - age ≤75, WHO 0-1, T1, T2, T3, N0, M0 stage of glottic and supraglottic laryngeal cancer. The treatment was: 66 Gy/2 Gy/33 fraction/45 days. The prospective group had - 199 patients, and the retrospective group: 150 patients. The two groups were comparable according to the age, site, sex and mean hemoglobin level. There was a significant difference in T-stage and performance status between the two groups. Overall survival, local control and CR-response were analyzed. To eliminate the influence of the differences in T=stage and performance status, regression models were applied - Cox's for survival and local control, logit for CR-response endpoint. The protocol compliance (prospective, retrospective) was as follows - total dose: (88%, 49%), treatment time: (47%, 11%) respectively. Three-year survival for the prospective and the retrospective groups were 89% and 74%, respectively (p=0.035), CR-response rates were 96% and 75%, respectively (p<0.001). There were no significant differences in probability of local recurrence in CR patients. A better outcome of treatment was observed in the prospective study group. It is probably due to a certain 'over-selection' of patients for the prospective study and many deviations from the therapeutic protocol in the historical group. 'Conventional treatment' has the same meaning in the prospective and retrospective

  18. Quality audit for dose determination in the field of radiotherapy using TLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Anjak, O.

    2010-08-01

    Quality audit is one of the important procedures in radiotherapy centers in order to verify the accuracy of the delivered radiation doses. The aim of this work is to establish a procedure for dose audit using TL dosimeters and to apply this procedure in radiotherapy centers. TL Dosimeters were distributed to several radiotherapy centers in Syria and Lebanon (4 with Co-60 and 14 with high energy photon beam radiotherapy units). They were exposed to 2 Gy in order to make an intercomparison study of the absorbed dose in water determined under reference conditions. The results show that only two beams were outside the accepted range, which is ±3.5%. and the were within the accepted range. External Quality audit is one of the important procedures in field of radiotherapy dosimeter in order to verify the accuracy of the radiation doses delivered to patients. (Author)

  19. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  20. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for high-grade gliomas: Does IMRT increase the integral dose to normal brain?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanto, Ulrich; Frija, Erik K.; Lii, MingFwu J.; Chang, Eric L.; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment increases the total integral dose of nontarget tissue relative to the conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) technique for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients treated with 3D-CRT for glioblastoma multiforme were selected for a comparative dosimetric evaluation with IMRT. Original target volumes, organs at risk (OAR), and dose-volume constraints were used for replanning with IMRT. Predicted isodose distributions, cumulative dose-volume histograms of target volumes and OAR, normal tissue integral dose, target coverage, dose conformity, and normal tissue sparing with 3D-CRT and IMRT planning were compared. Statistical analyses were performed to determine differences. Results: In all 20 patients, IMRT maintained equivalent target coverage, improved target conformity (conformity index [CI] 95% 1.52 vs. 1.38, p mean by 19.8% and D max by 10.7%), optic chiasm (D mean by 25.3% and D max by 22.6%), right optic nerve (D mean by 37.3% and D max by 28.5%), and left optic nerve (D mean by 40.6% and D max by 36.7%), p ≤ 0.01. This was achieved without increasing the total nontarget integral dose by greater than 0.5%. Overall, total integral dose was reduced by 7-10% with IMRT, p < 0.001, without significantly increasing the 0.5-5 Gy low-dose volume. Conclusions: These results indicate that IMRT treatment for high-grade gliomas allows for improved target conformity, better critical tissue sparing, and importantly does so without increasing integral dose and the volume of normal tissue exposed to low doses of radiation

  1. Treating all fields in every radiotherapy session? - Questioning the old dogma (or, pelvis radiotherapy: speculations on fractioning)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, S.L.; Ferrigno, R.; Osti, N.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty years ago Wilson and Hall published paper on the advisability of treating all fields at each radiotherapy session. That was based on the widely accepted method for calculating the biological effect of fractionated treatment in terms of a single quantity: the concept of a nominal standard dose (NSD). It was the beginning of an old dogma in radiation oncology: treating all fields every day. The basis megavoltage units of treatment in Brazil are cobalt and low energy linacs. The country is poor and it is not rare to have patients waiting lines. Due to that situation since five years ago we have been treating pelvic tumors with four fields (box technique) but irradiating only two fields per day. After treating hundreds of patients this way we have found no increased late complications, particularly subcutaneous tissue fibrosis. Previous data showed that TDE factors equal or lower than 90 were not related to any kind of fibrosis. treating pelvic tumors with the box technique but irradiating only two fields per day gives TDF values little greater than doing all four fields per day, but still lower than 90. That may explain why we have found no fibrosis. The impression is that not to treat all fields at each radiotherapy session may be possible with no increased rate of late complications. (author). 10 refs, 3 tabs, 2 figs

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of standard radiotherapy field borders in patients with uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Geison Moreira; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo; Ribalta, Julisa Chamorro Lascasas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate, by means of magnetic resonance imaging, the standardized field borders in radiotherapy for malignant neoplasm of uterine cervix, and to determine the role of this method in the reduction of possible planning errors related to the conventional technique. Materials and methods: magnetic resonance imaging studies for planning of treatment of 51 patients with uterine cervix cancer were retrospectively analyzed. The parameters assessed were the anterior and posterior field borders on sagittal section. Results: The anterior field border was inappropriate in 20 (39.2%) patients and geographic miss was observed in 37.3% of cases in the posterior border. The inappropriateness of both field borders did not correlate with clinical parameters such as patients' age, tumor staging, histological type and degree. Conclusion: the evaluation of standardized field borders with the use of magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated high indices of inappropriateness of the lateral field borders, as well as the relevant role of magnetic resonance imaging in the radiotherapy planning for patients with uterine cervix cancer with a view to reduce the occurrence of geographic miss of the target volume. (author)

  3. Preliminary comparison of the therapeutic efficacy of accelerated relative to conventional fractionation radiotherapy by treatment of spontaneous canine malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, David L.; Levin, Rebecca; Buncher, C. Ralph; Aron, Bernard S.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This study's ultimate goals involve development of an accelerated fractionation (AF) regimen with an integrated final concomitant boost (CB) and examination of factors prognostic of the CB's therapeutic efficacy which could be measured during the initial AF portion to determine for which patients CB should be used. These endpoints can be accurately determined quickly by evaluating the treatment (tx) of spontaneous canine veterinary patient tumors. Because surviving tumor clonogen growth rate increases after radiotherapy (RT) begins, this accelerated repopulation (AR) should be reduced by AF. Furthermore, CB using a small field encompassing only the tumor bed, given as a second daily tx during the last week of RT, should further reduce AR. The initial portion of this project which is nearing completion was designed to determine if incidentally treated normal tissues could tolerate the AF regimen and project whether addition of the tumor bed CB would also be tolerated. Materials and Methods: Currently 20 canine patients with biopsy proven localized tumors have received canine AF radiotherapy given as 3.2Gy/fraction(fx) administered 5 days a week (Mon-Fri) to a total of 15 fxs (48Gy) within 18 elapsed days. RT is given with a 60 Co teletherapy unit. Their tumor response, control, survival, and acute normal tissue responses are being directly compared to results we previously obtained from canines receiving a nearly equivalent dose/fx and total dose conventional fractionation (CF) regimen which was given alone or with adjuvant hyperthermia (HT). In that study the canines were stratified by tumor histology and anatomic site and randomly assigned to receive canine CF (3.5Gy/fx, 3 fxs/week [Mon-Wed-Fri] to 14 fxs (49Gy) in an elapsed time of approx. 30 days) either alone or followed weekly by local HT (44 deg. +/- 2 deg. C) for 30 minutes (5 HT fxs). As is currently done, these CF+/-HT patients were followed up to 3 years to quantitate the magnitudes

  4. Effect of 3D radiotherapy planning compared to 2D planning within a conventional treatment schedule of advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schraube, P.; Spahn, U.; Oetzel, D.; Wannenmacher, M.

    2000-01-01

    Background: The effect of 3D radiotherapy planning (3D RTP) in comparison to 2D radiotherapy planning (2D RTP) was evaluated in a usually practiced treatment schedule (starting by v./d. opposing portals, continued with computer-planned portals) for non-small-cell lung cancer. Patients and Methods: In 20 patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer the computer-planned part of the treatment schedule was calculated 2- and 3-dimensionally. Target volume were the primary tumor, the involved and the electively irradiated mediastinal lymph nodes. The results of the 2D RTP were recalculated 3-dimensionally and the mean doses to target volume and organs at risk were defined. Further, the normal tissue complications were calculated. Results: Under the prerequisite of 44 Gy maximally allowed to the spinal cord and a dose to the reference point of 50 Gy a small, but significant advantage with 2.1 Gy to the target (p=0.004) and a reduction of 3.6 Gy to the heart (p=0.05) was achievable for 3D RTP. The dose to the lungs did not differ significantly (19.7 Gy for 2D RTP, 20.3 Gy for 3D RTP). The dose to the heart was not estimated critical by NTCP (normal tissue complication probability). The NTCP for the ipsilateral lung was 16.1 and 18.7% for 2D RTP and 3D RTP, respectively. Regarding the simulator-planned ap/pa fields at the start of the radiotherapy the advantage of 3D RTP was further reduced but remained significant. Favorable with respect to the mean lung dose and the NTCP (18.7% NTCP ipsilateral lung for early onset of 3D planned radiotherapy vs 31.7% for late onset of 3D planned radiotherapy) but not significantly measurable is the early start of the treatment by computerized RTP. Conclusion: The main advantage of 3D RTP in treatment of advanced lung cancer is the better coverage of the target volume. A reduction of the mean lung dose cannot be expected. A dose escalation by 3D RTP to target volumes as described here seems not to be possible because of

  5. Comparison between 3D conventional techniques, field-in-field and electronic tissue compensation for mantle fields planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Lais P.; Silva, Leonardo P.; Trindade, Cassia; Garcia, Paulo L.; Santos, Maira R.; Batista, Delano V.S.

    2012-01-01

    External radiotherapy treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma over diaphragm region requires large radiation fields with protections applied to larynx, humerus head and lungs. The size and shape of the field, which covers different depths, make it difficult to distribute a homogeneous dose. Techniques such as field-in-field and electronic tissue compensation may be used to make dose homogeneous and compensate the obliquity from the tissue. Three types of planning were performed for diagnose of nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma: one plan with two fields, AP-PA (AP plan), another with four fields field-in- field (FF plan), and a third one with two fields and electronic tissue compensation (ETC plan). Results showed better gradient, cover of PTV and dose distribution for the ETC plan, besides the advantage from this technique of does not require protection blocks. In the meanwhile, AP and FF plans require simpler dosimetry and fewer MU. Related to the uniformity of dose distribution, AP plan showed hot areas in the neck region, FF plan showed hot areas in the shoulder region and ETC plan showed most uniform distribution without hot areas. The electronic tissue compensation is a useful tool for large and shaped fields as the mantle field, however higher MU and complex dosimetry should be taken in account. (author)

  6. Stereotactic radiosurgery photon field profile dosimetry using conventional dosimeters and polymer gel dosimetry. Analysis and inter-comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappas, E; Maris, T G; Zacharopoulou, F; Papadakis, A [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, 711 10 Stavrakia-Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Manolopoulos, S; Green, S [Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Birmingham B15 2TH (United Kingdom); Wojnecki, C, E-mail: epappas@edu.med.uoc.gr

    2009-05-01

    Small photon fields are increasingly used in modern radiotherapy and especially in IMRT and SRS/SRT treatments. Accurate beam profile measurements of such beams are crucial for a precise and effective treatment. In this work four different dosimetric methods have been used for profile measurements of three small 6 MV circular fields having diameters of 7.5, 15.0 and 30.0 mm. A small sensitive volume air ion chamber, a diamond detector, a novel silicon-diode array and Vinyl-Pyrrolidone based polymer gel dosimetry. The results of this work reveal the well-known disadvantages and/or problems of the conventional dosimeters for this kind of measurements and support that polymer gel dosimetry may overcome these problems. Conclusively, it is estimated that polymer gels could play an important role towards the minimization of the total SRS/SRT treatment error that is related with small field profile measurements.

  7. Determination of the optimal method for the field-in-field technique in breast tangential radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Hayashi, Shinya; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have reported the usefulness of the field-in-field (FIF) technique in breast radiotherapy. However, the methods for the FIF technique used in these studies vary. These methods were classified into three categories. We simulated a radiotherapy plan with each method and analyzed the outcomes. In the first method, a pair of subfields was added to each main field: the single pair of subfields method (SSM). In the second method, three pairs of subfields were added to each main field: the multiple pairs of subfields method (MSM). In the third method, subfields were alternately added: the alternate subfields method (ASM). A total of 51 patients were enrolled in this study. The maximum dose to the planning target volume (PTV) (Dmax) and the volumes of the PTV receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V100%) were calculated. The thickness of the breast between the chest wall and skin surface was measured, and patients were divided into two groups according to the median. In the overall series, the average V100% with ASM (60.3%) was significantly higher than with SSM (52.6%) and MSM (48.7%). In the thin breast group as well, the average V100% with ASM (57.3%) and SSM (54.2%) was significantly higher than that with MSM (43.3%). In the thick breast group, the average V100% with ASM (63.4%) was significantly higher than that with SSM (51.0%) and MSM (54.4%). ASM resulted in better dose distribution, regardless of the breast size. Moreover, planning for ASM required a relatively short time. ASM was considered the most preferred method. (author)

  8. Tcp and NTCP radiobiological models: conventional and hypo fractionated treatments in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astudillo V, A.; Paredes G, L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Resendiz G, G.; Posadas V, A. [Hospital Angeles Lomas, Av. Vialidad de la Barranca s/n, Col. Valle de las Palmas, 52763 Huixquilucan de Degallado, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Mitsoura, E. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Medicina, Paseo Tollocan, Esq. Jesus Carranza s/n, Col. Moderna de la Cruz, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Rodriguez L, A.; Flores C, J. M., E-mail: armando.astudillo@inin.gob.mx [Hospital Medica Sur, Puente de Piedra 150, Col. Toriello Guerra, 14050 Tlalpan, Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    The hypo and conventional fractionated schedules performance were compared in terms of the tumor control and the normal tissue complications. From the records of ten patients, treated for adenocarcinoma and without mastectomy, the dose-volume histogram was used. Using radiobiological models the probabilities for tumor control and normal tissue complications were calculated. For both schedules the tumor control was approximately the same. However, the damage in the normal tissue was larger in conventional fractionated schedule. This is important because patients assistance time to their fractions (15 fractions/25 fractions) can be optimized. Thus, the hypo fractionated schedule has suitable characteristics to be implemented. (Author)

  9. Tcp and NTCP radiobiological models: conventional and hypo fractionated treatments in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astudillo V, A.; Paredes G, L.; Resendiz G, G.; Posadas V, A.; Mitsoura, E.; Rodriguez L, A.; Flores C, J. M.

    2015-10-01

    The hypo and conventional fractionated schedules performance were compared in terms of the tumor control and the normal tissue complications. From the records of ten patients, treated for adenocarcinoma and without mastectomy, the dose-volume histogram was used. Using radiobiological models the probabilities for tumor control and normal tissue complications were calculated. For both schedules the tumor control was approximately the same. However, the damage in the normal tissue was larger in conventional fractionated schedule. This is important because patients assistance time to their fractions (15 fractions/25 fractions) can be optimized. Thus, the hypo fractionated schedule has suitable characteristics to be implemented. (Author)

  10. Assessing Precision in Conventional Field Measurements of Individual Tree Attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Luoma

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Forest resource information has a hierarchical structure: individual tree attributes are summed at the plot level and then in turn, plot-level estimates are used to derive stand or large-area estimates of forest resources. Due to this hierarchy, it is imperative that individual tree attributes are measured with accuracy and precision. With the widespread use of different measurement tools, it is also important to understand the expected degree of precision associated with these measurements. The most prevalent tree attributes measured in the field are tree species, stem diameter-at-breast-height (dbh, and tree height. For dbh and height, the most commonly used measuring devices are calipers and clinometers, respectively. The aim of our study was to characterize the precision of individual tree dbh and height measurements in boreal forest conditions when using calipers and clinometers. The data consisted of 319 sample trees at a study area in Evo, southern Finland. The sample trees were measured independently by four trained mensurationists. The standard deviation in tree dbh and height measurements was 0.3 cm (1.5% and 0.5 m (2.9%, respectively. Precision was also assessed by tree species and tree size classes; however, there were no statistically significant differences between the mensurationists for dbh or height measurements. Our study offers insights into the expected precision of tree dbh and height as measured with the most commonly used devices. These results are important when using sample plot data in forest inventory applications, especially now, at a time when new tree attribute measurement techniques based on remote sensing are being developed and compared to the conventional caliper and clinometer measurements.

  11. Dosimetric Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and 4-Field 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Uysal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this dosimetric study is the targeted dose homogeneity and critical organ dose comparison of 7-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT and 3-D 4-field conformal radiotherapy. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with low and moderate risk prostate cancer treated at Gülhane Military Medical School Radiation Oncology Department between January 2009 and December 2009 are included in this study. Two seperate dosimetric plans both for 7-field IMRT and 3D-CRT have been generated for each patient to comparatively evaluate the dosimetric status of both techniques and all the patients received 7-field IMRT. Results: Dose-comparative evaluation of two techniques revealed the superiority of IMRT technique with statistically significantly lower femoral head doses along with reduced critical organ dose-volume parameters of bladder V60 (the volume receiving 60 Gy and rectal V40 (the volume receiving 40 Gy and V60. Conclusion: It can be concluded that IMRT is an effective definitive management tool for prostate cancer with improved critical organ sparing and excellent dose homogenization in target organs of prostate and seminal vesicles.

  12. Locoregionally advanced carcinoma of the oropharynx: conventional radiotherapy vs. accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy vs. concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy - a multicenter randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmi, Patrizia; Crispino, Sergio; Fallai, Carlo; Torri, Valter; Rossi, Francesca; Bolner, Andrea; Amichetti, Maurizio; Signor, Marco; Taino, Raffaella; Squadrelli, Massimo; Colombo, Alessandro; Ardizzoia, Alessandro; Ponticelli, Pietro; Franchin, Giovanni; Minatel, Emilio; Gobitti, Carlo; Atzeni, Guido; Gava, Alessandro; Flann, Monica; Marsoni, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To compare conventional fractionation radiation therapy (RT), Arm A, vs. split-course accelerated hyperfractionated RT (S-AHF), Arm B, vs. conventional fractionation RT plus concomitant chemotherapy (CT), Arm C, in terms of survival and toxicity for advanced, unresectable epidermoid tumors of oropharynx. Methods and Materials: Between January 1993 and June 1998, 192 previously untreated patients affected with Stage III and IV oropharyngeal carcinoma (excluding T1N1 and T2N1) were accrued in a multicenter, randomized Phase III trial (ORO 93-01). For Arms A and C, 66-70 Gy in 33-35 fractions, 5 days a week, were administered in 6.5-7 weeks to tumor and positive nodes. In Arm B, the dose delivered to tumor and involved nodes was 64-67.2 Gy, giving 2 fractions of 1.6 Gy every day with an interfraction interval of at least 4 h and preferably 6 h, 5 days a week. At 38.4 Gy, a 2-week split was planned; after the split, RT was resumed with the same modality. In Arm C, CT regimen consisted of carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil (CBDCA 75 mg/m 2 , Days 1-4; 5-FU 1,000 mg/m 2 i.v. over 96 h, Days 1-4, recycling every 28 days (at 1st, 5th, and 9th week). Results: No statistically significant difference was detected in overall survival (p=0.129): 40% Arm A vs. 37% Arm B vs. 51% Arm C were alive at 24 months. Similarly, there was no statistically significant difference in terms of event-free survival (p=0.196): 20% for Arm A, 19% for Arm B, and 37% for Arm C were event free at 24 months. On the contrary, the 2-year disease-free survival was significantly different among the three arms (p = 0.022), with a superiority for Arm C. At 24 months, the proportion of patients without relapse was 42% for Arm C vs. 23% for Arm A and 20% for Arm B. Patients in Arm A less frequently developed G3+ acute mucositis than their counterparts in Arm B or C (14.7% vs. 40.3% vs. 44%). Regarding the CT-related acute toxicity, apart from 1 case of fatal nephrotoxicity, only hematologic G3+ (Grade 3

  13. There is no role for hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of children with newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic brainstem tumors: results of a pediatric oncology group phase III trial comparing conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandell, Lynda R.; Kadota, Richard; Freeman, Carolyn; Douglass, Edwin C.; Fontanesi, James; Cohen, Michael E.; Kovnar, Edward; Burger, Peter; Sanford, Robert A.; Kepner, James; Friedman, Henry; Kun, Larry E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In June 1992, POG began accrual to a phase III study, POG-9239, designed to compare the time to disease progression, overall survival, and toxicities observed in children with newly diagnosed brainstem tumor treated with 100 mg/m 2 of infusional cisplatin and randomized to either conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients eligible for study were those between 3 and 21 years of age with previously untreated tumors arising in the pons. Histologic confirmation of diagnosis was not mandatory, provided that the clinical and MRI scan findings were typical for a diffusely infiltrating pontine lesion. Treatment consisted of a six-week course of local field radiotherapy with either once a day treatment of 180 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 5400 cGy (arm 1) or a twice a day regimen of 117 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 7020 cGy (the second of the three hyperfractionated dose escalation levels of POG-8495) (arm 2). Because of previously reported poor results with conventional radiotherapy alone, cisplatin was included as a potential radiosensitizer in an attempt to improve progression-free and ultimate survival rates. Based on results of the phase I cisplatin dose escalation trial, POG-9139, 100 mg/m 2 was chosen for this trial and was delivered by continuous infusion over a 120-hour period, beginning on the first day of radiotherapy and repeated during weeks 3 and 5. One hundred thirty eligible patients were treated on protocol, 66 on arm 1 and 64 on arm 2. Results: The results we report are from time of diagnosis through October 1997. For patients treated on arm 1, the median time to disease progression (defined as time to off study) was 6 months (range 2-15 months) and the median time to death 8.5 months (range 3-24 months); survival at 1 year was 30.9% and at 2 years, 7.1%. For patients treated on arm 2, the corresponding values were 5 months (range 1-12 months) and 8 months (range 1-23 months), with 1- and 2-year

  14. Is it time to rethink the role of hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of children with newly-diagnosed brainstem glioma?: Results of a Pediatric Oncology Group Phase III trial comparing conventional VS. hyperfractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandell, L.; Kadota, R.; Douglass, E.C.; Fontanesi, J.; Freeman, C.; Cohen, M.; Kovnar, E.; Burger, P.; Sanford, R.A.; Kepner, J.; Friedman, H.; Kun, L.

    1997-01-01

    Purposes/Objective: In June 1992, POG began accrual to a Phase III study, POG 9239, designed to compare the time to disease progression, overall survival, and toxicities observed in children with newly diagnosed brainstem glioma treated with 100 mg/m 2 of infusional Cisplatin and randomized to either conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The trial was closed in March 1996, having achieved its accrual goal. Materials and Methods: Patients (pts) eligible for study were those between 3 and 21 years of age with previously untreated tumors arising in the pons. Histologic confirmation of diagnosis was not mandatory, provided that the clinical and MRI scan findings were typical for diffusely infiltrating pontine glioma. Treatment (Rx) consisted of a six-week course of local field radiotherapy with either once a day treatment (Rx 1) of 180 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 5400 cGy or a twice a day regimen (Rx 2) of 117 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 7020 cGy (the second of the three hyperfractionated dose escalation levels of POG 8495). Because of previously reported poor results with conventional radiotherapy alone, Cisplatin was included as a potential radiosensitizer in an attempt to improve progression-free and ultimate survival rates. Based on results of the Phase I Cisplatin dose escalation trial, POG 9139, 100 mg/m 2 was chosen for this trial and was delivered by continuous infusion over a 120-hour period, beginning on the first day of radiotherapy and repeated during Weeks 3 and 5. Of the 132 pts accrued to the study, 94 are eligible for review based upon time since entry, 47 in each Rx arm. In Rx 1, there were 23 males and 24 females, ranging in age from 40 to 161 mo (median, 77 mo); in Rx 2, there were 20 males and 27 females, ranging in age from 41 to 212 mo (median, 77 mo). As of 4/18/96, the study coordinator had not yet verified eligibility and assessed the evaluability of the remaining pts. Results: All results are from time of diagnosis

  15. Impact of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy on Health-Related Quality of Life for Head and Neck Cancer Patients: Matched-Pair Comparison with Conventional Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graff, Pierre; Lapeyre, Michel; Desandes, Emmanuel; Ortholan, Cecile; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Alfonsi, Marc; Maingon, Philippe; Giraud, Philippe; Bourhis, Jean; Marchesi, Vincent; Mege, Alice; Peiffert, Didier

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the benefit of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with conventional RT for the quality of life (QOL) of head and neck cancer survivors. Methods and Materials: Cross-sectional QOL measures (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire C30 and head and neck cancer module) were used with a French multicenter cohort of patients cured of head and neck cancer (follow-up ≥ 1 year) who had received bilateral neck RT (≥ 45 Gy) as a part of their initial treatment. We compared the QOL mean scores regarding RT modality (conventional RT vs. IMRT). The patients of the two groups were matched (one to one) according to the delay between the end of RT and the timing of the QOL evaluation and the T stage. Each QOL item was divided into two relevant levels of severity: 'not severe' (responses, 'not at all' and 'a little') vs. 'severe' (responses 'quite a bit' and 'very much'). The association between the type of RT and the prevalence of severe symptoms was approximated, through multivariate analysis using the prevalence odds ratio. Results: Two comparable groups (67 pairs) were available. Better scores were observed on the head and neck cancer module QOL questionnaire for the IMRT group, especially for dry mouth and sticky saliva (p < 0.0001). Severe symptoms were more frequent with conventional RT concerning saliva modifications and oral discomfort. The adjusted prevalence odds ratios were 3.17 (p = 0.04) for dry mouth, 3.16 (p = 0.02) for sticky saliva, 3.58 (p = 0.02) for pain in the mouth, 3.35 (p = 0.04) for pain in the jaw, 2.60 (p = 0.02) for difficulties opening the mouth, 2.76 (p = 0.02) for difficulties with swallowing, and 2.68 (p = 0.03) for trouble with eating. Conclusion: The QOL assessment of head and neck cancer survivors demonstrated the benefit of IMRT, particularly in the areas of salivary dysfunction and oral discomfort

  16. Health-Related Quality-of-Life Outcomes Following IMRT Versus Conventional Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Min; Karnell, Lucy H.; Funk, Gerry F.; Lu Heming; Dornfeld, Ken; Buatti, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were extracted from the database of an ongoing longitudinal Outcome Assessment Project. Eligible criteria included (1) treated with definitive radiation, and (2) provided 12-month posttreatment HRQOL data. Excluded were 7 patients who received IMRT before October 1, 2002, during this institution's developmental phase of the IMRT technique. The HRQOL outcomes of patients treated with IMRT were compared with those of patients who received CRT. Results: Twenty-six patients treated using IMRT and 27 patients treated using CRT were included. Patients in the IMRT group were older and had more advanced-stage diseases and more patients received concurrent chemotherapy. However, the IMRT group had higher mean Head and Neck Cancer Inventory scores (which represent better outcomes) for each of the four head-and-neck cancer-specific domains, including eating, speech, aesthetics, and social disruption, at 12 months after treatment. A significantly greater percentage of patients in the CRT group had restricted diets compared with those in the IMRT group (48.0% vs. 16.0%, p = 0.032). At 3 months after treatment, both groups had significant decreases from pretreatment eating scores. However, the IMRT group had a significant improvement during the first year, but the CRT group had only small improvement. Conclusions: Proper delivery of IMRT can improve HRQOL for patients with oropharyngeal cancer compared with CRT

  17. Assessment of three-dimensional set-up errors in conventional head and neck radiotherapy using electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Tejpal; Chopra, Supriya; Kadam, Avinash; Agarwal, Jai Prakash; Devi, P Reena; Ghosh-Laskar, Sarbani; Dinshaw, Ketayun Ardeshir

    2007-01-01

    Set-up errors are an inherent part of radiation treatment process. Coverage of target volume is a direct function of set-up margins, which should be optimized to prevent inadvertent irradiation of adjacent normal tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate three-dimensional (3D) set-up errors and propose optimum margins for target volume coverage in head and neck radiotherapy. The dataset consisted of 93 pairs of orthogonal simulator and corresponding portal images on which 558 point positions were measured to calculate translational displacement in 25 patients undergoing conventional head and neck radiotherapy with antero-lateral wedge pair technique. Mean displacements, population systematic (Σ) and random (σ) errors and 3D vector of displacement was calculated. Set-up margins were calculated using published margin recipes. The mean displacement in antero-posterior (AP), medio-lateral (ML) and supero-inferior (SI) direction was -0.25 mm (-6.50 to +7.70 mm), -0.48 mm (-5.50 to +7.80 mm) and +0.45 mm (-7.30 to +7.40 mm) respectively. Ninety three percent of the displacements were within 5 mm in all three cardinal directions. Population systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) were 0.96, 0.98 and 1.20 mm and 1.94, 1.97 and 2.48 mm in AP, ML and SI direction respectively. The mean 3D vector of displacement was 3.84 cm. Using van Herk's formula, the clinical target volume to planning target volume margins were 3.76, 3.83 and 4.74 mm in AP, ML and SI direction respectively. The present study report compares well with published set-up error data relevant to head and neck radiotherapy practice. The set-up margins were <5 mm in all directions. Caution is warranted against adopting generic margin recipes as different margin generating recipes lead to a different probability of target volume coverage

  18. A comparative dosimetric study of conventional, conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy in postoperative pelvic irradiation of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bin; An Jusheng; Wu Lingying; Huang Manni; Gao Juzhen; Xu Yingjie; Dai Jianrong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate target-volume coverage and organ at risk (OAR) protection achieved with conventional radiotherapy (CRT), three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) through dosimetric comparison in patients with cervical cancer after hysterectomy. Methods: The planning CT scans of 10 patients treated with pelvic radiation after hysterectomy for cervical cancer were used to generate CRT, 3DCRT and IMRT plans for this study. Clinical target volume(CTV) was contoured on the individual axial CT slices of every patient. The CTV was then uniformly expanded by 1.0 cm to create the planning target volume (PTV). The small bowel, rectum, bladder, bone marrow, ovaries, and femoral heads were outlined for the organ at risk (OAR) evaluation. The CRT, 3DCRT and IMRT plans were generated using commercial planning software. CRT plan was prescribed to deliver 45 Gy to the reference point, while IMRT and 3DCRT plans were 45 Gy to 95% of the PTV. Isodose line and dose volume histograms(DVH) were used to evaluate the dose distribution in CTV and OAR. Results: For 10 patients, the average volume of CTV receiving the prescribed dose of CRT was significantly lower than 3DCRT(Q=8.27, P<0.01) and IMRT(Q=8.37, P<0.01), respectively. Comparing with the CRT plan, the 3DCRT and IMRT plans notably reduced the volume of bowel at 30 and 45 Gy levels. The IMRT plan significantly spared rectum and bladder at 30 and 45 Gy levels comparing with the CRT (P<0.01) and 3DCRT(P<0.05) plans, while the 3DCRT plan significantly spared rectum and bladder at 45 Gy level comparing with the CRT(P<0.01) plans. For 4 patients with ovarian transposition, the average doses of ovary over 3 Gy were 2 patients with the 3 DCRT and IMRT plans, and 2 with all three plans. Conclusions: IMRT and 3DCRT are superior to CRT in improving dose coverage of target volume and sparing of OAR, while IMRT being the best. The superiority of IMRT and 3DCRT is obvious in sparing

  19. EORTC 22972-26991/MRC BR10 trial: Fractionated stereotactic boost following conventional radiotherapy of high grade gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumert, Brigitta G.; Brada, Michael; Bernier, Jacques; Kortmann, Rolf D.; Dehing-Oberije, Cary; Collette, Laurence; Davis, J. Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The EORTC trial No. 22972 investigated the role of an additional fractionated stereotactic boost (fSRT) to conventional radiotherapy for patients with high grade gliomas. A quality-assurance (QA) programme was run in conjunction with the study and was the first within the EORTC addressing the quality of a supposedly highly accurate treatment technique such as stereotactic radiotherapy. A second aim was to investigate a possible relation between the clinical results of the stereotactic boost arm and the results of the QA. Materials and methods: The trial was closed in 2001 due to low accrual. In total, 25 patients were randomized: 14 into the experimental arm and 11 into the control arm. Six centres randomized patients, 8 centres had completed the dummy run (DR) for the stereotactic boost part. All participating centres (9) were asked to complete a quality-assurance questionnaire. The DR consisted of treatment planning according to the guidelines of the protocol on 3 different tumour volumes drawn on CT images of a humanized phantom. The SRT technique to be used was evaluated by the questionnaire. Clinical data from patients recruited to the boost arm from 6 participating centres were analysed. Results: There was a full compliance to the protocol requirements for 5 centres. Major and minor deviations in conformality were observed for 2 and 3 centres, respectively. Of the 8 centres which completed the DR, one centre did not comply with the requirements of stereotactic radiotherapy concerning accuracy, dosimetry and planning. Median follow-up and median overall survival were 39.2 and 21.4 months, respectively. Acute and late toxicities of the stereotactic boost were low. One radiation necrosis was seen for a patient who has not received the SRT boost. Three reported serious adverse events were all seizures and probably therapy-related. Conclusions: Overall compliance was good but not ideal from the point of view of this highly precise radiation

  20. Dosimetric advantages of proton therapy over conventional radiotherapy with photons in young patients and adults with low-grade glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrabi, S.B.; Herfarth, K. [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Bougatf, N. [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Mohr, A. [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, T. [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, S.E. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Department of Radiation Sciences (DRS), Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Oberschleissheim (Germany); Deutsches Konsortium fuer Translationale Krebsforschung (dktk), Partner Site Munich, Munich (Germany); Debus, J.; Adeberg, S. [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Low-grade glioma (LGG) is a very common brain tumor in pediatric patients typically associated with a very good prognosis. This prognosis makes it imperative that the risk of long-term treatment-related side effects be kept at an absolute minimum. Proton therapy (PRT) provides a radiation technique that has the potential to further reduce the genesis of radiogenic impairment. We retrospectively assessed 74 patients with LGG who underwent PRT. Conventional three-dimensional photon and PRT plans were generated after contouring structures of neurogenesis, crucial neuronal structures, and areas susceptible to secondary malignancies. Target volume coverage was evaluated using the homogeneity index (HI) and inhomogeneity coefficient (IC). Results were compared using the Wilcoxon-signed rank test, with p < 0.05 being statistically significant. Target volume coverage was comparable for the photon and proton plans. Overall, we could show an essential reduction in maximal, mean, and integral doses in critical neurologic structures, areas of neurogenesis, and structures of neurocognitive function. The study indicated specifically how contralaterally located structures could be spared with PRT. PRT is a highly conformal radiation technique offering superior dosimetric advantages over conventional radiotherapy by allowing significant dose reduction for organs at risk (OAR) that are essential for neurologic function, neurocognition, and quality of life, thus demonstrating the potential of this technique for minimizing long-term sequelae. (orig.) [German] Niedriggradige Gliome (LGG) zaehlen zu den haeufigsten Hirntumoren im Kindesalter und sind ueblicherweise mit einer sehr guten Prognose vergesellschaftet. Es gilt daher, das Risiko fuer therapieassoziierte Spaetfolgen so gering wie moeglich zu halten. Mit der Protonenbestrahlung steht eine Bestrahlungsmodalitaet zur Verfuegung, mit der das Auftreten radiogener Spaetfolgen im Vergleich zu konventionellen Bestrahlungstechniken

  1. A rigorous assessment of tree height measurements obtained using airborne LIDAR and conventional field methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans-Erik Andersen; Stephen E. Reutebuch; Robert J. McGaughey

    2006-01-01

    Tree height is an important variable in forest inventory programs but is typically time-consuming and costly to measure in the field using conventional techniques. Airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) provides individual tree height measurements that are highly correlated with field-derived measurements, but the imprecision of conventional field techniques does...

  2. External beam abdominal radiotherapy in patients with seminoma stage I: field type, testicular dose, and spermatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Kari Dolven; Olsen, Dag Rune; Fossaa, Kristian; Fossaa, Sophie Dorothea

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a predictive model for the estimation of the gonadal dose during adjuvant para-aortic (PA) or dog leg (DL: PA plus ipsilateral iliac) field radiotherapy in patients with testicular seminoma. Methods and Materials: The surface gonadal dose was measured in patients with seminoma Stage I receiving PA or DL radiotherapy. Sperm cell analysis was performed before and 1 year after irradiation. PA and DL radiotherapy were simulated in the Alderson phantom while we measured the dose to the surface and middle of an artificial testicle, varying its position within realistic anatomical constraints. The symphysis-to-testicle distance (STD), field length, and thickness of the patient were experimental variables. The developed mathematical model was validated in subsequent patients. Results: The mean gonadal dose in patients was 0.09 and 0.32 Gy after PA and DL irradiation, respectively (p < 0.001). DL radiotherapy, but not PA irradiation led to significant reduction of the sperm count 1 year after irradiation. The gonadal dose-reducing effect of PA irradiation was confirmed in the Alderson phantom. A significant correlation was found between the STD and the gonadal dose during DL irradiation. A mathematical model was established for calculation of the gonadal dose and confirmed by measurements in patients. Conclusions: During radiotherapy of seminoma, the gonadal dose decreases with increasing STD. It is possible to predict the individual gonadal dose based on delivered midplane dose and STD

  3. Patch-based generation of a pseudo CT from conventional MRI sequences for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Daniel; Van Leemput, Koen; Hansen, Rasmus H.

    2015-01-01

    scans. In this study, we investigate the potential of a patch-based method for creating a pCT based on conventional T1-weighted MRI scans without using deformable registrations. We compare this method against two state-of-the-art methods within the voxel-based and atlas-based categories. Methods...... based on water equivalent path lengths was carried out, comparing the upper hemisphere of the head in the pCT and the real CT. Finally, the dosimetric accuracy was tested and compared for a photon treatment plan. Results:The pCTs produced with the patch-based method had the best voxel-wise, geometric......Purpose: In radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, the information on electron density must be derived from the MRI scan by creating a so-called pseudo computed tomography (pCT). This is a nontrivial task, since the voxel-intensities in an MRI scan...

  4. From conventional averages to individual dose painting in radiotherapy for human tumors: challenge to non-uniformity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Rodney Withers, H.

    2004-01-01

    The exploitation of a number of current clinical trials and reports on outcomes after radiation therapy (i.e. breast, head and neck, prostate) in clinical practice reflects many limitations for conventional techniques and dose-fractionation schedules and for 'average' conclusions. Even after decades of evolution of radiation therapy we still do not know how to optimize treatment for the individual patient and only have 'averages' and ill-defined 'probabilities' to guide treatment prescription. Wide clinical and biological heterogeneity within the groups of patients recruited into clinical trials with a few-fold variation in tumour volume within one stage of disease is obvious. Basic radiobiological guidelines concerning average cell killing of uniformly distributed and equally radiosensitive tumour cells arose from elegant but idealistic in vitro experiments and seem to be of uncertain validity. Therefore, we are confronted with more dilemmas than dogmas. Nonlinearity and in homogeneity of human tumour pattern and response to irradiation are discussed. The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss various aspects of non-uniform tumour cell targeted radiotherapy using conformal and dose intensity modulated techniques. (author)

  5. Monoisocentric three-beam split field technique for conventional treatment in the head and neck cancer using asymmetrical collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram Prasath, S.; Prabagaran, C.; Sanyal, B.; Sarkar, B.

    2008-01-01

    The importance of treatment planning of head and neck malignancies arises from the necessity to achieve homogenous doses to localized target volume surrounded by normal structures, which can produce acute and long-term morbidity. In many radiotherapy departments, a commonly employed strategy is a 3-field technique. Bilateral parallel-opposed fields are matched to anterior lower neck field. When the target extends to the lower neck regions, abutment of upper and lower neck fields is required. Field matching represents a technical challenge for the Medical Physicist and Radiation Oncologist to treat multiple fields while avoiding their overlap on the spinal cord. The aim of this work is to review merits, limitations and recent approaches to optimize matchline dose in Monoisocentric technique in conventional treatment for head and neck cancers. Although the technique has many advantages, it is subjected to some systematic and random errors due to equipment and patient setup accuracies. To decrease the magnitude of matchline inhomogeneities, multi leaf collimator have been used. This method is viable and represents alternative approaches to the problem of field matching using the asymmetric jaws

  6. Local field radiotherapy without elective nodal irradiation for postoperative loco-regional recurrence of esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Takuya; Yamazaki, Hideya; Suzuki, Gen; Aibe, Norihiro; Masui, Koji; Tatekawa, Kotoha; Sasaki, Naomi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Konishi, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Satoaki; Yamada, Kei

    2017-09-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the postoperative loco-regional recurrence of esophageal cancer; however, the optimal treatment field remains controversial. This study aims to evaluate the outcome of local field radiotherapy without elective nodal irradiation for postoperative loco-regional recurrence of esophageal cancer. We retrospectively investigated 35 patients treated for a postoperative loco-regional recurrence of esophageal cancer with local field radiotherapy between December 2008 and March 2016. The median irradiation dose was 60 Gy (range: 50-67.5 Gy). Thirty-one (88.6%) patients received concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up period was 18 months (range: 5-94 months). The 2-year overall survival was 55.7%, with a median survival time of 29.9 months. In the univariate analysis, the maximal diameter ≤20 mm (P = 0.0383), solitary lesion (P = 0.0352), and the complete remission after treatment (P = 0.00411) had a significantly better prognosis. A total of 27 of 35 patients (77.1%) had progressive disease (loco-regional failure [n = 9], distant metastasis [n = 7], and both loco-regional failure and distant metastasis [n = 11]). No patients had Grade 3 or greater mucositis. Local field radiotherapy is a considerable treatment option for postoperative loco-regional recurrence of esophageal cancer. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. Characterisation of neutron fields around high-energy x-ray radiotherapy machines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Králík, M.; Turek, Karel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 110, 1-4 (2004), s. 503-507 ISSN 0144-8420 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : radiotherapy machines * neutron fields * high-energy Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 0.617, year: 2003

  8. Nasopharynx carcinoma treatment: from the conventional radiotherapy to the conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation; Traitement du carcinome du nasopharynx: de la radiotherapie conventionnelle a la radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokaouim, K.; Grehange, G.; Truc, G.; Peingnaux, K.; Martin, E.; Zanetta, S.; Bruchon, Y.; Bonnetain, F.; Maingon, P. [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, 21 - Dijon (France)

    2009-10-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the impact of factors linked to the radiotherapy realisation on the local and locoregional control, the global survival, the survival without disease of patients suffering of naso-pharynx carcinoma. Conclusion: the patients suffering of a nasopharynx carcinoma treated by irradiation associated to chemotherapy have an improved global survival and an improved survival without disease. The conformal radiotherapy with or without modulated intensity reduce the risk of serous otitis, trismus and xerostomia at long term. It seems necessary to realize multi centric studies with a longer period of follow up before asserting the advantages of the I.M.R.T. in comparison to the classical and conformal technique in the treatment of naso-pharynx carcinomas. (N.C.)

  9. Weed seed predation in organic and conventional fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navntoft, Søren; Wratten, S.D.; Kristensen, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced biological control of weed seeds may improve sustainability of agricultural production. Biological control due to seed predation may be higher in organic fields because organic production generally supports more seed predators. To investigate such a difference, weed seed predation...... University and in two of the fields used for estimating seed predation. Recording of predators had therefore limited overlap with seed predation assays but was expected to give important information on key seed predators in the region. The mean seed removal rate was 17% in organic fields compared with 10...... edges. Overall, there was no consistent effect of distance from the field edge. Vegetation had a significant influence on the predation rates, with maximum rates at a medium-dense plant cover. Based on the video images, birds were the most important seed predators. The higher weed seed predation rate...

  10. Upfront Chemotherapy and Involved-Field Radiotherapy Results in More Relapses Than Extended Radiotherapy for Intracranial Germinomas: Modification in Radiotherapy Volume Might Be Needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Keun-Yong; Kim, Il Han; Park, Charn Il; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Jin Ho.; Kim, Kyubo; Kim, Seung Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Cho, Byung-Gyu; Jung, Hee-Won; Heo, Dae Seog; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the outcome of upfront chemotherapy plus radiotherapy (CRT) and the outcome of the use of extended radiotherapy (RT) only for intracranial germinoma. Methods and Materials: Of 81 patients with tissue-confirmed intracranial germinoma, 42 underwent CRT and 39 underwent RT only. For CRT, one to five cycles of upfront chemotherapy was followed by involved-field or extended-field RT, for which the dose was dependent on the M stage. For RT only, all 39 patients underwent craniospinal RT alone. The median follow-up was 68 months. Results: The 5- and 10-year overall survival rate was 100% and 92.5% for RT alone and 92.9% and 92.9% for CRT, respectively. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 100.0% for RT and 88.1% for CRT (p = 0.0279). No recurrences developed in patients given RT, but four relapses developed in patients who had received CRT-three in the brain and one in the spine. Only one patient achieved complete remission from salvage treatment. The proportion of patients requiring hormonal replacement was greater for patients who received RT than for those who had received CRT (p = 0.0106). Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that the better quality of life provided by CRT was compensated for by the greater rate of relapse. The possible benefit of including the ventricles in involved-field RT after upfront chemotherapy, specifically for patients with initial negative seeding, should be addressed in a prospective study

  11. Potency probability following conformal megavoltage radiotherapy using conventional doses for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantz, C.A.; Song, P.; Farhangi, E.; Nautiyal, J.; Awan, A.; Ignacio, L.; Weichselbaum, R.; Vijayakumar, S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Impotence is a familiar sequela of definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer; however, nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (NSRP) has offered potency rates as high as 70% for selected for patients in several large series. To the authors' knowledge, age and stage-matched comparisons between the effects of EBRT and NSRP upon the normal age trend of impotence have not been performed. Herein, we report the change in potency over time in an EBRT-treated population, determine the significantly predisposing health factors affecting potency in this population, and compare age and stage-matched potency rates with those of normal males and prostatectomy patients. Methods and Materials: Our results are obtained from a retrospective study of 114 patients ranging in age from 52 to 85 (mean, 68) who were diagnosed with clinical stages A-C C (T1-T4N0M0) prostate cancer and then treated conformally with megavoltage x-rays to 6500-7000 cGy (180-200 cGy per fraction) using the four-field box technique. Information concerning pre-RT potency, medical and surgical history, and medications was documented for each patient as was time of post-RT change in potency during regular follow-up. The median follow-up time was 18.5 months. Results: The actuarial probability of potency for all patients gradually decreased throughout post-RT follow-up. At months 1, 12, 24, and 36, potency rates were 98, 92, 75, and 66%, respectively. For those patients who became impotent, the median time to impotence was 14 months. Factors identified from logistic regression analysis as significant predictors of post-EBRT impotence include pre-EBRT partial potency (p < 0.001), vascular disease (p < 0.001), and diabetes (p = 0.003). Next, an actuarial plot of potency probability to patient age for the EBRT-treated population was compared to that obtained from the Massachusetts Male Aging Study of normal males. The two curves were not significantly different (logrank

  12. Decreased functional diversity and biological pest control in conventional compared to organic crop fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Krauss

    Full Text Available Organic farming is one of the most successful agri-environmental schemes, as humans benefit from high quality food, farmers from higher prices for their products and it often successfully protects biodiversity. However there is little knowledge if organic farming also increases ecosystem services like pest control. We assessed 30 triticale fields (15 organic vs. 15 conventional and recorded vascular plants, pollinators, aphids and their predators. Further, five conventional fields which were treated with insecticides were compared with 10 non-treated conventional fields. Organic fields had five times higher plant species richness and about twenty times higher pollinator species richness compared to conventional fields. Abundance of pollinators was even more than one-hundred times higher on organic fields. In contrast, the abundance of cereal aphids was five times lower in organic fields, while predator abundances were three times higher and predator-prey ratios twenty times higher in organic fields, indicating a significantly higher potential for biological pest control in organic fields. Insecticide treatment in conventional fields had only a short-term effect on aphid densities while later in the season aphid abundances were even higher and predator abundances lower in treated compared to untreated conventional fields. Our data indicate that insecticide treatment kept aphid predators at low abundances throughout the season, thereby significantly reducing top-down control of aphid populations. Plant and pollinator species richness as well as predator abundances and predator-prey ratios were higher at field edges compared to field centres, highlighting the importance of field edges for ecosystem services. In conclusion organic farming increases biodiversity, including important functional groups like plants, pollinators and predators which enhance natural pest control. Preventative insecticide application in conventional fields has only short

  13. Decreased functional diversity and biological pest control in conventional compared to organic crop fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Jochen; Gallenberger, Iris; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2011-01-01

    Organic farming is one of the most successful agri-environmental schemes, as humans benefit from high quality food, farmers from higher prices for their products and it often successfully protects biodiversity. However there is little knowledge if organic farming also increases ecosystem services like pest control. We assessed 30 triticale fields (15 organic vs. 15 conventional) and recorded vascular plants, pollinators, aphids and their predators. Further, five conventional fields which were treated with insecticides were compared with 10 non-treated conventional fields. Organic fields had five times higher plant species richness and about twenty times higher pollinator species richness compared to conventional fields. Abundance of pollinators was even more than one-hundred times higher on organic fields. In contrast, the abundance of cereal aphids was five times lower in organic fields, while predator abundances were three times higher and predator-prey ratios twenty times higher in organic fields, indicating a significantly higher potential for biological pest control in organic fields. Insecticide treatment in conventional fields had only a short-term effect on aphid densities while later in the season aphid abundances were even higher and predator abundances lower in treated compared to untreated conventional fields. Our data indicate that insecticide treatment kept aphid predators at low abundances throughout the season, thereby significantly reducing top-down control of aphid populations. Plant and pollinator species richness as well as predator abundances and predator-prey ratios were higher at field edges compared to field centres, highlighting the importance of field edges for ecosystem services. In conclusion organic farming increases biodiversity, including important functional groups like plants, pollinators and predators which enhance natural pest control. Preventative insecticide application in conventional fields has only short-term effects on aphid

  14. Progressive Muscle Atrophy and Weakness After Treatment by Mantle Field Radiotherapy in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M. van; Dorresteijn, Lucille D.A.; Pillen, Sigrid; Biesma, Douwe H.; Vogels, Oscar J.M.; Alfen, Nens van

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. Methods and Materials: We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Results: Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. On ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Conclusions: Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles.

  15. External beam radiotherapy of localized prostatic adenocarcinoma. Evaluation of conformal therapy, field number and target margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennernaes, B.; Rikner, G.; Letocha, H.; Nilsson, S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify factors of importance in the planning of external beam radiotherapy of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Seven patients with urogenital cancers were planned for external radiotherapy of the prostate. Four different techniques were used, viz. a 4-field box technique and four-, five- or six-field conformal therapy set-ups combined with three different margins (1-3 cm). The evaluations were based on the doses delivered to the rectum and the urinary bladder. A normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was calculated for each plan using Lyman's dose volume reduction method. The most important factors that resulted in a decrease of the dose delivered to the rectum and the bladder were the use of conformal therapy and smaller margins. Conformal therapy seemed more important for the dose distribution in the urinary bladder. Five- and six-field set-ups were not significantly better than those with four fields. NTCP calculations were in accordance with the evaluation of the dose volume histograms. To conclude, four-field conformal therapy utilizing reduced margins improves the dose distribution to the rectum and the urinary bladder in the radiotherapy of prostatic adenocarcinoma. (orig.)

  16. Field size and centring for conventional X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimpel, H.; Kreienfeld, H.; Overbeck, R.

    1989-01-01

    Since 1973, all X-ray equipment for medical applications in the Federal Republic of Germany has had to be examined according to the requirements of the German ''Rontgenverordnung'' before it is used on patients and after each essential modification of design or construction. These examinations are carried out by inspectors appointed by the authorities, e.g. TUV. The field size adjustment and the centring of the radiation beam in relation to the image reception area is checked, along with other tests. To increase quality assurance in X-ray diagnosis, since the mid-1980s X-ray equipment has also been subject to in-service inspections to an increasing extent. (author)

  17. Improving bladder cancer treatment with radiotherapy using separate intensity modulated radiotherapy plans for boost and elective fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rooijen, D.; Van de Kamer, J.; Hulshof, M.; Koning, C.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate to what extent IMRT can decrease the dose to the organs at risk in bladder cancer treatment compared with conformal treatment while making separate treatment plans for the elective field and the boost. Special attention is paid to sparing small intestines. Twenty patients who were treated with the field-in-field technique (FiF) were re-planned with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using five and seven beams, respectively. Separate treatment plans were made for the elective field (including the pelvic lymph nodes) and the boost, which enables position correction for bone and tumour separately. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy to the elective field and 55 or 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). For bladder and rectum, V{sub 45}Gy and V{sub 55}Gy were compared, and for small intestines, V{sub 25}Gy and V{sub 40}Gy. The dose distribution with IMRT conformed better to the shape of the target. There was no significant difference between the techniques in dose to the healthy bladder. The median V{sub 40}Gy of the small intestines decreased from 114 to 66 cc (P = 0.001) with five beam IMRT, and to 55 cc (P = 0.001) with seven beam IMRT compared with FiF. V{sub 45}Gy for rectum decreased from 34.2% to 17.5% (P = 0.004) for both five and seven beam plans, while V{sub 55}Gy for rectum remained the same. With IMRT, a statistically significant dose decrease to the small intestines can be achieved while covering both tumour and elective PTV adequately.

  18. Improving bladder cancer treatment with radiotherapy using separate intensity modulated radiotherapy plans for boost and elective fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rooijen, D.; Van de Kamer, J.; Hulshof, M.; Koning, C.; Bel, A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate to what extent IMRT can decrease the dose to the organs at risk in bladder cancer treatment compared with conformal treatment while making separate treatment plans for the elective field and the boost. Special attention is paid to sparing small intestines. Twenty patients who were treated with the field-in-field technique (FiF) were re-planned with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using five and seven beams, respectively. Separate treatment plans were made for the elective field (including the pelvic lymph nodes) and the boost, which enables position correction for bone and tumour separately. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy to the elective field and 55 or 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). For bladder and rectum, V 45 Gy and V 55 Gy were compared, and for small intestines, V 25 Gy and V 40 Gy. The dose distribution with IMRT conformed better to the shape of the target. There was no significant difference between the techniques in dose to the healthy bladder. The median V 40 Gy of the small intestines decreased from 114 to 66 cc (P = 0.001) with five beam IMRT, and to 55 cc (P = 0.001) with seven beam IMRT compared with FiF. V 45 Gy for rectum decreased from 34.2% to 17.5% (P = 0.004) for both five and seven beam plans, while V 55 Gy for rectum remained the same. With IMRT, a statistically significant dose decrease to the small intestines can be achieved while covering both tumour and elective PTV adequately.

  19. Two Metachronous Neoplasms in the Radiotherapy Fields of a Young Man With Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A. Williams BS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is recognized that various radiation-induced malignancies often follow childhood radiotherapy. Radiation-induced neoplasms have been shown to occur with increased frequency in syndromes due to mutated tumor suppressor genes. There exist no recommendations for the management of cancer patients with germline APC gene mutations. Preclinical data suggest that APC gene mutations cause enhanced radiosensitivity, but no clinical observations exist that show that patients with this mutation are at higher risk for radiation-induced malignancies. Results: We report the case of a 32-year-old man with a genetic diagnosis of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP who initially presented at age 10 with a medulloblastoma treated with radiotherapy and surgery. Radiation-induced papillary thyroid carcinoma followed 13 years later. Finally, radiation-induced soft tissue osteosarcoma occurred with widespread metastasis 20 years thereafter. Conclusions: This is the first report of 2 malignancies in the prior radiotherapy fields of a patient with a genetic diagnosis of FAP. More important, this suggests that APC-defective cells are at an enhanced sensitivity to the carcinogenic effects of radiotherapy compared with APC-proficient cells. This could argue for genetic screening in affected members of these families and for creation of treatment recommendations to more seriously consider the risks of radiation therapy.

  20. Small-field fractionated radiotherapy with or without stereotactic boost for vestibular schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagei, K.; Shirato, H.; Suzuki, K.; Isu, T.; Sawamura, Y.; Sakamoto, T.; Fukuda, S.; Nishioka, T.; Hashimoto, S.; Miyasaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of small-field fractionated radiotherapy with or without stereotactic boost (SB) for vestibular schwannomas.Methods and materials: Thirty-nine patients with vestibular schwannoma were treated with irradiation between March 1991 and February 1996. Extra-meatal tumor diameters were under 30 mm. Thirty-three patients received small-field fractionated radiotherapy followed by SB. Basic dose schedule was 44 Gy in 22 fractions over 5 1/2 weeks plus 4 Gy in one session. Six patients received small-field fractionated radiotherapy only (40-44 Gy in 20-22 fractions over 5-5 1/2 weeks or 36 Gy in 20 fractions over 5 weeks).< Results: Follow-up ranged from 6 to 69 months (median, 24 months). Tumors decreased in size in 13 cases (33%), were unchanged in 25 (64%), and increased in one (3%). The actuarial 2-year tumor control rate was 97%. Fifteen patients had useful hearing (Gardner-Robertson class 1-2) and 25 patients had testable hearing (class 1-4) before irradiation. The 2-year actuarial rates of useful hearing preservation (free of deterioration from class 1-2 to class 3-5) were 78%. The 2-year actuarial rates of any testable hearing preservation (free of deterioration from class 1-4 to class 5) were 96%. No permanent facial and trigeminal neuropathy developed after irradiation. The 2-year actuarial incidences of facial and trigeminal neuropathies were 8% and 16%, respectively.Conclusions: Small-field fractionated radiotherapy with or without SB provides excellent short-term local control and a relatively low incidence of complications for vestibular schwannoma, although further follow-up is necessary to evaluate the long-term results. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  1. Surface dose measurements in and out of field. Implications for breast radiotherapy with megavoltage photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonski, Peta; Kron, Tomas [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); RMIT Univ., Melbourne (Australia); Ramachandran, Prabhakar; Franich, Rick [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the difference in surface dose between flat and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in the context of breast radiotherapy. The surface dose was measured for 6 MV, 6 MV FFF, 10 MV, 10 MV FFF and 18 MV photon beams using a thin window ionisation chamber for various field sizes. Profiles were acquired to ascertain the change in surface dose off-axis. Out-of-field measurements were included in a clinically representative half beam block tangential breast field. In the field centres of FFF beams the surface dose was found to be increased for small fields and decreased for large fields compared to flat beams. For FFF beams, surface dose was found to decrease off-axis and resulted in lower surface dose out-of-field compared to flat beams.

  2. Left-sided breast cancer irradiation using rotational and fixed-field radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, X. Sharon; Liu, Tian X.; Liu, Arthur K.; Newman, Francis; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Kavanagh, Brian; Hu, Y. Angie

    2014-01-01

    The 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) technique is the standard for breast cancer radiotherapy. During treatment planning, not only the coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) but also the minimization of the dose to critical structures, such as the lung, heart, and contralateral breast tissue, need to be considered. Because of the complexity and variations of patient anatomy, more advanced radiotherapy techniques are sometimes desired to better meet the planning goals. In this study, we evaluated external-beam radiation treatment techniques for left breast cancer using various delivery platforms: fixed-field including TomoDirect (TD), static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT), and rotational radiotherapy including Elekta volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and tomotherapy helical (TH). A total of 10 patients with left-sided breast cancer who did or did not have positive lymph nodes and were previously treated with 3DCRT/sIMRT to the entire breast were selected, their treatment was planned with Monaco VMAT, TD, and TH. Dosimetric parameters including PTV coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, dose-volume histograms, and target minimum/maximum/mean doses were evaluated. It is found that for plans providing comparable PTV coverage, the Elekta VMAT plans were generally more inhomogeneous than the TH and TD plans. For the cases with regional node involvement, the average mean doses administered to the heart were 9.2 (± 5.2) and 8.8 (± 3.0) Gy in the VMAT and TH plans compared with 11.9 (± 6.4) and 11.8 (± 9.2) Gy for the 3DCRT and TD plans, respectively, with slightly higher doses given to the contralateral lung or breast or both. On average, the total monitor units for VMAT plans are 11.6% of those TH plans. Our studies have shown that VMAT and TH plans offer certain dosimetric advantages over fixed-field IMRT plans for advanced breast cancer requiring regional nodal treatment. However, for early-stage breast cancer fixed-field

  3. Dosimetric evaluation of tomography and four-box field conformal radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Mina; Lee, Hyo Chun; Chung, Mi Joo; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Jeon, Dong Min; Cheon, Geum Seong

    2013-01-01

    To report the results of dosimetric comparison between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using Tomotherapy and four-box field conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for pelvic irradiation of locally advanced rectal cancer. Twelve patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received a short course preoperative chemoradiotherapy (25 Gy in 5 fractions) on the pelvis using Tomotherapy, between July 2010 and December 2010, were selected. Using their simulation computed tomography scans, Tomotherapy and four-box field CRT plans with the same dose schedule were evaluated, and dosimetric parameters of the two plans were compared. For the comparison of target coverage, we analyzed the mean dose, Vn Gy, Dmin, Dmax, radical dose homogeneity index (rDHI), and radiation conformity index (RCI). For the comparison of organs at risk (OAR), we analyzed the mean dose. Tomotherapy showed a significantly higher mean target dose than four-box field CRT (p 0.001). But, V26.25 Gy and V27.5 Gywere not significantly different between the two modalities. Tomotherapy showed higher Dmax and lower Dmin. The Tomotherapy plan had a lower rDHI than four-box field CRT (p = 0.000). Tomotherapy showed better RCI than four-box field CRT (p = 0.007). For OAR, the mean irradiated dose was significantly lower in Tomotherapy than four-box field CRT. In locally advanced rectal cancer, Tomotherapy delivers a higher conformal radiation dose to the target and reduces the irradiated dose to OAR than four-box field CRT.

  4. Dosimetric evaluation of tomography and four-box field conformal radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mina; Lee, Hyo Chun; Chung, Mi Joo; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jong Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok; Jeon, Dong Min; Cheon, Geum Seong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To report the results of dosimetric comparison between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using Tomotherapy and four-box field conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for pelvic irradiation of locally advanced rectal cancer. Twelve patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received a short course preoperative chemoradiotherapy (25 Gy in 5 fractions) on the pelvis using Tomotherapy, between July 2010 and December 2010, were selected. Using their simulation computed tomography scans, Tomotherapy and four-box field CRT plans with the same dose schedule were evaluated, and dosimetric parameters of the two plans were compared. For the comparison of target coverage, we analyzed the mean dose, Vn Gy, Dmin, Dmax, radical dose homogeneity index (rDHI), and radiation conformity index (RCI). For the comparison of organs at risk (OAR), we analyzed the mean dose. Tomotherapy showed a significantly higher mean target dose than four-box field CRT (p 0.001). But, V26.25 Gy and V27.5 Gywere not significantly different between the two modalities. Tomotherapy showed higher Dmax and lower Dmin. The Tomotherapy plan had a lower rDHI than four-box field CRT (p = 0.000). Tomotherapy showed better RCI than four-box field CRT (p = 0.007). For OAR, the mean irradiated dose was significantly lower in Tomotherapy than four-box field CRT. In locally advanced rectal cancer, Tomotherapy delivers a higher conformal radiation dose to the target and reduces the irradiated dose to OAR than four-box field CRT.

  5. Concurrent radiotherapy and carboplatin in non small-cell lung cancer: a pilot study using conventional and accelerated fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, D.; Bishop, J.; Crennan, E.; Olver, I.

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen patients with unresectable non small cell lung cancer were treated with radical radiotherapy and carboplatin administered in order to ascertain the toxicity of concurent carboplatin/radiotherapy. The first 6 patients were treated to a total dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions in 6 weeks, with carboplatin 70 mg/m 2 /day on days 1 to 5 during weeks 1 and 5 of radiotherapy. The remaining 7 patients were given 60 Gy in 30 fractions in 3 weeks, treating twice a day (accelerated fractionation). Carboplatin was given as above but only during week 1 of radiotherapy. Twelve patients completed radiotherapy without interruption but 2 patients developed grade 3 neutropenia. Major toxicity was oesophagitis, one patient requiring nasogastric feeding. Average duration of dysphagia (any grade) in the accelerated fractionation group was 21 weeks. Four patients achieved good partial responses even though initial tumour volume was large. It is concluded that this treatment is associated with increased but acceptable early mucosal toxicity. 6 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  6. Can field-in-field technique replace wedge filter in radiotherapy treatment planning: a comparative analysis in various treatment sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, R.; Julka, P.K.; Rath, G.K.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to show whether field-in-field (FIF) technique can be used to replace wedge filter in radiation treatment planning. The study was performed in cases where wedges are commonly used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Thirty patients with different malignancies who received radiotherapy were studied. This includes patients with malignancies of brain, head and neck, breast, upper and lower abdomen. All the patients underwent computed tomography scanning and the datasets were transferred to the treatment planning system. Initially, wedge based planning was performed to achieve the best possible dose distribution inside the target volume with multileaf collimators (Plan1). Wedges were removed from a copy of the same plan and FIF plan was generated (Plan2). The two plans were then evaluated and compared for mean dose, maximum dose, median dose, doses to 2% (D 2 ) and 98% (D 9 8) of the target volume, volume receiving greater than 107% of the prescribed dose (V>107%), volume receiving less than 95% of the prescribed dose (V 2 , V>107% and CI for more of the sites with statistically significant reduction in monitor units. FIF results in better dose distribution in terms of homogeneity in most of the sites. It is feasible to replace wedge filter with FIF in radiotherapy treatment planning.

  7. Phantom measurements and computed estimates of breast dose with radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma: dose reduction with the use of the involved field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, A.; Kron, T.; Sorell, G.; Cramb, J.; Wittwer, H.; Sullivan, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The risk of breast cancer following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma appears to be dose related. In this study we compared breast dose in an anthropomorphic phantom for conventional 'mantle'; upper mediastinal/bilateral neck (minimantle) and unilateral neck fields, and evaluated the accuracy of computer planned dose estimates for out-of-field doses. For each field, computer-planned breast dose (CPD) estimates were compared with thermolu-minescence dosimetry measurements in five locations within 'breast tissue'. CPD were also compared with ion chamber measurements in a slab phantom. Measured dose and CPD were within 20% of each other up to approximately 10 cm from the field edge. Beyond 10 cm, the CPD underestimated dose by a factor of 2 or more. The minimantle reduced the breast dose by a factor of approximately 10 compared with the mantle treatment. Treating the neck field lowered the breast dose by a further 50% or more. Modern involved-field radiotherapy for lymphoma substantially reduces breast dose compared with mantle fields. Computer dosimetery underestimated dose at larger distances from the field. This needs to be considered if computer dosimetery is used to estimate breast dose and, by extrapolation, breast cancer risk.

  8. Health-related quality of life in survivors of stage I-II breast cancer: randomized trial of post-operative conventional radiotherapy and hypofractionated tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Versmessen Harijati

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL assessment is a key component of clinical oncology trials. However, few breast cancer trials comparing adjuvant conventional radiotherapy (CR and hypofractionated tomotherapy (TT have investigated HRQOL. We compared HRQOL in stage I-II breast cancer patients who were randomized to receive either CR or TT. Tomotherapy uses an integrated computed tomography scanner to improve treatment accuracy, aiming to reduce the adverse effects of radiotherapy. Methods A total of 121 stage I–II breast cancer patients who had undergone breast conserving surgery (BCS or mastectomy (MA were randomly assigned to receive either CR or TT. CR patients received 25 × 2 Gy over 5 weeks, and BCS patients also received a sequential boost of 8 × 2 Gy over 2 weeks. TT patients received 15 × 2.8 Gy over 3 weeks, and BCS patients also received a simultaneous integrated boost of 15 × 0.6 Gy over 3 weeks. Patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and BR23 questionnaires. The mean score (± standard error was calculated at baseline, the end of radiotherapy, and at 3 months and 1, 2, and 3 years post-radiotherapy. Data were analyzed by the 'intention-to-treat' principle. Results On the last day of radiotherapy, patients in both treatment arms had decreased global health status and functioning scores; increased fatigue (clinically meaningful in both treatment arms, nausea and vomiting, and constipation; decreased arm symptoms; clinically meaningful increased breast symptoms in CR patients and systemic side effects in TT patients; and slightly decreased body image and future perspective. At 3 months post-radiotherapy, TT patients had a clinically significant increase in role- and social-functioning scores and a clinically significant decrease in fatigue. The post-radiotherapy physical-, cognitive- and emotional-functioning scores improved faster in TT patients than CR patients. TT patients also had a better

  9. Health-related quality of life in survivors of stage I-II breast cancer: randomized trial of post-operative conventional radiotherapy and hypofractionated tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versmessen, Harijati; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Van Parijs, Hilde; Miedema, Geertje; Voordeckers, Mia; Adriaenssens, Nele; Storme, Guy; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) assessment is a key component of clinical oncology trials. However, few breast cancer trials comparing adjuvant conventional radiotherapy (CR) and hypofractionated tomotherapy (TT) have investigated HRQOL. We compared HRQOL in stage I-II breast cancer patients who were randomized to receive either CR or TT. Tomotherapy uses an integrated computed tomography scanner to improve treatment accuracy, aiming to reduce the adverse effects of radiotherapy. A total of 121 stage I–II breast cancer patients who had undergone breast conserving surgery (BCS) or mastectomy (MA) were randomly assigned to receive either CR or TT. CR patients received 25 × 2 Gy over 5 weeks, and BCS patients also received a sequential boost of 8 × 2 Gy over 2 weeks. TT patients received 15 × 2.8 Gy over 3 weeks, and BCS patients also received a simultaneous integrated boost of 15 × 0.6 Gy over 3 weeks. Patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and BR23 questionnaires. The mean score (± standard error) was calculated at baseline, the end of radiotherapy, and at 3 months and 1, 2, and 3 years post-radiotherapy. Data were analyzed by the 'intention-to-treat' principle. On the last day of radiotherapy, patients in both treatment arms had decreased global health status and functioning scores; increased fatigue (clinically meaningful in both treatment arms), nausea and vomiting, and constipation; decreased arm symptoms; clinically meaningful increased breast symptoms in CR patients and systemic side effects in TT patients; and slightly decreased body image and future perspective. At 3 months post-radiotherapy, TT patients had a clinically significant increase in role- and social-functioning scores and a clinically significant decrease in fatigue. The post-radiotherapy physical-, cognitive- and emotional-functioning scores improved faster in TT patients than CR patients. TT patients also had a better long-term recovery from fatigue than CR patients. ANOVA

  10. Costs of conventional radical radiotherapy versus continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) in the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer or carcinoma of the bronchus. Medical Research Council CHART Steering Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, D; Drummond, M F

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the costs of treatment with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) and those of conventional radiotherapy for patients with (1) head and neck cancer and (2) carcinoma of the bronchus. The study was conducted concurrently with two multicentre randomized controlled trials. Data were collected on the use of hospital and community service resources and patients' travel for treatment. Data on resource use up to 3 months after entry to the study were available for 526 head and neck patients (314 receiving CHART and 212 conventional therapy) and 284 bronchus patients (175 CHART and 109 conventional therapy). For patients with head and neck cancer, CHART cost Pounds 1092 (P hostel facilities. The results of this cost analysis will help to facilitate a decision about whether the benefits of CHART, as determined by the clinical trials, are worth the additional costs of hospital-based resource use. The collection of detailed patient-specific resource-use data from a number of centres allows the determination of ways for reducing the cost differential between therapies and making CHART a more cost effective treatment alternative.

  11. Significant correlation between rectal DVH and late bleeding in patients treated after radical prostatectomy with conformal or conventional radiotherapy (66.6-70.2 Gy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzarini, Cesare; Fiorino, Claudio; Ceresoli, Giovanni Luca; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Bolognesi, Angelo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Villa, Eugenio

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Investigating the correlation between dosimetric/clinical parameters and late rectal bleeding in patients treated with adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Data of 154 consecutive patients, including three-dimensional treatment planning and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum (including filling), were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-six of 154 patients presenting a (full) rectal volume >100 cc were excluded from the analysis. All patients considered for the analysis (n=128) were treated at a nominal dose equal to 66.6-70.2 Gy (ICRU dose 68-72.5 Gy; median 70 Gy) with conformal (n=76) or conventional (n=52) four-field technique (1.8 Gy/fr). Clinical parameters such as diabetes mellitus, acute rectal bleeding, hypertension, age, and hormonal therapy were considered. Late rectal bleeding was scored using a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, and patients experiencing ≥Grade 2 were considered bleeders. Median follow-up was 36 months (range 12-72). Mean and median rectal dose were considered, together with rectal volume and the % fraction of rectum receiving more than 50, 55, 60, and 65 Gy (V50, V55, V60, V65, respectively). Median and quartile values of all parameters were taken as cutoff for statistical analysis. Univariate (log-rank) and multivariate (Cox hazard model) analyses were performed. Results: Fourteen of 128 patients experienced ≥Grade 2 late bleeding (3-year actuarial incidence 10.5%). A significant correlation between a number of cutoff values and late rectal bleeding was found. In particular, a mean dose ≥54 Gy, V50 ≥63%, V55 ≥57%, and V60 ≥50% was highly predictive of late bleeding (p≤0.01). A rectal volume <60 cc and type of treatment (conventional vs. conformal) were also significantly predictive of late bleeding (p=0.05). Concerning clinical variables, acute bleeding (p < 0.001) was significantly related to late bleeding, and a trend was found for

  12. Quality assurance procedure for assessing mechanical accuracy of a radiation field center in stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, Daisaku; Ienaga, Akinori; Nakada, Ryosei; Yomoda, Akane; Inoue, Makoto; Ichida, Takao; Hosono, Masako

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy requires a quality assurance (QA) program that ensures the mechanical accuracy of a radiation field center. We have proposed a QA method for achieving the above requirement by conducting the Winston Lutz test using an electronic portal image device (EPID). An action limit was defined as three times the standard deviation. Then, the action limits for mean deviations of the radiation field center during collimator rotation, gantry rotation, and couch rotation in clockwise and counterclockwise resulted in 0.11 mm, 0.52 mm, 0.37 mm, and 0.41 mm respectively. Two years after the QA program was launched, the mean deviation of the radiation field center during gantry rotation exceeded the above action limit. Consequently, a mechanical adjustment for the gantry was performed, thereby restoring the accuracy of the radiation field center. A field center shift of 0.5 mm was also observed after a micro multi-leaf collimator was unmounted. (author)

  13. Impact of field number and beam angle on functional image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Chris M.; Wild, Jim M.; Swinscoe, James A.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hart, Kerry A.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of beam angles and field number on functionally-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) normal lung avoidance treatment plans that incorporate hyperpolarised helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He MRI) ventilation data. Eight non-small cell lung cancer patients had pre-treatment 3He MRI that was registered to inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy planning computed tomography. IMRT plans that minimised the volume of total lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (V20) were compared with plans that minimised 3He MRI defined functional lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (fV20). Coplanar IMRT plans using 5-field manually optimised beam angles and 9-field equidistant plans were also evaluated. For each pair of plans, the Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to compare fV20 and the percentage of planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90). Incorporation of 3He MRI led to median reductions in fV20 of 1.3% (range: 0.2-9.3% p  =  0.04) and 0.2% (range: 0 to 4.1%; p  =  0.012) for 5- and 9-field arrangements, respectively. There was no clinically significant difference in target coverage. Functionally-guided IMRT plans incorporating hyperpolarised 3He MRI information can reduce the dose received by ventilated lung without comprising PTV coverage. The effect was greater for optimised beam angles rather than uniformly spaced fields.

  14. Three-dimensional treatment planning for postoperative radiotherapy in patients with node-positive cervical cancer. Comparison between a conventional and a conformal technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olofsen-van Acht, M.J.J.; Quint, S.; Seven, M.; Berg, H.A. van den; Levendag, P.C. [University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Santvoort, J.P.C. van [University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands). Subdivision of Clinical Physics; Logmans, A. [University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Gynecologic Oncology

    1999-09-01

    Purpose: Reduction of irradiated small bowel volume, using a conformal three-dimensional treatment planning technique in postoperative radiotherapy of cervical cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Large gynecological treatment fields including the para-aortic nodes were analyzed in 15 patients. A conventional treatment plan with anterior and posterior (AP-PA) parallel opposed fields and a 3D 4-field conformal radiotherapy plan with a central blocking of small bowel were compared for each patient. Dose-volume histograms and dose parameters were established. Because of the tolerance constraints of the small bowel, the cumulative dose applied to the target was 48.6 Gy. Results: The mean Tumor Control Probability (TCP) values for both the conventional and the conformal technique were 0.60 and 0.61, respectively, with ranges of 0.56 to 0.67 and 0.57 to 0.66, respectively. The mean volume receiving 95% or more of the prescribed dose (V95) of the small bowel was 47.6% (32.5 to 66.3%) in the AP-PA technique and 14.9% (7.0 to 22.5%) in the conformal technique (p<0.001), indicating a significant reduction in irradiated volume of small bowel in the higher dose range. The mean Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) decreased from 0.11 to 0.03 with the conformal plan. In patients who received a pedicled omentoplasty during surgery, the mean V95 for small bowel could be reduced to 8.5% (7.0 to 9.9%). The mean median dose to the kidneys was only slightly elevated in the conformal treatment. Especially the mean dose to the right kidney in conventional vs conformal treatment was 3.3 vs 7.9 Gy. The mean near-minimum dose (D95) to the rectosigmoid decreased from 48.4 to 30.1 Gy in the conformal plan compared to the conventional plan. Conclusion: The small bowel dose can be significantly reduced with 3D treatment planning, particularly if a predicled omentoplasty is performed. This allows dose escalation to the tumor region without unacceptable toxicity for the small bowel

  15. A retrospective comparison of outcome and toxicity of preoperative image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus conventional pelvic radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chun-Ming; Huang, Ming-Yii; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Huang, Ching-Wen; Ma, Cheng-Jen; Lin, Chih-Hung; Huang, Chih-Jen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare clinical outcomes and toxicity between 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) administered through helical tomotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy. We reviewed 144 patients with Stage II–III rectal cancer receiving preoperative fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy followed by radical resection. Tumor responses following chemoradiotherapy were evaluated using the Dworak tumor regression grade (TRG). Of the 144 patients, 45 received IG-IMRT and 99 received 3DCRT. A significant reduction in Grade 3 or 4 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (IG-IMRT, 6.7%; 3DCRT, 15.1%; P = 0.039) was observed by IG-IMRT. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate did not differ between the IG-IMRT and the 3DCRT group (17.8% vs 15.1%, P = 0.52). Patients in the IG-IMRT group had the trend of favorable tumor regressions (TRG 3 or 4) compared with those in the 3DCRT group (66.7% vs 43.5%, P = 0.071). The median follow-up was 53 months (range, 18–95 months) in the 3DCRT group and 43 months (range, 17–69 months) in the IG-IMRT group. Four-year overall, disease-free, and local failure–free survival rates of the IG-IMRT and 3DCRT groups were 81.6% and 67.9% (P = 0.12), 53.8% and 51.8% (P = 0.51), and 88% and 75.1% (P = 0.031), respectively. LARC patients treated with preoperative IG-IMRT achieved lower acute gastrointestinal adverse effects and a higher local control rate than those treated with 3DCRT, but there was no prominent difference in distant metastasis rate and overall survival between two treatment modalities.

  16. SU-E-T-483: In Vivo Dosimetry of Conventional and Rotational Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using Integral Quality Monitor (IQM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L; Qian, J; Gonzales, R; Keck, J; Armour, E; Wong, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy, sensitivity and constancy of integral quality monitor (IQM), a new system for in vivo dosimetry of conventional intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or rotational volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) Methods: A beta-version IQM system was commissioned on an Elekta Infinity LINAC equipped with 160-MLCs Agility head. The stationary and rotational dosimetric constancy of IQM was evaluated, using five-field IMRT and single-or double-arc VMAT plans for prostate and head-and-neck (H&N) patients. The plans were delivered three times over three days to assess the constancy of IQM response. Picket fence (PF) fields were used to evaluate the sensitivity of detecting MLC leaf errors. A single leaf offset was intentionally introduced during delivery of various PF fields with segment apertures of 3×1, 5×1, 10×1, and 24×1cm2. Both 2mm and 5mm decrease in the field width were used. Results: Repeated IQM measurements of prostate and H&N IMRT deliveries showed 0.4 and 0.5% average standard deviation (SD) for segment-by-segment comparison and 0.1 and 0.2% for cumulative comparison. The corresponding SDs for VMAT deliveries were 6.5, 9.4% and 0.7, 1.3%, respectively. Statistical analysis indicates that the dosimetric differences detected by IQM were significant (p < 0.05) in all PF test deliveries. The largest average IQM signal response of a 2 mm leaf error was found to be 2.1% and 5.1% by a 5mm leaf error for 3×1 cm2 field size. The same error in 24×1 cm2 generates a 0.7% and 1.4% difference in the signal. Conclusion: IQM provides an effective means for real-time dosimetric verification of IMRT/ VMAT treatment delivery. For VMAT delivery, the cumulative dosimetry of IQM needs to be used in clinical practice.

  17. Large-field image intensifiers versus conventional chest radiography: ROC study with simulated interstitial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, L.H.L.; Chakraborty, D.P.; Waes, P.F.G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Two image intensifier tubes have recently been introduced whose large imaging area makes them suitable for chest imaging (Phillips Pulmodiagnost TLX slit II and Siemens TX 57 large entrance field II). Both modalities present a 10 x 10-cm hard copy image to the radiologist. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve study with simulated interstitial disease was performed to compare the image quality of these image intensifiers with conventional chest images. The relative ranking in terms of decreasing ROC areas was Siemens, conventional, and Philips. Compared with conventional imaging, none of the differences in ROC curve area were statistically significant at the 5% level

  18. Involved-field radiotherapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghuan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhao, Fen; Luo, Yijun; Kong, Li; Yu, Jinming

    2016-02-05

    Esophageal carcinoma (EC) is characterized by a high rate of lymph node metastasis and its spread pattern is not always predictable. Chemoradiotherapy has an important role in the treatment of EC in both the inoperable and the pre-operative settings. However, regarding the target volume for radiation, different clinical practices exist. Theoretically, in addition to the clinical target volume administered to the gross lesion, it might seem logical to deliver a certain dose to the uninvolved regional lymph node area at risk for microscopic disease. However, in practice, it is difficult because of the intolerance of normal tissue to radiotherapy (RT), particularly if all regions containing the cervical, mediastinal, and upper abdominal nodes are covered. To date, the use of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) is still controversial in the field of radiotherapy. Some investigators use involved-field radiotherapy (IFRT) in order to reduce treatment-related toxicities. It is thought that micrometastases can be controlled, to some extent, by chemotherapy and the abscopal effects of radiation. It is the presence of overtly involved lymph nodes rather than the micrometastatic nodes negatively affects survival in patients with EC. In another hand, lymph nodes stationed near primary tumors also receive considerable incidental irradiation doses that may contribute to the elimination of subclinical lesions. These data indicate that an irradiation volume covering only the gross tumor is appropriate. When using ENI or IFRT, very few patients experience solitary regional node failure and out-of-field lymph node failure is not common. Primary tumor recurrence and distant metastases, rather than regional lymph node failure, affect the overall survival in patients with EC. The available evidence indicates that the use of ENI seems to prevent or delay regional nodal relapse rather than improve survival. In a word, these data suggest that IFRT is feasible in EC patients.

  19. Results of a Prospective Study of High-Dose or Conventional Anthracycline-Cyclophosphamide Regimen Plus Radiotherapy for Localized Adult Non-Hodgkin’s Primary Bone Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmidt-Tanguy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Primary bone lymphoma (PBL is a rare entity that has only been reviewed in one prospective and small retrospective studies, from which it is difficult to establish treatment guidelines. We prospectively evaluated high-dose or conventional anthracycline-cyclophosphamide dose and radiotherapy for PBL. Patients and Methods. The GOELAMS prospective multicenter study (1986–1998 enrolled adults with localized high-grade PBL according to age and performance status (PS. Patients <60 years received a high-dose CHOP regimen (VCAP and those ≥60 years a conventional anthracycline-cyclophosphamide regimen (VCEP-bleomycin; all received intrathecal chemotherapy and local radiotherapy. Results. Among the 26 patients included (VCAP: 19; VCEP-bleomycin: 7, 39% had poor PS ≥2. With a median follow-up of 8 years, overall survival, event-free survival, and relapse-free survival were 64%, 62%, and 65%, respectively, with no significant difference between treatment groups. Poor PS was significantly associated with shorter OS and EFS. Conclusions. Our results confirm the efficacy of our age-based therapeutic strategy. High-doses anthracycline-cyclophosphamide did not improve the outcome. VCEP-bleomycin is effective and well tolerated for old patients. The intensification must be considered for patients with PS ≥2, a poor prognostic factor.

  20. Comparison of RapidArc plans and fixed field intensity modulated radiotherapy planning in cervical cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiangyu; Liu Xianfeng; He Ya'nan; Yin Wenjuan; Wu Yongzhong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the advantages and disadvantages between the RapidArc plans and fixed-field IMRT plan (IMRT). Methods: Ten cases of cervical cancer,aged 55 (36-70), who were to receive post-operative radiotherapy were selected randomly. Single arc (Arc 1), two arcs (Arc 2), and three arc (Arc 3) RapidArc plans and fixed-field IMRT plan were designed respectively in the Eclipse 8.6 planning system. The designing, treatment time, target area, and dose distribution of organs at risk by these 4 planning techniques were compared. Results: The values of average planned treatment time by the Arc 1, Arc 2, and Arc 3 ten cases was 98, 155, 185, and 46 min, respectively. The values of average treatment time in the Varian IX accelerator were 2.15, 3.32, 4.48, and 6.95 min, respectively. The average mean doses were (48.99±1.08),(49.40±0.51), (49.51±0.62), and (48.65±0.92) Gy, respectively. The values of homogeneity index (HI) of target were 1.11±0.07, 1.07±0.02, 1.06±0.02, and 1.12±0.05, respectively. The values of conformal index (CI) of target were 0.73±0.13, 0.87±0.06, 0.87±0.06, and 0.79±0.06, respectively. The doses at rectum, bladder, and small intestine calculated by IMRT plan were the lowest, and the doses at the femoral neck calculated by these 4 plans were similar. Conclusions: The RapidArc plan is superior in dose distribution at target, HI, CI, and treatment time to IMRT, but IMRT plan is superior to RapidArc in planned dose calculation time and protection of organs at risk. However, in general, the RapidArc plan is better in clinical application than IMRT plan. (authors)

  1. Determination of two- and three-dimensional radiation fields for neutron radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    The thesis deals with the computerized investigations for fast neutron radiotherapy planning, explaining the calculation and modelling of local dose distributions in patients as a result of mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields. For a computed irradiation program (elaborated for instance by the COMRAD program system), dose distribution functions are required for the simulation of multi-field or moving beam irradiations, the functions being derived semi-empirically by non-linear regression. The necessary data on stationary field doses are derived by measurements or by computed simulation with specific transport programs from the nuclear engineering sector. Transport calculations show the effects of inhomogeneities in the patient's body on the dose distribution. The determined, strong inhomogneity effects (lungs, head) have to be taken into account as precisely as possible in order to achieve optimum irradiation planning. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Supplemental computational phantoms to estimate out-of-field absorbed dose in photon radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Kyle J.; Tannous, Jaad; Nabha, Racile; Feghali, Joelle Ann; Ayoub, Zeina; Jalbout, Wassim; Youssef, Bassem; Taddei, Phillip J.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a straightforward method of supplementing patient anatomy and estimating out-of-field absorbed dose for a cohort of pediatric radiotherapy patients with limited recorded anatomy. A cohort of nine children, aged 2-14 years, who received 3D conformal radiotherapy for low-grade localized brain tumors (LBTs), were randomly selected for this study. The extent of these patients’ computed tomography simulation image sets were cranial only. To approximate their missing anatomy, we supplemented the LBT patients’ image sets with computed tomography images of patients in a previous study with larger extents of matched sex, height, and mass and for whom contours of organs at risk for radiogenic cancer had already been delineated. Rigid fusion was performed between the LBT patients’ data and that of the supplemental computational phantoms using commercial software and in-house codes. In-field dose was calculated with a clinically commissioned treatment planning system, and out-of-field dose was estimated with a previously developed analytical model that was re-fit with parameters based on new measurements for intracranial radiotherapy. Mean doses greater than 1 Gy were found in the red bone marrow, remainder, thyroid, and skin of the patients in this study. Mean organ doses between 150 mGy and 1 Gy were observed in the breast tissue of the girls and lungs of all patients. Distant organs, i.e. prostate, bladder, uterus, and colon, received mean organ doses less than 150 mGy. The mean organ doses of the younger, smaller LBT patients (0-4 years old) were a factor of 2.4 greater than those of the older, larger patients (8-12 years old). Our findings demonstrated the feasibility of a straightforward method of applying supplemental computational phantoms and dose-calculation models to estimate absorbed dose for a set of children of various ages who received radiotherapy and for whom anatomies were largely missing in their original

  3. Efficient CT simulation of the four-field technique for conformal radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Waterman, Frank M.; Croce, Raymond J.; Corn, Benjamin; Suntharalingam, Nagalingam; Curran, Walter J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma relies on contouring of individual CT slices for target and normal tissue localization. This process can be very time consuming. In the present report, we describe a method to more efficiently localize pelvic anatomy directly from digital reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Materials and Methods: Ten patients with prostate carcinoma underwent CT simulation (the spiral mode at 3 mm separation) for conformal four-field 'box' radiotherapy. The bulbous urethra and bladder were opacified with iodinated contrast media. On lateral and anteroposterior DRRs, the volume of interest (VOI) was restricted to 1.0-1.5 cm tissue thickness to optimize digital radiograph reconstruction of the prostate and seminal vesicles. By removing unessential voxel elements, this method provided direct visualization of those structures. For comparison, the targets of each patient were also obtained by contouring CT axial slices. Results: The method was successfully performed if the target structures were readily visualized and geometrically corresponded to those generated by contouring axial images. The targets in 9 of 10 patients were reliable representations of the CT-contoured volumes. One patient had 18 mm variation due to the lack of bladder opacification. Using VOIs to generate thin tissue DRRs, the time required for target and normal tissue localization was on the average less than 5 min. Conclusion: In CT simulation of the four-field irradiation technique for prostate carcinoma, thin-tissue DRRs allowed for efficient and accurate target localization without requiring individual axial image contouring. This method may facilitate positioning of the beam isocenter and provide reliable conformal radiotherapy

  4. Geometric accuracy of field alignment in fractionated stereotactic conformal radiotherapy of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kortmann, Rolf D.; Becker, Gerd; Perelmouter, Jury; Buchgeister, Markus; Meisner, Christoph; Bamberg, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of field alignment in patients undergoing three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy of brain tumors, and to evaluate the impact on the definition of planning target volume and control procedures. Methods and Materials: Geometric accuracy was analyzed in 20 patients undergoing fractionated stereotactic conformal radiotherapy for brain tumors. Rigid head fixation was achieved by using cast material. Transfer of stereotactic coordinates was performed by an external positioning device. The accuracy during treatment planning was quantitatively assessed by using repeated computed tomography (CT) examinations in treatment position (reproducibility of isocenter). Linear discrepancies were measured between treatment plan and CT examination. In addition, for each patient, a series of 20 verifications were taken in orthogonal projections. Linear discrepancies were measured between first and all subsequent verifications (accuracy during treatment delivery). Results: For the total group of patients, the distribution of deviations during treatment setup showed mean values between -0.3-1.2 mm, with standard deviations (SD) of 1.3-2.0 mm. During treatment delivery, the distribution of deviations revealed mean values between 0.7-0.8 mm, with SDs of 0.5-0.6 mm, respectively. For all patients, deviations for the transition to the treatment machine were similar to deviations during subsequent treatment delivery, with 95% of all absolute deviations between less than 2.8 and 4.6 mm. Conclusion: Random fluctuations of field displacements during treatment planning and delivery prevail. Therefore, our quantitative data should be considered when prescribing the safety margins of the planning target volume. Repeated CT examination are useful to detect operator errors and large random or systematic deviations before start of treatment. Control procedures during treatment delivery appear to be of limited importance. In addition, our findings should help to

  5. A comparison of ground beetle assemblages (Coleoptera: Carabidae in conventionally and ecologically managed alfalfa fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kolařík

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available From 2007-2011, the occurrence of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae was studied using emergence traps in two differently managed alfalfa fields in the Czech Republic - a conventional and an ecological production system. In total, 784 specimens of ground beetles representing 58 species were trapped in these two alfalfa fields in South Moravia. A slightly higher number of specimens were trapped in the conventionally managed than in the ecological alfalfa stand (404 vs 380, respectively. In the conventionally managed alfalfa stand, the number of species was also higher than in the ecological stand (45 vs 40, respectively. With the exception of 2007 and 2009, Simpson’s indices of diversity were higher in the conventional stand than in the ecological in all study years. Shannon’s index was higher in the conventional alfalfa field in 2008, 2009, and 2011. Regarding distribution, species classified into group E (i.e., those without special demands on the type and quality of their habitat dominated in both types of management throughout the experimental period. The incidence of species classified into group R (i.e., those with narrow ecological amplitude was very low; i.e., only four species. These ground beetle species are included in the Red List of Threatened Species of the Czech Republic, and all of them (i.e. Acupalpus suturalis, Calosoma auropunctatum, Cicindela germanica and Ophonus cribricollis are listed as vulnerable.

  6. Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W

    2008-02-21

    Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems.

  7. Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W

    2008-01-01

    Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems

  8. DO WE STILL NEED A CONVENTION IN THE FIELD OF HARMONISATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL LAW?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Korzhevskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper critically discusses the opinion of certain scholars that the use of multilateral treaties (conventions in the field of harmonisation of international commercial law has been in a state of steady decline. They believe that traditional treaty law has been gradually replaced in recent years by softer methods of making international law, such as the use of restatements and model laws. Some scholars even claim that treaty law is dead or dying. The work assesses whether this view has reasonable grounds, providing an overview of the most prominent hard law and soft law harmonising instruments and outlining issues relating to the success of conventions, their advantages, drawbacks and tensions arising in this area. The paper suggests that conventions remain necessary where the third party or public interest are at stake, however, further improvements are needed to make conventions more successful instruments in international commercial law.

  9. Feasibility and efficacy of helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer in comparison with conventionally fractionated 3D-CRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian; Huang, Yan; Chen, Yixing; Shi, Shiming; Ye, Luxi; Hu, Yong; Zhang, Jianying; Zeng, Zhaochong

    2016-05-01

    The standard treatment for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still 60 Gy in conventional fractions combined with concurrent chemotherapy; however, the resulting local controls are disappointing. The aim of this study was to compare and assess the feasibility and efficacy of hypofractionated chemoradiotherapy using helical tomotherapy (HT) with conventional fractionation as opposed to using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for stage III NSCLC. Sixty-nine patients with stage III (AJCC 7th edition) NSCLC who underwent definitive radiation treatment at our institution between July 2011 and November 2013 were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively. A dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions was delivered in the HT group (n=34), whereas 60 Gy in 30 fractions in the 3D-CRT group (n=35). Primary endpoints were toxicity, overall response rate, overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). The median follow-up period was 26.4 months. V20 (P=0.005), V30 (P=0.001), V40 (P=0.004), mean lung dose (P=0.000) and max dose of spinal cord (P=0.005) were significantly lower in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group. There was no significant difference in the incidences of acute radiation pneumonitis (RP) ≥ grade 2 between the two groups, whereas the incidences of acute radiation esophagitis ≥ grade 2 were significantly lower in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group (P=0.027). Two-year overall response rate was significantly higher in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group (P=0.015). One- and 2-year OS rates were significantly higher in the HT group (95.0% and 68.7%, respectively) than in the 3D-CRT group (85.5% and 47.6%, respectively; P=0.0236). One- and 2-year PFS rates were significantly higher in the HT group (57.8% and 26.3%, respectively) than in the 3D-CRT group (32.7% and 11.4%, respectively; P=0.0351). Univariate analysis indicated that performance status (PS), T stage and radiotherapy technique were significant prognostic factors for both OS

  10. Comparison of long-term survival and toxicity of simultaneous integrated boost vs conventional fractionation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao HM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hengmin Tao,1,2 Yumei Wei,1 Wei Huang,1 Xiujuan Gai,1,2 Baosheng Li11Department of 6th Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, 2School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Jinan University-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, People’s Republic of ChinaAim: In recent years, the intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB and intensity-modulated radiotherapy with conventional fractionation (IMRT-CF have been involved in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. However, the potential clinical effects and toxicities are still controversial.Methods: Here, 107 patients with biopsy-proven locally advanced NPC between March 2004 and January 2011 were enrolled in the retrospective study. Among them, 54 patients received IMRT-SIB, and 53 patients received IMRT-CF. Subsequently, overall survival (OS, 5-year progression-free survival (PFS, 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS, and relevant toxicities were analyzed.Results: In the present study, all patients completed the treatment, and the overall median follow-up time was 80 months (range: 8–126 months. The 5-year OS analysis revealed no significant difference between the IMRT-SIB and IMRT-CF groups (80.9% vs 80.5%, P=0.568. In addition, there were also no significant between-group differences in 5-year PFS (73.3% vs 74.4%, P=0.773 and 5-year LRFS (88.1% vs 90.8%, P=0.903. Notably, the dose to critical organs (spinal cord, brainstem, and parotid gland in patients treated by IMRT-CF was significantly lower than that in patients treated by IMRT-SIB (all P<0.05.Conclusion: Both IMRT-SIB and IMRT-CF techniques are effective in treating locally advanced NPC, with similar OS, PFS, and LRFS. However, IMRT-CF has more advantages than IMRT-SIB in protecting spinal cord, brainstem, and parotid gland from acute and late toxicities, such as xerostomia. Further prospective study is warranted to confirm our findings.Keywords: intensity

  11. Comparison of curricula in radiation technology in the field of radiotherapy in selected European Union countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janaszczyk, A.; Bogusz-Czerniewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Radiation technology is a discipline of medical science which deals with diagnostics, imaging and radiotherapy, that is treatment by ionizing radiation. Aim: To present and compare the existing curricula of radiation technology in selected EU countries. Materials and methods: The research work done for the purpose of the comparative analysis was based on the methods of diagnostic test and document analysis. Results: The comparison of curricula in selected countries, namely Austria, France, the Netherlands and Poland, showed that admission criteria to radiation technology courses are varied and depend on regulations of respective Ministries of Health. The most restrictive conditions, including written tests in biology, chemistry and physics, and psychometric test, are those in France. Contents of basic and specialist subject groups are very similar in all the countries. The difference is in the number of ECT points assigned to particular subjects and the number of course hours offered. The longest practical training is provided in the Netherlands and the shortest one in Poland. The duration of studies in the Netherlands is 4 years, while in Poland it is 3 years. Austria is the only country to offer extra practical training in quality management. Conclusion: Graduates in the compared EU countries have similar level of qualifications in the fields of operation of radiological equipment, radiotherapy, nuclear medicine, foreign language and specialist terminology in the field of medical and physical sciences, general knowledge of medical and physical sciences, and detailed knowledge of radiation technology. (authors)

  12. Testicular function after radiotherapy to inverted 'Y' field for malignant lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbjoernsen, G.; Molne, K.; Klepp, O.; Aakvaag, A.

    1976-01-01

    Testicular function was estimated by sperm counts, hormone assays and recording of reported conceptions in 9 patients irradiated for malignant lymphoma. The treatment had been an inverted 'Y' field including the inguinal regions with, in addition, a mantle field in 8 patients. Azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia was found in all but 1 patient, and the FSH levels were uniformly elevated. Testosterone and LH were within normal limits except in 2 patients with slightly subnormal testosterone levels. 7 of the patients were married to women of fertile age, and in 3 cases the wife became pregnant and gave birth to a healthy child. The time lapses from irradiation to conception were 18, 40 and 57 months. 2 of these patients had severe oligozoospermia on examination 2 and 4 months respectively from conception. Thus fertility may possibly be underestimated by sperm counting and hormone assays after this type of radiotherapy. (author)

  13. Testicular function after radiotherapy to inverted 'Y' field for malignant lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asbjoernsen, G; Molne, K; Klepp, O; Aakvaag, A [Norske Radiumhospital, Oslo; Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway))

    1976-01-01

    Testicular function was estimated by sperm counts, hormone assays and recording of reported conceptions in 9 patients irradiated for malignant lymphoma. The treatment had been an inverted 'Y' field including the inguinal regions with, in addition, a mantle field in 8 patients. Azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia was found in all but 1 patient, and the FSH levels were uniformly elevated. Testosterone and LH were within normal limits except in 2 patients with slightly subnormal testosterone levels. 7 of the patients were married to women of fertile age, and in 3 cases the wife became pregnant and gave birth to a healthy child. The time lapses from irradiation to conception were 18, 40 and 57 months. 2 of these patients had severe oligozoospermia on examination 2 and 4 months respectively from conception. Thus fertility may possibly be underestimated by sperm counting and hormone assays after this type of radiotherapy.

  14. Measurement of Thyroid Dose by TLD arising from Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients from Supraclavicular Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhood B.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading global cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a significant role in treatment of breast cancer and reduces locoregional recurrence and eventually improves survival. The treatment fields applied for breast cancer treatment include: tangential, axillary, supraclavicular and internal mammary fields. Objective: In the present study, due to the presence of sensitive organ such as thyroid inside the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose and its effective factors were investigated. Materials and Methods: Thyroid dose of 31 female patients of breast cancer with involved supraclavicular lymph nodes which had undergone radiotherapy were measured. For each patient, three TLD-100 chips were placed on their thyroid gland surface, and thyroid doses of patients were measured. The variables of the study include shield shape, the time of patient’s setup, the technologists’ experience and qualification. Finally, the results were analyzed by ANOVA test using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: The average age of the patients was 46±10 years. The average of thyroid dose of the patients was 140±45 mGy (ranged 288.2 and 80.8 in single fraction. There was a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and shield shape. There was also a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and the patient’s setup time. Conclusion: Beside organ at risk such as thyroid which is in the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose possibility should be reduced. For solving this problem, an appropriate shield shape, the appropriate time of the patient’s setup, etc. could be considered.

  15. Poster - 21: Verification of Monitor Unit Calculations for Breast Field-In-Field Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosztyla, Robert; Pierce, Greg; Ploquin, Nicolas; Roumeliotis, Michael; Schinkel, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the source of systematic monitor unit (MU) calculation discrepancies between RadCalc and Eclipse treatment planning software for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy field-in-field breast treatments. Methods: Data were reviewed for 28 patients treated with a field-in-field breast technique with MU calculations from RadCalc that were larger than MU calculations from Eclipse for at least one field. The distance of the calculation point from the jaws was measured in each field’s beam’s-eye-view and compared with the percentage difference in MU (%ΔMU) between RadCalc and Eclipse. 10×10, 17×13 and 20×20 cm 2 beam profiles were measured using the Profiler 2 diode array for 6-MV photon beams and compared with profiles calculated with Eclipse and RadCalc using a gamma analysis (3%, 3 mm). Results: The mean %ΔMU was 1.3%±0.3%. There was a statistically-significant correlation between %ΔMU and the distance of the calculation point from the Y jaw (r=−0.43, p<0.001). RadCalc profiles differed from measured profiles, especially near the jaws. The gamma pass rate for 6-MV fields of 17×13 cm 2 field size was 95%±1% for Eclipse-generated profiles and 53%±20% for RadCalc-generated profiles (p=0.01). Conclusions: Calculations using RadCalc for field-in-field breast plans resulted in MUs that were larger than expected from previous clinical experience with wedged plans with calculation points far from the jaws due to the position of the calculation point near the jaws in the beam’s-eye-view of each field.

  16. Poster - 21: Verification of Monitor Unit Calculations for Breast Field-In-Field Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosztyla, Robert; Pierce, Greg; Ploquin, Nicolas; Roumeliotis, Michael; Schinkel, Colleen [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the source of systematic monitor unit (MU) calculation discrepancies between RadCalc and Eclipse treatment planning software for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy field-in-field breast treatments. Methods: Data were reviewed for 28 patients treated with a field-in-field breast technique with MU calculations from RadCalc that were larger than MU calculations from Eclipse for at least one field. The distance of the calculation point from the jaws was measured in each field’s beam’s-eye-view and compared with the percentage difference in MU (%ΔMU) between RadCalc and Eclipse. 10×10, 17×13 and 20×20 cm{sup 2} beam profiles were measured using the Profiler 2 diode array for 6-MV photon beams and compared with profiles calculated with Eclipse and RadCalc using a gamma analysis (3%, 3 mm). Results: The mean %ΔMU was 1.3%±0.3%. There was a statistically-significant correlation between %ΔMU and the distance of the calculation point from the Y jaw (r=−0.43, p<0.001). RadCalc profiles differed from measured profiles, especially near the jaws. The gamma pass rate for 6-MV fields of 17×13 cm{sup 2} field size was 95%±1% for Eclipse-generated profiles and 53%±20% for RadCalc-generated profiles (p=0.01). Conclusions: Calculations using RadCalc for field-in-field breast plans resulted in MUs that were larger than expected from previous clinical experience with wedged plans with calculation points far from the jaws due to the position of the calculation point near the jaws in the beam’s-eye-view of each field.

  17. Less gastrointestinal toxicity after adjuvant radiotherapy on a small pelvic field compared to a standard pelvic field in patients with endometrial carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Renske A.; Pras, Elisabeth; Boezen, H. Marike; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Mourits, Marian J. E.; Arts, Henriette J. G.; Aalders, Jan G.; Slot, Annerie; Timmer, Paul R.; Hollema, Harry; Nijman, Hans W.

    Objective: Radiotherapy is associated with short-term and long-term morbidity. This study compared toxicity rates among patients with endometrial carcinoma (EC) treated with adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on a small pelvic field (SmPF) in comparison with a standard pelvic field

  18. Comparison of static conformal field with multiple noncoplanar arc techniques for stereotactic radiosurgery or stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Kuchnir, Franca T.; Sweeney, Patrick; Rubin, Steven J.; Dujovny, Manuel; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Chen, George T. Y.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Compare the use of static conformal fields with the use of multiple noncoplanar arcs for stereotactic radiosurgery or stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of intracranial lesions. Evaluate the efficacy of these treatment techniques to deliver dose distributions comparable to those considered acceptable in current radiotherapy practice. Methods and Materials: A previously treated radiosurgery case of a patient presenting with an irregularly shaped intracranial lesion was selected. Using a three-dimensional (3D) treatment-planning system, treatment plans using a single isocenter multiple noncoplanar arc technique and multiple noncoplanar conformal static fields were generated. Isodose distributions and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were computed for each treatment plan. We required that the 80% (of maximum dose) isodose surface enclose the target volume for all treatment plans. The prescription isodose was set equal to the minimum target isodose. The DVHs were analyzed to evaluate and compare the different treatment plans. Results: The dose distribution in the target volume becomes more uniform as the number of conformal fields increases. The volume of normal tissue receiving low doses (> 10% of prescription isodose) increases as the number of static fields increases. The single isocenter multiple arc plan treats the greatest volume of normal tissue to low doses, approximately 1.6 times more volume than that treated by four static fields. The volume of normal tissue receiving high (> 90% of prescription isodose) and intermediate (> 50% of prescription isodose) doses decreases by 29 and 22%, respectively, as the number of static fields is increased from four to eight. Increasing the number of static fields to 12 only further reduces the high and intermediate dose volumes by 10 and 6%, respectively. The volume receiving the prescription dose is more than 3.5 times larger than the target volume for all treatment plans. Conclusions: Use of a multiple noncoplanar

  19. Conformal fields in prostate radiotherapy: A comparison between measurement, calculation and simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seied R Mahdavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of a treatment planning system (TPS for calculating the dose distribution parameters in conformal fields (CF. Dosimetric parameters of CF′s were compared between measurement, Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP4C and TPS calculation. Materials and Methods: Field analyzer water phantom was used for obtaining percentage depth dose (PDD curves and beam profiles (BP of different conformal fields. MCNP4C was used to model conformal fields dose specification factors and head of linear accelerator varian model 2100C/D. Results: Results showed that the distance to agreement (DTA and dose difference (DD of our findings were well within the acceptance criteria of 3 mm and 3%, respectively. Conclusions: According to this study it can be revealed that TPS using equivalent tissue air ratio calculation method is still convenient for dose prediction in non small conformal fields normally used in prostate radiotherapy. It was also showed that, since there is a close correlation with Monte Carlo simulation, measurements and TPS, Monte Carlo can be further confirmed for implementation and calculation dose distribution in non standard and complex conformal irradiation field for treatment planning systems.

  20. Dual Liability for Nuclear Damage in Conventions and Finnish Legislation in the Field of Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, J.

    1986-01-01

    The exception made in the 1960 Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy to the otherwise absolute channelling of liability in order to avoid conflicts with the then existing international agreements in the field of transport is briefly described. The dual liability created by this provision is studied, as well as the question whether and when the victim might prefer to base his claim on a transport agreement instead of the Paris Convention. The so-called nuclear clauses in the new agreements in the transport field are analysed. The problems caused by the absence of a nuclear clause in the Guatemala City and Montreal Protocols, amending the Warsaw Convention relating to international air carriage are noted. Finally the relationship between nuclear liability legislation and transport legislation in Finland, as well as the cases where a dual liability existed at the time of the ratification of the Paris Convention and the changes which have taken place since then are described. (NEA) [fr

  1. SU-E-P-58: Dosimetric Study of Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Knowledge-Based Radiation Therapy for Postoperation of Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y [Shandong Tumor Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Provice (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of the target volume and organs at risk(OARs) between conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy(C-IMRT) and knowledge-based radiation therapy (KBRT) plans for cervix cancer. Methods: 39 patients with cervical cancer after surgery were randomly selected, 20 patient plans were used to create the model, the other 19 cases used for comparative evaluation. All plans were designed in Eclipse system. The prescription dose was 30.6Gy, 17 fractions, OARs dose satisfied to the clinical requirement. A paired t test was used to evaluate the differences of dose-volume histograms (DVH). Results: Comparaed to C-IMRT plan, the KBRT plan target can achieve the similar target dose coverage, D98,D95,D2,HI and CI had no difference (P≥0.05). The dose of rectum, bladder and femoral heads had no significant differences(P≥0.05). The time was used to design treatment plan was significant reduced. Conclusion: This study shows that postoperative radiotherapy of cervical KBRT plans can achieve the similar target and OARs dose, but the shorter designing time.

  2. Follow-up Thallium-201 scintigraphy after mantle field radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierga, J.Y.; Girinski, T.; Henry-Amar, M.; Maunoury, C.; Valette, H.; Tchernia, G.; Desgrez, A.; Socie, G.; Cosset, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Assessment of the long-term cardiac effects of mediastinal radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease, by Thallium scintigraphy. 32 patients (14 males and 18 females) who underwent mantle field radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease were included in this study. Twenty patients received 4 fractions of 2.5 Gy per week and 12, five fraction of 2 Gy per week, delivered on alternate days. All the patients, except three, performed exercise testing electrocardiogram and Thallium-201 tomoscintigraphy. The average time interval from completion of treatment to the study was 7 years (range 3--13 years). No patients had clinical symptoms of cardiac disease. Mean age at the time of the study was 35 years (range 23--48 years). Two electrocardiograms revealed left bundle branch block and the patients were excluded from the study. Only one out of 27 exercise electrocardiograms was abnormal in a patient with mitral valve prolapse, who was also excluded from the study. Twenty-six scintigraphies were evaluable. Twenty-two (85%) were clearly abnormal with partial or complete redistribution on delayed images. The anterior region was affected in 19 of these cases (86%). Four explorations were undoubtedly normal. Coronary angiography was not performed for ethical reasons in these asymptomatic patients. Despite possible false positive tests, the high rate of abnormality (85%) in this small series is striking. These preliminary data justify larger studies and a close long-term follow-up of these patients. 24 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  3. Definition of postlumpectomy tumor bed for radiotherapy boost field planning: CT versus surgical clips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Hadassah; Prosnitz, Robert G.; Olson, John A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the location and extent of the tumor bed as defined by surgical clips and computed tomography (CT) scans, after lumpectomy, for electron boost planning as part of breast radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Planning CT images of 31 operated breasts in 30 patients who underwent lumpectomy were reviewed. One or more clips were placed in the lumpectomy cavity. Serial CT images were used to measure the depth and transverse and longitudinal dimensions. The area and geometric center of the tumor bed were defined by the clips and CT. Results: The CT and clip measurements were identical for the maximal tumor depth in 27 of 30 patients. The CT bed extended beyond the clips by 0-7 mm medially in the transverse/longitudinal extent (multiclip patients). The median distance between the geometric centers in the coronal plane for the tumor bed center was larger for patients with single clips than for those with multiple clips (p 2 . The CT bed was more readily visible in patients with a shorter interval between surgery and radiotherapy. Conclusion: The maximal depth of the tumor bed was similar using the two methods. The extent and centers of the clip-and CT-determined beds differed significantly. This may indicate an underestimation of the tumor bed as defined by clips only and justifies integration of CT information in boost field planning

  4. Radiation Field Design and Patterns of Locoregional Recurrence Following Definitive Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Susie A.; Schuster, David M.; Mister, Donna; Liu Tian; Godette, Karen; Torres, Mylin A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Locoregional control is associated with breast cancer-specific and overall survival in select women with breast cancer. Although several patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics have been shown to contribute to locoregional recurrence (LRR), studies evaluating factors related to radiotherapy (XRT) technique have been limited. We investigated the relationship between LRR location and XRT fields and dose delivered to the primary breast cancer in women experiencing subsequent locoregional relapse. Methods and Materials: We identified 21 women who were previously treated definitively with surgery and XRT for breast cancer. All patients developed biopsy-result proven LRR and presented to Emory University Hospital between 2004 and 2010 for treatment. Computed tomography (CT) simulation scans with XRT dose files for the initial breast cancer were fused with 18 F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/CT images in DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) format identifying the LRR. Each LRR was categorized as in-field, defined as ≥95% of the LRR volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed whole-breast dose; marginal, defined as LRR at the field edge and/or not receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose to ≥95% of the volume; or out-of-field, that is, LRR intentionally not treated with the original XRT plan. Results: Of the 24 identified LRRs (3 patients experienced two LRRs), 3 were in-field, 9 were marginal, and 12 were out-of-field. Two of the 3 in-field LRRs were marginal misses of the additional boost XRT dose. Out-of-field LRRs consisted of six supraclavicular and six internal mammary nodal recurrences. Conclusions: Most LRRs in our study occurred in areas not fully covered by the prescribed XRT dose or were purposely excluded from the original XRT fields. Our data suggest that XRT technique, field design, and dose play a critical role in preventing LRR in women with breast cancer.

  5. Radiobiological analysis of the field in field technique in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medel B, E.; Vasquez R, M. A. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G., E-mail: marcosalivasquez@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In vivo dosimetry was performed in 6 unilateral breast cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy in order to evaluate the dose calculated by the radiotherapy treatment planning system (Xi O, ELEKTA). Results show a maximum difference of 0.473 Gy between the dose calculated by the treatment planning system and the dose measured in vivo using solid state detectors. Based on the DVHs statistics, tumor control probability (Tcp) was obtained using the Target-Poisson model, with the following Tcp parameters: α=0.288/Gy, α{sub s}pread= 0.13 and α/β=4.9 Gy. Tcp average obtained for the Clinical Tumor Volume (Ctv) is 35.1% and for Supra Clavicle Volume (Scv) is 35.345%. Finally using Lyman model Normal Tissue Complication Probability (Ntcp) was obtained for the following endpoints: contralateral breast fibrosis, lung radiation pneumonitis and heart pericarditis. Nonetheless the Ntcp values are not high; the improvement of the Tcp based on this plan makes Ntcp for lung radiation pneumonitis reach the 100% of probability in some cases. (Author)

  6. Evaluation of compensation in breast radiotherapy: a planning study using multiple static fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, Ellen M.; Johnson, Ursula; Shentall, Glyn; Evans, Philip M.; Neal, Anthony J.; Yarnold, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: A method that uses electronic portal imaging to design intensity-modulated beams for compensation in breast radiotherapy was implemented using multiple static fields in a planning study. We present the results of the study to verify the algorithm, and to assess improvements to the dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients were imaged with computed tomography (CT) and on a treatment unit using an electronic portal imager. The portal imaging data were used to design intensity-modulated beams to give an ideal dose distribution in the breast. These beams were implemented as multiple static fields added to standard wedged tangential fields. Planning of these treatments was performed on a commercial treatment planning system (Target 2, IGE Medical Systems, Slough, U.K.) using the CT data for each patient. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis of the plans with and without multileaf collimator (MLC) compensation was carried out. This work has been used as the basis for a randomized clinical trial investigating whether improvements in dosimetry are correlated with the reduction of long-term side effects from breast radiotherapy. Results: The planning analysis showed a mean increase in target volume receiving 95-105% of prescribed dose of 7.5% (range -0.8% to 15.9%) when additional MLC compensation was applied. There was no change to the minimum dose for all 14 patient data sets. The change in the volume of breast tissue receiving over 105% of prescribed dose, when applying MLC compensation, was between -1.4% and 11.9%, with positive numbers indicating an improvement. These effects showed a correlation with breast size; the larger the breast the greater the amount of improvement. Conclusions: The method for designing compensation for breast treatments using an electronic portal imager has been verified using planning on CT data for 14 patients. An improvement was seen in planning when applying MLC compensation and this effect was greater the larger the

  7. A multicentre randomized/controlled trial of a conventional versus modestly accelerated radiotherapy in the laryngeal cancer: influence of a 1 week shortening overall time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hliniak, A.; Gwiazdowska, B.; Szutkowski, Z.; Kraszewska, E.; Kukolowicz, P.; Jarzabski, A.; Sochacka, B.; Mazurkiewicz, M.; Paprota, K.; Oliskiewicz, W.; Zadrozna, O.; Milecki, P.; Kubiak, M.; Czopkiewicz, L.; Jagas, M.; Gozdz, S.; Wieczorek, A.; Woytowicz, A.; Cisowska, B.; Magdziarz, H.; Nowakowski, S.; Kosniewski, W.; Laskosz, I.; Serafin, A.; Gradon, E.

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare in a phase III study the loco-regional control, disease-free survival and overall survival induced by an accelerated regimen (AF) as compared with conventional regimen (CF) and to analyze the early and late post-radiation morbidity in both arms. Materials and methods: Patients with age≤75, WHO 0-1, suitable for a radical course of radiotherapy T1-T3, N0, M0, stage of glottic and supraglottic laryngeal cancer were randomized to either CF: 66Gy given in 33 fractions over 45 days or AF: 66Gy given in 33 fractions over 38 days (2 fractions every Thursday). A total of 395 patients were included from 05.1995 to 12.1998. Results. Early toxicity: At the end of radiotherapy patients treated with AF complained for more severe reactions than patients treated with CF. In 8 weeks after treatment completion patients treated with AF complained only for more severe pain on swallowing (P=0.027). In 4 months after treatment completion all types of toxicity except for skin teleangiectasia (P=0.001) were similar in the two groups. Loco-regional control: comparison between CF and AF showed no difference in terms of loco-regional control (P=0.37). Conclusions: The improvement in AF in terms of loco-regional control is estimated to be 3-5% in comparison with conventional regimen and is not significant. The intensity of reactions after 4 months was similar in both arms, what suggests the possibility of further shortening of the overall time by few days or enhancing the total dose within the limits of acceptable morbidity

  8. 'Tongue-and-groove' effect in intensity modulated radiotherapy with static multileaf collimator fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Que, W; Kung, J; Dai, J

    2004-01-01

    The 'tongue-and-groove problem' in step-and-shoot delivery of intensity modulated radiotherapy is investigated. A 'tongue-and-groove' index (TGI) is introduced to quantify the 'tongue-and-groove' effect in step-and-shoot delivery. Four different types of leaf sequencing methods are compared. The sliding window method and the reducing level method use the same number of field segments to deliver the same intensity map, but the TGI is much less for the reducing level method. The leaf synchronization method of Van Santvoort and Heijmen fails in step-and-shoot delivery, but a new method inspired by the method of Van Santvoort and Heijmen is shown to eliminate 'tongue-and-groove' underdosage completely

  9. Characterization of microbial communities and fungal metabolites on field grown strawberries from organic and conventional production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birgit; Knudsen, Inge-Marie Birkedal; Andersen, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    The background levels of culturable indigenous microbial communities (microbiotas) on strawberries were examined in a field survey with four conventional and four organic growers with different production practise and geographic distribution. The microbiota on apparently healthy strawberries...... produced cyclopenol, cyclopenin, and viridicatin on the artificially infected berries, while Altemaria arborescens produced tenuazonic acid, Alternaria tenuissima produced altertoxin land altenuene, and Trichoderma spp. produced several peptaibols. In conclusion, native strawberry microbiotas are highly...

  10. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of an open low-field magnetic resonance simulator for radiotherapy treatment planning of brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B.H.; Laursen, F.J.; Logager, V.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is superior to computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy of brain tumours. In this study an open low-field MR-simulator is evaluated in order to eliminate the cost of and time spent on additional CT scanning. Materials and methods: Eleven...

  11. Direct imaging of phase objects enables conventional deconvolution in bright field light microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Noemí Hernández Candia

    Full Text Available In transmitted optical microscopy, absorption structure and phase structure of the specimen determine the three-dimensional intensity distribution of the image. The elementary impulse responses of the bright field microscope therefore consist of separate absorptive and phase components, precluding general application of linear, conventional deconvolution processing methods to improve image contrast and resolution. However, conventional deconvolution can be applied in the case of pure phase (or pure absorptive objects if the corresponding phase (or absorptive impulse responses of the microscope are known. In this work, we present direct measurements of the phase point- and line-spread functions of a high-aperture microscope operating in transmitted bright field. Polystyrene nanoparticles and microtubules (biological polymer filaments serve as the pure phase point and line objects, respectively, that are imaged with high contrast and low noise using standard microscopy plus digital image processing. Our experimental results agree with a proposed model for the response functions, and confirm previous theoretical predictions. Finally, we use the measured phase point-spread function to apply conventional deconvolution on the bright field images of living, unstained bacteria, resulting in improved definition of cell boundaries and sub-cellular features. These developments demonstrate practical application of standard restoration methods to improve imaging of phase objects such as cells in transmitted light microscopy.

  12. A comparison of optic nerve dosimetry in craniospinal radiotherapy planned and treated with conventional and intensity modulated techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rene, Nicholas J.; Brodeur, Marylene; Parker, William; Roberge, David; Freeman, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Some CNS tumours present leptomeningeal dissemination. Craniospinal radiotherapy is complex and recurrences may occur at sites of target volume underdosage. IMRT, being highly conformal to the target, could theoretically underdose the optic nerves if they are not specifically targeted leading to optic nerve recurrences. We analyzed optic nerve dosimetry when they are not specifically targeted. Materials and methods: We designed 3D-conformal and tomotherapy plans for our last five patients treated to the craniospinal axis, not including the optic nerves in the target volume. We analyzed the dose delivered to the optic nerves, to the anterior and posterior half of the optic nerves, and to a theoretical optic nerve-PTV. Results: The dose delivered to the optic nerves was similar for both plans in all patients (V95% close to 100%) except one in whom tomotherapy considerably underdosed the anterior optic nerves. The dose to the optic nerve-PTV was lower with tomotherapy in all patients. Conclusion: Despite not intentionally targeting the optic nerves, the dose to the optic nerves with IMRT was similar to 3D-conformal plans in most cases but left no margin for setup error. In individual cases the anterior half of the optic nerves could be significantly underdosed.

  13. Multileaf collimator in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeraj, M.; Robar, V.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Basic goal of radiotherapy treatment is the irradiation of a target volume while minimizing the amount of radiation absorbed in healthy tissue. Shaping the beam is an important way of minimizing the absorbed dose in healthy tissue and critical structures. Conventional collimator jaws are used for shaping a rectangular treatment field; but, as usually treatment volume is not rectangular, additional shaping is required. On a linear accelerator, lead blocks or individually made Cerroben TM blocks are attached onto the treatment head under standard collimating system. Another option is the use of multileaf collimator (MLC). Conclusions. Multileaf collimator is becoming the main tool for beam shaping on the linear accelerator. It is a simple and useful system in the preparation and performance of radiotherapy treatment. Multileaf collimators are reliable, as their manufacturers developed various mechanisms for their precision, control and reliability, together with reduction of leakage and transmission of radiation between and through the leaves. Multileaf collimator is known today as a very useful clinical system for simple field shaping, but its use is getting even more important in dynamic radiotherapy, with the leaves moving during irradiation. This enables a precise dose delivery on any part of a treated volume. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the therapy of the future, is based on the dynamic use of MLC. (author)

  14. A retrospective study of the effectiveness of hemostatic radiotherapy with conventional fractionation in patients with advanced cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nomoto S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of hemostatic radiotherapy (HRT in patients with advanced cancer. Eighteen patients with advanced cancer treated with HRT at the Fukuoka University and Kyushu Rosai Hospitals in Japan between July 2010 and February 2015 were retrospectively assessed. The hemostatic effect of tumor-related bleeding was assessed by the clinical course of bleeding, laboratory data, the endoscopic study, and the number of blood transfusion units (BTRUs for one month before and after HRT. The median follow-up time was 2.6 months (range, 0.7 to 36.2 months. The median age of the patients was 77 years (range, 51 to 93. The primary diseases with tumor-related bleeding included gastric cancer, urinary bladder cancer, gynecological cancer, prostate cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. The median overall survival time was three months, and the one year survival rate was 22.9% of all patients. The HRT regimens ranged from 30 Gy in 10 fractions to 40 Gy in 20 fractions. In all patients, the anemia grade and the number of BTRUs decreased for 1 month after RT. The percentage of patients who were diagnosed as “successful” for hemostasis was 83% (15 of 18 patients. HRT is therefore strongly suggested as effective for the control of tumor-related bleeding in patients with advanced cancer. The optimal radiation doses and fractions are controversial; however, this treatment should be offered for patients with a poor life expectancy.

  15. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy prolongs the survival of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma compared with conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy: A 10-year experience with a large cohort and long follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng-Xia; Li, Jing; Shen, Guo-Ping; Zou, Xiong; Xu, Jun-Jie; Jiang, Rou; You, Rui; Hua, Yi-Jun; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun; Hong, Ming-Huang; Chen, Ming-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the survival benefit of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy (2D-CRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) using a large cohort with long follow-up. We retrospectively analysed 7081 non-metastatic NPC patients who received curative IMRT or 2D-CRT from February 2002 to December 2011. Of the 7081 patients, 2245 (31.7%) were administered IMRT, while 4836 (68.3%) were administered 2D-CRT. At 5 years, the patients administered IMRT had significantly higher local relapse-free survival (LRFS), loco-regional relapse-free survival (LRRFS), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (95.6%, 92.5%, 82.1% and 87.4%, respectively) than those administered 2D-CRT (90.8%, 88.5%, 76.7% and 84.5%, respectively; p<0.001). The distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was higher for IMRT than 2D-CRT, with borderline significance (87.6% and 85.7%, respectively; p=0.056). However, no difference was observed between IMRT and 2D-CRT in nodal relapse-free survival (NRFS; 96.3% and 97.4%, respectively; p=0.217). Multivariate analyses showed that IMRT was an independent protective prognostic factor for LRFS, LRRFS and PFS, but not NRFS, DMFS or OS. IMRT provided an improved LRFS, LRRFS and PFS in both the early and advanced T classifications and overall stage for non-disseminated NPC compared with 2D-CRT. However, no significant advantage was observed in NRFS, DMFS or OS when IMRT was used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cranial radiotherapy guided by computed tomography with or without fields conformation in pediatric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Diego; Caussa, Lucas; Murina, Patricia; Zunino, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Many malignancies in children can be cured by radiotherapy, acute toxicity and the significant effect of delayed treatment are worrying for the patient, family and society. Therefore, the end of the pediatric radiotherapy is to maintain or improve the cure rate of cancer, diminishing the aftermath of treatment. The goal of this study is to measure differences in doses to the healthy tissue of the central nervous system with two radiotherapy techniques, both guided by computed tomography [es

  17. Functional signatures of radio-induction in sarcomas developing in the radiation field after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadj-Hamou, N.S.

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of cancers. However, exposure to ionizing radiation is a well-known risk factor for secondary cancer development. Currently, rigorous defined scientific criteria are lacking to establish if an individual tumor has a radiation-induced or a sporadic origin. The main aim of my thesis program was to identify a transcriptome signature of the ionizing radiation effects in radiation-induced cancers. The series of cancers used in this study is composed of sarcomas developing in the irradiation field of patients treated by radiotherapy for a primary cancer. Strict selection criteria (histology different from the primary cancer, latency longer than 5 years) were used to establish with a high probability the sarcomas-radiation induced origin. Their transcriptomes were compared with those from patients without irradiation history. A method of classification adapted to small series was used for the study of all the 60 collected sarcomas (34 radiation-induced and 26 sporadic). A learning set composed of 24 sarcomas from known aetiology allowed us to determine a signature of 135 genes discriminating the sarcomas according to their aetiology. The signature classified 86% of the remaining sarcomas as a function of their aetiology with an accuracy of 97%. The analysis of the genes-function shows that the radiation-induced sarcomas suffered the effects of a chronic oxidative stress mainly generated by mitochondrial dysfunctions. This study shows, for the first time, that it is possible to diagnose, at the case by case level, radiation-induced sarcomas on a rigorous scientific basis. (author)

  18. Biological-effective versus conventional dose volume histograms correlated with late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: a matched pair analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roeske John C

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether the dose-volume histograms (DVH's for the rectum and bladder constructed using biological-effective dose (BED-DVH's better correlate with late gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU toxicity after treatment with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer than conventional DVH's (C-DVH's. Methods The charts of 190 patients treated with external beam radiotherapy with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were reviewed. Six patients (3.2% were found to have RTOG grade 3 GI toxicity, and similarly 6 patients (3.2% were found to have RTOG grade 3 GU toxicity. Average late C-DVH's and BED-DVH's of the bladder and rectum were computed for these patients as well as for matched-pair control patients. For each matched pair the following measures of normalized difference in the DVH's were computed: (a δAUC = (Area Under Curve [AUC] in grade 3 patient – AUC in grade 0 patient/(AUC in grade 0 patient and (b δV60 = (Percent volume receiving = 60 Gy [V60] in grade 3 patient – V60 in grade 0 patient/(V60 in grade 0 patient. Results As expected, the grade 3 curve is to the right of and above the grade 0 curve for all four sets of average DVH's – suggesting that both the C-DVH and the BED-DVH can be used for predicting late toxicity. δAUC was higher for the BED-DVH's than for the C-DVH's – 0.27 vs 0.23 (p = 0.036 for the rectum and 0.24 vs 0.20 (p = 0.065 for the bladder. δV60 was also higher for the BED-DVH's than for the C-DVH's – 2.73 vs 1.49 for the rectum (p = 0.021 and 1.64 vs 0.71 (p = 0.021 for the bladder. Conclusions When considering well-established dosimetric endpoints used in evaluating treatment plans, BED-DVH's for the rectum and bladder correlate better with late toxicity than C-DVH's and should be considered when attempting to minimize late GI and GU toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  19. Patterns of failure after involved field radiotherapy for locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo-Jie; Li, Hong-Wei; He, Bin; Wang, Geng-Ming; Cai, Han-Fei; Duan, Shi-Miao; Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Ya-Jun; Cui, Zhen; Jiang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively analyze the patterns of failure and the treatment effects of involved-field irradiation (IFI) on patients treated with locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and to determine whether IFI is practicable in these patients. A total of 79 patients with locally advanced ESCC underwent three dimensional conformal (3D)CRT) or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using IFI or elective nodal irradiation (ENI) according to the target volume. The patterns of failure were defined as local/regional, in-field, out)of)field regional lymph node (LN) and distant failure. With a median follow)up of 32.0 months, failures were observed in 66 (83.6%) patients. The cumulative incidence of local/regional failure (55.8 vs 52.8%) and in)field regional lymph node failure (25.6 vs 19.4%) showed no statistically significant difference between the IFI and the ENI group (p=0.526 and 0.215, respectively). Out)of)field nodal relapse rate of only 7.0% was seen in the IFI group. Three)year survival rates for the ENI and IFI group were 22.2 and 18.6%, respectively (p=0.240), and 3)year distant metastasis rates were 27.8 and 32.6%, respectively (p=0.180). The lung V10, V20, V30 and mean lung dose of the ENI group were greater than those of the IFI group, while the mean lung dose and V10 had statistically significant difference. The patterns of failure and survival rates in the IFI group were similar as in the ENI group; the regional recurrence and distant metastasis are the main cause of treatment failure. IFI is feasible for locally advanced ESCC. Further investigation is needed to increase local control and decrease distant metastasis in these patients.

  20. Characterization of microbial communities and fungal metabolites on field grown strawberries from organic and conventional production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birgit; Knudsen, Inge M. B.; Andersen, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    The background levels of culturable indigenous microbial communities (microbiotas) on strawberries were examined in a field survey with four conventional and four organic growers with different production practise and geographic distribution. The microbiota on apparently healthy strawberries...... was complex including potential plant pathogens, opportunistic human pathogens, plant disease biocontrol agents and mycotoxin producers. The latter group was dominated by Penicillium spp. and Aspergillus niger was also isolated. As expected, bacteria were the most abundant and diverse group of the strawberry...... microbiota followed by yeasts and filamentous fungi. No obvious correlation between grower practice and the strawberry microbiota was observed. Differences between microbiotas on strawberries from conventional systems with up to 10 fungicide spray treatments and organic production systems were insignificant...

  1. Early mortality after radical radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer: comparison of PET-staged and conventionally staged cohorts treated at a large tertiary referral center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Manus, Michael P.; Wong, Kevin; Hicks, Rodney J.; Matthews, Jane P.; Wirth, Andrew; Ball, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: At our center, approximately 30% of radical radiotherapy (RRT) candidates become ineligible for RRT for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after positron emission tomography (PET). We hypothesized that early cancer death rates would be lower in patients receiving RRT after PET staging compared with conventionally staged patients. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts were compared. Cohort 1 consisted of all participants in an Australian randomized trial from our center given 60 Gy conventionally fractionated RRT with or without concurrent carboplatin from 1989 to 1995. Eligible patients had Stage I-III, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status 0 or 1, <10% weight loss, and had not undergone PET. Cohort 2 included all RRT candidates between November 1996 and April 1999 who received RRT after PET staging and fulfilled the above criteria for stage, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status, and weight loss. Results: Eighty and 77 eligible patients comprised the PET and non-PET groups, respectively. The PET-selected patients had significantly less weight loss; 73% and 49% of the PET and non-PET patients, respectively, received chemotherapy. The median survival was 31 months for PET patients and 16 months for non-PET patients. Mortality from NSCLC and other causes in the first year was 17% and 8% for PET patients and 32% and 4% for non-PET patients, respectively. The hazard ratio for NSCLC mortality for PET vs. non-PET patients was 0.49 (p=0.0016) on unifactorial analysis and was 0.55 (p = 0.0075) after adjusting for chemotherapy, which significantly improved survival. Conclusion: Patients selected for RRT after PET have lower early cancer mortality than those selected using conventional imaging

  2. The field size matters: low dose external beam radiotherapy for thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis : Importance of field size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Bulling, Elke; Nitsche, Mirko; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Hermann, Robert Michael

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy (RT) for thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis (rhizarthrosis). The responses of 84 patients (n = 101 joints) were analyzed 3 months after therapy (n = 65) and at 12 months (n = 27). Patients were treated with 6 fractions of 1 Gy, two times a week, with a linear accelerator. At the end of therapy, about 70 % of patients reported a response (partial remission or complete remission), 3 months later about 60 %, and 1 year after treatment 70 %. In univariate regression analysis, higher patient age and field size greater than 6 × 4 cm were associated with response to treatment, while initial increase of pain under treatment was predictive for treatment failure. Duration of RT series (more than 18 days), gender, time of symptoms before RT, stress pain or rest pain, or prior ortheses use, injections, or surgery of the joint were not associated with treatment efficacy. In multivariate regression analysis, only field size and initial pain increase were highly correlated with treatment outcome. In conclusion, RT represents a useful treatment option for patients suffering from carpometacarpal osteoarthritis. In contrast to other benign indications, a larger field size (>6 × 4 cm) seems to be more effective than smaller fields and should be evaluated in further prospective studies.

  3. A randomised trial of accelerated and conventional radiotherapy for stage III and IV squamous carcinoma of the head and neck: a Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Michael G.; Denham, James W.; Peters, Lester J.; Lamb, David S.; Spry, Nigel A.; Hindley, Andrew; Krawitz, Hedley; Hamilton, Chris; Keller, Jacqui; Tripcony, Lee; Walker, Quenten

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this randomized controlled trial were to determine whether there were differences in the disease-free survival (DFS) and toxicity between conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and a continuous 3 week accelerated radiotherapy regimen (ART) in stage III and IV squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx. Patients and methods: Patients from 14 centres throughout Australia and New Zealand were randomly assigned to either CRT, using a single 2 Gy/day to a dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions in 49 days or to ART, using 1.8 Gy twice a day to a dose of 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions in 24 days. Treatment allocation was stratified for site and stage. The accrual began in 1991 and the trial was closed in 1998 when the target of 350 patients was reached. Results: The median potential follow-up time was 53 months (range, 14-101). The DFS at 5 years was 41% (95% CI, 33-50%) for ART and 35% (95% CI, 27-43%) for CRT (P=0.323) and the hazard ratio was 0.87 in favour of ART (95% CI, 0.66-1.15). The 5-year disease-specific survival rates were 40% for CRT and 46% for ART (P=0.398) and the loco-regional control was 47% for CRT vs. 52% for ART (P=0.300). The respective hazard ratios were 0.88 (95% CI, 0.65-1.2) and 0.85 (0.62-1.16), favouring the accelerated arm. In the ART arm, confluent mucositis was more severe (94 vs. 71%; P<0.001) and peaked about 3 weeks earlier than in the CRT arm, but healing appeared complete in all cases. There were statistically significant reductions in the probability of grade 2 or greater late soft tissue effects over time in the ART arm (P<0.05), except for the mucous membrane where late effects were similar in both arms. Conclusions: Differences in DFS, disease-specific survival and loco-regional control have not been demonstrated. ART resulted in more acute mucosal toxicity, but this did not result in greater prolongation of the treatment time compared with the CRT arm. There were less late effects in the ART arm

  4. Reproduction of set-up of the fields in x-ray radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izawa, Kazuo; Hata, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Junichi; Matsugi, Shunpei; Takeshita, Masanori; Okamoto, Hideaki; Nakajima, Tadashi

    1985-01-01

    We measured the reproducibility of the field in radiotherapy by lineacgram and carried out the measurement of the following sites such as the larynx, pharynx, whole brain and the whole pelvis. The measurement points are 5 in the head and neck, and 7 in pelvis. The data of this study were obtained from 536 film sheets for 62 patients during May 1983 to September 1983 period. We used the XTL-5 localization film and Kyokko GF intensifying screen. The reproducibility error was decided with the use of the average and standard deviations. The following results were obtained: 1) The site that has the minimal error is larynx with 4.8 mm; the maximal error is whole brain with 11.2 mm; and the whole pelvis with 6 mm. 2) The fixing device is always needed at the head and neck site. 3) Using the fixing device, it was comfirmed that the reproducibility error of the field is due to arrangement of place rather than the patients movement during the treatment time. We further aim, to reduce the scattering shown by the standard deviation than the one by the average value. (author)

  5. Adjuvant radiotherapy versus observation alone for patients at risk of lymph-node field relapse after therapeutic lymphadenectomy for melanoma : a randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burmeister, Bryan H.; Henderson, Michael A.; Ainslie, Jill; Fisher, Richard; Di Iulio, Juliana; Smithers, B. Mark; Hong, Angela; Shannon, Kerwin; Scolyer, Richard A.; Carruthers, Scott; Coventry, Brendon J.; Babington, Scott; Duprat, Joao; Hoekstra, Harald J.; Thompson, John F.

    Background The use of radiotherapy after therapeutic lymphadenectomy for patients with melanoma at high risk of further lymph-node field and distant recurrence is controversial. Decisions for radiotherapy in this setting are made on the basis of retrospective, non-randomised studies. We did this

  6. Dosimetric benefit of DMLC tracking for conventional and sub-volume boosted prostate intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommer, Tobias; Falk, Marianne; Poulsen, Per R.; Keall, Paul J.; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Meidahl Petersen, Peter; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the dosimetric impact of uncompensated motion and motion compensation with dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking for prostate intensity modulated arc therapy. Two treatment approaches were investigated; a conventional approach with a uniform radiation dose to the target volume and an intraprostatic lesion (IPL) boosted approach with an increased dose to a subvolume of the prostate. The impact on plan quality of optimizations with a leaf position constraint, which limited the distance between neighbouring adjacent MLC leaves, was also investigated. Deliveries were done with and without DMLC tracking on a linear acceleration with a high-resolution MLC. A cylindrical phantom containing two orthogonal diode arrays was used for dosimetry. A motion platform reproduced six patient-derived prostate motion traces, with the average displacement ranging from 1.0 to 8.9 mm during the first 75 s. A research DMLC tracking system was used for real-time motion compensation with optical monitoring for position input. The gamma index was used for evaluation, with measurements with a static phantom or the planned dose as reference, using 2% and 2 mm gamma criteria. The average pass rate with DMLC tracking was 99.9% (range 98.7-100%, measurement as reference), whereas the pass rate for untracked deliveries decreased distinctly as the average displacement increased, with an average pass rate of 61.3% (range 32.7-99.3%). Dose-volume histograms showed that DMLC tracking maintained the planned dose distributions in the presence of motion whereas traces with >3 mm average displacement caused clear plan degradation for untracked deliveries. The dose to the rectum and bladder had an evident dependence on the motion direction and amplitude for untracked deliveries, and the dose to the rectum was slightly increased for IPL boosted plans compared to conventional plans for anterior motion with large amplitude. In conclusion, optimization using a leaf position

  7. Comparison between 3D conventional techniques, field-in-field and electronic tissue compensation for mantle fields planning; Comparacao entre tecnica 3D convencional, field-in-field e compensacao eletronica para planejamento de manto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Lais P.; Silva, Leonardo P.; Trindade, Cassia; Garcia, Paulo L.; Santos, Maira R.; Batista, Delano V.S., E-mail: pm.lais@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    External radiotherapy treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma over diaphragm region requires large radiation fields with protections applied to larynx, humerus head and lungs. The size and shape of the field, which covers different depths, make it difficult to distribute a homogeneous dose. Techniques such as field-in-field and electronic tissue compensation may be used to make dose homogeneous and compensate the obliquity from the tissue. Three types of planning were performed for diagnose of nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma: one plan with two fields, AP-PA (AP plan), another with four fields field-in- field (FF plan), and a third one with two fields and electronic tissue compensation (ETC plan). Results showed better gradient, cover of PTV and dose distribution for the ETC plan, besides the advantage from this technique of does not require protection blocks. In the meanwhile, AP and FF plans require simpler dosimetry and fewer MU. Related to the uniformity of dose distribution, AP plan showed hot areas in the neck region, FF plan showed hot areas in the shoulder region and ETC plan showed most uniform distribution without hot areas. The electronic tissue compensation is a useful tool for large and shaped fields as the mantle field, however higher MU and complex dosimetry should be taken in account. (author)

  8. 4D-CT-based target volume definition in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumours: Comparison with a conventional technique using individual margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hof, Holger; Rhein, Bernhard; Haering, Peter; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric benefit of integration of 4D-CT in the planning target volume (PTV) definition process compared to conventional PTV definition using individual margins in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumours. Material and methods: Two different PTVs were defined: PTV conv consisting of the helical-CT-based clinical target volume (CTV) enlarged isotropically for each spatial direction by the individually measured amount of motion in the 4D-CT, and PTV 4D encompassing the CTVs defined in the 4D-CT phases displaying the extremes of the tumour position. Tumour motion as well as volumetric and dosimetric differences and relations of both PTVs were evaluated. Results: Volumetric examinations revealed a significant reduction of the mean PTV by 4D-CT from 57.7 to 40.7 cm 3 (31%) (p 4D in PTV conv (r = -0.69, 90% confidence limits: -0.87 and -0.34, p = 0.007). Mean lung dose (MLD) was decreased significantly by 17% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In SBRT of lung tumours the mere use of individual margins for target volume definition cannot compensate for the additional effects that the implementation of 4D-CT phases can offer.

  9. An adaptive radiotherapy planning strategy for bladder cancer using deformation vector fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vestergaard, Anne; Kallehauge, Jesper Folsted; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Høyer, Morten; Søndergaard, Jimmi; Muren, Ludvig Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has considerable potential in treatment of bladder cancer due to large inter-fractional changes in shape and size of the target. The aim of this study was to compare our clinically applied method for plan library creation that involves manual bladder delineations (Clin-ART) with a method using the deformation vector fields (DVFs) resulting from intensity-based deformable image registrations (DVF-based ART). Materials and methods: The study included thirteen patients with urinary bladder cancer who had daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) acquired for set-up. In both ART strategies investigated, three plan selection volumes were generated using the CBCTs from the first four fractions; in Clin-ART boolean combinations of delineated bladders were used, while the DVF-based strategy applied combinations of the mean and standard deviation of patient-specific DVFs. The volume ratios (VRs) of the course-averaged PTV for the two ART strategies relative the non-adaptive PTV were calculated. Results: Both Clin-ART and DVF-based ART considerably reduced the course-averaged PTV, compared to non-adaptive RT. The VR for DVF-based ART was lower than for Clin-ART (0.65 vs. 0.73; p < 0.01). Conclusions: DVF-based ART for bladder irradiation has a considerable normal tissue sparing potential surpassing our already highly conformal clinically applied ART strategy

  10. 2nd Tuebingen radiotherapy symposium: Whole body, large field and whole skin irradiation. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebener, K.H.; Frommhold, W.

    1987-01-01

    The symposium which took place on the 11th and 12th April 1986 set itself the task of discussing three different groups of radiotherapy topics. The chief issue was whole-body irradiation prior to bone marrow transplants, in which all the therapy centres in West Germany, Austria, East Germany and German-speaking Switzerland made clinical and radiophysical contributions. The second part of the Symposium consisted mainly of talks and discussions on large-field irradiation, more precisely half-body and sequential partial body irradiation. This topic was chosen because this type of therapy is scarcely practised at all, particularly in West Germany, whereas in the United States, East Germany, Switzerland and a number of other countries it has long since become one of the established methods. The last talk at the Symposium explained clinical and radiophysical aspects of whole-skin irradiation. Here too, one was impressed by the wide diversity of the equipment and methods of irradiation used which, nevertheless, all demonstrated satisfactory practical solutions in their common aim of distributing the dose as homogeneously as possible. (orig./MG) [de

  11. An adaptive radiotherapy planning strategy for bladder cancer using deformation vector fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Anne; Kallehauge, Jesper Folsted; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Høyer, Morten; Søndergaard, Jimmi; Muren, Ludvig Paul

    2014-09-01

    Adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has considerable potential in treatment of bladder cancer due to large inter-fractional changes in shape and size of the target. The aim of this study was to compare our clinically applied method for plan library creation that involves manual bladder delineations (Clin-ART) with a method using the deformation vector fields (DVFs) resulting from intensity-based deformable image registrations (DVF-based ART). The study included thirteen patients with urinary bladder cancer who had daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) acquired for set-up. In both ART strategies investigated, three plan selection volumes were generated using the CBCTs from the first four fractions; in Clin-ART boolean combinations of delineated bladders were used, while the DVF-based strategy applied combinations of the mean and standard deviation of patient-specific DVFs. The volume ratios (VRs) of the course-averaged PTV for the two ART strategies relative the non-adaptive PTV were calculated. Both Clin-ART and DVF-based ART considerably reduced the course-averaged PTV, compared to non-adaptive RT. The VR for DVF-based ART was lower than for Clin-ART (0.65 vs. 0.73; p<0.01). DVF-based ART for bladder irradiation has a considerable normal tissue sparing potential surpassing our already highly conformal clinically applied ART strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiotherapy of ovarian epithelial cancer by total orthogonal field irradiation of the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delouche, G.; Valinta, D.; Bachelot, F.

    1981-01-01

    Isotopic intraperitoneal curietherapy by 32 P is the simplest method for irradiating the peritoneum, but it has only limited indications. This irradiation has usually to be given by the percutaneous route, but because of the size of the region to be irradiated it raises delicate problems poorly resolved by the traditional methods applied. For this reason, a particular method is suggested including, among other characteristics: 4 orthogonal fields; 2 sessions daily, irradiating one part of the abdomen in the morning and the other part in the afternoon; spreading of the doses in confirmity with current specifications; and modulation of the total dose as a function of the maximum size of the tumoral remnants. Abdominal radiotherapy is currently the method of choice in cases where lesions are in their early stages, in so far as chemotherapy, much more restrictive for the patient, has not yet demonstrated its long-term efficacy. A controlled clinical study is necessary in order to determine the most effective method [fr

  13. Predictive local receptive fields based respiratory motion tracking for motion-adaptive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yubo Wang; Tatinati, Sivanagaraja; Liyu Huang; Kim Jeong Hong; Shafiq, Ghufran; Veluvolu, Kalyana C; Khong, Andy W H

    2017-07-01

    Extracranial robotic radiotherapy employs external markers and a correlation model to trace the tumor motion caused by the respiration. The real-time tracking of tumor motion however requires a prediction model to compensate the latencies induced by the software (image data acquisition and processing) and hardware (mechanical and kinematic) limitations of the treatment system. A new prediction algorithm based on local receptive fields extreme learning machines (pLRF-ELM) is proposed for respiratory motion prediction. All the existing respiratory motion prediction methods model the non-stationary respiratory motion traces directly to predict the future values. Unlike these existing methods, the pLRF-ELM performs prediction by modeling the higher-level features obtained by mapping the raw respiratory motion into the random feature space of ELM instead of directly modeling the raw respiratory motion. The developed method is evaluated using the dataset acquired from 31 patients for two horizons in-line with the latencies of treatment systems like CyberKnife. Results showed that pLRF-ELM is superior to that of existing prediction methods. Results further highlight that the abstracted higher-level features are suitable to approximate the nonlinear and non-stationary characteristics of respiratory motion for accurate prediction.

  14. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer: how much does it really cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Yolande; Obyn, Caroline; Mertens, Anne-Sophie; Van Halewyck, Dries; Hulstaert, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Despite the lack of randomized evidence, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being accepted as superior to conventional radiotherapy for patients with T1-2N0 non-small-cell lung cancer in the periphery of the lung and unfit or unwilling to undergo surgery. To introduce SBRT in a system of coverage with evidence development, a correct financing had to be determined. A time-driven activity-based costing model for radiotherapy was developed. Resource cost calculation of all radiotherapy treatments, standard and innovative, was conducted in 10 Belgian radiotherapy centers in the second half of 2012. The average cost of lung SBRT across the 10 centers (6221&OV0556;) is in the range of the average costs of standard fractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy (5919&OV0556;) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7379&OV0556;) for lung cancer. Hypofractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy schemes are less costly (3993&OV0556; respectively 4730&OV0556;). The SBRT cost increases with the number of fractions and is highly dependent of personnel and equipment use. SBRT cost varies more by centre than conventional radiotherapy cost, reflecting different technologies, stages in the learning curve and a lack of clear guidance in this field. Time-driven activity-based costing of radiotherapy is feasible in a multicentre setup, resulting in real-life resource costs that can form the basis for correct reimbursement schemes, supporting an early yet controlled introduction of innovative radiotherapy techniques in clinical practice.

  15. A chronicle of radiotherapy, 1900-1960. Selected chapters of the German literature in the field of radiooncology. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, E.

    1992-01-01

    This is the first publication to review the history of development of radiotherapy as a method of treatment, starting with the first publications form the fields of dermatology, gynecology, surgery and internal medicine, showing the whole way up to the emergence of radiooncology as an independent field of work. The most important monographies and many other contributions published in the years from 1912 to 1925 in the journal 'Strahlentherapie und Onkologie' have been compiled in this book to illustrate the various phases of development of techniques and methods as well as of research in the field of physics, or radiobiology. (orig.) [de

  16. Energetic fitness: Field metabolic rates assessed via 3D accelerometry complement conventional fitness metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grémillet, David; Lescroël, Amelie; Ballard, Grant; Dugger, Katie M.; Massaro, Melanie; Porzig, Elizabeth L.; Ainley, David G.

    2018-01-01

    Evaluating the fitness of organisms is an essential step towards understanding their responses to environmental change. Connections between energy expenditure and fitness have been postulated for nearly a century. However, testing this premise among wild animals is constrained by difficulties in measuring energy expenditure while simultaneously monitoring conventional fitness metrics such as survival and reproductive output.We addressed this issue by exploring the functional links between field metabolic rate (FMR), body condition, sex, age and reproductive performance in a wild population.We deployed 3D accelerometers on 115 Adélie penguins Pygoscelis adeliae during four breeding seasons at one of the largest colonies of this species, Cape Crozier, on Ross Island, Antarctica. The demography of this population has been studied for the past 18 years. From accelerometry recordings, collected for birds of known age and breeding history, we determined the vector of the dynamic body acceleration (VeDBA) and used it as a proxy for FMR.This allowed us to demonstrate relationships among FMR, a breeding quality index (BQI) and body condition. Notably, we found a significant quadratic relationship between mean VeDBA during foraging and BQI for experienced breeders, and individuals in better body condition showed lower rates of energy expenditure.We conclude that using FMR as a fitness component complementary to more conventional fitness metrics will yield greater understanding of evolutionary and conservation physiology.

  17. Gene flow from GM glyphosate-tolerant to conventional soybeans under field conditions in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Yasuyuki; Matsuo, Kazuhito; Yasuda, Koji

    2006-01-01

    Natural out-crossing rates were evaluated for conventional soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivated adjacent to genetically modified (GM) glyphosate-tolerant soybeans under field conditions during a four-year period in Japan. A total of 107 846 progeny of 2772 plants harvested from conventional varieties were screened for glyphosate herbicide tolerance. The highest out-crossing rates, 0.19% in 2001 and 0.16% in 2002, were observed in adjacent rows 0.7 m from the pollen source. The highest rate in 2004 was 0.052%, which was observed at 2.1 m. No out-crossing was observed in the rows 10.5 m from the pollen source over the four-year period. The farthest distances between receptor and pollen source at which out-crossing was observed were 7 m in 2001, 2.8 m in 2002, and 3.5 m in 2004. The greatest airborne pollen density during the flowering period, determined by Durham pollen samplers located between the rows of each variety, was 0.368 grains.cm(-2).day(-1), with the average value at 0.18 grains.cm(-2).day(-1), indicating that the possibility of out-crossing by wind is minimal. Thrips species and predatory Hemiptera visited the soybean flowers more frequently during the four-year period than any other common pollinators, such as bees.

  18. Five compared with six fractions per week of conventional radiotherapy of squamous-cell carcinoma of head and neck: DAHANCA 6 and 7 randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jens; Hansen, Hanne Sand; Specht, Lena

    2003-01-01

    Although head and neck cancer can be cured by radiotherapy, the optimum treatment time for locoregional control is unclear. We aimed to find out whether shortening of treatment time by use of six instead of five radiotherapy fractions per week improves the tumour response in squamous-cell carcinoma....

  19. Evaluation of the accuracy of the calculation of irregular photon fields in a radiotherapy planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bax, D.P.; Verlinde, P.H.; Storchi, P.; Woudstra, E.; Puurunen, H.

    1995-01-01

    In the Cadplan external beam planning system, irregular fields are calculated using the pencil beam convolution model. This model uses measured PDDs, profiles, and peak scatter factor data to extract pencil beam kernels. The scatter kernel is convolved with a matrix describing the field shape to calculate the PDD of the irregular field. The boundary kernel is used in the calculation of the off-axis ratios. The field matrix used in the convolution has a value of 1 in the open parts of the field a value of zero outside the field and equals the transmission in the blocked part. The evaluation of the model was done using two test cases. Both test cases are based on a 20x20 cm 2 field. In the first case, the central part of the field is blocked by an 8x8 cm 2 block. On one side this block is connected to the field edge by another block with a width of 3 cm. In the second case, two corners of the field are blocked by an 8x8.5 cm 2 block. There is a gap of 3 cm between the two blocks. The two cases were measured in a waterphantom for open and 45 deg. wedged beams of 4 different energies. 4, 6 and 23 MV were measured on conventional accelerators using customized blocks. 25 MV was measured on a scanned beam MM50 using a multileaf collimator. For all fields PDDs, and profiles were measured centrally and at 2 or more off-axis distances. All the measured doses are relative to the normalisation dose of a 20x20 cm 2 open field at d max . The PDDs and profiles measured for the two test cases were compared to results of the calculation of the pencil beam convolution model. The profiles were compared at four depths: d max , 5, 10, and 20 cm. The difference found between measurement and calculation was within acceptable limits, making it possible to use the model in routine clinical planning

  20. MO-FG-BRA-05: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Validation of Respiratory Gating in Conventional and Hypofractionated Radiotherapy of the Lung: Effect of Dose, Dose Rate, Gating Window and Breathing Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervino, L; Soultan, D; Pettersson, N; Yock, A; Cornell, M; Aguilera, J; Murphy, J; Advani, S; Moiseenko, V [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Gill, B [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the dosimetric and radiobiological consequences from having different gating windows, dose rates, and breathing patterns in gated VMAT lung radiotherapy. Methods: A novel 3D-printed moving phantom with central high and peripheral low tracer uptake regions was 4D FDG-PET/CT-scanned using ideal, patient-specific regular, and irregular breathing patterns. A scan of the stationary phantom was obtained as a reference. Target volumes corresponding to different uptake regions were delineated. Simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) 6 MV VMAT plans were produced for conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapy, using 30–70 and 100% cycle gating scenarios. Prescribed doses were 200 cGy with SIB to 240 cGy to high uptake volume for conventional, and 800 with SIB to 900 cGy for hypofractionated plans. Dose rates of 600 MU/min (conventional and hypofractionated) and flattening filter free 1400 MU/min (hypofractionated) were used. Ion chamber measurements were performed to verify delivered doses. Vials with A549 cells placed in locations matching ion chamber measurements were irradiated using the same plans to measure clonogenic survival. Differences in survival for the different doses, dose rates, gating windows, and breathing patterns were analyzed. Results: Ion chamber measurements agreed within 3% of the planned dose, for all locations, breathing patterns and gating windows. Cell survival depended on dose alone, and not on gating window, breathing pattern, MU rate, or delivery time. The surviving fraction varied from approximately 40% at 2Gy to 1% for 9 Gy and was within statistical uncertainty relative to that observed for the stationary phantom. Conclusions: Use of gated VMAT in PET-driven SIB radiotherapy was validated using ion chamber measurements and cell survival assays for conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapy.

  1. Decreasing Temporal Lobe Dose With Five-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Treatment of Pituitary Macroadenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parhar, Preeti K.; Duckworth, Tamara; Shah, Parinda; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Narayana, Ashwatha; Formenti, Silvia C.; Shah, Jinesh N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare temporal lobe dose delivered by three pituitary macroadenoma irradiation techniques: three-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), three-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (3F IMRT), and a proposed novel alternative of five-field IMRT (5F IMRT). Methods and Materials: Computed tomography-based external beam radiotherapy planning was performed for 15 pituitary macroadenoma patients treated at New York University between 2002 and 2007 using: 3D-CRT (two lateral, one midline superior anterior oblique [SAO] beams), 3F IMRT (same beam angles), and 5F IMRT (same beam angles with additional right SAO and left SAO beams). Prescription dose was 45 Gy. Target volumes were: gross tumor volume (GTV) = macroadenoma, clinical target volume (CTV) = GTV, and planning target volume = CTV + 0.5 cm. Structure contouring was performed by two radiation oncologists guided by an expert neuroradiologist. Results: Five-field IMRT yielded significantly decreased temporal lobe dose delivery compared with 3D-CRT and 3F IMRT. Temporal lobe sparing with 5F IMRT was most pronounced at intermediate doses: mean V25Gy (% of total temporal lobe volume receiving ≥25 Gy) of 13% vs. 28% vs. 29% for right temporal lobe and 14% vs. 29% vs. 30% for left temporal lobe for 5F IMRT, 3D-CRT, and 3F IMRT, respectively (p -7 for 5F IMRT vs. 3D-CRT and 5F IMRT vs. 3F IMRT). Five-field IMRT plans did not compromise target coverage, exceed normal tissue dose constraints, or increase estimated brain integral dose. Conclusions: Five-field IMRT irradiation technique results in a statistically significant decrease in the dose to the temporal lobes and may thus help prevent neurocognitive sequelae in irradiated pituitary macroadenoma patients.

  2. Pseudomembranous colitis within radiotherapy field following concurrent chemoradiation therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen BJ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bing-Jie Shen,1 Shih-Chiang Lin,2 Pei-Wei Shueng,1,3 Yueh-Hung Chou,4 Li-Ming Tseng,5 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,6,71Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Department of Anatomical Pathology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 7Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: Development of nonantibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis has been reported in patients receiving chemotherapy. Herein, we report a case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who received concurrent chemoradiation therapy after surgery for stage III pT3N1M0 rectal cancer. After completion of the therapy, the patient presented with a 2-week history of intermittent watery diarrhea (seven to nine times per day. However, the patient was afebrile and laboratory examination revealed no evidence of leukocytosis. Computed tomography disclosed inflammation of the sigmoid colon, infiltrative changes around the anastomotic site, and edematous changes straddling the serosal surface. Colonoscopic examination revealed multiple whitish patches within the radiation field, a finding suggestive of pseudomembranous colitis. No concomitant antibiotics were used during the period of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Empirical oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 hours was administrated for 2 weeks. At the end of this treatment, stool culture was negative for Clostridium difficile. Physicians should be aware of the potential for the development of

  3. Methods for improving limited field-of-view radiotherapy reconstructions using imperfect a priori images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Olivera, Gustavo H.; Kapatoes, Jeffrey M.; Reckwerdt, Paul J.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2002-01-01

    There are many benefits to having an online CT imaging system for radiotherapy, as it helps identify changes in the patient's position and anatomy between the time of planning and treatment. However, many current online CT systems suffer from a limited field-of-view (LFOV) in that collected data do not encompass the patient's complete cross section. Reconstruction of these data sets can quantitatively distort the image values and introduce artifacts. This work explores the use of planning CT data as a priori information for improving these reconstructions. Methods are presented to incorporate this data by aligning the LFOV with the planning images and then merging the data sets in sinogram space. One alignment option is explicit fusion, producing fusion-aligned reprojection (FAR) images. For cases where explicit fusion is not viable, FAR can be implemented using the implicit fusion of normal setup error, referred to as normal-error-aligned reprojection (NEAR). These methods are evaluated for multiday patient images showing both internal and skin-surface anatomical variation. The iterative use of NEAR and FAR is also investigated, as are applications of NEAR and FAR to dose calculations and the compensation of LFOV online MVCT images with kVCT planning images. Results indicate that NEAR and FAR can utilize planning CT data as imperfect a priori information to reduce artifacts and quantitatively improve images. These benefits can also increase the accuracy of dose calculations and be used for augmenting CT images (e.g., MVCT) acquired at different energies than the planning CT

  4. Development and experimental validation of a tool to determine out-of-field dose in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessieres, I.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last two decades, many technical developments have been achieved on intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and allow a better conformation of the dose to the tumor and consequently increase the success of cancer treatments. These techniques often reduce the dose to organs at risk close to the target volume; nevertheless they increase peripheral dose levels. In this situation, the rising of the survival rate also increases the probability of secondary effects expression caused by peripheral dose deposition (second cancers for instance). Nowadays, the peripheral dose is not taken into account during the treatment planning and no reliable prediction tool exists. However it becomes crucial to consider the peripheral dose during the planning, especially for pediatric cases. Many steps of the development of an accurate and fast Monte Carlo out-of-field dose prediction tool based on the PENELOPE code have been achieved during this PhD work. To this end, we demonstrated the ability of the PENELOPE code to estimate the peripheral dose by comparing its results with reference measurements performed on two experimental configurations (metrological and pre-clinical). During this experimental work, we defined a protocol for low doses measurement with OSL dosimeters. In parallel, we highlighted the slow convergence of the code for clinical use. Consequently, we accelerated the code by implementing a new variance reduction technique called pseudo-deterministic transport which is specifically with the objective of improving calculations in areas far away from the beam. This step improved the efficiency of the peripheral doses estimation in both validation configurations (by a factor of 20) in order to reach reasonable computing times for clinical application. Optimization works must be realized in order improve the convergence of our tool and consider a final clinical use. (author) [fr

  5. A randomized trial comparing hypofractionated and conventionally fractionated three-dimensional external-beam radiotherapy for localized prostate adenocarcinoma. A report on acute toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norkus, Darius; Miller, Albert; Kurtinaitis, Juozas; Valuckas, Konstantinas Povilas [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Inst. of Oncology, Vilnius Univ. (Lithuania); Haverkamp, Uwe [Dept. of Radiology, Clemenshospital, Muenster (Germany); Popov, Sergey [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Riga Eastern Hospital, Latvian Oncology Center, Riga (Latvia); Prott, Franz-Josef [Inst. of Radiology and Radiotherapy (RNS), St. Josefs Hospital, Wiesbaden (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: to compare acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity between patient groups with localized prostate adenocarcinoma, treated with conventionally fractionated (CFRT) and hypofractionated (HFRT) three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Patients and methods: 91 patients were enrolled into a randomized study with a minimum follow-up of 3 months. 44 men in the CFRT arm were irradiated with 74 Gy in 37 fractions at 2 Gy per fraction for 7.5 weeks. 47 men in the HFRT arm were treated with 57 Gy in 17 fractions for 3.5 weeks, given as 13 fractions of 3 Gy plus four fractions of 4.5 Gy. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the prostate and the base of seminal vesicles. The CTV-to-PTV (planning target volume) margin was 8-10 mm. Study patients had portal imaging and/or simulation performed on the first fractions and repeated at least weekly. Results: no acute grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. The grade 2 GU acute toxicity proportion was significantly lower in the HFRT arm: 19.1% versus 47.7% ({chi}{sup 2}-test, p = 0.003). The grade 2 GU acute toxicity-free survival was significantly better in the HFRT arm (log-rank test, p = 0.008). The median duration of overall GI acute toxicity was shorter with HFRT: 3 compared to 6 weeks with CFRT (median test, p = 0.017). Conclusion: in this first evaluation, the HFRT schedule is feasible and induces acceptable or even lower acute toxicity compared with the toxicities in the CFRT schedule. Extended follow-up is needed to justify this fractionation schedule's safety in the long term. (orig.)

  6. SU-F-P-14: Oxygen Inhalation Should Be the Conventional Approach in the Treatment of Thoracic and Abdominal Cancer by Radiotherapy with Active Breathing Control (ABC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, G; Guo, Y; Yin, Y [Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential benefit of oxygen inhalation (OI) during radiotherapy applying an active breathing control (ABC) device, by analyzing the blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and the instantaneous heart rate (IHR) variation in breath holding with OI and oxygen non-inhalation (ONI). Methods: The 27 healthy volunteers (16 males, 11 females) who were involved in this trial were all required to hold their breath for 10 times, non-inhaling and inhaling oxygen successively. The breath-holding time (BHT), rest time (RT), SpO2 and IHR under different oxygen status were recorded and compared. Results: The volunteers were divided into two groups according to SpO2 variations in breath-holding: group A (12 cases), with less than2% decline of SpO2; group B (15 cases), with a decline that surpassed 2%, and which could reach 3–6%. The BHT of group A, without inhaling oxygen, was significantly longer than that of group B (mean 33.77s Vs 30.51s, p<0.05); and was extended by 26.6% and 27.85%, after inhaling oxygen, in groups A and B, respectively. The SpO2 decreased in all volunteers during RT with ONI, to an extent that could reach up to 6%. The IHR of all volunteers showed the fast-slow-fast variation rule, and the oxygen had little effect. More than 70% of the volunteers stated that oxygen made them feel more comfortable and were more cooperative when ABC was used. Conclusion: The SpO2 declines during breath holding and RT could not be ignored while applying ABC, oxygen inhalation should become a conventional method with lengthening BHT and shortening RT, which yielded the benefit of improving the stability and reproducibility.

  7. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation vs conventional whole-breast radiotherapy in early breast cancer: A case-control study of disease control, cosmesis, and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadasadawala Tabassum

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI using various approaches is being increasingly employed for selected women with early breast cancer (EBC. Aims: To conduct a case-control study comparing disease control, cosmesis, and complications in patients with EBC undergoing APBI using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy vs those receiving conventional whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT. Settings and Design: Women with EBC fulfilling the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS criteria were selected as ′cases′ if treated with APBI or as ′controls′ if offered WBRT during the period from May 2000 to December 2004. Materials and Methods: APBI patients were treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR to a dose of 34 Gy/10#/6-8 days. WBRT was delivered to the whole breast to a dose of 45 Gy/25# followed by tumor bed boost, either with electrons (15 Gy/6# or interstitial brachytherapy (HDR 10 Gy/1#. Results: At the median follow-up of 43.05 months in APBI and 51.08 months in WBRT there was no difference in overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS, late arm edema, and symptomatic fat necrosis between the two groups. However, APBI resulted in increase in mild breast fibrosis at the tumor bed. Telangiectasias were observed in three patients of the APBI group. The cosmetic outcome was significantly better in the APBI group as compared to the WBRT group (P = 0.003. Conclusions: This study revealed equivalent locoregional and distant disease control in the two groups. APBI offered better overall cosmetic outcome, though at the cost of a slight increase in mild breast fibrosis and telangiectasias.

  8. Superiority of conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy over helical tomotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A comparative plan analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C. [National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of). Proton Therapy Center; Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Pyo, H.; Kim, J. [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Lim, Y.K.; Kim, D.W.; Cho, K.H. [National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of). Proton Therapy Center; Kim, W.C. [Inha Univ. School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kim, H.J. [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare helical tomotherapy (HT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using a variety of dosimetric and radiobiologic indexes in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Patients and methods: A total of 20 patients with LA-NSCLC were enrolled. IMRT plans with 4-6 coplanar beams and HT plans were generated for each patient. Dose distributions and dosimetric indexes for the tumors and critical structures were computed for both plans and compared. Results: Both modalities created highly conformal plans. They did not differ in the volumes of lung exposed to > 20 Gy of radiation. The average mean lung dose, volume receiving {>=} 30 Gy, and volume receiving {>=} 10 Gy in HT planning were 18.3 Gy, 18.5%, and 57.1%, respectively, compared to 19.4 Gy, 25.4%, and 48.9%, respectively, with IMRT (p = 0.004, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001). The differences between HT and IMRT in lung volume receiving {>=} 10-20 Gy increased significantly as the planning target volume (PTV) increased. For 6 patients who had PTV greater than 700 cm{sup 3}, IMRT was superior to HT for 5 patients in terms of lung volume receiving {>=} 5-20 Gy. The integral dose to the entire thorax in HT plans was significantly higher than in IMRT plans. Conclusion: HT gave significantly better control of mean lung dose and volume receiving {>=} 30-40 Gy, whereas IMRT provided better control of the lung volume receiving {>=} 5-15 Gy and the integral dose to entire thorax. In most patients with PTV greater than 700 cm{sup 3}, IMRT was superior to HT in terms of lung volume receiving {>=} 5-20 Gy. It is therefore advised that caution should be exercised when planning LA-NSCLC using HT. (orig.)

  9. SU-F-P-14: Oxygen Inhalation Should Be the Conventional Approach in the Treatment of Thoracic and Abdominal Cancer by Radiotherapy with Active Breathing Control (ABC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, G; Guo, Y; Yin, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential benefit of oxygen inhalation (OI) during radiotherapy applying an active breathing control (ABC) device, by analyzing the blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and the instantaneous heart rate (IHR) variation in breath holding with OI and oxygen non-inhalation (ONI). Methods: The 27 healthy volunteers (16 males, 11 females) who were involved in this trial were all required to hold their breath for 10 times, non-inhaling and inhaling oxygen successively. The breath-holding time (BHT), rest time (RT), SpO2 and IHR under different oxygen status were recorded and compared. Results: The volunteers were divided into two groups according to SpO2 variations in breath-holding: group A (12 cases), with less than2% decline of SpO2; group B (15 cases), with a decline that surpassed 2%, and which could reach 3–6%. The BHT of group A, without inhaling oxygen, was significantly longer than that of group B (mean 33.77s Vs 30.51s, p<0.05); and was extended by 26.6% and 27.85%, after inhaling oxygen, in groups A and B, respectively. The SpO2 decreased in all volunteers during RT with ONI, to an extent that could reach up to 6%. The IHR of all volunteers showed the fast-slow-fast variation rule, and the oxygen had little effect. More than 70% of the volunteers stated that oxygen made them feel more comfortable and were more cooperative when ABC was used. Conclusion: The SpO2 declines during breath holding and RT could not be ignored while applying ABC, oxygen inhalation should become a conventional method with lengthening BHT and shortening RT, which yielded the benefit of improving the stability and reproducibility.

  10. Dose enhancement in radiotherapy of small lung tumors using inline magnetic fields: A Monte Carlo based planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oborn, B. M., E-mail: brad.oborn@gmail.com [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Ge, Y. [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hardcastle, N. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Metcalfe, P. E. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2500, Australia and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia); Keall, P. J. [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To report on significant dose enhancement effects caused by magnetic fields aligned parallel to 6 MV photon beam radiotherapy of small lung tumors. Findings are applicable to future inline MRI-guided radiotherapy systems. Methods: A total of eight clinical lung tumor cases were recalculated using Monte Carlo methods, and external magnetic fields of 0.5, 1.0, and 3 T were included to observe the impact on dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and gross tumor volume (GTV). Three plans were 6 MV 3D-CRT plans while 6 were 6 MV IMRT. The GTV’s ranged from 0.8 to 16 cm{sup 3}, while the PTV’s ranged from 1 to 59 cm{sup 3}. In addition, the dose changes in a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom were investigated for small beams. The central 20 cm of this phantom contained either water or lung density insert. Results: For single beams, an inline magnetic field of 1 T has a small impact in lung dose distributions by reducing the lateral scatter of secondary electrons, resulting in a small dose increase along the beam. Superposition of multiple small beams leads to significant dose enhancements. Clinically, this process occurs in the lung tissue typically surrounding the GTV, resulting in increases to the D{sub 98%} (PTV). Two isolated tumors with very small PTVs (3 and 6 cm{sup 3}) showed increases in D{sub 98%} of 23% and 22%. Larger PTVs of 13, 26, and 59 cm{sup 3} had increases of 9%, 6%, and 4%, describing a natural fall-off in enhancement with increasing PTV size. However, three PTVs bounded to the lung wall showed no significant increase, due to lack of dose enhancement in the denser PTV volume. In general, at 0.5 T, the GTV mean dose enhancement is around 60% lower than that at 1 T, while at 3 T, it is 5%–60% higher than 1 T. Conclusions: Monte Carlo methods have described significant and predictable dose enhancement effects in small lung tumor plans for 6 MV radiotherapy when an external inline magnetic field is included. Results of this study

  11. Measurement and modeling of out-of-field doses from various advanced post-mastectomy radiotherapy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Heins, David; Zhao, Xiaodong; Sanders, Mary; Zhang, Rui

    2017-12-01

    More and more advanced radiotherapy techniques have been adopted for post-mastectomy radiotherapies (PMRT). Patient dose reconstruction is challenging for these advanced techniques because they increase the low out-of-field dose area while the accuracy of out-of-field dose calculations by current commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) is poor. We aim to measure and model the out-of-field radiation doses from various advanced PMRT techniques. PMRT treatment plans for an anthropomorphic phantom were generated, including volumetric modulated arc therapy with standard and flattening-filter-free photon beams, mixed beam therapy, 4-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and tomotherapy. We measured doses in the phantom where the TPS calculated doses were lower than 5% of the prescription dose using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The TLD measurements were corrected by two additional energy correction factors, namely out-of-beam out-of-field (OBOF) correction factor K OBOF and in-beam out-of-field (IBOF) correction factor K IBOF, which were determined by separate measurements using an ion chamber and TLD. A simple analytical model was developed to predict out-of-field dose as a function of distance from the field edge for each PMRT technique. The root mean square discrepancies between measured and calculated out-of-field doses were within 0.66 cGy Gy-1 for all techniques. The IBOF doses were highly scattered and should be evaluated case by case. One can easily combine the measured out-of-field dose here with the in-field dose calculated by the local TPS to reconstruct organ doses for a specific PMRT patient if the same treatment apparatus and technique were used.

  12. Bright-field Nanoscopy: Visualizing Nano-structures with Localized Optical Contrast Using a Conventional Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suran, Swathi; Bharadwaj, Krishna; Raghavan, Srinivasan; Varma, Manoj M

    2016-04-26

    Most methods for optical visualization beyond the diffraction limit rely on fluorescence emission by molecular tags. Here, we report a method for visualization of nanostructures down to a few nanometers using a conventional bright-field microscope without requiring additional molecular tags such as fluorophores. The technique, Bright-field Nanoscopy, is based on the strong thickness dependent color of ultra-thin germanium on an optically thick gold film. We demonstrate the visualization of grain boundaries in chemical vapour deposited single layer graphene and the detection of single 40 nm Ag nanoparticles. We estimate a size detection limit of about 2 nm using this technique. In addition to visualizing nano-structures, this technique can be used to probe fluid phenomena at the nanoscale, such as transport through 2D membranes. We estimated the water transport rate through a 1 nm thick polymer film using this technique, as an illustration. Further, the technique can also be extended to study the transport of specific ions in the solution. It is anticipated that this technique will find use in applications ranging from single-nanoparticles resolved sensing to studying nanoscale fluid-solid interface phenomena.

  13. Quality control of involved field radiotherapy in the HD 13 and HD 14 trials. Report of the radiotherapy panel of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T.; Baues, C.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R.; Herfarth, K.; Lukas, P.; Pluetschow, A.; Fuchs, M.; Engert, A.; Schmidberger, H.; Staar, S.

    2017-01-01

    As part of the foundation of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) in 1978, a central radiotherapy (RT) reference centre was established to evaluate and to improve the quality of treatment. During the study generations, the quality assurance programs (QAP) were continued and adapted to the demands of each study. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the results of the fifth study generation and to compare them to the previous findings. With the start of the fourth GHSG study generation (HD10-12), a central prospective review of all diagnostic images was established to create an individual treatment plan for each early stage study patient. The quality of involved field RT was retrospectively evaluated by an expert panel of radiation oncologists. In the fifth study generation (HD13-15), the retrospective review of radiotherapy performed was refined and the results were compared with the findings of the fourth generation. The expert panel analyzed the RT planning and application of 1037 (28 %) patients (HD13 n = 465, HD14 n = 572). Simulation films were available in 85 % of cases and verification films in 87 %. RT was assessed as major violation in 46 % (HD13 = 38 %, HD14 = 52 %), minor violation in 9 % (HD13 = 9 %, HD14 = 9 %) and according to the protocol in 45 % (HD13 = 52 %, HD14 = 38 %). The value for QAP of RT within the GHSG trials is well known. Still there were several protocol violations. In the future, the QAP program has to be adapted to the requirements of ''modern RT'' in malignant lymphoma. (orig.) [de

  14. CNR considerations for rapid real-time MRI tumor tracking in radiotherapy hybrid devices: Effects of B0 field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachowicz, K.; De Zanche, N.; Yip, E.; Volotovskyy, V.; Fallone, B. G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work examines the subject of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), specifically between tumor and tissue background, and its dependence on the MRI field strength, B 0 . This examination is motivated by the recent interest and developments in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids where real-time imaging can be used to guide treatment beams. The ability to distinguish a tumor from background tissue is of primary importance in this field, and this work seeks to elucidate the complex relationship between the CNR and B 0 that is too often assumed to be purely linear. Methods: Experimentally based models of B 0 -dependant relaxation for various tumor and normal tissues from the literature were used in conjunction with signal equations for MR sequences suitable for rapid real-time imaging to develop field-dependent predictions for CNR. These CNR models were developed for liver, lung, breast, glioma, and kidney tumors for spoiled gradient-echo, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP), and single-shot half-Fourier fast spin echo sequences. Results: Due to the pattern in which the relaxation properties of tissues are found to vary over B 0 field (specifically the T 1 time), there was always an improved CNR at lower fields compared to linear dependency. Further, in some tumor sites, the CNR at lower fields was found to be comparable to, or sometimes higher than those at higher fields (i.e., bSSFP CNR for glioma, kidney, and liver tumors). Conclusions: In terms of CNR, lower B 0 fields have been shown to perform as well or better than higher fields for some tumor sites due to superior T 1 contrast. In other sites this effect was less pronounced, reversing the CNR advantage. This complex relationship between CNR and B 0 reveals both low and high magnetic fields as viable options for tumor tracking in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids.

  15. 7T MRI in focal epilepsy with unrevealing conventional field strength imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciantis, Alessio; Barba, Carmen; Tassi, Laura; Cosottini, Mirco; Tosetti, Michela; Costagli, Mauro; Bramerio, Manuela; Bartolini, Emanuele; Biagi, Laura; Cossu, Massimo; Pelliccia, Veronica; Symms, Mark R; Guerrini, Renzo

    2016-03-01

    To assess the diagnostic yield of 7T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting and characterizing structural lesions in patients with intractable focal epilepsy and unrevealing conventional (1.5 or 3T) MRI. We conducted an observational clinical imaging study on 21 patients (17 adults and 4 children) with intractable focal epilepsy, exhibiting clinical and electroencephalographic features consistent with a single seizure-onset zone (SOZ) and unrevealing conventional MRI. Patients were enrolled at two tertiary epilepsy surgery centers and imaged at 7T, including whole brain (three-dimensional [3D] T1 -weighted [T1W] fast-spoiled gradient echo (FSPGR), 3D susceptibility-weighted angiography [SWAN], 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery [FLAIR]) and targeted imaging (2D T2*-weighted dual-echo gradient-recalled echo [GRE] and 2D gray-white matter tissue border enhancement [TBE] fast spin echo inversion recovery [FSE-IR]). MRI studies at 1.5 or 3T deemed unrevealing at the referral center were reviewed by three experts in epilepsy imaging. Reviewers were provided information regarding the suspected localization of the SOZ. The same team subsequently reviewed 7T images. Agreement in imaging interpretation was reached through consensus-based discussions based on visual identification of structural abnormalities and their likely correlation with clinical and electrographic data. 7T MRI revealed structural lesions in 6 (29%) of 21 patients. The diagnostic gain in detection was obtained using GRE and FLAIR images. Four of the six patients with abnormal 7T underwent epilepsy surgery. Histopathology revealed focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) in all. In the remaining 15 patients (71%), 7T MRI remained unrevealing; 4 of the patients underwent epilepsy surgery and histopathologic evaluation revealed gliosis. 7T MRI improves detection of epileptogenic FCD that is not visible at conventional field strengths. A dedicated protocol including whole brain FLAIR and GRE images at 7T

  16. Conventional Gymnasium vs. Geodesic Field House. A Comparative Study of High School Physical Education and Assembly Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    A description is presented of the design features of a high school's geodesic dome field house. Following consideration of various design features and criteria for the physical education facility, a comprehensive analysis is given of comparative costs of a geodesic dome field house and conventional gymnasium. On the basis of the study it would…

  17. Misconception regarding conventional coupling of fields and particles in XFEL codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [Europeam XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [DESY Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Maxwell theory is usually treated in the laboratory frame under the standard time order, that is the usual light-signal clock synchronization. In contrast, particle tracking in the laboratory frame usually treats time as an independent variable. As a result, here we argue that the evolution of electron beams is usually treated according to the absolute time convention i.e. using a different time order defined by a non-standard clock synchronization procedure. This essential point has never received attention in the accelerator community. There are two possible ways of coupling fields and particles in this situation. The first, Lorentz's prerelativistic way, consists in a 'translation' of Maxwell's electrodynamics to the absolute time world-picture. The second, Einstein's way, consists in a 'translation' of particle tracking results to the electromagnetic world-picture, obeying the standard time order. Conventional particle tracking shows that the electron beam direction changes after a transverse kick, while the orientation of the microbunching phase front stays unvaried. Here we show that in the ultrarelativistic asymptotic v → c, the orientation of the planes of simultaneity, i.e. the orientation of the microbunching fronts, is always perpendicular to the electron beam velocity when the evolution of the modulated electron beam is treated under Einstein's time order. This effect allows for the production of coherent undulator radiation from a modulated electron beam in the kicked direction without suppression. We hold a recent FEL study at the LCLS as a direct experimental evidence that the microbunching wavefront indeed readjusts its direction after the electron beam is kicked by a large angle, limited only by the beamline aperture. In a previous paper we quantitatively described this result invoking the aberration of light effect, which corresponds to Lorentz's way of coupling fields and particles. The purpose of

  18. Misconception regarding conventional coupling of fields and particles in XFEL codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2016-01-01

    Maxwell theory is usually treated in the laboratory frame under the standard time order, that is the usual light-signal clock synchronization. In contrast, particle tracking in the laboratory frame usually treats time as an independent variable. As a result, here we argue that the evolution of electron beams is usually treated according to the absolute time convention i.e. using a different time order defined by a non-standard clock synchronization procedure. This essential point has never received attention in the accelerator community. There are two possible ways of coupling fields and particles in this situation. The first, Lorentz's prerelativistic way, consists in a 'translation' of Maxwell's electrodynamics to the absolute time world-picture. The second, Einstein's way, consists in a 'translation' of particle tracking results to the electromagnetic world-picture, obeying the standard time order. Conventional particle tracking shows that the electron beam direction changes after a transverse kick, while the orientation of the microbunching phase front stays unvaried. Here we show that in the ultrarelativistic asymptotic v → c, the orientation of the planes of simultaneity, i.e. the orientation of the microbunching fronts, is always perpendicular to the electron beam velocity when the evolution of the modulated electron beam is treated under Einstein's time order. This effect allows for the production of coherent undulator radiation from a modulated electron beam in the kicked direction without suppression. We hold a recent FEL study at the LCLS as a direct experimental evidence that the microbunching wavefront indeed readjusts its direction after the electron beam is kicked by a large angle, limited only by the beamline aperture. In a previous paper we quantitatively described this result invoking the aberration of light effect, which corresponds to Lorentz's way of coupling fields and particles. The purpose of

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of standard radiotherapy field borders in patients with uterine cervix cancer;Ressonancia magnetica para avaliacao dos limites dos campos classicos de radioterapia em pacientes portadoras de neoplasia maligna de colo uterino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Geison Moreira; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo, E-mail: segreto.dmed@epm.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), SP (Brazil). Unit of Radioterapy; Ribalta, Julisa Chamorro Lascasas [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Gynecology

    2010-05-15

    Objective: to evaluate, by means of magnetic resonance imaging, the standardized field borders in radiotherapy for malignant neoplasm of uterine cervix, and to determine the role of this method in the reduction of possible planning errors related to the conventional technique. Materials and methods: magnetic resonance imaging studies for planning of treatment of 51 patients with uterine cervix cancer were retrospectively analyzed. The parameters assessed were the anterior and posterior field borders on sagittal section. Results: The anterior field border was inappropriate in 20 (39.2%) patients and geographic miss was observed in 37.3% of cases in the posterior border. The inappropriateness of both field borders did not correlate with clinical parameters such as patients' age, tumor staging, histological type and degree. Conclusion: the evaluation of standardized field borders with the use of magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated high indices of inappropriateness of the lateral field borders, as well as the relevant role of magnetic resonance imaging in the radiotherapy planning for patients with uterine cervix cancer with a view to reduce the occurrence of geographic miss of the target volume. (author)

  20. Dosimetric effect of images of double field exposure and positioning in radiotherapy of breast treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez Luna, R.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Martin Martin, G.; Lopez Fernandez, A.; Caballero Perea, B.; Ludena Martinez, B.; Prados Losa, R.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to quantify the increased dose in white volume and the organ at risk in breast radiotherapy treatment, derived from portals of double-exposure images scheduled for treatment, evaluate dose reduction by passing images of single exposure and consider whether it would be wise to consider this doses in the planning process. (Author)

  1. Characteristics of the TPE reversed-field pinch plasmas in conventional and improved confinement regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakita, H.; Asai, T.; Fiksel, G.; Yagi, Y.; Frassinetti, L.; Hayase, K.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Shimada, T.; Innocente, P.; Spizzo, G.; Terranova, D.; Sato, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.

    2005-01-01

    We present the characteristics and experimental scaling laws of reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas, which are obtained from the recently established toroidal pinch experiment (TPE) database. The database contains information for approximately 1500 discharges consistently selected from four TPE RFP devices, and covers two decades of RFP experiments under conventional operating conditions at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology. We present the physics of the pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) discharges in the TPE-RX RFP device, and a comparison of the improved energy confinement time in PPCD, τ E P PCD , with τ E s caling as the reference scaling law (τ E s caling ∼ a 1.63 (I P 0.78 (I P /N) 0.33 Θ 2.97 ) in the TPE database, is attempted. The result shows that τ E P PCD agrees well with τ E s caling because of the strong pinch parameter dependence on the TPE scaling law. A potential improved confinement mode in the quasi-single-helicity (QSH) state is also investigated in TPE-RX, with respect to the operation conditions under which the QSH spontaneously appears in the core region, where a typical island structure is observed by means of soft Xray tomography. (author)

  2. Out-of-field organ doses and associated radiogenic risks from para-aortic radiotherapy for testicular seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazonakis, Michalis, E-mail: mazonak@med.uoc.gr; Berris, Theocharis; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P. O. Box 2208, 71003 Iraklion, Crete (Greece); Varveris, Charalambos; Lyraraki, Efrossyni [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital of Iraklion, 71110 Iraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to (a) calculate the radiation dose to out-of-field organs from radiotherapy for stage I testicular seminoma and (b) estimate the associated radiogenic risks. Methods: Monte Carlo methodology was employed to model radiation therapy with typical anteroposterior and posteroanterior para-aortic fields on an anthropomorphic phantom simulating an average adult. The radiation dose received by all main and remaining organs that defined by the ICRP publication 103 and excluded from the treatment volume was calculated. The effect of field dimensions on each organ dose was determined. Additional therapy simulations were generated by introducing shielding blocks to protect the kidneys from primary radiation. The gonadal dose was employed to assess the risk of heritable effects for irradiated male patients of reproductive potential. The lifetime attributable risks (LAR) of radiotherapy-induced cancer were estimated using gender- and organ-specific risk coefficients for patient ages of 20, 30, 40, and 50 years old. The risk values were compared with the respective nominal risks. Results: Para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy resulted in out-of-field organ doses of 5.0–538.6 mGy. Blocked field treatment led to a dose change up to 28%. The mean organ dose variation by increasing or decreasing the applied field dimensions was 18.7% ± 3.9% and 20.8% ± 4.5%, respectively. The out-of-field photon doses increased the lifetime intrinsic risk of developing thyroid, lung, bladder, prostate, and esophageal cancer by (0.1–1.4)%, (0.4–1.1)%, (2.5–5.4)%, (0.2–0.4)%, and (6.4–9.2)%, respectively, depending upon the patient age at exposure and the field size employed. A low risk for heritable effects of less than 0.029% was found compared with the natural incidence of these defects. Conclusions: Testicular cancer survivors are subjected to an increased risk for the induction of bladder and esophageal cancer following para-aortic radiotherapy. The

  3. Act No. 160 of 17 March 1979 containing regulations approving the Paris Convention of 29 July 1960 on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy and its Additional Protocol of 28 January 1964 as well as the Brussels Convention of 31 January 1963 supplementary to the Paris Convention and its Additional Protocol of 28 January 1964

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    By this Act the Netherlands approved the 1960 Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy, as well as the Brussels Convention of 1963 Supplementary to that Convention. This Act came into force on 28 December 1979 thus bringing into force on that date the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention in the Netherlands. (NEA) [fr

  4. Agro-environmental scheme for segetal plant conservation in Wallonia (Belgium: an assessment in conventional and organic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemoine, C.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the subject. Segetal plant species are highly threatened in arable land. They are an integral part of agricultural history and biodiversity in Western Europe. In Wallonia (southern Belgium, an agro-environmental scheme (AES has been adopted for their conservation. It consists of strips on a field margin, with at least 60% cereals in crop rotation, and proscribes spraying and fertilisation. Objectives. This paper assessed the impact of an AES on segetal species conservation. Method. In eight organic fields and six conventional fields, a vegetation survey was performed on an AES strip and on a control margin of each field. Evenness, richness, cover and species composition for both total and segetal species were compared between AES strips and their corresponding control margins. Also, a cover of pernicious weeds was considered to be a factor in the rejection of AES by farmers. Results. In conventional agriculture, species richness (total and segetal and cover (total and segetal were higher in the AES than in the respective control; however, pernicious weed cover was also enhanced. In organic fields, total species richness was higher and pernicious weed cover was lower in the AES than in the respective control. Total evenness was higher in organic than in conventional fields, due to the co-dominance of several species. Under the AES, species composition and abundance remained different between conventional and organic fields. In all cases, rare species were hardly found in our survey. Conclusions. AES promote plant diversity in both organic and conventional fields. Sowing AES strips with uncleaned seeds from well-preserved fields, or species introduction, are recommended to enhance rare species recovery.

  5. Preirradiation evaluation and technical assessment of involved-field radiotherapy using computed tomographic (CT) simulation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy for intracranial germinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Kei; Shirato, Hiroki; Sawamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Keishiro; Ikeda, Jun; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the importance of preirradiation mental and endocrinological evaluation, and the effectiveness of involved-field radiotherapy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Following etoposide and cisplatin with or without ifosfamide, 13 patients with nondisseminated disease received involved-field irradiation of 24 Gy in 12 fractions within 3 weeks and 2 patients with disseminated germinoma received 24 Gy craniospinal irradiation (CSI). CT simulation was used to cover the tumor bed. Results: Full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ) tests given at the time of the initial radiotherapy showed less than 90 in 7 of 11 patients who had tumors involving the neurohypophyseal region, but the 4 patients who had solitary pineal tumors showed higher scores. Panhypopituitarism was observed in 9 patients with tumors involving the neurohypophyseal region. All patients are alive without disease, with a median follow-up period of 40 months. No in-field relapse was noted after the involved-field radiotherapy. One patient experienced a recurrence outside of the planning target volume. Conclusion: Decline of neurocognitive and endocrine functions were often seen in patients with tumors involving the hypophyseal region, but not in patients with solitary pineal germinoma before radiotherapy. Involved-field radiotherapy using 24 Gy is effective with the help of CT simulation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy

  6. Low-Dose Involved-Field Radiotherapy as Alternative Treatment of Nodular Lymphocyte Predominance Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Rick L.M.; Girinsky, Theo; Aleman, Berthe; Henry-Amar, Michel; Boer, Jan-Paul de; Jong, Daphne de

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Nodular lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin's lymphoma is a very rare disease, characterized by an indolent clinical course, with sometimes very late relapses occurring in a minority of all patients. Considerable discussion is ongoing on the treatment of primary and relapsed disease. Patients and Methods: A group of 9 patients were irradiated to a dose of 4 Gy on involved areas only. Results: After a median follow-up of 37 months (range, 6-66), the overall response rate was 89%. Six patients had complete remission (67%), two had partial remission (22%), and one had stable disease (11%). Of 8 patients, 5 developed local relapse 9-57 months after radiotherapy. No toxicity was noted. Conclusion: In nodular lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin's lymphoma, low-dose radiotherapy provided excellent response rates and lasting remissions without significant toxicity.

  7. Localized field conformation radiotherapy combined with endocrine therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Kaizu, Toshihide; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Yoshiaki

    1999-01-01

    To improve the quality of life (QOL) of the patients with prostate cancer, we limit the radiotherapy target volume to the prostate and seminal vesicles while using endocrine therapy towards the disease outside the target volume. Radiotherapy technique was rotation conformation technique with computer-controlled multileaf collimators to the total doses of up to 66-70 Gy. Among 145 evaluable cases with the median age of 74, overall and cause-specific 5-year survival rates were 59.3% and 84.1%, respectively, and the relative survival rate of the Stage A-C cases was 100%. The two thirds (33/50) of the deaths were not of prostate cancer. The rate of severe complication was 1.4%. As for QOL, the rate of impotence was 90%, however, the patients' overall satisfaction towards the treatment was 90%. From this analysis, this combined treatment seems beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. (author)

  8. Photoneutron intensity variation with field size around radiotherapy linear accelerator 18-MeV X-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ghamdi, H.; Fazal-ur-Rehman [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: mibrahim@kfupm.edu.sa; Maalej, N. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-08-15

    In X-ray radiotherapy accelerators, neutrons are produced mainly by ({gamma},n) reaction when high energy X-rays interact with high Z materials of the linear accelerator head. These materials include the lead (Pb) used as shielding in the collimator, tungsten (W) target used for the production of X-rays and iron (Fe) in the accelerator head. These unwanted neutrons contaminate the therapeutic beam and contribute to the patient dose during the treatment of a cancer patient. Knowing the neutron distribution around the radiotherapy accelerator is therefore desired. CR-39 nuclear track detectors (NTDs) were used to study the variation of fast and thermal neutron relative intensities around an 18 MeV linear accelerator X-ray beam with the field sizes of 0, 10x10, 20x20, 30x30 and 40x40cm{sup 2}. For fast neutron detection, bare NTDs were used. For thermal neutron detection, NTDs were covered with lithium tetra borate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) converters. The NTDs were placed at different locations in the direction perpendicular to the treatment couch (transversal) and in the direction parallel to the treatment couch (longitudinal) with respect to the isocenter of the accelerator. The fast neutron relative intensity is symmetrical about the beam axis and exhibits an exponential-like drop with distance from the isocenter of the accelerator for all the field sizes. At the primary beam (isocenter), the relative fast neutron intensity is highest for 40x40cm{sup 2} field size and decreases linearly with the decrease in the field size. However, fast neutron intensities do not change significantly with beam size for the measurements outside the primary beam. The fast neutron intensity in the longitudinal direction outside the primary beam decreases linearly with the field size. The thermal neutron intensity, at any location, was found to be almost independent of the field size.

  9. Auxiliary collimating device for obtaining irradiation fields of any shape for high energy radiotherapy apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piret, P.; Fraikin, H.; Hubert, A.

    1976-01-01

    An auxiliary collimator is added to the main collimator of a radiotherapy apparatus and comprises a master-container filled with mercury and a localizing container containing a block of nonabsorbent material having a predetermined shape; means being provided for automatically positioning these containers with respect to the main collimator and for allowing the mercury to enter the localizing container when once it has taken its working position

  10. Quality control of involved field radiotherapy in the HD 13 and HD 14 trials. Report of the radiotherapy panel of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Baues, C. [University of Cologne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cologne (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, R. [University of Marburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Marburg (Germany); Herfarth, K. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Lukas, P. [University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Innsbruck (Austria); Pluetschow, A.; Fuchs, M.; Engert, A. [University of Cologne, Department of Internal Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Schmidberger, H. [University of Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mainz (Germany); Staar, S. [Bremen Mitte, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bremen (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    As part of the foundation of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) in 1978, a central radiotherapy (RT) reference centre was established to evaluate and to improve the quality of treatment. During the study generations, the quality assurance programs (QAP) were continued and adapted to the demands of each study. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the results of the fifth study generation and to compare them to the previous findings. With the start of the fourth GHSG study generation (HD10-12), a central prospective review of all diagnostic images was established to create an individual treatment plan for each early stage study patient. The quality of involved field RT was retrospectively evaluated by an expert panel of radiation oncologists. In the fifth study generation (HD13-15), the retrospective review of radiotherapy performed was refined and the results were compared with the findings of the fourth generation. The expert panel analyzed the RT planning and application of 1037 (28 %) patients (HD13 n = 465, HD14 n = 572). Simulation films were available in 85 % of cases and verification films in 87 %. RT was assessed as major violation in 46 % (HD13 = 38 %, HD14 = 52 %), minor violation in 9 % (HD13 = 9 %, HD14 = 9 %) and according to the protocol in 45 % (HD13 = 52 %, HD14 = 38 %). The value for QAP of RT within the GHSG trials is well known. Still there were several protocol violations. In the future, the QAP program has to be adapted to the requirements of ''modern RT'' in malignant lymphoma. (orig.) [German] Seit Gruendung der German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) im Jahr 1978 wurde ein zentrales Qualitaetssicherungsprogramm (QAP) der Radiotherapie (RT) etabliert, um die Qualitaet der RT sicherzustellen. Waehrend der fortlaufenden Studiengenerationen wurde dieses QAP kontinuierlich weiterentwickelt. In dieser Auswertung werden die Ergebnisse der fuenften Studiengeneration (HD13-15) praesentiert und mit frueheren Ergebnissen

  11. Validation of the total dysphagia risk score (TDRS) in head and neck cancer patients in a conventional and a partially accelerated radiotherapy scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nevens, Daan; Deschuymer, Sarah; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Daisne, Jean -Francois; Duprez, Frederic; De Neve, Wilfried; Nuyts, Sandra

    Background and purpose: A risk model, the total dysphagia risk score (TDRS), was developed to predict which patients are most at risk to develop grade >= 2 dysphagia at 6 months following radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer. The purpose of this study was to validate this model at 6 months and

  12. Comparison of onboard low-field magnetic resonance imaging versus onboard computed tomography for anatomy visualization in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Camille E; Parikh, Parag J; Spencer, Christopher R; Green, Olga L; Hu, Yanle; Mutic, Sasa; Olsen, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Onboard magnetic resonance imaging (OB-MRI) for daily localization and adaptive radiotherapy has been under development by several groups. However, no clinical studies have evaluated whether OB-MRI improves visualization of the target and organs at risk (OARs) compared to standard onboard computed tomography (OB-CT). This study compared visualization of patient anatomy on images acquired on the MRI-(60)Co ViewRay system to those acquired with OB-CT. Fourteen patients enrolled on a protocol approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and undergoing image-guided radiotherapy for cancer in the thorax (n = 2), pelvis (n = 6), abdomen (n = 3) or head and neck (n = 3) were imaged with OB-MRI and OB-CT. For each of the 14 patients, the OB-MRI and OB-CT datasets were displayed side-by-side and independently reviewed by three radiation oncologists. Each physician was asked to evaluate which dataset offered better visualization of the target and OARs. A quantitative contouring study was performed on two abdominal patients to assess if OB-MRI could offer improved inter-observer segmentation agreement for adaptive planning. In total 221 OARs and 10 targets were compared for visualization on OB-MRI and OB-CT by each of the three physicians. The majority of physicians (two or more) evaluated visualization on MRI as better for 71% of structures, worse for 10% of structures, and equivalent for 14% of structures. 5% of structures were not visible on either. Physicians agreed unanimously for 74% and in majority for > 99% of structures. Targets were better visualized on MRI in 4/10 cases, and never on OB-CT. Low-field MR provides better anatomic visualization of many radiotherapy targets and most OARs as compared to OB-CT. Further studies with OB-MRI should be pursued.

  13. Intensity modulation in breast radiotherapy: Development of an innovative field-in-field technique at Institut Gustave-Roussy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heymann, S.; Bourhis, J.; Bourgier, C.; Verstraet, R.; Pichenot, C.; Vergne, E.; Lefkopoulos, D.; Husson, F.; Kafrouni, H.; Mahe, J.; Kandalaft, B.; Marsiglia, H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - To assess the potential dosimetric gain of pre-segmentation modulated radiotherapy (OAPS, DosiSoft TM ) of breast, compared to routine 3D conformal radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Twenty patients treated with conservative surgery for breast cancer (9 right and 11 left sided) with various breast volume (median 537 cm 3 ; range [100-1049 cm 3 ]) have been selected. For each patient, we have delineated a breast volume and a compensation volume (target volumes), as well as organs at risk (lungs and heart). Two treatment plans have been generated: one using the routine 3D conformal technique and the other with the pre-segmentation algorithm of DosiSoft TM (OAPS). The dose distribution were analyzed using the conformity index for target volumes, mean dose and V 30 Gy for the heart, and mean dose, V 20 Gy and V 30 Gy for lungs. Results. - Over the 20 patients, the conformity index increased from 0.897 with routine technique to 0.978 with OAPS (P TM ) is an original method of segmentation of breast. It is automatic, fast and easy, and is able to increase the conformity index, while sparing organ at risk. (authors)

  14. Involved Node, Site, Field and Residual Volume Radiotherapy for Lymphoma: A Comparison of Organ at Risk Dosimetry and Second Malignancy Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, L; Sethugavalar, B; Robertshaw, H; Bayman, E; Thomas, E; Gilson, D; Prestwich, R J D

    2015-07-01

    Recent radiotherapy guidelines for lymphoma have included involved site radiotherapy (ISRT), involved node radiotherapy (INRT) and irradiation of residual volume after full-course chemotherapy. In the absence of late toxicity data, we aim to compare organ at risk (OAR) dose-metrics and calculated second malignancy risks. Fifteen consecutive patients who had received mediastinal radiotherapy were included. Four radiotherapy plans were generated for each patient using a parallel pair photon technique: (i) involved field radiotherapy (IFRT), (ii) ISRT, (iii) INRT, (iv) residual post-chemotherapy volume. The radiotherapy dose was 30 Gy in 15 fractions. The OARs evaluated were: breasts, lungs, thyroid, heart, oesophagus. Relative and absolute second malignancy rates were estimated using the concept of organ equivalent dose. Significance was defined as P risks of second cancers were significantly higher with IFRT compared with ISRT for lung, breast and thyroid; INRT and residual volume resulted in significantly lower relative risks compared with ISRT for lung, breast and thyroid. The median excess absolute risks of second cancers were consistently lowest for the residual technique and highest for IFRT in terms of thyroid, lung and breast cancers. The risk of oesophageal cancer was similar for all four techniques. Overall, the absolute risk of second cancers was very similar for ISRT and INRT. Decreasing treatment volumes from IFRT to ISRT, INRT or residual volume reduces radiation exposure to OARs. Second malignancy modelling suggests that this reduction in treatment volumes will lead to a reduction in absolute excess second malignancy. Little difference was observed in second malignancy risks between ISRT and INRT, supporting the use of ISRT in the absence of a pre-chemotherapy positron emission tomography scan in the radiotherapy treatment position. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Metrological legal frame in the field of the photon dosimetry of radiotherapy in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walwyn S, G.; Gutierrez L, S.; Gonzalez R, N.

    2006-01-01

    The Clinical Dosimetry in the planning of the doses to administer to patients under radiant treatment is of great importance. At the moment the clinical dosemeters its are manufactured with a high technology but errors of production or manipulation cannot be discarded that lead to errors in this planning. It also exists, a group of metrological and of operation parameters that are not checked in a routine calibration, and for those that are checked, legal base that restricts its use in cases of bad operation doesn't exist. This motivated to the Cuban standard elaboration NC 352:2005, for the verification of reference dosemeters of radiotherapy, process that trafficked for an exhaustive search and study of standards and international technical reports, selecting as base document, the standard IEC 60731:1997, for essays of approval of model of clinical dosemeters used in radiotherapy. The present article shows the main technical aspects considered and the requirements and verification methods for the declaration of aptitude of the dosemeters. This document constitutes the scientific base for the implementation from a verification service to national level and an important contribution to the standardization of the metrology of ionizing radiations of Cuba. (Author)

  16. A multipurpose hybrid conventional/scanning near-field optical microscope for applications in materials science and biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, G; Girasole, M; Pompeo, G; Generosi, R; Luce, M; Cricenti, A

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid conventional/scanning near-field optical microscope is presented. The instrument is obtained coupling an Olympus IX-70 inverted optical microscope with a SNOM head, to combine the versatility and ease of use of the conventional microscope with the high-resolution and three-dimensional reconstruction achieved by the SNOM. The head can be run in shear or tapping mode and is optimized to characterize soft, biological samples including living cells in physiological environment by including the SNOM in a cylindrical chamber that insulates it from external noise, while maintaining a controlled temperature and atmosphere

  17. The comparison of 5-field conformal radiotherapy techniques for the treatment of prostate cancer: The best for femoral head sparing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zare, Mahkameh; Lashkari, Marzieh; Ghalehtaki, Reza; Ghasemi, Arash; Dehghan Manshadi, Hamidreza; Mir, Ali; Noorollahi, Somayeh; Alamolhoda, Mahboobeh

    2016-01-01

    External radiotherapy is a standard treatment procedure for localized prostate cancer. Given the relatively high long term survival treatment complications have been brought in center of attention. In this planning study, between 2012 and 2014, CT simulation data of 90 consecutive high-risk prostate cancer patients were collected. In the first phase, all were planned for whole pelvis irradiation up to 46Gy in 23 daily fractions. In the second phase, only the prostate gland was the target of radiation. Next, the subjects were divided randomly into three groups and each received a unique 5field conformal radiation plan including Plan A (Gantry angle: 0, 60, 120, 240, and 300), Plan B (Gantry angles: 0, 90, 120, 240, and 270) and Plan C (Gantry angles: 0, 60, 90, 270, and 300). The total dose was 70Gy. For each patient, the rectum, bladder, and both femoral heads were contoured as the at risk organs (OAR). From dose volume histograms, the proportional dose of PTV V100, the bladder and rectum V80 and V90 and femoral head V50 and V100 were calculated in all subjects and compared across plans. A statistically significant difference in the femoral head V50 and V100 was found between our studied 5field plans so that in Plan A (beam angles: 0, 60, 120, 240 and 300) less dose was received by both heads of femur. This study suggests that 5 field treatment planning including an anterior, two anterior oblique and two posterior oblique portals to be more proper for 3D conformal radiotherapy in order to spare femoral head with acceptable PTV coverage, and bladder and rectal doses.

  18. The impact of involved node, involved field and mantle field radiotherapy on estimated radiation doses and risk of late effects for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M V; Jørgensen, M; Brodin, N P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of radiotherapy (RT) is debated for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) due to the late effects of treatment. Radiation doses to the thyroid, heart, lungs, and breasts are compared with the extensive mantle field (MF), Involved Field RT(IFRT), Modified IFRT (m......IFRT), and Involved Node RT (INRT) and the risk of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease, secondary cancers, and the corresponding Life Years Lost (LYL) is estimated with each technique. PROCEDURE: INRT, mIFRT, IFRT, and MF plans (20 and 30 Gy) were simulated for 10 supradiaphragmatic, clinical stage I......–II classical HL patients lung, breast, and thyroid cancer with each technique were estimated. The estimated excess risks attributable to RT were based on HL series with long-term follow...

  19. Impact of Conventional and Integrated Management Systems on the Water-Soluble Vitamin Content in Potatoes, Field Beans, and Cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Sabine; Verrall, Susan R; Pont, Simon D A; McRae, Diane; Sungurtas, Julia A; Palau, Raphaëlle; Hawes, Cathy; Alexander, Colin J; Allwood, J William; Foito, Alexandre; Stewart, Derek; Shepherd, Louise V T

    2018-01-31

    The reduction of the environmental footprint of crop production without compromising crop yield and their nutritional value is a key goal for improving the sustainability of agriculture. In 2009, the Balruddery Farm Platform was established at The James Hutton Institute as a long-term experimental platform for cross-disciplinary research of crops using two agricultural ecosystems. Crops representative of UK agriculture were grown under conventional and integrated management systems and analyzed for their water-soluble vitamin content. Integrated management, when compared with the conventional system, had only minor effects on water-soluble vitamin content, where significantly higher differences were seen for the conventional management practice on the levels of thiamine in field beans (p water-soluble vitamin content of the crops analyzed here.

  20. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} gemcitabine can be administered using limited-field radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Hideya [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; National Hospital Organization, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Nishiyama, Kinji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Eiichi [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Ioka, Tatsuya; Uehara, Hiroyuki; Iishi, Hiroyasu; Nakaizumi, Akihiko [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Internal Medicine; Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Osamu [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Surgery

    2007-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility of concurrent use of full-dose gemcitabine (GEM) and radiotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. Patient and Methods: 22 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were subjected to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (GEM 1,000 mg/m2 weekly, three times during 4 weeks). They received limited-field irradiation by three-dimensional radiotherapy planning. Results: Of the 22 patients, 16 (72%) completed the treatment (50 Gy irradiation and at least three times concurrent administration of 1 g/m{sup 2} GEM). One patient with unresectable tail cancer showed peritonitis carcinomatosa and both chemotherapy and radiotherapy had to be stopped. Dose reduction or omission of GEM was necessary in another four patients. In addition, radiotherapy was discontinued in one patient for fatigue. Grade 3 hematologic toxicity was detected in eight patients (36%), and grade 3 nonhematologic toxicity (anorexia) in one patient (5%). In total, the response rate amounted to 32% (seven partial responses), and the median survival time (MST) was 16 months. Among the twelve patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, nine underwent surgery and showed a survival rate of 78% at 1 year. Another 13 patients without surgery showed 14 months of MST. No regional lymph node failure has appeared so far. Conclusion: Limited-field radiotherapy enables the safe concurrent administration of 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} GEM.

  1. Postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Morbidity of local-only or local-plus-pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldstein, Cora; Poetter, Richard; Widder, Joachim; Goldner, Gregor; Doerr, Wolfgang

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterise actuarial incidence and prevalence of early and late side effects of local versus pelvic three-dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Based on a risk-adapted protocol, 575 patients received either local (n = 447) or local-plus-pelvic (n = 128) radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects (≥grade 2 RTOG/EORTC criteria) were prospectively assessed. Maximum morbidity, actuarial incidence rate, and prevalence rates were compared between the two groups. For local radiotherapy, median follow-up was 68 months, and the mean dose was 66.7 Gy. In pelvic radiotherapy, the median follow-up was 49 months, and the mean local and pelvic doses were 66.9 and 48.3 Gy respectively. Early GI side effects ≥ G2 were detected in 26% and 42% of patients respectively (p < 0.001). Late GI adverse events were detected in 14% in both groups (p = 0.77). The 5-year actuarial incidence rates were 14% and 14%, while the prevalence rates were 2% and 0% respectively. Early GU ≥ G2 side effects were detected in 15% and 16% (p = 0.96), while late GU morbidity was detected in 18% and 24% (p = 0.001). The 5-year actuarial incidence rates were 16% and 35% (p = 0.001), while the respective prevalence rates were 6% and 8%. Despite the low prevalence of side effects, postoperative pelvic radiotherapy results in significant increases in the actuarial incidence of early GI and late GU morbidity using a conventional 4-field box radiotherapy technique. Advanced treatment techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) should therefore be considered in pelvic radiotherapy to potentially reduce these side effects. (orig.) [de

  2. Dosimetric comparison between intensity-modulated with coplanar field and 3D conformal radiotherapy with noncoplanar field for postocular invasion tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenyong, Tu; Lu, Liu; Jun, Zeng; Weidong, Yin; Yun, Li

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a dosimetric optimization effort aiming to compare noncoplanar field (NCF) on 3 dimensions conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and coplanar field (CF) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for postocular invasion tumor. We performed a planning study on the computed tomography data of 8 consecutive patients with localized postocular invasion tumor. Four fields NCF 3D-CRT in the transverse plane with gantry angles of 0-10 degrees , 30-45 degrees , 240-270 degrees , and 310-335 degrees degrees were isocentered at the center of gravity of the target volume. The geometry of the beams was determined by beam's eye view. The same constraints were prepared with between CF IMRT optimization and NCF 3D-CRT treatment. The maximum point doses (D max) for the different optic pathway structures (OPS) with NCF 3D-CRT treatment should differ in no more than 3% from those with the NCF IMRT plan. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were obtained for all targets and organ at risk (OAR) with both treatment techniques. Plans with NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT constraints on target dose in homogeneity were computed, as well as the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) in the target volume. The PTV coverage was optimal with both NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT plans in the 8 tumor sites. No difference was noted between the two techniques for the average D(max) and D(min) dose. NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT will yield similar results on CI. However, HI was a significant difference between NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT plan (p 3D-CRT versus CF IMRT set-up is very slight. NCF3D-CRT is one of the treatment options for postocular invasion tumor. However, constraints for OARs are needed. 2010 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Biophysical analysis of the acute toxicity of radiotherapy in Hodgkin's lymphoma-a comparison between extended field and involved field radiotherapy based on the data of the German Hodgkin Study Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eich, Hans Theodor; Haverkamp, Uwe; Engert, Andreas; Kocher, Martin; Skripnitchenko, Roman; Brillant, Corinne; Sehlen, Susanne; Duehmke, Eckhart; Diehl, Volker; Mueller, Rolf-Peter

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine biophysical parameters from the complication probability data during and after radiotherapy of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), based on the number of gastrointestinal side effects that were found in the multicenter HD8 trial of the German Hodgkin Lymphoma Study Group. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 1998, 1204 patients with newly diagnosed, histology-proven HL in clinical Stages I/IIA/IIB with defined risk factors and stage IIIA without risk factors were enrolled into the multicenter HD8 study. Patients were randomized to receive two cycles of COPP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone) alternating with two cycles of ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) followed by radiotherapy (RT) of 30 Gy extended field plus 10 Gy to bulky disease (Arm A) or 30 Gy involved field plus 10 Gy to bulky disease (Arm B). For 910 patients, the rates of acute gastrointestinal side effects during and after RT could be determined. Comparison showed differences between Arms A and B (Grade 1-2: 16.6 vs. 3.9; Grade 3-4: 0.9 vs. 0.2; p 3 ), we determined the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) (V, D, m, n, TD 50 ), the biophysical parameter TD 50 , and n (volume dependent) in such a manner that the observed NTCP in Arm A in cases of supradiaphragmatic involvement only and in cases of infradiaphragmatic involvement correlated with the calculated values. Results: Of 1,204 patients randomized, 1,064 patients were informative for the comparison of study arms. The median observation time was 54 months. The overall survival for all eligible patients was 91%, and freedom from treatment failure was 83%. Survival rates at 5 years after start of RT revealed no differences in terms of freedom from treatment failure (85.8% in Arm A, 84.2% in Arm B) and overall survival (90.8% and 92.4%). There were also no differences between the two arms in terms of complete remission, progressive disease, relapse, death, and secondary neoplasias. In

  4. Effect of high-intensity pulsed electric fields processing and conventional heat treatment on orange-carrot juice carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa, Francisco; Cortés, Clara; Esteve, María J; Frígola, Ana

    2005-11-30

    Liquid chromatography (LC) was the method of choice for quantification of carotenoids (including geometrical isomers) to evaluate the effects of high-intensity pulsed electric field (HIPEF), a nonthermal preservation method, with different parameters (electric field intensities and treatment times), on an orange-carrot juice mixture (80:20, v/v). In parallel, a conventional heat treatment (98 degrees C, 21 s) was applied to the juice. HIPEF processing generally caused a significant increase in the concentrations of the carotenoids identified as treatment time increased. HIPEF treatment at 25 and 30 kV/cm provided a vitamin A concentration higher than that found in the pasteurized juice.

  5. Different rectal toxicity tolerance with and without simultaneous conventionally-fractionated pelvic lymph node treatment in patients receiving hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Andrew M; Baker, Christopher B; Popple, Richard A; Shekar, Kiran; Yang, Eddy S; Jacob, Rojymon; Cardan, Rex; Kim, Robert Y; Fiveash, John B

    2014-01-01

    To investigate added morbidity associated with the addition of pelvic elective nodal irradiation (ENI) to hypofractionated radiotherapy to the prostate. Two-hundred twelve patients, treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy to the prostate between 2004 and 2011, met the inclusion criteria for the analysis. All patients received 70 Gy to the prostate delivered over 28 fractions and 103 (49%) received ENI consisting of 50.4 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics delivered simultaneously in 1.8 Gy fractions. The mean dose-volume histograms were compared between the two subgroups defined by use of ENI, and various dose-volume parameters were analyzed for effect on late lower gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity. Acute grade 2 lower GI toxicity occurred in 38 (37%) patients receiving ENI versus 19 (17%) in those who did not (p = 0.001). The Kaplan-Meier estimate of grade ≥ 2 lower GI toxicity at 3 years was 15.3% for patients receiving ENI versus 5.3% for those who did not (p = 0.026). Each rectal isodose volume was increased for patients receiving ENI up to 50 Gy (p ≤ 0.021 for each 5 Gy increment). Across all patients, the absolute V 70 of the rectum was the only predictor of late GI toxicity. When subgroups, defined by the use of ENI, were analyzed separately, rectal V 70 was only predictive of late GI toxicity for patients who received ENI. For patients receiving ENI, V 70 > 3 cc was associated with an increased risk of late GI events. Elective nodal irradiation increases the rates of acute and late GI toxicity when delivered simultaneously with hypofractioanted prostate radiotherapy. The use of ENI appears to sensitize the rectum to hot spots, therefore we recommend added caution to minimize the volume of rectum receiving 100% of the prescription dose in these patients

  6. Different rectal toxicity tolerance with and without simultaneous conventionally-fractionated pelvic lymph node treatment in patients receiving hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Andrew M; Baker, Christopher B; Popple, Richard A; Shekar, Kiran; Yang, Eddy S; Jacob, Rojymon; Cardan, Rex; Kim, Robert Y; Fiveash, John B

    2014-06-03

    To investigate added morbidity associated with the addition of pelvic elective nodal irradiation (ENI) to hypofractionated radiotherapy to the prostate. Two-hundred twelve patients, treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy to the prostate between 2004 and 2011, met the inclusion criteria for the analysis. All patients received 70 Gy to the prostate delivered over 28 fractions and 103 (49%) received ENI consisting of 50.4 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics delivered simultaneously in 1.8 Gy fractions. The mean dose-volume histograms were compared between the two subgroups defined by use of ENI, and various dose-volume parameters were analyzed for effect on late lower gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity. Acute grade 2 lower GI toxicity occurred in 38 (37%) patients receiving ENI versus 19 (17%) in those who did not (p = 0.001). The Kaplan-Meier estimate of grade ≥ 2 lower GI toxicity at 3 years was 15.3% for patients receiving ENI versus 5.3% for those who did not (p = 0.026). Each rectal isodose volume was increased for patients receiving ENI up to 50 Gy (p ≤ 0.021 for each 5 Gy increment). Across all patients, the absolute V70 of the rectum was the only predictor of late GI toxicity. When subgroups, defined by the use of ENI, were analyzed separately, rectal V70 was only predictive of late GI toxicity for patients who received ENI. For patients receiving ENI, V70 > 3 cc was associated with an increased risk of late GI events. Elective nodal irradiation increases the rates of acute and late GI toxicity when delivered simultaneously with hypofractioanted prostate radiotherapy. The use of ENI appears to sensitize the rectum to hot spots, therefore we recommend added caution to minimize the volume of rectum receiving 100% of the prescription dose in these patients.

  7. Comparison of two radiotherapy schemes, conventional and fractionated, in elderly patients suffering from a locally advanced rectum cancer; Comparaison de deux schemas de radiotherapie, classique et hypofractionne, chez les patients ages atteints d'un cancer du rectum localement evolue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillerme, F.; Clavier, J.B.; Guihard, S.; Schumacher, C.; Nehme-Schuster, H.; Ben Abdelghani, M.; Noel, G. [Centre Paul-Strauss, Strasbourg (France); Kurtz, J.E.; Brigand, C. [Hopitaux universitaires, Strasbourg (France)

    2011-10-15

    Based on results obtained on 177 patients older than 65 and suffering from T3-4 rectum cancer, and treated either according to a conventional scheme (45 to 50,4 Gy by 1,8 to 2 Gy fractions) or according to a fractionated scheme (39 Gy by 3 Gy fractions), the authors report the comparison of these both methods in terms of toxicity, delay between end of radiotherapy and surgery), histological response, global survival. The hypo-fractionated treatment allows the treatment duration to be reduced, is therefore less constraining and seems more suitable for elderly people. Short communication

  8. A practical and theoretical definition of very small field size for radiotherapy output factor measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, P H; Cranmer-Sargison, G; Thwaites, D I; Crowe, S B; Kairn, T; Knight, R T; Kenny, J; Langton, C M; Trapp, J V

    2014-04-01

    This work introduces the concept of very small field size. Output factor (OPF) measurements at these field sizes require extremely careful experimental methodology including the measurement of dosimetric field size at the same time as each OPF measurement. Two quantifiable scientific definitions of the threshold of very small field size are presented. A practical definition was established by quantifying the effect that a 1 mm error in field size or detector position had on OPFs and setting acceptable uncertainties on OPF at 1%. Alternatively, for a theoretical definition of very small field size, the OPFs were separated into additional factors to investigate the specific effects of lateral electronic disequilibrium, photon scatter in the phantom, and source occlusion. The dominant effect was established and formed the basis of a theoretical definition of very small fields. Each factor was obtained using Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian iX linear accelerator for various square field sizes of side length from 4 to 100 mm, using a nominal photon energy of 6 MV. According to the practical definition established in this project, field sizes ≤ 15 mm were considered to be very small for 6 MV beams for maximal field size uncertainties of 1 mm. If the acceptable uncertainty in the OPF was increased from 1.0% to 2.0%, or field size uncertainties are 0.5 mm, field sizes ≤ 12 mm were considered to be very small. Lateral electronic disequilibrium in the phantom was the dominant cause of change in OPF at very small field sizes. Thus the theoretical definition of very small field size coincided to the field size at which lateral electronic disequilibrium clearly caused a greater change in OPF than any other effects. This was found to occur at field sizes ≤ 12 mm. Source occlusion also caused a large change in OPF for field sizes ≤ 8 mm. Based on the results of this study, field sizes ≤ 12 mm were considered to be theoretically very small for 6 MV beams. Extremely

  9. Evaluation of a liquid ionization chamber for relative dosimetry in small and large fields of radiotherapy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benítez, E.M.; Casado, F.J.; García-Pareja, S.; Martín-Viera, J.A.; Moreno, C.; Parra, V.

    2013-01-01

    Commissioning and quality assurance of radiotherapy linear accelerators require measurement of the absorbed dose to water, and a wide range of detectors are available for absolute and relative dosimetry in megavoltage beams. In this paper, the PTW microLion isooctane-filled ionization chamber has been tested to perform relative measurements in a 6 MV photon beam from a linear accelerator. Output factors, percent depth dose and dose profiles have been obtained for small and large fields. These quantities have been compared with those from usual detectors in the routine practice. In order to carry out a more realistic comparison, an uncertainty analysis has been developed, taking type A and B uncertainties into account. The results present microLion as a good option when high spatial resolution is needed, thanks to its reduced sensitive volume. The liquid filling also provides a high signal compared to other detectors, like that based on air filling. Furthermore, the relative response of microLion when field size is varied suggests that this detector has energy dependence, since it is appreciated an over-response for small fields and an under-response for the large ones. This effect is more obvious for field sizes wider than 20 × 20 cm 2 , where the differences in percent depth dose at great depths exceed the uncertainties estimated in this study. - Highlights: • When high spatial resolution is required the results confirm the suitability of the liquid chamber. • Some energy dependence of the liquid detector can be appreciated in OFs and PDDs for small and large fields. • For field sizes >20 × 20 cm 2 , the differences in PDDs at great depths exceed the uncertainties estimated. • Some drawbacks should be considered: the time to reach stability, the high voltage supply required and the acquiring cost

  10. The impact of involved node, involved field and mantle field radiotherapy on estimated radiation doses and risk of late effects for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M. V.; Jorgensen, M.; Brodin, N. P.

    2014-01-01

    –II classical HL patients 4 x 2 plans for each patient. The lifetime excess risks of cardiac morbidity, cardiac mortality, lung, breast, and thyroid cancer with each technique were estimated. The estimated excess risks attributable to RT were based on HL series with long-term follow......IFRT), and Involved Node RT (INRT) and the risk of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease, secondary cancers, and the corresponding Life Years Lost (LYL) is estimated with each technique. PROCEDURE: INRT, mIFRT, IFRT, and MF plans (20 and 30 Gy) were simulated for 10 supradiaphragmatic, clinical stage I...... to the heart, lungs, breasts, and thyroid compared to past,extended fields, even for patients with mediastinal disease. This translated into a significantly reduced estimated risk of cardiovascular disease, secondary cancers, and LYL. CONCLUSIONS: Involved Node Radiotherapy should be considered for pediatric...

  11. Pulmonary radio-responses to surface field radiotherapy of Morbus Hodgkin using a 4 MeV linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, H.U.

    1982-01-01

    In 119 patients suffering from Morbus Hodgkin who were treated between 1974 and 1979, the pulmonary radioresponse was retroperspectively investigated. Besides incidence and degree of severity also the course over the time of the individual stages of radio-response where investigated. 14 patients showed no paramediastinal irradiation fibrosis as lasting stationary change, 52 showed a light one, 34 a medium-sized and 19 a severe one. Each fibrosis had been preceded by the radiomorphologic sign of pneumonitis of always the same degree of severity. The course over the time of the radiomorphologically subdivided stages determined that on the average the signs of a beginning pneumonitis occurred 11.6 weeks after onset of radiotherapy. An active pneumonitis was detectable after 14.8 weeks (on the average) and 20.4 weeks after radiotherapy had been started, a still florid pneumonitis with beginning shrinkage of the paramediastinal regions was found. The stage of stationary pulmonary fibrosis was reached 34.1 weeks (averaged value) after surface field irradiation had been started. Correlative relations to different individual diseasedependent and radiotherapeutic factors were detected, which are considered to be responsible for the intensity and character of the floride radio-response and the remaining pulmonary fibrosis. Considered from the radiomorphologic course of pulmonary irradiation reaction and its intensity and character, no significant advantage of tumor-reducing chemotherapy compared to irradiation or of split-course-technique compared to continuous fractioning was found. The introduction of individually adjustable shields helped to reduce the degree of severity of radio-response. (orig./MG) [de

  12. Extension of radiotherapy (involved field vs subtotal nodal) after short-term chemotherapy in early-stage Hodgkin's disease (ESHD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanini, M.; Bonfante, V.; Soncini, F.; Di Russo, A.; Santoro, A.; Viviani, S.; Devizzi, L.; Gasparini, M.; Tesoro, Tess J.D.; Valagussa, P.; Bonadonna, G.

    1995-01-01

    Aims of this study were to avoid staging laparotomy, to improve the results of radiotherapy (RT) alone by a combined modality approach, to evaluate the optimal extent of RT after short-term chemotherapy (CT) and to reduce the long-term toxicity in patients cured for ESHD. From (2(90)) to (1(95)), 110 consecutive patients with clinical stage I (bulky and/or B), IIA, IIA bulky and IIEA entered a randomized trial comparing subtotal nodal irradiation (STNI) vs involved field radiotherapy (IFRT), both after short-term chemotherapy (ABVD for 4 cycles). The doses of RT were 30 Gy to uninvolved and 36 Gy to involved sites, respectively. With a median follow-up of 38 mos., the main results in 96 evaluable patients (stage I: 13 pts., stage II: 83 pts., median age 28 yrs., range 17-64) are as reported below. Most patients achieved complete remission (CR) after CT (92%), while 8 partial responders attained CR with RT (IFRT 5 pts., STNI 3 pts.). Four stage II patients relapsed (IFRT 2, pts., STNI 2 pts.), mainly in extranodal or not irradiated sites. Up-to-date the most remarkable toxicities include: acute myocardial infarction (1%), aspecific EKG changes (5%), reductions in pulmonary function tests (most mild and/or transient) in 45%, subclinical or clinical hypothyroidism 26% (only in pts. irradiated to the neck), 3 cases of azoospermia in 23 evaluable patients (13%) and transient amenorreha in(1(44)) patients. No second malignancies have been so far observed. The results of this study seem to indicate that 4 courses of ABVD plus RT are an effective treatment in clinical ESHD, with moderate long-term toxicities. In almost 10% of patients RT changed partial into complete remission. Should these results be confirmed on a longer follow-up, IFRT will definitely replace STNI in a combined modality treatment

  13. Detection of pesticides residues in water samples from organic and conventional paddy fields of Ledang, Johor, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Md Pauzi; Othman, Mohamed Rozali; Ishak, Anizan; Nabhan, Khitam Jaber

    2016-11-01

    Pesticides have been used extensively by the farmers in Malaysia during the last few decades. Sixteen water samples, collected from paddy fields both organic and conventional, from Ledang, Johor, were analyzed to determine the occurrence and distribution of organochlorine (OCPs) and organophosphorus (OPPs) pesticide residues. GC-ECD instrument was used to identify and determine the concentrations of these pesticide residues. Pesticide residues were detected in conventional fields in the range about 0.036-0.508 µg/L higher than detected in organic fields about 0.015-0.428 µg/L. However the level of concentration of pesticide residues in water sample from both paddy fields are in the exceed limit for human consumption, according to European Economic Commission (EEC) (Directive 98/83/EC) at 0.1 µg/L for any pesticide or 0.5 µg/L for total pesticides. The results that the organic plot is still contaminated with pesticides although pesticides were not use at all in plot possibly from historical used as well as from airborne contamination.

  14. Waste rice seed in conventional and stripper-head harvested fields in California: Implications for wintering waterfowl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleskes, Joseph P.; Halstead, Brian J.; Casazza, Michael L.; Coates, Peter S.; Kohl, Jeffrey D.; Skalos, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Waste rice seed is an important food for wintering waterfowl and current estimates of its availability are needed to determine the carrying capacity of rice fields and guide habitat conservation. We used a line-intercept method to estimate mass-density of rice seed remaining after harvest during 2010 in the Sacramento Valley (SACV) of California and compared results with estimates from previous studies in the SACV and Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV). Posterior mean (95% credible interval) estimates of total waste rice seed mass-density for the SACV in 2010 were 388 (336–449) kg/ha in conventionally harvested fields and 245 (198–307) kg/ha in stripper-head harvested fields; the 2010 mass-density is nearly identical to the mid-1980s estimate for conventionally harvested fields but 36% lower than the mid-1990s estimate for stripped fields. About 18% of SACV fields were stripper-head harvested in 2010 vs. 9–15% in the mid-1990s and 0% in the mid-1980s; but due to a 50% increase in planted rice area, total mass of waste rice seed in SACV remaining after harvest in 2010 was 43% greater than in the mid-1980s. However, total mass of seed-eating waterfowl also increased 82%, and the ratio of waste rice seed to seed-eating waterfowl mass was 21% smaller in 2010 than in the mid-1980s. Mass-densities of waste rice remaining after harvest in SACV fields are within the range reported for MAV fields. However, because there is a lag between harvest and waterfowl use in the MAV but not in the SACV, seed loss is greater in the MAV and estimated waste seed mass-density available to wintering waterfowl in SACV fields is about 5–30 times recent MAV estimates. Waste rice seed remains an abundant food source for waterfowl wintering in the SACV, but increased use of stripper-head harvesters would reduce this food. To provide accurate data on carrying capacities of rice fields necessary for conservation planning, trends in planted rice area, harvest method, and postharvest field

  15. ‘Inverted Y’ field radiotherapy planning with multi-leaf collimator: A single isocentric technique using multiple fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Sahai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study is to describe a planning technique using multi-leaf collimator and asymmetric fields for irradiating an ‘inverted Y’ shaped geometry in a patient with testicular seminoma. The entire target area covering the para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal nodal regions was split into three fields. Single isocenter half-beam block technique was employed. The fields were planned with antero-posterior and postero-anterior portals with a differential weightage. The dose was prescribed at the respective reference points of the fields. A uniform dose distribution for the entire portal was achieved without any under- or over-dosing at the field junctions.  

  16. Reliability of conventional crystal field models in f-electron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajek, Z. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. Niskich Temperatur i Badan Strukturalnych

    1995-03-15

    Crystal field models commonly applied to explain the electronic properties of solid f-electron compounds are discussed from the point of view of their inherent limitations and the false conclusions they may lead to. Both phenomenological and ab initio approximate models are considered. The discussion is based on generalized perturbation model calculations of the crystal field parameters for europium, uranium, plutonium and neptunium ions in various crystals. The results reveal the inadequacy of various electrostatic approaches and the correctness of models based on renormalization terms. ((orig.))

  17. Comparing conVEntional RadioTherapy with stereotactIC body radiotherapy in patients with spinAL metastases: study protocol for an randomized controlled trial following the cohort multiple randomized controlled trial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velden, Joanne M. van der; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Seravalli, Enrica; Hes, Jochem; Gerlich, A. Sophie; Kasperts, Nicolien; Eppinga, Wietse S. C.; Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan; Vulpen, Marco van

    2016-01-01

    Standard radiotherapy is the treatment of first choice in patients with symptomatic spinal metastases, but is only moderately effective. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is increasingly used to treat spinal metastases, without randomized evidence of superiority over standard radiotherapy. The VERTICAL study aims to quantify the effect of stereotactic radiation therapy in patients with metastatic spinal disease. This study follows the ‘cohort multiple Randomized Controlled Trial’ design. The VERTICAL study is conducted within the PRESENT cohort. In PRESENT, all patients with bone metastases referred for radiation therapy are enrolled. For each patient, clinical and patient-reported outcomes are captured at baseline and at regular intervals during follow-up. In addition, patients give informed consent to be offered experimental interventions. Within PRESENT, 110 patients are identified as a sub cohort of eligible patients (i.e. patients with unirradiated painful, mechanically stable spinal metastases who are able to undergo stereotactic radiation therapy). After a protocol amendment, also patients with non-spinal bony metastases are eligible. From the sub cohort, a random selection of patients is offered stereotactic radiation therapy (n = 55), which patients may accept or refuse. Only patients accepting stereotactic radiation therapy sign informed consent for the VERTICAL trial. Non-selected patients (n = 55) receive standard radiotherapy, and are not aware of them serving as controls. Primary endpoint is pain response after three months. Data will be analyzed by intention to treat, complemented by instrumental variable analysis in case of substantial refusal of the stereotactic radiation therapy in the intervention arm. This study is designed to quantify the treatment response after (stereotactic) radiation therapy in patients with symptomatic spinal metastases. This is the first randomized study in palliative care following the cohort multiple Randomized

  18. Proof-of-principle study of a small animal PET/field-cycled MRI combined system using conventional PMT technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Hao; Handler, William B.; Scholl, Timothy J.; Simpson, P.J.; Chronik, Blaine A.

    2010-01-01

    There are currently several approaches to the development of combined PET/MRI systems, all of which need to address adverse interactions between the two systems. Of particular relevance to the majority of proposed PET/MRI systems is the effect that static and dynamic magnetic fields have on the performance of PET detection systems based on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). In the work reported in this paper, performance of two conventional PMTs has been systematically investigated and characterized as a function of magnetic field exposure conditions. Detector gain, energy resolution, time resolution, and efficiency were measured for static field exposures between 0 and 6.3 mT. Additionally, the short-term recovery and long-term stability of gain and energy resolution were measured in the presence of repeatedly applied dynamic magnetic fields changing at 4 T/s. It was found that the detectors recovered normal operation within several milliseconds following the end of large pulsed magnetic fields. In addition, the repeated applications of large pulsed magnetic fields did not significantly affect detector stability. Based on these results, we implemented a proof-of-principle PET/field-cycled MRI (FCMRI) system for small animal imaging using commercial PMT-based PET detectors. The first PET images acquired within the PET/FCMRI system are presented. The image quality, in terms of spatial resolution, was compared between standalone PET and the PET/FCMRI system. Finally, the relevance of these results to various aspects of PET/MRI system design is discussed.

  19. Comparison of Miniaturized and Conventional Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4 Channels for Nanoparticle Separations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengchao You

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a miniaturized channel for the separation of polymer and metal nanoparticles (NP using Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4 was investigated and compared with a conventional AF4 system. To develop standard separation methods, experimental parameters like cross flow, gradient profile and injection time were varied and optimized. Corresponding chromatographic parameters were calculated and compared. Our results indicate that the chromatographic resolution in the miniaturized channel is lower, whereas significantly shorter analyses time and less solvent consumption were obtained. Moreover, the limit of detection (LOD and limit of quantification (LOQ obtained from hyphenation with a UV-detector are obviously lower than in a conventional channel, which makes the miniaturized channel interesting for trace analysis.

  20. Radiation dose and cancer risk to out-of-field and partially in-field organs from radiotherapy for symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazonakis, Michalis, E-mail: mazonak@med.uoc.gr; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Iraklion, Crete 71003 (Greece); Tzedakis, Antonis [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital of Iraklion, Iraklion, Crete 71110 (Greece); Lyraraki, Efrossyni [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital of Iraklion, Iraklion, Crete 71110 (Greece)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Vertebral hemangiomas (VHs) are the most common benign tumors of the spine that may cause bone resorption. Megavoltage irradiation is usually the treatment of choice for the management of symptomatic VHs. The current study was conducted to estimate the risk for carcinogenesis from radiotherapy of this benign disease on the basis of the calculated radiation doses to healthy organs. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-particle transport code was employed to simulate the irradiation with 6 MV x-rays of a VH presented in the cervical, upper thoracic, lower thoracic, and lumbar spine. The average radiation dose (D{sub av}) received by each critical organ located outside the primarily irradiated area was calculated. Three-dimensional treatment plans were also generated for the VHs occurring at the four different sites of the spinal cord based on patients’ computed tomography data. The organ equivalent dose (OED) to each radiosensitive structure, which was partly encompassed by the applied treatment fields, was calculated with the aid of differential dose–volume histograms. The D{sub av} and the OED values were combined with a linear-no-threshold model and a nonlinear mechanistic model, respectively, to estimate the organ-, age-, and gender-specific lifetime attributable risks (LARs) for cancer development. The estimated risks were compared with the respective nominal lifetime intrinsic risks (LIRs) for the unexposed population. Results: For a standard target dose of 34 Gy, the OED varied from 0.39–5.15 Gy by the organ of interest and the irradiation site. The D{sub av} range for the out-of-field organs was 4.9 × 10{sup −4} to 0.56 Gy. The LAR for the appearance of malignancies in the partially in-field organs after radiotherapy of male and female patients was (0.08%–1.8%) and (0.09%–1.9%), respectively. These risk values were 1.5–15.5 times lower when compared to the respective LIRs. The lifetime probability for out-of-field cancer induction in irradiated

  1. Radiation dose and cancer risk to out-of-field and partially in-field organs from radiotherapy for symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Damilakis, John; Tzedakis, Antonis; Lyraraki, Efrossyni

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Vertebral hemangiomas (VHs) are the most common benign tumors of the spine that may cause bone resorption. Megavoltage irradiation is usually the treatment of choice for the management of symptomatic VHs. The current study was conducted to estimate the risk for carcinogenesis from radiotherapy of this benign disease on the basis of the calculated radiation doses to healthy organs. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-particle transport code was employed to simulate the irradiation with 6 MV x-rays of a VH presented in the cervical, upper thoracic, lower thoracic, and lumbar spine. The average radiation dose (D_a_v) received by each critical organ located outside the primarily irradiated area was calculated. Three-dimensional treatment plans were also generated for the VHs occurring at the four different sites of the spinal cord based on patients’ computed tomography data. The organ equivalent dose (OED) to each radiosensitive structure, which was partly encompassed by the applied treatment fields, was calculated with the aid of differential dose–volume histograms. The D_a_v and the OED values were combined with a linear-no-threshold model and a nonlinear mechanistic model, respectively, to estimate the organ-, age-, and gender-specific lifetime attributable risks (LARs) for cancer development. The estimated risks were compared with the respective nominal lifetime intrinsic risks (LIRs) for the unexposed population. Results: For a standard target dose of 34 Gy, the OED varied from 0.39–5.15 Gy by the organ of interest and the irradiation site. The D_a_v range for the out-of-field organs was 4.9 × 10"−"4 to 0.56 Gy. The LAR for the appearance of malignancies in the partially in-field organs after radiotherapy of male and female patients was (0.08%–1.8%) and (0.09%–1.9%), respectively. These risk values were 1.5–15.5 times lower when compared to the respective LIRs. The lifetime probability for out-of-field cancer induction in irradiated males and

  2. Pre-trial quality assurance processes for an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) trial: PARSPORT, a UK multicentre Phase III trial comparing conventional radiotherapy and parotid-sparing IMRT for locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C H; Miles, E A; Urbano, M T Guerrero; Bhide, S A; Bidmead, A M; Harrington, K J; Nutting, C M

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare conventional radiotherapy with parotid gland-sparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the PARSPORT trial. The validity of such a trial depends on the radiotherapy planning and delivery meeting a defined standard across all centres. At the outset, many of the centres had little or no experience of delivering IMRT; therefore, quality assurance processes were devised to ensure consistency and standardisation of all processes for comparison within the trial. The pre-trial quality assurance (QA) programme and results are described. Each centre undertook exercises in target volume definition and treatment planning, completed a resource questionnaire and produced a process document. Additionally, the QA team visited each participating centre. Each exercise had to be accepted before patients could be recruited into the trial. 10 centres successfully completed the quality assurance exercises. A range of treatment planning systems, linear accelerators and delivery methods were used for the planning exercises, and all the plans created reached the standard required for participation in this multicentre trial. All 10 participating centres achieved implementation of a comprehensive and robust IMRT programme for treatment of head and neck cancer.

  3. Using a Monte Carlo model to predict dosimetric properties of small radiotherapy photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Alison J. D.; Nahum, Alan E.; Fenwick, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate characterization of small-field dosimetry requires measurements to be made with precisely aligned specialized detectors and is thus time consuming and error prone. This work explores measurement differences between detectors by using a Monte Carlo model matched to large-field data to predict properties of smaller fields. Measurements made with a variety of detectors have been compared with calculated results to assess their validity and explore reasons for differences. Unshielded diodes are expected to produce some of the most useful data, as their small sensitive cross sections give good resolution whilst their energy dependence is shown to vary little with depth in a 15 MV linac beam. Their response is shown to be constant with field size over the range 1-10 cm, with a correction of 3% needed for a field size of 0.5 cm. BEAMnrc has been used to create a 15 MV beam model, matched to dosimetric data for square fields larger than 3 cm, and producing small-field profiles and percentage depth doses (PDDs) that agree well with unshielded diode data for field sizes down to 0.5 cm. For fields sizes of 1.5 cm and above, little detector-to-detector variation exists in measured output factors, however for a 0.5 cm field a relative spread of 18% is seen between output factors measured with different detectors--values measured with the diamond and pinpoint detectors lying below that of the unshielded diode, with the shielded diode value being higher. Relative to the corrected unshielded diode measurement, the Monte Carlo modeled output factor is 4.5% low, a discrepancy that is probably due to the focal spot fluence profile and source occlusion modeling. The large-field Monte Carlo model can, therefore, currently be used to predict small-field profiles and PDDs measured with an unshielded diode. However, determination of output factors for the smallest fields requires a more detailed model of focal spot fluence and source occlusion.

  4. Phase II study to assess the efficacy of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy followed by a stereotactic radiosurgery boost in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koong, Albert C.; Christofferson, Erin; Le, Quynh-Thu; Goodman, Karyn A.; Ho, Anthony; Kuo, Timothy; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Greco, Ralph; Norton, Jeffrey; Yang, George P.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) followed by body stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, all patients (19) had pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma and were uniformly staged. Our treatment protocol consisted of 45 Gy IMRT with concurrent 5-FU followed by a 25 Gy SRS boost to the primary tumor. Results: Sixteen patients completed the planned therapy. Two patients experienced Grade 3 toxicity (none had more than Grade 3 toxicity). Fifteen of these 16 patients were free from local progression until death. Median overall survival was 33 weeks. Conclusions: Concurrent IMRT and 5-FU followed by SRS in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer results in excellent local control, but does not improve overall survival and is associated with more toxicity than SRS, alone

  5. Conventional 3D staging PET/CT in CT simulation for lung cancer: impact of rigid and deformable target volume alignments for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, G G; Van Sörnsen De Koste, J R; Carson, K J; O'Sullivan, J M; Hounsell, A R; Senan, S

    2011-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scans can improve target definition in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). As staging PET/CT scans are increasingly available, we evaluated different methods for co-registration of staging PET/CT data to radiotherapy simulation (RTP) scans. 10 patients underwent staging PET/CT followed by RTP PET/CT. On both scans, gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were delineated using CT (GTV(CT)) and PET display settings. Four PET-based contours (manual delineation, two threshold methods and a source-to-background ratio method) were delineated. The CT component of the staging scan was co-registered using both rigid and deformable techniques to the CT component of RTP PET/CT. Subsequently rigid registration and deformation warps were used to transfer PET and CT contours from the staging scan to the RTP scan. Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was used to assess the registration accuracy of staging-based GTVs following both registration methods with the GTVs delineated on the RTP PET/CT scan. When the GTV(CT) delineated on the staging scan after both rigid registration and deformation was compared with the GTV(CT)on the RTP scan, a significant improvement in overlap (registration) using deformation was observed (mean DSC 0.66 for rigid registration and 0.82 for deformable registration, p = 0.008). A similar comparison for PET contours revealed no significant improvement in overlap with the use of deformable registration. No consistent improvements in similarity measures were observed when deformable registration was used for transferring PET-based contours from a staging PET/CT. This suggests that currently the use of rigid registration remains the most appropriate method for RTP in NSCLC.

  6. Breath-hold technique in conventional APPA or intensity-modulated radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Comparison of ILROG IS-RT and the GHSG IF-RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, Jan; Spickermann, Max; Lehrich, Philipp; Reinartz, Gabriele; Eich, Hans; Haverkamp, Uwe [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Schmidberger, Heinz [University Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    The present study addresses the role of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in contrast to standard RT (APPA) for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) with a focus on deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique and a comparison between the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) Involved Site Radiotherapy (IS-RT) versus the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) Involved Field Radiotherapy (IF-RT). APPA treatment and 2 IMRT plans were compared for 11 patients with HL. Furthermore, treatment with DIBH versus free breathing (FB) and two different treatment volumes, i.e. IF-RT versus IS-RT, were compared. IMRT was planned as a sliding-window technique with 5 and 7 beam angles. For each patient 12 different treatment plans were calculated (132 plans). Following organs at risk (OAR) were analysed: lung, heart, spinal cord, oesophagus, female breast and skin. Comparisons of the different values with regard to dose-volume histograms (DVH), conformity and homogeneity indices were made. IS-RT reduces treatment volumes. With respect to the planning target volume (PTV), IMRT achieves better conformity but the same homogeneity. Regarding the D{sub mean} for the lung, IMRT shows increased doses, while RT in DIBH reduces doses. The IMRT shows improved values for D{sub max} concerning the spinal cord, whereas the APPA shows an improved D{sub mean} of the lung and the female breast. IS-RT reduces treatment volumes. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy shows advantages in the conformity. Treatment in DIBH also reduces the dose applied to the lungs and the heart. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Auswertung ist es, die konventionelle APPA-Feldanordnung mit der Intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie (IMRT) bei Patienten mit Hodgkin-Lymphom (HL) zu vergleichen. Ein besonderer Fokus liegt hierbei auf der Bestrahlung in tiefer Inspiration und Atemanhaltetechnik (DIBH). Des Weiteren wurde die ''Involved-site''-Radiotherapie (IS-RT) der International

  7. Septic Systems Contribution to Phosphorus in Shallow Groundwater: Field-Scale Studies Using Conventional Drainfield Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechtensimer, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Septic systems can be a potential source of phosphorus (P) in groundwater and contribute to eutrophication in aquatic systems. Our objective was to investigate P transport from two conventional septic systems (drip dispersal and gravel trench) to shallow groundwater. Two new in-situ drainfields (6.1 m long by 0.61 m wide) with a 3.72 m2 infiltrative surface were constructed. The drip dispersal drainfield was constructed by placing 30.5 cm commercial sand on top of natural soil and the gravel trench drainfield was constructed by placing 30.5 cm of gravel on top of 30.5 cm commercial sand and natural soil. Suction cup lysimeters were installed in the drainfields (at 30.5, 61, 106.7 cm below infiltrative surface) and piezometers were installed in the groundwater (>300 cm below infiltrative surface) to capture P dynamics from the continuum of unsaturated to saturated zones in the septic systems. Septic tank effluent (STE), soil-water, and groundwater samples were collected for 64 events (May 2012–Dec 2013) at 2 to 3 days (n = 13), weekly (n = 29), biweekly (n = 17), and monthly (n = 5) intervals. One piezometer was installed up-gradient of the drainfields to monitor background groundwater (n = 15). Samples were analyzed for total P (TP), orthophosphate-P (PO4–P), and other–P (TP—PO4-P). The gravel trench drainfield removed significantly (p300 cm in the groundwater, both systems had similar TP reductions of >97%. After 18 months of STE application, there was no significant increase in groundwater TP concentrations in both systems. We conclude that both drainfield designs are effective at reducing P transport to shallow groundwater. PMID:28107505

  8. Septic Systems Contribution to Phosphorus in Shallow Groundwater: Field-Scale Studies Using Conventional Drainfield Designs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mechtensimer

    Full Text Available Septic systems can be a potential source of phosphorus (P in groundwater and contribute to eutrophication in aquatic systems. Our objective was to investigate P transport from two conventional septic systems (drip dispersal and gravel trench to shallow groundwater. Two new in-situ drainfields (6.1 m long by 0.61 m wide with a 3.72 m2 infiltrative surface were constructed. The drip dispersal drainfield was constructed by placing 30.5 cm commercial sand on top of natural soil and the gravel trench drainfield was constructed by placing 30.5 cm of gravel on top of 30.5 cm commercial sand and natural soil. Suction cup lysimeters were installed in the drainfields (at 30.5, 61, 106.7 cm below infiltrative surface and piezometers were installed in the groundwater (>300 cm below infiltrative surface to capture P dynamics from the continuum of unsaturated to saturated zones in the septic systems. Septic tank effluent (STE, soil-water, and groundwater samples were collected for 64 events (May 2012-Dec 2013 at 2 to 3 days (n = 13, weekly (n = 29, biweekly (n = 17, and monthly (n = 5 intervals. One piezometer was installed up-gradient of the drainfields to monitor background groundwater (n = 15. Samples were analyzed for total P (TP, orthophosphate-P (PO4-P, and other-P (TP-PO4-P. The gravel trench drainfield removed significantly (p300 cm in the groundwater, both systems had similar TP reductions of >97%. After 18 months of STE application, there was no significant increase in groundwater TP concentrations in both systems. We conclude that both drainfield designs are effective at reducing P transport to shallow groundwater.

  9. Earthworms influenced by reduced tillage, conventional tillage and energy forest in Swedish agricultural field experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerloef, Jan (SLU, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)), Email: Jan.Lagerlof@ekol.slu.se; Paalsson, Olof; Arvidsson, Johan (SLU, Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2012-03-15

    We compared earthworm density, depth distribution and species composition in three soil cultivation experiments including the treatments ploughless tillage and mouldboard ploughing. Sampling was done in September 2005 and for one experiment also in 1994. By yearly sampling 1995-2005, earthworms in an energy forest of Salix viminalis were compared with those in an adjacent arable field. Sampling method was digging of soil blocks and hand sorting and formalin sampling in one cultivation experiment. Both methods were used in the energy forest and arable land comparison. In two soil cultivation experiments, highest abundances or biomass were found in ploughless tillage. Earthworm density was higher in the upper 10 cm, especially in the ploughless tillage. Earthworm density was significantly higher in the energy forest than in the arable field. Formalin sampling revealed c. 36% of the earthworm numbers found by digging in the energy forest and gave almost no earthworms in the arable field. In all treatments with soil cultivation, species living and feeding in the rhizosphere and soil dominated. One such species, Allolobophora chlorotica, was more abundant under mouldboard ploughing than ploughless tillage. Lumbricus terrestris, browsing on the surface and producing deep vertical burrows, was more common in the ploughless tillage. Species living and feeding close to the soil surface were almost only found in the energy forest, which had not been soil cultivated since 1984. The findings support earlier studies pointing out possibilities to encourage earthworms by reduced soil cultivation. This is one of the first published studies that followed earthworm populations in an energy forest plantation during several years. Explanation of earthworm reactions to management and environmental impacts should be done with consideration of the ecology of species or species groups. Earthworm sampling by formalin must always be interpreted with caution and calibrated by digging and

  10. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  11. Experimental assessment of out-of-field dose components in high energy electron beams used in external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdoaburas, Mohamad M; Mege, Jean-Pierre; Chavaudra, Jean; Bezin, Jérémi Vũ; Veres, Atilla; de Vathaire, Florent; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this work was to experimentally investigate the out-of-field dose in a water phantom, with several high energy electron beams used in external beam radiotherapy (RT). The study was carried out for 6, 9, 12, and 18 MeV electron beams, on three different linear accelerators, each equipped with a specific applicator. Measurements were performed in a water phantom, at different depths, for different applicator sizes, and off-axis distances up to 70 cm from beam central axis (CAX). Thermoluminescent powder dosimeters (TLD-700) were used. For given cases, TLD measurements were compared to EBT3 films and parallel-plane ionization chamber measurements. Also, out-of-field doses at 10 cm depth, with and without applicator, were evaluated. With the Siemens applicators, a peak dose appears at about 12-15 cm out of the field edge, at 1 cm depth, for all field sizes and energies. For the Siemens Primus, with a 10 × 10 cm(²) applicator, this peak reaches 2.3%, 1%, 0.9% and 1.3% of the maximum central axis dose (Dmax) for 6, 9, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams, respectively. For the Siemens Oncor, with a 10 × 10 cm(²) applicator, this peak dose reaches 0.8%, 1%, 1.4%, and 1.6% of Dmax for 6, 9, 12, and 14 MeV, respectively, and these values increase with applicator size. For the Varian 2300C/D, the doses at 12.5 cm out of the field edge are 0.3%, 0.6%, 0.5%, and 1.1% of Dmax for 6, 9, 12, and 18 MeV, respectively, and increase with applicator size. No peak dose is evidenced for the Varian applicator for these energies. In summary, the out-of-field dose from electron beams increases with the beam energy and the applicator size, and decreases with the distance from the beam central axis and the depth in water. It also considerably depends on the applicator types. Our results can be of interest for the dose estimations delivered in healthy tissues outside the treatment field for the RT patient, as well as in studies exploring RT long-term effects.

  12. Dosimetric Comparison Between Intensity-Modulated with Coplanar Field and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy with Noncoplanar Field for Postocular Invasion Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Wenyong; Liu Lu; Zeng Jun; Yin Weidong; Li Yun

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a dosimetric optimization effort aiming to compare noncoplanar field (NCF) on 3 dimensions conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and coplanar field (CF) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for postocular invasion tumor. We performed a planning study on the computed tomography data of 8 consecutive patients with localized postocular invasion tumor. Four fields NCF 3D-CRT in the transverse plane with gantry angles of 0-10 deg., 30-45 deg., 240-270 deg., and 310-335 deg. degrees were isocentered at the center of gravity of the target volume. The geometry of the beams was determined by beam's eye view. The same constraints were prepared with between CF IMRT optimization and NCF 3D-CRT treatment. The maximum point doses (D max) for the different optic pathway structures (OPS) with NCF 3D-CRT treatment should differ in no more than 3% from those with the NCF IMRT plan. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were obtained for all targets and organ at risk (OAR) with both treatment techniques. Plans with NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT constraints on target dose in homogeneity were computed, as well as the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) in the target volume. The PTV coverage was optimal with both NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT plans in the 8 tumor sites. No difference was noted between the two techniques for the average D max and D min dose. NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT will yield similar results on CI. However, HI was a significant difference between NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT plan (p < 0.001). Physical endpoints for target showed the mean target dose to be low in the CF IMRT plan, caused by a large target dose in homogeneity (p < 0.001). The impact of NCF 3D-CRT versus CF IMRT set-up is very slight. NCF3D-CRT is one of the treatment options for postocular invasion tumor. However, constraints for OARs are needed.

  13. Late toxicities after conventional radiation therapy alone for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuan, Jeffrey Kit Loong, E-mail: ntrtkl@nccs.com.sg [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Ha, Tam Cam [Division of Clinical Trials and Epidemiological Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School (Singapore); Ong, Whee Sze [Division of Clinical Trials and Epidemiological Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Siow, Tian Rui [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Tham, Ivan Weng Keong [National University Health System Singapore (Singapore); Yap, Swee Peng; Tan, Terence Wee Kiat; Chua, Eu Tiong; Fong, Kam Weng [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Wee, Joseph Tien Seng [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Division of Clinical Trials and Epidemiological Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School (Singapore)

    2012-09-15

    Background and purpose: We sought to evaluate the nature and frequency of late toxicities in a cohort of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with conventional radiotherapy alone. Methods and materials: Seven-hundred and ninety-six consecutive NPC patients treated using conventional radiotherapy at a single center from 1992 to 1995 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with histology proven, completely staged, Stage I-IVB World Health Organization Type I-III NPC and completed radical radiotherapy were included. Patients with incomplete staging investigations, distant metastases at diagnosis, previous treatment, and incomplete radiotherapy were excluded. Radiotherapy-related complications were categorized using the RTOG Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. Results: Median follow-up was 7.2 years. The 5-year overall survival and disease free survival were 69% and 56%, respectively, and the corresponding 10-year rates were 52% and 44%. Among 771 patients with at least 3 months of follow-up post treatment, 565 (73%) developed RT-related complications. Diagnosed neurological complications were cranial nerve palsies (n = 70; 9%), temporal lobe necrosis (n = 37; 5%), Lhermitte's syndrome (n = 7; 1%), and brachial plexopathy (n = 2; 0.3%). Non-neurological complications included xerostomia (n = 353; 46%), neck fibrosis (n = 169; 22%), hypo-pituitarism (n = 48; 6%), hearing loss (n = 120; 16%), dysphagia (n = 116; 15%), otorrhea (n = 101; 13%), tinnitus (n = 94; 12%), permanent tube feeding (n = 61; 8%), trismus (n = 45; 6%), second malignancies within treatment field (n = 17; 2%), and osteo-radionecrosis (n = 13; 2%). Conclusions: While radiotherapy is curative in NPC, many patients suffer significant late treatment morbidities with conventional radiotherapy techniques.

  14. Late toxicities after conventional radiation therapy alone for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuan, Jeffrey Kit Loong; Ha, Tam Cam; Ong, Whee Sze; Siow, Tian Rui; Tham, Ivan Weng Keong; Yap, Swee Peng; Tan, Terence Wee Kiat; Chua, Eu Tiong; Fong, Kam Weng; Wee, Joseph Tien Seng

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: We sought to evaluate the nature and frequency of late toxicities in a cohort of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with conventional radiotherapy alone. Methods and materials: Seven-hundred and ninety-six consecutive NPC patients treated using conventional radiotherapy at a single center from 1992 to 1995 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with histology proven, completely staged, Stage I–IVB World Health Organization Type I–III NPC and completed radical radiotherapy were included. Patients with incomplete staging investigations, distant metastases at diagnosis, previous treatment, and incomplete radiotherapy were excluded. Radiotherapy-related complications were categorized using the RTOG Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. Results: Median follow-up was 7.2 years. The 5-year overall survival and disease free survival were 69% and 56%, respectively, and the corresponding 10-year rates were 52% and 44%. Among 771 patients with at least 3 months of follow-up post treatment, 565 (73%) developed RT-related complications. Diagnosed neurological complications were cranial nerve palsies (n = 70; 9%), temporal lobe necrosis (n = 37; 5%), Lhermitte’s syndrome (n = 7; 1%), and brachial plexopathy (n = 2; 0.3%). Non-neurological complications included xerostomia (n = 353; 46%), neck fibrosis (n = 169; 22%), hypo-pituitarism (n = 48; 6%), hearing loss (n = 120; 16%), dysphagia (n = 116; 15%), otorrhea (n = 101; 13%), tinnitus (n = 94; 12%), permanent tube feeding (n = 61; 8%), trismus (n = 45; 6%), second malignancies within treatment field (n = 17; 2%), and osteo-radionecrosis (n = 13; 2%). Conclusions: While radiotherapy is curative in NPC, many patients suffer significant late treatment morbidities with conventional radiotherapy techniques.

  15. Propellant perforation breakdown technique: non-conventional field applications in Colombia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almazna, Edgar; Feijoo, David; Folse, Kent C.; Campuzano, Alvaro [Halliburton Energy Services (Colombia). Completions and Reservoir Optimization

    2004-07-01

    Hocol Nimir operates the SF-136 oil well, located in southern Colombia. The area is characterized by complex geology and low permeability, low porosity reservoirs. In SF-136, the operator wanted to produce from the Tetuan fractured carbonates, a shallower limestone with low permeability (estimated 0.01-1.0 md) and porosity (estimated to be 2.2%) that produces through natural fractures. The operator was seeking an economical technology that could provide contact with these fractures. To meet operator needs, a propellant-assisted technique was suggested. This stimulation technique can optimize well productivity while maintaining stringent technical, health, safety and environmental standards. The alternative technologies used to further develop the Tetuan reserves attained operator goals and provided a new option for Columbia field development, especially in wells where the presence of natural fractures had been detected. Another Columbian case history that required an unusual stimulation technique in a gas field operated by Petro-Colombia will also be presented. The well, Opon-6, provided extreme challenges because of difficult well Rio oil and gas expo and conference 2004 conditions caused by collapse points in the casing. In this well, fracturing software was used to perform several simulations before the job was run to predict the approximate micro fracture lengths and to foresee any potential problems with the completion equipment during the operation. This was a special application for which special tools had to be designed to modify the propellant application for slick-line operations. The process eliminated electric line by initiating the propellant with a special electronic triggering device. The process also used memory production logging tools to help properly position propellant devices at selected depths. The methods developed to satisfy the operational challenges in these cases will be presented. This paper will discuss how implementing innovative

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of patient dose perturbations in rotational-type radiotherapy due to a transverse magnetic field: A tomotherapy investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y. M.; Geurts, M.; Smilowitz, J. B.; Bednarz, B. P., E-mail: bbednarz2@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (United States); Sterpin, E. [Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium 1348 (Belgium)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Several groups are exploring the integration of magnetic resonance (MR) image guidance with radiotherapy to reduce tumor position uncertainty during photon radiotherapy. The therapeutic gain from reducing tumor position uncertainty using intrafraction MR imaging during radiotherapy could be partially offset if the negative effects of magnetic field-induced dose perturbations are not appreciated or accounted for. The authors hypothesize that a more rotationally symmetric modality such as helical tomotherapy will permit a systematic mediation of these dose perturbations. This investigation offers a unique look at the dose perturbations due to homogeneous transverse magnetic field during the delivery of Tomotherapy{sup ®} Treatment System plans under varying degrees of rotational beamlet symmetry. Methods: The authors accurately reproduced treatment plan beamlet and patient configurations using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. This code has a thoroughly benchmarked electromagnetic particle transport physics package well-suited for the radiotherapy energy regime. The three approved clinical treatment plans for this study were for a prostate, head and neck, and lung treatment. The dose heterogeneity index metric was used to quantify the effect of the dose perturbations to the target volumes. Results: The authors demonstrate the ability to reproduce the clinical dose–volume histograms (DVH) to within 4% dose agreement at each DVH point for the target volumes and most planning structures, and therefore, are able to confidently examine the effects of transverse magnetic fields on the plans. The authors investigated field strengths of 0.35, 0.7, 1, 1.5, and 3 T. Changes to the dose heterogeneity index of 0.1% were seen in the prostate and head and neck case, reflecting negligible dose perturbations to the target volumes, a change from 5.5% to 20.1% was observed with the lung case. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the effect of external magnetic fields can

  17. The practical application of scintillation dosimetry in small-field photon-beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Elisa; Poppinga, Daniela; Schoenfeld, Andreas A.; Poppe, Bjoern; Looe, Hui Khee [Oldenburg Univ. (Germany). Univ. Clinic for Medical Radiation Physics; Harder, Dietrich [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Medical Physics and Biophysics

    2017-07-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors are a new instrument of stereotactic photon-beam dosimetry. The clinical application of the plastic scintillation detector Exradin W1 at the Siemens Artiste and Elekta Synergy accelerators is a matter of current interest. In order to reduce the measurement uncertainty, precautions have to be taken with regard to the geometrical arrangement of the scintillator, the light-guide fiber and the photodiode in the radiation field. To determine the ''Cerenkov light ratio'' CLR with a type A uncertainty below 1%, the Cerenkov calibration procedure for small-field measurements based on the two-channel spectral method was used. Output factors were correctly measured with the W1 for field sizes down to 0.5 x 0.5 cm{sup 2} with a type A uncertainty of 1.8%. Measurements of small field dose profiles and percentage depth dose curves were carried out with the W1 using automated water phantom profile scans, and a type A uncertainty for dose maxima of 1.4% was achieved. The agreement with a synthetic diamond detector (microDiamond, PTW Freiburg) and a plane parallel ionization chamber (Roos chamber, PTW Freiburg) in relative dose measurements was excellent. In oversight of all results, the suitability of the plastic scintillation detector Exradin W1 for clinical dosimetry under stereotactic conditions, in particular the tried and tested procedures for CLR determination, output factor measurement and automated dose profile scans in water phantoms, have been confirmed.

  18. Advances in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, T.R.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation therapy is in the midst of a rebirth largely driven by the use of computers for treatment planning and beam delivery. The first edge of this renaissance was the advent of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT). This was enabled by the widespread availability and utilization of three-dimensional imaging such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance scanning, themselves products of the computer revolution. For the first time this allowed radiation oncologists to segment and visualize the tumor in association with it neighboring sensitive soft-tissue structures. Software tools to visualize the beam paths through the body enabled the beam directions and beam shapes to be manually optimized. Simultaneously, improved dose calculations utilizing the CT images of the patient anatomy produced more accurate distributions of dose. The dose was delivered with custom-shaped blocks or recently collimators with multiple leaves that allow complex shaped fields to be delivered without the need for block fabrication. In the last couple of decades new treatment delivery methodologies have emerged. The first has been stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which is the purview of neurosurgeons (who call it SRS) as well as radiation oncologists (who usually call it SRT). SRS and SRT are premised on multiple beams focusing on one location typically with circular aperture collimators but increasingly with fields shaped by multi-leaved collimators. Often only a single treatment session (the usual for SRS) is used when the treatment volume is small, but for larger lesions several treatment sessions, or fractions, are used (most often for SRT) to allow for normal tissue repair. The new equipment market for SRS and SRT is about 10% of the total for radiation therapy. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the latest treatment methodology and its adoption has been extremely rapid, particularly in the United States. IMRT uses

  19. A 1.5 T transverse magnetic field in radiotherapy of rectal cancer: Impact on the dose distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uilkema, Sander, E-mail: s.uilkema@nki.nl; Heide, Uulke van der; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Triest, Baukelien van; Nijkamp, Jasper [Department of Radiotherapy, NKI-AVL, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Moreau, Michel [RTP Research Group, Elekta, Maryland Heights, Missouri 63043 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: MRI guidance during radiotherapy has the potential to enable more accurate dose delivery, optimizing the balance between local control and treatment related toxicity. However, the presence of a permanent magnetic field influences the dose delivery, especially around air cavities. Here, electrons are able to return to the surface through which they entered the air cavity (electron return effect, ERE) locally resulting in dose hot- and cold-spots. Where RT of rectal cancer patients might benefit from MRI guidance for margin reduction, air cavities in and around the target volume are frequently present. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the impact of the presence of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field on dose delivery in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Ten patients treated with 5 × 5 Gy RT having large changes in pelvic air content were selected out of a cohort of 33 patients. On the planning CT, a 1.5 T, 6 MV, 7-field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan was created. This plan was subsequently recalculated on daily CT scans. For each daily CT, the CTV V{sub 95%} and V{sub 107%} and bowel area V{sub 5Gy}, V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 15Gy}, V{sub 20Gy}, and V{sub 25Gy} were calculated to evaluate the changes in dose distribution from fraction to fraction. For comparison, the authors repeated this procedure for the 0 T situation. To study the effect of changing air cavities separate from other anatomical changes, the authors also generated artificial air cavities in the CTV of one patient (2 and 5 cm diameter), in the high dose gradient region (2 cm), and in the low dose area (2 cm). Treatment plans were optimized without and with each simulated air cavity. For appearing and disappearing air cavities, the CTV V{sub 95%} and V{sub 107%} were evaluated. The authors also evaluated the ERE separate from attenuation changes locally around appearing gas pockets. Results: For the ten patients, at 1.5 T, the V{sub 95%} was influenced by both appearing and

  20. Estimation of extremely small field radiation dose for brain stereotactic radiotherapy using the Vero4DRT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Shinichi; Monzen, Hajime; Onishi, Yuichi; Kaneshige, Soichiro; Kanno, Ikuo

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was a dosimetric validation of the Vero4DRT for brain stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with extremely small fields calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS) iPlan (Ver.4.5.1; algorithm XVMC). Measured and calculated data (e.g. percentage depth dose [PDD], dose profile, and point dose) were compared for small square fields of 30 × 30, 20 × 20, 10 × 10 and 5 × 5 mm 2 using ionization chambers of 0.01 or 0.04 cm 3 and a diamond detector. Dose verifications were performed using an ionization chamber and radiochromic film (EBT3; the equivalent field sizes used were 8.2, 8.7, 8.9, 9.5, and 12.9 mm 2 ) for five brain SRT cases irradiated with dynamic conformal arcs. The PDDs and dose profiles for the measured and calculated data were in good agreement for fields larger than or equal to 10 × 10 mm 2 when an appropriate detector was chosen. The dose differences for point doses in fields of 30 × 30, 20 × 20, 10 × 10 and 5 × 5 mm 2 were +0.48%, +0.56%, -0.52%, and +11.2% respectively. In the dose verifications for the brain SRT plans, the mean dose difference between the calculated and measured doses were -0.35% (range, -0.94% to +0.47%), with the average pass rates for the gamma index under the 3%/2 mm criterion being 96.71%, 93.37%, and 97.58% for coronal, sagittal, and axial planes respectively. The Vero4DRT system provides accurate delivery of radiation dose for small fields larger than or equal to 10 × 10 mm 2 . Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Simple Carotid-Sparing Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Technique and Preliminary Experience for T1-2 Glottic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, David I.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Barker, Jerry L.; Mason, Bryan M.S.; Garcia, John A. C.; Lewin, Jan S.; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Stasney, C. Richard; Frank, Steven J.; Schwartz, David L.; Morrison, William H.; Garden, Adam S.; Ang, K. Kian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry and feasibility of carotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early glottic cancer and to report preliminary clinical experience. Methods and Materials: Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine radiotherapy (DICOM-RT) datasets from 6 T1-2 conventionally treated glottic cancer patients were used to create both conventional IMRT plans. We developed a simplified IMRT planning algorithm with three fields and limited segments. Conventional and IMRT plans were compared using generalized equivalent uniform dose and dose-volume parameters for in-field carotid arteries, target volumes, and organs at risk. We have treated 11 patients with this simplified IMRT technique. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy consistently reduced radiation dose to the carotid arteries (p < 0.05) while maintaining the clinical target volume coverage. With conventional planning, median carotid V35, V50, and V63 were 100%, 100%, and 69.0%, respectively. With IMRT planning these decreased to 2%, 0%, and 0%, respectively (p < 0.01). Radiation planning and treatment times were similar for conventional radiotherapy and IMRT. Treatment results have been excellent thus far. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy significantly reduced unnecessary radiation dose to the carotid arteries compared with conventional lateral fields while maintaining clinical target volume coverage. Further experience and longer follow-up will be required to demonstrate outcomes for cancer control and carotid artery effects.

  2. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate gradient measurements by PADC detectors in LINAC radiotherapy treatments-field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, M. T., E-mail: mariate9590@gmail.com; Barros, H.; Pino, F.; Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simón Bolívar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Sartenejas, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Dávila, J. [Física Médica C. A. and Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-07-23

    LINAC VARIAN 2100 is where energetic electrons produce Bremsstrahlung radiation, with energies above the nucleon binding energy (E≈5.5MeV). This radiation induce (γ,n) and (e,e’n) reactions mainly in the natural tungsten target material (its total photoneutron cross section is about 4000 mb in a energy range from 9-17 MeV). These reactions may occur also in other components of the system (e.g. multi leaf collimator). During radiation treatment the human body may receive an additional dose inside and outside the treated volume produced by the mentioned nuclear reactions. We measured the neutron density at the treatment table using nuclear track detectors (PADC-NTD). These covered by a boron-converter are employed, including a cadmium filter, to determine the ratio between two groups of neutron energy, i.e. thermal and epithermal. The PADC-NTD detectors were exposed to the radiation field at the iso-center during regular operation of the accelerator. Neutron are determined indirectly by the converting reaction {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li the emerging charged particle leave their kinetic energy in the PADC forming a latent nuclear track, enlarged by chemical etching (6N, NaOH, 70°C). Track density provides information on the neutron density through calibration coefficient (∼1.6 10{sup 4} neutrons /track) obtained by a californium source. We report the estimation of the thermal and epithermal neutron field and its gradient for photoneutrons produced in radiotherapy treatments with 18 MV linear accelerators. It was obsered that photoneutron production have higher rate at the iso-center.

  3. CT-guided intracavitary radiotherapy for cervical cancer: Comparison of conventional point A plan with clinical target volume-based three-dimensional plan using dose-volume parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Tae Hyun; Cho, Jung Keun; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Chie, Eui Kyu; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To perform an intracavitary radiotherapy (ICR) plan comparison between the conventional point A plan (conventional plan) and computed tomography (CT)-guided clinical target volume-based plan (CTV plan) by analysis of the quantitative dose-volume parameters and irradiated volumes of organs at risk in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty plans for 192 Ir high-dose-rate ICR after 30-40-Gy external beam radiotherapy were investigated. CT images were acquired at the first ICR session with artifact-free applicators in place. The gross tumor volume, clinical target volume (CTV), point A, and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 38 rectal and bladder points were defined on reconstructed CT images. A fractional 100% dose was prescribed to point A in the conventional plan and to the outermost point to cover all CTVs in the CTV plan. The reference volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V ref ), and the dose-volume parameters of the coverage index, conformal index, and external volume index were calculated from the dose-volume histogram. The bladder, rectal point doses, and percentage of volumes receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% of the prescribed dose were also analyzed. Results: Conventional plans were performed, and patients were categorized on the basis of whether the 100% isodose line of point A prescription dose fully encompassed the CTV (Group 1, n = 20) or not (Group 2, n = 10). The mean gross tumor volume (11.6 cm 3 ) and CTV (24.9 cm 3 ) of Group 1 were smaller than the corresponding values (23.7 and 44.7 cm 3 , respectively) for Group 2 (p = 0.003). The mean V ref for all patients was 129.6 cm 3 for the conventional plan and 97.0 cm 3 for the CTV plan (p = 0.003). The mean V ref in Group 1 decreased markedly with the CTV plan (p < 0.001). For the conventional and CTV plans in all patients, the mean coverage index, conformal index, and external volume index were 0.98 and 1.0, 0.23 and 0.34, and 3.86 and

  4. Transition from 2-D radiotherapy to 3-D conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-05-01

    in number in the near future. Since these treatment techniques are perceived as the cutting-edge of development in the field, there is a concern that centres and countries need orientation as to the preparatory conditions and resources involved. In addition the current status of the evidence supporting the use of IMRT in terms of patient outcomes has to be kept in mind when planning to invest in these technologies. To respond to the needs of Member States to establish the guidelines for the transition from 2-D radiotherapy through 3-D CRT to IMRT several consultants and advisory group meetings were convened to discuss the necessary steps and the milestones for the transfer from 2-D to 3-D conformal radiotherapy and to IMRT. As a result, the present report serves as complementary recommendations to an IAEA recent publication on setting-up a basic radiotherapy programme. Both reports provide a comprehensive overview of the required radiotherapy infrastructure and processes for a broad spectrum of radiotherapy services. The current publication is addressed to those professionals and administrators involved in the development, implementation and management of radiation oncology programmes who seek to improve the conventional approach with the aim of achieving higher precision by transition from simpler radiation treatment approaches to advanced radiotherapy. This report provides the guidelines and highlights the milestones to be achieved by radiotherapy centres in the transition from 2-D to 3-D treatment planning and delivery and further, in transitioning to IMRT. These guidelines and milestones facilitate the process and represent continuation of the work at the IAEA for providing access to safer and better quality treatment for the steadily increasing number of cancer patients in Member States

  5. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Following In-Field Failure of Initial SBRT for Spinal Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Isabelle; Campbell, Mikki; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Letourneau, Daniel; Yu, Eugene; Cho, B C John; Lee, Young K; Fehlings, Michael G; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-10-01

    We report our experience in salvaging spinal metastases initially irradiated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), who subsequently progressed with imaging-confirmed local tumor progression, and were re-irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. From a prospective database, 56 metastatic spinal segments in 40 patients were identified as having been irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. In addition, 24 of 56 (42.9%) segments had initially been irradiated with conventional external beam radiation therapy before the first course of SBRT. Local control (LC) was defined as no progression on magnetic resonance imaging at the treated segment, and calculated according to the competing risk model. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated for each patient treated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. The median salvage second SBRT total dose and number of fractions was 30 Gy in 4 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 2-5 fractions), and for the first course of SBRT was 24 Gy in 2 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 1-5 fractions). The median follow-up time after salvage second SBRT was 6.8 months (range, 0.9-39 months), the median OS was 10.0 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 48%. A longer time interval between the first and second SBRT courses predicted for better OS (P=.02). The crude LC was 77% (43/56), the 1-year LC rate was 81%, and the median time to local failure was 3.0 months (range, 2.7-16.7 months). Of the 13 local failures, 85% (11/13) and 46% (6/13) showed progression within the epidural space and paraspinal soft tissues, respectively. Absence of baseline paraspinal disease predicted for better LC (Pinitial SBRT is a feasible and efficacious salvage treatment option. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dosimetry performed on inverted 'Y' field for radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorsch, G.

    1984-01-01

    Examinations with integrated spleen volume on the Alderson phantom were performed with photon rays of the telecobalt device and linear accelerators with 6 and 10 MeV limit energy. Concerning radiation quality and field homogeneity, 10 MeV linear accelerators are to be preferred. Exposure of one third of the leftside kidney to damaging radiation doses obtain with spleen irradiation only. Lumbar spinal marrow can be protected against radiation damage by using dorsal absorbers from 20 Gy focal dose onwards. Craniolateral oophoropexy has to be performed prior to irradiation in order to maintain ovary functions. (DG) [de

  7. Dose distribution over the radiation field and organs of the body during radiotherapy procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.; Begum, M.; Ambia, A.S.M.; Akhter, S.; Banu, H.

    2001-01-01

    Beam profile of the 60 Co teletherapy unit for 10 cm x 10 cm along central axis was measured to study the symmetry of the gamma beam and found that the average dose was 98.44±1.40 mGy. Output dose versus field size was also measured and values were found reasonable. Dose prescription to delivery was measured by placing TLD onto the treatment field for lung and cervix cancer patient which was found to be 39.16±2.98 Gy and 50.48±3.68 Gy respectively which are within 2 % and 0.17 % of the prescribed dose as 40.00 and 50.40 Gy respectively, reveals good agreement with the treatment planning. Six typical types of patients (both male and female) with cancers in lung, larynx, breast, cervix, oesophagus and brain treated with 60 Co teletherapy were particularly considered for dose assessment at different critical organs of interest. It was observed that the doses to the lens of eye with a maximum value of 460.35+78.87 mGy for a larynx cancer patient to a minimum value of 30.80+4.00 mGy of a cervix cancer patient. Doses to the gonad vary with a maximum value of 3810.80+389.76 mGy for a cervix cancer patient to a minimum value of 8.20+1.00 mGy for a brain cancer patient. (author)

  8. SU-E-J-198: Out-Of-Field Dose and Surface Dose Measurements of MRI-Guided Cobalt-60 Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, J; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Thomas, D; Yang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure quantities of dosimetric interest in an MRI-guided cobalt radiotherapy machine that was recently introduced to clinical use. Methods: Out-of-field dose due to photon scatter and leakage was measured using an ion chamber and solid water slabs mimicking a human body. Surface dose was measured by irradiating stacks of radiochromic film and extrapolating to zero thickness. Electron out-of-field dose was characterized using solid water slabs and radiochromic film. Results: For some phantom geometries, up to 50% of Dmax was observed up to 10 cm laterally from the edge of the beam. The maximum penetration was between 1 and 2 mm in solid water, indicating an electron energy not greater than approximately 0.4 MeV. Out-of-field dose from photon scatter measured at 1 cm depth in solid water was found to fall to less than 10% of Dmax at a distance of 1.2 cm from the edge of a 10.5 × 10.5 cm field, and less that 1% of Dmax at a distance of 10 cm from field edge. Surface dose was measured to be 8% of Dmax. Conclusion: Surface dose and out-of-field dose from the MRIguided cobalt radiotherapy machine was measured and found to be within acceptable limits. Electron out-of-field dose, an effect unique to MRI-guided radiotherapy and presumed to arise from low-energy electrons trapped by the Lorentz force, was quantified. Dr. Low is a member of the scientific advisory board of ViewRay, Inc

  9. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Following In-Field Failure of Initial SBRT for Spinal Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibault, Isabelle; Campbell, Mikki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Tseng, Chia-Lin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Atenafu, Eshetu G. [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Letourneau, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yu, Eugene [Department of Radiology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cho, B.C. John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lee, Young K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fehlings, Michael G. [Department of Radiology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: We report our experience in salvaging spinal metastases initially irradiated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), who subsequently progressed with imaging-confirmed local tumor progression, and were re-irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. Methods and Materials: From a prospective database, 56 metastatic spinal segments in 40 patients were identified as having been irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. In addition, 24 of 56 (42.9%) segments had initially been irradiated with conventional external beam radiation therapy before the first course of SBRT. Local control (LC) was defined as no progression on magnetic resonance imaging at the treated segment, and calculated according to the competing risk model. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated for each patient treated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median salvage second SBRT total dose and number of fractions was 30 Gy in 4 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 2-5 fractions), and for the first course of SBRT was 24 Gy in 2 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 1-5 fractions). The median follow-up time after salvage second SBRT was 6.8 months (range, 0.9-39 months), the median OS was 10.0 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 48%. A longer time interval between the first and second SBRT courses predicted for better OS (P=.02). The crude LC was 77% (43/56), the 1-year LC rate was 81%, and the median time to local failure was 3.0 months (range, 2.7-16.7 months). Of the 13 local failures, 85% (11/13) and 46% (6/13) showed progression within the epidural space and paraspinal soft tissues, respectively. Absence of baseline paraspinal disease predicted for better LC (P<.01). No radiation-induced vertebral compression fractures or cases of myelopathy were observed. Conclusion: A second course of spine SBRT, most often with 30 Gy in 4 fractions, for spinal metastases that failed initial SBRT is a feasible and efficacious salvage treatment option.

  10. CT ESP for Yme, Converting the Yme field offshore Norway from a conventional rig-operated field to CT-operated for workover and drilling applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baklid, A.; Apeland, O. J.; Teigen, A. S. [Statoil (Norway)

    1998-12-31

    Conventional tubing deployed electrical submersible pump (ESP) was the original choice as the artificial lift method for the Yme field offshore Norway. Several operational problems experienced over the past two years, such as formation damage, complicated and costly workovers and limited access to the reservoir, combined with revised field requirements and a reevaluation of artificial lift methods resulted in a change in completion philosophy. Following these reassessments coiled tubing ESPs utilizing internal power cable were installed and became the preferred method. This paper provides an assessment of the value of installing CT-ESP in a live well, and describes the system design for a true underbalanced CT-ESP installation. Well control and barrier philosophy during installation, production and workover mode is also evaluated. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  11. Theoretical and experimental study about dose distribution in irregular fields used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feld de Lindenboim, D.B.; Lopez de Gomez, C.M.

    1979-02-01

    Considering the broad use of irregular fields in treatments with teletherapy machines, it is necessary to have simple calculation methods. The purpose of this work is to verify, through measures made with a water phantom, the reliability of a particular calculation method based on measures made in airand the use of the Tables of scatter-air ratio. Based on the values obtained, we may conclude that the method is acceptable for points distant from the lead blocks. Simultaneously, it was proved that secondary radiation in points under lead protections is so important that it becomes of small effectiveness to increase the lead block thickness in order to diminish the total dose in those points. (author) [es

  12. Comparative UAV and Field Phenotyping to Assess Yield and Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Hybrid and Conventional Barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefauver, Shawn C; Vicente, Rubén; Vergara-Díaz, Omar; Fernandez-Gallego, Jose A; Kerfal, Samir; Lopez, Antonio; Melichar, James P E; Serret Molins, María D; Araus, José L

    2017-01-01

    With the commercialization and increasing availability of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) multiple rotor copters have expanded rapidly in plant phenotyping studies with their ability to provide clear, high resolution images. As such, the traditional bottleneck of plant phenotyping has shifted from data collection to data processing. Fortunately, the necessarily controlled and repetitive design of plant phenotyping allows for the development of semi-automatic computer processing tools that may sufficiently reduce the time spent in data extraction. Here we present a comparison of UAV and field based high throughput plant phenotyping (HTPP) using the free, open-source image analysis software FIJI (Fiji is just ImageJ) using RGB (conventional digital cameras), multispectral and thermal aerial imagery in combination with a matching suite of ground sensors in a study of two hybrids and one conventional barely variety with ten different nitrogen treatments, combining different fertilization levels and application schedules. A detailed correlation network for physiological traits and exploration of the data comparing between treatments and varieties provided insights into crop performance under different management scenarios. Multivariate regression models explained 77.8, 71.6, and 82.7% of the variance in yield from aerial, ground, and combined data sets, respectively.

  13. Comparative UAV and Field Phenotyping to Assess Yield and Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Hybrid and Conventional Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn C. Kefauver

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With the commercialization and increasing availability of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs multiple rotor copters have expanded rapidly in plant phenotyping studies with their ability to provide clear, high resolution images. As such, the traditional bottleneck of plant phenotyping has shifted from data collection to data processing. Fortunately, the necessarily controlled and repetitive design of plant phenotyping allows for the development of semi-automatic computer processing tools that may sufficiently reduce the time spent in data extraction. Here we present a comparison of UAV and field based high throughput plant phenotyping (HTPP using the free, open-source image analysis software FIJI (Fiji is just ImageJ using RGB (conventional digital cameras, multispectral and thermal aerial imagery in combination with a matching suite of ground sensors in a study of two hybrids and one conventional barely variety with ten different nitrogen treatments, combining different fertilization levels and application schedules. A detailed correlation network for physiological traits and exploration of the data comparing between treatments and varieties provided insights into crop performance under different management scenarios. Multivariate regression models explained 77.8, 71.6, and 82.7% of the variance in yield from aerial, ground, and combined data sets, respectively.

  14. Conformal radiotherapy: principles and classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, J.C.; Gaboriaud, G.; Pontvert, D.

    1999-01-01

    'Conformal radiotherapy' is the name fixed by usage and given to a new form of radiotherapy resulting from the technological improvements observed during the last ten years. While this terminology is now widely used, no precise definition can be found in the literature. Conformal radiotherapy refers to an approach in which the dose distribution is more closely 'conformed' or adapted to the actual shape of the target volume. However, the achievement of a consensus on a more specific definition is hampered by various difficulties, namely in characterizing the degree of 'conformality'. We have therefore suggested a classification scheme be established on the basis of the tools and the procedures actually used for all steps of the process, i.e., from prescription to treatment completion. Our classification consists of four levels: schematically, at level 0, there is no conformation (rectangular fields); at level 1, a simple conformation takes place, on the basis of conventional 2D imaging; at level 2, a 3D reconstruction of the structures is used for a more accurate conformation; and level 3 includes research and advanced dynamic techniques. We have used our personal experience, contacts with colleagues and data from the literature to analyze all the steps of the planning process, and to define the tools and procedures relevant to a given level. The corresponding tables have been discussed and approved at the European level within the Dynarad concerted action. It is proposed that the term 'conformal radiotherapy' be restricted to procedures where all steps are at least at level 2. (author)

  15. Postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikama, Naoto; Koguchi, Masahiko; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kaneko, Tomoki; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Since there have been few reports on postmastectomy radiotherapy having a high evidence level in Japan, the significance of postoperative radiotherapy and the irradiation techniques were reviewed based on reports from Western countries. Authors focused on the indications for postoperative irradiation, irradiation methods (irradiation sites, irradiation techniques; prosthetics, methods of irradiating the chest wall and lymph nodes, timing of irradiation), and complications, and discuss them. The factors thought to be adaptable to postmastectomy radiotherapy have been listed. Axillary lymph node metastasis and the size of the primary focus are thought to be important factors in locoregional recurrence. The chest wall and the supraclavicular lymph nodes are the usual sites of irradiation after mastectomy. The irradiation method consists of tangential irradiation of the chest wall and single-field irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes, with 46-50 Gy in fractional doses of 1.8-2 Gy x 5/w is administered for 4.5-5.5 weeks. The timing of irradiation in the West is generally after chemotherapy. Adverse radiation effects include ischemic heart disease, pneumonitis, arm edema, rib fractures, and brachial plexus paralysis. The frequency of these complications is increased by the combined use of chemotherapy or surgery. The breast cancer cure rate in Japan is generally better than in the West. It remains to be determined whether the clinical data from Europe and America are applicable to the treatment of breast cancer in Japan. To address this issue, a clinical investigation should be performed in Japan with close cooperation between surgeons, physicians, pathologists, and radiotherapists. (K.H.)

  16. Radiation Effect on Body Weight and Hematological Changes of Hybrid Mice by Conventional Fraction, Large Abdominal Field Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Heon; Shin, Sei One; Kim, Myung Se

    1985-01-01

    Radiation effect on mammals, especially on hematologic changes, has been studied since discovery of x-ray. Various experimental animals were tried for radiobiological studies. 72 hybrid mice with conventional fraction (5X/week), large abdominal field (2 x 3cm, from symphysis pubic to xyphoid process) were used. Body weight was declined gradually by increasing irradiation doses, nadir was about 29.7% in male ; 30.4% in female at 6000 rad irradiation group. Hemoglobin value was nearly normal throughout entire treatment. Significant dropping of WBC count was noted to 40-50% of pretreatment values by only 1000 rad irradiation. Change of differential count was interesting; lymphocyte proportion showed gradual reduction, instead of gradual increasing of segmented neutrophil. Those proportion were reversed after 6000 rad irradiation. Urinary protein tests showed + - +++, showing no correlation with dosage. Application. of our study in clinical combination therapy (radiation + chemotherapy) was discussed

  17. Health-related quality of life after intensity modulated radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. Comparison with conventional and conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namiki, Shunichi; Ishidoya, Shigeto; Tochigi, Tatsuo

    2006-01-01

    No previous studies have reported the longitudinal health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We compared HRQOL after IMRT with that after conventional and after conformal radiation therapy (XRT). A total of 110 patients underwent XRT (34 patients underwent conventional radiation therapy and 76 underwent conformal radiation therapy) and 30 underwent IMRT for clinically localized prostate cancer between 2000 and 2002. We measured the general and disease-specific HRQOL using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Health Survey and University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index, respectively. There were no significant differences in the preoperative characteristics and HRQOL scores of the two groups. Repeated measure analyses of variance revealed significantly different patterns of alteration in several general HRQOL domains between XRT and the IMRT groups. In the urinary domain, there was no difference in the alteration patterns between the two groups. The XRT group suffered worse bowel function at 3 and 6 months than the IMRT group (P<0.05). In the XRT group, sexual function decreased at 3 months and remained substantially lower than the baseline level. However, the IMRT group showed no significant difference from the baseline level at any of the observation periods. At 18 months the XRT group showed worse sexual function than the IMRT group. The two approaches showed different longitudinal profiles regarding general and disease-specific HRQOL during the first 2 years after treatment. The IMRT approach produced little impairment in bowel and sexual function. (author)

  18. Clinical outcome of extended-field irradiation vs. pelvic irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Yi; Wang, Yanhong; Chen, Kai; Cao, Xinping; Zeng, Yiming

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the distinctions in survival and toxicity between patients with cervical cancer with common iliac node or para-aortic node involvement, who were treated with extended-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (EF-IMRT) and patients with or without lower involved pelvic nodes, who were treated with pelvic IMRT. A total of 55 patients treated with EF-IMRT and 52 patients treated with pelvic IMRT at the Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center (Guangzhou, China) were retrospectively analyzed. Patients treated with EF-IMRT had the highest level of lymph node involvement to the para-aortic or common iliac nodes, while patients treated with pelvic IMRT had no para-aortic or common iliac nodes involved (Pirradiation was a protective prognostic factor for OS and DFS. A total of 16 patients in the EF-IMRT group and 13 patients in the pelvic IMRT group experienced treatment failure (P=0.67), with the patterns of failure being the same for the two groups (P=0.88). The cumulative incidence of grade 3 and 4 acute toxicities in the EF-IMRT group was 34.5%, in comparison with 19.2% in the pelvic group (P=0.048). The results of the present study suggest that patients with cervical cancer with grossly involved common iliac or para-aortic nodes should be electively subjected to EF irradiation to improve the survival and alter patterns of recurrence. Notably, EF irradiation delivered via IMRT exhibits an increased toxicity incidence, however, this remains within an acceptable range.

  19. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yaowen; Cao Yongzhen; Li Jin; Wang Qin

    2008-01-01

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. Nowadays, a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research, and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features. This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism. (authors)

  20. Radiotherapy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiotherapy Physics Group works on the physical and biophysical aspects of charged particle radiotherapy. Our activities include the development of isosurvival beams (beams of uniform biological effect), computerized treatment planning development for charged particle radiotherapy, design of compensation to shape dose distributions, and development of dosimetry techniques to verify planned irradiations in both phantoms and patients

  1. Observer variability when evaluating patient movement from electronic portal images of pelvic radiotherapy fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraint Lewis, D.; Ryan, Karen R.; Smith, Cyril W.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: A study has been performed to evaluate inter-observer variability when assessing pelvic patient movement using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Materials and methods: Four patient image sets were used with 3-6 portal images per set. The observer group consisted of nine radiographers with 3-18 months clinical EPID experience. The observers outlined bony landmarks on a digital simulator image and used matching software to evaluate field placement errors (FPEs) on each portal image relative to the reference simulator image. Data were evaluated statistically, using a two-component analysis of variance technique, to quantify both the inter-observer variability in evaluating FPEs and inter-fraction variability in patient position relative to the residuals of the analysis. Intra-observer variability was also estimated using four of the observers carrying out three sets of repeat readings. Results: Eight sets of variance data were analysed, based on FPEs in two orthogonal directions for each of the four patient image sets studied. Initial analysis showed that both inter-observer variation and inter-fraction-patient position variation were statistically significant (P<0.05) in seven of the eight cases evaluated. The averaged root-mean-square (RMS) deviation of the observers from the group mean was 1.1 mm, with a maximum deviation of 5.0 mm recorded for an individual observer. After additional training and re-testing of two of the observers who recorded the largest deviations from the group mean, a subsequent analysis showed the inter-observer variability for the group to be significant in only three of the eight cases, with averaged RMS deviation reduced to 0.5 mm, with a maximum deviation of 2.7 mm. The intra-observer variability was 0.5 mm, averaged over the four observers tested. Conclusions: We have developed a quantitative approach to evaluate inter-observer variability in terms of its statistical significance compared to inter

  2. 331 cases of clinically node-negative supraglottic carcinoma of the larynx: a study of a modest size fixed field radiotherapy approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, Andrew J.; Slevin, Nicholas J.; Gupta, Nirmal K.; Brewster, Allison E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: For node-negative supraglottic carcinoma of the larynx, radiotherapy with surgery in reserve commonly provides very good results in terms of both local control and survival, while preserving function. However uncertainty exists over the treatment of the node-negative neck. Elective whole neck radiotherapy, while effective, may be associated with significant morbidity. The purpose of this study was to examine our practice of treating a modest size, fixed field to a high biologically effective dose and compare it with the patterns of recurrence from other centers that use different dose/volume approaches. Methods and Materials: Over a 10-year period 331 patients with node-negative supraglottic carcinoma of the larynx were treated with radiotherapy at the Christie Hospital Manchester. Patients were treated with doses of 50-55 Gy in 16 fractions over 3 weeks. Data were collected retrospectively for local and regional control, survival, and morbidity. Results: Overall local control, after surgical salvage in 17 cases, was 79% (T1-92%, T2-81%, T3-67%, T4-73%). Overall regional lymph node control, after surgical salvage in 13 cases, was 84% (T1-91%, T2-88%, T3-81%, T4-72%). Five-year crude survival was 50%, but after correcting for intercurrent deaths was 70% (T1-83%, T2-78%, T3-53%, T4-61%). Serious morbidity requiring surgery was seen in 7 cases (2.1%) and was related to prescribed dose (50 Gy-0%, 52.5 Gy-1.3%, 55 Gy-3.4%). Discussion: Our results confirm that treating a modest size, fixed field to a high biologically effective dose is highly effective. It enables preservation of the larynx in most cases, with acceptable regional control and no loss of survival compared to whole neck radiotherapy regimes

  3. Acute toxicity and cost analysis of a phase III randomized trial of accelerated and conventional radiotherapy for squamous carcinoma of the head and neck: a trans- tasman radiation oncology group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, M.; Williamson, S.; Tripcony, L.; Spry, N.; Peters, L.; Penniment, M.; Lamb, D.; Krawitz, H.

    1999-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present analysis was to assess the feasibility and acute toxicity of a pure accelerated fractionation regimen in a cooperative group setting. This analysis included the first 320 patients entered on to the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) randomized controlled trial which compared accelerated radiotherapy (ART) with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in stage lIl and IV squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck. Patients were randomized to either 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions over 24 days (ART) or to 70 Gy 35 fractions over 49 days (CRT) after being stratified for site and stage. Accrual began in 1991 and the trial was closed on 3 April 1998 with the targeted 350 patients. The 3-year survival for the whole group was 54%, and the 3-year disease-free survival was 41%. Toxicity data were available on 303 patients (148 ART; 155 CRT). Mucosal toxicity was worse in the accelerated grup, and it peaked ∼ 3 weeks earlier than the conventional grup. Skin toxicity was equivalent but occurred ∼ 7 days earlier in the accelerated grup. Acute effects in both grups healed completely. Hospitalization was more common in the ART grup (71 vs 52 patients; P=0.01) but the total bed days in hospital was not greatly different (1707 bed days for ART and 1607 bed days for CRT). Patients were more likely to require nasogastric (NG) feeding in the ART grup (49 vs 33 patients; P = 0.02). There were 1157 NG feeding days for ART and 1154 NG feeding days for CRT. The average cost of radiation treatment per patient including hospitalisation, NG feeding and accommodation was $11 750 in the ART grup and $11 587 in the CRT grup. The accelerated grup has been shown to be a tolerable, practical and cost-equivalent regimen. The assessment of the therapeutic ratio of this accelerated protocol (ART) will be determined when the analysis of late effects and loco-regional control is made when the data are more mature. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  4. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in recurrent or oligometastatic pancreatic cancer. A toxicity review of simultaneous integrated protection (SIP) versus conventional SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gkika, E.; Kirste, S.; Schimek-Jasch, T. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Adebahr, S. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (partner site Freiburg) (Germany); Wiehle, R. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Claus, R. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Hematology, Oncology and Stem-Cell Transplantation, Freiburg (Germany); Wittel, U. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Nestle, U.; Grosu, A.L.; Brunner, T.B. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (partner site Freiburg) (Germany); University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Baltas, D. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (partner site Freiburg) (Germany); University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in pancreatic cancer can be limited by its proximity to organs at risk (OAR). In this analysis, we evaluated the toxicity and efficacy of two different treatment approaches in patients with locally recurrent or oligometastatic pancreatic cancer. According to the prescription method, patients were divided in two cohorts (C1 and C2). The planning target volume (PTV) was created through a 4 mm expansion of the internal target volume. In C2, a subvolume was additionally created, a simultaneous integrated protection (SIP), which is the overlap of the PTV with the planning risk volume of an OAR to which we prescribed a reduced dose. In all, 18 patients were treated (7 with local recurrences, 9 for oligometastases, 2 for both). Twelve of 23 lesions were treated without SIP (C1) and 11 with SIP (C2). The median follow-up was 12.8 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 13.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.8-14.6) months. The OS rates at 6 and 12 months were 87 and 58%, respectively. Freedom from local progression for combined cohorts at 6 and 12 months was 93 and 67% (95% CI 15-36), respectively. Local control was not statistically different between the two groups. One patient in C2 experienced grade ≥3 acute toxicities and 1 patient in C1 experienced a grade ≥3 late toxicity. The SIP approach is a useful prescription method for abdominal SBRT with a favorable toxicity profile which does not compromise local control and overall survival despite dose sacrifices in small subvolumes. (orig.) [German] Die stereotaktische Strahlentherapie (SBRT) ist bei Pankreaskarzinomen durch die enge Lagebeziehung der Risikoorgane (OAR) zum Zielvolumen erschwert. In dieser Analyse evaluierten wir die Toxizitaet und die Lokalkontrolle von zwei unterschiedlichen Therapiestrategien bei Patienten mit rezidivierendem oder oligometastatischem Pankreaskarzinom. Die Patienten wurden anhand der Verschreibungsmethode in zwei Kohorten geteilt (C1 und C2). Das

  5. SU-F-T-338: Flattening Filter Free Photon Beams Can Achieve the Same Plan Quality as Conventional Flattened Beams for Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolar, M; Szwedowski, R; Greskovich, J; Xia, P [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Some modern linear accelerators are equipped with one low energy flat beam and two flattening filter free (FFF) beams at high and low energies. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the high energy FFF beam can produce the same plan quality as the conventional low energy flat beam, using a volumetric modulated arc (VMAT) technique for prostate patients. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients were selected with a prescription of 78Gy. For each patient, three plans were created: (a) double arc flat 6MV plan used clinically; (b) double arc 10MV FFF plan; (c) single arc 10MV FFF plan. Each plan was prescribed so that at least 95% of the PTV received the prescription dose. The following dosimetric endpoints were evaluated: volume receiving 78Gy (V78) of the CTV and PTV, PTV conformality index (CI, ratio of prescription isodose volume to the PTV volume), bladder volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 60Gy (V60), rectum volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 50Gy (V50), dose to 10cc of the rectum, and volume of both femoral heads receiving 50Gy (V50). Total monitor units for each plan were recorded. Results: No significant difference was found for all dosimetric endpoints between all plans (p>0.05). Compared to the 6MV plans, monitor units were higher with the double arc 10MV FFF plans and lower with the single arc 10MV FFF plans, 29% and 4% respectively. Conclusion: Both single arc and double arc 10MV FFF VMAT can achieve equivalent plan quality as 6MV flat beam double arc treatment plans. With the gantry speed restriction, a high dose rate of 2400MU/min may allow the optimizer to use more MUs than actually needed. Single arc 10MV FFF VMAT plans are a reasonable alternative to double arc 6MV flat beam VMAT plans.

  6. SU-F-T-545: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Evaluation of Dose Calculation Algorithms On Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Conventional Flattened and Flattening-Filter-Free Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S; Suh, T; Chung, J; Eom, K; Lee, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric and radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms on prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy plans with both conventional flattened (FF) and flattening-filter free (FFF) modes. Methods: For thirteen patients with prostate cancer, SBRT planning was performed using 10-MV photon beam with FF and FFF modes. The total dose prescribed to the PTV was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions. All plans were initially calculated using AAA algorithm in Eclipse treatment planning system (11.0.34), and then were re-calculated using AXB with the same MUs and MLC files. The four types of plans for different algorithms and beam energies were compared in terms of homogeneity and conformity. To evaluate the radiobiological impact, the tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculations were performed. Results: For PTV, both calculation algorithms and beam modes lead to comparable homogeneity and conformity. However, the averaged TCP values in AXB plans were always lower than in AAA plans with an average difference of 5.3% and 6.1% for 10-MV FFF and FF beam, respectively. In addition, the averaged NTCP values for organs at risk (OARs) were comparable. Conclusion: This study showed that prostate SBRT plan were comparable dosimetric results with different dose calculation algorithms as well as delivery beam modes. For biological results, even though NTCP values for both calculation algorithms and beam modes were similar, AXB plans produced slightly lower TCP compared to the AAA plans.

  7. SU-F-T-545: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Evaluation of Dose Calculation Algorithms On Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Conventional Flattened and Flattening-Filter-Free Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S; Suh, T [The catholic university of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, J; Eom, K [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J [Konkuk University Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric and radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms on prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy plans with both conventional flattened (FF) and flattening-filter free (FFF) modes. Methods: For thirteen patients with prostate cancer, SBRT planning was performed using 10-MV photon beam with FF and FFF modes. The total dose prescribed to the PTV was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions. All plans were initially calculated using AAA algorithm in Eclipse treatment planning system (11.0.34), and then were re-calculated using AXB with the same MUs and MLC files. The four types of plans for different algorithms and beam energies were compared in terms of homogeneity and conformity. To evaluate the radiobiological impact, the tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculations were performed. Results: For PTV, both calculation algorithms and beam modes lead to comparable homogeneity and conformity. However, the averaged TCP values in AXB plans were always lower than in AAA plans with an average difference of 5.3% and 6.1% for 10-MV FFF and FF beam, respectively. In addition, the averaged NTCP values for organs at risk (OARs) were comparable. Conclusion: This study showed that prostate SBRT plan were comparable dosimetric results with different dose calculation algorithms as well as delivery beam modes. For biological results, even though NTCP values for both calculation algorithms and beam modes were similar, AXB plans produced slightly lower TCP compared to the AAA plans.

  8. SU-F-T-338: Flattening Filter Free Photon Beams Can Achieve the Same Plan Quality as Conventional Flattened Beams for Prostate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolar, M; Szwedowski, R; Greskovich, J; Xia, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Some modern linear accelerators are equipped with one low energy flat beam and two flattening filter free (FFF) beams at high and low energies. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the high energy FFF beam can produce the same plan quality as the conventional low energy flat beam, using a volumetric modulated arc (VMAT) technique for prostate patients. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients were selected with a prescription of 78Gy. For each patient, three plans were created: (a) double arc flat 6MV plan used clinically; (b) double arc 10MV FFF plan; (c) single arc 10MV FFF plan. Each plan was prescribed so that at least 95% of the PTV received the prescription dose. The following dosimetric endpoints were evaluated: volume receiving 78Gy (V78) of the CTV and PTV, PTV conformality index (CI, ratio of prescription isodose volume to the PTV volume), bladder volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 60Gy (V60), rectum volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 50Gy (V50), dose to 10cc of the rectum, and volume of both femoral heads receiving 50Gy (V50). Total monitor units for each plan were recorded. Results: No significant difference was found for all dosimetric endpoints between all plans (p>0.05). Compared to the 6MV plans, monitor units were higher with the double arc 10MV FFF plans and lower with the single arc 10MV FFF plans, 29% and 4% respectively. Conclusion: Both single arc and double arc 10MV FFF VMAT can achieve equivalent plan quality as 6MV flat beam double arc treatment plans. With the gantry speed restriction, a high dose rate of 2400MU/min may allow the optimizer to use more MUs than actually needed. Single arc 10MV FFF VMAT plans are a reasonable alternative to double arc 6MV flat beam VMAT plans.

  9. Two cases with giant lung abscess originating in the irradiated lung field following the concurrent chemo-radiotherapy of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Takeshi; Inui, Hiroyuki; Yukawa, Susumu; Nomoto, Hiroshi (Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan)); Minakata, Yoshiaki; Yamagata, Toshiyuki

    1992-05-01

    Two patients with giant lung abscess originating in the irradiated lung field are reported. Lung abscesses occurred during the term of leukopenia following the concurrent chemo-radiotherapy of lung cancer. Both patients were diagnosed as small cell lung cancer, and were treated concurrently with chemotherapy (Cisplatin + Etoposide) and radiotherapy (total 40-50 Gy). Case 1 was a 59 years old male. Seven weeks after the first irradiation, a giant lung abscess was caused by methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) originated in the lung field with radiation pneumonitis, and giant bronchial fistula was formed, that showed the specific bronchofiberscopic findings. Case 2 was a 67 years old male. Twelve weeks after the first irradiation, a giant lung abscess was caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa originated in the irradiated lung field following the formation of a pneumatocele. MRSA and pseudomonas aeruginosa are important as cause of hospital infection, and both can cause lung abscess. However, in our cases, lung abscess were formed just in the irradiated lung field and rapidly enlarged. These clinical findings suggested that myelosuppression and radiation injury of lung tissue might cause such giant lung abscess. (author).

  10. Two cases with giant lung abscess originating in the irradiated lung field following the concurrent chemo-radiotherapy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Takeshi; Inui, Hiroyuki; Yukawa, Susumu; Nomoto, Hiroshi; Minakata, Yoshiaki; Yamagata, Toshiyuki.

    1992-01-01

    Two patients with giant lung abscess originating in the irradiated lung field are reported. Lung abscesses occurred during the term of leukopenia following the concurrent chemo-radiotherapy of lung cancer. Both patients were diagnosed as small cell lung cancer, and were treated concurrently with chemotherapy (Cisplatin + Etoposide) and radiotherapy (total 40-50 Gy). Case 1 was a 59 years old male. Seven weeks after the first irradiation, a giant lung abscess was caused by methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) originated in the lung field with radiation pneumonitis, and giant bronchial fistula was formed, that showed the specific bronchofiberscopic findings. Case 2 was a 67 years old male. Twelve weeks after the first irradiation, a giant lung abscess was caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa originated in the irradiated lung field following the formation of a pneumatocele. MRSA and pseudomonas aeruginosa are important as cause of hospital infection, and both can cause lung abscess. However, in our cases, lung abscess were formed just in the irradiated lung field and rapidly enlarged. These clinical findings suggested that myelosuppression and radiation injury of lung tissue might cause such giant lung abscess. (author)

  11. Dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated, conformal, and four-field pelvic radiotherapy boost plans for gynecologic cancer: a retrospective planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Philip; Yeo, Inhwan; Perkins, Gregory; Fyles, Anthony; Milosevic, Michael

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as an alternative to conformal radiotherapy (CRT) or 4-field box boost (4FB) in women with gynecologic malignancies who are unsuitable for brachytherapy for technical or medical reasons. Dosimetric and toxicity information was analyzed for 12 patients with cervical (8), endometrial (2) or vaginal (2) cancer previously treated with external beam pelvic radiotherapy and a CRT boost. Optimized IMRT boost treatment plans were then developed for each of the 12 patients and compared to CRT and 4FB plans. The plans were compared in terms of dose conformality and critical normal tissue avoidance. The median planning target volume (PTV) was 151 cm 3 (range 58–512 cm 3 ). The median overlap of the contoured rectum with the PTV was 15 (1–56) %, and 11 (4–35) % for the bladder. Two of the 12 patients, both with large PTVs and large overlap of the contoured rectum and PTV, developed grade 3 rectal bleeding. The dose conformity was significantly improved with IMRT over CRT and 4FB (p ≤ 0.001 for both). IMRT also yielded an overall improvement in the rectal and bladder dose-volume distributions relative to CRT and 4FB. The volume of rectum that received the highest doses (>66% of the prescription) was reduced by 22% (p < 0.001) with IMRT relative to 4FB, and the bladder volume was reduced by 19% (p < 0.001). This was at the expense of an increase in the volume of these organs receiving doses in the lowest range (<33%). These results indicate that IMRT can improve target coverage and reduce dose to critical structures in gynecologic patients receiving an external beam radiotherapy boost. This dosimetric advantage will be integrated with other patient and treatment-specific factors, particularly internal tumor movement during fractionated radiotherapy, in the context of a future image-guided radiation therapy study

  12. Estimating the Magnitude and Field-Size Dependence of Radiotherapy-Induced Mortality and Tumor Control After Postoperative Radiotherapy For Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Calculations From Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, Edward F.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Kirkpatrick, John P.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To create, on the basis of available data, a mathematical model to describe the tumor stage- and field size-dependent risks/benefits of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and to assess whether this simple model can accurately describe the reported changes in overall survival. Methods and Materials: The increase in overall survival afforded by PORT is assumed equal to the increase in cancer-specific survival minus the rate of RT-induced mortality. The increase in cancer-specific survival is the product of the probabilities of (residual local disease) x (sterilization of residual disease with PORT) x (absence of metastatic disease). Data were extracted from the literature to estimate these probabilities. Different models were considered to relate the RT-induced mortality to field size. Results: The rate of RT-induced mortality seems to be proportional to the cube of the field size. When these mortality rates are included in the model, the predicted changes in overall survival approximate the literature values. Conclusion: Clinical data can be explained by a simple model that suggests that RT-induced mortality is strongly dependent on field size and at least partly offsets the benefit afforded by PORT. Smaller RT fields, tailored to treat the areas most at risk for recurrence, provide the highest therapeutic ratio. The data used do not reflect the impact of chemotherapy, which will reduce the rate of distant metastases and enhance the efficacy of RT

  13. Historical review of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onai, Yoshio

    1993-01-01

    The techniques of radiotherapy have been improved by development of particle accelerators, radionuclides and computers. This paper presents a historical review of the physical and technical aspects of radiotherapy in Japan. Changes in the kinds of radiation, such as X-rays, gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and protons used for external radiotherapy, and the equipment involved are described chronologically, and historical changes in the quality of radiotherapy apparatus are outlined. Patient data acquisition equipment, such as X-ray simulator and X-ray CT, beam modifying devices, patient setup devices, and devices to verify treatment fields and patient doses are reviewed historically. Radiation sources for brachytherapy and internal radiotherapy, and remotely controlled afterloading systems are reviewed chronologically. Historical changes in methods to evaluate absorbed doses, dose monitor systems and beam data acquisition systems are outlined. Changes in methods of calculating dose distributions for external X-ray and electron therapy, brachytherapy and internal radiotherapy by unsealded radionuclides are described and calculation techniques for treatment planning system are reviewed. Annual figures in the numbers of radiotherapy equipment, such as telecobalt and telecesium units, linear accelerators, betatrons, microtrons, stereotactic gamma units, conformation radiotherapy units, remotely controlled afterloading systems, and associated equipment such as X-ray simulators and treatment planning systems are provided, as are changes in the number of accelerators by maximum X-ray energy and maximum electron energy, and in the number of licensed hospitals and clinics using small sealed sources. Changes in techniques of external radiotherapy and brachytherapy are described briefly from the point of view of dose distributions. (author)

  14. Diversity and abundance of Beauveria bassiana in soils, stink bugs and plant tissues of common bean from organic and conventional fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Yordanys; Portal, Orelvis; Lysøe, Erik; Meyling, Nicolai V; Klingen, Ingeborg

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the natural occurrence of Beauveria spp. in soil, from infections in the stink bug Piezodorus guildinii, an important pest of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and as endophytes in bean plant tissue. Twelve conventional and 12 organic common bean fields in the Villa Clara province, Cuba were sampled from September 2014 to April 2015. One hundred and fifty Beauveria isolates were obtained from soil samples, bean plant parts and stink bugs. The overall frequency of occurrence of Beauveria isolates in conventional fields (8.4%) was significantly lower than that in organic fields (23.6%). Beauveria were also obtained significantly more frequently from bean roots in organic fields (15.0%) compared to bean roots in conventional fields (3.3%). DNA sequencing of the intergenic Bloc region was performed for Beauveria species identification. All isolates where characterized as Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo-Crivelli) Vuillemin, and clustered with isolates of neotropical origin previously described as AFNEO_1. The Cuban B. bassiana isolates formed five clusters in the phylogeny. Isolates of two clusters originated from all four locations, organic and conventional fields, as well as soil, plants and stink bugs. Organic fields contained isolates of all five clusters while conventional fields only harbored isolates of the two most frequent ones. Mating type PCR assays revealed that mating type distribution was skewed, with MAT1/MAT2 proportion of 146/4, indicating limited potential for recombination. The present study is the first to report of B. bassiana as a naturally occurring endophyte in common bean. Further, it shows that B. bassiana occurs naturally in diverse environments of common bean fields, and constitutes a potential reservoir of natural enemies against pest insects particularly in organic fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Field Evidence Supporting Conventional Onion Curing Practices as a Strategy To Mitigate Escherichia coli Contamination from Irrigation Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Daniel; Feibert, Erik; Reitz, Stuart; Shock, Clint; Waite-Cusic, Joy

    2018-03-01

    The Produce Safety Rule of the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act includes restrictions on the use of agricultural water of poor microbiological quality. Mitigation options for poor water quality include the application of an irrigation-to-harvest interval of onion production includes an extended irrigation-to-harvest interval (onion fields (randomized block design; n = 5) via drip tape on the final day of irrigation. Onions remained undisturbed for 7 days and were then lifted to the surface to cure for an additional 21 days before harvest. Water, onions, and soil were tested for presence of rifampin-resistant E. coli. One day after irrigation, 13.3% of onions (20 of 150) receiving the poorest quality water (3 log CFU/mL) tested positive for E. coli; this prevalence was reduced to 4% (6 of 150 onions) after 7 days. Regardless of inoculum level, E. coli was not detected on any onions beyond 15 days postirrigation. These results support conventional dry bulb onion curing practices as an effective strategy to mitigate microbiological concerns associated with poor quality irrigation water.

  16. Involved-Field Radiotherapy versus Elective Nodal Irradiation in Combination with Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Randomized Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Bao, Yong; Ma, Hong-Lian; Wang, Jin; Wang, Yan; Peng, Fang; Zhou, Qi-Chao; Xie, Cong-Hua

    2013-01-01

    This prospective randomized study is to evaluate the locoregional failure and its impact on survival by comparing involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) with elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in combination with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. It appears that higher dose could be delivered in IFRT arm than that in ENI arm, and IFRT did not increase the risk of initially uninvolved or isolated nodal failures. Both a tendency of improved locoregional progression-free survival and a significant increased overall survival rate are in favor of IFRT arm in this study. PMID:23762840

  17. Whither radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, W M

    1987-03-01

    The 1986 Glyn Evans Memorial Lecture, given at the Joint Provincial Meeting of the Royal College of Radiologists, Sheffield, September 1986, sketches an outline of the history of radiotherapy and discusses the future development of the art. Topics included are siting of centres, training needs, the relationship of radiotherapy to other medical specialities, and the advantages and disadvantages of radiotherapy practitioners forming a separate medical College. (U.K.)

  18. First patients treated with a 1.5 T MRI-Linac: clinical proof of concept of a high-precision, high-field MRI guided radiotherapy treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaymakers, B. W.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, I. M.; Bol, G. H.; Glitzner, M.; Kotte, A. N. T. J.; van Asselen, B.; de Boer, J. C. J.; Bluemink, J. J.; Hackett, S. L.; Moerland, M. A.; Woodings, S. J.; Wolthaus, J. W. H.; van Zijp, H. M.; Philippens, M. E. P.; Tijssen, R.; Kok, J. G. M.; de Groot-van Breugel, E. N.; Kiekebosch, I.; Meijers, L. T. C.; Nomden, C. N.; Sikkes, G. G.; Doornaert, P. A. H.; Eppinga, W. S. C.; Kasperts, N.; Kerkmeijer, L. G. W.; Tersteeg, J. H. A.; Brown, K. J.; Pais, B.; Woodhead, P.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2017-12-01

    The integration of 1.5 T MRI functionality with a radiotherapy linear accelerator (linac) has been pursued since 1999 by the UMC Utrecht in close collaboration with Elekta and Philips. The idea behind this integrated device is to offer unrivalled, online and real-time, soft-tissue visualization of the tumour and the surroundings for more precise radiation delivery. The proof of concept of this device was given in 2009 by demonstrating simultaneous irradiation and MR imaging on phantoms, since then the device has been further developed and commercialized by Elekta. The aim of this work is to demonstrate the clinical feasibility of online, high-precision, high-field MRI guidance of radiotherapy using the first clinical prototype MRI-Linac. Four patients with lumbar spine bone metastases were treated with a 3 or 5 beam step-and-shoot IMRT plan. The IMRT plan was created while the patient was on the treatment table and based on the online 1.5 T MR images; pre-treatment CT was deformably registered to the online MRI to obtain Hounsfield values. Bone metastases were chosen as the first site as these tumors can be clearly visualized on MRI and the surrounding spine bone can be detected on the integrated portal imager. This way the portal images served as an independent verification of the MRI based guidance to quantify the geometric precision of radiation delivery. Dosimetric accuracy was assessed post-treatment from phantom measurements with an ionization chamber and film. Absolute doses were found to be highly accurate, with deviations ranging from 0.0% to 1.7% in the isocenter. The geometrical, MRI based targeting as confirmed using portal images was better than 0.5 mm, ranging from 0.2 mm to 0.4 mm. In conclusion, high precision, high-field, 1.5 T MRI guided radiotherapy is clinically feasible.

  19. A comparison of mantle versus involved-field radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma: reduction in normal tissue dose and second cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Eng-Siew; Paul, Narinder; Hodgson, David C; Tran, Tu Huan; Heydarian, Mostafa; Sachs, Rainer K; Tsang, Richard W; Brenner, David J; Pintilie, Melania; Xu, Tony; Chung, June

    2007-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) survivors who undergo radiotherapy experience increased risks of second cancers (SC) and cardiac sequelae. To reduce such risks, extended-field radiotherapy (RT) for HL has largely been replaced by involved field radiotherapy (IFRT). While it has generally been assumed that IFRT will reduce SC risks, there are few data that quantify the reduction in dose to normal tissues associated with modern RT practice for patients with mediastinal HL, and no estimates of the expected reduction in SC risk. Organ-specific dose-volume histograms (DVH) were generated for 41 patients receiving 35 Gy mantle RT, 35 Gy IFRT, or 20 Gy IFRT, and integrated organ mean doses were compared for the three protocols. Organ-specific SC risk estimates were estimated using a dosimetric risk-modeling approach, analyzing DVH data with quantitative, mechanistic models of radiation-induced cancer. Dose reductions resulted in corresponding reductions in predicted excess relative risks (ERR) for SC induction. Moving from 35 Gy mantle RT to 35 Gy IFRT reduces predicted ERR for female breast and lung cancer by approximately 65%, and for male lung cancer by approximately 35%; moving from 35 Gy IFRT to 20 Gy IFRT reduces predicted ERRs approximately 40% more. The median reduction in integral dose to the whole heart with the transition to 35 Gy IFRT was 35%, with a smaller (2%) reduction in dose to proximal coronary arteries. There was no significant reduction in thyroid dose. The significant decreases estimated for radiation-induced SC risks associated with modern IFRT provide strong support for the use of IFRT to reduce the late effects of treatment. The approach employed here can provide new insight into the risks associated with contemporary IFRT for HL, and may facilitate the counseling of patients regarding the risks associated with this treatment

  20. Glyphosate-tolerant soybeans remain compositionally equivalent to conventional soybeans (Glycine max L.) during three years of field testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Melinda C; Liu, Keshun; Trujillo, William A; Dobert, Raymond C

    2005-06-29

    Previous studies have shown that the composition of glyphosate-tolerant soybeans (GTS) and selected processed fractions was substantially equivalent to that of conventional soybeans over a wide range of analytes. This study was designed to determine if the composition of GTS remains substantially equivalent to conventional soybeans over the course of several years and when introduced into multiple genetic backgrounds. Soybean seed samples of both GTS and conventional varieties were harvested during 2000, 2001, and 2002 and analyzed for the levels of proximates, lectin, trypsin inhibitor, and isoflavones. The measured analytes are representative of the basic nutritional and biologically active components in soybeans. Results show a similar range of natural variability for the GTS soybeans as well as conventional soybeans. It was concluded that the composition of commercial GTS over the three years of breeding into multiple varieties remains equivalent to that of conventional soybeans.

  1. Development of targeted radiotherapy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, Guillermina; Villarreal, Jose E.; Garcia, Laura; Tendilla, Jose I.; Paredes, Lydia; Murphy, Consuelo A.; Pedraza, Martha

    2001-01-01

    Conventional or external beam radiotherapy, has been a viable alternative for cancer treatment. Although this technique is effective, its use is limited if the patient has multiple malignant lesions (metastases). An alternative approach is based on the design of radiopharmaceuticals that, to be administered in the patient, are directed specifically toward the target cell producing a selective radiation delivery. This treatment is known as targeted radiotherapy. We have summarized and discussed some results related to our investigations on the development of targeted radiotherapy systems, including aspects of internal dosimetry

  2. Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek P. Bergsma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC typically presents at an advanced stage, which is often felt to be incurable, and such patients are usually treated with a palliative approach. Accumulating retrospective and prospective clinical evidence, including a recently completed randomized trial, support the existence of an oligometastatic disease state wherein select individuals with advanced NSCLC may experience historically unprecedented prolonged survival with aggressive local treatments, consisting of radiotherapy and/or surgery, to limited sites of metastatic disease. This is reflected in the most recent AJCC staging subcategorizing metastatic disease into intra-thoracic (M1a, a single extra thoracic site (M1b, and more diffuse metastases (M1c. In the field of radiation oncology, recent technological advances have allowed for the delivery of very high, potentially ablative, doses of radiotherapy to both intra- and extra-cranial disease sites, referred to as stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy (or SABR, in much shorter time periods compared to conventional radiation and with minimal associated toxicity. At the same time, significant improvements in systemic therapy, including platinum-based doublet chemotherapy, molecular agents targeting oncogene-addicted NSCLC, and immunotherapy in the form of checkpoint inhibitors, have led to improved control of micro-metastatic disease and extended survival sparking newfound interest in combining these agents with ablative local therapies to provide additive, and in the case of radiation and immunotherapy, potentially synergistic, effects in order to further improve progression-free and overall survival. Currently, despite the tantalizing potential associated with aggressive local therapy in the setting of oligometastatic NSCLC, well-designed prospective randomized controlled trials sufficiently powered to detect and measure the possible added benefit afforded by this approach are

  3. Physics aspects of recent and future concepts in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, D.

    2001-01-01

    optimal dose level for treating coronary arteries. Another field of investigation is the comparison of beta radiation and gamma radiation for of this treatment modality. Because conventional conformal radiotherapy has been a major research subject during the last decade its place in radiation therapy practice is assured. In a similar way, recent and future concepts in radiotherapy such as SRT, IMRT, hadron therapy or endovascular brachytherapy need to be further investigated until their full potential can be demonstrated. (author)

  4. Final Report of Multicenter Canadian Phase III Randomized Trial of 3 Versus 8 Months of Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Before Conventional-Dose Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crook, Juanita; Ludgate, Charles; Malone, Shawn; Perry, Gad; Eapen, Libni; Bowen, Julie; Robertson, Susan; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of 3 vs. 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before conventional-dose radiotherapy (RT) on disease-free survival for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 1995 and June 2001, 378 men were randomized to either 3 or 8 months of flutamide and goserelin before 66 Gy RT at four participating centers. The median baseline prostate-specific antigen level was 9.7 ng/mL (range, 1.3-189). Of the 378 men, 26% had low-, 43% intermediate-, and 31% high-risk disease. The two arms were balanced in terms of age, Gleason score, clinical T category, risk group, and presenting prostate-specific antigen level. The median follow-up for living patients was 6.6 years (range, 1.6-10.1). Of the 378 patients, 361 were evaluable, and 290 were still living. Results: The 5-year actuarial freedom from failure rate for the 3- vs. 8-month arms was 72% vs. 75%, respectively (p = 0.18). No difference was found in the failure types between the two arms. The median prostate-specific antigen level at the last follow-up visit for patients without treatment failure was 0.6 ng/mL in the 3-month arm vs. 0.50 ng/mL in the 8-month arm. The disease-free survival rate at 5 years was improved for the high-risk patients in the 8-month arm (71% vs. 42%, p = 0.01). Conclusion: A longer period of NHT before standard-dose RT did not alter the patterns of failure when combined with 66-Gy RT. High-risk patients in the 8-month arm had significant improvement in the 5-year disease-free survival rate

  5. Novel radiotherapy techniques for involved-field and involved-node treatment of mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma. When should they be considered and which questions remain open

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohr, Frank; Koeck, Julia; Abo-Madyan, Yasser [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Georg, Dietmar; Knaeusl, Barbara; Dieckmann, Karin [Medical University Vienna/AKH Vienna, Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Medical University Vienna/AKH Vienna, Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Cozzi, Luca [Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy, Muenster (Germany); Weber, Damien C. [Paul Scherrer Institute, University of Bern, Center for Proton Therapy, Bern (Switzerland); Fiandra, Christian; Ricardi, Umberto [University of Torino, Radiation Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, Turin (Italy); Mueller, Rolf-Peter [University of Cologne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cologne (Germany); Engert, Andreas [University of Cologne, Department of Medical Oncology, Cologne (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a highly curable disease. Reducing late complications and second malignancies has become increasingly important. Radiotherapy target paradigms are currently changing and radiotherapy techniques are evolving rapidly. This overview reports to what extent target volume reduction in involved-node (IN) and advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy-compared with involved-field (IF) and 3D radiotherapy (3D-RT)- can reduce high doses to organs at risk (OAR) and examines the issues that still remain open. Although no comparison of all available techniques on identical patient datasets exists, clear patterns emerge. Advanced dose-calculation algorithms (e.g., convolution-superposition/Monte Carlo) should be used in mediastinal HL. INRT consistently reduces treated volumes when compared with IFRT with the exact amount depending on the INRT definition. The number of patients that might significantly benefit from highly conformal techniques such as IMRT over 3D-RT regarding high-dose exposure to organs at risk (OAR) is smaller with INRT. The impact of larger volumes treated with low doses in advanced techniques is unclear. The type of IMRT used (static/rotational) is of minor importance. All advanced photon techniques result in similar potential benefits and disadvantages, therefore only the degree-of-modulation should be chosen based on individual treatment goals. Treatment in deep inspiration breath hold is being evaluated. Protons theoretically provide both excellent high-dose conformality and reduced integral dose. Further reduction of treated volumes most effectively reduces OAR dose, most likely without disadvantages if the excellent control rates achieved currently are maintained. For both IFRT and INRT, the benefits of advanced radiotherapy techniques depend on the individual patient/target geometry. Their use should therefore be decided case by case with comparative treatment planning

  6. Digital linear accelerator: The advantages for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andric, S.; Maksimovic, M.; Dekic, M.; Clark, T.

    1998-01-01

    Technical performances of Digital Linear Accelerator were presented to point out its advantages for clinical radiotherapy treatment. The accelerator installation is earned out at Military Medical Academy, Radiotherapy Department, by Medes and Elekta companies. The unit offers many technical advantages with possibility of introduction new conformal treatment techniques as stereotactic radiosurgery, total body and total skin irradiation. In the paper are underlined advantages in relation to running conventional accelerator units at Yugoslav radiotherapy departments, both from technical and medical point of view. (author)

  7. Malignant astrocytoma following radiotherapy for craniopharyngioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation induced gliomas are uncommon. Occurrence of glioma following radiotherapy for craniopharyngiomas is extremely uncommon and only eight case reports have been so far published. We present our experience with one similar case of temporal gliomas occurring twelve years following radiotherapy for a sub totally excised craniopharyngioma. Although the exact mechanism of gliomas formation is unclear, their occurrence following conventional radiotherapy is a distinct possibility and signifies a poor prognosis.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the biofilm-forming Curtobacterium sp. strain BH-2-1-1, isolated from lettuce (Lactuca sativa) originating from a conventional field in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dees, Merete Wiken; Brurberg, May Bente; Lysøe, Erik

    2016-12-01

    Here, we present the 3,795,952 bp complete genome sequence of the biofilm-forming Curtobacterium sp. strain BH-2-1-1, isolated from conventionally grown lettuce ( Lactuca sativa ) from a field in Vestfold, Norway. The nucleotide sequence of this genome was deposited into NCBI GenBank under the accession CP017580.

  9. CNR considerations for rapid real-time MRI tumor tracking in radiotherapy hybrid devices: Effects of B{sub 0} field strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachowicz, K., E-mail: keith.wachowicz@albertahealthservices.ca; De Zanche, N.; Yip, E. [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Volotovskyy, V. [Cross Cancer Institute, Alberta Health Services, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Fallone, B. G. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Departments of Oncology and Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: This work examines the subject of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), specifically between tumor and tissue background, and its dependence on the MRI field strength, B{sub 0}. This examination is motivated by the recent interest and developments in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids where real-time imaging can be used to guide treatment beams. The ability to distinguish a tumor from background tissue is of primary importance in this field, and this work seeks to elucidate the complex relationship between the CNR and B{sub 0} that is too often assumed to be purely linear. Methods: Experimentally based models of B{sub 0}-dependant relaxation for various tumor and normal tissues from the literature were used in conjunction with signal equations for MR sequences suitable for rapid real-time imaging to develop field-dependent predictions for CNR. These CNR models were developed for liver, lung, breast, glioma, and kidney tumors for spoiled gradient-echo, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP), and single-shot half-Fourier fast spin echo sequences. Results: Due to the pattern in which the relaxation properties of tissues are found to vary over B{sub 0} field (specifically the T{sub 1} time), there was always an improved CNR at lower fields compared to linear dependency. Further, in some tumor sites, the CNR at lower fields was found to be comparable to, or sometimes higher than those at higher fields (i.e., bSSFP CNR for glioma, kidney, and liver tumors). Conclusions: In terms of CNR, lower B{sub 0} fields have been shown to perform as well or better than higher fields for some tumor sites due to superior T{sub 1} contrast. In other sites this effect was less pronounced, reversing the CNR advantage. This complex relationship between CNR and B{sub 0} reveals both low and high magnetic fields as viable options for tumor tracking in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids.

  10. The implication of hot spots on bone scans within the irradiated field of breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy followed by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won; Huh, Seung-Jae; Yang, Jung-Hyun

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the implication of abnormal hot spots in the irradiated field of patients treated with mastectomy followed by radiotherapy for breast cancer. We reviewed 1842 consecutive bone scans performed on 292 patients treated with a modified radical mastectomy and followed by radiotherapy. If abnormal hot spots at the irradiated sites were detected in the bone scans, we evaluated further studies to determine whether bone metastases were present. Radiation was given using 4 or 6 MV X-rays at a dosage of 50.4 Gy during 5.5 weeks with a dosage per fraction of 1.8 Gy. The follow-up period was 25-136 months (median 57 months). Sixty patients (20.6%) developed bone metastasis. Solitary rib metastases were identified in four patients; all were detected outside of the irradiated field. Of 232 patients who did not develop bone metastases, hot spots in the irradiated field were detected in 30 patients (12.9%). A simple rib facture at the site of a hot spot was demonstrated in four patients. The cumulative incidence of hot spots at 5 years was 12.9%. The cumulative incidence of hot spots was more common in postmenopausal women, patients who were less than 60 kg, patients who received adjuvant hormonal therapy and patients who had radiation that included the supraclavicular area. We confirmed that the hot spots within the irradiated fields might be benign, especially in patients who were postmenopause, had a low body weight, received adjuvant hormonal therapy and who had radiation that included the supraclavicular area. (author)

  11. Dosimetry and microdosimetry using LET spectrometer based on the track-etch detector: radiotherapy Bremsstrahlung beam, onboard aircraft radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadrnickova, I.; Spurny, F.

    2006-01-01

    The spectrometer of linear energy transfer (Let) based on the chemically etched poly-allyl-diglycol-carbonate (P.A.D.C.) track-etch detector was developed several years ago in our institute. This Let spectrometer enables determining Let of particles approximately from 10 to 700 keV/μm. From the Let spectra, dose characteristics can be calculated. The contribution presents the Let spectra and other dosimetric characteristics obtained onboard a commercial aircraft during more than 6 months long exposure and in the 18 MV radiotherapy Bremsstrahlung beam. (authors)

  12. Integral dose delivered to normal brain with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy IMRT during partial brain radiotherapy for high-grade gliomas with and without selective sparing of the hippocampus, limbic circuit and neural stem cell compartment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, James C.; Ziel, Ellis G; Diaz, Aidnag Z; Turian, Julius V; Wendt, Julie A.; Gobole, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    We compared integral dose with uninvolved brain (ID brain ) during partial brain radiotherapy (PBRT) for high-grade glioma patients using helical tomotherapy (HT) and seven field traditional inverse-planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with and without selective sparing (SPA) of contralateral hippocampus, neural stem cell compartment (NSC) and limbic circuit. We prepared four PBRT treatment plans for four patients with high-grade gliomas (60Gy in 30 fractions delivered to planning treatment volume (PTV60Gy)). For all plans, a structure denoted 'uninvolved brain' was created, which included all brain tissue not part of PTV or standard (STD) organs at risk (OAR). No dosimetric constraints were included for uninvolved brain. Selective SPA plans were prepared with IMRT and HT; contralateral hippocampus, NSC and limbic circuit were contoured; and dosimetric constraints were entered for these structures without compromising dose to PTV or STD OAR. We compared V100 and D95 for PTV46Gy and PTV60Gy, and ID brain for all plans. There were no significant differences in V100 and D95 for PTV46Gy and PTV60Gy. ID brain was lower in traditional IMRT versus HT plans for STD and SPA plans (mean ID brain 23.64Gy vs. 28Gy and 18.7Gy vs. 24.5Gy, respectively) and in SPA versus STD plans both with IMRT and HT (18.7Gy vs. 23.64Gy and 24.5Gy vs. 28Gy, respectively). n the setting of PBRT for high-grade gliomas, IMRT reduces ID brain compared with HT with or without selective SPA of contralateral hippocampus, limbic circuit and NSC, and the use of selective SPA reduces ID brain compared with STD PBRT delivered with either traditional IMRT or HT.

  13. Treatment planning and delivery of involved field radiotherapy in advanced Hodgkin's disease: results from a questionnaire-based audit for the UK Stanford V regimen vs ABVD clinical trial quality assurance programme (ISRCTN 64141244).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, P; Hoskin, P J; Aird, E G A

    2007-10-01

    This questionnaire forms the basis of the quality assurance (QA) programme for the UK randomized Phase III study of the Stanford V regimen versus ABVD for treatment of advanced Hodgkin's disease to assess differences between participating centres in treatment planning and delivery of involved-field radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma The questionnaire, which was circulated amongst 42 participating centres, consisted of seven sections: target volume definition and dose prescription; critical structures; patient positioning and irradiation techniques; planning; dose calculation; verification; and future developments The results are based on 25 responses. One-third plan using CT alone, one-third use solely the simulator and the rest individualize, depending on disease site. Eleven centres determine a dose distribution for each patient. Technique depends on disease site and whether CT or simulator planning is employed. Most departments apply isocentric techniques and use immobilization and customized shielding. In vivo dosimetry is performed in 7 centres and treatment verification occurs in 24 hospitals. In conclusion, the planning and delivery of treatment for lymphoma patients varies across the country. Conventional planning is still widespread but most centres are moving to CT-based planning and virtual simulation with extended use of immobilization, customized shielding and compensation.

  14. Convention on the establishment of a security control in the field of nuclear energy. Protocol on the tribunal established by the convention on the establishment of a security control in the field of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1957-01-01

    The governments of Germany, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Greece, Ireland, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Netherlands, Portugal, United Kingdom, Sweden, Switzerland and Turkey, having resolved to promote the development of the production and uses of nuclear energy in the Member countries of the Organisation for European Economic Co-operation between these countries and the harmonisation of national measures; considering that the joint action undertaken to this end in the Organisation is intended to develop the European nuclear industry for purely peaceful ends and must not further any military purpose; considering that at its meeting of' 18 July, 1956, the Council of the Organisation decided to establish to this effect an international security control; considering that by a Decision dated this day the Council has established, within the Organisation, a European Nuclear Energy Agency with the task of pursuing the joint action undertaken; have agreed the present convention. The governments party to the Convention, desirous of determining in accordance with Article 12 of the Convention the organisation of the Tribunal established by the said Article and the status of its judges; have agreed upon the provisions which are annexed to the Convention

  15. Radiotherapy gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldock, C.

    2002-01-01

    shapes and sizes while sparing normal tissue. The situation is further complicated if the normal tissues are critical organs or are particularly sensitive to radiation. Radiotherapy techniques employed to obtain a closer conformation of the dose distribution to the tumour volume are referred to as conformal radiotherapy techniques. The clinical implementation of conformal therapy has been delayed by limitations in the verification of conformal dose distributions calculated by treatment planning systems prior to the irradiation of the patient and the verification of complex treatments during its delivery to the patient. There are several aspects of conformal therapy that complicate dose verification. To achieve the dose distributions conforming to complex 3D volumes, high dose gradients arise in the treatment volume. Further, overdose or underdose regions can exist when separate radiation fields are used to deliver additional radiation. These aspects require that practical dose measurement (dosimetry) techniques be able to integrate dose over time and easily measure dose distributions in 3D with high spatial resolution. Traditional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters and radiographic film do not fulfil these requirements. Novel gel dosimetry techniques are being developed in which dose distributions can potentially be determined in vitro in 3D using anthropomorphic phantoms to simulate a clinically irradiated situation. As long ago as the 1950's, radiation-induced colour change in dyes was used to investigate radiation doses in gels. It was subsequently shown that radiation induced changes in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties of gels infused with conventional Fricke dosimetry solutions could be measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In Fricke gels, Fe 2+ ions in ferrous sulphate solutions are usually dispersed throughout a gelatin, agarose or PVA matrix. Radiation-induced changes in the dosimeters are considered to

  16. Reducing radiation induced emesis in abdominal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, K.

    1994-01-01

    In patients with seminoma testes, a comparison was made between radiation induced emesis suffered by patients receiving 'dogleg' radiotherapy with those suffered by patients who received para-aortic radiotherapy. The same comparisons were made between the effects suffered by those patients who received the anti-emetic, Ondansetron, and those suffered by patients who received conventional anti-emetics. (UK)

  17. Use of CT simulation for treatment of cervical cancer to assess the adequacy of lymph node coverage of conventional pelvic fields based on bony landmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlay, Marisa H.; Ackerman, Ida; Tirona, Romeo G. B.Sc.; Hamilton, Paul; Barbera, Lisa; Thomas, Gillian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the adequacy of nodal coverage of 'conventional' pelvic radiation fields for carcinoma of the cervix, with contoured pelvic vessels on simulation computed tomography (CT) as surrogates for lymph node location. Methods and Materials: Pelvic arteries were contoured on non-contrast-enhanced CT simulation images of 43 patients with cervix cancer, FIGO Stages I-III. Vessel contours were hidden, and conventional pelvic fields were outlined: (1) anterior/posterior fields (AP): superior border, L5-S1 interspace; inferior border, obturator foramina; lateral border, 2 centimeters lateral to pelvic brim. (2) Lateral fields (LAT): Anterior border, symphysis pubis; posterior border, S2-S3 interspace. Distances were measured between the following: (1) bifurcation of the common iliac artery and superior border (2) external iliac artery and lateral border of the AP field, and (3) external iliac artery and anterior border of the LAT field. The distances were considered as 'inadequate' if 20 mm. Results: Superiorly, 34 patients (79.1%) had inadequate coverage. On the AP, margins were generous in 19 (44.2%), but inadequate in 9 (20.9%). On the LAT, margins were inadequate in 30 (69.8%) patients. Overall, 41 (95.4%, CI, 84.2%-99.4%) patients had at least 1 inadequate margin, the majority located superiorly. Twenty-four (55.8%; CI, 39.9%-70.9%) patients had at least 1 generous margin, the majority located laterally on the AP field. Conclusion: Conventional pelvic fields based on bony landmarks do not provide optimal lymph node coverage in a substantial proportion of patients and may include excess normal tissue in some. CT simulation with vessel contouring as a surrogate for lymph node localization provides more precise and individualized field delineation

  18. Movement of the cervix in after-loading brachytherapy: implications for designing external-beam radiotherapy boost fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombaiah, U; Blake, P; Bidmead, M

    2006-05-01

    Women with invasive carcinoma of the cervix treated by chemo-radiotherapy and brachytherapy may also receive a pelvic sidewall boost using a midline shield (MLS). The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of implanted gold grains in detecting the movement of the cervix caused by the insertion of low-dose-rate brachytherapy applicators, and its implications in designing the MLS. The medical records of 42 women with various stages of cervical carcinoma, who were treated by radical chemo-radiotherapy, were reviewed. All of these women underwent examination under anaesthesia (EUA) and a gold-grain insertion to demarcate the vaginal tumour extent, in the antero-posterior and lateral planes, before starting external-beam radiotherapy. The isocentric orthogonal films (simulator films) of external radiotherapy and brachytherapy were compared to assess the change in position of the gold grains and the consequences for the design of the MLS for parametrial and pelvic sidewall boosts. A significant shift in the position of the gold grains was noted in both the x (lateral) and the y (cranial/caudal) axes. The median shift of the midline, right and left lateral gold grains was 4.5, 5 and 7 mm in the x axis, whereas it was 10, 8 and 9.5 mm in the y axis, respectively. The median shift in the x and y axes was 5.5 and 9 mm, ranging from 1 to 40 mm and 1 to 45 mm, respectively. The gold grains were shifted cranially in 34 (80%) and laterally in 29 (69%) women. Thirty-two women (76.2%) received parametrial boost radiotherapy, of which 25 (59.5%) women had a customised, pear-shaped shield, and the remaining seven (16.7%) had a straight-sided, rectangular MLS. Four women (9.5%) relapsed locally, and three of them had been treated using a customised shield. In two of these four women, there was an absolute under-dosage of the central pelvis at the tip of the intra-uterine tube by 50% of the parametrial boost dose (5.4 Gy/3 fractions/3 days). Insertion of the gold grains

  19. Conventional resin cation exchangers versus EDI for CACE measurement in power plants. Feasibility and practical field results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigrist, Manuel [Swan Systeme AG, Hinwil (Switzerland)

    2017-10-15

    The conductivity measurement after a cation exchanger in power plants with steam turbines was introduced soon after 1950 by Larson and Lane. Due to the simple measuring principle, the sensitivity to ionic contaminations and to its high reliability, the conductivity measurement after a cation exchanger (CACE) has become the most commonly used online analytical method in power plants with steam generators. Swan has investigated electro deionisation (EDI) as substitution of the conventional cation exchange resin and has developed a new conductivity instrument using this principle. This paper provides a description of the conventional method for cation conductivity measurements as well as of the new AMI CACE using EDI method.

  20. Conventional resin cation exchangers versus EDI for CACE measurement in power plants. Feasibility and practical field results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigrist, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The conductivity measurement after a cation exchanger in power plants with steam turbines was introduced soon after 1950 by Larson and Lane. Due to the simple measuring principle, the sensitivity to ionic contaminations and to its high reliability, the conductivity measurement after a cation exchanger (CACE) has become the most commonly used online analytical method in power plants with steam generators. Swan has investigated electro deionisation (EDI) as substitution of the conventional cation exchange resin and has developed a new conductivity instrument using this principle. This paper provides a description of the conventional method for cation conductivity measurements as well as of the new AMI CACE using EDI method.

  1. Study of two novel large-field-of-view image intensifiers versus conventional chest radiography with use of FROC methods and simulated pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, L.H.L.; Chakraborty, D.P.; Van Waes, P.F.G.M.; Puylaert, C.B.A.J.

    1989-01-01

    Two novel large-field-of-view image intensifier (LFOV 1.1) tubes have been introduced whose image area makes them suitable for chest imaging. Both modalities present a 100-mm hard-copy image to the radiologist. A pulmonary nodule performance experiment was done to compare the diagnostic accuracy of these tubes with conventional full-size chest images. The data were analyzed with the maximum-likelihood FROCFIT program. The relative ranking in terms of decreasing A1 values was TLX, Siemens 43-cm mode, conventional radiography, and Siemens 57-cm mode

  2. Radiotherapy alone for stage I-III low grade follicular lymphoma: long-term outcome and comparison of extended field and total nodal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Alexandrow, Nikolaus; Flentje, Michael

    2012-01-01

    To analyze long-term results of radiotherapy alone for stage I-III low grade follicular lymphoma and to compare outcome after extended field irradiation (EFI) and total nodal irradiation (TNI). Between 1982 and 2007, 107 patients were treated with radiotherapy alone for low grade follicular lymphoma at Ann Arbor stage I (n = 50), II (n = 36) and III (n = 21); 48 and 59 patients were treated with EFI and TNI, respectively. The median total dose in the first treatment series of the diaphragmatic side with larger lymphoma burden was 38 Gy (25 Gy – 50 Gy) and after an interval of median 30 days, a total dose of 28 Gy (12.6 Gy – 45 Gy) was given in the second treatment series completing TNI. After a median follow-up of 14 years for living patients, 10-years and 15-years overall survival (OS) were 64% and 50%, respectively. Survival was not significantly different between stages I, II and III. TNI and EFI resulted in 15-years OS of 65% and 34% but patients treated with TNI were younger, had better performance status and higher stage of disease compared to patients treated with EFI. In multivariate analysis, only age at diagnosis (p < 0.001, relative risk [RR] 1.06) and Karnofsky performance status (p = 0.04, RR = 0.96) were significantly correlated with OS. Freedom from progression (FFP) was 58% and 56% after 10-years and 15-years, respectively. Recurrences outside the irradiated volume were significantly reduced after TNI compared to EFI; however, increased rates of in-field recurrences and extra-nodal out-of-field recurrence counterbalanced this effect resulting in no significant difference in FFP between TNI and EFI. In univariate analysis, FFP was significantly improved in stage I compared to stage II but no differences were observed between stages I/II and stage III. In multivariate analysis no patient or treatment parameter was correlated with FFP. Acute toxicity was significantly increased after TNI compared to EFI with a trend to increased late toxicity as

  3. 3 July 1985: Convention signed in Brussels on 31 January 1963, supplementary to the Paris Convention of 29 July 1960 on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy and Act approving the Protocols to amend the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This Act refers to the Brussels Supplementary Convention approved by Belgium in 1966 and ratified on 20 August 1985 and approves ratification of the Protocols of 16 November 1982 to amend the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention respectively. The Protocols are reproduced in French, Dutch and German. (NEA) [fr

  4. The pioneer of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilleri, J.P.; Coursaget, J.

    2005-09-01

    This work narrates the history of the birth of a new field, the radiology and its application to radiotherapy for these multiform pathologies that are the cancers. Two leading figures will favour this field: Marie Curie, physicist and twice awarded by nobel price, and Claudius Regaud, histologist and become a specialist of the action of ionizing radiations on tissues. They will create the Curie Institute, in relation with the Radium Institute and the support of the Pasteur Institute in 1920. (N.C.)

  5. Spinal Cord Doses in Palliative Lung Radiotherapy Schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ffrrcsi, F.H.; Parton, C.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: We aim to check the safety of the standard palliative radiotherapy techniques by using the Linear quadratic model for a careful estimation of the doses received by the spinal cord, in all standard palliative lung radiotherapy fields and fractionation. Material and Methods: All patients surveyed at this prospective audit were treated with palliative chest radio-therapy for lung cancer over a period from January to June 2005 by different clinical oncology specialists within the department. Radiotherapy field criteria were recorded and compared with the recommended limits of the MRC trial protocols for the dose and fractionation prescribed. Doses delivered to structures off the field central axis were estimated using a standard CT scan of the chest. Dose estimates were made using an SLPLAN planning system. As unexpected spinal cord toxicity has been reported after hypo fractionated chest radiotherapy, a sagittal view was used to calculate the isodoses along the length of the spinal cord that could lie within the RT field. Equivalent dose estimates are made using the Linear Quadratic Equivalent Dose formula (LQED). The relative radiation sensitivity of spinal cord for myelopathy (the a/b dose) cord has been estimated as a/b = 1 Gy. Results: 17 Gy in 2 fraction and 39 Gy in 13 fraction protocols have spinal cord equivalent doses (using the linear-quadratic model) that lie within the conventional safe limits of 50 Gy in 25 fractions for the 100% isodose. However when the dosimetry is modelled for a 6 MV 100 cm isocentric linac in 3 dimensions, and altered separations and air space inhomogeneity are considered, the D-Max doses consistently fall above this limit on our 3 model patients. Conclusion: The 17 Gy in 2 fraction and 39 Gy in 13 fraction protocol would risk spinal cord damage if the radio therapist was unaware of the potential spinal cord doses. Alterative doses are suggested below 15.5 Gy/ 2 fractions (7 days apart) would be most acceptable

  6. Patterns of Failure and Treatment-Related Toxicity in Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients Treated Using Extended Field Radiotherapy With Curative Intent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasooriyar, Chrishanthi; Van Dyk, Sylvia; Bernshaw, David; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Barkati, Maroie; Narayan, Kailash

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patterns of failure and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates in cervical cancer patients who had metastatic disease in common iliac or para-aortic lymph nodes and were treated with curative intent, using extended field radiotherapy (EFRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study involving 39 patients treated from January 1996 to June 2007, using EFRT with concurrent chemotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy. EFRT consisted of 45 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Radiation to involved nodes was boosted to a total dose of 50.4 to 54 Gy. Primary tumor radiation was boosted to a dose of 80 Gy using brachytherapy. Results: Overall, 30 patients (77%) have relapsed. The 5-year OS rate was 26% (95% confidence interval [CI], 11-44). The 5-year DFS rate was 19.4% (95% CI, 8-35). Only 3 patients (7.5%) experienced treatment failure exclusively within the treatment field, and 2 patients underwent salvage treatment. Grade 3 to 4 acute bone marrow and gastrointestinal toxicities were observed in 10 (26%) and 7 (18%) patients, respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent chemotherapy and EFRT treatment was well tolerated. Most patients showed failure at multiple sites and outside the treatment field. Only 3/39 patients had failures exclusively within the treatment field, and 2 underwent salvage treatment.

  7. Simple and versatile modifications allowing time gated spectral acquisition, imaging and lifetime profiling on conventional wide-field microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Robert; Beeby, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An inverted microscope has been adapted to allow time-gated imaging and spectroscopy to be carried out on samples containing responsive lanthanide probes. The adaptation employs readily available components, including a pulsed light source, time-gated camera, spectrometer and photon counting detector, allowing imaging, emission spectroscopy and lifetime measurements. Each component is controlled by a suite of software written in LabVIEW and is powered via conventional USB ports. (technical note)

  8. Complete genome sequence of the biofilm-forming Microbacterium sp. strain BH-3-3-3, isolated from conventional field-grown lettuce (Lactuca sativa) in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dees, Merete Wiken; Brurberg, May Bente; Lysøe, Erik

    2017-03-01

    The genus Microbacterium contains bacteria that are ubiquitously distributed in various environments and includes plant-associated bacteria that are able to colonize tissue of agricultural crop plants. Here, we report the 3,508,491 bp complete genome sequence of Microbacterium sp. strain BH-3-3-3, isolated from conventionally grown lettuce ( Lactuca sativa ) from a field in Vestfold, Norway. The nucleotide sequence of this genome was deposited into NCBI GenBank under the accession CP017674.

  9. The impact of radiotherapy dose and other treatment-related and clinical factors on in-field control in stage I and II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, Sachin S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Lynch, James W.; Mendenhall, Nancy Price

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To assess local (in-field) disease control, identify potential prognostic factors, and elucidate the optimal radiotherapy dose in various clinical settings of Stage I and II nonHodgkin's lymphoma (non-CNS). Materials and Methods: A total of 285 consecutive patients with Stage I and II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated with curative intent, including 159 with radiotherapy (RT) alone and 126 with combined-modality therapy (CMT). Of these, 72 patients had low-grade lymphomas (LGL), 92 had intermediate or high-grade lymphomas (I/HGL), and 21 had unclassified lymphomas. Clinical and treatment variables with potential prognostic significance for in-field disease control, freedom from relapse (FFR), and absolute survival (AS) were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The 5-, 10-, and 20-year actuarial AS rates were 73%, 46%, and 33% for patients with LGL and 64%, 44%, and 18% for patients with I/HGL, respectively. The 5-, 10-, and 20-year actuarial FFR rates were 62%, 59%, and 49% for patients with LGL and 66%, 57%, and 57% for patients with I/HGL, respectively. Significant prognostic factors identified by the multivariate analysis were age, tumor size, and histology for AS; tumor size and treatment for FFR; and only tumor size for in-field disease control. There were 95 total failures, with only 12 occurring infield. Most failures (65%) were in contiguous unirradiated sites. All 4 in-field failures in patients with LGL occurred after RT doses 6 cm, and 4 with less than a complete response (CR) to chemotherapy. Conclusion: Our analysis suggests that the overwhelming problem in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is not in-field failure but, rather, failure in contiguous unirradiated sites. A dose of 20-25 Gy may be sufficient for small-volume LGL of the orbit. A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for LGL in general, as well as for patients with nonbulky (≤ 6 cm) I/HGL treated with CMT who have a CR. However, patients with I

  10. Radiotherapy for hypersplenism from congestive splenomegaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Mu-Tai; Hsieh, Chang-Yo; Chang, Tung-Hao; Lin, Jao-Perng; Huang, Chia-Chun

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of splenic irradiation on the common hematological disorders of hypersplenism. From August 2002 to March 2003, five patients with hypersplenism due to congestive splenomegaly underwent splenic irradiation at the Department od Radiation Oncology, Changhua Chirstian Hospital, Taiwan. 3 were males and 2 were females aging from 38 to 66 years. All patients had history of liver cirrhosis. 4 patients underwent thee-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and received conventional radiotherapy with anterior-posterior parallel opposing fields. The followup-period ranged from 1 to 7 months. Thrombocytopenia and splenomegaly were found in all 5 patients by physical examination, hematological test, abdominal sonography and/or abdominal computed tomography. After radiotherapy, thrombocytopenia improved, but leukopenia and anemia did not. No complication due to radiotherapy was found during the follow-up period after splenic irradiation. 2 patients died of hepatocellular carcinoma with active bleeding. One patient died of renal failure due to end-stage renal disease. Based on our results, it seems that splenic irradiation might be effective in treating thrombocytopenia and splenomegaly. Splenic irradiatin seems to be effective for thrombocytopenia, splenomegaly and splenic pain associated with hypersplenism from congenstive splenomegaly. This approach is non-invasive and may be an alternative treatment for splenectomy and splenic embolization for patients with hypersplenism due to congestive splenomegaly. The shortcoming of this study are small sample size, short period of follow-up and lack of randomization. A randomized control trial with more cases and further follow-up of hematological tests and splenic size estimation are warranted to evaluate long term improvement of congestive splenomegaly with thrombocytopeniaafter splenic irradiation

  11. Field-tested technology for gas compression: using high-speed induction motors to replace conventional solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Karina Velloso; Pradurat, Jean Francois [Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine (INPL), Nancy (France). Converteam Rotating Machines Division

    2009-07-01

    Industry leaders are all concerned about rationalization of electric power use, increase of efficiency and flexibility, environmental impact, installations size and maintenance efforts diminution. The high-speed induction motors are a good solution when addressing these parameters. How this technology works and how using it can help pipelines operators meet growing operational and environmental challenges is the main subject of this paper, that also explain how it can be used to replace conventional solutions. As a conclusion the future opportunities of electric high-speed drive systems application in production, transport and storage for natural gas industry are going to be discussed. (author)

  12. Thalassaemic osteoarthropathy treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Patients with beta thalassaemia may develop a specific osteoarthropathy involving the feet. A number of different treatments for this condition have been tried, including rest, analgesia and hypertransfusion. We report a case of a patient with thalassaemic osteoarthropathy who responded to radiotherapy after failing conventional treatment. (author)

  13. Field displacement during external radiotherapy in prostatic adenocarcinoma treated with radioactive 198Au implants and external irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennernaes, B.; Letocha, H.; Rikner, G.; Magnusson, A.; Nilsson, S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study displacement error and internal movements of the prostate during external beam radiotherapy. Verification films in the frontal (n=194) and lateral (n=64) portals were investigated in 14 patients treated with radioactive 198 Au implants. Displacement errors of two implants were investigated. In seven patients, filling of the rectum and the bladder with contrast medium or isotonic saline was performed during CT investigation for planning purposes to detect movements of the prostate. Most (95%) of the displacement errors were less than 10 mm in the frontal portal and less than 15 mm in the lateral portals. No correlation to the patient's weight was found. The displacement errors were randomly distributed. The spatial relations between the implants were not altered during the treatments. Small movements of the prostate were observed. To conclude, the positioning system employed at present (laser) can be sufficient for the margins used (2 cm). In lateral portals, however, the system did not have the ability to detect a possible systematic displacement error from simulator to accelerator. The intention is to decrease the margins to 1 cm, which will necessitate a better positioning system. (orig.)

  14. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) vs. involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A comparative analysis of toxicities and clinical outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Shen, Jason; Finlay, Jarod; Mitra, Nandita; Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey; Lin, Lilie; Hahn, Stephen; Glatstein, Eli; Rengan, Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Background: Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) and involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) are definitive radiotherapeutic approaches used to treat patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ENI delivers prophylactic radiation to clinically uninvolved lymph nodes, while IFRT only targets identifiable gross nodal disease. Because clinically uninvolved nodal stations may harbor microscopic disease, IFRT raises concerns for increased nodal failures. This retrospective cohort analysis evaluates failure rates and treatment-related toxicities in patients treated at a single institution with ENI and IFRT. Methods: We assessed all patients with stage III locally advanced or stage IV oligometastatic NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy from 2003 to 2008. Each physician consistently treated with either ENI or IFRT, based on their treatment philosophy. Results: Of the 108 consecutive patients assessed (60 ENI vs. 48 IFRT), 10 patients had stage IV disease and 95 patients received chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 18.9 months. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, patients treated with IFRT demonstrated a significantly lower risk of high grade esophagitis (Odds ratio: 0.31, p = 0.036). The differences in 2-year local control (39.2% vs. 59.6%), elective nodal control (84.3% vs. 84.3%), distant control (47.7% vs. 52.7%) and overall survival (40.1% vs. 43.7%) rates were not statistically significant between ENI vs. IFRT. Conclusions: Nodal failure rates in clinically uninvolved nodal stations were not increased with IFRT when compared to ENI. IFRT also resulted in significantly decreased esophageal toxicity, suggesting that IFRT may allow for integration of concurrent systemic chemotherapy in a greater proportion of patients.

  15. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) vs. involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A comparative analysis of toxicities and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Annemarie T; Shen, Jason; Finlay, Jarod; Mitra, Nandita; Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey; Lin, Lilie; Hahn, Stephen; Glatstein, Eli; Rengan, Ramesh

    2010-05-01

    Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) and involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) are definitive radiotherapeutic approaches used to treat patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ENI delivers prophylactic radiation to clinically uninvolved lymph nodes, while IFRT only targets identifiable gross nodal disease. Because clinically uninvolved nodal stations may harbor microscopic disease, IFRT raises concerns for increased nodal failures. This retrospective cohort analysis evaluates failure rates and treatment-related toxicities in patients treated at a single institution with ENI and IFRT. We assessed all patients with stage III locally advanced or stage IV oligometastatic NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy from 2003 to 2008. Each physician consistently treated with either ENI or IFRT, based on their treatment philosophy. Of the 108 consecutive patients assessed (60 ENI vs. 48 IFRT), 10 patients had stage IV disease and 95 patients received chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 18.9 months. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, patients treated with IFRT demonstrated a significantly lower risk of high grade esophagitis (Odds ratio: 0.31, p = 0.036). The differences in 2-year local control (39.2% vs. 59.6%), elective nodal control (84.3% vs. 84.3%), distant control (47.7% vs. 52.7%) and overall survival (40.1% vs. 43.7%) rates were not statistically significant between ENI vs. IFRT. Nodal failure rates in clinically uninvolved nodal stations were not increased with IFRT when compared to ENI. IFRT also resulted in significantly decreased esophageal toxicity, suggesting that IFRT may allow for integration of concurrent systemic chemotherapy in a greater proportion of patients. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Morbidity of local-only or local-plus-pelvic radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldstein, Cora; Poetter, Richard; Widder, Joachim; Goldner, Gregor [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Christian-Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiooncology, Vienna (Austria)

    2018-01-15

    The aim of this work was to characterise actuarial incidence and prevalence of early and late side effects of local versus pelvic three-dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Based on a risk-adapted protocol, 575 patients received either local (n = 447) or local-plus-pelvic (n = 128) radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects (≥grade 2 RTOG/EORTC criteria) were prospectively assessed. Maximum morbidity, actuarial incidence rate, and prevalence rates were compared between the two groups. For local radiotherapy, median follow-up was 68 months, and the mean dose was 66.7 Gy. In pelvic radiotherapy, the median follow-up was 49 months, and the mean local and pelvic doses were 66.9 and 48.3 Gy respectively. Early GI side effects ≥ G2 were detected in 26% and 42% of patients respectively (p < 0.001). Late GI adverse events were detected in 14% in both groups (p = 0.77). The 5-year actuarial incidence rates were 14% and 14%, while the prevalence rates were 2% and 0% respectively. Early GU ≥ G2 side effects were detected in 15% and 16% (p = 0.96), while late GU morbidity was detected in 18% and 24% (p = 0.001). The 5-year actuarial incidence rates were 16% and 35% (p = 0.001), while the respective prevalence rates were 6% and 8%. Despite the low prevalence of side effects, postoperative pelvic radiotherapy results in significant increases in the actuarial incidence of early GI and late GU morbidity using a conventional 4-field box radiotherapy technique. Advanced treatment techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) should therefore be considered in pelvic radiotherapy to potentially reduce these side effects. (orig.) [German] Ziel der vorgestellten Arbeit ist es, die Haeufigkeit frueher und spaeter Nebenwirkungen nach postoperativer Bestrahlung von Prostatakarzinompatienten zu analysieren. Verglichen wurden dabei die Nebenwirkungen von lokaler

  17. A Controlled Study on Vaginal Blood Flow During Sexual Arousal Among Early-Stage Cervical Cancer Survivors Treated With Conventional Radical or Nerve-Sparing Surgery With or Without Radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Rinske Maria; Pieterse, Quirine D.; van Lonkhuijzen, Luc R. C. W.; Trimbos, Baptist J. B. M. Z.; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Kenter, Gemma G.; de Kroon, Cor D.; ter Kuile, Moniek M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Sexual problems among cervical cancer survivors may in part be caused by reduced vaginal blood flow due to damaged hypogastric nerves during radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy and/or by radiation-induced vaginal changes after pelvic radiotherapy. A nerve-sparing modification

  18. Radiotherapy; Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannenmacher, M. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Debus, J. [Univ. Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Wenz, F. (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2006-07-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy.

  19. Variations in the phytochemical contents and antioxidant capacity of organically and conventionally grown Italian cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. subsp. botrytis): results from a three-year field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Scalzo, Roberto; Picchi, Valentina; Migliori, Carmela Anna; Campanelli, Gabriele; Leteo, Fabrizio; Ferrari, Valentino; Di Cesare, Luigi Francesco

    2013-10-30

    A three-year field study (2009-2011) was performed to evaluate phytochemicals and antioxidant capacities of two genotypes (HF1 Emeraude and the local variety, Velox) of green cauliflower grown under organic and conventional management. The conventional system increased yield, but had little effect on the dry matter, whereas the organic system increased the soluble solids. Phytochemicals and antioxidant capacity showed significant year-to-year variability. During the third year, the scarce rainfall determined a significant increase of total glucosinolates and a general decrease of antioxidants in all samples. Interestingly, in the same year organic plants were less affected by the unfavorable climatic conditions, as they increased ascorbic acid, polyphenols, and carotenoids with respect to conventional ones. The overall results for the three years showed that the two genotypes responded differently. Compared to the conventional system, Velox showed 24, 21, 13, 48, and 44% higher content of ascorbic acid, polyphenols, carotenoids, volatiles, and antioxidant capacity, respectively. In contrast, no significant increase in the phytochemicals or the antioxidant potential was found in organic Emeraude, with the exception of total volatiles (+41%). These findings suggest that organic cultivation may be highly effective for particular cauliflower genotypes.

  20. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated by radical radiotherapy alone: Ten-year experience of a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Junlin; Gao Li; Huang Xiaodong; Li Suyan; Luo Jinwei; Cai Weiming; Xiao Jianping; Xu Guozhen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To report on our experience in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by radical radiotherapy alone in our institution during the last decade. Methods and Materials: From January 1990 to May 1999, 905 NPC patients were treated and were studied retrospectively. Radical radiotherapy was given to this cohort by conventional technique in a routine dose of 70-72 Gy to the primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes. In case of residual primary lesion, a boost dose of 8-24 Gy was delivered by either 192 Ir afterloading brachytherapy, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, conformal radiotherapy, or small external-beam fields. Results: The 5-year and 10-year local-regional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 81.7% and 76.7%, 76.1% and 66.5%, 58.4% and 52.1%, respectively. In case of residual primary lesions after a dose of 70-72 Gy of conventional external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT), an additional boost was able to achieve a local control of 80.8%, similar to that obtained with primary lesions that completely disappeared at 70-72 Gy (82.6%, p = 0.892). Conclusions: The treatment results of radical EBRT followed by a boost dose to the residual primary tumor for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in our institution are promising

  1. Responses of conventional and extended-range neutron detectors in mixed radiation fields around a 150-MeV electron LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yu-Chi; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Chen, Ang-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the responses of two types of neutron detector in mixed gamma-ray and neutron radiation fields around a 150-MeV electron linear accelerator (LINAC). The detectors were self-assembled, high efficiency, and designed in two configurations: (1) a conventional moderated-type neutron detector based on a large cylindrical He-3 proportional counter; and (2) an extended-range version with an embedded layer of lead in the moderator to increase the detector’s sensitivity to high-energy neutrons. Two sets of the detectors were used to measure neutrons at the downstream and lateral locations simultaneously, where the radiation fields differed considerably in intensities and spectra of gamma rays and neutrons. Analyzing the detector responses through a comparison between calculations and measurements indicated that not only neutrons but also high-energy gamma rays (>5 MeV) triggered the detectors because of photoneutrons produced in the detector materials. In the lateral direction, the contribution of photoneutrons to both detectors was negligible. Downstream of the LINAC, where high-energy photons were abundant, photoneutrons contributed approximately 6% of the response of the conventional neutron detector; however, almost 50% of the registered counts of the extended-range neutron detector were from photoneutrons because of the presence of the detector rather than the effect of the neutron field. Dose readings delivered by extended-range neutron detectors should be interpreted cautiously when used in radiation fields containing a mixture of neutrons and high-energy gamma rays

  2. Optimal usage of cone beam computed tomography system with different field of views in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Venkata Naga Madhusudhana Sresty

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To find methods for optimal usage of XVI (X-ray volume imaging system in Elekta synergy linear accelerator with different field of views for same lesion in order to minimize patient dose due to imaging.Methods: 20 scans of 2 individual patients with ca sigmoid colon and ca lung were used in this study. Kilo voltage collimators with medium field of view were used as per the preset information. Images were reconstructed for another collimator with small field of view. The set up errors were evaluated with XVI software. Shift results of both methods were compared. Results: Variation in treatment set up errors with M20 and S20 collimators were ≤ 0.2 mm in translational and 0.30 in rotational shifts. Results showed almost equal translational and rotational shifts in both medium and small field of views with different collimators in all the scans. Visualization of target and surrounding structures were good enough and sufficient for XVI auto matching.Conclusion: Imaging with small field of view results less patient dose compared with medium or large field of views. It is Suggestible to use collimators with small field of view wherever possible. In this study, collimators with small field of view were sufficient for both patients though the preset information indicated medium field of view. But, it always depends on the area required for matching purpose. So, individual selection is important than preset information in the XVI system.

  3. Relations of image quality in on-line portal images and individual patient parameters for pelvic field radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuvel, F. van den; Neve, W. de; Coghe, M.; Verellen, D.; Storme, G.

    1992-01-01

    The aims of the present study involving 566 pelvic fields on 13 patients were: 1. To study the machine- and patient-related factors influencing image quality. 2. To study the factors related to machine, patient and patient set-up, influencing the errors of field set-up. 3. To develop a method for predicting the camera settings. The OPI device consisted of a fluorescent screen scanned by a video camera. An image quality score on a scale 0-5 was given for 546/566 fields. In a univariate analysis, open field subtraction adversely affected the score. The image score of anterior fields was significantly better than that of posterior fields. Multivariate stepwise logistic regression showed that, in addition to anterior or posterior field and subtraction, gender was also a significant predictor of image score. Errors requiring field adjustments were detected on 289/530 (54.5%) evaluable fields or 229/278 (82.4%) evaluable patient set-ups. Multivariate logistic regression showed that the probability of performing an adjustment was significantly related to gender, image quality and AP-PA diameter. The magnitude of adjustments made in the lateral direction correlated significantly with patient bulk. The camera kV level with gain held constant showed an exponential dependency on dose rate at the image detector plate and can thus be predicted by treatment planning. (orig.)

  4. Radiotherapy apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.M.; Webb, H.P.J.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to apparatus for applying intracavitary radiotherapy. In previously-known systems radioactive material is conveyed to a desired location within a patient by transporting a chain of balls pneumatically to and from an appropriately inserted applicator. According to this invention a ball chain for such a purpose comprises several radioactive balls separated by non-radioactive tracer balls of radiographically transparent material of lower density and surface hardness than the radioactive balls. The invention also extends to radiotherapy treatment apparatus comprising a storage, sorting and assembly system

  5. Rigid body displacement fields of an in-plane-deformable curved beam based on conventional strain definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Won Joo; Min, Oak Key; Kim, Yong Woo

    1998-01-01

    To improve the convergence and the accuracy of a finite element, the finite element has to describe not only displacement and stress distributions in a static analysis but also rigid body displacements. In this paper, we consider the in-plane-deformable curved beam element to understand the descriptive capability of rigid body displacements of a finite element. We derive the rigid body displacement fields of a single finite element under various essential boundary conditions when the nodal displacements are caused by the rigid body displacement. We also examine the rigid body displacement fields of a quadratic curved beam element by employing the reduced minimization theory

  6. Transverse tomography and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leer, J.W.H.

    1982-01-01

    This study was intended to delineate the indications for radiotherapy treatment-planning with the help of computerized axial tomography (C.T.) and transverse analog tomography (T.A.T.). Radiotherapy localisation procedures with the conventional method (simulator), with the CT-scanner and with the transverse analog tomograph (T.A.T., Simtomix, Oldelft) were compared. As criterium for evaluation differences in reconstruction drawing based on these methods were used. A certain method was judged ''superior'' to another if the delineation of the target volume was more accurate, if a better impression was gained of the site of (for irradiation) organs at risk, or if the localisation could only be performed with that method. The selected group of patients consisted of 120 patients for whom a reconstruction drawing in the transverse plane was made according to the treatment philosophy. In this group CT-assisted localisation was judged on 68 occasions superior to the conventional method. In a number of cases it was found that a ''standard'' change in a standard target volume, on the base of augmented anatomical knowledge, made the conventional method sufficient. The use of CT-scanner for treatment planning was estimated. For ca. 270/1000 new patients a CT-scan is helpful (diagnostic scan), for 140 of them the scan is necessary (planning scan). The quality of the anatomical information obtained with the T.A.T. does not yet fall within acceptable limits, but progress has been made. (Auth.)

  7. Parotid gland sparing radiotherapy technique using 3-D conformal radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Gwi Eon; Keum, Ki Chang; Suh, Chang Ok; Lee, Sang Wook; Park, Hee Chul; Cho, Jae Ho; Chang, Sei Kyung; Loh, Juhn Kyu

    2000-01-01

    Although using the high energy photon beam with conventional parallel-opposed beams radio-therapy for nasopgaryngeal carcinoma, radiation-induced xerostomia is a troublesome problem for patients. We conducted this study to explore a new parotid gland sparing technique in 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT) in an effort to prevent the radiation-induced xerostomia. We performed three different planning for four clinically node-negative nasopharyngeal cancer patients with different location of tumor(intracranial extension, nasal cavity extension, oropharyngeal extension, parapharyngeal extension), and intercompared the plans. Total prescription dose was 70.2 Gy to the isocenter. For plan-A, 2-D parallel opposing fields, a conventional radiotherapy technique, were employed. For plan-B, 2-D parallel opposing fields were used up until 54 Gy and afterwards 3-D non-coplanar beams were used. For plan-C, the new technique, 54Gy was delivered by 3-D conformal 3-port beams (AP and both lateral ports with wedge compensator, shielding both superficial lobes of parotid glands at the AP beam using BEV) from the beginning of the treatment and early spinal cord block (at 36 Gy) was performed. And bilateral posterior necks were treated with electron after 36 Gy. After 54 Gy, non-coplanar beams were used for cone-down plan. We intercompared dose statistics (Dmax, Dmin, Dmean, D95, D05, V95, V05, Volume receiving 46 Gy) and dose volume histograms (DVH) of tumor and normal tissues and NTCP values of parotid glands for the above three plans. For all patients, the new technique (plan-C) was comparable or superior to the other plans in target volume isodose distribution and dose statistics and it has more homogenous target volume coverage. The new technique was most superior to the other plans in parotid glands sparing (volume receiving 46 Gy: 100, 98, 69% for each plan-A, B and C). And it showed the lowest NTCP value of parotid glands in all patients (range of NTCP; 96-100%, 79-99%, 51

  8. Sites of local recurrence after surgery, with or without chemotherapy, for rectal cancer: implications for radiotherapy field design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hruby, George; Barton, Michael; Miles, Sharon; Carroll, Susan; Nasser, Elias; Stevens, Graham

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the sites of pelvic recurrence in patients with rectal cancer previously untreated with radiotherapy to determine the relative frequency and location of recurrence within the pelvis. Methods and Materials: The records of patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer referred to three radiation oncology departments between 1984 and 1997 were reviewed. The data collected included the date and type of the initial resection and the pathologic findings. The site of recurrence within the pelvis, presence of metastasis, and date of recurrence were documented. Results: A total of 269 patients were included. Tumor had invaded through the muscularis in 74% and involved other organs in 9%. Fifty-two percent of patients were node positive at initial surgery. The median time to local recurrence from surgery was 18 months (range 15-20) and from local recurrence to death was 14 months (range 12-17). Both the initial tumor stage and the resection type influenced the recurrence location within the pelvis (p<0.01). T4 tumors comprised only 9% of initial T stage tumors but accounted for 38% of anterior central pelvic recurrences (p<0.01). All perineal recurrences occurred after abdominoperineal resection. The sites of recurrence within the pelvis were the posterior central pelvis (47%) and anastomotic (21%). Conclusion: If those patients with T4 tumors at presentation were excluded, 89% had local recurrence at, or posterior to, the anastomosis. Furthermore, if we exclude both patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection and those with T4 tumors at presentation, the rate increases to 93%. The rate of recurrence anteriorly (7%) does not justify routine radiation of the anterior pelvis beyond that required to adequately cover the anastomotic site

  9. Long-term conventional and no-tillage effects on field hydrology and yields of a dryland crop rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semiarid dryland crop yields with no-till, NT, residue management are often greater than stubble-mulch, SM, tillage as a result of improved soil conditions and water conservation, but information on long-term tillage effects on field hydrology and sustained crop production are needed. Our objective ...

  10. SU-F-P-52: A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Clinical Trials Comparing Elective Nodal Irradiation with Involved-Field Irradiation for Conformal Or Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Patients with Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, W; Zhang, R; Zhou, Z; Qiao, X [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare elective nodal irradiation with involved-field irradiation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer by a metaanalysis. Methods: Wanfang, CNKI, VIP, CBM databases, PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library were searched to identify the controlled clinical trials of elective nodal irradiation with involved-field irradiation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. The obtained data were analyzed using Stata 11.0. The difference between two groups was estimated by calculating the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Results: A total of 12 controlled clinical trials involving 1095 esophageal cancer patients, which were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed that the elective nodal irradiation group reduced the rates of out-field failure comparing with involved-field irradiation group (OR=3.727, P=0.007). However, the rates of ≥grades 3 acute radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis were significantly higher in the elective nodal irradiation group than in the involved-field irradiation group (OR=0.348, P=0.001, OR=0.385, P=0.000). 1-, 2-, 3-year local control rates (OR=0.966, P=0.837, OR=0.946, P=0.781; OR=0.732P=0.098) and 1-, 3-, 5-year survival rates were similar in the two groups ( OR=0.966, P=0.837; OR=0.946, P=0.781; OR=0.732, P=0.098; OR=0.952, P=0.756; OR=1.149, P=0.422; OR=0.768, P=0.120). It is the same with the rates of distant metastasis (OR=0.986, P=0.937). Conclusion: Compared with involved-field irradiation, the elective nodal irradiation can reduce the rates of out-field failure for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. However, its advantage of local control and survival rates is not obvious and it increases the incidence

  11. Influences of Biodynamic and Conventional Farming Systems on Quality of Potato (Solanum Tuberosum L.) Crops: Results from Multivariate Analyses of Two Long-Term Field Trials in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellenberg, Lars; Granstedt, Artur

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this paper was to present results from two long term field experiments comparing potato samples from conventional farming systems with samples from biodynamic farming systems. The principal component analyses (PCA), consistently exhibited differences between potato samples from the two farming systems. According to the PCA, potato samples treated with inorganic fertilizers exhibited a variation positively related to amounts of crude protein, yield, cooking or tissue discoloration and extract decomposition. Potato samples treated according to biodynamic principles, with composted cow manure, were more positively related to traits such as Quality- and EAA-indices, dry matter content, taste quality, relative proportion of pure protein and biocrystallization value. Distinctions between years, crop rotation and cultivars used were sometimes more significant than differences between manuring systems. Grown after barley the potato crop exhibited better quality traits compared to when grown after ley in both the conventional and the biodynamic farming system.

  12. Influences of Biodynamic and Conventional Farming Systems on Quality of Potato (Solanum Tuberosum L. Crops: Results from Multivariate Analyses of Two Long-Term Field Trials in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Kjellenberg

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to present results from two long term field experiments comparing potato samples from conventional farming systems with samples from biodynamic farming systems. The principal component analyses (PCA, consistently exhibited differences between potato samples from the two farming systems. According to the PCA, potato samples treated with inorganic fertilizers exhibited a variation positively related to amounts of crude protein, yield, cooking or tissue discoloration and extract decomposition. Potato samples treated according to biodynamic principles, with composted cow manure, were more positively related to traits such as Quality- and EAA-indices, dry matter content, taste quality, relative proportion of pure protein and biocrystallization value. Distinctions between years, crop rotation and cultivars used were sometimes more significant than differences between manuring systems. Grown after barley the potato crop exhibited better quality traits compared to when grown after ley in both the conventional and the biodynamic farming system.

  13. Act of 18 July 1966 on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy, establishing certain measures regarding implementation of the Paris Convention and its additional protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    This Act on nuclear third party liability lays down that certain Articles (definitions, liability, scope and amounts of liability, insurance) of the Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy (Paris Convention) are immediately applicable in Belgium. It stipulates that a nuclear operator is recognised as such by the King when he furnishes proof that he has taken out insurance or other financial security to cover his liability under this Act, without prejudice to implementation of legal and regulatory provisions on protection of the population against the hazards of ionizing radiations. Finally, the operator of a nuclear installation must take out and maintain, for each installation, insurance approved by the appropriate authorities; if the State itself operates a nuclear installation, it has no obligation to take out insurance or other financial security. (NEA) [fr

  14. Role of radiotherapy fractionation in head and neck cancers (MARCH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacas, Benjamin; Bourhis, Jean; Overgaard, Jens

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Meta-Analysis of Radiotherapy in squamous cell Carcinomas of Head and neck (MARCH) showed that altered fractionation radiotherapy is associated with improved overall and progression-free survival compared with conventional radiotherapy, with hyperfractionated radiotherapy showing...... the greatest benefit. This update aims to confirm and explain the superiority of hyperfractionated radiotherapy over other altered fractionation radiotherapy regimens and to assess the benefit of altered fractionation within the context of concomitant chemotherapy with the inclusion of new trials. METHODS......: For this updated meta-analysis, we searched bibliography databases, trials registries, and meeting proceedings for published or unpublished randomised trials done between Jan 1, 2009, and July 15, 2015, comparing primary or postoperative conventional fractionation radiotherapy versus altered fractionation...

  15. Quality indicators in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cionini, Luca; Gardani, Gianstefano; Gabriele, Pietro; Magri, Secondo; Morosini, Pier Luigi; Rosi, Antonella; Viti, Vincenza

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is a widespread and increasing tendency to develop hospital performance indicators in the field of accreditation/certification systems and quality benchmarking. A study has been undertaken to develop a set of performance indicators for a typical radiotherapy Centre and to evaluate their ability to provide a continuous quality improvement. Materials and methods: A working group consisting of radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation technologists under the coordination of experts in health technology assessment has elaborated a set of general indicators able to monitor performances and the quality level of a typical radiotherapy Centre. The work has been carried out through four steps: a preliminary set of indicators was selected; data on these indicators were collected in a number of Italian radiotherapy Centres and medical physics Services; problems in collection and analysis of data were discussed; a final set of indicators was developed. Results: A final set of 13 indicators is here presented. They concern general structural and/or operational features, health physics activities and accuracy and technical complexity of the treatment. Conclusions: The indicators tested in a few Italian Centres of radiotherapy and medical physics Services are now ready to be utilized by a larger community

  16. Value of magnetic resonance imaging in the radiotherapy planning of tumours of the uterine cervix: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justino, Pitagoras Baskara; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Blasbalg, Roberto; Leite, Claudia da Costa

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the rate of geographic miss on conventional radiotherapy planning of patients with cervical cancer, using magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: Thirty-two patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix were studied. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis was performed after clinical staging. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were compared with the classic fields described for the 'box' technique. Target volume within less than 1 cm margins of the fields' limits was considered as geographic miss. Results: Classical radiation field limits were inadequate in 24 cases (75%), all in the anterior (46%) or posterior (40%) border of the lateral fields. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance detected a high probability of geographic miss on conventional radiotherapy planning in this population, both in initial and advanced stages of the disease. (author)

  17. Shielding the spinal cord is necessary when junctioning abutting fields with independent collimation in head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, David I.; McDonough, James; Kassaee, Alireza

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Asymmetric collimation is a relatively new method of junctioning abutting fields with non-diverging beam edges. When this technique is used at the junction of lateral and low anterior fields in three field head and neck set ups, there should, in theory, be a perfect match. There should be no overdose or underdose at the match line. We have performed dosimetric measurements to evaluate the actual dosimetry at the central axis. Materials and Methods: X-ray verification film was placed in a water-equivalent phantom at a depth of 4 cm, corresponding to an isocentric distance of 100 cm. A double exposure technique was used to mimic two half-beam blocked fields abutting at the central axis. Each half of the film was irradiated with 50 monitor units using a 6 MV photon beam. One of the collimators was set to an off-axis position to force a gap or overlap of the radiation fields at the isocenter in increments of 1 mm. The films were scanned with a laser densitometer with a resolution of 300 μm. The beam profiles were evaluated at the region of overdose or underdose around the match line. Results: The dose on the central axis varied linearly from - 50% (field gap of 3 mm) to + 50% (field overlap of 3 mm). Surprisingly, the width (defined as a full-width, half-maximum, FWHM) of the region of overdose or underdose around the match line is 3 mm for field gaps or overlaps of 1 and 2 mm. The width of the region is 4.5 mm for field gaps or overlaps of 3 mm. The larger than expected width of this region is due to the addition of the two abutting penumbras. Conclusion: Asymmetric collimation with half-beam blocks may overdose the spinal cord. Calibration specifications generally allow for a 1 mm tolerance in the position of each independent jaw. In a calibrated machine, this could lead to a 2 mm field overlap. A field overlap of just 1 mm results in a FWHM region of overdose measuring 3 mm with a maximum dose of 140%. To our knowledge, there are no current recommendations

  18. Radiotherapy of tumors under respiratory motion. Estimation of the motional velocity field and dose accumulation based on 4D image data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Rene

    2013-01-01

    belong to the most precise methods currently available. In clinical practice, however, there exists the problem that many medical facilities are not equipped with 4D imaging devices. Further, 4D images still offer only a snapshot of the patient-specific motion range and potential motion variability may limit the conclusions that can be drawn from them. To address these aspects, in the next part of the thesis - based on the optimized methods for motion field estimation in 4D CT image data and further including statistical motion information and models, respectively - model-based approaches for motion field estimation and prediction are developed. First, a novel approach for statistical modeling of lung motion in a patient collective is presented, and methods for adapting the model for prediction of patient-specific motion patterns are provided. The latter allow, for instance, the estimation of respiratory lung and lung tumor motion for radiation therapy treatment planning, if no temporally resolved image sequences are available for the patient; this use case is demonstrated. Further, techniques of multivariate statistics are applied to account for variations of motion patterns by integrating additional information provided by motion indicators used in 4D radiation therapy (e.g. abdominal belts or spirometer measurements) for a patient-specific, situation-related adaption of the motion fields computed using 4D images and the methods for motion field estimation described before. In the last part of the thesis, the developed methods are finally applied for assessing and analyzing the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion during radiation therapy of lung tumors. Both 3D conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy are modeled as treatment modalities. In the case of intensity modulated radiotherapy, short delivery times for single radiation fields lead to the risk that the corresponding dose contributions are not only subject to a motion-induced dose blurring

  19. Investigation of the 4D composite MR image distortion field associated with tumor motion for MR-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanescu, T; Jaffray, D

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images are affected by geometric distortions due to the specifics of the MR scanner and patient anatomy. Quantifying the distortions associated with mobile tumors is particularly challenging due to real anatomical changes in the tumor's volume, shape, and relative location within the MR imaging volume. In this study, the authors investigate the 4D composite distortion field, which combines the effects of the susceptibility-induced and system-related distortion fields, experienced by mobile lung tumors. The susceptibility (χ) effects were numerically simulated for two specific scenarios: (a) a full motion cycle of a lung tumor due to breathing as depicted on ten phases of a 4D CBCT data set and (b) varying the tumor size and location in lung tissue via a synthetically generated sphere with variable diameter (4-80 mm). The χ simulation procedure relied on the segmentation and generation of 3D susceptibility (χ) masks and computation of the magnetic field by means of finite difference methods. A system-related distortion field, determined with a phantom and image processing algorithm, was used as a reference. The 4D composite distortion field was generated as the vector summation of the χ-induced and system-related fields. The analysis was performed for two orientations of the main magnetic field (B0), which correspond to several MRIgRT system configurations. Specifically, B0 was set along the z-axis as in the case of a cylindrical-bore scanner and in the (x,y)-plane as for a biplanar MR. Computations were also performed for a full revolution at 15° increments in the case of a rotating biplanar magnet. Histograms and metrics such as maximum, mean, and range were used to evaluate the characteristics of the 4D distortion field. The χ-induced field depends on the change in volume and shape of the moving tumor as well as the local surrounding anatomy. In the case of system-related distortions, the tumor experiences increased field

  20. Radiotherapy of vertebral hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Kohichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atushi; Sido, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tamakawa, Mituharu; Akiba, Hidenari; Morita, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1996, 14 patients (11 females, 3 males) with vertebral hemangioma received treatment with radiotherapy. Thirteen patients had a history of back pain or lumbago and 2 patients had neurological symptoms such as sensory impairment or paraplegia. The standard dose administered was 36 Gy in 18 fractions (five treatments per week). In the 13 patients with pain, this was completely or partially relieved. The condition of a man with hypesthesia of the legs deteriorated and a woman with paraplegia who was treated with decompressive laminectomy followed by radiotherapy recovered completely after irradiation. CT scan before irradiation showed thickened trabeculae as small punctate areas of sclerosis in all patients. At MR imaging before irradiation, T2-weighted MR images showed areas of high intensity in all patients and MR images demonstrated lesion enhancement. However, none of the patients who were treated successfully with radiation demonstrated any changes of the affected vertebra in the conventional radiographic films, CT scan or MR imaging, even 5 years after irradiation. Radiological imaging is indispensable for the diagnosis of vertebral hemangiomas but does not appear to be useful for evaluating the effects of radiotherapy. (orig.)

  1. Grain yield losses in yellow-rusted durum wheat estimated using digital and conventional parameters under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Vergara-Diaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The biotrophic fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici is the causal agent of the yellow rust in wheat. Between the years 2010–2013 a new strain of this pathogen (Warrior/Ambition, against which the present cultivated wheat varieties have no resistance, appeared and spread rapidly. It threatens cereal production in most of Europe. The search for sources of resistance to this strain is proposed as the most efficient and safe solution to ensure high grain production. This will be helped by the development of high performance and low cost techniques for field phenotyping. In this study we analyzed vegetation indices in the Red, Green, Blue (RGB images of crop canopies under field conditions. We evaluated their accuracy in predicting grain yield and assessing disease severity in comparison to other field measurements including the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, leaf chlorophyll content, stomatal conductance, and canopy temperature. We also discuss yield components and agronomic parameters in relation to grain yield and disease severity. RGB-based indices proved to be accurate predictors of grain yield and grain yield losses associated with yellow rust (R2 = 0.581 and R2 = 0.536, respectively, far surpassing the predictive ability of NDVI (R2 = 0.118 and R2 = 0.128, respectively. In comparison to potential yield, we found the presence of disease to be correlated with reductions in the number of grains per spike, grains per square meter, kernel weight and harvest index. Grain yield losses in the presence of yellow rust were also greater in later heading varieties. The combination of RGB-based indices and days to heading together explained 70.9% of the variability in grain yield and 62.7% of the yield losses.

  2. Why Radiotherapy Works. Chapter 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, S.; Nishibuchi, I.; Wondergem, J.

    2017-01-01

    The history of radiotherapy began in 1895, when Röntgen discovered X rays, and in the following year, radiation was used for medical treatment. In the early days, the development of radiotherapy was based extensively on empiricism. Radiotherapists worked closely with radiation biologists in attempting to describe and understand the phenomena produced by ionizing radiation in the clinic and in biological systems. During the ensuing 120 years, radiotherapy has been improved significantly and, in addition to radiation biology, medical physics has played an important role in the design and development of equipment, quality assurance and dosimetry. Over recent decades, advances have been made in the field of molecular biology. Currently available techniques enable us to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of cellular response to ionizing irradiation, and it is anticipated that the role and contributions of radiation biology in radiotherapy will remain relevant. This chapter describes the clinically important biological points, including knowledge from current molecular biology.

  3. Radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, S.; Herfarth, K.

    2011-01-01

    With the development of modern radiation techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a dose escalation in the definitive radiotherapy of prostate cancer and a consecutive improvement in biochemical recurrence-free survival (BFS) could be achieved. Among others, investigators at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) saw 5-year BFS rates of up to 98%. A further gain in effectiveness and safety is expected of hypofractionation schedules, as suggested by data published by Kupelian et al., who saw a low 5-year rate of grade ≥2 rectal side-effects of 4.5%. However, randomized studies are just beginning to mature. Patients with intermediate or high-risk tumors should receive neoadjuvant (NHT) and adjuvant (AHT) androgen deprivation. Bolla et al. could show an increase in 5-year overall survival from 62-78%. The inclusion of the whole pelvis in the treatment field (WPRT) is still controversial. The RTOG 94-13 study showed a significant advantage in disease-free survival after 60 months but long-term data did not yield significant differences between WPRT and irradiation of the prostate alone. The German Society of Urology strongly recommends adjuvant radiotherapy of the prostate bed for pT3 N0 tumors with positive margins. In a pT3 N0 R0 or pT2 N0 R+ situation, adjuvant radiotherapy should at least be considered. So far, no randomized data on NHT and AHT have been published, so androgen deprivation remains an individual decision in the postoperative setting. In a retrospective analysis Spiotto et al. reported a positive effect for adjuvant WPRT and biochemical control. This article summarizes the essential publications on definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy and discusses the additional use of androgen deprivation and WPRT. (orig.) [de

  4. Dose-response curve for blood exposed to gamma-neutron mixed field by conventional cytogenetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing concern about airline crew members (about one million worldwide) are exposed to measurable neutrons doses. Historically, cytogenetic biodosimetry assays have been based on quantifying asymmetrical chromosome alterations (dicentrics, centric rings and acentric fragments) in mytogen-stimulated T-lymphocytes in their first mitosis after radiation exposure. Increased levels of chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes are a sensitive indicator of radiation exposure and they are routinely exploited for assessing radiation absorbed dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Since radiological accidents are not common, not all nations feel that it is economically justified to maintain biodosimetry competence. However, dependable access to biological dosimetry capabilities is completely critical in event of an accident. In this paper the dose-response curve was measured for the induction of chromosomal alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes after chronic exposure in vitro to neutron-gamma mixes field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to two neutron-gamma mixed field from sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The evaluated absorbed doses were 0.2 Gy; 1.0 Gy and 2.5 Gy. The dicentric chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphase figures were analyzed for the presence of dicentrics by two experienced scorers after painted by giemsa 5%. Our preliminary results showed a linear dependence between radiations absorbed dose and dicentric chromosomes frequencies. Dose-response curve described in this paper will contribute to the construction of calibration curve that will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry. (author)

  5. Dose-response curve for blood exposed to gamma-neutron mixed field by conventional cytogenetic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F., E-mail: jodinilson@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: fflima@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: jasantos@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide, E-mail: santos_neide@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica

    2009-07-01

    There is increasing concern about airline crew members (about one million worldwide) are exposed to measurable neutrons doses. Historically, cytogenetic biodosimetry assays have been based on quantifying asymmetrical chromosome alterations (dicentrics, centric rings and acentric fragments) in mytogen-stimulated T-lymphocytes in their first mitosis after radiation exposure. Increased levels of chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes are a sensitive indicator of radiation exposure and they are routinely exploited for assessing radiation absorbed dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Since radiological accidents are not common, not all nations feel that it is economically justified to maintain biodosimetry competence. However, dependable access to biological dosimetry capabilities is completely critical in event of an accident. In this paper the dose-response curve was measured for the induction of chromosomal alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes after chronic exposure in vitro to neutron-gamma mixes field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to two neutron-gamma mixed field from sources {sup 241}AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The evaluated absorbed doses were 0.2 Gy; 1.0 Gy and 2.5 Gy. The dicentric chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphase figures were analyzed for the presence of dicentrics by two experienced scorers after painted by giemsa 5%. Our preliminary results showed a linear dependence between radiations absorbed dose and dicentric chromosomes frequencies. Dose-response curve described in this paper will contribute to the construction of calibration curve that will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry. (author)

  6. Evaluation of the dosimetric consequences of adding a single asymmetric or MLC shaped field to a tangential breast radiotherapy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, Neil D.; Turner, Robert N.; Dawes, Peter J.D.K.; Lambert, Geoff D.; Lawrence, Gill P.

    2003-01-01

    Fifteen consecutive patients had standard treatment plans generated using our departmental protocol and two further plans produced using either an asymmetric, or MLC shaped additional field, from each tangential direction. The mean percentage of the PTV receiving over 107% of the isocentre dose was 19.8% for the standard planned patients (95% confidence interval 12.3-27.4%). This was reduced to 6.0% for the asymmetric field technique (95% confidence interval 4.1-8.0%) and 5.3% for the MLC technique (95% confidence interval 2.8-7.7%). These high dose volume reductions were therefore significant at the 95% confidence level. It was also concluded that both alternative planning techniques offer the greatest potential when the standard plan indicated that more than 20% of the PTV would receive greater than 107% of the prescribed dose. Under these circumstances the segmented field techniques led to a reduction of at least 15 percentage points in this figure. It is this group of patients who stand to benefit most from application of these simple additional field techniques

  7. Reference dosimetry and small-field dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy: Results from a Danish intercomparison study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Behrens, Claus F.; Sibolt, Patrik

    methods was performed by DTU Nutech at six Danish clinics. The first part of the intercompa-rison regarded the consistency of reference dosimetry. Absorbed dose to water under reference conditions was measured using a Farmer ionization chamber, and was found to agree within 1 % with the daily dose checks......-specific correction factors for non-reference fields....

  8. Fetal dose from radiotherapy photon beams: Physical basis, techniques to estimate radiation dose outside of the treatment field, biological effects and professional considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stovell, Marilyn; Blackwell, C. Robert

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The presentation will review: 1. The physical basis of radiation dose outside of the treatment field. 2. Techniques to estimate and reduce fetal dose. 3. Clinical examples of fetal dose estimation and reduction. 4. Biological effects of fetal irradiation. 5. Professional considerations. Approximately 4000 women per year in the United States require radiotherapy during pregnancy. This report presents data and techniques that allow the medical physicist to estimate the radiation dose the fetus will receive and to reduce this dose with appropriate shielding. Out-of-beam data are presented for a variety of photon beams, including cobalt-60 gamma rays and x rays from 4 to 18 MV. Designs for simple and inexpensive to more complex and expensive types of shielding equipment are described. Clinical examples show that proper shielding can reduce the radiation dose to the fetus by 50%. In addition, a review of the biological aspects of irradiation enables estimates of the risks of lethality, growth retardation, mental retardation, malformation, sterility, cancer induction, and genetic defects to the fetus. A summary of professional considerations/recommendations is also provided as a guide for the radiation oncologist and medical physicist

  9. Diagnosis of initial changes in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. A comparison between low-field magnetic resonance imaging, 3-phase bone scintigraphy and conventional X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoepfner, S.; Dresel, S.; Weiss, M.; Hahn, K.; Treitl, M.; Krolak, C.; Becker-Gaab, C.; Schattenkirchner, M.

    2002-01-01

    Besides conventional X-rays, in the diagnostic work up of initial changes in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 3-phase bone scintigraphy (3P-Sz) is as well established as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of the newly developed low field MRI with the proven methods X-rays and 3P-Sz. Methods: 65 patients (47f, 18m; 20-86 yrs) were studied on a one day protocol with 3P-Sz (550 MBq Tc-99m DPD), MRI and X-rays of the hands. Images were visually analysed by two blinded nuclear medicine physicians and radiologists and classified as a) RA-typical, b) inflammatory, non-RA-typical and c) non inflammatory changes. All methods were compared to 3P-Sz as golden standard. Results: In comparison to 3P-Sz, low field MRI presents with almost equal sensitivity and specificity in rheumatoid-typical and inflammatory changes. Conventional X-rays revealed in arthritis-typical changes as well as in inflammatory changes a significantly lower sensitivity and also a lower negative predictive value while specificity equals the one of MRI. Quantitative analysis of 3P-Sz using ROI-technique unveiled significantly higher values in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in those with no inflammatory changes. Conclusion: MRI represents an equally sensitive method in the initial diagnosis of rheumatoid-typical and inflammatory changes in the region of the hands as compared to the 3P-Sz. Besides the basic diagnosis with conventional X-rays, 3P-Sz is still the recommended method of choice to evaluate the whole body when RA is suspected. Additionally, quantitative analysis of the 3P-Sz using the ROI technique in the region of the hands reveals statistically significant results and should therefore be taken into account in the assessment of inflammatory changes. (orig.) [de

  10. Involved-field radiotherapy (IFRT) versus elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in combination with concurrent chemotherapy for 239 esophageal cancers: a single institutional retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Takenaka, Ryousuke; Omori, Mami; Imae, Toshikazu; Okuma, Kae; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study on early and locally advanced esophageal cancer was conducted to evaluate locoregional failure and its impact on survival by comparing involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) with elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in combination with concurrent chemotherapy. We assessed all patients with esophageal cancer of stages I-IV treated with definitive radiotherapy from June 2000 to March 2014. Between 2000 and 2011, ENI was used for all cases excluding high age cases. After Feb 2011, a prospective study about IFRT was started, and therefore IFRT was used since then for all cases. Concurrent chemotherapy regimen was nedaplatin (80 mg/m 2 at D1 and D29) and 5-fluorouracil (800 mg/m 2 at D1-4 and D29-32). Of the 239 consecutive patients assessed (120 ENI vs. 119 IFRT), 59 patients (24.7 %) had stage IV disease and all patients received at least one cycle of chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 34.0 months. There were differences in 3-year local control (44.8 % vs. 55.5 %, p = 0.039), distant control (53.8 % vs. 69.9 %, p = 0.021) and overall survival (34.8 % vs. 51.6 %, p = 0.087) rates between ENI vs. IFRT, respectively. Patients treated with IFRT (8 %) demonstrated a significantly lower risk (p = 0.047) of high grade late toxicities than with ENI (16 %). IFRT did not increase the risk of initially uninvolved or isolated nodal failures (27.5 % in ENI and 13.4 % in IFRT). Nodal failure rates in clinically uninvolved nodal stations were not increased with IFRT when compared to ENI. IFRT also resulted in significantly decreased esophageal toxicity, suggesting that IFRT may allow for integration of concurrent systemic chemotherapy in a greater proportion of patients. Both tendencies of improved loco-regional progression-free survival and a significant increased overall survival rate favored the IFRT arm over the ENI arm in this study

  11. Involved-field radiotherapy (IFRT) versus elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in combination with concurrent chemotherapy for 239 esophageal cancers: a single institutional retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Takenaka, Ryousuke; Omori, Mami; Imae, Toshikazu; Okuma, Kae; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2015-08-14

    This retrospective study on early and locally advanced esophageal cancer was conducted to evaluate locoregional failure and its impact on survival by comparing involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) with elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in combination with concurrent chemotherapy. We assessed all patients with esophageal cancer of stages I-IV treated with definitive radiotherapy from June 2000 to March 2014. Between 2000 and 2011, ENI was used for all cases excluding high age cases. After Feb 2011, a prospective study about IFRT was started, and therefore IFRT was used since then for all cases. Concurrent chemotherapy regimen was nedaplatin (80 mg/m(2) at D1 and D29) and 5-fluorouracil (800 mg/m(2) at D1-4 and D29-32). Of the 239 consecutive patients assessed (120 ENI vs. 119 IFRT), 59 patients (24.7%) had stage IV disease and all patients received at least one cycle of chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 34.0 months. There were differences in 3-year local control (44.8% vs. 55.5%, p = 0.039), distant control (53.8% vs. 69.9%, p = 0.021) and overall survival (34.8% vs. 51.6%, p = 0.087) rates between ENI vs. IFRT, respectively. Patients treated with IFRT (8 %) demonstrated a significantly lower risk (p = 0.047) of high grade late toxicities than with ENI (16%). IFRT did not increase the risk of initially uninvolved or isolated nodal failures (27.5% in ENI and 13.4% in IFRT). Nodal failure rates in clinically uninvolved nodal stations were not increased with IFRT when compared to ENI. IFRT also resulted in significantly decreased esophageal toxicity, suggesting that IFRT may allow for integration of concurrent systemic chemotherapy in a greater proportion of patients. Both tendencies of improved loco-regional progression-free survival and a significant increased overall survival rate favored the IFRT arm over the ENI arm in this study.

  12. Interstitial radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardino, P.T.; Bretas, F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors now have 20 years of experience with modern techniques of brachytherapy. The large number of patients treated in medical centers around the world and the widespread use of this type of radiotherapy have provided us with substantial information about the indications and contraindications, advantages and disadvantages, pitfalls and complications, as well as the results of these techniques. Although the focus of this review is the experience at Baylor using the combined technique of gold seed implantation plus external beam irradiation, the alternative forms of brachytherapy will be described and compared. The authors' intention is to provide the busy clinician with a succinct and informative review indicating the status of modern interstitial radiotherapy and describing day-to-day approach and results

  13. Palliative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, J.

    2003-01-01

    Palliative care does not attempt to prolong survival but to the achieve the highest quality of life both for the patient and their family covering their physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Radiotherapy (RT), one of the most important therapeutic modalities, has a great significance in palliative medicine for cancer since it attempts to reduce as much as possible the acute reaction associated with the treatment for the patient. (Author)

  14. Establishment of dosimetric references for high energy X-ray beams of very small field sizes (≤ 1 cm2) used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufreneix, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    The French primary standard dosimetry laboratory 'Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel' is in charge of the establishment of dosimetric standards for ionizing radiation beams. Absolute dose measurements are thus available for X-Ray beams used in radiotherapy for field sizes between 10 and 2 cm. Since the miniaturization of absolute dosimeters is not possible for smaller field sizes, a dose area product (DAP) has been suggested as a substitute to the absorbed dose at a point.In order to measure a DAP with dosimeters which sensitive surface is larger than the beam, a graphite calorimeter with a sensitive surface of 3 cm diameter was designed, built and tested. An ionization chamber with the same diameter was realized and tested to transfer the dosimetric references to the end users. Its calibration factor in terms of DAP was determined in circular beams of 2, 1 and 0.75 cm diameter with an uncertainty smaller than 0.7 %. The two-Dimension relative dose distribution was measured thanks to a diamond dosimeter, a PinPoint ionization chamber and gafchromic films, using a specific protocol. Both approaches, respectively based on a PDS and an absorbed dose to water at a point, were in good agreement in the 2 cm beam. Correction factors determined from Monte Carlo simulations and measured dose distributions were needed for this comparison. The calibration factor of the large ionization chamber in the 1 and 0.75 cm diameter beams were in good agreement within the uncertainties but a gap of -2.6 % was found with the one established in the 2 cm diameter beam. As a result, the DAP can be used if the sensitive surface is much larger than the beam section. (author) [fr

  15. Dumping convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, P.

    1992-01-01

    Sea dumping of radioactive waste has, since 1983, been precluded under a moratorium established by the London Dumping Convention. Pressure from the nuclear industry to allow ocean dumping of nuclear waste is reported in this article. (author)

  16. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  17. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Soevik, Aste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Oeyvind S; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2006-01-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO 2 -related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO 2 -related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO 2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO 2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure

  18. Cardiac avoidance in breast radiotherapy: a comparison of simple shielding techniques with intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landau, David; Adams, Elizabeth J.; Webb, Steve; Ross, Gillian

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) is now part of the routine care of patients with early breast cancer. However, analysis of the Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative suggests that patients with the lowest risk of dying of breast cancer are at significant risk of cardiac mortality due to longer relapse-free survival. Patients with a significant amount of heart in the high-dose volume have been shown to be at risk of fatal cardiac events. This study was designed to assess whether conformal planning or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques allow reduced cardiac irradiation whilst maintaining full target coverage. Material and methods: Ten patients with early breast cancer were available for computed tomography (CT) planning. Each had at least 1 cm maximum heart depth within the posterior border of conventional tangents. For each patient, plans were generated and compared using dose volume histograms for planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk. The plans included conventional tangents with and without shielding. The shielding was designed to either completely spare the heart or to shield as much heart as possible without compromising PTV coverage. IMRT plans were also prepared using two- and four-field tangential and six-field arc-like beam arrangements. Results: PTV homogeneity was better for the tangential IMRT techniques. For all patients, cardiac irradiation was reduced by the addition of partial cardiac shielding to conventional tangents, without compromise of PTV coverage. The two- and four-field IMRT techniques also reduced heart doses. The average percentage volume of heart receiving >60% of the prescription dose was 4.4% (range 1.0-7.1%) for conventional tangents, 1.5% (0.2-3.9%) for partial shielding, 2.3% (0.5-4.6%) for the two-field IMRT technique and 2.2% (0.4-5.6%) for the four-field IMRT technique. For patients with larger maximum heart depths the four-field IMRT plan achieved greater heart sparing

  19. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholten, Astrid N.; Leer, Jan-Willem H.; Collins, C. David; Wondergem, Jan; Hermans, Jo; Timothy, Adrian

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: The policy of the Radiotherapy Department of St. Thomas' Hospital in London for patients with invasive bladder cancer, used to be treatment with hypofractionated radiotherapy. The advantages of this fractionation scheme included reduction of the number of treatment sessions and better use of limited resources. Our results after hypofractionation were compared to series with more conventional radiotherapy. Material and methods: Between 1975 and 1985, 123 patients with a T2-T3 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder were treated by a radical course of hypofractionated radiotherapy. Local control, survival and morbidity rates were analysed retrospectively. Results: The actuarial local control rates at 5 and 10 years were 31 and 29%, respectively. The actuarial cancer-specific 5- and 10-year survival rates were 48 and 39%, respectively. Acute side effects were observed in 87% of patients. The actuarial overall and severe late complication rates at 5 years were 33 and 9%, respectively. The local control, survival and early side effect rates we found, were in the same range as those reported in literature. Late radiation side effects however, were more common after hypofractionated radiotherapy compared to conventional radiotherapy schedules. Conclusions: We conclude that the potential advantage of a reduced number of treatment sessions may be lost in the long term, because of the higher incidence of late morbidity after hypofractionated radiotherapy. Hypofractionation however, remains a valuable technique for palliation and deserves further investigation for radical treatment where access to equipment is difficult or resources are limited

  20. Conformation radiotherapy and conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo

    1999-01-01

    In order to coincide the high dose region to the target volume, the 'Conformation Radiotherapy Technique' using the multileaf collimator and the device for 'hollow-out technique' was developed by Prof. S. Takahashi in 1960. This technique can be classified a type of 2D-dynamic conformal RT techniques. By the clinical application of this technique, the late complications of the lens, the intestine and the urinary bladder after radiotherapy for the maxillary cancer and the cervical cancer decreased. Since 1980's the exact position and shape of the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues can be easily obtained by the tremendous development of the CT/MRI imaging technique. As a result, various kinds of new conformal techniques such as the 3D-CRT, the dose intensity modulation, the tomotherapy have been developed since the beginning of 1990'. Several 'dose escalation study with 2D-/3D conformal RT' is now under way to improve the treatment results. (author)

  1. Bone Health and Pelvic Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, C E; Faithfull, S

    2015-11-01

    Survivors who have received pelvic radiotherapy make up many of the long-term cancer population, with therapies for gynaecological, bowel, bladder and prostate malignancies. Individuals who receive radiotherapy to the pelvis as part of their cancer treatment are at risk of insufficiency fractures. Symptoms of insufficiency fractures include pelvic and back pain and immobility, which can affect substantially quality of life. This constellation of symptoms can occur within 2 months of radiotherapy up to 63 months post-treatment, with a median incidence of 6-20 months. As a condition it is under reported and evidence is poor as to the contributing risk factors, causation and best management to improve the patient's bone health and mobility. As radiotherapy advances, chronic symptoms, such as insufficiency fractures, as a consequence of t