WorldWideScience

Sample records for convective transport carried

  1. Convective transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ippolito, D.A.; Myra, J.R.; Russell, D.A.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Pigarov, A.Yu.; Yu, G.Q.; Xu, X.Q.; Nevins, W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Scrape-off-layer (SOL) convection in fusion experiments appears to be a universal phenomenon that can 'short-circuit' the divertor in some cases. The theory of 'blob' transport provides a simple and robust physical paradigm for studying convective transport. This paper summarizes recent advances in the theory of blob transport and its comparison with 2D and 3D computer simulations. We also discuss the common physical basis relating radial transport of blobs, pellets, and ELMs and a new blob regime that may lead to a connection between blob transport and the density limit. (author)

  2. Convective transport resistance in the vitreous humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, Anita; Sadhal, Satwindar; Ratanakijsuntorn, Komsan; Moats, Rex; Tang, Yang; Hughes, Patrick; Robinson, Michael; Lee, Susan

    2012-11-01

    It has been established by MRI visualization experiments that the convection of nanoparticles and large molecules with high rate of water flow in the vitreous humor will experience resistance, depending on the respective permeabilities of the injected solute. A set of experiments conducted with Gd-DTPA (Magnevist, Bayer AG, Leverkusen, Germany) and 30 nm gadolinium-based particles (Gado CELLTrackTM, Biopal, Worcester, MA) as MRI contrast agents showed that the degree of convective transport in this Darcy-type porous medium varies between the two solutes. These experiments consisted of injecting a mixture of the two (a 30 μl solution of 2% Magnevist and 1% nanoparticles) at the middle of the vitreous of an ex vivo whole bovine eye and subjecting the vitreous to water flow rate of 100 μl/min. The water (0.9% saline solution) was injected at the top of the eye, and was allowed to drain through small slits cut at the bottom of the eyeball. After 50 minutes of pumping, MRI images showed that the water flow carried the Gd-DTPA farther than the nanoparticles, even though the two solutes, being mixed, were subjected to the same convective flow conditions. We find that the convected solute lags the water flow, depending on the solute permeability. The usual convection term needs to be adjusted to allow for the filtration effect on the larger particles in the form (1- σ) u . ∇ c with important implications for the modeling of such systems.

  3. Unstable mixed convective transport in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schincariol, R.A.; Schwartz, F.W.

    1990-01-01

    This study is an experimental investigation of variable density groundwater flow in homogeneous and lenticular porous media. A solution of 500 mg/l Rhodamine WT dye served as the carrier for various concentrations of solute (NaCl) introduced into a two-dimensional flow tank at concentrations ranging from 1000 to 100,000 mg/l. At the scale of the experiments, mass transport depends upon both forced and free convection. In addition, density differences as low as 0.008 g/cm 3 (1000 mg/l NaCl) between a plume of dense water and ambient groundwater in homogeneous medium produces gravitational instabilities at realistic groundwater velocities. These instabilities are manifest by lobe-shaped protuberances that formed first along the bottom edge of the plume and later within the plume. As the density difference increases to 0.0015 g/cm 3 (2000 mg/l NaCl), 0.0037 g/cm 3 (5000 mg/l NaCl) or higher, this unstable mixing due to convective dispersion significantly alters the spreading process, resulting in a large degree of vertical spreading of the plume. In a lenticular medium the combination of convective dispersion and nonuniform flow due to heterogeneities results in relatively large dispersion. Scale considerations indicate that convective dispersion may provide an important component of mixing at the field scale. (Author) (30 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.)

  4. Mass transport in propagating patterns of convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, E.; Steinberg, V.

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies of propagating waves in an oscillatory convection of binary mixtures arise questions about transport properties of this flow. Optical visualization of a field of refraction index due to a shadowgraph technique gives information on the temperature and concentration fields. However, experimental observation of rolls propagating along the cell as travelling waves (TW) does not necessarily imply that mass is transferred hydrodynamically by the convective motion along the cell. One of the possibilities discussed, e.g., is that TW observed is only a phase propagation. The traditional examples of such situations come from the domain of linear, superposition-oriented physics. Acoustic waves transfer momentum and energy, but do not cause the mass to make excursions for their equilibrium point that are larger than the oscillation amplitude. In the case of nonlinear physics we were aware that small amplitude surface waves cause only small oscillatory motion round the equilibrium point, while larger amplitudes can cause the mass to start moving in the direction of the TW. This paper discussed the different possibilities of mass transfer by TW. 27 refs., 20 figs

  5. Magnetically Modulated Heat Transport in a Global Simulation of Solar Magneto-convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Campus Box 600, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Charbonneau, Paul [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K. [European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, RG2 9AX (United Kingdom); Rast, Mark P., E-mail: Jean-Francois.Cossette@lasp.colorado.edu, E-mail: paulchar@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: smolar@ecmwf.int, E-mail: Mark.Rast@lasp.colorado.edu [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Campus Box 391, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2017-05-20

    We present results from a global MHD simulation of solar convection in which the heat transported by convective flows varies in-phase with the total magnetic energy. The purely random initial magnetic field specified in this experiment develops into a well-organized large-scale antisymmetric component undergoing hemispherically synchronized polarity reversals on a 40 year period. A key feature of the simulation is the use of a Newtonian cooling term in the entropy equation to maintain a convectively unstable stratification and drive convection, as opposed to the specification of heating and cooling terms at the bottom and top boundaries. When taken together, the solar-like magnetic cycle and the convective heat flux signature suggest that a cyclic modulation of the large-scale heat-carrying convective flows could be operating inside the real Sun. We carry out an analysis of the entropy and momentum equations to uncover the physical mechanism responsible for the enhanced heat transport. The analysis suggests that the modulation is caused by a magnetic tension imbalance inside upflows and downflows, which perturbs their respective contributions to heat transport in such a way as to enhance the total convective heat flux at cycle maximum. Potential consequences of the heat transport modulation for solar irradiance variability are briefly discussed.

  6. Vertical Transport by Coastal Mesoscale Convective Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, K.; Kading, T.

    2016-12-01

    This work is part of an ongoing investigation of coastal mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), including changes in vertical transport of boundary layer air by storms moving from inland to offshore. The density of a storm's cold pool versus that of the offshore marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL), in part, determines the ability of the storm to successfully cross the coast, the mechanism driving storm propagation, and the ability of the storm to lift air from the boundary layer aloft. The ability of an MCS to overturn boundary layer air can be especially important over the eastern US seaboard, where warm season coastal MCSs are relatively common and where large coastal population centers generate concentrated regions of pollution. Recent work numerically simulating idealized MCSs in a coastal environment has provided some insight into the physical mechanisms governing MCS coastal crossing success and the impact on vertical transport of boundary layer air. Storms are simulated using a cloud resolving model initialized with atmospheric conditions representative of a Mid-Atlantic environment. Simulations are run in 2-D at 250 m horizontal resolution with a vertical resolution stretched from 100 m in the boundary layer to 250 m aloft. The left half of the 800 km domain is configured to represent land, while the right half is assigned as water. Sensitivity experiments are conducted to quantify the influence of varying MABL structure on MCS coastal crossing success and air transport, with MABL values representative of those observed over the western Mid-Atlantic during warm season. Preliminary results indicate that when the density of the cold pool is much greater than the MABL, the storm successfully crosses the coastline, with lifting of surface parcels, which ascend through the troposphere. When the density of the cold pool is similar to that of the MABL, parcels within the MABL remain at low levels, though parcels above the MABL ascend through the troposphere.

  7. Convective cells and transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassam, A.B.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1978-12-01

    The properties of convective cells and the diffusion resulting from such cells are significantly influenced by an inhomogeneity in the extermal confining magnetic field, such as that in toroidal plasmas. The convective diffusion in the presence of a field inhomogeneity is estimated. For a thermal background, this diffusion is shown to be substantially smaller than classical collisional diffusion. For a model nonthermal background, the diffusion is estimated, for typical parameters, to be at most of the order of collisional diffusion. The model background employed is based on spectra observed in numerical simulations of drift-wave-driven convective cells

  8. NUMERICALLY DETERMINED TRANSPORT LAWS FOR FINGERING ('THERMOHALINE') CONVECTION IN ASTROPHYSICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traxler, A.; Garaud, P.; Stellmach, S.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional simulations of fingering convection performed at parameter values approaching those relevant for astrophysics. Our simulations reveal the existence of simple asymptotic scaling laws for turbulent heat and compositional transport, which can be straightforwardly extrapolated from our numerically tractable values to the true astrophysical regime. Our investigation also indicates that thermo-compositional 'staircases', a key consequence of fingering convection in the ocean, cannot form spontaneously in the fingering regime in stellar interiors. Our proposed empirically determined transport laws thus provide simple prescriptions for mixing by fingering convection in a variety of astrophysical situations, and should, from here on, be used preferentially over older and less accurate parameterizations. They also establish that fingering convection does not provide sufficient extra-mixing to explain observed chemical abundances in red giant branch stars.

  9. Heat transport in bubbling turbulent convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkaraju, Rajaram; Stevens, Richard J A M; Oresta, Paolo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-06-04

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to numerous mechanisms, many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubble compounds with that of the liquid to give rise to a much-enhanced natural convection. In this article, we focus specifically on this enhancement and present a numerical study of the resulting two-phase Rayleigh-Bénard convection process in a cylindrical cell with a diameter equal to its height. We make no attempt to model other aspects of the boiling process such as bubble nucleation and detachment. The cell base and top are held at temperatures above and below the boiling point of the liquid, respectively. By keeping this difference constant, we study the effect of the liquid superheat in a Rayleigh number range that, in the absence of boiling, would be between 2 × 10(6) and 5 × 10(9). We find a considerable enhancement of the heat transfer and study its dependence on the number of bubbles, the degree of superheat of the hot cell bottom, and the Rayleigh number. The increased buoyancy provided by the bubbles leads to more energetic hot plumes detaching from the cell bottom, and the strength of the circulation in the cell is significantly increased. Our results are in general agreement with recent experiments on boiling Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

  10. Urban development control based on transportation carrying capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miharja, M.; Sjafruddin, A. H.

    2017-06-01

    Severe transportation problems in Indonesian urban areas are stimulated by one fundamental factor, namely lack of awareness on transportation carrying capacity in these areas development control. Urban land use development towards more physical coverage is typically not related with the capability of transportation system to accommodate additional trips volume. Lack of clear connection between development permit with its implication on the transportation side has led to a phenomenon of exceeding transport demand over supply capacity. This paper discusses the concept of urban land use development control which will be related with transport carrying capacity. The discussion would cover both supply and demand sides of transportation. From supply side, the analysis regarding the capacity of transport system would take both existing as well as potential road network capacity could be developed. From demand side, the analysis would be through the control of a maximum floor area and public transport provision. Allowed maximum floor area for development would be at the level of generating traffic at reasonable volume. Ultimately, the objective of this paper is to introduce model to incorporate transport carrying capacity in Indonesian urban land use development control.

  11. Carry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koijen, Ralph S.J.; Moskowitz, Tobias J.; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    that include global equities, global bonds, currencies, commodities, US Treasuries, credit, and equity index options. This predictability underlies the strong returns to "carry trades" that go long high-carry and short low-carry securities, applied almost exclusively to currencies, but shown here...

  12. Evaluation of cloud convection and tracer transport in a three-dimensional chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Feng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the performance of cloud convection and tracer transport in a global off-line 3-D chemical transport model. Various model simulations are performed using different meteorological (reanalyses (ERA-40, ECMWF operational and ECMWF Interim to diagnose the updraft mass flux, convective precipitation and cloud top height.

    The diagnosed upward mass flux distribution from TOMCAT agrees quite well with the ECMWF reanalysis data (ERA-40 and ERA-Interim below 200 hPa. Inclusion of midlevel convection improves the agreement at mid-high latitudes. However, the reanalyses show strong convective transport up to 100 hPa, well into the tropical tropopause layer (TTL, which is not captured by TOMCAT. Similarly, the model captures the spatial and seasonal variation of convective cloud top height although the mean modelled value is about 2 km lower than observed.

    The ERA-Interim reanalyses have smaller archived upward convective mass fluxes than ERA-40, and smaller convective precipitation, which is in better agreement with satellite-based data. TOMCAT captures these relative differences when diagnosing convection from the large-scale fields. The model also shows differences in diagnosed convection with the version of the operational analyses used, which cautions against using results of the model from one specific time period as a general evaluation.

    We have tested the effect of resolution on the diagnosed modelled convection with simulations ranging from 5.6° × 5.6° to 1° × 1°. Overall, in the off-line model, the higher model resolution gives stronger vertical tracer transport, however, it does not make a large change to the diagnosed convective updraft mass flux (i.e., the model results using the convection scheme fail to capture the strong convection transport up to 100 hPa as seen in the archived convective mass fluxes. Similarly, the resolution of the forcing winds in the higher resolution CTM does not make a

  13. Carry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koijen, Ralph S.J.; Moskowitz, Tobias; Pedersen, Lasse Heje

    2018-01-01

    -sectionally and in time series for a host of different asset classes, including global equities, global bonds, commodities, US Treasuries, credit, and options. Carry is not explained by known predictors of returns from these asset classes, and it captures many of these predictors, providing a unifying framework...... for return predictability. We reject a generalized version of Uncovered Interest Parity and the Expectations Hypothesis in favor of models with varying risk premia, in which carry strategies are commonly exposed to global recession, liquidity, and volatility risks, though none fully explains carry’s premium....

  14. Magnetic flux tubes and transport of heat in the convection zone of the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruit, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    This thesis consists of five papers dealing with transport of heat in the solar convection zone on the one hand, and with the structure of magnetic flux tubes in the top of the convection zone on the other hand. These subjects are interrelated. For example, the heat flow in the convection zone is disturbed by the presence of magnetic flux tubes, while exchange of heat between a flux tube and the convection zone is important for the energy balance of such a tube. A major part of this thesis deals with the structure of small magnetic flux tubes. Such small tubes (diameters less than about 2'') carry most of the flux appearing at the solar surface. An attempt is made to construct models of the surface layers of such small tubes in sufficient detail to make a comparison with observations possible. Underlying these model calculations is the assumption that the magnetic elements at the solar surface are flux tubes in a roughly static equilibrium. The structure of such tubes is governed by their pressure equilibrium, exchange of heat with the surroundings, and transport of heat by some modified form of convection along the tube. The tube models calculated are compared with observations

  15. Regional modelling of tracer transport by tropical convection – Part 1: Sensitivity to convection parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Arteta

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The general objective of this series of papers is to evaluate long duration limited area simulations with idealised tracers as a tool to assess tracer transport in chemistry-transport models (CTMs. In this first paper, we analyse the results of six simulations using different convection closures and parameterizations. The simulations are using the Grell and Dévényi (2002 mass-flux framework for the convection parameterization with different closures (Grell = GR, Arakawa-Shubert = AS, Kain-Fritch = KF, Low omega = LO, Moisture convergence = MC and an ensemble parameterization (EN based on the other five closures. The simulations are run for one month during the SCOUT-O3 field campaign lead from Darwin (Australia. They have a 60 km horizontal resolution and a fine vertical resolution in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. Meteorological results are compared with satellite products, radiosoundings and SCOUT-O3 aircraft campaign data. They show that the model is generally in good agreement with the measurements with less variability in the model. Except for the precipitation field, the differences between the six simulations are small on average with respect to the differences with the meteorological observations. The comparison with TRMM rainrates shows that the six parameterizations or closures have similar behaviour concerning convection triggering times and locations. However, the 6 simulations provide two different behaviours for rainfall values, with the EN, AS and KF parameterizations (Group 1 modelling better rain fields than LO, MC and GR (Group 2. The vertical distribution of tropospheric tracers is very different for the two groups showing significantly more transport into the TTL for Group 1 related to the larger average values of the upward velocities. Nevertheless the low values for the Group 1 fluxes at and above the cold point level indicate that the model does not simulate significant overshooting. For stratospheric tracers

  16. Classical convective energy transport in large gradient regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinton, F.L.

    1996-01-01

    Large gradients in density and temperature occur near the edge in H-mode plasmas and in the core of tokamak plasmas with negative central shear. Transport in these regions may be comparable to neoclassical. Standard neoclassical theory does not apply when the gradient lengths are comparable to an ion orbit excursion, or banana width. A basic question for neoclassical transport in large gradient regions is: do ion-ion collisions drive particle transport? Near the plasma edge in H-mode, where ion orbit loss requires that the ion energy transport be convective, neoclassical particle transport due to ion-ion collisions may play an important role. In negative central shear plasmas, where transport is inferred to be near neoclassical, it is important to have accurate predictions for the neoclassical rate of energy and particle transport. A simple 2-D slab model has been used, with a momentum-conserving collision operator, to show that ion-ion collisions do drive particle transport. When the gradients are large, the open-quotes field particleclose quotes contribution to the particle flux is non-local, and does not cancel the open-quotes test particleclose quotes contribution, which is local. Solutions of the kinetic equation are found which show that the steepness of the density profile, for increasing particle flux, is limited by orbit averaging. The gradient length is limited by the thermal gyroradius, and the convective energy flux is independent of ion temperature. This will allow an ion thermal runaway to occur, if there are no other ion energy loss mechanisms

  17. Heat and momentum transport scalings in vertical convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-11-01

    For vertical convection, where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls, we investigate the heat and momentum transport, which are measured, respectively, by the Nusselt number Nu and the Reynolds number Re . For laminar vertical convection we derive analytically the dependence of Re and Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr from our boundary layer equations and find two different scaling regimes: Nu Pr 1 / 4 Ra 1 / 4 , Re Pr - 1 / 2 Ra 1 / 2 for Pr > 1 . Direct numerical simulations for Ra from 105 to 1010 and Pr from 0.01 to 30 are in excellent ageement with our theoretical findings and show that the transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 0.1. We summarize the results from and present new theoretical and numerical results for transitional and turbulent vertical convection. The work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the Grant Sh 405/4 - Heisenberg fellowship.

  18. Condition of damping of anomalous radial transport, determined by ordered convective electron dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.I.; Barchuk, S.V.; Lapshin, V.I.; Volkov, E.D.; Melentsov, Yu.V.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown, that at development of instability due to a radial gradient of density in the crossed electric and magnetic fields in nuclear fusion installations ordering convective cells can be excited. It provides anomalous particle transport. The spatial structures of these convective cells have been constructed. The radial dimensions of these convective cells depend on their amplitudes and on a radial gradient of density. The convective-diffusion equation for radial dynamics of the electrons has been derived. At the certain value of the universal controlling parameter, the convective cell excitation and the anomalous radial transport are suppressed. (author)

  19. Nonlinear 2D convection and enhanced cross-field plasma transport near the MHD instability threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastukhov, V.P.; Chudin, N.V.

    2003-01-01

    Results of theoretical study and computer simulations of nonlinear 2D convection induced by a convective MHD instability near its threshold in FRC-like non-paraxial magnetic confinement system are presented. An appropriate closed set of weakly nonideal reduced MHD equations is derived to describe the self-consistent plasma dynamics. It is shown that the convection forms nonlinear large scale stochastic vortices (convective cells), which tend to restore and to maintain the marginally stable pressure pro e and result in an essentially nonlocal enhanced heat transport. A large amount of data on the structure of the nascent convective flows is obtained and analyzed. The computer simulations of long time plasma evolutions demonstrate such features of the resulting anomalous transport as pro e consistency, L-H transition, external transport barrier, pinch of impurities, etc. (author)

  20. Laminar flow and convective transport processes scaling principles and asymptotic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, Howard

    1992-01-01

    Laminar Flow and Convective Transport Processes: Scaling Principles and Asymptotic Analysis presents analytic methods for the solution of fluid mechanics and convective transport processes, all in the laminar flow regime. This book brings together the results of almost 30 years of research on the use of nondimensionalization, scaling principles, and asymptotic analysis into a comprehensive form suitable for presentation in a core graduate-level course on fluid mechanics and the convective transport of heat. A considerable amount of material on viscous-dominated flows is covered.A unique feat

  1. Heat Transport Enhancement of Turbulent Thermal Convection by Inserted Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ke-Qing; Zhang, Lu

    2017-11-01

    We report an experimental study on the heat transport properties of turbulent Rayleigh Benard Convection (RBC) in a rectangular cell with two types of 3D-printed structures inserted inside. The first one splits the original rectangular cell into 60 identical sub cells whose aspect ratio is 1:1:10 (length, width, height). The second one splits the cell into 30 sub cells, each with a 1:2:10 aspect ratio and a baffle in the center. We find that for large Rayleigh numbers (Ra), the Nusselt numbers (Nu) of both structures increase compared with that of the empty rectangular cell. An enhancement in Nu as much as 20% is found for the second type of insertion at Rayleigh number 2 ×109 . Moreover, the Nu-Ra scaling shows a transition with both geometries. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement within a single sub unit indicates that the transition may be related to the laminar to turbulent transition in flow field. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) confirm the experimental results. Our results demonstrate the potential in using insertions to enhance passive heat transfer. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council (RGC) of HKSAR (Nos. CUHK404513 and CUHK14301115).

  2. Carbon dioxide sequestration: Modeling the diffusive and convective transport under a CO2 cap

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca; Sun, Shuyu

    2012-01-01

    of low permeability. CO2 from this ‘capped' region diffuses into the fluid underlying it, and the resulting CO2-fluid mixture increases in density. This increase in density leads to gravity-driven convection. Accordingly, diffusive-convective transport

  3. Spatial model of convective solute transport in brain extracellular space does not support a "glymphatic" mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Byung-Ju; Smith, Alex J; Verkman, Alan S

    2016-12-01

    A "glymphatic system," which involves convective fluid transport from para-arterial to paravenous cerebrospinal fluid through brain extracellular space (ECS), has been proposed to account for solute clearance in brain, and aquaporin-4 water channels in astrocyte endfeet may have a role in this process. Here, we investigate the major predictions of the glymphatic mechanism by modeling diffusive and convective transport in brain ECS and by solving the Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations, using realistic ECS geometry for short-range transport between para-arterial and paravenous spaces. Major model parameters include para-arterial and paravenous pressures, ECS volume fraction, solute diffusion coefficient, and astrocyte foot-process water permeability. The model predicts solute accumulation and clearance from the ECS after a step change in solute concentration in para-arterial fluid. The principal and robust conclusions of the model are as follows: (a) significant convective transport requires a sustained pressure difference of several mmHg between the para-arterial and paravenous fluid and is not affected by pulsatile pressure fluctuations; (b) astrocyte endfoot water permeability does not substantially alter the rate of convective transport in ECS as the resistance to flow across endfeet is far greater than in the gaps surrounding them; and (c) diffusion (without convection) in the ECS is adequate to account for experimental transport studies in brain parenchyma. Therefore, our modeling results do not support a physiologically important role for local parenchymal convective flow in solute transport through brain ECS. © 2016 Jin et al.

  4. Anomalous heat transport and condensation in convection of cryogenic helium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Pavel; Schmoranzer, D.; Hanzelka, Pavel; Sreenivasan, K. R.; Skrbek, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 20 (2013), s. 8036-8039 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP203/12/P897 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : two-phase convection * temperature inversion * condensation * rain formation Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 9.809, year: 2013

  5. One-dimensional model of oxygen transport impedance accounting for convection perpendicular to the electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainka, J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Computacao Cientifica (LNCC), CMC 6097, Av. Getulio Vargas 333, 25651-075 Petropolis, RJ, Caixa Postal 95113 (Brazil); Maranzana, G.; Thomas, A.; Dillet, J.; Didierjean, S.; Lottin, O. [Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee (LEMTA), Universite de Lorraine, 2, avenue de la Foret de Haye, 54504 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); LEMTA, CNRS, 2, avenue de la Foret de Haye, 54504 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2012-10-15

    A one-dimensional (1D) model of oxygen transport in the diffusion media of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is presented, which considers convection perpendicular to the electrode in addition to diffusion. The resulting analytical expression of the convecto-diffusive impedance is obtained using a convection-diffusion equation instead of a diffusion equation in the case of classical Warburg impedance. The main hypothesis of the model is that the convective flux is generated by the evacuation of water produced at the cathode which flows through the porous media in vapor phase. This allows the expression of the convective flux velocity as a function of the current density and of the water transport coefficient {alpha} (the fraction of water being evacuated at the cathode outlet). The resulting 1D oxygen transport impedance neglects processes occurring in the direction parallel to the electrode that could have a significant impact on the cell impedance, like gas consumption or concentration oscillations induced by the measuring signal. However, it enables us to estimate the impact of convection perpendicular to the electrode on PEMFC impedance spectra and to determine in which conditions the approximation of a purely diffusive oxygen transport is valid. Experimental observations confirm the numerical results. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. On interpreting studies of tracer transport by deep cumulus convection and its effects on atmospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Lawrence

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Global chemistry-transport models (CTMs and chemistry-GCMs (CGCMs generally simulate vertical tracer transport by deep convection separately from the advective transport by the mean winds, even though a component of the mean transport, for instance in the Hadley and Walker cells, occurs in deep convective updrafts. This split treatment of vertical transport has various implications for CTM simulations. In particular, it has led to a misinterpretation of several sensitivity simulations in previous studies in which the parameterized convective transport of one or more tracers is neglected. We describe this issue in terms of simulated fluxes and fractions of these fluxes representing various physical and non-physical processes. We then show that there is a significant overlap between the convective and large-scale mean advective vertical air mass fluxes in the CTM MATCH, and discuss the implications which this has for interpreting previous and future sensitivity simulations, as well as briefly noting other related implications such as numerical diffusion.

  7. Effect of perturbation of convective energy transport on the luminosity and radius of the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endal, A.S.; Twigg, L.W.

    1982-01-01

    The response of solar models to perturbations of the efficiency of convective energy transport is studied for a number of cases. Such perturbations primarily affect the shallow superadiabatic layer of the convective envelope (at depths 3 km below the photosphere). Independent of the details of the perturbation scheme, the resulting change in the solar radius (ΔR/R) is always very small compared to the change in luminosity (ΔL/L). This appears to be true for any physical mechanism of solar variability which operates in the outer layers of the convection zone. Changes of the solar radius have been inferred by Dunham et al. from historical observations of solar eclipses in 1715 and 1925. Considering the constraints on concurrent luminosity changes, this type of solar variability must be indicative of changes in the solar structure at substantial depths below the superadiabatic layer of the convective envelope

  8. Fluid flow and convective transport of solutes within the intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Stephen J; Ito, Keita; Nolte, Lutz P

    2004-02-01

    Previous experimental and analytical studies of solute transport in the intervertebral disc have demonstrated that for small molecules diffusive transport alone fulfils the nutritional needs of disc cells. It has been often suggested that fluid flow into and within the disc may enhance the transport of larger molecules. The goal of the study was to predict the influence of load-induced interstitial fluid flow on mass transport in the intervertebral disc. An iterative procedure was used to predict the convective transport of physiologically relevant molecules within the disc. An axisymmetric, poroelastic finite-element structural model of the disc was developed. The diurnal loading was divided into discrete time steps. At each time step, the fluid flow within the disc due to compression or swelling was calculated. A sequentially coupled diffusion/convection model was then employed to calculate solute transport, with a constant concentration of solute being provided at the vascularised endplates and outer annulus. Loading was simulated for a complete diurnal cycle, and the relative convective and diffusive transport was compared for solutes with molecular weights ranging from 400 Da to 40 kDa. Consistent with previous studies, fluid flow did not enhance the transport of low-weight solutes. During swelling, interstitial fluid flow increased the unidirectional penetration of large solutes by approximately 100%. Due to the bi-directional temporal nature of disc loading, however, the net effect of convective transport over a full diurnal cycle was more limited (30% increase). Further study is required to determine the significance of large solutes and the timing of their delivery for disc physiology.

  9. Hydrodynamic theory of convective transport across a dynamically stabilized diffuse boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhauser, H.

    1983-09-01

    The diffuse boundary layer between miscible liquids is subject to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities if the heavy fluid is supported by the light one. The resulting rapid interchange of the liquids can be suppressed by enforcing vertical oscillations on the whole system. This dynamic stabilization is incomplete and produces some peculiar novel transport phenomena such as decay off the density profile into several steps, periodic peeling of density sheets of the boundary layer and the appearance of steady vortex flow. The theory presented in this paper identifies the basic mechanism as formation of convective cells leading to enhanced diffusion, and explains previous experimental results with water and ZnJ 2 -solutions. A nonlinear treatment of the stationary convective flow problem gives the saturation amplitude of the ground mode and provides an upper bound for the maximum convective transport. The hydrodynamic model can be used for visualizing similar transport processes in the plasma of toroidal confinement devices such as sawtooth oscillations in soft disruptions of tokamak discharges and anomalous diffusion by excitation of convective cells. The latter process is investigated here in some detail, leading to the result that the maximum possible transport is of the order of Bohm diffusion. (orig.)

  10. A consistent formulation of the finite element method for solving diffusive-convective transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmo, E.G.D. do; Galeao, A.C.N.R.

    1986-01-01

    A new method specially designed to solve highly convective transport problems is proposed. Using a variational approach it is shown that this weighted residual method belongs to a class of Petrov-Galerkin's approximation. Some examples are presented in order to demonstrate the adequacy of this method in predicting internal or external boundary layers. (Author) [pt

  11. Intermittent convective transport carried by propagating electromagnetic filamentary structures in nonuniformly magnetized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.S.; Naulin, Volker; Fundamenski, W.

    2010-01-01

    Drift-Alfvén vortex filaments associated with electromagnetic turbulence were recently identified in reversed field pinch devices. Similar propagating filamentary structures were observed in the Earth magnetosheath, magnetospheric cusp and Saturn’s magnetosheath by spacecrafts. The characteristics...... energy, magnetic momentum, and angular momentum. The perpendicular vortex motions and the kinetic shear Alfvén waves are coupled through the parallel current and Ampere’s law, leading to field line bending. On the timescale of interchange motion τ⊥, a thermal expansion force in the direction of curvature......, heat, and momentum in the fusion plasmas can be interpreted in terms of the ballistic motion of these solitary electromagnetic filamentary structures....

  12. Carbon dioxide sequestration: Modeling the diffusive and convective transport under a CO2 cap

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    A rise in carbon dioxide levels from industrial emissions is contributing to the greenhouse effect and global warming. CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers is a strategy to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels. Scientists and researchers rely on numerical simulators to predict CO2 storage by modeling the fluid transport behaviour. Studies have shown that after CO2 is injected into a saline aquifer, undissolved CO2 rises due to buoyant forces and will spread laterally away from the injection site under an area of low permeability. CO2 from this ‘capped\\' region diffuses into the fluid underlying it, and the resulting CO2-fluid mixture increases in density. This increase in density leads to gravity-driven convection. Accordingly, diffusive-convective transport is important to model since it predicts an enhanced storage capacity of the saline aquifer. This work incorporates the diffusive and convective transport processes into the transport modeling equation, and uses a self-generated code. Discretization of the domain is done with a cell-centered finite difference method. Cases are set up using similar parameters from published literature in order to compare results. Enhanced storage capacity is predicted in this work, similar to work done by others. A difference in the onset of convective transport between this work and published results is noticed and discussed in this paper. A sensitivity analysis is performed on the density model used in this work, and on the diffusivity value assumed. The analysis shows that the density model and diffusivity value is a key component on simulation results. Also, perturbations are added to porosity and permeability in order to see the effect of perturbations on the onset of convection, and results agree with similar findings by others. This work provides a basis for studying other cases, such as the impact of heterogeneity on the diffusion-convective transport. An extension of this work may involve the use of an equation of state to

  13. Representation of tropical deep convection in atmospheric models – Part 2: Tracer transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hoyle

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The tropical transport processes of 14 different models or model versions were compared, within the framework of the SCOUT-O3 (Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere project. The tested models range from the regional to the global scale, and include numerical weather prediction (NWP, chemical transport, and chemistry-climate models. Idealised tracers were used in order to prevent the model's chemistry schemes from influencing the results substantially, so that the effects of modelled transport could be isolated. We find large differences in the vertical transport of very short-lived tracers (with a lifetime of 6 h within the tropical troposphere. Peak convective outflow altitudes range from around 300 hPa to almost 100 hPa among the different models, and the upper tropospheric tracer mixing ratios differ by up to an order of magnitude. The timing of convective events is found to be different between the models, even among those which source their forcing data from the same NWP model (ECMWF. The differences are less pronounced for longer lived tracers, however they could have implications for modelling the halogen burden of the lowermost stratosphere through transport of species such as bromoform, or short-lived hydrocarbons into the lowermost stratosphere. The modelled tracer profiles are strongly influenced by the convective transport parameterisations, and different boundary layer mixing parameterisations also have a large impact on the modelled tracer profiles. Preferential locations for rapid transport from the surface into the upper troposphere are similar in all models, and are mostly concentrated over the western Pacific, the Maritime Continent and the Indian Ocean. In contrast, models do not indicate that upward transport is highest over western Africa.

  14. Diapycnal Transport and Pattern Formation in Double-Diffusive Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    carried out only over the geostrophic interior. By virtue of (2.55), we further simplify (2.58) to * int 0dlw M = ∇∫ . (2.59) The final step is the...The processes discussed in this study could be affected by the nonlinearities of the equation of state (e.g., McDougall 1987). Thus, the quantitative...nonlinear equation of state given in McDougall et al. (2003). Model geometry consisted of a volume comprising 320 grid points in the zonal and 256

  15. Results from transient transport experiments in Rijnhuizen tokamak project: Heat convection, transport barriers and 'non-local' effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantica, P.; Gorini, G.; Hogeweij, G.M.D.; Kloe, J. de; Lopez Cardozo, N.J.; Schilham, A.M.R.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of experimental transport studies performed on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP) using transient transport techniques in both Ohmic and ECH dominated plasmas is presented. Modulated Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) and oblique pellet injection (OPI) have been used to induce electron temperature (T e ) perturbations at different radial locations. These were used to probe the electron transport barriers observed near low order rational magnetic surfaces in ECH dominated steady-state RTP plasmas. Layers of inward electron heat convection in off-axis ECH plasmas were detected with modulated ECH. This suggests that RTP electron transport barriers consist of heat pinch layers rather than layers of low thermal diffusivity. In a different set of experiments, OPI triggered a transient rise of the core T e due to an increase of the T e gradient in the 1< q<2 region. These transient transport barriers were probed with modulated ECH and found to be due to a transient drop of the electron heat diffusivity, except for off-axis ECH plasmas, where a transient inward pinch is also observed. Transient transport studies in RTP could not solve this puzzling interplay between heat diffusion and convection in determining an electron transport barrier. They nevertheless provided challenging experimental evidence both for theoretical modelling and for future experiments. (author)

  16. Carbon Sequestration in Saline Aquifers: Modeling Diffusive and Convective Transport Of a Carbon-­Dioxide Cap

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    done on the diffusive-convective transport that occurs under a cap of CO2-saturated fluid, which results after CO2 is injected into an aquifer and spreads laterally under an area of low permeability. The diffusive-convective modeling reveals an enhanced

  17. Off-line algorithm for calculation of vertical tracer transport in the troposphere due to deep convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belikov, D.A.; Maksyutov, S.; Krol, M.C.; Fraser, A.; Rigby, M.; Bian, H.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; Bergmann, D.; Bousquet, P.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Chipperfield, M.P.; Fortems-Cheiney, A.; Gloor, E.; Haynes, K.; Hess, P.; Houweling, S.; Kawa, S.R.; Law, R.M.; Loh, Z.; Meng, L.; Palmer, P.I.; Patra, P.K.; Prinn, R.G.; Saito, R.; Wilson, C.

    2013-01-01

    A modified cumulus convection parametrisation scheme is presented. This scheme computes the mass of air transported upward in a cumulus cell using conservation of moisture and a detailed distribution of convective precipitation provided by a reanalysis dataset. The representation of vertical

  18. Optimal wall spacing for heat transport in thermal convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishkina, Olga [Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    The simulation of RB flow for Ra up to 1 x 10{sup 10} is computationally expensive in terms of computing power and hard disk storage. Thus, we gratefully acknowledge the computational resources supported by Leibniz-Rechenzentrum Munich. Compared to Γ=1 situation, a new physical picture of heat transport is identified here at Γ{sub opt} for any explored Ra. Therefore, a detailed comparison between Γ=1 and Γ=Γ{sub opt} is valuable for our further research, for example, their vertical temperature and velocity profiles. Additionally, we plan to compare the fluid with different Pr under geometrical confinement, which are computationally expensive for the situations of Pr<<1 and Pr>>1.

  19. Large plasma pressure perturbations and radial convective transport in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Yu, Guanghui; Ryutov, Dmitri

    2004-01-01

    Strongly localized plasma structures with large pressure inhomogeneities (such as plasma blobs in the scrape-off-layer (SOL)/shadow regions, pellet clouds, Edge localized Modes (ELMs)) observed in the tokamaks, stellarators and linear plasma devices. Experimental studies of these phenomena reveal striking similarities including more convective rather than diffusive radial plasma transport. We suggest that rather simple models can describe many essentials of blobs, ELMs, and pellet clouds dynamics. The main ingredient of these models is the effective plasma gravity caused by magnetic curvature, centrifugal or friction forces effects. As a result, the equations governing plasma transport in such localized structures appear to be rather similar to that used to describe nonlinear evolution of thermal convection in the Boussinesq approximation (directly related to the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability). (author)

  20. Convective Transport of Very-short-lived Bromocarbons to the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qing; Atlas, Elliot Leonard; Blake, Donald Ray; Dorf, Marcel; Pfeilsticker, Klaus August; Schauffler, Sue Myhre

    2014-01-01

    We use the NASA GEOS Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM) to quantify the contribution of two most important brominated very short-lived substances (VSLS), bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2), to stratospheric bromine and its sensitivity to convection strength. Model simulations suggest that the most active transport of VSLS from the marine boundary layer through the tropopause occurs over the tropical Indian Ocean, the Western Pacific warm pool, and off the Pacific coast of Mexico. Together, convective lofting of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 and their degradation products supplies 8 ppt total bromine to the base of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL, 150 hPa), similar to the amount of VSLS organic bromine available in the marine boundary layer (7.8-8.4 ppt) in the above active convective lofting regions. Of the total 8 ppt VSLS-originated bromine that enters the base of TTL at 150 hPa, half is in the form of source gas injection (SGI) and half as product gas injection (PGI). Only a small portion (Br2, together, contribute 7.7 pptv to the present-day inorganic bromine in the stratosphere. However, varying model deep convection strength between maximum and minimum convection conditions can introduce a 2.6 pptv uncertainty in the contribution of VSLS to inorganic bromine in the stratosphere (BryVSLS). Contrary to the conventional wisdom, minimum convection condition leads to a larger BryVSLS as the reduced scavenging in soluble product gases, thus a significant increase in PGI (2-3 ppt), greatly exceeds the relative minor decrease in SGI (a few 10ths ppt.

  1. Modification Of Carry-Blair Transport Media For Storage Salmonella typhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yati Supriatin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine transport media modification as alternative media to replace Carry Blair. One type of transport media that often use to carry faeces specimens suspected to contain Salmonella typhi is Carry-Blair media. Studies have been conducted experimentally by storing Salmonella typhi on alternative transport media with Peptone composition, disodium Phosphate, Sodium chloride, Calcium chloride, which is made using a semi-solid and Carry-Blair as a control. Three variety of storage was done (0 hour,6 hours,9 hours at a temperature 4⁰-8⁰C and then Salmonella typhi was inoculated in Salmonella Shigella Agar using spread plate technique incubated during 24 hours at 37⁰C, counted the number of colonies by the plate count method using the colony counter. The results of ANOVA could be concluded that modification media could be use as alternative media replace Carry-Blair at 6 hours. Based on regression correlation test was assumed that the Salmonella typhi bacteria still life at less than 11 hours 54 minutes.

  2. Convective and diffusive effects on particle transport in asymmetric periodic capillaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmul Islam

    Full Text Available We present here results of a theoretical investigation of particle transport in longitudinally asymmetric but axially symmetric capillaries, allowing for the influence of both diffusion and convection. In this study we have focused attention primarily on characterizing the influence of tube geometry and applied hydraulic pressure on the magnitude, direction and rate of transport of particles in axi-symmetric, saw-tooth shaped tubes. Three initial value problems are considered. The first involves the evolution of a fixed number of particles initially confined to a central wave-section. The second involves the evolution of the same initial state but including an ongoing production of particles in the central wave-section. The third involves the evolution of particles a fully laden tube. Based on a physical model of convective-diffusive transport, assuming an underlying oscillatory fluid velocity field that is unaffected by the presence of the particles, we find that transport rates and even net transport directions depend critically on the design specifics, such as tube geometry, flow rate, initial particle configuration and whether or not particles are continuously introduced. The second transient scenario is qualitatively independent of the details of how particles are generated. In the third scenario there is no net transport. As the study is fundamental in nature, our findings could engender greater understanding of practical systems.

  3. Convective-diffusive transport of fission products in the gap of a failed fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, Z.W.; Carlucci, L.N.; Arimescu, V.I.

    1995-03-01

    A model is presented to describe the transport behaviour of gaseous fission products along the axial fuel-to-sheathe gap of a failed fuel element to the coolant system. The model is applicable to an element having failed under normal operating conditions or loss-of coolant-accident conditions. Because of the large differences in operating parameters, the transport characteristics of gaseous fission products in a failed element under these two operating conditions are significantly different. However, in both cases the transport process can be described by convection-diffusion caused by the continuous release of fission products from the fuel to the gap. Under normal operating conditions, the bulk-flow velocity is found to be negligible, due to the low release rate of fission products from fuel. The process can be well approximated by the diffusion of fission products in a stagnant gas-steam mixture. The effect of convection on the fission product transport, however, becomes significant under loss-of-coolant-accident conditions, where the release rates of fission products from fuel can be several orders of magnitude higher that that under normal operating conditions. The convection of the mixture in the gap not only contributes an additional flux to the gas-mixture transport, but also increases the gradient of fission products concentration across the opening, and therefore increases the diffusion flux to the coolant. As a result of the bulk flow, the transport of fission products along the gap is accelerated and the hold-up of short-lived isotopes in the gap is significantly reduced. Steam ingress through the opening into the gap is obstructed by the bulk flow, resulting in low steam concentrations in the gap under loss-of-coolant-accident conditions. (author). 6 refs., 8 figs

  4. Convective transport in ATM simulations and its relation to the atmospheric stability conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta

    2017-04-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 80 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases, in particular xenon isotopes, supported by the atmospheric transport modeling (ATM). One of the important noble gases, monitored on a daily basis, is radioxenon. It can be produced either during a nuclear explosion with a high fission yield, and thus be considered as an important tracer to prove the nuclear character of an explosion, or be emitted from nuclear power plants (NPPs) or from isotope production facilities (IPFs). To investigate the transport of xenon emissions, the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) operates an Atmospheric Transport Modelling (ATM) system based on the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. To address the question whether including the convective transport in ATM simulations will change the results significantly, the differences between the outputs with the convective transport turned off and turned on, were computed and further investigated taking into account the atmospheric stability conditions. For that purpose series of 14 days forward simulations, with convective transport and without it, released daily in the period January 2011 to February 2012, were analysed. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. The unique opportunity of having access to both daily emission values for ANSTO as well as measured Xe-133 activity concentration (AC) values at the IMS stations, gave a chance to validate the simulations.

  5. Numerical modelling of convective heat transport by air flow in permafrost talus slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wicky

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Talus slopes are a widespread geomorphic feature in the Alps. Due to their high porosity a gravity-driven internal air circulation can be established which is forced by the gradient between external (air and internal (talus temperature. The thermal regime is different from the surrounding environment, leading to the occurrence of permafrost below the typical permafrost zone. This phenomenon has mainly been analysed by field studies and only few explicit numerical modelling studies exist. Numerical simulations of permafrost sometimes use parameterisations for the effects of convection but mostly neglect the influence of convective heat transfer in air on the thermal regime. In contrast, in civil engineering many studies have been carried out to investigate the thermal behaviour of blocky layers and to improve their passive cooling effect. The present study further develops and applies these concepts to model heat transfer in air flows in a natural-scale talus slope. Modelling results show that convective heat transfer has the potential to develop a significant temperature difference between the lower and the upper parts of the talus slope. A seasonally alternating chimney-effect type of circulation develops. Modelling results also show that this convective heat transfer leads to the formation of a cold reservoir in the lower part of the talus slope, which can be crucial for maintaining the frozen ground conditions despite increasing air temperatures caused by climate change.

  6. Diffusive and convective transport modelling from analysis of ECRH-stimulated electron heat wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erckmann, V.; Gasparino, U.; Giannone, L.

    1992-01-01

    ECRH power modulation experiments in toroidal devices offer the chance to analyze the electron heat transport more conclusively: the electron heat wave propagation can be observed by ECE (or SX) leading to radial profiles of electron temperature modulation amplitude and time delay (phase shift). Taking also the stationary power balance into account, the local electron heat transport can be modelled by a combination of diffusive and convective transport terms. This method is applied to ECRH discharges in the W7-AS stellarator (B=2.5T, R=2m, a≤18 cm) where the ECRH power deposition is highly localized. In W7-AS, the T e modulation profiles measured by a high resolution ECE system are the basis for the local transport analysis. As experimental errors limit the separation of diffusive and convective terms in the electron heat transport for central power deposition, also ECRH power modulation experiments with off-axis deposition and inward heat wave propagation were performed (with 70 GHz o-mode as well as with 140 GHz x-mode for increased absorption). Because collisional electron-ion coupling and radiative losses are only small, low density ECRH discharges are best candidates for estimating the electron heat flux from power balance. (author) 2 refs., 3 figs

  7. Convective Influence and Transport Pathways Controlling the Tropical Distribution of Carbon Monoxide at 100 Hpa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric; Bergman, John; Pfister, Leonard; Ueyama, Rei; Kinnison, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Trajectory calculations with convective influence diagnosed from geostationary-satellite cloud measurements are used to evaluate the relative importance of different Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) transport pathways for establishing the distribution of carbon monoxide (CO) at 100 hPa as observed by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on board the Aura satellite. Carbon monoxide is a useful tracer for investigating TTL transport and convective influence because the CO lifetime is comparable to the time require for slow ascent through the TTL (a couple of months). Offline calculations of TTL radiative heating are used to determine the vertical motion field. The simple trajectory model does a reasonable job of reproducing the MLS CO distributions during Boreal wintertime and summertime. The broad maximum in CO concentration over the Pacific is primarily a result of the strong radiative heating (indicating upward vertical motion) associated with the abundant TTL cirrus in this region. Sensitivity tests indicate that the distinct CO maximum in the Asian monsoon anticyclone is strongly impacted by extreme convective systems with detrainment of polluted air above 360 K potential temperature. The relative importance of different CO source regions will also be discussed.

  8. Analysis of nuclide transport under natural convection and time dependent boundary condition using TOUGH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javeri, V. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    After implementation of TOUGH2 at GRS in summer 91, it was first used to analyse the gas transport in a repository for the nuclear waste with negligible heat generation and to verify the results obtained with ECLIPSE/JAV 92/. Since the original version of TOUGH2 does not directly simulate the decay of radionuclide and the time dependent boundary conditions, it is not a appropriate tool to study the nuclide transport in a porous medium/PRU 87, PRU 91/. Hence, in this paper some modifications are proposed to study the nuclide transport under combined influence of natural convection diffusion, dispersion and time dependent boundary condition. Here, a single phase fluid with two liquid components is considered as in equation of state model for water and brine/PRU 91A/.

  9. Off-line algorithm for calculation of vertical tracer transport in the troposphere due to deep convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Belikov

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A modified cumulus convection parametrisation scheme is presented. This scheme computes the mass of air transported upward in a cumulus cell using conservation of moisture and a detailed distribution of convective precipitation provided by a reanalysis dataset. The representation of vertical transport within the scheme includes entrainment and detrainment processes in convective updrafts and downdrafts. Output from the proposed parametrisation scheme is employed in the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES global chemical transport model driven by JRA-25/JCDAS reanalysis. The simulated convective precipitation rate and mass fluxes are compared with observations and reanalysis data. A simulation of the short-lived tracer 222Rn is used to further evaluate the performance of the cumulus convection scheme. Simulated distributions of 222Rn are evaluated against observations at the surface and in the free troposphere, and compared with output from models that participated in the TransCom-CH4 Transport Model Intercomparison. From this comparison, we demonstrate that the proposed convective scheme in general is consistent with observed and modeled results.

  10. Regional modelling of tracer transport by tropical convection – Part 2: Sensitivity to model resolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Arteta

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The general objective of this series of two papers is to evaluate long duration limited-area simulations with idealised tracers as a possible tool to assess the tracer transport in chemistry-transport models (CTMs. In this second paper we analyse the results of three simulations using different horizontal and vertical resolutions. The goal is to study the impact of the model spatial resolution on convective transport of idealized tracer in the tropics. The reference simulation (REF uses a 60 km horizontal resolution and 300 m vertically in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS. A 20 km horizontal resolution simulation (HR is run as well as a simulation with 850 m vertical resolution in the UTLS (CVR. The simulations are run for one month during the SCOUT-O3 field campaign. Aircraft data, TRMM rainrate estimates and radiosoundings have been used to evaluate the simulations. They show that the HR configuration gives generally a better agreement with the measurements than the REF simulation. The CVR simulation gives generally the worst results. The vertical distribution of the tropospheric tracers for the simulations has a similar shape with a ~15 km altitude maximum for the 6h-lifetime tracer of 0.4 ppbv for REF, 1.2 for HR and 0.04 for CVR. These differences are related to the dynamics produced by the three simulations that leads to larger values of the upward velocities on average for HR and lower for CVR compared to REF. HR simulates more frequent and stronger convection leading to enhanced fluxes compared to REF and higher detrainment levels compared to CVR. HR provides also occasional overshoots over the cold point dynamical barrier. For the stratospheric tracers the differences between the three simulations are small. The diurnal cycle of the fluxes of all tracers in the Tropical Tropopause Layer exhibits a maximum linked to the maximum of convective activity.

  11. The effect of centrifugal buoyancy on the heat transport in rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Susanne; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    In a rapidly rotating and differentially heated fluid, the centrifugal acceleration can play a similar role to that of gravity in generating convective motion. However, in the paradigm system of rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection, centrifugal buoyancy is typically not considered in theoretical studies and, thus, usually undesired in laboratory experiments, despite being unavoidable. How centrifugal buoyancy affects the turbulent flow, including the heat transport, is still largely unknown, in particular, when it can be considered negligible. We study this problem by means of direct numerical simulations. Unlike in experiments, we are able to systematically vary the Froude number Fr (ratio of centrifugal to gravitational acceleration) and the Rossby number Ro (dimensionless rotation rate) independently, and even set each to zero exactly. We show that the centrifugal acceleration simultaneously leads to contending phenomena, e.g. reflected by an increase and a decrease of the center temperature, or a suppression and an enhancement of the heat transfer efficiency. Which one prevails as net effect strongly depends on the combination of Fr and Ro. Furthermore, we discuss implications for experiments of rapidly rotating convection. SH acknowledges funding by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under Grant HO 5890/1-1, JA by the NSF Geophysics Program.

  12. Study on ac losses of HTS coil carrying ac transport current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Taozhen; Tang Yuejin; Li Jingdong; Zhou Yusheng; Cheng Shijie; Pan Yuan

    2005-01-01

    Ac loss has an important influence on the thermal performances of HTS coil. It is necessary to quantify ac loss to ascertain its impact on coil stability and for sizing the coil refrigeration system. In this paper, we analyzed in detail the ac loss components, hysteresis loss, eddy loss and flux flow loss in the pancake HTS coil carrying ac transport current by finite element method. We also investigated the distribution of the ac losses in the coil to study the effects of magnetic field distribution on ac losses

  13. Silicon nanopore membrane (SNM) for islet encapsulation and immunoisolation under convective transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shang; Faleo, Gaetano; Yeung, Raymond; Kant, Rishi; Posselt, Andrew M.; Desai, Tejal A.; Tang, Qizhi; Roy, Shuvo

    2016-03-01

    Problems associated with islet transplantation for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) such as shortage of donor cells, use of immunosuppressive drugs remain as major challenges. Immune isolation using encapsulation may circumvent the use of immunosuppressants and prolong the longevity of transplanted islets. The encapsulating membrane must block the passage of host’s immune components while providing sufficient exchange of glucose, insulin and other small molecules. We report the development and characterization of a new generation of semipermeable ultrafiltration membrane, the silicon nanopore membrane (SNM), designed with approximately 7 nm-wide slit-pores to provide middle molecule selectivity by limiting passage of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, the use of convective transport with a pressure differential across the SNM overcomes the mass transfer limitations associated with diffusion through nanometer-scale pores. The SNM exhibited a hydraulic permeability of 130 ml/hr/m2/mmHg, which is more than 3 fold greater than existing polymer membranes. Analysis of sieving coefficients revealed 80% reduction in cytokines passage through SNM under convective transport. SNM protected encapsulated islets from infiltrating cytokines and retained islet viability over 6 hours and remained responsive to changes in glucose levels unlike non-encapsulated controls. Together, these data demonstrate the novel membrane exhibiting unprecedented hydraulic permeability and immune-protection for islet transplantation therapy.

  14. Savanna burning and convective mixing in Southern Africa: Implications for CO emissions and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connors, V.S.; Cahoon, D.R. Jr.; Reichle, H.G. Jr.; Brunke, E.G.; Garstang, M.; Seiler, W.; Scheel, H.E.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines both the emission and the transport of CO from the surface to the free troposphere and the role of convection in redistributing this gas in the free troposphere over southern Africa. Upper-air soundings, the meteorological analyses from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), and the multispectral imagery from the European Space Agency's Meteosat-2 satellite comprise the meteorological data base. The surface measurements of CO were measured at an atmospheric chemistry laboratory in Cape Point, South Africa. The CO in the middle troposphere was measured by the Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS) experiment flown on the space shuttle. This study focuses on the emissions and transport of CO from Africa south of the equator on 5-6 October 1984

  15. Spatial model of convective solute transport in brain extracellular space does not support a “glymphatic” mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Byung-Ju; Smith, Alex J.

    2016-01-01

    A “glymphatic system,” which involves convective fluid transport from para-arterial to paravenous cerebrospinal fluid through brain extracellular space (ECS), has been proposed to account for solute clearance in brain, and aquaporin-4 water channels in astrocyte endfeet may have a role in this process. Here, we investigate the major predictions of the glymphatic mechanism by modeling diffusive and convective transport in brain ECS and by solving the Navier–Stokes and convection–diffusion equations, using realistic ECS geometry for short-range transport between para-arterial and paravenous spaces. Major model parameters include para-arterial and paravenous pressures, ECS volume fraction, solute diffusion coefficient, and astrocyte foot-process water permeability. The model predicts solute accumulation and clearance from the ECS after a step change in solute concentration in para-arterial fluid. The principal and robust conclusions of the model are as follows: (a) significant convective transport requires a sustained pressure difference of several mmHg between the para-arterial and paravenous fluid and is not affected by pulsatile pressure fluctuations; (b) astrocyte endfoot water permeability does not substantially alter the rate of convective transport in ECS as the resistance to flow across endfeet is far greater than in the gaps surrounding them; and (c) diffusion (without convection) in the ECS is adequate to account for experimental transport studies in brain parenchyma. Therefore, our modeling results do not support a physiologically important role for local parenchymal convective flow in solute transport through brain ECS. PMID:27836940

  16. Transport characteristics of nanoscale zero-valent iron carried by three different "vehicles" in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yan; Zhao, Yong S; Li, Lu L; Qin, Chuan Y; Wu, Fan; Geng, Nan N; Lei, Jian S

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the transport properties of nanoscale zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) (nZVI) carried by three vehicles: water, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, and SDS foam. Batch experiments were conducted to assess the sedimentation capability of nZVI particles in these three vehicles. Column experiments were conducted to investigate the transport properties of nZVI in porous media formed with different sizes of sand (0.25 mm to 0.5 mm, 0.5 mm to 0.9 mm, and 0.9 mm to 1.4 mm). Three main results were obtained. First, the batch experiments revealed that the stabilities of nZVI particles in SDS solution and SDS foam were improved, compared with that of nZVI particles in water. Moreover, the sedimentation of nZVI in foam was closely associated with the foam drainage volume. The nZVI content in foam was similar to that in the original foaming suspension, and the nZVI particle distribution in foam became significantly more uniform at a stirring speed of 3000 r/min. Second, the transport of nZVI was enhanced by foam compared with water and SDS solution for 0.25 mm to 0.5 mm diameter sand. For sand with diameters of 0.5 mm to 0.9 mm and 0.9 mm to 1.4 mm, the mobility of nZVI carried by SDS solution was optimal, followed by that of nZVI carried by foam and water. Thus, the mobility of nZVI in finer sand was significantly enhanced by foam, compared with that in coarse sand. In contrast, compared with the bare nZVI suspension and nZVI-laden foam, the spatial distribution of nZVI particles carried by SDS solution was significantly uniform along the column length. Third, the SDS concentration significantly influenced the migration of nZVI in porous media. The enhancement in the migration of nZVI carried by SDS solution was greater at an SDS dose of 0.25% compared with that at the other three doses (0.2%, 0.5%, and 1%) for sand with a 0.25 mm to 0.5 mm diameter. Increased SDS concentrations positively affected the transport of nZVI by foam for sand with a

  17. The role of convective tracer transport for the NO{sub x} content in the North Atlantic flight corridor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, I; Sausen, R [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1998-12-31

    The effect of convective tracer transport on the NO{sub x} distribution at cruising altitudes is studied by means of the atmosphere general circulation model ECHAM which was extended by a simplified (linear) NO{sub x} chemistry module. NO{sub x} originates from several sources including aircraft emissions. Two numerical simulations have been performed: one including convective tracer transport and one without this process. The differences in the NO{sub x} distribution of these two runs are discussed. (author) 8 refs.

  18. The role of convective tracer transport for the NO{sub x} content in the North Atlantic flight corridor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, I.; Sausen, R. [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    The effect of convective tracer transport on the NO{sub x} distribution at cruising altitudes is studied by means of the atmosphere general circulation model ECHAM which was extended by a simplified (linear) NO{sub x} chemistry module. NO{sub x} originates from several sources including aircraft emissions. Two numerical simulations have been performed: one including convective tracer transport and one without this process. The differences in the NO{sub x} distribution of these two runs are discussed. (author) 8 refs.

  19. Improving representation of convective transport for scale-aware parameterization: 2. Analysis of cloud-resolving model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Chin; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Guang J.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-01

    Following Part I, in which 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complex in the midlatitude continental and the tropical regions are conducted and evaluated, we examine the scale dependence of eddy transport of water vapor, evaluate different eddy transport formulations, and improve the representation of convective transport across all scales by proposing a new formulation that more accurately represents the CRM-calculated eddy flux. CRM results show that there are strong grid-spacing dependencies of updraft and downdraft fractions regardless of altitudes, cloud life stage, and geographical location. As for the eddy transport of water vapor, updraft eddy flux is a major contributor to total eddy flux in the lower and middle troposphere. However, downdraft eddy transport can be as large as updraft eddy transport in the lower atmosphere especially at the mature stage of midlatitude continental convection. We show that the single-updraft approach significantly underestimates updraft eddy transport of water vapor because it fails to account for the large internal variability of updrafts, while a single downdraft represents the downdraft eddy transport of water vapor well. We find that using as few as three updrafts can account for the internal variability of updrafts well. Based on the evaluation with the CRM simulated data, we recommend a simplified eddy transport formulation that considers three updrafts and one downdraft. Such formulation is similar to the conventional one but much more accurately represents CRM-simulated eddy flux across all grid scales.

  20. Volumetric vs Mass Velocity in Analyzing Convective-Diffusive Transport Processes in Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Howard

    2000-11-01

    Because mass rather than volume is preserved in fluid-mechanical problems involving density changes, a natural predilection exists for quantifying convective-diffusive transport phenomena in terms of a velocity field based upon mass, rather than volume. Indeed, in the classic BSL "Transport Phenomena" textbook, but a single reference exists even to the very concept of a volume velocity, and even then it is relegated to a homework assignment. However, especially when dealing with transport in fluids in which the mass density of the conserved property being transported (e.g., chemical species, internal energy, etc.) is independent of the prevailing pressure, as is largely true in the case of liquids, overwhelming advantages exist is preferring the volume velocity over the more ubiquitous and classical mass velocity. In a generalization of ideas pioneered by D. D. Joseph and co-workers, we outline the reasons for this volumetric velocity preference in a broad general context by identifying a large class of physical problems whose solutions are rendered more accessible by exploiting this unconventional velocity choice.

  1. Dynamics and mass transport of solutal convection in a closed porous media system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Baole; Akhbari, Daria; Hesse, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Most of the recent studies of CO2 sequestration are performed in open systems where the constant partial pressure of CO2 in the vapor phase results in a time-invariant saturated concentration of CO2 in the brine (Cs). However, in some closed natural CO2 reservoirs, e.g., Bravo Dome in New Mexico, the continuous dissolution of CO2 leads to a pressure drop in the gas that is accompanied by a reduction of Cs and thereby affects the dynamics and mass transport of convection in the brine. In this talk, I discuss the characteristics of convective CO2 dissolution in a closed system. The gas is assumed to be ideal and its solubility given by Henry's law. An analytical solution shows that the diffusive base state is no longer self-similar and that diffusive mass transfer declines rapidly. Scaling analysis reveals that the volume ratio of brine and gas η determines the behavior of the system. DNS show that no constant flux regime exists for η > 0 nevertheless, the quantity F /Cs2 remains constant, where F is the dissolution flux. The onset time is only affected by η when the Rayleigh number Ra is small. In this case, the drop in Cs during the initial diffusive regime significantly reduces the effective Ra and therefore delays the onset.

  2. The diffusion mechanism and convective transport in the formation of surface anomalies of RADON-222 generated at depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.B.; Hamza, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminar study on the importance of a thermally-activated convective transport of radon is made in order to explain radon anomalies at surface generated at great depth. It is theoretically shown that convective currents should be of the order of 10 μm/s or larger to explain such anomalies. The influence of surface temperature changes on the convective transport is also discussed. Seasonal changes in temperature typical of climates such as that of southern Brazil can develop thermal inversion layers at depths up to 20 metres. The optimum period of the year for the employment of surface emanometric techniques is during the second and the third months after the winter peak when the thermal inversion barriers are less intense. (Author) [pt

  3. Transport of gaseous pollutants by convective boundary layer around a human body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licina, Dusan; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Sekhar, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the ability of the human convective boundary layer to transport pollution in a quiescent indoor environment. The impact of the source location in the vicinity of a human body is examined in relation to pollution distribution in the breathing zone and the thickness...... of the pollution boundary layer. The study, in addition, evaluates the effects of the room air temperature, table positioning, and seated body inclination. The human body is represented by a thermal manikin that has a body shape, size, and surface temperature that resemble those of a real person. The results show...... at the upper back or behind the chair. The results also indicate that a decrease in personal exposure to pollutants released from or around the human body increases the extent to which the pollution spreads to the surroundings. Reducing the room air temperature or backward body inclination intensifies...

  4. Nanofluidic transport over a curved surface with viscous dissipation and convective mass flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehmood, Zaffar; Iqbal, Z.; Azhar, Ehtsham; Maraj, E.N. [HITEC Univ., Taxila (Pakistan). Dept. of Mathematics

    2017-06-01

    This article is a numerical investigation of boundary layer flow of nanofluid over a bended stretching surface. The study is carried out by considering convective mass flux condition. Contribution of viscous dissipation is taken into the account along with thermal radiation. Suitable similarity transformations are employed to simplify the system of nonlinear partial differential equations into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Computational results are extracted by means of a shooting method embedded with a Runge-Kutta Fehlberg technique. Key findings include that velocity is a decreasing function of curvature parameter K. Moreover, Nusselt number decreases with increase in curvature of the stretching surface while skin friction and Sherwood number enhance with increase in K.

  5. Transport Phenomena Projects: Natural Convection between Porous, Concentric Cylinders--A Method to Learn and to Innovate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatadjian, Esteban; Lesage, Francois; Mota, Jose Paulo B.

    2013-01-01

    A project that involves the numerical simulation of transport phenomena is an excellent method to teach this subject to senior/graduate chemical engineering students. The subject presented here has been used in our senior/graduate course, it concerns the study of natural convection heat transfer between two concentric, horizontal, saturated porous…

  6. Characteristics of convective heat transport in a packed pebble-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulmohsin, Rahman S., E-mail: rsar62@mst.edu [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 400 West 11th Street/231 Schrenk Hall, Rolla, MO 65409-1230 (United States); Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H., E-mail: aldahhanm@mst.edu [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 400 West 11th Street/231 Schrenk Hall, Rolla, MO 65409-1230 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, 301 W. 14th St./222 Fulton Hall (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • A fast-response heat transfer probe has been developed and used in this work. • Heat transport has been quantified in terms of local heat transfer coefficients. • The method of the electrically heated single sphere in packing has been applied. • The heat transfer coefficient increases from the center to the wall of packed bed. • This work advancing the knowledge of heat transport in the studied packed bed. - Abstract: Obtaining more precise results and a better understanding of the heat transport mechanism in the dynamic core of packed pebble-bed reactors is needed because this mechanism poses extreme challenges to the reliable design and efficient operation of these reactors. This mechanism can be quantified in terms of a solid-to-gas convective heat transfer coefficient. Therefore, in this work, the local convective heat transfer coefficients and their radial profiles were measured experimentally in a separate effect pilot-plant scale and cold-flow experimental setup of 0.3 m in diameter, using a sophisticated noninvasive heat transfer probe of spherical type. The effect of gas velocity on the heat transfer coefficient was investigated over a wide range of Reynolds numbers of practical importance. The experimental investigations of this work include various radial locations along the height of the bed. It was found that an increase in coolant gas flow velocity causes an increase in the heat transfer coefficient and that effect of the gas flow rate varies from laminar to turbulent flow regimes at all radial positions of the studied packed pebble-bed reactor. The results show that the local heat transfer coefficient increases from the bed center to the wall due to the change in the bed structure, and hence, in the flow pattern of the coolant gas. The findings clearly indicate that one value of an overall heat transfer coefficient cannot represent the local heat transfer coefficients within the bed; therefore, correlations are needed to

  7. Optimized convective transport with automated pressure control in on-line postdilution hemodiafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyeux, V; Sijpkens, Y; Haddj-Elmrabet, A; Bijvoet, A J; Nilsson, L-G

    2008-11-01

    In a stable patient population we evaluated on-line postdilution hemodiafiltration (HDF) on the incremental improvement in blood purification versus high-flux HD, using the same dialyzer and blood flow rate. For HDF we used a new way of controlling HDF treatments based on the concept of constant pressure control where the trans-membrane pressure is automatically set by the machine using a feedback loop on the achieved filtration (HDF UC). We enrolled 20 patients on on-line HDF treatment and during a 4-week study period recorded key treatment parameters in HDF UC. For one mid-week study treatment performed in HD and one midweek HDF UC treatment we sampled blood and spent dialysate to evaluate the removal of small- and middle-sized solutes. We achieved 18+/-3 liters of ultrafiltration in four-hour HDF UC treatments, corresponding to 27+/-3% of the treated blood volume. That percentage varied by patient hematocrit level. The ultrafiltration amounted to 49+/-4% of the estimated plasma water volume treated. We noted few machine alarms. For beta2m and factor D the effective reduction in plasma level by HDF (76+/-6% and 43+/-9%, respectively) was significantly greater than in HD, and a similar relation was seen in mass recovered in spent dialysate. Small solute removal was similar in HDF and HD. Albumin loss was low. The additional convective transport provided by on-line HDF significantly improved the removal of middle molecules when all other treatment settings were equal. Using the automated pressure control mode in HDF, the convective volume depended on the blood volume processed and the patient hematocrit level.

  8. Bounds on heat transport in rapidly rotating Rayleigh–Bénard convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grooms, Ian; Whitehead, Jared P

    2015-01-01

    The heat transport in rotating Rayleigh–Bénard convection is considered in the limit of rapid rotation (small Ekman number E) and strong thermal forcing (large Rayleigh number Ra). The analysis proceeds from a set of asymptotically reduced equations appropriate for rotationally constrained dynamics; the conjectured range of validity for these equations is Ra ≲ E −8/5 . A rigorous bound on heat transport of Nu ⩽ 20.56Ra 3 E 4 is derived in the limit of infinite Prandtl number using the background method. We demonstrate that the exponent in this bound cannot be improved on using a piece-wise monotonic background temperature profile like the one used here. This is true for finite Prandtl numbers as well, i.e. Nu ≲ Ra 3 is the best upper bound for this particular setup of the background method. The feature that obstructs the availability of a better bound in this case is the appearance of small-scale thermal plumes emanating from (or entering) the thermal boundary layer. The derived upper bound is consistent with, although significantly higher than the observed behaviour in simulations of the reduced equations, which find at most Nu ∼ Ra 2 E 8/3 . (paper)

  9. Carbon Sequestration in Saline Aquifers: Modeling Diffusive and Convective Transport Of a Carbon-­Dioxide Cap

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2011-05-01

    An increase in the earth’s surface temperature has been directly linked to the rise of carbon dioxide (CO2) levels In the atmosphere and an enhanced greenhouse effect. CO2 sequestration is one of the proposed mitigation Strategies in the effort to reduce atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Globally speaking, saline aquifers provide an adequate storage capacity for the world’s carbon emissions, and CO2 sequestration projects are currently underway in countries such as Norway, Germany, Japan, USA, and others. Numerical simulators serve as predictive tools for CO2 storage, yet must model fluid transport behavior while coupling different transport processes together accurately. With regards to CO2 sequestration, an extensive amount of research has been done on the diffusive-convective transport that occurs under a cap of CO2-saturated fluid, which results after CO2 is injected into an aquifer and spreads laterally under an area of low permeability. The diffusive-convective modeling reveals an enhanced storage capacity in saline aquifers, due to the density increase between pure fluid and CO2‐saturated fluid. This work presents the transport modeling equations that are used for diffusive- convective modeling. A cell-centered finite difference method is used, and simulations are run using MATLAB. Two cases are explored in order to compare the results from this work’s self-generated code with the results published in literature. Simulation results match relatively well, and the discrepancy for a delayed onset time of convective transport observed in this work is attributed to numerical artifacts. In fact, onset time in this work is directly attributed to the instability of the physical system: this instability arises from non-linear coupling of fluid flow, transport, and convection, but is triggered by numerical errors in these simulations. Results from this work enable the computation of a value for the numerical constant that appears in the onset time equation that

  10. Microphysics of mass-transport in coupled droplet-pairs at low Reynolds number and the role of convective dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qingming; Sau, Amalendu

    2016-06-01

    Interfacial mass-transport and redistribution in the micro-scale liquid droplets are important in diverse fields of research interest. The role of the "inflow" and the "outflow" type convective eddy-pairs in the entrainment of outer solute and internal relocation are examined for different homogeneous and heterogeneous water droplet pairs appearing in a tandem arrangement. Two micro-droplets of pure (rain) water interact with an oncoming outer air stream (Re ≤ 100) contaminated by uniformly distributed SO2. By virtue of separation/attachment induced non-uniform interfacial shear-stress gradient, the well-defined inflow/outflow type pairs of recirculating eddy-based convective motion quickly develops, and the eddies effectively attract/repel the accumulated outer solute and control the physical process of mass-transport in the droplet-pair. The non-uniformly shear-driven flow interaction and bifurcation of the circulatory internal flow lead to growth of important micro-scale "secondary" eddies which suitably regroup with the adjacent "primary" one to create the sustained inflow/outflow type convective dynamics. The presently derived flow characteristics and in-depth analysis help to significantly improve our understanding of the micro-droplet based transport phenomena in a wider context. By tuning "Re" (defined in terms of the droplet diameter and the average oncoming velocity of the outer air) and gap-ratio "α," the internal convective forcing and the solute entrainment efficiency could be considerably enhanced. The quantitative estimates for mass entrainment, convective strength, and saturation characteristics for different coupled micro-droplet pairs are extensively examined here for 0.2 ≤ α ≤ 2.0 and 30 ≤ Re ≤ 100. Interestingly, for the compound droplets, with suitably tuned radius-ratio "B" (of upstream droplet with respect to downstream one) the generated "inflow" type coherent convective dynamics helped to significantly augment the centre

  11. Effect of particle shape and slip mechanism on buoyancy induced convective heat transport with nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Pranit Satish; Mahapatra, Pallab Sinha; Pattamatta, Arvind

    2017-12-01

    Experiments and numerical simulation of natural convection heat transfer with nanosuspensions are presented in this work. The investigations are carried out for three different types of nanosuspensions: namely, spherical-based (alumina/water), tubular-based (multi-walled carbon nanotube/water), and flake-based (graphene/water). A comparison with in-house experiments is made for all the three nanosuspensions at different volume fractions and for the Rayleigh numbers in the range of 7 × 105-1 × 107. Different models such as single component homogeneous, single component non-homogeneous, and multicomponent non-homogeneous are used in the present study. From the present numerical investigation, it is observed that for lower volume fractions (˜0.1%) of nanosuspensions considered, single component models are in close agreement with the experimental results. Single component models which are based on the effective properties of the nanosuspensions alone can predict heat transfer characteristics very well within the experimental uncertainty. Whereas for higher volume fractions (˜0.5%), the multi-component model predicts closer results to the experimental observation as it incorporates drag-based slip force which becomes prominent. The enhancement observed at lower volume fractions for non-spherical particles is attributed to the percolation chain formation, which perturbs the boundary layer and thereby increases the local Nusselt number values.

  12. Numerical study of the influence of the convective heat transport on acoustic streaming in a standing wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Červenka, Milan; Bednařík, Michal

    2018-02-01

    Within this work, acoustic streaming in an air-filled cylindrical resonator with walls supporting a temperature gradient is studied by means of numerical simulations. A set of equations based on successive approximations is derived from the Navier-Stokes equations. The equations take into account the acoustic-streaming-driven convective heat transport; as time-averaged secondary-field quantities are directly calculated, the equations are much easier to integrate than the original fluid-dynamics equations. The model equations are implemented and integrated employing commercial software COMSOL Multiphysics. Numerical calculations are conducted for the case of a resonator with a wall-temperature gradient corresponding to the action of a thermoacoustic effect. It is shown that due to the convective heat transport, the streaming profile is considerably distorted even in the case of weak wall-temperature gradients. The numerical results are consistent with available experimental data.

  13. TRACKING AND TRACING SOLUTION FOR DANGEROUS GOODS CARRIED BY INTERMODAL TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kvet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problem of designing a complex tracking and tracing solution for dangerous goods transportation with the support of modern information technologies. This research activity presents a part of the “ChemLogTT” [2] project solved at the University of Žilina. The main goal of our contribution is to present basic conception of a complex developed software tool for monitoring and analyzing mentioned dangerous goods transportation.

  14. Anomalous convection diffusion and wave coupling transport of cells on comb frame with fractional Cattaneo-Christov flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Zheng, Liancun; Liu, Fawang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-09-01

    An improved Cattaneo-Christov flux model is proposed which can be used to capture the effects of the time and spatial relaxations, the time and spatial inhomogeneous diffusion and the spatial transition probability of cell transport in a highly non-homogeneous medium. Solutions are obtained by numerical discretization method where the time and spatial fractional derivative are discretized by the L1-approximation and shifted Grünwald definition, respectively. The solvability, stability and convergence of the numerical method for the special case of the Cattaneo-Christov equation are proved. Results indicate that the fractional convection diffusion-wave equation is an evolution equation which displays the coexisting characteristics of parabolicity and hyperbolicity. In other words, for α in (0, 1), the cells transport occupies the characteristics of coupling convection diffusion and wave spreading. Moreover, the effects of pertinent time parameter, time and spatial fractional derivative parameters, relaxation parameter, weight coefficient and the convection velocity on the anomalous transport of cells are shown graphically and analyzed in detail.

  15. A 10-year Ground-Based Radar Climatology of Convective Penetration of Stratospheric Intrusions and Associated Large-Scale Transport over the CONUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homeyer, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    Deep convection reaching the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) and its impact on atmospheric composition through rapid vertical transport of lower troposphere air and stratosphere-troposphere exchange has received increasing attention in the past 5-10 years. Most efforts focused on convection have been directed toward storms that reach and/or penetrate the coincident environmental lapse-rate tropopause. However, convection has also been shown to reach into large-scale stratospheric intrusions (depressions of stratospheric air lying well below the lapse-rate tropopause on the cyclonic side of upper troposphere jet streams). Such convective penetration of stratospheric intrusions is not captured by studies of lapse-rate tropopause-penetrating convection. In this presentation, it will be shown using hourly, high-quality mergers of ground-based radar observations from 2004 to 2013 in the contiguous United States (CONUS) and forward large-scale trajectory analysis that convective penetration of stratospheric intrusions: 1) is more frequent than lapse-rate tropopause-penetrating convection, 2) occurs over a broader area of the CONUS than lapse-rate tropopause-penetrating convection, and 3) can influence the composition of the lower stratosphere through large-scale advection of convectively influenced air to altitudes above the lapse-rate tropopause, which we find to occur for about 8.5% of the intrusion volumes reached by convection.

  16. Multiple zonal jets and convective heat transport barriers in a quasi-geostrophic model of planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guervilly, C.; Cardin, P.

    2017-10-01

    We study rapidly rotating Boussinesq convection driven by internal heating in a full sphere. We use a numerical model based on the quasi-geostrophic approximation for the velocity field, whereas the temperature field is 3-D. This approximation allows us to perform simulations for Ekman numbers down to 10-8, Prandtl numbers relevant for liquid metals (˜10-1) and Reynolds numbers up to 3 × 104. Persistent zonal flows composed of multiple jets form as a result of the mixing of potential vorticity. For the largest Rayleigh numbers computed, the zonal velocity is larger than the convective velocity despite the presence of boundary friction. The convective structures and the zonal jets widen when the thermal forcing increases. Prograde and retrograde zonal jets are dynamically different: in the prograde jets (which correspond to weak potential vorticity gradients) the convection transports heat efficiently and the mean temperature tends to be homogenized; by contrast, in the cores of the retrograde jets (which correspond to steep gradients of potential vorticity) the dynamics is dominated by the propagation of Rossby waves, resulting in the formation of steep mean temperature gradients and the dominance of conduction in the heat transfer process. Consequently, in quasi-geostrophic systems, the width of the retrograde zonal jets controls the efficiency of the heat transfer.

  17. The Effect of Online Hemodiafiltration on Infections: Results from the CONvective TRAnsport STudy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire H den Hoedt

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis (HD patients have a high risk of infections. The uremic milieu has a negative impact on several immune responses. Online hemodiafiltration (HDF may reduce the risk of infections by ameliorating the uremic milieu through enhanced clearance of middle molecules. Since there are few data on infectious outcomes in HDF, we compared the effects of HDF with low-flux HD on the incidence and type of infections.We used data of the 714 HD patients (age 64 ±14, 62% men, 25% Diabetes Mellitus, 7% catheters participating in the CONvective TRAnsport STudy (CONTRAST, a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of HDF as compared to low-flux HD. The events were adjudicated by an independent event committee. The risk of infectious events was compared with Cox regression for repeated events and Cox proportional hazard models. The distributions of types of infection were compared between the groups.Thirty one percent of the patients suffered from one or more infections leading to hospitalization during the study (median follow-up 1.96 years. The risk for infections during the entire follow-up did not differ significantly between treatment arms (HDF 198 and HD 169 infections in 800 and 798 person-years respectively, hazard ratio HDF vs. HD 1.09 (0.88-1.34, P = 0.42. No difference was found in the occurrence of the first infectious event (either fatal, non-fatal or type specific. Of all infections, respiratory infections (25% in HDF, 28% in HD were most common, followed by skin/musculoskeletal infections (21% in HDF, 13% in HD.HDF as compared to HD did not result in a reduced risk of infections, larger studies are needed to confirm our findings.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00205556.

  18. Diffusive and convective transport modelling from analysis of ECRH-stimulated electron heat wave propagation. [ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erckmann, V; Gasparino, U; Giannone, L. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)) (and others)

    1992-01-01

    ECRH power modulation experiments in toroidal devices offer the chance to analyze the electron heat transport more conclusively: the electron heat wave propagation can be observed by ECE (or SX) leading to radial profiles of electron temperature modulation amplitude and time delay (phase shift). Taking also the stationary power balance into account, the local electron heat transport can be modelled by a combination of diffusive and convective transport terms. This method is applied to ECRH discharges in the W7-AS stellarator (B=2.5T, R=2m, a[<=]18 cm) where the ECRH power deposition is highly localized. In W7-AS, the T[sub e] modulation profiles measured by a high resolution ECE system are the basis for the local transport analysis. As experimental errors limit the separation of diffusive and convective terms in the electron heat transport for central power deposition, also ECRH power modulation experiments with off-axis deposition and inward heat wave propagation were performed (with 70 GHz o-mode as well as with 140 GHz x-mode for increased absorption). Because collisional electron-ion coupling and radiative losses are only small, low density ECRH discharges are best candidates for estimating the electron heat flux from power balance. (author) 2 refs., 3 figs.

  19. 3/2 or 5/2 for convective thermal transport?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duechs, D.F.

    1989-07-01

    To resolve frequent arguments on the form of the convective part of the thermal energy flux the relevant definitions and equations are compiled. The relative importance of the different terms involved is shown for Joint European Torus (JET) data. The choice of the ''adiabatic source terms'', p''centre dot''div v- ''->'' or v- ''->centre dot''grad p, decides the form of the convective heat flux. (author)

  20. Electron heat transport in current carrying and currentless thermonuclear plasmas. Tokamaks and stellarators compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, M.

    1996-01-01

    In the first experiment the plasma current in the RTP tokamak is varied. Here the underlying idea was to check whether at a low plasma current, transport in the tokamak resembles transport in stellarators more than at higher currents. Secondly, experiments have been done to study the relation of the diffusivity χ to the temperature and its gradient in both W7-AS and RTP. In this case the underlying idea was to find the explanation for the phenomenon observed in both tokamaks and stellarators that the quality of the confinement degrades when more heating is applied. A possible explanation is that the diffusivity increases with the temperature or its gradient. Whereas in standard tokamak and stellarator experiments the temperature and its gradient are strongly correlated, a special capability of the plasma heating system of W7-AS and RTP can force them to decouple. (orig.)

  1. A simulation of a multifilamentary wire carrying a transport current in an AC applied field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rem, P.C.; Hartmann, R.A.; Dijkstra, D.; Van Beckum, F.P.H.; Van de Klundert, L.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of calculating the current distribution in a multi-filamentary wire subjected to a time-dependent field becomes difficult as soon as the non-linearity due to the saturation of layers of filaments can be neglected no more. Such a problem can be solved approximately if the shape of the boundaries between unsaturated regions can be prescribed on the basis of general considerations such as symmetry arguments. For cases involving both a transport current and an applied field, however, little is known about the boundaries and their time-dependence behaviour. For such cases a brute force numerical calculation may provide an answer. The results presented below were calculated for a combination of DC transport current and AC applied field

  2. Electron heat transport in current carrying and currentless thermonuclear plasmas. Tokamaks and stellarators compared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, M

    1996-01-16

    In the first experiment the plasma current in the RTP tokamak is varied. Here the underlying idea was to check whether at a low plasma current, transport in the tokamak resembles transport in stellarators more than at higher currents. Secondly, experiments have been done to study the relation of the diffusivity {chi} to the temperature and its gradient in both W7-AS and RTP. In this case the underlying idea was to find the explanation for the phenomenon observed in both tokamaks and stellarators that the quality of the confinement degrades when more heating is applied. A possible explanation is that the diffusivity increases with the temperature or its gradient. Whereas in standard tokamak and stellarator experiments the temperature and its gradient are strongly correlated, a special capability of the plasma heating system of W7-AS and RTP can force them to decouple. (orig.).

  3. Poly-N-acetylglucosamine matrix polysaccharide impedes fluid convection and transport of the cationic surfactant cetylpyridinium chloride through bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshnarayan, Krishnaraj; Shah, Suhagi M; Libera, Matthew R; Santostefano, Anthony; Kaplan, Jeffrey B

    2009-03-01

    Biofilms are composed of bacterial cells encased in a self-synthesized, extracellular polymeric matrix. Poly-beta(1,6)-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) is a major biofilm matrix component in phylogenetically diverse bacteria. In this study we investigated the physical and chemical properties of the PNAG matrix in biofilms produced in vitro by the gram-negative porcine respiratory pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and the gram-positive device-associated pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis. The effect of PNAG on bulk fluid flow was determined by measuring the rate of fluid convection through biofilms cultured in centrifugal filter devices. The rate of fluid convection was significantly higher in biofilms cultured in the presence of the PNAG-degrading enzyme dispersin B than in biofilms cultured without the enzyme, indicating that PNAG decreases bulk fluid flow. PNAG also blocked transport of the quaternary ammonium compound cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) through the biofilms. Binding of CPC to biofilms further impeded fluid convection and blocked transport of the azo dye Allura red. Bioactive CPC was efficiently eluted from biofilms by treatment with 1 M sodium chloride. Taken together, these findings suggest that CPC reacts directly with the PNAG matrix and alters its physical and chemical properties. Our results indicate that PNAG plays an important role in controlling the physiological state of biofilms and may contribute to additional biofilm-associated processes such as biocide resistance.

  4. The Role of Rotation in Convective Heat Transport: an Application to Low-Mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilsky, Loren; Hindman, Bradley W.; Toomre, Juri; Featherstone, Nicholas

    2018-06-01

    It is often supposed that the convection zones (CZs) of low-mass stars are purely adiabatically stratified. This is thought to be because convective motions are extremely efficient at homogenizing entropy within the CZ. For a purely adiabatic fluid layer, only very small temperature variations are required to drive convection, making the amplitude and overall character of the convection highly sensitive to the degree of adiabaticity established in the CZ. The presence of rotation, however, fundamentally changes the dynamics of the CZ; the strong downflow plumes that are required to homogenize entropy are unable to penetrate through the entire fluid layer if they are deflected too soon by the Coriolis force. This talk discusses 3D global models of spherical-shell convection subject to different rotation rates. The simulation results emphasize the possibility that for stars with a high enough rotation rate, large fractions of their CZs are not in fact adiabatically stratified; rather, there is a finite superadiabatic gradient that varies in magnitude with radius, being at a minimum in the CZ’s middle layers. Two consequences of the varying superadiabatic gradient are that the convective amplitudes at the largest length scales are effectively suppressed and that there is a strong latitudinal temperature gradient from a cold equator to a hot pole, which self-consistently drives a thermal wind. A connection is naturally drawn to the Sun’s CZ, which has supergranulation as an upper limit to its convective length scales and isorotational contours along radial lines, which can be explained by the presence of a thermal wind.

  5. Influence of convection on the diffusive transport and sieving of water and small solutes across the peritoneal membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Ramzana B; Diskin, Ann M; Spanel, Patrik; Smith, David; Davies, Simon J

    2005-02-01

    The three-pore model of peritoneal membrane physiology predicts sieving of small solutes as a result of the presence of a water-exclusive pathway. The purpose of this study was to measure the diffusive and convective components of small solute transport, including water, under differing convection. Triplicate studies were performed in eight stable individuals using 2-L exchanges of bicarbonate buffered 1.36 or 3.86% glucose and icodextrin. Diffusion of water was estimated by establishing an artificial gradient of deuterated water (HDO) between blood/body water and the dialysate. (125)RISA (radio-iodinated serum albumin) was used as an intraperitoneal volume marker to determine the net ultrafiltration and reabsorption of fluid. The mass transfer area coefficient (MTAC) for HDO and solutes was estimated using the Garred and Waniewski equations. The MTAC of HDO calculated for 1.36% glucose and icodextrin were similar (36.8 versus 39.7 ml/min; P = 0.3), whereas for other solutes, values obtained using icodextrin were consistently higher (P solutes is a reflection of their sieving. The increase in the MTAC of water and urea associated with an increase in convection is most likely due to increased mixing within the interstitium.

  6. Location-dependent coronary artery diffusive and convective mass transport properties of a lipophilic drug surrogate measured using nonlinear microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Joseph T; Simon, Bruce R; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2013-04-01

    Arterial wall mass transport properties dictate local distribution of biomolecules or locally delivered dugs. Knowing how these properties vary between coronary artery locations could provide insight into how therapy efficacy is altered between arterial locations. We introduced an indocarbocyanine drug surrogate to the lumens of left anterior descending and right coronary (LADC; RC) arteries from pigs with or without a pressure gradient. Interstitial fluorescent intensity was measured on live samples with multiphoton microscopy. We also measured binding to porcine coronary SMCs in monoculture. Diffusive transport constants peaked in the middle sections of the LADC and RC arteries by 2.09 and 2.04 times, respectively, compared to the proximal and distal segments. There was no statistical difference between the average diffusivity value between LADC and RC arteries. The convection coefficients had an upward trend down each artery, with the RC being higher than the LADC by 3.89 times. This study demonstrates that the convective and diffusive transport of lipophilic molecules changes between the LADC and the RC arteries as well as along their length. These results may have important implications in optimizing drug delivery for the treatment of coronary artery disease.

  7. Effect of Melt Convection and Solid Transport on Macrosegregation and Grain Structure in Equiaxed Al-Cu Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerko, Rodney S.; deGroh, Henry C., III; Beckermann, Christoph; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Macrosegregation in metal casting can be caused by thermal and solutal melt convection, and the transport of unattached solid crystals. These free grains can be a result of, for example, nucleation in the bulk liquid or dendrite fragmentation. In an effort to develop a comprehensive numerical model for the casting of alloys, an experimental study has been conducted to generate benchmark data with which such a solidification model could be tested. The specific goal of the experiments was to examine equiaxed solidification in situations where sinking of grains is (and is not) expected. The objectives were: 1) experimentally study the effects of solid transport and thermosolutal convection on macrosegregation and grain size distribution patterns; and 2) provide a complete set of controlled thermal boundary conditions, temperature data, segregation data, and grain size data, to validate numerical codes. The alloys used were Al-1 wt. pct. Cu, and Al-10 wt. pct. Cu with various amounts of the grain refiner TiB2 added. Cylindrical samples were either cooled from the top, or the bottom. Several trends in the data stand out. In attempting to model these experiments, concentrating on experiments that show clear trends or differences is recommended.

  8. Indirect estimation of the Convective Lognormal Transfer function model parameters for describing solute transport in unsaturated and undisturbed soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2012-05-01

    Solute transport in partially saturated soils is largely affected by fluid velocity distribution and pore size distribution within the solute transport domain. Hence, it is possible to describe the solute transport process in terms of the pore size distribution of the soil, and indirectly in terms of the soil hydraulic properties. In this paper, we present a conceptual approach that allows predicting the parameters of the Convective Lognormal Transfer model from knowledge of soil moisture and the Soil Moisture Characteristic (SMC), parameterized by means of the closed-form model of Kosugi (1996). It is assumed that in partially saturated conditions, the air filled pore volume act as an inert solid phase, allowing the use of the Arya et al. (1999) pragmatic approach to estimate solute travel time statistics from the saturation degree and SMC parameters. The approach is evaluated using a set of partially saturated transport experiments as presented by Mohammadi and Vanclooster (2011). Experimental results showed that the mean solute travel time, μ(t), increases proportionally with the depth (travel distance) and decreases with flow rate. The variance of solute travel time σ²(t) first decreases with flow rate up to 0.4-0.6 Ks and subsequently increases. For all tested BTCs predicted solute transport with μ(t) estimated from the conceptual model performed much better as compared to predictions with μ(t) and σ²(t) estimated from calibration of solute transport at shallow soil depths. The use of μ(t) estimated from the conceptual model therefore increases the robustness of the CLT model in predicting solute transport in heterogeneous soils at larger depths. In view of the fact that reasonable indirect estimates of the SMC can be made from basic soil properties using pedotransfer functions, the presented approach may be useful for predicting solute transport at field or watershed scales. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Application of rain scanner SANTANU and transportable weather radar in analyze of Mesoscale Convective System (MCS) events over Bandung, West Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, G. A.; Sinatra, T.; Trismidianto; Fathrio, I.

    2018-05-01

    Simultaneous observation of transportable weather radar LAPAN-GMR25SP and rain-scanner SANTANU were conducted in Bandung and vicinity. The objective is to observe and analyse the weather condition in this area during rainy and transition season from March until April 2017. From the observation result reported some heavy rainfall with hail and strong winds occurred on March 17th and April 19th 2017. This events were lasted within 1 to 2 hours damaged some properties and trees in Bandung. Mesoscale convective system (MCS) are assumed to be the cause of this heavy rainfall. From two radar data analysis showed a more local convective activity in around 11.00 until 13.00 LT. This local convective activity are showed from the SANTANU observation supported by the VSECT and CMAX of the Transportable radar data that signify the convective activity within those area. MCS activity were observed one hour after that. This event are confirm by the classification of convective-stratiform echoes from radar data and also from the high convective index from Tbb Himawari 8 satellite data. The different MCS activity from this two case study is that April 19 have much more MCS activity than in March 17, 2017.

  10. Fluid flow and convective transport of solutes within the intervertebral disc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferguson, S.J.; Ito, K.; Nolte, L.P.

    2004-01-01

    Previous experimental and analytical studies of solute transport in the intervertebral disc have demonstrated that for small molecules diffusive transport alone fulfils the nutritional needs of disc cells. It has been often suggested that fluid flow into and within the disc may enhance the transport

  11. Impact of Convection and Long Range Transport on Short-Lived Trace Gases in the UT/LS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, E. L.; Schauffler, S.; Navarro, M. A.; Lueb, R.; Hendershot, R.; Ueyama, R.

    2017-12-01

    Chemical composition of the air in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere is controlled by a balance of transport, photochemistry, and physical processes, such as interactions with clouds, ice, and aerosol. The chemistry of the air masses that reach the upper troposphere can potentially have profound impacts on the chemistry in the near tropopause region. For example, the transport of reactive organic halogens and their transformation to inorganic halogen species, e.g., Br, BrO, etc., can have a significant impact on ozone budgets in this region and even deeper the stratosphere. Trace gas measurements in the region near the tropopause can also indicate potential sources of surface emissions that are transported to high altitudes. Measurement of trace gases, including such compounds as non-methane hydrocarbons, hydrochlorofluorocarbons, halogenated solvents, methyl halides, etc., can be used to characterize source emissions from industrial, urban, biomass burning, or marine origins. Recent airborne research campaigns have been conducted to better characterize the chemical composition and variations in the UT/LS region. This presentation will discuss these measurements, with a special emphasis on the role of convection and transport in modifying the chemical composition of the UT/LS.

  12. Transport of Formaldehyde to the Upper Troposphere In Deep Convective Storms During the 2012 DC3 Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J.; Olson, J. R.; Crawford, J. H.; Barth, M. C.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Bela, M. M.; Toon, O. B.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Luo, Z. J.

    2014-12-01

    scavenging efficiencies in the 49-55% range. Although somewhat higher than previous determinations, there is still sufficient transport of CH2O to the UTLS, thus providing an important source to the HOx budget in convective outflow regions.

  13. Convective transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs facilitates direct penetration into deep tissues after topical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancik, Yuri; Anissimov, Yuri G; Jepps, Owen G; Roberts, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To relate the varying dermal, subcutaneous and muscle microdialysate concentrations found in man after topical application to the nature of the drug applied and to the underlying physiology. METHODS We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model in which transport to deeper tissues was determined by tissue diffusion, blood, lymphatic and intersitial flow transport and drug properties. The model was applied to interpret published human microdialysis data, estimated in vitro dermal diffusion and protein binding affinity of drugs that have been previously applied topically in vivo and measured in deep cutaneous tissues over time. RESULTS Deeper tissue microdialysis concentrations for various drugs in vivo vary widely. Here, we show that carriage by the blood to the deeper tissues below topical application sites facilitates the transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs that penetrate the skin, leading to rapid and significant concentrations in those tissues. Hence, the fractional concentration for the highly plasma protein bound diclofenac in deeper tissues is 0.79 times that in a probe 4.5 mm below a superficial probe whereas the corresponding fractional concentration for the poorly protein bound nicotine is 0.02. Their corresponding estimated in vivo lag times for appearance of the drugs in the deeper probes were 1.1 min for diclofenac and 30 min for nicotine. CONCLUSIONS Poorly plasma protein bound drugs are mainly transported to deeper tissues after topical application by tissue diffusion whereas the transport of highly plasma protein bound drugs is additionally facilitated by convective blood, lymphatic and interstitial transport to deep tissues. PMID:21999217

  14. Modelling the transport phenomena and texture changes of chicken breast meat during the roasting in a convective oven

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabeler, Felix; Feyissa, Aberham Hailu

    2018-01-01

    A numerical 3D model of coupled transport phenomena and texture changes during the roasting of chicken breast meat in a convection oven was developed. The model is based on heat and mass transfer coupled with the kinetics of temperature induced texture changes of chicken breast meat. The partial...... experimentally values. The developed model enables the prediction of the texture development inside the chicken meat as function of the process parameters. The model predictions and measured values show the clear effect of changing process settings on the texture profiles during the roasting process. Overall......, the developed model provides deep insights into the local and spatial texture changes of chicken breast meat during the roasting process that cannot be gained by experimentation alone....

  15. The Modelling Analysis of the Response of Convective Transport of Energy and Water to Multiscale Surface Heterogeneity over Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, G.; Hu, Z.; Ma, Y.; Ma, W.

    2017-12-01

    The land-atmospheric interactions over a heterogeneous surface is a tricky issue for accurately understanding the energy-water exchanges between land surface and atmosphere. We investigate the vertical transport of energy and water over a heterogeneous land surface in Tibetan Plateau during the evolution of the convective boundary layer using large eddy simulation (WRF_LES). The surface heterogeneity is created according to remote sensing images from high spatial resolution LandSat ETM+ images. The PBL characteristics over a heterogeneous surface are analyzed in terms of secondary circulations under different background wind conditions based on the horizontal and vertical distribution and evolution of wind. The characteristics of vertical transport of energy and heat over a heterogeneous surface are analyzed in terms of the horizontal distribution as well as temporal evolution of sensible and latent heat fluxes at different heights under different wind conditions on basis of the simulated results from WRF_LES. The characteristics of the heat and water transported into the free atmosphere from surface are also analyzed and quantified according to the simulated results from WRF_LES. The convective transport of energy and water are analyzed according to horizontal and vertical distributions of potential temperature and vapor under different background wind conditions. With the analysis based on the WRF_LES simulation, the performance of PBL schemes of mesoscale simulation (WRF_meso) is evaluated. The comparison between horizontal distribution of vertical fluxes and domain-averaged vertical fluxes of the energy and water in the free atmosphere is used to evaluate the performance of PBL schemes of WRF_meso in the simulation of vertical exchange of energy and water. This is an important variable because only the energy and water transported into free atmosphere is able to influence the regional and even global climate. This work would will be of great significance not

  16. Transport modeling of convection dominated helicon discharges in Proto-MPEX with the B2.5-Eirene code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, L. W.; Rapp, J.; Canik, J.; Lore, J. D.

    2017-11-01

    Data-constrained interpretative analyses of plasma transport in convection dominated helicon discharges in the Proto-MPEX linear device, and predictive calculations with additional Electron Cyclotron Heating/Electron Bernstein Wave (ECH/EBW) heating, are reported. The B2.5-Eirene code, in which the multi-fluid plasma code B2.5 is coupled to the kinetic Monte Carlo neutrals code Eirene, is used to fit double Langmuir probe measurements and fast camera data in front of a stainless-steel target. The absorbed helicon and ECH power (11 kW) and spatially constant anomalous transport coefficients that are deduced from fitting of the probe and optical data are additionally used for predictive simulations of complete axial distributions of the densities, temperatures, plasma flow velocities, particle and energy fluxes, and possible effects of alternate fueling and pumping scenarios. The somewhat hollow electron density and temperature radial profiles from the probe data suggest that Trivelpiece-Gould wave absorption is the dominant helicon electron heating source in the discharges analyzed here. There is no external ion heating, but the corresponding calculated ion temperature radial profile is not hollow. Rather it reflects ion heating by the electron-ion equilibration terms in the energy balance equations and ion radial transport resulting from the hollow density profile. With the absorbed power and the transport model deduced from fitting the sheath limited discharge data, calculated conduction limited higher recycling conditions were produced by reducing the pumping and increasing the gas fueling rate, resulting in an approximate doubling of the target ion flux and reduction of the target heat flux.

  17. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: a case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, H.; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, G. S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-20

    The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep, continental convective clouds in the mid-latitudes is studied for a severe storm case in Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. A new passive-tracer based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize the convective transport based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases. The passive gas concentration in the upper troposphere convective outflow results from a mixture of 47% from the lower level (0-3 km), 21% entrained from the upper troposphere, and 32% from mid-atmosphere based on observations. The transport analysis framework is applied to aerosols to estimate aerosol transport and wet-scavenging efficiency. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% and 68% for aerosol mass (Dp < 1μm) and aerosol number (0.03< Dp < 2.5μm), respectively. Little chemical selectivity to wet scavenging is seen among observed submicron sulfate (84%), organic (82%), and ammonium (80%) aerosols, while nitrate has a much lower scavenging efficiency of 57% likely due to the uptake of nitric acid. Observed larger size particles (0.15 - 2.5μm) are scavenged more efficiently (84%) than smaller particles (64%; 0.03 - 0.15μm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the WRF model. Compared to the observation based analysis, the standard model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency for both mass and number concentrations with low biases of 31% and 40%, respectively. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulation results, so that the bias in scavenging efficiency in mass and number concentrations is reduced to <10%. This supports the hypothesis that secondary activation is an important process for wet removal of aerosols in deep convective storms.

  18. Effects of Convective Transport of Solute and Impurities on Defect-Causing Kinetics Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Higginbotham, Henry Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For in-situ studies of the formation and evolution of step patterns during the growth of protein crystals, we have designed and assembled an experimental setup based on Michelson interferometry with the surface of the growing protein crystal as one of the reflective surfaces. The crystallization part of the device allows optical monitoring of a face of a crystal growing at temperature stable within 0.05 C in a developed solution flow of controlled direction and speed. The reference arm of the interferometer contains a liquid-crystal element that allows controlled shifts of the phase of the interferograms. We employ an image processing algorithm which combines five images with a pi/2 phase difference between each pair of images. The images are transferred to a computer by a camera capable of capturing 6-8 frames per second. The device allows data collection data regarding growth over a relatively large area (approximately .3 sq. mm) in-situ and in real time during growth. The estimated dept resolution of the phase shifting interferometry is about 100 A. The lateral resolution, depending on the zoom ratio, varies between 0.3 and 0.6 micrometers. We have now collected quantitative results on the onset, initial stages and development of instabilities in moving step trains on vicinal crystal surfaces at varying supersaturation, position on the facet, crystal size and temperature with the proteins ferritin, apoferritin and thaumatin. Comparisons with theory, especially with the AFM results on the molecular level processes, see below, allow tests of the rational for the effects of convective flows and, as a particular case, the lack thereof, on step bunching.

  19. Hydromagnetic transport phenomena from a stretching or shrinking nonlinear nanomaterial sheet with Navier slip and convective heating: A model for bio-nano-materials processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M.J., E-mail: jashim_74@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, American International University-Bangladesh, Banani Dhaka 1213 (Bangladesh); Bég, O. Anwar [Gort Engovation Research (Propulsion/Biomechanics), Gabriel' s Wing House, 15 Southmere Ave., Bradford, BD7 3NU England (United Kingdom); Amin, N. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-11-15

    Steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic laminar free convective boundary layer slip flow of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid from a translating stretching/shrinking sheet in a quiescent fluid is studied. A convective heating boundary condition is incorporated. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and following the implementation of a linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg fourth fifth order method from Maple. Validation of the Maple solutions is achieved with previous non-magnetic published results. The effects of the emerging thermophysical parameters; namely, stretching/shrinking, velocity slip, magnetic field, convective heat transfer and buoyancy ratio parameters, on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration (nanoparticle fraction) are depicted graphically and interpreted at length. It is found that velocity increases whilst temperature and concentration reduce with the velocity slip. Magnetic field causes to reduce velocity and enhances temperature and concentration. Velocity, temperature as well as concentration rises with convective heating parameter. The study is relevant to the synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids of potential interest in wound treatments, skin repair and smart coatings for biological devices. - Highlights: • This paper analyses MHD slip flow of nofluid with convective boundary conditions. • Group method is used to transform governing equations into similarity equations. • The Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method is used for numerical computations. • The study is relevant to synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids.

  20. Analysis of corrosion product transport in PWR primary system under non-convective condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byoung Sub

    1992-02-01

    The increase of occupational radiation exposure (ORE) due to the increase of the operational period at existing nuclear power plant and also the publication of the new version of ICRP recommendation (ICRP publication No. 60) for radiological protection require much more strict reduction of radiation buildup in the nuclear power plant. The major sources of the radiation, i.e. the radioactive corrosion-products, are generated by the neutron activation of the corrosion products at the reactor core, and then the radioactive corrosion products are transported to the outside of the core, and accumulated near the steam generator side at PWR. Major radioactive corrosion-products of interest in PWR are Cr 51 ,: Mn 54 ,: Co 58 ,: Fe 59 and Co 60 . Among them Co 58 and Co 60 are known to contribute approximately more than 70% of the total ORE. Thus our main concerns are focused on predicting the transport and deposition of the Co radionuclides and suggesting the optimizing method which can minimize and control the ORE of the nuclear power plant. It is well known that Co-source is most effectively controlled by pH-solubility radiation control, and also some complex computer codes such as CORA and PACTOLE have been developed and revised to predict the corrosion product behavior. However these codes still imply some intrisic problems in simulating the real behavior of corrosion products in the reactor because of 1) the lack of important experimental data, coefficients and parameters of the transport and reactions under actual high temperature and pressure conditions, 2) no general theoretical modelling which can describe such many different mechanisms involved in the corrosion product movements, 3) the newly developed and measured behavior of the corrosion product transport mechanism. Since no sufficient and detailed information is available from the above-mentioned codes (also due to propriority problems), we concentrate on developing a new computer code, CP-TRAN (Corrosion

  1. Relationships of dispersive mass transport and stochastic convective flow through hydrologic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Uncertainty in water flow velocity appears to be a major factor in determining the magnitude of contaminant dispersion expected in a ground water system. This report discusses some concepts and mathematical methods relating dispersive contaminant transport to stochastic aspects of ground water flow. The theory developed should not be construed as absolutely rigorous mathematics, but is presented with the intention of clarifying the physical concepts

  2. Effects of regional-scale and convective transports on tropospheric ozone chemistry revealed by aircraft observations during the wet season of the AMMA campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ancellet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA fourth airborne campaign was conducted in July–August 2006 to study the chemical composition of the middle and upper troposphere in West Africa with the major objective to better understand the processing of chemical emissions by the West African Monsoon (WAM and its associated regional-scale and vertical transports. In particular, the french airborne experiment was organized around two goals. The first was to characterize the impact of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs on the ozone budget in the upper troposphere and the evolution of the chemical composition of these convective plumes as they move westward toward the Atlantic Ocean. The second objective was to discriminate the impact of remote sources of pollution over West Africa, including transport from the middle east, Europe, Asia and from southern hemispheric fires. Observations of O3, CO, NOx, H2O and hydroperoxide above West Africa along repeated meridional transects were coupled with transport analysis based on the FLEXPART lagrangian model. The cross analysis of trace gas concentrations and transport pathways revealed 5 types of air masses: convective uplift of industrial and urban emissions, convective uplift of biogenic emissions, slow advection from Cotonou polluted plumes near the coast, meridional transport of upper tropospheric air from the subtropical barrier region, and meridional transport of Southern Hemisphere (SH biomass burning emissions. O3/CO correlation plots and the correlation plots of H2O2 with a OH proxy revealed not only a control of the trace gas variability by transport processes but also significant photochemical reactivity in the mid- and upper troposphere. The study of four MCSs outflow showed contrasted chemical composition and air mass origins depending on the MCSs lifetime and latitudinal position. Favorables conditions for ozone

  3. Trace gas composition in the free and upper troposphere over Asia: Examining the influence of long-range transport and convection of local pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. K.; Traud, S.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A.; Hoor, P. M.; Neumaier, M.; Oram, D.; Rauthe-Schöch, A.; Schloegl, S.; Sprung, D.; Slemr, F.; van Velthoven, P.; Wernli, H.; Zahn, A.; Ziereis, H.

    2013-12-01

    Between May 2005 and March 2008 the CARIBIC observatory (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) was deployed to make atmospheric observations during 21 round-trip flights between Frankfurt, Germany and Manila, the Philippines with a stopover in Guangzhou, China. This nearly 3 year flight series provides us with information about atmospheric composition in the free and upper troposphere over Asia during all seasons and was used to investigate seasonal and regional differences in trace gas distributions and the relative influences of long range transport and convected local air masses on composition. The flight route was separated into three different regions having unique characteristics in transport and composition; these were Western Asia (5°E to 70°E), Central Asia (70°E to 100°E) and East Asia (100°E to 125°E). The region over Western Asia was heavily influenced by long range transport of air masses from North America and had elevated levels of NOy and acetone, while the region over East Asia was mostly influenced by convected local (South East Asian) pollution, particularly from biomass/biofuel burning as indicated by high levels of acetonitrile and carbon monoxide. Air masses over Central Asia were found to be influenced by both recently convected air masses from the Indian subcontinent and mid-range transport from Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Elevated levels of propane and other non-methane hydrocarbons, both with and without concommitant elevations in other trace gases (i.e. carbon monoxide, acetonitrile) were a persisent feature of this region in all seasons except summer, and were particularly prominent in fall. Influences on composition over Central Asia were investigated more thoroughly in a case study from a series of flights in October 2006, and elevated levels of pollutants were found to be the result of convective transport of both biomass/biofuel burning and urban emissions from

  4. Calculation of Self-consistent Radial Electric Field in Presence of Convective Electron Transport in a Stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernbichler, W.; Heyn, M.F.; Kasilov, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    Convective transport of supra-thermal electrons can play a significant role in the energy balance of stellarators in case of high power electron cyclotron heating. Here, together with neoclassical thermal particle fluxes also the supra-thermal electron flux should be taken into account in the flux ambipolarity condition, which defines the self-consistent radial electric field. Since neoclassical particle fluxes are non-linear functions of the radial electric field, one needs an iterative procedure to solve the ambipolarity condition, where the supra-thermal electron flux has to be calculated for each iteration. A conventional Monte-Carlo method used earlier for evaluation of supra-thermal electron fluxes is rather slow for performing the iterations in reasonable computer time. In the present report, the Stochastic Mapping Technique (SMT), which is more effective than the conventional Monte Carlo method, is used instead. Here, the problem with a local monoenergetic supra-thermal particle source is considered and the effect of supra-thermal electron fluxes on both, the self-consistent radial electric field and the formation of different roots of the ambipolarity condition are studied

  5. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencs, László, E-mail: bencs.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Laczai, Nikoletta [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Ajtony, Zsolt [Institute of Food Science, University of West Hungary, H-9200 Mosonmagyaróvár, Lucsony utca 15–17 (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective–diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass — m{sub 0}) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m{sub 0} values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm{sup 3} min{sup −1}) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m{sub 0}(mini-flow)-to-m{sub 0}(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m{sub 0} data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m{sub 0} values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology. - Highlights: • A calculation scheme for convective–diffusive vapor loss in GFAAS is described. • Residence time (τ) formulas were compared for sensitivity (m{sub 0}) in a THGA furnace. • Effects of the sample/platform dimension and dosing hole on τ were assessed. • Theoretical m{sub 0} of 18 analytes were

  6. Development of a nonlocal convective mixing scheme with varying upward mixing rates for use in air quality and chemical transport models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailović, Dragutin T; Alapaty, Kiran; Sakradzija, Mirjana

    2008-06-01

    Asymmetrical convective non-local scheme (CON) with varying upward mixing rates is developed for simulation of vertical turbulent mixing in the convective boundary layer in air quality and chemical transport models. The upward mixing rate form the surface layer is parameterized using the sensible heat flux and the friction and convective velocities. Upward mixing rates varying with height are scaled with an amount of turbulent kinetic energy in layer, while the downward mixing rates are derived from mass conservation. This scheme provides a less rapid mass transport out of surface layer into other layers than other asymmetrical convective mixing schemes. In this paper, we studied the performance of a nonlocal convective mixing scheme with varying upward mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer and its impact on the concentration of pollutants calculated with chemical and air-quality models. This scheme was additionally compared versus a local eddy-diffusivity scheme (KSC). Simulated concentrations of NO(2) and the nitrate wet deposition by the CON scheme are closer to the observations when compared to those obtained from using the KSC scheme. Concentrations calculated with the CON scheme are in general higher and closer to the observations than those obtained by the KSC scheme (of the order of 15-20%). Nitrate wet deposition calculated with the CON scheme are in general higher and closer to the observations than those obtained by the KSC scheme. To examine the performance of the scheme, simulated and measured concentrations of a pollutant (NO(2)) and nitrate wet deposition was compared for the year 2002. The comparison was made for the whole domain used in simulations performed by the chemical European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme Unified model (version UNI-ACID, rv2.0) where schemes were incorporated.

  7. Interaction of convective flow generated by human body with room ventilation flow: impact on transport of pollution to the breathing zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licina, Dusan; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Sekhar, Chandra

    2014-01-01

    interaction with opposing flow from above and assisting flow from below; and secondly, implication of such a flow interaction on the particle transport from the feet to the breathing zone is examined. The results reveal that the human body heat transports the pollution to the breathing zone and increases......This study aims to investigate the interaction between the human convective boundary layer (CBL) and uniform airflow from two directions and with different velocities. The study has two objectives: first, to characterize the velocity field in the breathing zone of a thermal manikin under its...

  8. A two-dimensional analytical well model with applications to groundwater flow and convective transport modelling in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.; Nakka, B.W.

    1994-12-01

    A two-dimensional analytical well model has been developed to describe steady groundwater flow in an idealized, confined aquifer intersected by a withdrawal well. The aquifer comprises a low-dipping fracture zone. The model is useful for making simple quantitative estimates of the transport of contaminants along groundwater pathways in the fracture zone to the well from an underground source that intercepts the fracture zone. This report documents the mathematical development of the analytical well model. It outlines the assumptions and method used to derive an exact analytical solution, which is verified by two other methods. It presents expressions for calculating quantities such as streamlines (groundwater flow paths), fractional volumetric flow rates, contaminant concentration in well water and minimum convective travel time to the well. In addition, this report presents the results of applying the analytical model to a site-specific conceptual model of the Whiteshell Research Area in southeastern Manitoba, Canada. This hydrogeological model includes the presence of a 20-m-thick, low-dipping (18 deg) fracture zone (LD1) that intercepts the horizon of a hypothetical disposal vault located at a depth of 500 m. A withdrawal well intercepts LD1 between the vault level and the ground surface. Predictions based on parameters and boundary conditions specific to LD1 are presented graphically. The analytical model has specific applications in the SYVAC geosphere model (GEONET) to calculate the fraction of a plume of contaminants moving up the fracture zone that is captured by the well, and to describe the drawdown in the hydraulic head in the fracture zone caused by the withdrawal well. (author). 16 refs., 6 tabs., 35 figs

  9. The impacts of pore-scale physical and chemical heterogeneities on the transport of radionuclide-carrying colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WU, Ning

    2018-04-24

    Independent of the methods of nuclear waste disposal, the degradation of packaging materials could lead to mobilization and transport of radionuclides into the geosphere. This process can be significantly accelerated due to the association of radionuclides with the backfill materials or mobile colloids in groundwater. The transport of these colloids is complicated by the inherent coupling of physical and chemical heterogeneities (e.g., pore space geometry, grain size, charge heterogeneity, and surface hydrophobicity) in natural porous media that can exist on the length scale of a few grains. In addition, natural colloids themselves are often heterogeneous in their surface properties (e.g., clay platelets possess opposite charges on the surface and along the rim). Both physical and chemical heterogeneities influence the transport and retention of radionuclides under various groundwater conditions. However, the precise mechanisms how these coupled heterogeneities influence colloidal transport are largely elusive. This knowledge gap is a major source of uncertainty in developing accurate models to represent the transport process and to predict distribution of radionuclides in the geosphere.

  10. Airborne lidar measurements to investigate the impact of long-range transported dust on shallow marine trade wind convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, S.; Gutleben, M.; Wirth, M.; Ewald, F.

    2017-12-01

    Aerosols and clouds are still main contributors to uncertainties in estimates and interpretation of the Earth's changing energy budget. Their interaction with the Earth's radiation budged has a direct component by scattering and absorbing solar and terrestrial radiation, and an indirect component, e.g. as aerosols modify the properties and thus the life-time of clouds or by changing the atmosphere's stability. Up to know now sufficient understanding in aerosol-cloud interaction and climate feedback is achieved. Thus studies with respect to clouds, aerosols, their interaction and influence on the radiation budged are highly demanded. In August 2016 the NARVAL-II (Next-generation airborne remote sensing for validation studies) mission took place. Measurements with a combined active (high spectral resolution and water vapor differential absorption lidar and cloud radar) and passive remote sensing (microwave radiometer, hyper spectral imager, radiation measurements) payload were performed with the German high altitude and long-range research aircraft HALO over the subtropical North-Atlantic Ocean to study shallow marine convection during the wet and dusty season. With this, NARVAL-II is follow-up of the NARVAL-I mission which took place during the dry and dust free season in December 2013. During NARVAL-II the measurement flights were designed the way to sample dust influenced areas as well as dust free areas in the trades. One main objective was to investigate the optical and macro physical properties of the dust layer, differences in cloud occurrence in dusty and non-dusty areas, and to study the influence of aerosols on the cloud properties and formation. This allows comparisons of cloud and aerosol distribution as well as their environment between the dry and the wet season, and of cloud properties and distribution with and without the influence of long-range transported dust across the Atlantic Ocean. In our presentation we will give an overview of the NARVAL

  11. Impact of West African Monsoon convective transport and lightning NOx production upon the upper tropospheric composition: a multi-model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Schlager

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Within the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA, we investigate the impact of nitrogen oxides produced by lightning (LiNOx and convective transport during the West African Monsoon (WAM upon the composition of the upper troposphere (UT in the tropics. For this purpose, we have performed simulations with 4 state-of-the-art chemistry transport models involved within AMMA, namely MOCAGE, TM4, LMDz-INCA and p-TOMCAT. The model intercomparison is complemented with an evaluation of the simulations based on both spaceborne and airborne observations. The baseline simulations show important differences between the UT CO and O3 distributions simulated by each of the 4 models when compared to measurements from the MOZAIC program and fom the Aura/MLS spaceborne sensor. We show that such model discrepancies can be explained by differences in the convective transport parameterizations and, more particularly, the altitude reached by convective updrafts (ranging between ~200–125 hPa. Concerning UT O3, the models exhibit a good agreement with the main observed features. Nevertheless the majority of models simulate low O3 concentrations compared to both MOZAIC and Aura/MLS observations south of the equator, and rather high concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere. Sensitivity studies are performed to quantify the effect of deep convective transport and the influence of LiNOx production on the UT composition. These clearly indicate that the CO maxima and the elevated O3 concentrations south of the equator are due to convective uplift of air masses impacted by Southern African biomass burning, in agreement with previous studies. Moreover, during the WAM, LiNOx from Africa are responsible for the highest UT O3 enhancements (10–20 ppbv over the tropical Atlantic between 10° S–20° N. Differences between models are primarily due to the performance of the parameterizations used to simulate lightning activity which are evaluated using spaceborne

  12. Left ventricular mass in dialysis patients, determinants and relation with outcome. Results from the COnvective TRansport STudy (CONTRAST.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira M Mostovaya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Left ventricular mass (LVM is known to be related to overall and cardiovascular mortality in end stage kidney disease (ESKD patients. The aims of the present study are 1 to determine whether LVM is associated with mortality and various cardiovascular events and 2 to identify determinants of LVM including biomarkers of inflammation and fibrosis. DESIGN SETTING PARTICIPANTS & MEASUREMENTS: Analysis was performed with data of 327 ESKD patients, a subset from the CONvective TRAnsport STudy (CONTRAST. Echocardiography was performed at baseline. Cox regression analysis was used to assess the relation of LVM tertiles with clinical events. Multivariable linear regression models were used to identify factors associated with LVM. RESULTS: Median age was 65 (IQR: 54-73 years, 203 (61% were male and median LVM was 227 (IQR: 183-279 grams. The risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.11-2.99, cardiovascular death (HR = 3.66, 95% CI: 1.35-10.05 and sudden death (HR = 13.06; 95% CI: 6.60-107 was increased in the highest tertile (>260 grams of LVM. In the multivariable analysis positive relations with LVM were found for male gender (B = 38.8±10.3, residual renal function (B = 17.9±8.0, phosphate binder therapy (B = 16.9±8.5, and an inverse relation for a previous kidney transplantation (B = -41.1±7.6 and albumin (B = -2.9±1.1. Interleukin-6 (Il-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, hepcidin-25 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF were not related to LVM. CONCLUSION: We confirm the relation between a high LVM and outcome and expand the evidence for increased risk of sudden death. No relationship was found between LVM and markers of inflammation and fibrosis. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN38365125.

  13. Carrying Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Henning; Andersen, Jan; Kjærgård, Bente

    2012-01-01

    A spatial planning act was introduced inIndonesia 1992 and renewed in 2008. It emphasised the planning role of decentralised authorities. The spatial planning act covers both spatial and environmental issues. It defines the concept of carrying capacity and includes definitions of supportive....../cities. Four different sectors (water, food production, waste, and forests) were selected as core areas for decentralised spatial planning. Indicators for SCC and ACC were identified and assessed with regard to relevance and quantifiability. For each of the indicators selected, a legal threshold or guiding...... was introduced inIndonesia 1992 and renewed in 2008. It emphasised the planning role of decentralised authorities. The spatial planning act covers both spatial and environmental issues. It defines the concept of carrying capacity and includes definitions of supportive carrying capacity (SCC) and assimilative...

  14. Large scale circulation in the convection zone and solar differential rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belvedere, G [Instituto di Astronomia dell' Universita di Catania, 95125 Italy; Paterno, L [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, 95125 Italy

    1976-04-01

    In this paper the dependence on depth and latitude of the solar angular velocity produced by a meridian circulation in the convection zone is studied assuming that the main mechanism responsible for setting up and driving the circulation is the interaction of rotation with convection. The first order equations (perturbation of the spherically symmetric state are solved in the Boussinesq approximation and in the steady state for the axissymmetric case. The interaction of convection with rotation is modelled by a convective transport coefficient. The model is consistent with the fact that the interaction of convection with rotation sets up a circulation (driven by the temperature gradient) which carries angular momentum toward the equator against the viscous friction. Unfortunately also a large flux variation at the surface is obtained. Nevertheless it seems that the model has the basic requisites for correct dynamo action.

  15. Plasma confinement modification and convective transport suppression in the scrape-off layer using additional gas puffing in the STOR-M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreval, M; Hubeny, M; Ding, Y; Onchi, T; Liu, Y; Hthu, K; Elgriw, S; Xiao, C; Hirose, A

    2013-01-01

    The influence of short gas puffing (GP) pulses on the scrape-off layer (SOL) transport is studied. Similar responses of ion saturation current and floating potential measured near the GP injection valve and in the 90° toroidally separated cross-section suggest that the GP influence on the SOL region should be global. A drop in plasma temperature and a decrease in the rotational velocity of the plasma are observed in the SOL region immediately after the GP pulse; however, an unexpected increase in electron and ion temperatures is observed in the second stage of the plasma response. The decrease in floating potential fluctuations indicates that the turbulent transport is dumped immediately after the GP pulse. The GP-induced modification of turbulence properties in the SOL points to a convective transport suppression in the STOR-M tokamak. A substantial decrease in the skewness and kurtosis of ion saturation current fluctuations is observed in the SOL region resulting in the probability distribution function (PDF) getting closer to the Gaussian distribution. The plasma potential reduction, the change in plasma rotation and the suppression of turbulent transport in the SOL region indicate that the plasma confinement is modified after the GP injection. Some features of the H-mode-like confinement in the plasma bulk also accompany the SOL observations after application of the additional sharp GP pulse. (paper)

  16. Effect of increased convective clearance by on-line hemodiafiltration on all cause and cardiovascular mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients – the Dutch CONvective TRAnsport STudy (CONTRAST: rationale and design of a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN38365125

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nubé Menso J

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high incidence of cardiovascular disease in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD is related to the accumulation of uremic toxins in the middle and large-middle molecular weight range. As online hemodiafiltration (HDF removes these molecules more effectively than standard hemodialysis (HD, it has been suggested that online HDF improves survival and cardiovascular outcome. Thus far, no conclusive data of HDF on target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are available. Therefore, the CONvective TRAnsport STudy (CONTRAST has been initiated. Methods CONTRAST is a Dutch multi-center randomised controlled trial. In this trial, approximately 800 chronic hemodialysis patients will be randomised between online HDF and low-flux HD, and followed for three years. The primary endpoint is all cause mortality. The main secondary outcome variables are fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events. Conclusion The study is designed to provide conclusive evidence whether online HDF leads to a lower mortality and less cardiovascular events as compared to standard HD.

  17. Pilot Testing of a Sampling Methodology for Assessing Seed Attachment Propensity and Transport Rate in a Soil Matrix Carried on Boot Soles and Bike Tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Nigel; Dietz, Kristina Charlotte; Bride, Ian; Passfield, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Land managers of natural areas are under pressure to balance demands for increased recreation access with protection of the natural resource. Unintended dispersal of seeds by visitors to natural areas has high potential for weedy plant invasions, with initial seed attachment an important step in the dispersal process. Although walking and mountain biking are popular nature-based recreation activities, there are few studies quantifying propensity for seed attachment and transport rate on boot soles and none for bike tires. Attachment and transport rate can potentially be affected by a wide range of factors for which field testing can be time-consuming and expensive. We pilot tested a sampling methodology for measuring seed attachment and transport rate in a soil matrix carried on boot soles and bike tires traversing a known quantity and density of a seed analog (beads) over different distances and soil conditions. We found % attachment rate on boot soles was much lower overall than previously reported, but that boot soles had a higher propensity for seed attachment than bike tires in almost all conditions. We believe our methodology offers a cost-effective option for researchers seeking to manipulate and test effects of different influencing factors on these two dispersal vectors.

  18. Pilot Testing of a Sampling Methodology for Assessing Seed Attachment Propensity and Transport Rate in a Soil Matrix Carried on Boot Soles and Bike Tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Nigel; Dietz, Kristina Charlotte; Bride, Ian; Passfield, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Land managers of natural areas are under pressure to balance demands for increased recreation access with protection of the natural resource. Unintended dispersal of seeds by visitors to natural areas has high potential for weedy plant invasions, with initial seed attachment an important step in the dispersal process. Although walking and mountain biking are popular nature-based recreation activities, there are few studies quantifying propensity for seed attachment and transport rate on boot soles and none for bike tires. Attachment and transport rate can potentially be affected by a wide range of factors for which field testing can be time-consuming and expensive. We pilot tested a sampling methodology for measuring seed attachment and transport rate in a soil matrix carried on boot soles and bike tires traversing a known quantity and density of a seed analog (beads) over different distances and soil conditions. We found % attachment rate on boot soles was much lower overall than previously reported, but that boot soles had a higher propensity for seed attachment than bike tires in almost all conditions. We believe our methodology offers a cost-effective option for researchers seeking to manipulate and test effects of different influencing factors on these two dispersal vectors.

  19. A solution of the dispersion-convection equation of radial tracer transportation by the finite element variational method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, J.

    1979-01-01

    The variational finite element method (of the Rayleigh-Ritz type) has been applied to solve the standard diffusion-convection equation of radial flow in a dispersive medium. It was shown that the imposing of the boundary condition ΔC/Δx = 0 (=null concentration gradient) introduced great errors in computation results. To remedy it this condition was imposed at the free end of the artifical domain. Its other end joined to the downstream boundary of the investigated domain. The results of calculations compared with the known analytical solutions of the parallel flow show their good accuracy. The method was used to discuss the applicability of the approximate analytical solutions of the radial flow. (author)

  20. Momentum, heat, and neutral mass transport in convective atmospheric pressure plasma-liquid systems and implications for aqueous targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alexander; Anderson, Carly; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 μ m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results from this study include the presence of a 10 K temperature drop in the gas boundary layer adjacent to the interface that arises from convective cooling. Though the temperature magnitudes may vary among atmospheric discharge types (different amounts of plasma-gas heating), this relative difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures is expected to be present for any system in which convection is significant. Accounting for the resulting difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures has a significant impact on reaction kinetics; factor of two changes in terminal aqueous species concentrations like H2O2, NO2- , and NO3- are observed in this study if the effect of evaporative cooling is not included.

  1. Evidence of Inward Toroidal Momentum Convection in the JET Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Ferreira, J.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the Joint European Torus tokamak to determine the diffusive and convective momentum transport. Torque, injected by neutral beams, was modulated to create a periodic perturbation in the toroidal rotation velocity. Novel transport analysis shows the magnitude...... and profile shape of the momentum diffusivity are similar to those of the ion heat diffusivity. A significant inward momentum pinch, up to 20 m/s, has been found. Both results are consistent with gyrokinetic simulations. This evidence is complemented in plasmas with internal transport barriers....

  2. The combined use of mechanical CPR and a carry sheet to maintain quality resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients during extrication and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard M; Crawford, Anna; Crookston, Colin; Short, Steven; Clegg, Gareth R

    2015-08-01

    Quality of manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during extrication and transport of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims is known to be poor. Performing manual CPR during ambulance transport poses significant risk to the attending emergency medical services crew. We sought to use pre-hospital video recording to objectively analyse the impact of introducing mechanical CPR with an extrication sheet (Autopulse, Zoll) to an advanced, second-tier cardiac arrest response team. The study was conducted prospectively using defibrillator downloads and analysis of pre-hospital video recording to measure the quality of CPR during extrication from scene and ambulance transport of the OHCA patient. Adult patients with non-traumatic OHCA were included. The interruption to manual CPR to during extrication and to deploy the mechanical CPR device was analysed. In the manual CPR group, 53 OHCA cases were analysed for quality of CPR during extrication. The median time that chest compression was interrupted to allow the patient to be carried from scene to the ambulance was 270 s (IQR 201-387 s). 119 mechanical CPR cases were analysed. The median time interruption from last manual compression to first Autopulse compression was 39 s (IQR 29-47 s). The range from last manual compression to first Autopulse compression was 14-118 s. Mechanical CPR used in combination with an extrication sheet can be effectively used to improve the quality of resuscitation during extrication and ambulance transport of the refractory OHCA patient. The time interval to deploy the mechanical CPR device can be shortened with regular simulation training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Heat Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiji, Latif M.

    Professor Jiji's broad teaching experience lead him to select the topics for this book to provide a firm foundation for convection heat transfer with emphasis on fundamentals, physical phenomena, and mathematical modelling of a wide range of engineering applications. Reflecting recent developments, this textbook is the first to include an introduction to the challenging topic of microchannels. The strong pedagogic potential of Heat Convection is enhanced by the follow ing ancillary materials: (1) Power Point lectures, (2) Problem Solutions, (3) Homework Facilitator, and, (4) Summary of Sections and Chapters.

  4. A transilient matrix for moist convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2011-08-15

    A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

  5. Role of stochasticity in turbulence and convective intermittent transport at the scrape off layer of Ohmic plasma in QUEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Santanu; Ishiguro, M.; Tashima, S.; Mishra, K.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Nakamura, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Matsuoka, K.; Nishino, N.; Liu, H. Q.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical features of fluctuations are investigated using the fast camera imaging technique in the scrape of layer (SOL) of electron cyclotron resonance heated Ohmic plasma. Fluctuations in the SOL towards low field side are dominated by coherent convective structures (blobs). Two dimensional structures of the higher order moments (skewness s and kurtosis k) representing the shape of probability density function (PDF) are studied. s and k are seen to be functions of the magnetic field lines. s and k are consistently higher towards the bottom half of the vessel in the SOL showing the blob trajectory along the field lines from the top towards bottom of the vessel. Parabolic relation (k=As 2 +C) is observed between s and k near the plasma boundary, featuring steep density gradient region and at the far SOL. The coefficient A, obtained experimentally, indicates a shift of prominence from pure drift-wave instabilities towards fully developed turbulence. Numerical coefficients characterizing the Pearson system are derived which demonstrates the progressive deviation of the PDF from Gaussian towards gamma from the density gradient region, towards the far SOL. Based on a simple stochastic differential equation, a direct correspondence between the multiplicative noise amplitude, increased intermittency, and hence change in PDF is discussed

  6. Heat-flow patterns in Tian-Calvet microcalorimeters: Conductive, convective, and radiative transport in gas dosing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilchiz, Luis Enrique; Pacheco-Vega, Arturo; Handy, Brent E.

    2005-01-01

    Mathematical models of a Tian-Calvet microcalorimeter were solved numerically by the finite-element method in an effort to understand the relative importance of the three basic heat transfer mechanisms operative during gas dosing experiments typically used to determine heats of adsorption on catalysts and adsorbents. The analysis pays particular attention to the quantitative release of heat through various elements of the cell and sensor cups to assess time delays and the deg.ree of thermal shunting that may result in inaccuracies in calorimetric measurements. Conductive transfer predominates in situations where there is high gas headspace pressure. The convection currents that arise when dosing with considerable gas pressure in the cell headspace region are not sufficiently strong to shunt significant amounts of sample heat away from being sensed by the surrounding thermopiles. Therefore, the heat capture fraction (heat sensed/heat produced) does not vary significantly with gas headspace pressure. During gas dosing under very low gas headspace pressure, radiation losses from the top of the sample bed may significantly affect the heat capture fraction, leading to underestimations of adsorption heats, unless the heat radiated from the top of the catalyst bed is effectively reflected back to the sample region or absorbed by an inert packing layer also in thermal contact with the thermopile wall

  7. Thermal convection loop experiments and analysis of mass transport process in Lithium/Fe-12Cr-1MoVW systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, G.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Lithium is an attractive coolant and breeder material for first- generation fusion reactor blankets. The compatibility of lithium with structural alloys, in the form of mass transport and deposition, may impose restrictions on blanket operating parameters such as temperature and lithium purity. A ferritic steel, such as Fe-12CrlMoVW, is a candidate for use as a structural alloy in a self-cooled lithium blanket design. Experimental data on mass transport in lithium/Fe-12CrlMoVW were obtained from two thermal convection loops which spanned the fusion relevant temperature range; one operated from 360 to 505/degree/C for 3040 hours and the other from 525 to 655/degree/C for 2510 hours. The experimental effort was supported by analysis of the mechanisms and processes of mass transport and deposition. It was found that mass transport and deposition, as measured by specimen weight change, were not simple functions of temperature for the entire temperature range investigated. The mass transfer behavior and surface morphology at low temperatures were dominated by impurity reactions of nitrogen and carbon in the lithium with the steel. In the experiment between 360 and 505/degree/C, nitrogen levels were sufficient below 450/degree/C to allow the formation of the adherent, protective corrosion product Li 9 CrN 5 . Weight losses in the 360 to 505/degree/C experiment were insensitive to temperature below 450/degree/C. Between 450 and 505/degree/C, the precipitation of carbon in the form of chromium-rich M 23 C 6 (M = Fe or Cr) carbides, due to the formation of Li 9 CrN 5 and corresponding release of carbon, resulted in weight gains for the highest temperature specimens in the experiment. 98 refs., 83 figs., 9 tabs

  8. Particle-tracking code (track3d) for convective solute transport modelling in the geosphere: Description and user`s manual; Programme de reperage de particules (track3d) pour la modelisation du transport par convection des solutes dans la geosphere: description et manuel de l`utilisateur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakka, B W; Chan, T

    1994-12-01

    A deterministic particle-tracking code (TRACK3D) has been developed to compute convective flow paths of conservative (nonreactive) contaminants through porous geological media. TRACK3D requires the groundwater velocity distribution, which, in our applications, results from flow simulations using AECL`s MOTIF code. The MOTIF finite-element code solves the transient and steady-state coupled equations of groundwater flow, solute transport and heat transport in fractured/porous media. With few modifications, TRACK3D can be used to analyse the velocity distributions calculated by other finite-element or finite-difference flow codes. This report describes the assumptions, limitations, organization, operation and applications of the TRACK3D code, and provides a comprehensive user`s manual.

  9. Parameterizing convective organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Earle Mapes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lateral mixing parameters in buoyancy-driven deep convection schemes are among the most sensitive and important unknowns in atmosphere models. Unfortunately, there is not a true optimum value for plume mixing rate, but rather a dilemma or tradeoff: Excessive dilution of updrafts leads to unstable stratification bias in the mean state, while inadequate dilution allows deep convection to occur too easily, causing poor space and time distributions and variability. In this too-small parameter space, compromises are made based on competing metrics of model performance. We attempt to escape this “entrainment dilemma” by making bulk plume parameters (chiefly entrainment rate depend on a new prognostic variable (“organization,” org meant to reflect the rectified effects of subgrid-scale structure in meteorological fields. We test an org scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5 with a new unified shallow-deep convection scheme (UW-ens, a 2-plume version of the University of Washington scheme. Since buoyant ascent involves natural selection, subgrid structure makes convection systematically deeper and stronger than the pure unorganized case: plumes of average (or randomly sampled air rising in the average environment. To reflect this, org is nonnegative, but we leave it dimensionless. A time scale characterizes its behavior (here ∼3 h for a 2o model. Currently its source is rain evaporation, but other sources can be added easily. We also let org be horizontally transported by advection, as a mass-weighted mean over the convecting layer. Linear coefficients link org to a plume ensemble, which it assists via: 1 plume base warmth above the mean temperature 2 plume radius enhancement (reduced mixing, and 3 increased probability of overlap in a multi-plume scheme, where interactions benefit later generations (this part has only been implemented in an offline toy column model. Since rain evaporation is a source for org, it functions as a time

  10. Transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Here is the decree of the thirtieth of July 1998 relative to road transportation, to trade and brokerage of wastes. It requires to firms which carry out a road transportation as well as to traders and to brokers of wastes to declare their operations to the prefect. The declaration has to be renewed every five years. (O.M.)

  11. Columnar to equiaxed transition in a refined Al-Cu alloy under diffusive and convective transport conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupouy, M.D.; Camel, D.; Mazille, J.E. [CEA Centre d' Etudes et de Recherches sur les Materiaux, 38 - Grenoble (France); Hugon, I. [Lab. de Metallographie, DCC/DTE/SIM, CEA Valrho (France)

    2000-07-01

    The columnar-equiaxed transition under diffusive transport conditions was studied in microgravity (EUROMIR95 and spacelab-LMS96) by solidifying four Al-4wt%Cu alloys refined at different levels, with a constant cooling rate (1 K/min), both under nearly isothermal conditions and under a decreasing temperature gradient. Isothermal samples showed a homogeneous equiaxed structure with no fading of the refiner efficiency. Gradient samples revealed a continuous transition consisting of an orientation of the microsegregation parallel to the solidification direction, without any grain selection effect. For comparison, ground samples evidence the influence of the motion of both refiner particles and growing equiaxed grains. (orig.)

  12. Transport and handling of dangerous goods. Training of persons in charge of vehicles or vessels carrying dangerous goods by road or by inland waterways (Dangerous Goods 1979 No.1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This Order supplements the Regulations of 15 April 1945 on the transport of dangerous goods by rail, land and inland waterways. It deals with the training of persons in charge of vehicles or boats carrying dangerous goods by road or by inland waterways. It refers in particular to transport of radioactive materials. (NEA) [fr

  13. A strategy for representing the effects of convective momentum transport in multiscale models: Evaluation using a new superparameterized version of the Weather Research and Forecast model (SP-WRF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulich, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a general method for the treatment of convective momentum transport (CMT) in large-scale dynamical solvers that use a cyclic, two-dimensional (2-D) cloud-resolving model (CRM) as a "superparameterization" of convective-system-scale processes. The approach is similar in concept to traditional parameterizations of CMT, but with the distinction that both the scalar transport and diagnostic pressure gradient force are calculated using information provided by the 2-D CRM. No assumptions are therefore made concerning the role of convection-induced pressure gradient forces in producing up or down-gradient CMT. The proposed method is evaluated using a new superparameterized version of the Weather Research and Forecast model (SP-WRF) that is described herein for the first time. Results show that the net effect of the formulation is to modestly reduce the overall strength of the large-scale circulation, via "cumulus friction." This statement holds true for idealized simulations of two types of mesoscale convective systems, a squall line, and a tropical cyclone, in addition to real-world global simulations of seasonal (1 June to 31 August) climate. In the case of the latter, inclusion of the formulation is found to improve the depiction of key synoptic modes of tropical wave variability, in addition to some aspects of the simulated time-mean climate. The choice of CRM orientation is also found to importantly affect the simulated time-mean climate, apparently due to changes in the explicit representation of wide-spread shallow convective regions.

  14. Ion thermal conductivity and convective energy transport in JET hot-ion regimes and H-modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibone, F.; Balet, B.; Cordey, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    Local transport in a recent series of JET experiments has been studied using interpretive codes. Auxiliary heating, mainly via neutral beam injection, was applied on low-density target plasmas confined in the double-null X-point configuration. This has produced two-component plasmas with high ion temperature and neutron yield and, above a threshold density, H-modes characterised by peak density and power deposition profiles. H-mode confinement was also obtained for the first time with 25 MW auxiliary power, of which 10 MW was from ion cyclotron resonance heating. We have used profile measurements of electron temperature T e from electron cyclotron emission and LIDAR Thomson scattering, ion temperature T i from charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (during NBI), electron density n e from LIDAR and Abel-inverted interferometer measurements. Only sparse information is, however, available to date concerning radial profiles of effective ionic charge and radiation losses. Deuterium depletion due to high impurity levels is an important effect in these discharges, and our interpretation of thermal ion energy content, neutron yield and ion particle fluxes needs to be confirmed using measured Z eff -profiles. (author) 4 refs., 4 figs

  15. National Convective Weather Diagnostic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current convective hazards identified by the National Convective Weather Detection algorithm. The National Convective Weather Diagnostic (NCWD) is an automatically...

  16. Convective overshoot at the solar tachocline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Anders, Evan H.; Lecoanet, Daniel; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey M.

    2017-08-01

    At the base of the solar convection zone lies the solar tachocline. This internal interface is where motions from the unstable convection zone above overshoot and penetrate downward into the stiffly stable radiative zone below, driving gravity waves, mixing, and possibly pumping and storing magnetic fields. Here we study the dynamics of convective overshoot across very stiff interfaces with some properties similar to the internal boundary layer within the Sun. We use the Dedalus pseudospectral framework and study fully compressible dynamics at moderate to high Peclet number and low Mach number, probing a regime where turbulent transport is important, and where the compressible dynamics are similar to those of convective motions in the deep solar interior. We find that the depth of convective overshoot is well described by a simple buoyancy equilibration model, and we consider implications for dynamics at the solar tachocline and for the storage of magnetic fields there by overshooting convection.

  17. Ignition in Convective-Diffusive Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Law, Chung

    1999-01-01

    ... efficiency as well as the knock and emission characteristics. The ignition event is clearly controlled by the chemical reactions of fuel oxidation and the fluid mechanics of convective and diffusive transport...

  18. Convective equilibrium and mixing-length theory for stellarator reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.D.M.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1985-09-01

    In high β stellarator and tokamak reactors, the plasma pressure gradient in some regions of the plasma may exceed the critical pressure gradient set by ballooning instabilities. In these regions, convective cells break out to enhance the transport. As a result, the pressure gradient can rise only slightly above the critical gradient and the plasma is in another state of equilibrium - ''convective equilibrium'' - in these regions. Although the convective transport cannot be calculated precisely, it is shown that the density and temperature profiles in the convective region can still be estimated. A simple mixing-length theory, similar to that used for convection in stellar interiors, is introduced in this paper to provide a qualitative description of the convective cells and to show that the convective transport is highly efficient. A numerical example for obtaining the density and temperature profiles in a stellarator reactor is given

  19. A functional polymorphism in a serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) interacts with 9/11 to predict gun-carrying behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J C; Beaver, Kevin M; Boutwell, Brian B

    2013-01-01

    On September 11, 2001, one of the deadliest terrorist attacks in US history took place on American soil and people around the world were impacted in myriad ways. Building on prior literature which suggests individuals are more likely to purchase a gun for self-protection if they are fearful of being victimized, the authors hypothesized that the terrorist attacks of 9/11 would lead to an increase in gun carrying among US residents. At the same time, a line of research has shown that a polymorphism in the 5-HTT gene (i.e., 5-HTTLPR) interacts with environmental stressors to predict a range of psychopathologies and behaviors. Thus, it was hypothesized that 9/11 and 5-HTTLPR would interact to predict gun carrying. The results supported both hypotheses by revealing a positive association between 9/11 and gun carrying (b = .426, odds ratio = 1.531, standard error for b = .194, z = 2.196, p = .028) in the full sample of respondents (n = 15,052) and a statistically significant interaction between 9/11 and 5-HTTLPR in the prediction of gun carrying (b = -1.519, odds ratio = .219, standard error for b = .703, z = -2.161, p = .031) in the genetic subsample of respondents (n = 2,350). This is one of the first studies to find an association between 9/11 and gun carrying and, more importantly, is the first study to report a gene-environment interaction (GxE) between a measured gene and a terrorist attack.

  20. Topology Optimisation for Coupled Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    This thesis deals with topology optimisation for coupled convection problems. The aim is to extend and apply topology optimisation to steady-state conjugate heat transfer problems, where the heat conduction equation governs the heat transfer in a solid and is coupled to thermal transport...... in a surrounding uid, governed by a convection-diffusion equation, where the convective velocity field is found from solving the isothermal incompressible steady-state Navier-Stokes equations. Topology optimisation is also applied to steady-state natural convection problems. The modelling is done using stabilised...... finite elements, the formulation and implementation of which was done partly during a special course as prepatory work for this thesis. The formulation is extended with a Brinkman friction term in order to facilitate the topology optimisation of fluid flow and convective cooling problems. The derived...

  1. Understanding and controlling plasmon-induced convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxworthy, Brian J.; Bhuiya, Abdul M.; Vanka, Surya P.; Toussaint, Kimani C.

    2014-01-01

    The heat generation and fluid convection induced by plasmonic nanostructures is attractive for optofluidic applications. However, previously published theoretical studies predict only nanometre per second fluid velocities that are inadequate for microscale mass transport. Here we show both theoretically and experimentally that an array of plasmonic nanoantennas coupled to an optically absorptive indium-tin-oxide (ITO) substrate can generate >micrometre per second fluid convection. Crucially, the ITO distributes thermal energy created by the nanoantennas generating an order of magnitude increase in convection velocities compared with nanoantennas on a SiO2 base layer. In addition, the plasmonic array alters absorption in the ITO, causing a deviation from Beer-Lambert absorption that results in an optimum ITO thickness for a given system. This work elucidates the role of convection in plasmonic optical trapping and particle assembly, and opens up new avenues for controlling fluid and mass transport on the micro- and nanoscale.

  2. National Convective Weather Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NCWF is an automatically generated depiction of: (1) current convection and (2) extrapolated signficant current convection. It is a supplement to, but does NOT...

  3. A continuous and prognostic convection scheme based on buoyancy, PCMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérémy, Jean-François; Piriou, Jean-Marcel

    2016-04-01

    A new and consistent convection scheme (PCMT: Prognostic Condensates Microphysics and Transport), providing a continuous and prognostic treatment of this atmospheric process, is described. The main concept ensuring the consistency of the whole system is the buoyancy, key element of any vertical motion. The buoyancy constitutes the forcing term of the convective vertical velocity, which is then used to define the triggering condition, the mass flux, and the rates of entrainment-detrainment. The buoyancy is also used in its vertically integrated form (CAPE) to determine the closure condition. The continuous treatment of convection, from dry thermals to deep precipitating convection, is achieved with the help of a continuous formulation of the entrainment-detrainment rates (depending on the convective vertical velocity) and of the CAPE relaxation time (depending on the convective over-turning time). The convective tendencies are directly expressed in terms of condensation and transport. Finally, the convective vertical velocity and condensates are fully prognostic, the latter being treated using the same microphysics scheme as for the resolved condensates but considering the convective environment. A Single Column Model (SCM) validation of this scheme is shown, allowing detailed comparisons with observed and explicitly simulated data. Four cases covering the convective spectrum are considered: over ocean, sensitivity to environmental moisture (S. Derbyshire) non precipitating shallow convection to deep precipitating convection, trade wind shallow convection (BOMEX) and strato-cumulus (FIRE), together with an entire continental diurnal cycle of convection (ARM). The emphasis is put on the characteristics of the scheme which enable a continuous treatment of convection. Then, a 3D LAM validation is presented considering an AMMA case with both observations and a CRM simulation using the same initial and lateral conditions as for the parameterized one. Finally, global

  4. A thermodynamically general theory for convective vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renno, Nilton O.

    2008-08-01

    Convective vortices are common features of atmospheres that absorb lower-entropy-energy at higher temperatures than they reject higher-entropy-energy to space. These vortices range from small to large-scale and play an important role in the vertical transport of heat, momentum, and tracer species. Thus, the development of theoretical models for convective vortices is important to our understanding of some of the basic features of planetary atmospheres. The heat engine framework is a useful tool for studying convective vortices. However, current theories assume that convective vortices are reversible heat engines. Since there are questions about how reversible real atmospheric heat engines are, their usefulness for studying real atmospheric vortices is somewhat controversial. In order to reduce this problem, a theory for convective vortices that includes irreversible processes is proposed. The paper's main result is that the proposed theory provides an expression for the pressure drop along streamlines that includes the effects of irreversible processes. It is shown that a simplified version of this expression is a generalization of Bernoulli's equation to convective circulations. It is speculated that the proposed theory not only explains the intensity, but also sheds light on other basic features of convective vortices such as their physical appearance.

  5. What favors convective aggregation and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Caroline; Bony, Sandrine

    2015-07-01

    The organization of convection is ubiquitous, but its physical understanding remains limited. One particular type of organization is the spatial self-aggregation of convection, taking the form of cloud clusters, or tropical cyclones in the presence of rotation. We show that several physical processes can give rise to self-aggregation and highlight the key features responsible for it, using idealized simulations. Longwave radiative feedbacks yield a "radiative aggregation." In that case, sufficient spatial variability of radiative cooling rates yields a low-level circulation, which induces the upgradient energy transport and radiative-convective instability. Not only do vertically integrated radiative budgets matter but the vertical profile of cooling is also crucial. Convective aggregation is facilitated when downdrafts below clouds are weak ("moisture-memory aggregation"), and this is sufficient to trigger aggregation in the absence of longwave radiative feedbacks. These results shed some light on the sensitivity of self-aggregation to various parameters, including resolution or domain size.

  6. Comparing convective heat fluxes derived from thermodynamics to a radiative-convective model and GCMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Chirag; Renner, Maik; Kleidon, Axel

    2015-04-01

    The convective transport of heat and moisture plays a key role in the climate system, but the transport is typically parameterized in models. Here, we aim at the simplest possible physical representation and treat convective heat fluxes as the result of a heat engine. We combine the well-known Carnot limit of this heat engine with the energy balances of the surface-atmosphere system that describe how the temperature difference is affected by convective heat transport, yielding a maximum power limit of convection. This results in a simple analytic expression for convective strength that depends primarily on surface solar absorption. We compare this expression with an idealized grey atmosphere radiative-convective (RC) model as well as Global Circulation Model (GCM) simulations at the grid scale. We find that our simple expression as well as the RC model can explain much of the geographic variation of the GCM output, resulting in strong linear correlations among the three approaches. The RC model, however, shows a lower bias than our simple expression. We identify the use of the prescribed convective adjustment in RC-like models as the reason for the lower bias. The strength of our model lies in its ability to capture the geographic variation of convective strength with a parameter-free expression. On the other hand, the comparison with the RC model indicates a method for improving the formulation of radiative transfer in our simple approach. We also find that the latent heat fluxes compare very well among the approaches, as well as their sensitivity to surface warming. What our comparison suggests is that the strength of convection and their sensitivity in the climatic mean can be estimated relatively robustly by rather simple approaches.

  7. Steady, three-dimensional, internally heated convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, G.; Glatzmaier, G.A.; Travis, B.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical calculations have been carried out of steady, symmetric, three-dimensional modes of convection in internally heated, infinite Prandtl number, Boussinesq fluids at a Rayleigh number of 1.4x10 4 in a spherical shell with inner/outer radius of 0.55 and in a 3x3x1 rectangular box. Multiple patterns of convection occur in both geometries. In the Cartesian geometry the patterns are dominated by cylindrical cold downflows and a broad hot upwelling. In the spherical geometry the patterns consist of cylindrical cold downwellings centered either at the vertices of a tetrahedron or the centers of the faces of a cube. The cold downflow cylinders are immersed in a background of upwelling within which there are cylindrical hot concentrations (plumes) and hot halos around the downflows. The forced hot upflow return plumes of internally heated spherical convection are fundamentally different from the buoyancy-driven plumes of heated from below convection

  8. Natural convection in superposed fluid-porous layers

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Aniruddha

    2013-01-01

    Natural Convection in Composite Fluid-Porous Domains provides a timely overview of the current state of understanding on the phenomenon of convection in composite fluid-porous layers. Natural convection in horizontal fluid-porous layers has received renewed attention because of engineering problems such as post-accident cooling of nuclear reactors, contaminant transport in groundwater, and convection in fibrous insulation systems. Because applications of the problem span many scientific domains, the book serves as a valuable resource for a wide audience.

  9. A Thermodynamically General Theory for Convective Circulations and Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renno, N. O.

    2007-12-01

    Convective circulations and vortices are common features of atmospheres that absorb low-entropy-energy at higher temperatures than they reject high-entropy-energy to space. These circulations range from small to planetary-scale and play an important role in the vertical transport of heat, momentum, and tracer species. Thus, the development of theoretical models for convective phenomena is important to our understanding of many basic features of planetary atmospheres. A thermodynamically general theory for convective circulations and vortices is proposed. The theory includes irreversible processes and quantifies the pressure drop between the environment and any point in a convective updraft. The article's main result is that the proposed theory provides an expression for the pressure drop along streamlines or streamtubes that is a generalization of Bernoulli's equation to convective circulations. We speculate that the proposed theory not only explains the intensity, but also shed light on other basic features of convective circulations and vortices.

  10. Observing Convective Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-11-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  11. Convective aggregation in realistic convective-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the real-world relevance of idealized-model convective self-aggregation, five 15 day cases of real organized convection in the tropics are simulated. These include multiple simulations of each case to test sensitivities of the convective organization and mean states to interactive radiation, interactive surface fluxes, and evaporation of rain. These simulations are compared to self-aggregation seen in the same model configured to run in idealized radiative-convective equilibrium. Analysis of the budget of the spatial variance of column-integrated frozen moist static energy shows that control runs have significant positive contributions to organization from radiation and negative contributions from surface fluxes and transport, similar to idealized runs once they become aggregated. Despite identical lateral boundary conditions for all experiments in each case, systematic differences in mean column water vapor (CWV), CWV distribution shape, and CWV autocorrelation length scale are found between the different sensitivity runs, particularly for those without interactive radiation, showing that there are at least some similarities in sensitivities to these feedbacks in both idealized and realistic simulations (although the organization of precipitation shows less sensitivity to interactive radiation). The magnitudes and signs of these systematic differences are consistent with a rough equilibrium between (1) equalization due to advection from the lateral boundaries and (2) disaggregation due to the absence of interactive radiation, implying disaggregation rates comparable to those in idealized runs with aggregated initial conditions and noninteractive radiation. This points to a plausible similarity in the way that radiation feedbacks maintain aggregated convection in both idealized simulations and the real world.Plain Language SummaryUnderstanding the processes that lead to the organization of tropical rainstorms is an important challenge for weather

  12. Double Diffusive Natural Convection in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Hao; J. Nitao; T.A. Buscheck; Y. Sun

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we conduct a two-dimensional numerical analysis of double diffusive natural convection in an emplacement drift for a nuclear waste repository. In-drift heat and moisture transport is driven by combined thermal- and compositional-induced buoyancy forces. Numerical results demonstrate buoyancy-driven convective flow patterns and configurations during both repository heat-up and cool-down phases. It is also shown that boundary conditions, particularly on the drip-shield surface, have strong impacts on the in-drift convective flow and transport

  13. Double stratification effects in chemically reactive squeezed Sutterby fluid flow with thermal radiation and mixed convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Farooq, M.; Javed, M.; Anjum, Aisha

    2018-03-01

    A current analysis is carried out to study theoretically the mixed convection characteristics in squeezing flow of Sutterby fluid in squeezed channel. The constitutive equation of Sutterby model is utilized to characterize the rheology of squeezing phenomenon. Flow characteristics are explored with dual stratification. In flowing fluid which contains heat and mass transport, the first order chemical reaction and radiative heat flux affect the transport phenomenon. The systems of non-linear governing equations have been modulating which then solved by mean of convergent approach (Homotopy Analysis Method). The graphs are reported and illustrated for emerging parameters. Through graphical explanations, drag force, rate of heat and mass transport are conversed for different pertinent parameters. It is found that heat and mass transport rate decays with dominant double stratified parameters and chemical reaction parameter. The present two-dimensional examination is applicable in some of the engineering processes and industrial fluid mechanics.

  14. Optical Carry Adder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    AOM’s) with the deflected beam as the modulator "on" state. These AOM’s ( TeO2 crystals, manufactured by Newport E.O. Systems) have high deflection...caused by the slow acoustic propagation (4.2 - 105 cm/s for TeO2 ), but this delay can be minimized by placing the laser beam close to the acoustic...dependent jitter in the optical carry to below 1 ns, the total carry path must be less than 30 cm long (or 20 cm in glass , 14 cm in LiNbO 3). Thus, a 32

  15. Convective heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kakac, Sadik; Pramuanjaroenkij, Anchasa

    2014-01-01

    Intended for readers who have taken a basic heat transfer course and have a basic knowledge of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and differential equations, Convective Heat Transfer, Third Edition provides an overview of phenomenological convective heat transfer. This book combines applications of engineering with the basic concepts of convection. It offers a clear and balanced presentation of essential topics using both traditional and numerical methods. The text addresses emerging science and technology matters, and highlights biomedical applications and energy technologies. What’s New in the Third Edition: Includes updated chapters and two new chapters on heat transfer in microchannels and heat transfer with nanofluids Expands problem sets and introduces new correlations and solved examples Provides more coverage of numerical/computer methods The third edition details the new research areas of heat transfer in microchannels and the enhancement of convective heat transfer with nanofluids....

  16. The relative contributions of thermo-solutal Marangoni convections on flow patterns in a liquid bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakuchi, H.; Takagi, Y.; Okano, Y.; Gima, S.; Dost, S.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical simulation study was carried out to investigate the relative contributions of thermal and solutal Marangoni convections on transport structures in a liquid bridge under zero gravity. The liquid bridge in the model represents a three dimensional half-zone configuration of the Floating Zone (FZ) growth system. Three dimensional field equations of the liquid zone, i.e. continuity, momentum, energy, and diffusion equations, were solved by the PISO algorithm. Computations were performed using the open source software OpenFOAM. The numerical simulation results show that the flow field becomes three-dimensional and time-depended when the solutal Marangoni number is larger than the critical value. It was also shown that not only flow patterns but also the azimuthal wave number (m) changes due to the competing contributions of thermal and solutal Marangoni convective flows.

  17. Density limit and cross-field edge transport scaling in Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBombard, B.; Greenwald, M.; Hughes, J.W.; Lipschultz, B.; Mossessian, D.; Terry, J.L.; Boivin, R.L.; Carreras, B.A.; Pitcher, C.S.; Zweben, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Recent experiments in Alcator C-Mod have uncovered a direct link between the character and scaling of cross-field particle transport in the edge plasma and the density limit, n G . As n-bar e /n G is increased from low values to values approaching ∼1, an ordered progression in the cross-field edge transport physics occurs: first benign cross-field heat convection, then cross-field heat convection impacting the scrape-off layer (SOL) power loss channels and reducing the separatrix electron temperature, and finally 'bursty' transport (normally associated with the far SOL) invading into closed flux surface regions and carrying a convective power loss that impacts the power balance of the discharge. These observations suggest that SOL transport and its scaling with plasma conditions plays a key role in setting the empirically observed density limit scaling law. (author)

  18. Introductory analysis of Benard-Marangoni convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroto, J A; Perez-Munuzuri, V; Romero-Cano, M S

    2007-01-01

    We describe experiments on Benard-Marangoni convection which permit a useful understanding of the main concepts involved in this phenomenon such as, for example, Benard cells, aspect ratio, Rayleigh and Marangoni numbers, Crispation number and critical conditions. In spite of the complexity of convection theory, we carry out a simple and introductory analysis which has the additional advantage of providing very suggestive experiments. As a consequence, we recommend our device for use as a laboratory experiment for undergraduate students of the thermodynamics of nonlinear and fluid physics

  19. Introductory analysis of Benard-Marangoni convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroto, J A [Group of Physics and Chemistry of Linares, Escuela Politecnica Superior, St Alfonso X El Sabio, 28, University of Jaen, E-23700 Linares, Jaen (Spain); Perez-Munuzuri, V [Group of Nonlinear Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Romero-Cano, M S [Group of Complex Fluids Physics, Department of Applied Physics, University of Almeria, E-04120 Almeria (Spain)

    2007-03-15

    We describe experiments on Benard-Marangoni convection which permit a useful understanding of the main concepts involved in this phenomenon such as, for example, Benard cells, aspect ratio, Rayleigh and Marangoni numbers, Crispation number and critical conditions. In spite of the complexity of convection theory, we carry out a simple and introductory analysis which has the additional advantage of providing very suggestive experiments. As a consequence, we recommend our device for use as a laboratory experiment for undergraduate students of the thermodynamics of nonlinear and fluid physics.

  20. Parameterization of convective transport in the boundary layer and its impact on the representation of the diurnal cycle of wind and dust emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hourdin

    2015-06-01

    boundary layer by a mass flux scheme leads to realistic representation of the diurnal cycle of wind in spring, with a maximum near-surface wind in the morning. This maximum occurs when the thermal plumes reach the low-level jet that forms during the night at a few hundred meters above surface. The horizontal momentum in the jet is transported downward to the surface by compensating subsidence around thermal plumes in typically less than 1 h. This leads to a rapid increase of wind speed at surface and therefore of dust emissions owing to the strong nonlinearity of emission laws. The numerical experiments are performed with a zoomed and nudged configuration of the LMDZ general circulation model coupled to the emission module of the CHIMERE chemistry transport model, in which winds are relaxed toward that of the ERA-Interim reanalyses. The new set of parameterizations leads to a strong improvement of the representation of the diurnal cycle of wind when compared to a previous version of LMDZ as well as to the reanalyses used for nudging themselves. It also generates dust emissions in better agreement with current estimates, but the aerosol optical thickness is still significantly underestimated.

  1. Convective effects in a regulatory and proposed fire model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.D.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation is the dominant mode of heat transfer in large fires. However, convection can be as much as 10 to 20 percent of the total heat transfer to an object in a large fire. The current radioactive material transportation packaging regulations include convection as a mode of heat transfer in the accident condition scenario. The current International Atomic Energy Agency Safety Series 6 packaging regulation states ''the convection coefficient shall be that value which the designer can justify if the package were exposed to the specified fire''. The current Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71) packaging regulation states ''when significant, convection heat input must be included on the basis of still, ambient air at 800 degrees C (1475 degrees F)''. Two questions that can arise in an analysts mind from an examination of the packaging regulations is whether convection is significant and whether convection should be included in the design analysis of a radioactive materials transportation container. The objective of this study is to examine the convective effects on an actual radioactive materials transportation package using a regulatory and a proposed thermal boundary condition

  2. Airborne Measurements of BrO and the Sum of HOBr and Br2 over the Tropical West Pacific from 1 to 15 Km During the CONvective TRansport of Active Species in the Tropics (CONTRAST) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dexian; Huey, L. Gregory; Tanner, David J.; Salawitch, Ross J.; Anderson, Daniel C.; Wales, Pamela A.; Pan, Laura L.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Apel, Eric C.; hide

    2016-01-01

    A chemical ionization mass spectrometer was used to measure BrO and HOBr + Br2 over the Tropical West Pacific Ocean within the altitude range of 1 to 15 km, during the CONvective TRansport of Active Species in the Tropics (CONTRAST) campaign in 2014. Isolated episodes of elevated BrO (up to 6.6 pptv) and/or HOBr + Br2 (up to 7.3 pptv) were observed in the tropical free troposphere (TFT) and were associated with biomass burning. However, most of the time we did not observe significant BrO or HOBr + Br2 in the TFT and the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) above our limits of detection (LOD). The 1 min average LOD for BrO ranged from 0.6 to 1.6 pptv and for HOBr + Br2 ranged from 1.3 to 3.5 pptv. During one flight, BrO observations from the TTL to the extratropical lowermost stratosphere were used to infer a profile of inorganic bromine (Br(sub y)). Based on this profile, we estimated the product gas injection of bromine species into the stratosphere to be 2 pptv. Analysis of Br(sub y) partitioning further indicates that BrO levels are likely very low in the TFT environment and that future studies should target the measurement of HBr or atomic Br.

  3. Transport of CO2 and other combustion products in soils during slash-pile burns [Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. J. Massman; M. M. Nobles; G. Butters; S. J. Mooney

    2010-01-01

    The most obvious indication of transport of mass during a fire is flames and smoke. Furthermore it is well known that localized heating during the fire creates 3-D convective currents in the atmosphere and that these currents carry the combustion products away from the fire.

  4. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hohenegger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM. Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle.

    Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and mid-latitude continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  5. The influence of convective current generator on the global current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Morozov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical generalization of classical model of the global circuit with taking into account the convective current generator, working in the planetary boundary layer was considered. Convective current generator may be interpreted as generator, in which the electromotive force is generated by processes, of the turbulent transport of electrical charge. It is shown that the average potential of ionosphere is defined not only by the thunderstorm current generators, working at the present moment, but by the convective current generator also. The influence of the convective processes in the boundary layer on the electrical parameters of the atmosphere is not only local, but has global character as well. The numerical estimations, made for the case of the convective-unstable boundary layer demonstrate that the increase of the average potential of ionosphere may be of the order of 10% to 40%.

  6. Convection and stellar oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarslev, Magnus Johan

    2017-01-01

    for asteroseismology, because of the challenges inherent in modelling turbulent convection in 1D stellar models. As a result of oversimplifying the physics near the surface, theoretical calculations systematically overestimate the oscillation frequencies. This has become known as the asteroseismic surface effect. Due...... to lacking better options, this frequency difference is typically corrected for with ad-hoc formulae. The topic of this thesis is the improvement of 1D stellar convection models and the effects this has on asteroseismic properties. The source of improvements is 3D simulations of radiation...... atmospheres to replace the outer layers of stellar models. The additional turbulent pressure and asymmetrical opacity effects in the atmosphere model, compared to convection in stellar evolution models, serve to expand the atmosphere. The enlarged acoustic cavity lowers the pulsation frequencies bringing them...

  7. Active control of convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bau, H.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  8. Physics of Stellar Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, W. David

    2009-05-01

    We review recent progress using numerical simulations as a testbed for development of a theory of stellar convection, much as envisaged by John von Newmann. Necessary features of the theory, non-locality and fluctuations, are illustrated by computer movies. It is found that the common approximation of convection as a diffusive process presents the wrong physical picture, and improvements are suggested. New observational results discussed at the conference are gratifying in their validation of some of our theoretical ideas, especially the idea that SNIb and SNIc events are related to the explosion of massive star cores which have been stripped by mass loss and binary interactions [1

  9. Mathematical models of convection

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Victor K; Goncharova, Olga N; Pukhnachev, Vladislav V

    2012-01-01

    Phenomena of convection are abundant in nature as well as in industry. This volume addresses the subject of convection from the point of view of both, theory and application. While the first three chapters provide a refresher on fluid dynamics and heat transfer theory, the rest of the book describes the modern developments in theory. Thus it brings the reader to the ""front"" of the modern research. This monograph provides the theoretical foundation on a topic relevant to metallurgy, ecology, meteorology, geo-and astrophysics, aerospace industry, chemistry, crystal physics, and many other fiel

  10. Convective aggregation in realistic convective-scale simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Holloway, Christopher E.

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the real-world relevance of idealized-model convective self-aggregation, five 15-day cases of real organized convection in the tropics are simulated. These include multiple simulations of each case to test sensitivities of the convective organization and mean states to interactive radiation, interactive surface fluxes, and evaporation of rain. These simulations are compared to self-aggregation seen in the same model configured to run in idealized radiative-convective equilibriu...

  11. A new lattice Boltzmann equation to simulate density-driven convection of carbon dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca; Reis, Tim; Sun, Shuyu

    2013-01-01

    -driven convection becomes an important transport process to model. However, the challenge lies in simulating this transport process accurately with high spatial resolution and low CPU cost. This issue can be addressed by using the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE

  12. Double stratification effects in chemically reactive squeezed Sutterby fluid flow with thermal radiation and mixed convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ahmad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A current analysis is carried out to study theoretically the mixed convection characteristics in squeezing flow of Sutterby fluid in squeezed channel. The constitutive equation of Sutterby model is utilized to characterize the rheology of squeezing phenomenon. Flow characteristics are explored with dual stratification. In flowing fluid which contains heat and mass transport, the first order chemical reaction and radiative heat flux affect the transport phenomenon. The systems of non-linear governing equations have been modulating which then solved by mean of convergent approach (Homotopy Analysis Method. The graphs are reported and illustrated for emerging parameters. Through graphical explanations, drag force, rate of heat and mass transport are conversed for different pertinent parameters. It is found that heat and mass transport rate decays with dominant double stratified parameters and chemical reaction parameter. The present two-dimensional examination is applicable in some of the engineering processes and industrial fluid mechanics. Keywords: Squeezing flow, Sutterby fluid model, Mixed convection, Double stratification, Thermal radiation, Chemical reaction

  13. CDM Convective Forecast Planning guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CDM Convective Forecast Planning (CCFP) guidance product provides a foreast of en-route aviation convective hazards. The forecasts are updated every 2 hours and...

  14. Transperitoneal transport of sodium during hypertonic peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Fugleberg, S; Brahm, J

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms of transperitoneal sodium transport during hypertonic peritoneal dialysis were evaluated by kinetic modelling. A total of six nested mathematical models were designed to elucidate the presence or absence of diffusive, non-lymphatic convective and lymphatic convective solute transport....... Experimental results were obtained from 26 non-diabetic patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The model validation procedure demonstrated that only diffusive and non-lymphatic convective transport mechanisms were identifiable in the transperitoneal transport of sodium. Non-lymphatic convective sodium...

  15. Confinement and dynamical regulation in two-dimensional convective turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2003-01-01

    In this work the nature of confinement improvement implied by the self-consistent generation of mean flows in two-dimensional convective turbulence is studied. The confinement variations are linked to two distinct regulation mechanisms which are also shown to be at the origin of low......-frequency bursting in the fluctuation level and the convective heat flux integral, both resulting in a state of large-scale intermittency. The first one involves the control of convective transport by sheared mean flows. This regulation relies on the conservative transfer of kinetic energy from tilted fluctuations...

  16. Presentation on Tropical Mesoscale convective Systems and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Shallow convection- 70% of the storm heights are below 6 km. ♢ Deep convection ... Decay convection, the convective top is found at a higher altitude than deep .... Stratospheric Fountain – Two step process. Warm tropopause- preferable for.

  17. Convective overshooting in stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrássy, R.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous observations provide evidence that the standard picture, in which convective mixing is limited to the unstable layers of a star, is incomplete. The mixing layers in real stars are significantly more extended than what the standard models predict. Some of the observations require changing

  18. Convective Propagation Characteristics Using a Simple Representation of Convective Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, R. B.; Mapes, B. E.

    2016-12-01

    Observed equatorial wave propagation is intimately linked to convective organization and it's coupling to features of the larger-scale flow. In this talk we a use simple 4 level model to accommodate vertical modes of a mass flux convection scheme (shallow, mid-level and deep). Two paradigms of convection are used to represent convective processes. One that has only both random (unorganized) diagnosed fluctuations of convective properties and one with organized fluctuations of convective properties that are amplified by previously existing convection and has an explicit moistening impact on the local convecting environment We show a series of model simulations in single-column, 2D and 3D configurations, where the role of convective organization in wave propagation is shown to be fundamental. For the optimal choice of parameters linking organization to local atmospheric state, a broad array of convective wave propagation emerges. Interestingly the key characteristics of propagating modes are the low-level moistening followed by deep convection followed by mature 'large-scale' heating. This organization structure appears to hold firm across timescales from 5-day wave disturbances to MJO-like wave propagation.

  19. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, James; Carr, Ron; Chebl, Maroun; Coleman, Robert; Costantini, William; Cox, Robert; Dial, William; Jenkins, Robert; McGovern, James; Mueller, Peter

    2006-01-01

    ...., trains, ships, etc.) and maximizing intermodal efficiency. A healthy balance must be achieved between the flow of international commerce and security requirements regardless of transportation mode...

  20. Terminal project heat convection in thin cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Corona, J.

    1992-01-01

    Heat convection in thin cylinders and analysis about natural convection for straight vertical plates, and straight vertical cylinders submersed in a fluid are presented some works carry out by different authors in the field of heat transfer. In the part of conduction, deduction of the equation of heat conduction in cylindrical coordinates by means of energy balance in a control volume is presented. Enthalpy and internal energy are used for the outlining of the equation and finally the equation in its vectorial form is obtained. In the convection part development to calculate the Nusselt number for a straight vertical plate by a forces analysis, an energy balance and mass conservation over a control volume is outlined. Several empiric correlations to calculate the Nusselt number and its relations with other dimensionless numbers are presented. In the experimental part the way in which a prototype rode is assembled is presented measurements of temperatures attained in steady state and in free convection for working fluids as air and water are showed in tables. Also graphs of Nusselt numbers obtained in the experimental way through some empiric correlations are showed (Author)

  1. Boundary-modulated Thermal Convection Model in the Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, K.; Kumagai, I.

    2008-12-01

    Analog experiments have played an important role in the constructing ideas of mantle dynamics. The series of experiments by H. Ramberg is one of the successful examples. Recently, however the realm of the analog experiments seems to be overwhelmed by steady progress of computer simulations. Is there still room for the analog experiments? This might be a main and hidden subject of this session. Here we propose a working hypothesis how the convecting mantle behaves based on the analog experiments in the system of viscous fluid and particles. The essential part is the interaction of convecting flow with heterogeneities existing in the boundaries. It is proposed the preexisting topographical heterogeneity in the boundary could control the flow pattern of convecting fluid. If this kind of heterogeneity can be formed as a consequence of convective motion and mobilized by the flow, the convection also can control the heterogeneity. We can expect interactions in two ways, by which the system behaves in a self-organize fashion. To explore the mutual interactions between convection flow and heterogeneity the system of viscous fluid and particles with slightly higher density is selected as 2D Rayleigh-Benard type convection. The basic structure consists of a basal particulate layer where permeable convection transports heat and an upper viscous fluid layer. By reducing the magnitude of the density difference the convective flow can mobilize the particles and can erode the basal layer. The condition of this erosion can be identified in the phase diagram of the particle Shields"f and the Rayleigh numbers. At Ra greater than 107 the convection style drastically changed before and after the erosion. Before the erosion where the flat interface of the boundary is maintained small scaled turbulent convection pattern is dominant. After the erosion where the interface becomes bumpy the large scale convective motion is observed. The structure is coherent to that of the boundary. This

  2. Convection heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bejan, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Written by an internationally recognized authority on heat transfer and thermodynamics, this second edition of Convection Heat Transfer contains new and updated problems and examples reflecting real-world research and applications, including heat exchanger design. Teaching not only structure but also technique, the book begins with the simplest problem solving method (scale analysis), and moves on to progressively more advanced and exact methods (integral method, self similarity, asymptotic behavior). A solutions manual is available for all problems and exercises.

  3. Can a Wind Model Mimic a Convection-Dominated Accretion Flow Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Heon-Young

    2001-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the properties of advection-dominated accretion flows(ADAFs) in case that outflows carry away infalling matter with its angular momentum and energy. Positive Bernoulli numbers in ADAFs allow a fraction of the gas to be ex-pelled in a form of outflows. The ADAFs are also unstable to convection. We present self-similar solutions for advection-dominated accretion flows in the presence of out-flows from the accretion flows (ADIOS). The axisymmetric flow is treated in variables integrated over polar sections and the effects of outflows on the accretion rlow are parameterized for possible configurations compatible with the one dimensional self-similar ADAF solution. We explicitly derive self-similar solutions of ADAFs in the presence of outflows and show that the strong outflows in the accretion flows result in a flatter density profile, which is similar to that of the convection-dominated accretion flows (CDAFs) in which convection transports the a! ngular momentum inward and the energy outward. These two different versions of the ADAF model should show similar behaviors in X-ray spectrum to some extent. Even though the two models may show similar behaviors, they should be distinguishable due to different physical properties. We suggest that for a central object of which mass is known these two different accretion flows should have different X-ray flux value due to deficient matter in the wind model.

  4. Can a Wind Model Mimic a Convection-Dominated Accretion Flow Model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heon-Young Chang

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the properties of advection-dominated accretion flows(ADAFs in case that outflows carry away infalling matter with its angular momentum and energy. Positive Bernoulli numbers in ADAFs allow a fraction of the gas to be ex-pelled in a form of outflows. The ADAFs are also unstable to convection. We present self-similar solutions for advection-dominated accretion flows in the presence of out-flows from the accretion flows (ADIOS. The axisymmetric flow is treated in variables integrated over polar sections and the effects of outflows on the accretion rlow are parameterized for possible configurations compatible with the one dimensional self-similar ADAF solution. We explicitly derive self-similar solutions of ADAFs in the presence of outflows and show that the strong outflows in the accretion flows result in a flatter density profile, which is similar to that of the convection-dominated accretion flows (CDAFs in which convection transports the a! ngular momentum inward and the energy outward. These two different versions of the ADAF model should show similar behaviors in X-ray spectrum to some extent. Even though the two models may show similar behaviors, they should be distinguishable due to different physical properties. We suggest that for a central object of which mass is known these two different accretion flows should have different X-ray flux value due to deficient matter in the wind model.

  5. The diurnal interaction between convection and peninsular-scale forcing over South Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, H. J.; Simpson, J.; Garstang, M.

    1982-01-01

    One of the outstanding problems in modern meterology is that of describing in detail the manner in which larger scales of motion interact with, influence and are influenced by successively smaller scales of motion. The present investigation is concerned with a study of the diurnal evolution of convection, the interaction between the peninsular-scale convergence and convection, and the role of the feedback produced by the cloud-scale downdrafts in the maintenance of the convection. Attention is given to the analysis, the diurnal cycle of the network area-averaged divergence, convective-scale divergence, convective mass transports, and the peninsular scale divergence. The links established in the investigation between the large scale (peninsular), the mesoscale (network), and the convective scale (cloud) are found to be of fundamental importance to the understanding of the initiation, maintenance, and decay of deep precipitating convection and to its theoretical parameterization.

  6. Concepts of magnetospheric convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasyliunas, V.M.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetospheric physics, which grew out of attempts to understand the space environment of the Earth, is becoming increasingly applicable to other systems in the Universe. Among the planets, in addition to the Earth, Jupiter, Mercury, Mars and (in a somewhat different way) Venus are now known to have magnetospheres. The magnetospheres of pulsars have been regarded as an essential part of the pulsar phenomenon. Other astrophysical systems, such as supernova remnant shells or magnetic stars and binary star systems, may be describable as magnetospheres. The major concepts of magnetospheric physics thus need to be formulated in a general way not restricted to the geophysical context in which they may have originated. Magnetospheric convection has been one of the most important and fruitful concepts in the study of the Earth's magnetosphere. This paper describes the basic theoretical notions of convection in a manner applicable to magnetospheres generally and discusses the relative importance of convective corotational motions, with particular reference to the comparison of the Earth and Jupiter. (Auth.)

  7. Heat transport in bubbling turbulent convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakkaraju, R.; Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Oresta, P.; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to numerous mechanisms, many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubble compounds with that of the liquid to

  8. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allshouse, Michael; Armstrong, Frederick Henry; Burns, Stephen; Courts, Michael; Denn, Douglas; Fortunato, Paul; Gettings, Daniel; Hansen, David; Hoffman, D. W; Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    .... The ability of the global transportation industry to rapidly move passengers and products from one corner of the globe to another continues to amaze even those wise to the dynamics of such operations...

  9. Bounds on poloidal kinetic energy in plane layer convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilgner, A.

    2017-12-01

    A numerical method is presented that conveniently computes upper bounds on heat transport and poloidal energy in plane layer convection for infinite and finite Prandtl numbers. The bounds obtained for the heat transport coincide with earlier results. These bounds imply upper bounds for the poloidal energy, which follow directly from the definitions of dissipation and energy. The same constraints used for computing upper bounds on the heat transport lead to improved bounds for the poloidal energy.

  10. Convective instabilities in SN 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Willy; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    1990-01-01

    Following Bandiera (1984), it is shown that the relevant criterion to determine the stability of a blast wave, propagating through the layers of a massive star in a supernova explosion, is the Schwarzschild (or Ledoux) criterion rather than the Rayleigh-Taylor criterion. Both criteria coincide only in the incompressible limit. Results of a linear stability analysis are presented for a one-dimensional (spherical) explosion in a realistic model for the progenitor of SN 1987A. When applying the Schwarzschild criterion, unstable regions get extended considerably. Convection is found to develop behind the shock, with a characteristic growth rate corresponding to a time scale much smaller than the shock traversal time. This ensures that efficient mixing will take place. Since the entire ejected mass is found to be convectively unstable, Ni can be transported outward, even into the hydrogen envelope, while hydrogen can be mixed deep into the helium core.

  11. Convective mass transfer around a dissolving bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplat, Jerome; Grandemange, Mathieu; Poulain, Cedric

    2017-11-01

    Heat or mass transfer around an evaporating drop or condensing vapor bubble is a complex issue due to the interplay between the substrate properties, diffusion- and convection-driven mass transfer, and Marangoni effects, to mention but a few. In order to disentangle these mechanisms, we focus here mainly on the convective mass transfer contribution in an isothermal mass transfer problem. For this, we study the case of a millimetric carbon dioxide bubble which is suspended under a substrate and dissolved into pure liquid water. The high solubility of CO2 in water makes the liquid denser and promotes a buoyant-driven flow at a high (solutal) Rayleigh number (Ra˜104 ). The alteration of p H allows the concentration field in the liquid to be imaged by laser fluorescence enabling us to measure both the global mass flux (bubble volume, contact angle) and local mass flux around the bubble along time. After a short period of mass diffusion, where the boundary layer thickens like the square root of time, convection starts and the CO2 is carried by a plume falling at constant velocity. The boundary layer thickness then reaches a plateau which depends on the bubble cross section. Meanwhile the plume velocity scales like (dV /d t )1 /2 with V being the volume of the bubble. As for the rate of volume loss, we recover a constant mass flux in the diffusion-driven regime followed by a decrease in the volume V like V2 /3 after convection has started. We present a model which agrees well with the bubble dynamics and discuss our results in the context of droplet evaporation, as well as high Rayleigh convection.

  12. Effects of Solutally Dominant Convection on Physical Vapor Transport for a Mixture of Hg{sub 2}Br{sub 2} and Br{sub 2} under Microgravity Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geug-Tae [Hannam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kown, Moo Hyun [Woosuk University, Wanju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    The convective flow structures in the vapor phase on earth are shown to be single unicellular, indicating the solutally dominant convection is important. These findings reflect that the total molar fluxes show asymmetrical patterns in a viewpoint of interfacial distributions. With decreasing the gravitational level form 1 g{sub 0} down to 1.0x10{sup -4} g{sub 0}, the total molar fluxes decay first order exponentially. It is also found that the total molar fluxes decay first order exponentially with increasing the partial pressure of component B, PB (Torr) form 5 Torr up to 400 Torr.. Under microgravity environments less than 1 g{sub 0}, a diffusive-convection mode is dominant and, results in much uniformity in front of the crystal regions in comparisons with a normal gravity acceleration of 1 g{sub 0}.

  13. Kinetic thermal structure in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Yin, Ze-Xia; She, Zhen-Su; Bao, Yun

    2017-11-01

    Plumes are believed to be the most important heat carrier in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC). However, a physically sound and clear definition of plume is still absent. We report here the investigation of a definition of plume called kinetic thermal structure (KTS), based on the analysis of vertical velocity gradient (Λ = ∂w / ∂z), using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of the three-dimensional RBC in a rectangular cell for Pr = 0.7 and Ra = 1 ×108 5 ×109 . It is shown that the conditional average of temperature on Λ exhibits such a behavior that when Λ is larger than a threshold, the volume carries a constant temperature of fluid, hence defines an unambiguous thermal structure, KTS. The DNS show that the KTS behaves in a sheet-like shape near the conducting plate, and becomes slender and smaller with increasing Ra . The heat flux carried by KTS displays a scaling law, with an exponent larger than the global- Nu - Ra scaling, indicating stronger heat transport than the turbulent background. An advantage of the KTS is its connection to the balance equation allowing, for the first time, a prediction of the Ra -dependence of its vertical velocity and the characteristic Λ threshold, validated by DNS. Supported by NSFC (11172006, 11221062, 11452002), and by MOST (China) 973 project (2009CB724100).

  14. Vertical Structure of Radiation-pressure-dominated Thin Disks: Link between Vertical Advection and Convective Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Hong-Yu; Gu, Wei-Min

    2017-01-01

    In the classic picture of standard thin accretion disks, viscous heating is balanced by radiative cooling through the diffusion process, and the radiation-pressure-dominated inner disk suffers convective instability. However, recent simulations have shown that, owing to the magnetic buoyancy, the vertical advection process can significantly contribute to energy transport. In addition, in comparing the simulation results with the local convective stability criterion, no convective instability has been found. In this work, following on from simulations, we revisit the vertical structure of radiation-pressure-dominated thin disks and include the vertical advection process. Our study indicates a link between the additional energy transport and the convectively stable property. Thus, the vertical advection not only significantly contributes to the energy transport, but it also plays an important role in making the disk convectively stable. Our analyses may help to explain the discrepancy between classic theory and simulations on standard thin disks.

  15. Bidispersive-inclined convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulone, Giuseppe; Straughan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    A model is presented for thermal convection in an inclined layer of porous material when the medium has a bidispersive structure. Thus, there are the usual macropores which are full of a fluid, but there are also a system of micropores full of the same fluid. The model we employ is a modification of the one proposed by Nield & Kuznetsov (2006 Int. J. Heat Mass Transf. 49, 3068–3074. (doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2006.02.008)), although we consider a single temperature field only. PMID:27616934

  16. Global vertical mass transport by clouds - A two-dimensional model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olofsson, Mats

    1988-05-01

    A two-dimensional global dispersion model, where vertical transport in the troposphere carried out by convective as well as by frontal cloud systems is explicitly treated, is developed from an existing diffusion model. A parameterization scheme for the cloud transport, based on global cloud statistics, is presented. The model has been tested by using Kr-85, Rn-222 and SO 2 as tracers. Comparisons have been made with observed distributions of these tracers, but also with model results without the cloud transport, using eddy diffusion as the primary means of vertical transport. The model results indicate that for trace species with a turnover time of days to weeks, the introduction of cloud-transport gives much more realistic simulations of their vertical distribution. Layers of increased mixing ratio with height, which can be found in real atmosphere, are reproduced in our cloud-transport model profiles, but can never be simulated with a pure eddy diffusion model. The horizontal transport in the model, by advection and eddy diffusion, gives a realistic distribution between the hemispheres of the more long-lived tracers (Kr-85). A combination of vertical transport by convective and frontal cloud systems is shown to improve the model simulations, compared to limiting it to convective transport only. The importance of including cumulus clouds in the convective transport scheme, in addition to the efficient transport by cumulonimbus clouds, is discussed. The model results are shown to be more sensitive to the vertical detrainment distribution profile than to the absolute magnitude of the vertical mass transport. The scavenging processes for SO 2 are parameterized without the introduction of detailed chemistry. An enhanced removal, due to the increased contact with droplets in the in-cloud lifting process, is introduced in the model. (author)

  17. Transperitoneal transport of creatinine. A comparison of kinetic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleberg, S; Graff, J; Joffe, P

    1994-01-01

    Six kinetic models of transperitoneal creatinine transport were formulated and validated on the basis of experimental results obtained from 23 non-diabetic patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The models were designed to elucidate the presence or absence of diffusive, non-lymphatic convective...... including all three forms of transport is superior to other models. We conclude that the best model of transperitoneal creatinine transport includes diffusion, non-lymphatic convective transport and lymphatic convective transport....

  18. Modifications in the Teach-C computer code for convection analysis-two-dimensional transient diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampaio, P.A.B. de.

    1987-08-01

    Some modifications in Teach-C computer program to analyse the heat conduction with convective heat transport are presented. The utilization of the program to solve a convective - diffusion problem is studied and the results are compared with an analysis of the same problem, in steady - state conditions, by finite element method [pt

  19. Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Faculty ii INDUSTRY TRAVEL Domestic Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Transportation Policy), Washington, DC Department of...developed between the railroad and trucking industries. Railroads: Today’s seven Class I freight railroad systems move 42% of the nation’s intercity ...has been successfully employed in London to reduce congestion and observed by this industry study during its travels . It is currently being

  20. NEUTRINO-DRIVEN TURBULENT CONVECTION AND STANDING ACCRETION SHOCK INSTABILITY IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.; Radice, David; Roberts, Luke F.; Haas, Roland; Reisswig, Christian; Mösta, Philipp; Klion, Hannah; Schnetter, Erik

    2015-01-01

    We conduct a series of numerical experiments into the nature of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics in the postbounce stalled-shock phase of core-collapse supernovae using 3D general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of a 27 M ⊙ progenitor star with a neutrino leakage/heating scheme. We vary the strength of neutrino heating and find three cases of 3D dynamics: (1) neutrino-driven convection, (2) initially neutrino-driven convection and subsequent development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), and (3) SASI-dominated evolution. This confirms previous 3D results of Hanke et al. and Couch and Connor. We carry out simulations with resolutions differing by up to a factor of ∼4 and demonstrate that low resolution is artificially favorable for explosion in the 3D convection-dominated case since it decreases the efficiency of energy transport to small scales. Low resolution results in higher radial convective fluxes of energy and enthalpy, more fully buoyant mass, and stronger neutrino heating. In the SASI-dominated case, lower resolution damps SASI oscillations. In the convection-dominated case, a quasi-stationary angular kinetic energy spectrum E(ℓ) develops in the heating layer. Like other 3D studies, we find E(ℓ) ∝ℓ −1 in the “inertial range,” while theory and local simulations argue for E(ℓ) ∝ ℓ −5/3 . We argue that current 3D simulations do not resolve the inertial range of turbulence and are affected by numerical viscosity up to the energy-containing scale, creating a “bottleneck” that prevents an efficient turbulent cascade

  1. NEUTRINO-DRIVEN TURBULENT CONVECTION AND STANDING ACCRETION SHOCK INSTABILITY IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.; Radice, David; Roberts, Luke F.; Haas, Roland; Reisswig, Christian; Mösta, Philipp; Klion, Hannah [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, Mailcode 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schnetter, Erik, E-mail: cott@tapir.caltech.edu [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-20

    We conduct a series of numerical experiments into the nature of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics in the postbounce stalled-shock phase of core-collapse supernovae using 3D general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of a 27 M{sub ⊙} progenitor star with a neutrino leakage/heating scheme. We vary the strength of neutrino heating and find three cases of 3D dynamics: (1) neutrino-driven convection, (2) initially neutrino-driven convection and subsequent development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), and (3) SASI-dominated evolution. This confirms previous 3D results of Hanke et al. and Couch and Connor. We carry out simulations with resolutions differing by up to a factor of ∼4 and demonstrate that low resolution is artificially favorable for explosion in the 3D convection-dominated case since it decreases the efficiency of energy transport to small scales. Low resolution results in higher radial convective fluxes of energy and enthalpy, more fully buoyant mass, and stronger neutrino heating. In the SASI-dominated case, lower resolution damps SASI oscillations. In the convection-dominated case, a quasi-stationary angular kinetic energy spectrum E(ℓ) develops in the heating layer. Like other 3D studies, we find E(ℓ) ∝ℓ{sup −1} in the “inertial range,” while theory and local simulations argue for E(ℓ) ∝ ℓ{sup −5/3}. We argue that current 3D simulations do not resolve the inertial range of turbulence and are affected by numerical viscosity up to the energy-containing scale, creating a “bottleneck” that prevents an efficient turbulent cascade.

  2. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canaan, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array

  3. Study of mixed convection in sodium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhou; Chen Yan

    1995-01-01

    The mixed convection phenomena in the sodium pool of fast reactor have been studied systematically by the two dimensional modeling method. A generalized concept of circumferential line in the cylindrical coordinates was proposed to overcome the three dimensional effect induced by the pool geometry in an analysis of two dimensional modeling. A method of sub-step in time was developed for solving the turbulent equations. The treatments on the boundary condition for the auxiliary velocity field have been proposed, and the explanation of allowing the flow function method to be used in the flow field in presence of a mass source term was given. As examples of verification, the experiments were conducted with water flow in a rectangular cavity. The results from theoretical analysis were applied to the numerical computation for the mixed convection in the cavity. The mechanism of stratified flow in the cavity was studied. A numerical calculation was carried out for the mixed convection in hot plenum of a typical fast reactor

  4. Nonlinear Convective Models of RR Lyrae Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuchtinger, M.; Dorfi, E. A.

    The nonlinear behavior of RR Lyrae pulsations is investigated using a state-of-the-art numerical technique solving the full time-dependent system of radiation hydrodynamics. Grey radiative transfer is included by a variable Eddington-factor method and we use the time-dependent turbulent convection model according to Kuhfuss (1986, A&A 160, 116) in the version of Wuchterl (1995, Comp. Phys. Comm. 89, 19). OPAL opacities extended by the Alexander molecule opacities at temperatures below 6000 K and an equation of state according to Wuchterl (1990, A&A 238, 83) close the system. The resulting nonlinear system is discretized on an adaptive mesh developed by Dorfi & Drury (1987, J. Comp. Phys. 69, 175), which is important to provide the necessary spatial resolution in critical regions like ionization zones and shock waves. Additionally, we employ a second order advection scheme, a time centered temporal discretizaton and an artificial tensor viscosity in order to treat discontinuities. We compute fundamental as well first overtone models of RR Lyrae stars for a grid of stellar parameters both with and without convective energy transport in order to give a detailed picture of the pulsation-convection interaction. In order to investigate the influence of the different features of the convection model calculations with and without overshooting, turbulent pressure and turbulent viscosity are performed and compared with each other. A standard Fourier decomposition is used to confront the resulting light and radial velocity variations with recent observations and we show that the well known RR Lyrae phase discrepancy problem (Simon 1985, ApJ 299, 723) can be resolved with these stellar pulsation computations.

  5. The interaction between deep convective clouds and their environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Böing, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Deep convective clouds play a key role in tropical weather patterns, summertime rainfall, and the global transport of energy from the tropics to higher latitudes. Current weather and climate models struggle to realistically represent the development and behavior of these clouds. Both the timing of

  6. Convection in Porous Media

    CERN Document Server

    Nield, Donald A

    2013-01-01

    Convection in Porous Media, 4th Edition, provides a user-friendly introduction to the subject, covering a wide range of topics, such as fibrous insulation, geological strata, and catalytic reactors. The presentation is self-contained, requiring only routine mathematics and the basic elements of fluid mechanics and heat transfer. The book will be of use not only to researchers and practicing engineers as a review and reference, but also to graduate students and others entering the field. The new edition features approximately 1,750 new references and covers current research in nanofluids, cellular porous materials, strong heterogeneity, pulsating flow, and more. Recognized as the standard reference in the field Includes a comprehensive, 250-page reference list Cited over 2300 times to date in its various editions Serves as an introduction for those entering the field and as a comprehensive reference for experienced researchers Features new sections on nanofluids, carbon dioxide sequestration, and applications...

  7. Temperature-Driven Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohan, Richard J.; Vandegrift, Guy

    2003-02-01

    Warm air aloft is stable. This explains the lack of strong winds in a warm front and how nighttime radiative cooling can lead to motionless air that can trap smog. The stability of stratospheric air can be attributed to the fact that it is heated from above as ultraviolet radiation strikes the ozone layer. On the other hand, fluid heated from below is unstable and can lead to Bernard convection cells. This explains the generally turbulent nature of the troposphere, which receives a significant fraction of its heat directly from the Earth's warmer surface. The instability of cold fluid aloft explains the violent nature of a cold front, as well as the motion of Earth's magma, which is driven by radioactive heating deep within the Earth's mantle. This paper describes how both effects can be demonstrated using four standard beakers, ice, and a bit of food coloring.

  8. Convection in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Nield, Donald A

    1992-01-01

    This book provides a user-friendly introduction to the topic of convection in porous media The authors as- sume that the reader is familiar with the basic elements of fluid mechanics and heat transfer, but otherwise the book is self-contained The book will be useful both as a review (for reference) and as a tutorial work, suitable as a textbook in a graduate course or seminar The book brings into perspective the voluminous research that has been performed during the last two decades The field has recently exploded because of worldwide concern with issues such as energy self-sufficiency and pollution of the environment Areas of application include the insulation of buildings and equipment, energy storage and recovery, geothermal reservoirs, nuclear waste disposal, chemical reactor engineering, and the storage of heat-generating materials such as grain and coal Geophysical applications range from the flow of groundwater around hot intrusions to the stability of snow against avalanches

  9. Convective heat transfer around vertical jet fires: An experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozanoglu, Bulent, E-mail: bulentu.kozanoglu@udlap.mx [Universidad de las Americas, Puebla (Mexico); Zarate, Luis [Universidad Popular Autonoma del Estado de Puebla (Mexico); Gomez-Mares, Mercedes [Universita di Bologna (Italy); Casal, Joaquim [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (Spain)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experiments were carried out to analyze convection around a vertical jet fire. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Convection heat transfer is enhanced increasing the flame length. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nusselt number grows with higher values of Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In subsonic flames, Nusselt number increases with Froude number. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Convection and radiation are equally important in causing a domino effect. - Abstract: The convection heat transfer phenomenon in vertical jet fires was experimentally analyzed. In these experiments, turbulent propane flames were generated in subsonic as well as sonic regimes. The experimental data demonstrated that the rate of convection heat transfer increases by increasing the length of the flame. Assuming the solid flame model, the convection heat transfer coefficient was calculated. Two equations in terms of adimensional numbers were developed. It was found out that the Nusselt number attains greater values for higher values of the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers. On the other hand, the Froude number was analyzed only for the subsonic flames where the Nusselt number grows by this number and the diameter of the orifice.

  10. Moist Orographic Convection: Physical Mechanisms and Links to Surface-Exchange Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Kirshbaum

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current understanding of moist orographic convection and its regulation by surface-exchange processes. Such convection tends to develop when and where moist instability coincides with sufficient terrain-induced ascent to locally overcome convective inhibition. The terrain-induced ascent can be owing to mechanical (airflow over or around an obstacle and/or thermal (differential heating over sloping terrain forcing. For the former, the location of convective initiation depends on the dynamical flow regime. In “unblocked” flows that ascend the barrier, the convection tends to initiate over the windward slopes, while in “blocked” flows that detour around the barrier, the convection tends to initiate upstream and/or downstream of the high terrain where impinging flows split and rejoin, respectively. Processes that destabilize the upstream flow for mechanically forced moist convection include large-scale moistening and ascent, positive surface sensible and latent heat fluxes, and differential advection in baroclinic zones. For thermally forced flows, convective initiation is driven by thermally direct circulations with sharp updrafts over or downwind of the mountain crest (daytime or foot (nighttime. Along with the larger-scale background flow, local evapotranspiration and transport of moisture, as well as thermodynamic heterogeneities over the complex terrain, regulate moist instability in such events. Longstanding limitations in the quantitative understanding of related processes, including both convective preconditioning and initiation, must be overcome to improve the prediction of this convection, and its collective effects, in weather and climate models.

  11. Climatology and Impact of Convection on the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Franklin; Pittman, Jasna

    2007-01-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in controlling the radiative balance and the chemical composition of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Mechanisms ranging from slow transport and dehydration under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions to fast transport in convection have been proposed as regulators of the amount of water vapor in this layer. However,.details of these mechanisms and their relative importance remain poorly understood, The recently completed Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling (TC4) campaign had the opportunity to sample the.TTL over the Eastern Tropical Pacific using ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne instruments. The main goal of this study is to provide the climatological context for this campaign of deep and overshooting convective activity using various satellite observations collected during the summertime. We use the Microwave Humidity Sensor (MRS) aboard the NOAA-18 satellite to investigate the horizontal extent.and the frequency of convection reaching and penetrating into the TTL. We use the Moderate Resolution I1l1aging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua satellite to investigate the frequency distribution of daytime cirrus clouds. We use the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission(TRMM) and CloudSat to investigate the vertical structure and distribution of hydrometeors in the convective cells, In addition to cloud measurements; we investigate the impact that convection has on the concentration of radiatively important gases such as water vapor and ozone in the TTL by examining satellite measurement obtained from the Microwave Limb Sounder(MLS) aboard the Aura satellite.

  12. An experimental study of mixed convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez, Manuel

    1998-01-01

    The aim of our study is to establish a reliable data base for improving thermal-hydraulic codes, in the field of turbulent flows with buoyancy forces. The flow considered is mixed convection in the Reynolds and Richardson number range: Re=10"3 to 6*10"4 and Ri=10"-"4 to 1. Experiments are carried out in an upward turbulent flow between vertical parallel plates at different wall temperatures. Part 1 gives a detailed data base of turbulent mixed flow of free and forced convection. Part II presents the installation and the calibration system intended for probes calibration. Part III describes the measurement technique (constant-temperature probe and cold-wire probe) and the method for measuring the position of the hot-wire anemometer from the wall surface. The measurement accuracy is within 0.001 mm in the present system. Part IV relates the development of a method for near wall measurements. This correction procedure for hot-wire anemometer close to wall has been derived on the basis of a two-dimensional numerical study. The method permits to obtain a quantitative correction of the wall influence on hot-wires and takes into account the velocity profile and the effects the wall material has on the heat loss. Part V presents the experimental data obtained in the channel in forced and mixed convection. Results obtained in the forced convection regime serve as a verification of the measurement technique close to the wall and give the conditions at the entrance of the test section. The effects of the buoyancy force on the mean velocity and temperature profiles are confirmed. The buoyancy strongly affects the flow structure and deforms the distribution of mean velocity. The velocity profiles are asymmetric. The second section of part V gives an approach of analytical wall functions with buoyancy forces, on the basis of the experimental data obtained in the test section. (author) [fr

  13. Convective parameters in fuel elements for research nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Martinez, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    The study of a prototype for the simulation of fuel elements for research nuclear reactors by natural convection in water is presented in this paper. This project is carry out in the thermofluids laboratory of National Institute of Nuclear Research. The fuel prototype has already been test for natural convection in air, and the first results in water are presented in this work. In chapter I, a general description of Triga Mark III is made, paying special atention to fuel-moderator components. In chapter II and III an approach to convection subject in its global aspects is made, since the intention is to give a general idea of the events occuring around fuel elements in a nuclear reactor. In chapter II, where an emphasis on forced convection is made, some basic concepts for forced convection as well as for natural convection are included. The subject of flow through cylinders is annotated only as a comparative reference with natural convection in vertical cylinders, noting the difference between used correlations and the involved variables. In chapter III a compilation of correlation found in the bibliography about natural convection in vertical cylinders is presented, since its geometry is the more suitable in the analysis of a fuel rod. Finally, in chapter IV performed experiments in the test bench are detailed, and the results are presented in form of tables and graphs, showing the used equations for the calculations and the restrictions used in each case. For the analysis of the prototypes used in the test bench, a constant and uniform flow of heat in the whole length of the fuel rod is considered. At the end of this chapter, the work conclusions and a brief explanation of the results are presented (Author)

  14. Airborne measurements of turbulent trace gas fluxes and analysis of eddy structure in the convective boundary layer over complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasel, M.; Kottmeier, Ch.; Corsmeier, U.; Wieser, A.

    2005-03-01

    Using the new high-frequency measurement equipment of the research aircraft DO 128, which is described in detail, turbulent vertical fluxes of ozone and nitric oxide have been calculated from data sampled during the ESCOMPTE program in the south of France. Based on airborne turbulence measurements, radiosonde data and surface energy balance measurements, the convective boundary layer (CBL) is examined under two different aspects. The analysis covers boundary-layer convection with respect to (i) the control of CBL depth by surface heating and synoptic scale influences, and (ii) the structure of convective plumes and their vertical transport of ozone and nitric oxides. The orographic structure of the terrain causes significant differences between planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights, which are found to exceed those of terrain height variations on average. A comparison of boundary-layer flux profiles as well as mean quantities over flat and complex terrain and also under different pollution situations and weather conditions shows relationships between vertical gradients and corresponding turbulent fluxes. Generally, NO x transports are directed upward independent of the terrain, since primary emission sources are located near the ground. For ozone, negative fluxes are common in the lower CBL in accordance with the deposition of O 3 at the surface. The detailed structure of thermals, which largely carry out vertical transports in the boundary layer, are examined with a conditional sampling technique. Updrafts mostly contain warm, moist and NO x loaded air, while the ozone transport by thermals alternates with the background ozone gradient. Evidence for handover processes of trace gases to the free atmosphere can be found in the case of existing gradients across the boundary-layer top. An analysis of the size of eddies suggests the possibility of some influence of the heterogeneous terrain in mountainous area on the length scales of eddies.

  15. Stellar convection and dynamo theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, R L

    1989-10-01

    In considering the large scale stellar convection problem the outer layers of a star are modelled as two co-rotating plane layers coupled at a fluid/fluid interface. Heating from below causes only the upper fluid to convect, although this convection can penetrate into the lower fluid. Stability analysis is then used to find the most unstable mode of convection. With parameters appropriate to the Sun the most unstable mode is steady convection in thin cells (aspect ratio {approx equal} 0.2) filling the convection zone. There is negligible vertical motion in the lower fluid, but considerable thermal penetration, and a large jump in helicity at the interface, which has implications for dynamo theory. An {alpha}{omega} dynamo is investigated in isolation from the convection problem. Complexity is included by allowing both latitudinal and time dependence in the magnetic fields. The nonlinear dynamics of the resulting partial differential equations are analysed in considerable detail. On varying the main control parameter D (the dynamo number), many transitions of behaviour are found involving many forms of time dependence, but not chaos. Further, solutions which break equatorial symmetry are common and provide a theoretical explanation of solar observations which have this symmetry. Overall the behaviour was more complicated than expected. In particular, there were multiple stable solutions at fixed D, meaning that similar stars can have very different magnetic patterns, depending upon their history. (author).

  16. On triply diffusive convection in completely confined fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Jyoti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper carries forward Prakash et al. [21] analysis for triple diffusive convection problem in completely confined fluids and derives upper bounds for the complex growth rate of an arbitrary oscillatory disturbance which may be neutral or unstable through the use of some non-trivial integral estimates obtained from the coupled system of governing equations of the problem.

  17. A new lattice Boltzmann equation to simulate density-driven convection of carbon dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    The storage of CO2 in fluid-filled geological formations has been carried out for more than a decade in locations around the world. After CO2 has been injected into the aquifer and has moved laterally under the aquifer\\'s cap-rock, density-driven convection becomes an important transport process to model. However, the challenge lies in simulating this transport process accurately with high spatial resolution and low CPU cost. This issue can be addressed by using the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) to formulate a model for a similar scenario when a solute diffuses into a fluid and density differences lead to convective mixing. The LBE is a promising alternative to the traditional methods of computational fluid dynamics. Rather than discretizing the system of partial differential equations of classical continuum mechanics directly, the LBE is derived from a velocity-space truncation of the Boltzmann equation of classical kinetic theory. We propose an extension to the LBE, which can accurately predict the transport of dissolved CO2 in water, as a step towards fluid-filled porous media simulations. This is achieved by coupling two LBEs, one for the fluid flow and one for the convection and diffusion of CO2. Unlike existing lattice Boltzmann equations for porous media flow, our model is derived from a system of moment equations and a Crank-Nicolson discretization of the velocity-truncated Boltzmann equation. The forcing terms are updated locally without the need for additional central difference approximation. Therefore our model preserves all the computational advantages of the single-phase lattice Boltzmann equation and is formally second-order accurate in both space and time. Our new model also features a novel implementation of boundary conditions, which is simple to implement and does not suffer from the grid-dependent error that is present in the standard "bounce-back" condition. The significance of using the LBE in this work lies in the ability to efficiently

  18. Upscale Impact of Mesoscale Disturbances of Tropical Convection on Convectively Coupled Kelvin Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q.; Majda, A.

    2017-12-01

    potential temperature anomalies are induced in the lower troposphere, suppressing convection in a moist environment. This simple model also reproduces convective momentum transport and CCKWs in agreement with results from a recent cloud resolving simulation.

  19. The convection patterns in microemulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korneta, W.; Lopez Quintela, M.A.; Fernandez Novoa, A.

    1991-07-01

    The Rayleigh-Benard convection in the microemulsion consisting of water (7.5%), cyclohexan (oil-61.7%) and diethylenglycolmonobutylether (surfactant-30.8%) is studied from the onset of convection to the phase separation. The five classes of convection patterns are observed and recorded on the video: localized travelling waves, travelling waves, travelling waves and localized steady rolls, steady rolls and steady polygons. The Fourier transforms and histograms of these patterns are presented. The origin of any pattern is discussed. The intermittent behaviour close to the phase separation was observed. Possible applications of the obtained results are suggested. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  20. Transient particle transport studies at the W7-AS stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, J.

    2000-01-01

    One of the crucial problems in fusion research is the understanding of the transport of particles and heat in plasmas relevant for energy production. Extensive experimental transport studies have unraveled many details of heat transport in tokamaks and stellarators. However, due to larger experimental difficulties, the properties of particle transport have remained much less known. In particular, very few particle transport studies have been carried out in stellarators. This thesis summarises the transient particle transport experiments carried out at the Wendelstein 7-Advanced Stellarator (W7-AS). The main diagnostics tool was a 10-channel microwave interferometer. A technique for reconstructing the electron density profiles from the multichannel interferometer data was developed and implemented. The interferometer and the reconstruction software provide high quality electron density measurements with high temporal and sufficient spatial resolution. The density reconstruction is based on regularization methods studied during the development work. An extensive program of transient particle transport studies was carried out with the gas modulation method. The experiments resulted in a scaling expression for the diffusion coefficient. Transient inward convection was found in the edge plasma. The role of convection is minor in the core plasma, except at higher heating power, when an outward directed convective flux is observed. Radially peaked density profiles were found in discharges free of significant central density sources. Such density profiles are usually observed in tokamaks, but never before in W7-AS. Existence of an inward pinch is confirmed with two independent transient transport analysis methods. The density peaking is possible if the plasma is heated with extreme off-axis Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH), when the temperature gradient vanishes in the core plasma, and if the gas puffing level is relatively low. The transport of plasma particles and heat

  1. Knorr 147 Leg V Hydrographic Data Report: Labrador Sea Deep Convection Experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zimmerman, Sarah

    2000-01-01

    Between 2 February and 20 March 1997, the first phase of the Labrador Sea Deep Convection Experiment was carried out on R/V Knorr, during which 127 hydrographic stations were occupied throughout the Labrador basin...

  2. Mixed convection in fluid superposed porous layers

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, John M

    2017-01-01

    This Brief describes and analyzes flow and heat transport over a liquid-saturated porous bed. The porous bed is saturated by a liquid layer and heating takes place from a section of the bottom. The effect on flow patterns of heating from the bottom is shown by calculation, and when the heating is sufficiently strong, the flow is affected through the porous and upper liquid layers. Measurements of the heat transfer rate from the heated section confirm calculations. General heat transfer laws are developed for varying porous bed depths for applications to process industry needs, environmental sciences, and materials processing. Addressing a topic of considerable interest to the research community, the brief features an up-to-date literature review of mixed convection energy transport in fluid superposed porous layers.

  3. Convection in the Labrador Sea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, R

    1997-01-01

    The long-term goal of this grant was to describe the process of deep oceanic convection well enough to provide critical tests of, and guidance to, models used to predict subsurface ocean conditions...

  4. Convective heat flow probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  5. Convection-enhanced water evaporation

    OpenAIRE

    B. M. Weon; J. H. Je; C. Poulard

    2011-01-01

    Water vapor is lighter than air; this can enhance water evaporation by triggering vapor convection but there is little evidence. We directly visualize evaporation of nanoliter (2 to 700 nL) water droplets resting on silicon wafer in calm air using a high-resolution dual X-ray imaging method. Temporal evolutions of contact radius and contact angle reveal that evaporation rate linearly changes with surface area, indicating convective (instead of diffusive) evaporation in nanoliter water droplet...

  6. Reynolds analogy for subcooled surface boiling under forced convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdeev, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    For the case of subcooled surface boiling under forced convection the analytic expression of analogy between the heat transfer and carry pulse (Reynolds analogy) is derived. It is concluded that the obtained dependence creates the basis for solution of a series of problems of surface boiling physics. On the basis of the performed analysis the method of coordinate calculation of the origin of intensive vapour generation is developed and the formula for calculation of the broken-off-bubble radius under forced convection is derived [ru

  7. Development of a parameterization scheme of mesoscale convective systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotton, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a parameterization scheme of mesoscale convective systems (MCS) including diabatic heating, moisture and momentum transports, cloud formation, and precipitation. The approach is to: Perform explicit cloud-resolving simulation of MCSs; Perform statistical analyses of simulated MCSs to assist in fabricating a parameterization, calibrating coefficients, etc.; Test the parameterization scheme against independent field data measurements and in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models emulating general circulation model (GCM) grid resolution. Thus far we have formulated, calibrated, implemented and tested a deep convective engine against explicit Florida sea breeze convection and in coarse-grid regional simulations of mid-latitude and tropical MCSs. Several explicit simulations of MCSs have been completed, and several other are in progress. Analysis code is being written and run on the explicitly simulated data

  8. Computational simulation of turbulent natural convection in a volumetrically heated square cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Camila Braga; Su, Jian; Niceno, Bojan

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to analyze the turbulent natural convection in a volumetrically heated fluid with similar characteristics of an oxide layer of a molten core in the lower head of the pressure vessel. The simulations were carried out in a square cavity with isothermal walls, for Rayleigh numbers (Ra) ranging from 10 9 to 10 11 . Different turbulence models based on Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations were studied, such as the standard k - ε, low-Reynolds-k - ε, and Shear Stress Transport (SST), using the open-source Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code - Open FOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation). The results of the three turbulence models were compared versus the results of experimental correlations and other authors’ simulations, and the conclusion was that the most promising model proves to be the SST, due to its accuracy and robustness. (author)

  9. Consequences of high effective Prandtl number on solar differential rotation and convective velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Miesch, Mark; Bekki, Yuto

    2018-04-01

    Observations suggest that the large-scale convective velocities obtained by solar convection simulations might be over-estimated (convective conundrum). One plausible solution to this could be the small-scale dynamo which cannot be fully resolved by global simulations. The small-scale Lorentz force suppresses the convective motions and also the turbulent mixing of entropy between upflows and downflows, leading to a large effective Prandtl number (Pr). We explore this idea in three-dimensional global rotating convection simulations at different thermal conductivity (κ), i.e., at different Pr. In agreement with previous non-rotating simulations, the convective velocity is reduced with the increase of Pr as long as the thermal conductive flux is negligible. A subadiabatic layer is formed near the base of the convection zone due to continuous deposition of low entropy plumes in low-κ simulations. The most interesting result of our low-κ simulations is that the convective motions are accompanied by a change in the convection structure that is increasingly influenced by small-scale plumes. These plumes tend to transport angular momentum radially inward and thus establish an anti-solar differential rotation, in striking contrast to the solar rotation profile. If such low diffusive plumes, driven by the radiative-surface cooling, are present in the Sun, then our results cast doubt on the idea that a high effective Pr may be a viable solution to the solar convective conundrum. Our study also emphasizes that any resolution of the conundrum that relies on the downward plumes must take into account the angular momentum transport and heat transport.

  10. Extended Subadiabatic Layer in Simulations of Overshooting Convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Käpylä, Petri J.; Arlt, Rainer [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Rheinhardt, Matthias; Käpylä, Maarit J.; Olspert, Nigul [ReSoLVE Centre of Excellence, Department of Computer Science, P.O. Box 15400, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Brandenburg, Axel [NORDITA, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Lagg, Andreas; Warnecke, Jörn [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2017-08-20

    We present numerical simulations of hydrodynamic overshooting convection in local Cartesian domains. We find that a substantial fraction of the lower part of the convection zone (CZ) is stably stratified according to the Schwarzschild criterion while the enthalpy flux is outward directed. This occurs when the heat conduction profile at the bottom of the CZ is smoothly varying, based either on a Kramers-like opacity prescription as a function of temperature and density or a static profile of a similar shape. We show that the subadiabatic layer arises due to nonlocal energy transport by buoyantly driven downflows in the upper parts of the CZ. Analysis of the force balance of the upflows and downflows confirms that convection is driven by cooling at the surface. We find that the commonly used prescription for the convective enthalpy flux being proportional to the negative entropy gradient does not hold in the stably stratified layers where the flux is positive. We demonstrate the existence of a non-gradient contribution to the enthalpy flux, which is estimated to be important throughout the convective layer. A quantitative analysis of downflows indicates a transition from a tree-like structure where smaller downdrafts merge into larger ones in the upper parts to a structure in the deeper parts where a height-independent number of strong downdrafts persist. This change of flow topology occurs when a substantial subadiabatic layer is present in the lower part of the CZ.

  11. Numerical Simulation on Natural Convection Cooling of a FM Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Pil; Park, Su Ki [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The irradiated FM(Fission-Molly) target is unloaded from the irradiation hole during normal operation, and then cooled down in the reactor pool for a certain period of time. Therefore, it is necessary to identify the minimum decay time needed to cool down FM target sufficiently by natural convection. In the present work, numerical simulations are performed to predict cooling capability of a FM target cooled by natural convection using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX. The present study is carried out using CFD code to investigate cooling capability of a FM target cooled by natural convection. The steady state simulation as well as transient simulation is performed in the present work. Based on the transient simulation (T1), the minimum decay time that the maximum fuel temperature does not reach the design limit temperature (TONB-3 .deg. C) is around 15.60 seconds.

  12. Convection Cells in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, Katherine; Mellado, Juan-Pedro

    2017-04-01

    In dry, shear-free convective boundary layers (CBLs), the turbulent flow of air is known to organise itself on large scales into coherent, cellular patterns, or superstructures, consisting of fast, narrow updraughts and slow, wide downdraughts which together form circulations. Superstructures act as transport mechanisms from the surface to the top of the boundary layer and vice-versa, as opposed to small-scale turbulence, which only modifies conditions locally. This suggests that a thorough investigation into superstructure properties may help us better understand transport across the atmospheric boundary layer as a whole. Whilst their existence has been noted, detailed studies into superstructures in the CBL have been scarce. By applying methods which are known to successfully isolate similar large-scale patterns in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we can assess the efficacy of those detection techniques in the CBL. In addition, through non-dimensional analysis, we can systematically compare superstructures in various convective regimes. We use direct numerical simulation of four different cases for intercomparison: Rayleigh-Bénard convection (steady), Rayleigh-Bénard convection with an adiabatic top lid (quasi-steady), a stably-stratified CBL (quasi-steady) and a neutrally-stratified CBL (unsteady). The first two are non-penetrative and the latter two penetrative. We find that although superstructures clearly emerge from the time-mean flow in the non-penetrative cases, they become obscured by temporal averaging in the CBL. This is because a rigid lid acts to direct the flow into counter-rotating circulation cells whose axis of rotation remains stationary, whereas a boundary layer that grows in time and is able to entrain fluid from above causes the circulations to not only grow in vertical extent, but also to move horizontally and merge with neighbouring circulations. Spatial filtering is a useful comparative technique as it can be performed on boundary

  13. Forced convection boiling of sodium. Study carried out in the framework of fast neutrons reactors safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlety, Paul

    1971-01-01

    Within the framework of the safety of fast neutron reactors, this research thesis reports the study of sodium boiling in order to assess safety margins, and to predict the consequences of some accidents. The author thus addresses issues related to sodium boiling by notably focussing on boiling physics. He first defines these issues and presents the adopted approach for this research, and then describes the experimental installation. He reports the experimental study which comprised different types of tests, and presents experimental results. He reports the development of a calculation model which could report phenomena which have been experimentally noticed [fr

  14. Transport phenomena II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Transport Phenomena II covers forced convention, temperature distribution, free convection, diffusitivity and the mechanism of mass transfer, convective mass transfer, concentration

  15. Transitions in rapidly rotating convection dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilgner, A.

    2013-12-01

    It is commonly assumed that buoyancy in the fluid core powers the geodynamo. We study here the minimal model of a convection driven dynamo, which is a horizontal plane layer in a gravity field, filled with electrically conducting fluid, heated from below and cooled from above, and rotating about a vertical axis. Such a plane layer may be viewed as a local approximation to the geophysically more relevant spherical geometry. The numerical simulations have been run on graphics processing units with at least 960 cores. If the convection is driven stronger and stronger at fixed rotation rate, the flow behaves at some point as if it was not rotating. This transition shows in the scaling of the heat transport which can be used to distinguish slow from rapid rotation. One expects dynamos to behave differently in these two flow regimes. But even within the convection flows which are rapidly rotating according to this criterion, it will be shown that different types of dynamos exist. In one state, the magnetic field strength obeys a scaling indicative of a magnetostrophic balance, in which the Lorentz force is in equilibrium with the Coriolis force. The flow in this case is helical. A different state exists at higher magnetic Reynolds numbers, in which the magnetic energy obeys a different scaling law and the helicity of the flow is much reduced. As one increases the Rayleigh number, all other parameters kept constant, one may find both types of dynamos separated by an interval of Rayleigh numbers in which there are no dynamos at all. The effect of these transitions on energy dissipation and mean field generation have also been studied.

  16. Natural convection in a porous medium: External flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, P.

    1985-01-01

    Early theoretical work on heat transfer in porous media focussed its attention on the onset of natural convection and cellular convection in rectangular enclosures with heating from below. Recently, increased attention has been directed to the study of natural convection in a porous medium external to heated surfaces and bodies. Boundary layer approximations were introduced, and similarly solutions have been obtained for steady natural convection boundary layers adjacent to a heated flat plate, a horizontal cylinder and a sphere as well as other two-dimensional and axisymmetric bodies of arbitrary shape. Higher order boundary layer theories have been carried out to assess the accuracy of the boundary layer approximation. The effects of entrainments at the edge of the boundary layer, the inclination angle of the heated inclined plate, and the upstream geometry on the heat transfer characteristics have been investigated based on the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The conditions for the onset of vortex instability in porous layers heated from below were determined based on linear stability analyses. The effects of no-slip boundary conditions, non-Darcy and thermal dispersion, which were neglected in all of the previous theoretical investigations, have recently been re-examined. Experimental investigations on natural convection about a vertical and inclined heated plate, a horizontal cylinder, as well as plume rise from a horizontal line source of heat have been conducted. All of this work is reviewed in this paper

  17. Placarding of road vehicles carrying radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of this Code is to give guidance on the placarding requirements for vehicles carrying radioactive materials by road in Great Britain and on the continent of Europe. Additional placards may be required regarding dangerous properties other than radioactivity. The labelling of packages for transport is dealt with in AECP 1030. This Code deals with two aspects of road vehicle placarding:-(a) placarding on the outside of road vehicles in Great Britain and on the continent of Europe, (b) a fireproof placard fixed in the driver's cab. Responsibility for placarding the vehicle rests with the carrier, but in practice the consignor may need to provide the placards. (U.K.)

  18. Analysis Of Convective Plane Stagnation Point Chemically Reactive Mhd Flow Past A Vertical Porous Plate With A Convective Boundary Condition In The Presence Of A Uniform Magnetic Field.

    OpenAIRE

    Adeniyan, A.,

    2013-01-01

    The numerical investigation of a stagnation point boundary layer flow , mass and heat transfer of a steady two dimensional , incompressible , viscous electrically conducting, chemically reacting laminar fluid over a vertical convectively heated , electrically neutral flat plate exposed to a transverse uniform magnetic field has been carried out to examine the influence of the simultaneous presence of the effects of a convective boundary condition, chemical reaction, heat transfer and suctio...

  19. Mantle Convection on Modern Supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weismüller, J.; Gmeiner, B.; Huber, M.; John, L.; Mohr, M.; Rüde, U.; Wohlmuth, B.; Bunge, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle convection is the cause for plate tectonics, the formation of mountains and oceans, and the main driving mechanism behind earthquakes. The convection process is modeled by a system of partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Characteristic to mantle flow is the vast disparity of length scales from global to microscopic, turning mantle convection simulations into a challenging application for high-performance computing. As system size and technical complexity of the simulations continue to increase, design and implementation of simulation models for next generation large-scale architectures is handled successfully only in an interdisciplinary context. A new priority program - named SPPEXA - by the German Research Foundation (DFG) addresses this issue, and brings together computer scientists, mathematicians and application scientists around grand challenges in HPC. Here we report from the TERRA-NEO project, which is part of the high visibility SPPEXA program, and a joint effort of four research groups. TERRA-NEO develops algorithms for future HPC infrastructures, focusing on high computational efficiency and resilience in next generation mantle convection models. We present software that can resolve the Earth's mantle with up to 1012 grid points and scales efficiently to massively parallel hardware with more than 50,000 processors. We use our simulations to explore the dynamic regime of mantle convection and assess the impact of small scale processes on global mantle flow.

  20. Benard convection in liquid sodium layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kek, V.

    1989-08-01

    In a sodium layer heated from below and cooled from above, the integral Nusselt numbers are determined in a range of Rayleigh numbers 1.5x10 3 5 . The experiments are performed in containers with dimensions of 500 mm in diameter and 15 mm and 45 mm in height. The relevant quantities are evaluated from measured temperature and heating power data. The experiments show that the heat transfer across the layer is determined mainly by heat conduction up to Rayleigh number Ra ≅ 10 4 . Beyond this value a significant increase of the convective heat transport is observed. At a Rayleigh number of 4x10 4 the Nusselt number achieves the value Nu = 1.7. This result differs from values given by Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations reported in the literature for liquids with higher Prandtl number. A regression analysis of the experimental data results empirical correlations for the Nusselt number. A time series analysis of the time dependent temperature signals shows that the measured temperature fluctuations exhibit predominantly stochastic features. However, in the lower range of Rayleigh numbers 1.5x10 3 4 certain regular frequencies can be identified from peaks in broadband power density spectra. These frequencies correspond to fluctuations of a period of 80 to 200 seconds. These regular frequencies are explained by instabilities of the cellular pattern in the convection layer reported in the literature. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Deferred correction approach on generic transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, I.A.; Ali, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a two dimensional Steady Convection-Diffusion was solved, using Deferred correction approach, and results were compared with standard spatial discretization schemes. Numerical investigations were carried out based on the velocity and flow direction, for various diffusivity coefficients covering a range from diffusive to convective flows. The results show that the Deferred Ted Correction Approach gives more accurate and stable results in relation to UDS and CDs discretization of convective terms. Deferred Correction Approach caters for the wiggles for convective flows in case of central difference discretization of the equation and also caters for the dissipative error generated by the first order upwind discretization of convective fluxes. (author)

  2. Convective behaviour in severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    The nature and magnitude of the hazard from radioactivity posed by a possible nuclear accident depend strongly on convective behaviour within and immediately adjacent to the plant in question. This behaviour depends upon the nature of the vapour-gas-aerosol mixture concerned, and can show unusual properties such as 'upside-down' convection in which hot mixtures fall and cold mixtures rise. Predictions and criteria as to the types of behaviour which could possibly occur are summarised. Possible applications to present reactors are considered, and ways in which presently expected convection could be drastically modified are described. In some circumstances these could be used to suppress the radioactive source term or to switch its effect between distant dilute contamination and severe local contamination. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  3. A two-column formalism for time-dependent modelling of stellar convection. I. Description of the method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stökl, A.

    2008-11-01

    Context: In spite of all the advances in multi-dimensional hydrodynamics, investigations of stellar evolution and stellar pulsations still depend on one-dimensional computations. This paper devises an alternative to the mixing-length theory or turbulence models usually adopted in modelling convective transport in such studies. Aims: The present work attempts to develop a time-dependent description of convection, which reflects the essential physics of convection and that is only moderately dependent on numerical parameters and far less time consuming than existing multi-dimensional hydrodynamics computations. Methods: Assuming that the most extensive convective patterns generate the majority of convective transport, the convective velocity field is described using two parallel, radial columns to represent up- and downstream flows. Horizontal exchange, in the form of fluid flow and radiation, over their connecting interface couples the two columns and allows a simple circulating motion. The main parameters of this convective description have straightforward geometrical meanings, namely the diameter of the columns (corresponding to the size of the convective cells) and the ratio of the cross-section between up- and downdrafts. For this geometrical setup, the time-dependent solution of the equations of radiation hydrodynamics is computed from an implicit scheme that has the advantage of being unaffected by the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy time-step limit. This implementation is part of the TAPIR-Code (short for The adaptive, implicit RHD-Code). Results: To demonstrate the approach, results for convection zones in Cepheids are presented. The convective energy transport and convective velocities agree with expectations for Cepheids and the scheme reproduces both the kinetic energy flux and convective overshoot. A study of the parameter influence shows that the type of solution derived for these stars is in fact fairly robust with respect to the constitutive numerical

  4. Topology Optimization for Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    2011-01-01

    This report deals with the topology optimization of convection problems.That is, the aim of the project is to develop, implement and examine topology optimization of purely thermal and coupled thermomechanical problems,when the design-dependent eects of convection are taken into consideration.......This is done by the use of a self-programmed FORTRAN-code, which builds on an existing 2D-plane thermomechanical nite element code implementing during the course `41525 FEM-Heavy'. The topology optimizationfeatures have been implemented from scratch, and allows the program to optimize elastostatic mechanical...

  5. Experimental methods in natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, J.N.

    1982-11-01

    Some common experimental techniques to determine local velocities and to visualize temperature fields in natural convection research are discussed. First the physics and practice of anemometers are discussed with emphasis put on optical anemometers. In the second and third case the physics and practice of the most developed interferometers are discussed; namely differential interferometry for visualization of temperature gradient fields and holographic interferometry for visualization of temperature fields. At the Institut fuer Reaktorbauelemente these three measuring techniques are applied for convection and pipe flow studies. (orig.) [de

  6. A stochastic parameterization for deep convection using cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, L.; Steinheimer, M.; Bechtold, P.; Geleyn, J.

    2012-12-01

    Cumulus parameterizations used in most operational weather and climate models today are based on the mass-flux concept which took form in the early 1970's. In such schemes it is assumed that a unique relationship exists between the ensemble-average of the sub-grid convection, and the instantaneous state of the atmosphere in a vertical grid box column. However, such a relationship is unlikely to be described by a simple deterministic function (Palmer, 2011). Thus, because of the statistical nature of the parameterization challenge, it has been recognized by the community that it is important to introduce stochastic elements to the parameterizations (for instance: Plant and Craig, 2008, Khouider et al. 2010, Frenkel et al. 2011, Bentsson et al. 2011, but the list is far from exhaustive). There are undoubtedly many ways in which stochastisity can enter new developments. In this study we use a two-way interacting cellular automata (CA), as its intrinsic nature possesses many qualities interesting for deep convection parameterization. In the one-dimensional entraining plume approach, there is no parameterization of horizontal transport of heat, moisture or momentum due to cumulus convection. In reality, mass transport due to gravity waves that propagate in the horizontal can trigger new convection, important for the organization of deep convection (Huang, 1988). The self-organizational characteristics of the CA allows for lateral communication between adjacent NWP model grid-boxes, and temporal memory. Thus the CA scheme used in this study contain three interesting components for representation of cumulus convection, which are not present in the traditional one-dimensional bulk entraining plume method: horizontal communication, memory and stochastisity. The scheme is implemented in the high resolution regional NWP model ALARO, and simulations show enhanced organization of convective activity along squall-lines. Probabilistic evaluation demonstrate an enhanced spread in

  7. Edge plasma density convection during ICRH on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, M.; Colas, L.; Gunn, J.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, A.; Pecoul, S.; Heuraux, S.

    2001-11-01

    The 2D edge plasma density distribution around ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennae is studied experimentally and numerically in the tokamak Tore Supra (TS). A local density decrease in front of the loaded ICRH antenna ('pump-out' effect) is demonstrated by Langmuir probe measurements in a low recycling regime. An up-down asymmetry in the heat-flux and in the antenna erosion is also observed, and is associated with poloidal variations of the local density. These density redistributions are ascribed to an ExB convection process linked with RF-sheaths. To assess this interpretation, the 2D transport code CELLS was developed for modeling the density distribution near an antenna. The code takes into account perpendicular diffusion, parallel transport and convection in RF-sheath-driven potentials given by the 3D-antenna code ICANT. The strong density differences obtained in simulations reproduce up-down asymmetries of the heat fluxes. (authors)

  8. Transient Convection, Diffusion, and Adsorption in Surface-Based Biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rasmus; Bruus, Henrik; Callisen, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and computational investigation of convection, diffusion, and adsorption in surface-based biosensors. In particular, we study the transport dynamics in a model geometry of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. The work, however, is equally relevant for other...... microfluidic surface-based biosensors, operating under flow conditions. A widely adopted approximate quasi-steady theory to capture convective and diffusive mass transport is reviewed, and an analytical solution is presented. An expression of the Damköhler number is derived in terms of the nondimensional...... concentration to the maximum surface capacity is critical for reliable use of the quasi-steady theory. Finally, our results provide users of surface-based biosensors with a tool for correcting experimentally obtained adsorption rate constants....

  9. Edge plasma density convection during ICRH on Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becoulet, M.; Colas, L.; Gunn, J.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, A. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Pecoul, S.; Heuraux, S. [Nancy-1 Univ., 54 (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    2001-11-01

    The 2D edge plasma density distribution around ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennae is studied experimentally and numerically in the tokamak Tore Supra (TS). A local density decrease in front of the loaded ICRH antenna ('pump-out' effect) is demonstrated by Langmuir probe measurements in a low recycling regime. An up-down asymmetry in the heat-flux and in the antenna erosion is also observed, and is associated with poloidal variations of the local density. These density redistributions are ascribed to an ExB convection process linked with RF-sheaths. To assess this interpretation, the 2D transport code CELLS was developed for modeling the density distribution near an antenna. The code takes into account perpendicular diffusion, parallel transport and convection in RF-sheath-driven potentials given by the 3D-antenna code ICANT. The strong density differences obtained in simulations reproduce up-down asymmetries of the heat fluxes. (authors)

  10. Hydrothermal convection and uranium deposits in abnormally radioactive plutons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Hydrothermal uranium deposits are often closely associated with granites of abnormally high uranium content. We have studied the question whether the heat generated within such granites can cause fluid convection of sufficient magnitude to develop hydrothermal uranium deposits. Numerical models of flow through porous media were used to calculate temperatures and fluid flow in and around plutons similar to the Conway Granite, New Hampshire, i.e. with a halfwidth of 17 km, a thickness of 6.25 km, and with a uniform internal heat generation rate of 20 x 10 -13 cal/cm 3 -sec. Fluid convection was computed for plutons with permeabilities between 0.01 and 5 millidarcies (1 x10 -13 cm 2 to 5 x 10 -11 cm 2 . Flow rates and the size and location of convection cells in and around radioactive plutons like the Conway Granite were found to depend critically on the permeability distribution within the pluton and in adjacent country rocks. The depth of burial, the distribution of heat sources within the pluton, and small rates of heat generation in the country rock are only of minor importance. Topographic relief is unlikely to effect flow rates significantly, but can have a major influence on the distribution of recharge and discharge areas. Within a few million years, the mass of water transported by steady state convection through such radioactive plutons can equal the mass of water which can convect through them during initial cooling from magmatic temperatures. If the permeability in a Conway-type pluton is on the order of 0.5 millidarcies, the rate of fluid convection is probably sufficient to develop a hydrothermal ore deposit containing 10,000 tons of uranium in a period of two million years. Such a uranium deposit is most likely to develop in an area of strong upwelling or strong downwelling flow

  11. How honey bees carry pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matherne, Marguerite E.; Anyanwu, Gabriel; Leavey, Jennifer K.; Hu, David L.

    2017-11-01

    Honey bees are the tanker of the skies, carrying thirty percent of their weight in pollen per foraging trip using specialized orifices on their body. How do they manage to hang onto those pesky pollen grains? In this experimental study, we investigate the adhesion force of pollen to the honeybee. To affix pollen to themselves, honey bees form a suspension of pollen in nectar, creating a putty-like pollen basket that is skewered by leg hairs. We use tensile tests to show that the viscous force of the pollen basket is more than ten times the honeybee's flight force. This work may provide inspiration for the design of robotic flying pollinators.

  12. Plasma convection in the magnetotail lobes: statistical results from Cluster EDI measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Haaland

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A major part of the plasma in the Earth's magnetotail is populated through transport of plasma from the solar wind via the magnetotail lobes. In this paper, we present a statistical study of plasma convection in the lobes for different directions of the interplanetary magnetic field and for different geomagnetic disturbance levels. The data set used in this study consists of roughly 340 000 one-minute vector measurements of the plasma convection from the Cluster Electron Drift Instrument (EDI obtained during the period February 2001 to June 2007. The results show that both convection magnitude and direction are largely controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. For a southward IMF, there is a strong convection towards the central plasma sheet with convection velocities around 10 km s−1. During periods of northward IMF, the lobe convection is almost stagnant. A By dominated IMF causes a rotation of the convection patterns in the tail with an oppositely directed dawn-dusk component of the convection for the northern and southern lobe. Our results also show that there is an overall persistent duskward component, which is most likely a result of conductivity gradients in the footpoints of the magnetic field lines in the ionosphere.

  13. Statistics of Deep Convection in the Congo Basin Derived From High-Resolution Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, B.; Stier, P.; Kipling, Z.; Gryspeerdt, E.; Taylor, S.

    2016-12-01

    Convection transports moisture, momentum, heat and aerosols through the troposphere, and so the temporal variability of convection is a major driver of global weather and climate. The Congo basin is home to some of the most intense convective activity on the planet and is under strong seasonal influence of biomass burning aerosol. However, deep convection in the Congo basin remains under studied compared to other regions of tropical storm systems, especially when compared to the neighbouring, relatively well-understood West African climate system. We use the WRF model to perform a high-resolution, cloud-system resolving simulation to investigate convective storm systems in the Congo. Our setup pushes the boundaries of current computational resources, using a 1 km grid length over a domain covering millions of square kilometres and for a time period of one month. This allows us to draw statistical conclusions on the nature of the simulated storm systems. Comparing data from satellite observations and the model enables us to quantify the diurnal variability of deep convection in the Congo basin. This approach allows us to evaluate our simulations despite the lack of in-situ observational data. This provides a more comprehensive analysis of the diurnal cycle than has previously been shown. Further, we show that high-resolution convection-permitting simulations performed over near-seasonal timescales can be used in conjunction with satellite observations as an effective tool to evaluate new convection parameterisations.

  14. Ten Year Analysis of Tropopause-Overshooting Convection Using GridRad Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, John W.; Bowman, Kenneth P.; Homeyer, Cameron R.; Fenske, Tyler M.

    2018-01-01

    Convection that penetrates the tropopause (overshooting convection) rapidly transports air from the lower troposphere to the lower stratosphere, potentially mixing air between the two layers. This exchange of air can have a substantial impact on the composition, radiation, and chemistry of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). In order to improve our understanding of the role convection plays in the transport of trace gases across the tropopause, this study presents a 10 year analysis of overshooting convection for the eastern two thirds of the contiguous United States for March through August of 2004 to 2013 based on radar observations. Echo top altitudes are estimated at hourly intervals using high-resolution, three-dimensional, gridded, radar reflectivity fields created by merging observations from available radars in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) network. Overshooting convection is identified by comparing echo top altitudes with tropopause altitudes derived from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. It is found that overshooting convection is most common in the central United States, with a weak secondary maximum along the southeast coast. The maximum number of overshooting events occur consistently between 2200 and 0200 UTC. Most overshooting events occur in May, June, and July when convection is deepest and the tropopause altitude is relatively low. Approximately 45% of the analyzed overshooting events (those with echo tops at least 1 km above the tropopause) have echo tops extending above the 380 K level into the stratospheric overworld.

  15. Segregation and convection in dendritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, D. R.

    1990-01-01

    Microsegregation in dentritic alloys is discussed, including solidification with and without thermal gradient, the convection of interdendritic liquid. The conservation of momentum, energy, and solute is considered. Directional solidification and thermosolutal convection are discussed.

  16. Experimental study on convective heat transfer with thin porous bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Yoshihisa; Kinoshita, Izumi; Furuya, Masahiro

    2001-01-01

    Experimental studies are made on the convective heat transfer of three types of thin porous bodies. Heat transfer performances, flow patterns and temperature profiles near the porous bodies are compared with each other. The heat transfer performance of porous bodies with the largest pore diameter is large. It became clear that the high heat transfer performance depends on an excellent heat transportation ability inside the pore and near the surface of the porous bodies. (author)

  17. Gregarious Convection and Radiative Feedbacks in Idealized Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-29

    water,’’ PW, a very strong predictor of deep moist convection [Bretherton et al., 2004; Neelin et al., 2009]. These papers freely interchange VIMSE and...exist neither on the globe nor within the cloud model. Since mesoscales impose great computational costs on atmosphere models, as well as inconven...continuity. Bottom-heavy or ‘‘ shallow ’’ circulations are especially effective at transporting moisture (since it is concen- trated at low altitudes

  18. Tropical teleconnections via the ocean and atmosphere induced by Southern Ocean deep convective events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, I.; Cabre, A.; Gunn, A.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2016-12-01

    The current generation (CMIP5) of Earth System Models (ESMs) shows a huge variability in their ability to represent Southern Ocean (SO) deep-ocean convection and Antarctic Bottom Water, with a preference for open-sea convection in the Weddell and Ross gyres. A long control simulation in a coarse 3o resolution ESM (the GFDL CM2Mc model) shows a highly regular multi-decadal oscillation between periods of SO open sea convection and non-convective periods. This process also happens naturally, with different frequencies and durations of convection across most CMIP5 models under preindustrial forcing (deLavergne et al, 2014). Here we assess the impact of SO deep convection and resulting sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies on the tropical atmosphere and ocean via teleconnections, with a focus on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We combine analysis of our low-resolution coupled model with inter-model analysis across historical CMIP5 simulations. SST cooling south of 60S during non-convective decades triggers a stronger, northward shifted SH Hadley cell, which results in intensified northward cross-equatorial moist heat transport and a poleward shift in the ITCZ. Resulting correlations between the cross-equatorial atmospheric heat transport and ITCZ location are in good agreement with recent theories (e.g. Frierson et al. 2013; Donohoe et al. 2014). Lagged correlations between a SO convective index and cross-equatorial heat transports (in the atmosphere and ocean), as well as various tropical (and ENSO) climate indices are analyzed. In the ocean realm, we find that non-convective decades result in weaker AABW formation and weaker ACC but stronger Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) formation, likely as a result of stronger SO westerlies (more positive SAM). The signals of AABW and AAIW are seen in the tropics on short timescales of years to decades in the temperature, heat storage and heat transport anomalies and also in deep and intermediate ocean oxygen. Most

  19. Thermal turbulent convection: thermal plumes and fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, M.

    2007-10-01

    In this study we investigate the phenomenon of thermal turbulent convection in new and unprecedented ways. The first system we studied experimentally is an infinite vertical channel, where a constant vertical mean gradient of temperature exists. Inside this channel the average mass flux is null. The results obtained from our measurements reveal that the flow is mainly inertial; indeed the dissipative coefficients (here the viscosity) play a role only to define a coherence length L. This length is the distance over which the thermal plumes can be considered as 'free falling' objects. The horizontal transport, of heat and momentum, is entirely due to fluctuations. The associated 'mixing length' is small compared to the channel width. In the other hand, the vertical heat transport is due to coherent structures: the heat plumes. Those objects were also investigated in a Lagrangian study of the flow in the bulk of a Rayleigh-Benard cell. The probe, which has the same density as the fluid used in this experiment, is a sphere of 2 cm in diameter with embarked thermometers and radio-emitter. The heat plumes transport it, which allows a statistical study of such objects. (author)

  20. Boiling Suppression in Convective Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aounallah, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The development of convective boiling heat transfer correlations and analytical models has almost exclusively been based on measurements of the total heat flux, and therefore on the overall two-phase heat transfer coefficient, when the well-known heat transfer correlations have often assumed additive mechanisms, one for each mode of heat transfer, convection and boiling. While the global performance of such correlations can readily be assessed, the predictive capability of the individual components of the correlation has usually remained elusive. This becomes important when, for example, developing mechanistic models for subcooled void formation based on the partitioning of the wall heat flux into a boiling and a convective component, or when extending a correlation beyond its original range of applications where the preponderance of the heat transfer mechanisms involved can be significantly different. A new examination of existing experimental heat transfer data obtained under fixed hydrodynamic conditions, whereby the local flow conditions are decoupled from the local heat flux, has allowed the unequivocal isolation of the boiling contribution over a broad range of thermodynamic qualities (0 to 0.8) for water at 7 MPa. Boiling suppression, as the quality increases, has consequently been quantified, thus providing valuable new insights on the functionality and contribution of boiling in convective flows. (author)

  1. A containment convective loop analysis using the RELAP5-Mod 3.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, M.

    1996-01-01

    The present study was performed to verify the RELAP5-Mod 3.2 code capability to calculate convection phenomena of the type occurring in a convective loop. A simplified geometrical model of a reactor containment system was used. The parametric studies were made for the main variables which govern material transport in the volume junctions considered. The results obtained and that got using the same model with the CONTAIN code, were compared. The comparison is satisfactory. (author). 3 refs., 11 figs

  2. VHF/UHF radar observations of tropical mesoscale convective systems over southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kishore Kumar

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Several campaigns have been carried out to study the convective systems over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, a tropical station in India, using VHF and UHF radars. The height-time sections of several convective systems are investigated in detail to study reflectivity, turbulence and vertical velocity structure. Structure and dynamics of the convective systems are the main objectives of these campaigns. The observed systems are classified into single- and multi-cell systems. It has been observed that most of the convective systems at this latitude are multi-cellular in nature. Simultaneous VHF and UHF radar observations are used to classify the observed precipitating systems as convective, intermediary and stratiform regions. Composite height profiles of vertical velocities in these regions were obtained and the same were compared with the profiles obtained at other geographical locations. These composite profiles of vertical velocity in the convective regions have shown their peaks in the mid troposphere, indicating that the maximum latent heat is being released at those heights. These profiles are very important for numerical simulations of the convective systems, which vary significantly from one geographical location to the other.

    Keywords. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (Mesoscale meteorology; Convective processes – Radio science (Remote sensing

  3. VHF/UHF radar observations of tropical mesoscale convective systems over southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kishore Kumar

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Several campaigns have been carried out to study the convective systems over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, a tropical station in India, using VHF and UHF radars. The height-time sections of several convective systems are investigated in detail to study reflectivity, turbulence and vertical velocity structure. Structure and dynamics of the convective systems are the main objectives of these campaigns. The observed systems are classified into single- and multi-cell systems. It has been observed that most of the convective systems at this latitude are multi-cellular in nature. Simultaneous VHF and UHF radar observations are used to classify the observed precipitating systems as convective, intermediary and stratiform regions. Composite height profiles of vertical velocities in these regions were obtained and the same were compared with the profiles obtained at other geographical locations. These composite profiles of vertical velocity in the convective regions have shown their peaks in the mid troposphere, indicating that the maximum latent heat is being released at those heights. These profiles are very important for numerical simulations of the convective systems, which vary significantly from one geographical location to the other. Keywords. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (Mesoscale meteorology; Convective processes – Radio science (Remote sensing

  4. Charge effects on hindrance factors for diffusion and convection of solute in pores I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O-tani, Hideyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kansai University, Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Akinaga, Takeshi; Sugihara-Seki, Masako, E-mail: ga8d002@kansai-u.ac.jp [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Kansai University, Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    The transport of a spherical solute through a long circular cylindrical pore filled with an electrolyte solution is studied numerically, in the presence of constant surface charge on the solute and the pore wall. Fluid dynamic analyses were carried out to calculate the flow field around the solute in the pore to evaluate the drag coefficients exerted on the solute. Electrical potentials around the solute in the electrolyte solution were computed based on a mean-field theory to provide the interaction energy between the charged solute and the pore wall. Combining the results of the fluid dynamic and electrostatic analyses, we estimated the rate of the diffusive and convective transport of the solute across the pore. Although the present estimates of the drag coefficients on the solute suggest more than 10% difference from existing studies, depending on the radius ratio of the solute relative to the pore and the radial position of the solute center in the pore, this difference leads to a minor effect on the hindrance factors. It was found that even at rather large ion concentrations, the repulsive electrostatic interaction between the charged solute and the pore wall of like charge could significantly reduce the transport rate of the solute.

  5. Drift wave vortices and anomalous transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.

    1990-01-01

    Many plasma equations for drift waves and other modes possess vortex solutions, so it is important to consider the transport associated with vortex structures and their mutual interactions. Vortex structures occur when the amplitude of the fluctuation is sufficient to trap and circulate plasma around the vortex in one wave period. The vortex contribution of the diffusion of the passively convected scalar field was calculated. It was found that the field can be represented by the superposition of vortices and wave fluctuation components. For transport the computer solutions for the vortex-vortex collisions with various impact parameters while carrying along the passively convected scalar thermodynamic field were used. As the result, the inelastic collisions with b≅r 0 ≅1/k x cross-section σ(b)≅b exp(-b/r 0 )≅r 0 give the strongest transport. An example is shown in figure. As the final result, the anomalous diffusion D was derived in dimensional form. (M.T.)

  6. Land surface sensitivity of mesoscale convective systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournay, Robert C.

    the high plains in the east of regions. Examining the covariance of SM and vegetation at CI points revealed that July and August showed expected covariance relationships with concurrently measured convective variables (i.e., high SM/vegetation associated with high CAPE and vice versa for low SM/vegetation) while May and June higher CAPE and CIN over low vegetation anomalies. A climatology of elevated mixed layers in the central GP was conducted, revealing that the greatest number of EMLS occurred in the northern GP. Back trajectories (BT) were conducted from the radiosonde point of detection for 18 and 36 hours, revealing that the BT point mean for days with severe weather were further west and south from the origin point. The SM and vegetation was sampled at the BT point, revealing a negative, significant correlation with EML depth when pooling the northern stations in 18-hr BTs, and a significant, negative correlation with EVI when pooling the southern sites. A modeling case study was conducted in which an idealized SM anomaly was imposed over the EML origin region. Experiments were also conducted to test the sensitivity of ML formation and EML transport using different PBL parameterizations. While the YSU PBL parameterization produced the deeper PBL over anonymously dry soils in the EML origin region, the EML was not transported to the east as it was in those experiments using the MYNN parameterization, impacting the timing and extent of precipitation in the model runs.

  7. Lateral convection and diffusion of sediment in straight rivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bo; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    and a higher level of turbulence at the channel centre, than in the near bank zones, which means that the ability to support suspended sediment will decrease from the channel centre. The two turbulence models give different estimates for the lateral transport, which mainly are caused by turbulence generated......The lateral transport of suspended sediment in a straight river cross section with a parabolic shaped bed is studied be use of a k-e and a full Reynolds stress turbulence model. Due to depth variations a lateral transport of suspended sediment is generated. This is mainly caused by the slopping bed...... secondary flow cells in the Reynolds stress model. The flow cells make zones with alternately high and low sediment concentration, and thereby much higher local gradients in the lateral direction. Both models found a net inward lateral transport. The transport by convection was found more dominant than...

  8. Study on natural convection characteristics in a narrow annular gap, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naohara, Nobuyuki; Uotani, Masaki; Kinoshita, Izumi; Arazeki, Hideo

    1987-01-01

    To clarify the characteristics of natural convection in a narrow annular gap at the roof-slab penetration in pool-type LMFBR, experimental study was carried out. Experiment is to investigate the effect of annular gap width. The results are summarized as follows. (1) A chart showing the presence of natural convection was drawn, and it was showed that the natural convection in an annular gap was influenced by gap width. (2) Dimensionless circumferential temperature in annular wall could be rearranged by new parameter taking account of the annular gap width and a characteristics curve was obtained. (author)

  9. Forced-convection boiling tests performed in parallel simulated LMR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, S.D.; Carbajo, J.J.; Levin, A.E.; Lloyd, D.B.; Montgomery, B.H.; Wantland, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Forced-convection tests have been carried out using parallel simulated Liquid Metal Reactor fuel assemblies in an engineering-scale sodium loop, the Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety facility. The tests, performed under single- and two-phase conditions, have shown that for low forced-convection flow there is significant flow augmentation by thermal convection, an important phenomenon under degraded shutdown heat removal conditions in an LMR. The power and flows required for boiling and dryout to occur are much higher than decay heat levels. The experimental evidence supports analytical results that heat removal from an LMR is possible with a degraded shutdown heat removal system

  10. Effects of external environment on thermocapillary convection of high prandtl number fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ruquan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations have been carried out to investigate the influence of external environment on thermocapillary convection in high Prandtl number (Pr=68 liquid. The geometric model of physical problem is that the the liquid bridge surrounded by ambient air under zero or ground gravity. The interface velocity, temperature, heat flux and flow pattern in the liquid bridge are presented and discussed under different conditions by changing the external environment. The buoyancy convection produces a symmetrical vortex in the liquid bridge. The ambient air affects the distributions of the temperature velocity and heat flux on the interface by changing the thermocapillary convection.

  11. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-01

    , combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.

  12. Turbulence modeling of natural convection in enclosures: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong O

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a review of recent developments of turbulence models for natural convection in enclosures is presented. The emphasis is placed on the effect of the treatments of Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux on the stability and accuracy of the solution for natural convection in enclosures. The turbulence models considered in the preset study are the two-layer k -ε model, the shear stress transport (SST) model, the elliptic-relaxation (V2-f) model and the elliptic-blending second-moment closure (EBM). Three different treatments of the turbulent heat flux are the generalized gradient diffusion hypothesis (GGDH), the algebraic flux model (AFM) and the differential flux model (DFM). The mathematical formulation of the above turbulence models and their solution method are presented. Evaluation of turbulence models are performed for turbulent natural convection in a 1:5 rectangular cavity ( Ra = 4.3x10 10 ) and in a square cavity with conducting top and bottom walls ( Ra =1.58x10 9 ) and the Rayleigh-Benard convection ( Ra = 2x10 6 ∼ Ra =10 9 ). The relative performances of turbulence models are examined and their successes and shortcomings are addressed

  13. Rotating thermal convection at very large Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stephan; van Gils, Dennis; Ahlers, Guenter; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2016-11-01

    The large scale thermal convection systems in geo- and astrophysics are usually influenced by Coriolis forces caused by the rotation of their celestial bodies. To better understand the influence of rotation on the convective flow field and the heat transport at these conditions, we study Rayleigh-Bénard convection, using pressurized sulfur hexaflouride (SF6) at up to 19 bars in a cylinder of diameter D=1.12 m and a height of L=2.24 m. The gas is heated from below and cooled from above and the convection cell sits on a rotating table inside a large pressure vessel (the "Uboot of Göttingen"). With this setup Rayleigh numbers of up to Ra =1015 can be reached, while Ekman numbers as low as Ek =10-8 are possible. The Prandtl number in these experiment is kept constant at Pr = 0 . 8 . We report on heat flux measurements (expressed by the Nusselt number Nu) as well as measurements from more than 150 temperature probes inside the flow. We thank the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for financial support through SFB963: "Astrophysical Flow Instabilities and Turbulence". The work of GA was supported in part by the US National Science Foundation through Grant DMR11-58514.

  14. Mining key elements for severe convection prediction based on CNN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Pan, Ning; Zhang, Changan; Sha, Hongzhou; Zhang, Bolei; Liu, Liang; Zhang, Meng

    2017-04-01

    Severe convective weather is a kind of weather disasters accompanied by heavy rainfall, gust wind, hail, etc. Along with recent developments on remote sensing and numerical modeling, there are high-volume and long-term observational and modeling data accumulated to capture massive severe convective events over particular areas and time periods. With those high-volume and high-variety weather data, most of the existing studies and methods carry out the dynamical laws, cause analysis, potential rule study, and prediction enhancement by utilizing the governing equations from fluid dynamics and thermodynamics. In this study, a key-element mining method is proposed for severe convection prediction based on convolution neural network (CNN). It aims to identify the key areas and key elements from huge amounts of historical weather data including conventional measurements, weather radar, satellite, so as numerical modeling and/or reanalysis data. Under this manner, the machine-learning based method could help the human forecasters on their decision-making on operational weather forecasts on severe convective weathers by extracting key information from the real-time and historical weather big data. In this paper, it first utilizes computer vision technology to complete the data preprocessing work of the meteorological variables. Then, it utilizes the information such as radar map and expert knowledge to annotate all images automatically. And finally, by using CNN model, it cloud analyze and evaluate each weather elements (e.g., particular variables, patterns, features, etc.), and identify key areas of those critical weather elements, then help forecasters quickly screen out the key elements from huge amounts of observation data by current weather conditions. Based on the rich weather measurement and model data (up to 10 years) over Fujian province in China, where the severe convective weathers are very active during the summer months, experimental tests are conducted with

  15. A Numerical Study of Nonlinear Nonhydrostatic Conditional Symmetric Instability in a Convectively Unstable Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seman, Charles J.

    1994-06-01

    Nonlinear nonhydrostatic conditional symmetric instability (CSI) is studied as an initial value problem using a two-dimensional (y, z)nonlinear, nonhydrostatic numerical mesoscale/cloud model. The initial atmosphere for the rotating, baroclinic (BCF) simulation contains large convective available potential energy (CAPE). Analytical theory, various model output diagnostics, and a companion nonrotating barotropic (BTNF) simulation are used to interpret the results from the BCF simulation. A single warm moist thermal initiates convection for the two 8-h simulations.The BCF simulation exhibited a very intricate life cycle. Following the initial convection, a series of discrete convective cells developed within a growing mesoscale circulation. Between hours 4 and 8, the circulation grew upscale into a structure resembling that of a squall-line mesoscale convective system (MCS). The mesoscale updrafts were nearly vertical and the circulation was strongest on the baroclinically cool side of the initial convection, as predicted by a two-dimensional Lagrangian parcel model of CSI with CAPE. The cool-side mesoscale circulation grew nearly exponentially over the last 5 h as it slowly propagated toward the warm air. Significant vertical transport of zonal momentum occurred in the (multicellular) convection that developed, resulting in local subgeostrophic zonal wind anomalies aloft. Over time, geostrophic adjustment acted to balance these anomalies. The system became warm core, with mesohigh pressure aloft and mesolow pressure at the surface. A positive zonal wind anomaly also formed downstream from the mesohigh.Analysis of the BCF simulation showed that convective momentum transport played a key role in the evolution of the simulated MCS, in that it fostered the development of the nonlinear CSI on mesoscale time scales. The vertical momentum transport in the initial deep convection generated a subgeostrophic zonal momentum anomaly aloft; the resulting imbalance in pressure

  16. BLOOD SUBSTITUTES: EVOLUTION FROM NON-CARRYING TO OXYGEN AND GAS CARRYING FLUIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrales, Pedro; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The development of oxygen (O2) carrying blood substitutes has evolved from the goal of replicating blood O2 transports properties to that of preserving microvascular and organ function, reducing the inherent or potential toxicity of the material used to carry O2, and treating pathologies initiated by anemia and hypoxia. Furthermore, the emphasis has shifted from blood replacement fluid to “O2 therapeutics” that restore tissue oxygenation to specific tissues regions. This review covers the different alternatives, potential and limitations of hemoglobin based O2 carriers (HBOCs) and perfluorocarbon based O2 carriers (PFCOCs), with emphasis on the physiological conditions disturbed in the situation that they will be used. It describes how concepts learned from plasma expanders without O2 carrying capacity can be applied to maintain O2 delivery and summarizes the microvascular responses due to HBOCs and PFCOCs. This review also presents alternative applications of HBOCs and PFCOCs namely: 1) How HBOC O2 affinity can be engineered to target O2 delivery to hypoxic tissues; and 2) How the high gas solubility of PFCOCs provides new opportunities for carrying, dissolving and delivering gases with biological activity. It is concluded that current blood substitutes development has amplified their applications horizon by devising therapeutic functions for oxygen carriers requiring limited O2 delivery capacity restoration. Conversely, full, blood-like O2 carrying capacity re-establishment awaits control of O2 carrier toxicity. PMID:23820271

  17. Heat convection in a set of three vertical cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano Ramirez, M.L. de.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results on temperature and heat flow in a set of three vertical cylinders with internal generation of heat, water submerged and in free convection are presented in this work . Temperature distribution, Nusselt number and convective coefficient (h) for each rod, developed for the distance between the axis of cylinders in vertical position, as a consequence of the application of power in its outside, are analyzed. Experimental information about heat transfer by free convection in vertical cylinders and surfaces is analyzed. Information of the several author who have carried out studies about the heat transfer on vertical cylinders was compiled, and the proposed equations with the experimental data obtained in the thermo fluids laboratory of National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) were tested. The way in which separation distance, s, distribution temperature array, Nusselt number, and convective coefficient calculated for the proposed channel with the Keyhani, Dutton and experimental equations are tabulated and they are plotted for each power value and for each separation between rods. The scheme of the used equipment and the experimentation description as well as the observations of tests and graphical results are included. (Author)

  18. Evidence of Convective Redistribution of Carbon Monoxide in Aura Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyin, Michael; Douglass, Anne; Schoeberl, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Vertical convective transport is a key element of the tropospheric circulation. Convection lofts air from the boundary layer into the free troposphere, allowing surface emissions to travel much further, and altering the rate of chemical processes such as ozone production. This study uses satellite observations to focus on the convective transport of CO from the boundary layer to the mid and upper troposphere. Our hypothesis is that strong convection associated with high rain rate regions leads to a correlation between mid level and upper level CO amounts. We first test this hypothesis using the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model. We find the correlation is robust and increases as the precipitation rate (the strength of convection) increases. We next examine three years of CO profiles from the Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instruments aboard EOS Aura. Rain rates are taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B-42 multi-satellite product. Again we find a correlation between mid-level and upper tropospheric CO, which increases with rain rate. Our result shows the critical importance of tropical convection in coupling vertical levels of the troposphere in the transport of trace gases. The effect is seen most clearly in strong convective regions such as the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone.

  19. Hydrodynamical simulation of the core helium flash with two-dimensional convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    The thermonuclear runaway of helium reactions under the condition of electron degeneracy in the hot, dense central regions of a low mass Population II red giant is investigated. A two-dimensional finite difference approach to time dependent convection has been applied to a peak energy production model of this phenomenon called the core helium flash. The dynamical conservation equations are integrated in two spatial dimensions and time which allow the horizontal variations of the dynamical variables to be followed explicitly. The unbalanced bouyancy forces in convectively unstable regions lead to mass flow (i.e., convective energy transport) by calculation of the velocity flow patterns produced by the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy without recourse to any phenomenological theory of convection. The initial phase of this hydrodynamical simulation is characterized by a thermal readjustment via downward convective energy transport into the neutrino cooled core in a series of convection modulated thermal pulses. Each of these pulses is driven by the thermal runaway and quenched by the convective energy transport when the actual temperature gradient in the flash region becomes sufficiently superadiabatic. These convection modulated thermal pulses are observed throughout 95% of the calculation, the duration of which is approximately 570,000 cycles or nearly 96,000 seconds of evolution. After this initial thermal restructuring, there ensues in the simulation a dynamic phase in which the thermonuclear runaway becomes violent. The degree of violence, the final composition, and the peak temperature depend sensitively on the nuclear energy generation rates of those reactions involving alpha particle captures

  20. Benefits of microgravity for measurement of thermo-transport coefficients in liquid metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praizey, J.P.

    1988-05-01

    After giving a brief review of thermo-transport principles, this paper describes the experimental technique used and presents the results obtained on the ground. The author determines the solutal stability conditions to be satisfied by the metal alloy so that ground thermotransport measurements are not disturbed by convection effects. The benefits of microgravity when such conditions cannot be achieved are demonstrated and the results obtained on pure Sn (isotope separation), Sn-Co, Sn-Ag and Sn-Bi during Spacelab missions in 1983 and 1985 are presented. The results of experiments carried out without the disturbing effect of convection are compared with those found in literature (experiments or calculations carried out from liquid structure models) [fr

  1. CRUCIB: an axisymmetric convection code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, L.A.

    1975-03-01

    The CRUCIB code was written in support of an experimental program aimed at measurement of thermal diffusivities of refractory liquids. Precise values of diffusivity are necessary to realistic analysis of reactor safety problems, nuclear waste disposal procedures, and fundamental metal forming processes. The code calculates the axisymmetric transient convective motions produced in a right circular cylindrical crucible, which is surface heated by an annular heat pulse. Emphasis of this report is placed on the input-output options of the CRUCIB code, which are tailored to assess the importance of the convective heat transfer in determining the surface temperature distribution. Use is limited to Prandtl numbers less than unity; larger values can be accommodated by replacement of a single block of the code, if desired. (U.S.)

  2. Fluid convection, constraint and causation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Complexity—nonlinear dynamics for my purposes in this essay—is rich with metaphysical and epistemological implications but is receiving sustained philosophical analysis only recently. I will explore some of the subtleties of causation and constraint in Rayleigh–Bénard convection as an example of a complex phenomenon, and extract some lessons for further philosophical reflection on top-down constraint and causation particularly with respect to causal foundationalism. PMID:23386955

  3. Engineering photochemical smog through convection towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, S.; Prueitt, M.L.; Bossert, J.E.; Mroz, E.J.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jacobson, M.Z.; Turco, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Dept.

    1995-02-01

    Reverse convection towers have attracted attention as a medium for cleansing modern cities. Evaporation of an aqueous mist injected at the tower opening could generate electrical power by creating descent, and simultaneously scavenge unsightly and unhealthful particulates. The study offered here assesses the influence to tower water droplets on the photochemical component of Los Angeles type smog. The primary radical chain initiator OH is likely removed into aqueous phases well within the residence time of air in the tower, and then reacts away rapidly. Organics do not dissolve, but nighttime hydrolysis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} depletes the nitrogen oxides. A lack of HOx would slow hydrocarbon oxidation and so also ozone production. Lowering of NOx would also alter ozone production rates, but the direction is uncertain. SO{sub 2} is available in sufficient quantities in some urban areas to react with stable oxidants, and if seawater were the source of the mist, the high pH would lead to fast sulfur oxidation kinetics. With an accommodation coefficient of 10{sup {minus}3}, however, ozone may not enter the aqueous phase efficiently. Even if ozone is destroyed or its production suppressed, photochemical recovery times are on the order of hours, so that tower processing must be centered on a narrow midday time window. The cost of building the number of structures necessary for this brief turnover could be prohibitive. The increase in humidity accompanying mist evaporation could be controlled with condensers, but might otherwise counteract visibility enhancements by recreating aqueous aerosols. Quantification of the divergent forcings convection towers must exert upon the cityscape would call for coupled three dimensional modeling of transport, microphysics, and photochemistry. 112 refs.

  4. Cryogenic helium gas convection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    This is a report prepared by a group interested in doing research in thermal convection using the large scale refrigeration facilities available at the SSC Laboratories (SSCL). The group preparing this report consists of Michael McAshan at SSCL, Robert Behringer at Duke University, Katepalli Sreenivasan at Yale University, Xiao-Zhong Wu at Northern Illinois University and Russell Donnelly at the University of Oregon, who served as Editor for this report. This study reports the research and development opportunities in such a project, the technical requirements and feasibility of its construction and operation, and the costs associated with the needed facilities and support activities. The facility will be a unique national resource for studies of high-Reynolds-number and high-Rayleigh-number and high Rayleigh number turbulence phenomena, and is one of the six items determined as suitable for potential funding through a screening of Expressions of Interest. The proposed facility is possible only because of the advanced cryogenic technology available at the SSCL. Typical scientific issues to be addressed in the facility will be discussed. It devolved during our study, that while the main experiment is still considered to be the thermal convection experiment discussed in our original Expression of Interest, there are now a very substantial set of other, important and fundamental experiments which can be done with the large cryostat proposed for the convection experiment. We believe the facility could provide several decades of front-line research in turbulence, and shall describe why this is so

  5. Thermosolutal convection during dendritic solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Nandapurkar, P.; Poirier, D. R.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for directional solidification of a binary alloy including a dendritic region underlying an all-liquid region. It is assumed initially that there exists a nonconvecting state with planar isotherms and isoconcentrates solidifying at a constant velocity. The stability of this system has been analyzed and nonlinear calculations are performed that show the effect of convection in the solidification process when the system is unstable. Results of calculations for various cases defined by the initial temperature gradient at the dendrite tips and varying strength of the gravitational field are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys. The results show that the systems are stable for a gravitational constant of 0.0001 g(0) and that convection can be suppressed by appropriate choice of the container's size for higher values of the gravitational constant. It is also concluded that for the lead-tin systems considered, convection in the mushy zone is not significant below the upper 20 percent of the dendritic zone, if al all.

  6. Non-Boussinesq Dissolution-Driven Convection in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amooie, M. A.; Soltanian, M. R.; Moortgat, J.

    2017-12-01

    Geological carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in deep saline aquifers has been increasingly recognized as a feasible technology to stabilize the atmospheric carbon concentrations and subsequently mitigate the global warming. Solubility trapping is one of the most effective storage mechanisms, which is associated initially with diffusion-driven slow dissolution of gaseous CO2 into the aqueous phase, followed by density-driven convective mixing of CO2 throughout the aquifer. The convection includes both diffusion and fast advective transport of the dissolved CO2. We study the fluid dynamics of CO2 convection in the underlying single aqueous-phase region. Two modeling approaches are employed to define the system: (i) a constant-concentration condition for CO2 in aqueous phase at the top boundary, and (ii) a sufficiently low, constant injection-rate for CO2 from top boundary. The latter allows for thermodynamically consistent evolution of the CO2 composition and the aqueous phase density against the rate at which the dissolved CO2 convects. Here we accurately model the full nonlinear phase behavior of brine-CO2 mixture in a confined domain altered by dissolution and compressibility, while relaxing the common Boussinesq approximation. We discover new flow regimes and present quantitative scaling relations for global characters of spreading, mixing, and dissolution flux in two- and three-dimensional media for the both model types. We then revisit the universal Sherwood-Rayleigh scaling that is under debate for porous media convective flows. Our findings confirm the sublinear scaling for the constant-concentration case, while reconciling the classical linear scaling for the constant-injection model problem. The results provide a detailed perspective into how the available modeling strategies affect the prediction ability for the total amount of CO2 dissolved in the long term within saline aquifers of different permeabilities.

  7. ULTRA-SHARP nonoscillatory convection schemes for high-speed steady multidimensional flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, B. P.; Mokhtari, Simin

    1990-01-01

    For convection-dominated flows, classical second-order methods are notoriously oscillatory and often unstable. For this reason, many computational fluid dynamicists have adopted various forms of (inherently stable) first-order upwinding over the past few decades. Although it is now well known that first-order convection schemes suffer from serious inaccuracies attributable to artificial viscosity or numerical diffusion under high convection conditions, these methods continue to enjoy widespread popularity for numerical heat transfer calculations, apparently due to a perceived lack of viable high accuracy alternatives. But alternatives are available. For example, nonoscillatory methods used in gasdynamics, including currently popular TVD schemes, can be easily adapted to multidimensional incompressible flow and convective transport. This, in itself, would be a major advance for numerical convective heat transfer, for example. But, as is shown, second-order TVD schemes form only a small, overly restrictive, subclass of a much more universal, and extremely simple, nonoscillatory flux-limiting strategy which can be applied to convection schemes of arbitrarily high order accuracy, while requiring only a simple tridiagonal ADI line-solver, as used in the majority of general purpose iterative codes for incompressible flow and numerical heat transfer. The new universal limiter and associated solution procedures form the so-called ULTRA-SHARP alternative for high resolution nonoscillatory multidimensional steady state high speed convective modelling.

  8. CFD study of convective heat transfer to carbon dioxide and water at supercritical pressures in vertical circular pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, F.; Novog, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Computational simulations of convective heat transfer of both carbon dioxide and water at supercritical pressures have been carried out using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics code STAR-CCM+. Detailed comparisons between four turbulence models, including two low-Reynolds k-ε models, SST k-ω model and the Reynolds Stress Transport (RST) model, are made under different flow conditions against two independent experiments on upward flow in vertical circular pipes. The heat-flux effect and mass-flux effect on the occurrence of heat transfer deterioration (HTD) are discussed, along with sensitivity studies of the boundary conditions and turbulent Prandtl number. The thresholds and mechanisms of HTD are also investigated using selected turbulence models. (author)

  9. Large-scale thermal convection of viscous fluids in a faulted system: 3D test case for numerical codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Fabien; Cacace, Mauro; Fischer, Thomas; Kolditz, Olaf; Wang, Wenqing; Watanabe, Norihiro

    2017-04-01

    In contrast to simple homogeneous 1D and 2D systems, no appropriate analytical solutions exist to test onset of thermal convection against numerical models of complex 3D systems that account for variable fluid density and viscosity as well as permeability heterogeneity (e.g. presence of faults). Owing to the importance of thermal convection for the transport of energy and minerals, the development of a benchmark test for density/viscosity driven flow is crucial to ensure that the applied numerical models accurately simulate the physical processes at hands. The presented study proposes a 3D test case for the simulation of thermal convection in a faulted system that accounts for temperature dependent fluid density and viscosity. The linear stability analysis recently developed by Malkovsky and Magri (2016) is used to estimate the critical Rayleigh number above which thermal convection of viscous fluids is triggered. The numerical simulations are carried out using the finite element technique. OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012) and Moose (Gaston et al., 2009) results are compared to those obtained using the commercial software FEFLOW (Diersch, 2014) to test the ability of widely applied codes in matching both the critical Rayleigh number and the dynamical features of convective processes. The methodology and Rayleigh expressions given in this study can be applied to any numerical model that deals with 3D geothermal processes in faulted basins as by example the Tiberas Basin (Magri et al., 2016). References Kolditz, O., Bauer, S., Bilke, L., Böttcher, N., Delfs, J. O., Fischer, T., U. J. Görke, T. Kalbacher, G. Kosakowski, McDermott, C. I., Park, C. H., Radu, F., Rink, K., Shao, H., Shao, H.B., Sun, F., Sun, Y., Sun, A., Singh, K., Taron, J., Walther, M., Wang,W., Watanabe, N., Wu, Y., Xie, M., Xu, W., Zehner, B., 2012. OpenGeoSys: an open-source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical/chemical (THM/C) processes in porous media. Environmental

  10. A Generalized Evolution Criterion in Nonequilibrium Convective Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiyanagi, Masakazu; Nisizima, Kunisuke

    1989-04-01

    A general evolution criterion, applicable to transport processes such as the conduction of heat and mass diffusion, is obtained as a direct version of the Le Chatelier-Braun principle for stationary states. The present theory is not based on any radical departure from the conventional one. The generalized theory is made determinate by proposing the balance equations for extensive thermodynamic variables which will reflect the character of convective systems under the assumption of local equilibrium. As a consequence of the introduction of source terms in the balance equations, there appear additional terms in the expression of the local entropy production, which are bilinear in terms of the intensive variables and the sources. In the present paper, we show that we can construct a dissipation function for such general cases, in which the premises of the Glansdorff-Prigogine theory are accumulated. The new dissipation function permits us to formulate a generalized evolution criterion for convective systems.

  11. Direct simulation of natural convection in square porous enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourshaghaghy, A.; Hakkaki-Fard, A.; Mahdavi-Nejad, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, natural convection in a square porous enclosure is simulated by a direct numerical method. The solution method is based on a random distribution of solid blocks, which resembles the porous media within the cavity. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved directly in the fluid region without the assumption of volume averaging. The no-slip condition is applied on the surface of any solid particle, and the energy transport equation is solved separately for the solid phase and fluid flow. The local and average Nusselt numbers are presented for steady state for two different cases of thermal boundary conditions of the cavity walls. An oscillatory solution is observed for the local Nu number on the surface of the enclosure, and the critical Ra numbers are found in which natural convection flow is started within the cavity

  12. Natural convection and dispersion in a tilted fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, A.W.; Linz, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    In many geophysical situations, fluid is contained in long narrow fractures embedded within an impermeable medium of different thermal conductivity; and there may be a uniform vertical temperature gradient imposed upon the system. We show that whenever the slot is tilted to the vertical, convection develops in the fluid, even if the background temperature increases with height. Using typical values for the physical properties of a water-filled fracture, we show that the Earth's geothermal gradient produces a convective flow in a fracture; this has an associated dispersion coefficient D T ∼10 2 -10 3 D in fractures about a centimetre wide. We show that this shear dispersion could transport radioactive material, of half-life 10 4 years, tens of metres along the fracture within one half-life; without this dispersion, the material would only diffuse a few metres along the fracture within one half-life. (author)

  13. Model of two-temperature convective transfer in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruais, Isabelle; Poliševski, Dan

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we study the asymptotic behaviour of the solution of a convective heat transfer boundary problem in an ɛ -periodic domain which consists of two interwoven phases, solid and fluid, separated by an interface. The fluid flow and its dependence with respect to the temperature are governed by the Boussinesq approximation of the Stokes equations. The tensors of thermal diffusion of both phases are ɛ -periodic, as well as the heat transfer coefficient which is used to describe the first-order jump condition on the interface. We find by homogenization that the two-scale limits of the solutions verify the most common system used to describe local thermal non-equilibrium phenomena in porous media (see Nield and Bejan in Convection in porous media, Springer, New York, 1999; Rees and Pop in Transport phenomena in porous media III, Elsevier, Oxford, 2005). Since now, this system was justified only by volume averaging arguments.

  14. Peculiarities of natural convective heat removal from complex pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groetzbach, Guenther

    2002-01-01

    Considerable sensitivities are investigated in using natural convection for cooling large pools. Such a flow occurred in a sump cooling concept for a water cooled reactor. The related SUCOS model experiments were analyzed by means of the FLUTAN code. The numerical interpretations show, the natural convection in large pools is strongly influenced by local thermal disturbances, either due to structures in the fluid domain, or by bounding structures interacting thermally with the fluid. These experiment specific disturbances must be recorded in the numerical model in order to achieve adequate simulations of the heat transport. Some geometric imperfections of horizontal coolers or heaters could also have tremendous influences. As a consequence, not only the numerical model has to record all relevant phenomena as realistic as possible, but also the model experiment. (author)

  15. Increased risk of a shutdown of ocean convection posed by warm North Atlantic summers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmanns, Marilena; Karstensen, Johannes; Fischer, Jürgen

    2018-04-01

    A shutdown of ocean convection in the subpolar North Atlantic, triggered by enhanced melting over Greenland, is regarded as a potential transition point into a fundamentally different climate regime1-3. Noting that a key uncertainty for future convection resides in the relative importance of melting in summer and atmospheric forcing in winter, we investigate the extent to which summer conditions constrain convection with a comprehensive dataset, including hydrographic records that are over a decade in length from the convection regions. We find that warm and fresh summers, characterized by increased sea surface temperatures, freshwater concentrations and melting, are accompanied by reduced heat and buoyancy losses in winter, which entail a longer persistence of the freshwater near the surface and contribute to delaying convection. By shortening the time span for the convective freshwater export, the identified seasonal dynamics introduce a potentially critical threshold that is crossed when substantial amounts of freshwater from one summer are carried over into the next and accumulate. Warm and fresh summers in the Irminger Sea are followed by particularly short convection periods. We estimate that in the winter 2010-2011, after the warmest and freshest Irminger Sea summer on our record, 40% of the surface freshwater was retained.

  16. Nonlinear equilibrium in Tokamaks including convective terms and viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Castro, E.; Puerta, J.

    2003-01-01

    MHD equilibrium in tokamaks becomes very complex, when the non-linear convective term and viscosity are included in the momentum equation. In order to simplify the analysis, each new term has been separated in type gradient terms and vorticity depending terms. For the special case in which the vorticity vanishes, an extended Grad-Shafranov type equation can be obtained. However now the magnetic surface is not isobars or current surfaces as in the usual Grad-Shafranov treatment. The non-linear convective terms introduces gradient of Bernoulli type kinetic terms . Montgomery and other authors have shown the importance of the viscosity terms in tokamaks [1,2], here the treatment is carried out for the equilibrium condition, including generalized tokamaks coordinates recently described [3], which simplify the equilibrium analysis. Calculation of the new isobar surfaces is difficult and some computation have been carried out elsewhere for some particular cases [3]. Here, our analysis is extended discussing how the toroidal current density, plasma pressure and toroidal field are modified across the midplane because of the new terms (convective and viscous). New calculations and computations are also presented. (Author)

  17. Chaotic dynamics of large-scale double-diffusive convection in a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shutaro; Gotoda, Hiroshi; Miyano, Takaya; Tokuda, Isao T.

    2018-02-01

    We have studied chaotic dynamics of large-scale double-diffusive convection of a viscoelastic fluid in a porous medium from the viewpoint of dynamical systems theory. A fifth-order nonlinear dynamical system modeling the double-diffusive convection is theoretically obtained by incorporating the Darcy-Brinkman equation into transport equations through a physical dimensionless parameter representing porosity. We clearly show that the chaotic convective motion becomes much more complicated with increasing porosity. The degree of dynamic instability during chaotic convective motion is quantified by two important measures: the network entropy of the degree distribution in the horizontal visibility graph and the Kaplan-Yorke dimension in terms of Lyapunov exponents. We also present an interesting on-off intermittent phenomenon in the probability distribution of time intervals exhibiting nearly complete synchronization.

  18. Direct numerical simulation and modeling of turbulent natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudjemadi, R.

    1996-03-01

    The main objectives of this thesis are the direct numerical simulation of natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot and the improvements of second-order turbulence modelling. A three-dimensional direct numerical simulation code has been developed in order to gain a better understanding of turbulence properties in natural convection flows. This code has been validated in several physical configurations: non-stratified natural convection flows (conduction solution), stratified natural convection flows (double boundary layer solution), transitional and turbulent Poiseuille flows. For the conduction solution, the turbulent regime was reached at a Rayleigh number of 1*10 5 and 5.4*10 5 . A detailed analysis of these results has revealed the principal qualities of the available models but has also pointed our their shortcomings. This data base has been used in order to improve the triple correlations transport models and to select the turbulent time scales suitable for such flows. (author). 122 refs., figs., tabs., 4 appends

  19. The excitation of solar-like oscillations in a δ Sct star by efficient envelope convection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoci, V.; Handler, G.; Kallinger, T.

    2011-01-01

    Delta Scuti (δSct) stars are opacity-driven pulsators with masses of 1.5-2.5Msolar, their pulsations resulting from the varying ionization of helium. In less massive stars such as the Sun, convection transports mass and energy through the outer 30per cent of the star and excites a rich spectrum...... of resonant acoustic modes. Based on the solar example, with no firm theoretical basis, models predict that the convective envelope in δSct stars extends only about 1per cent of the radius, but with sufficient energy to excite solar-like oscillations. This was not observed before the Kepler mission, so...... the presence of a convective envelope in the models has been questioned. Here we report the detection of solar-like oscillations in the δSct star HD187547, implying that surface convection operates efficiently in stars about twice as massive as the Sun, as the ad hoc models predicted....

  20. New numerical solutions of three-dimensional compressible hydrodynamic convection. [in stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Murshed; Mullan, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical solutions of three-dimensional compressible hydrodynamics (including sound waves) in a stratified medium with open boundaries are presented. Convergent/divergent points play a controlling role in the flows, which are dominated by a single frequency related to the mean sound crossing time. Superposed on these rapid compressive flows, slower eddy-like flows eventually create convective transport. The solutions contain small structures stacked on top of larger ones, with vertical scales equal to the local pressure scale heights, H sub p. Although convective transport starts later in the evolution, vertical scales of H sub p are apparently selected at much earlier times by nonlinear compressive effects.

  1. Development of heavy load carrying vehicle for nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terabayashi, Yasuharu; Oono, Hiroo; Aizu, Takao; Kawaguchi, Kaname; Yamanaka, Masayuki; Hirobe, Tamio; Inagaki, Yoshiaki.

    1985-01-01

    In nuclear power stations, in order to carry out sound and stable operation, the routine inspection and regular inspection of machinery and equipment are performed, therefore, the transportation of heavy things is frequently carried out. Especially, the transportation of heavy things over the steps of passages and stairs requires much labor. Therefore, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. and Chubu Plant Service Co., Ltd. carried out the research on the development of a vehicle for transporting heavy components of nuclear power plants. In this research, it was aimed at developing a vehicle which can carry heavy components and get over a step, climb and descend stairs, and run through a narrow passage having many curves as well as running on flat ground. For this purpose, the actual state of the transportation of heavy things was investigated during the regular inspection of a nuclear power station, and on the basis of this results, a prototype vehicle was made and tested. Thereafter, a transporting vehicle of actual scale was made and tested. The investigation of actual state and the examination of the fundamental concept, the design, trial manufacture and verifying test are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Adiabatic and diabatic aerosol transport to the Jungfraujoch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugauer, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Furger, M.; Jost, D.T.; Schwikowski, M.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Synoptic scale vertical motion, here detected by the geopotential height of the 500 hPa surface, mainly accounts for the aerosol transport to the Jungfraujoch in winter. In summer, diabatic convection provides the dominant vertical transport mechanism. Nevertheless, synoptic scale adiabatic motion still determines whether diabatic convection can develop. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  3. Why Compositional Convection Cannot Explain Substellar Objects’ Sharp Spectral-type Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, Jérémy

    2018-02-01

    As brown dwarfs and young giant planets cool down, they are known to experience various chemical transitions—for example, from {CO} rich L-dwarfs to methane rich T-dwarfs. Those chemical transitions are accompanied by spectral transitions with sharpness that cannot be explained by chemistry alone. In a series of articles, Tremblin et al. proposed that some of the yet-unexplained features associated with these transitions could be explained by a reduction of the thermal gradient near the photosphere. To explain, in turn, this more isothermal profile, they invoke the presence of an instability analogous to fingering convection—compositional convection—triggered by the change in mean molecular weight of the gas due to the chemical transitions mentioned above. In this Letter, we use existing arguments to demonstrate that any turbulent transport, if present, would in fact increase the thermal gradient. This misinterpretation comes from the fact that turbulence mixes/homogenizes entropy (potential temperature) instead of temperature. So, while increasing transport, turbulence in an initially stratified atmosphere actually carries energy downward, whether it is due to fingering or any other type of compositional convection. These processes therefore cannot explain the features observed along the aforementioned transitions by reducing the thermal gradient in the atmosphere of substellar objects. Understanding the microphysical and dynamical properties of clouds at these transitions thus probably remains our best way forward.

  4. The convection electric field in auroral substorms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) electric field and ion drift data are used in a statistical study of the ionospheric convection electric field in bulge-type auroral substorms. Thirty-one individual DE 2 substorm crossings were carefully selected and organized by the use of global auroral images obtained...... this database enabled us to compile a model of the ionospheric convection electric field. The characteristics of the premidnight convection reversal show a pronounced local time dependency. Far west of the surge it is a fairly well defined point reversal or convection shear. Approaching the surge and within...... the surge it is a region of weak electric fields increasing in width toward midnight that separates regions of equatorward and poleward electric fields. Therefore we adopt the term Harang region rather than the Harang discontinuity for the premidnight convection reversal. A relatively narrow convection...

  5. The pattern of convection in the Sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, N.O.

    1976-01-01

    The structure of solar magnetic fields is dominated by the effects of convection, which should be incorporated in any model of the solar cycle. Although mixing length theory is adequate for calculating the structure of main sequence stars, a better description of convection is needed for any detailed dynamo model. Recent work on nonlinear convection at low Prandt numbers is reviewed. There has been some progress towards a theory of compressible convection, though there is still no firm theoretical evidence for cells with scales less than the depth of the convecting layer. However, it remains likely that the pattern of solar convection is dominated by granules, supergranules and giant cells. The effects of rotation on these cells are briefly considered. (Auth.)

  6. On the Role of Convection and Turbulence for Tropospheric Ozone and its Precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivie, D.J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the work in this thesis is to investigate the convective and diffusive transport in the TM chemistry transport model, and to investigate some aspects of the consequences for NOx. The large inaccuracy and uncertainty in the description of processes like convection and turbulent diffusion, the strong dependence of the radiative forcing of ozone on its vertical distribution, and the strong dependence of the ozone production on the distribution of NOx, are the main motivation. The availability of the ERA-40 data, where convective data and vertical diffusion coefficients are archived, allows a study of the effect of different convective mass flux sets, and different vertical diffusion coefficients on the model-simulated distribution of tracers. In this thesis the following questions are addressed : (1) How large is the sensitivity of the (model simulated) distribution of ozone and nitrogen oxides on (the) convection (parameterisation)?; (2) What requirements should be fulfilled by diffusive transport parameterisations in order to simulate the diurnal cycle in trace gas concentrations?; (3) How large are the differences in concentrations between simulations with archived and off-line diagnosed physical parameterisations?; (4) How do the results of different parameterisations of nitrogen oxide production by lightning compare?; (5) What is the effect of an explicit description of the effect of convective redistribution on the vertical distribution of lightning produced NOx? In Chapter 2, the first question and part of the third question are addressed. Because convection can bring reactive trace gases to the upper troposphere where they can live longer, and possibly are transported to remote regions, it is important to well describe the convective transport. The archival of convective mass fluxes in the ERA-40 data set allows us to drive the convective transport in the TM model. We compare these archived fluxes with the standard off-line diagnosed fluxes used in

  7. Strategy of experimental studies in PNC on natural convection decay heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ieda, Y.; Kamide, H.; Ohshima, H.; Sugawara, S.; Ninokata, H.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental studies have been and are being carried out in PNC to establish the design and safety evaluation methods and the design and safety evaluation guide lines for decay heat removal by natural convection. A strategy of the experimental studies in PNC is described in this paper. The sphere of studies in PNC is to develop the evaluation methods to be available to DRACS as well as PRACS and IRACS for the plant where decay heat is removed by natural convection in some cases of loss of station service power. Similarity parameters related to natural convection are derived from the governing equations. The roles of both sodium and water experiments are defined in consideration of the importance of the similarity parameters and characteristics of scale model experiments. The experimental studies in PNC are reviewed. On the basis of the experimental results, recommended evaluation methods are shown for decay heat removal feature by natural convection. Future experimental works are also proposed. (author)

  8. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    those of tight junction and interspace basement membrane by convection-diffusion. With solute permeability of paracellular pathway large relative to paracellular water flow, the paracellular flux ratio of the solute (influx/outflux) is small (2-4) in agreement with experiments. The virtual solute......A mathematical model of an absorbing leaky epithelium is developed for analysis of solute coupled water transport. The non-charged driving solute diffuses into cells and is pumped from cells into the lateral intercellular space (lis). All membranes contain water channels with the solute passing...... increases with hydraulic conductance of the pathway carrying water from mucosal solution into lis. Uphill water transport is accomplished, but with high hydraulic conductance of cell membranes strength of transport is obscured by water flow through cells. Anomalous solvent drag occurs when back flux...

  9. Titan Balloon Convection Model, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative research effort is directed at determining, quantitatively, the convective heat transfer coefficients applicable to a Montgolfiere balloon operating...

  10. REVERSALS IN THE 6-CELLS CONVECTION DRIVEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Vodinchar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the large-scale model geodynamo, which based on indirect data of inhomogeneities in the density of the Earth’s core. Convection structure is associated with spherical harmonic Y24 , which defines the basic poloidal component of velocity. Coriolis drift of this mode determines the toroidal component of velocity. Thus, 6 convective cells are formed. The model takes into account the feedback effect of the magnetic field on convection. It was ascertained that the model contains stable regimes of field generation. The velocity of convection and the dipole component of the magnetic field are close to the observed ones.

  11. Thermal turbulent convection: thermal plumes and fluctuations; Convection thermique turbulente: panaches et fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibert, M

    2007-10-15

    In this study we investigate the phenomenon of thermal turbulent convection in new and unprecedented ways. The first system we studied experimentally is an infinite vertical channel, where a constant vertical mean gradient of temperature exists. Inside this channel the average mass flux is null. The results obtained from our measurements reveal that the flow is mainly inertial; indeed the dissipative coefficients (here the viscosity) play a role only to define a coherence length L. This length is the distance over which the thermal plumes can be considered as 'free falling' objects. The horizontal transport, of heat and momentum, is entirely due to fluctuations. The associated 'mixing length' is small compared to the channel width. In the other hand, the vertical heat transport is due to coherent structures: the heat plumes. Those objects were also investigated in a Lagrangian study of the flow in the bulk of a Rayleigh-Benard cell. The probe, which has the same density as the fluid used in this experiment, is a sphere of 2 cm in diameter with embarked thermometers and radio-emitter. The heat plumes transport it, which allows a statistical study of such objects. (author)

  12. Scale analysis of convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micha Gryschka

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The size distribution of cumulus clouds due to shallow and deep convection is analyzed using satellite pictures, LES model results and data from the German rain radar network. The size distributions found can be described by simple power laws as has also been proposed for other cloud data in the literature. As the observed precipitation at ground stations is finally determined by cloud numbers in an area and individual sizes and rain rates of single clouds, the cloud size distributions might be used for developing empirical precipitation forecasts or for validating results from cloud resolving models being introduced to routine weather forecasts.

  13. Characterizing Convection in Stellar Atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, Joel; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre; Robinson, Frank

    2011-01-01

    We perform 3D radiative hydrodynamic simulations to study the properties of convection in the superadiabatic layer of stars. The simulations show differences in both the stratification and turbulent quantities for different types of stars. We extract turbulent pressure and eddy sizes, as well as the T-τ relation for different stars and find that they are sensitive to the energy flux and gravity. We also show that contrary to what is usually assumed in the field of stellar atmospheres, the structure and gas dynamics of simulations of turbulent atmospheres cannot be parameterized with T eff and log(g) alone.

  14. Kinematic structure of convective-scale elements in the rainbands of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hence, Deanna A.; Houze, Robert A.

    2008-08-01

    Airborne Doppler radar data collected during the Hurricane Rainband and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) show the convective-scale air motions embedded in the principal rainbands of hurricanes Katrina and Rita. These embedded convective cells have overturning updrafts and low-level downdrafts (originating at 2-4 km) that enter the rainband on its radially outward side and cross over each other within the rainband as well as a strong downdraft emanating from upper levels (6+ km) on the radially inward side. These vertical motion structures repeat from one convective cell to another along each rainband. The resulting net vertical mass transport is upward in the upwind portion of the band and greatest in the middle sector of the principal rainband, where the updraft motions contribute generally to an increase of potential vorticity below the 3-4 km level. Because the convective cells in the middle sector are systematically located radially just inside the secondary horizontal wind maximum (SHWM), the local increase in vorticity implied by the convective mass transport is manifest locally as an increase in the strength of the SHWM at midlevels (˜4 km). The overturning updrafts of the convective cells tilt, stretch, and vertically transport vorticity such that the convergence of the vertical flux of vorticity strengthens the vorticity anomaly associated with the SHWM. This process could strengthen the SHWM by several meters per second per hour, and may explain how high wave number convective-scale features can influence a low wave number feature such as the principal rainband, and subsequently influence the primary vortex.

  15. Two-dimensional turbulent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzino, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    We present an overview of the most relevant, and sometimes contrasting, theoretical approaches to Rayleigh-Taylor and mean-gradient-forced Rayleigh-Bénard two-dimensional turbulence together with numerical and experimental evidences for their support. The main aim of this overview is to emphasize that, despite the different character of these two systems, especially in relation to their steadiness/unsteadiness, turbulent fluctuations are well described by the same scaling relationships originated from the Bolgiano balance. The latter states that inertial terms and buoyancy terms balance at small scales giving rise to an inverse kinetic energy cascade. The main difference with respect to the inverse energy cascade in hydrodynamic turbulence [R. H. Kraichnan, "Inertial ranges in two-dimensional turbulence," Phys. Fluids 10, 1417 (1967)] is that the rate of cascade of kinetic energy here is not constant along the inertial range of scales. Thanks to the absence of physical boundaries, the two systems here investigated turned out to be a natural physical realization of the Kraichnan scaling regime hitherto associated with the elusive "ultimate state of thermal convection" [R. H. Kraichnan, "Turbulent thermal convection at arbitrary Prandtl number," Phys. Fluids 5, 1374-1389 (1962)].

  16. Upper Troposphere Lower Stratosphere structure during convective systems using GPS radio occultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo

    The deep convective systems play a fundamental role in atmospheric circulation and climate. Thunderstorms and meso-scale convective systems produce fast vertical transport, redistributing water vapor and trace gases and influencing the thermal structure of the upper troposphere and lower...... stratosphere (UTLS) contributing to the troposphere-stratosphere transport and affecting the Earth global circulation and the climate changes. The Global Positioning System (GPS) Radio Occultation (RO) technique enables measurement of atmospheric density structure in any meteorological condition...... to the analysis of tropical storms for the future mission ACES will also be evaluated. Using data from the past and ongoing GPS RO missions we have defined an algorithm to detect the clouds top of the convective systems and their thermal structure. Other satellite and in-situ measurements co-located with GPS ROs...

  17. Bursting and large-scale intermittency in turbulent convection with differential rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.

    2003-01-01

    The tilting mechanism, which generates differential rotation in two-dimensional turbulent convection, is shown to produce relaxation oscillations in the mean flow energy integral and bursts in the global fluctuation level, akin to Lotka-Volterra oscillations. The basic reason for such behavior is the unidirectional and conservative transfer of kinetic energy from the fluctuating motions to the mean component of the flows, and its dissipation at large scales. Results from numerical simulations further demonstrate the intimate relation between these low-frequency modulations and the large-scale intermittency of convective turbulence, as manifested by exponential tails in single-point probability distribution functions. Moreover, the spatio-temporal evolution of convective structures illustrates the mechanism triggering avalanche events in the transport process. The latter involves the overlap of delocalized mixing regions when the barrier to transport, produced by the mean component of the flow, transiently disappears

  18. Modeling and Simulation of Nanoparticle Transport in Multiphase Flows in Porous Media: CO2 Sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-09-03

    Geological storage of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in deep saline aquifers has recently received tremendous attention in the scientific literature. Injected CO2 plume buoyantly accumulates at the top part of the deep aquifer under a sealing cap rock, and some concern that the high-pressure CO2 could breach the seal rock. However, CO2 will diffuse into the brine underneath and generate a slightly denser fluid that may induce instability and convective mixing. Onset times of instability and convective mixing performance depend on the physical properties of the rock and fluids, such as permeability and density contrast. The novel idea is to adding nanoparticles to the injected CO2 to increase density contrast between the CO2-rich brine and the underlying resident brine and, consequently, decrease onset time of instability and increase convective mixing. As far as it goes, only few works address the issues related to mathematical and numerical modeling aspects of the nanoparticles transport phenomena in CO2 storages. In the current work, we will present mathematical models to describe the nanoparticles transport carried by injected CO2 in porous media. Buoyancy and capillary forces as well as Brownian diffusion are important to be considered in the model. IMplicit Pressure Explicit Saturation-Concentration (IMPESC) scheme is used and a numerical simulator is developed to simulate the nanoparticles transport in CO2 storages.

  19. Density limit and cross-field edge transport scaling in Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBombard, B.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments in Alcator C-Mod have uncovered a direct link between the character and scaling of edge transport and the empirical Greenwald density limit (n G ). In low to moderate density discharges, the scrape-off layer (SOL) exhibits a two-layer structure: a near SOL (∼5 mm zone) with steep density and temperature gradients and a far SOL with flatter profiles. In the far SOL, the transport fluxes exhibit large transport events ('bursts' which carry particles to main-chamber structures. In the near SOL, transport fluxes appear to be less 'bursty' particle diffusivities in this region is found to increase strongly with local plasma collisionality. As n/n G (or collisionality) is raised, cross-field heat convection begins to compete with parallel conduction to the divertor. At N/n G ∼0.5, T E at the separatrix is reduced. As n/n G approaches ∼1, regions inside the separatrix exhibit flatter profiles with 'bursty' transport behavior; cross-field heat convection to main-chamber structures becomes comparable to the radiated power. Thus as n/n G is increased, cross-field edge transport physics progressively changes, ultimately impacting the power balance of the discharge near N/n G ∼1. (author)

  20. Overview of the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, M. C.; Brune, W. H.; Cantrell, C. A.; Rutledge, S. A.; Crawford, J. H.; Flocke, F. M.; Huntrieser, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) project conducted a 7-week field campaign during May and June 2012 to study thunderstorm dynamical, physical, and electrical characteristics, as well as their effects on the atmosphere's composition, especially ozone and particles in the climate-sensitive upper troposphere near the thunderstorm tops. The NSF/NCAR Gulfstream V (GV) and the NASA DC-8 aircraft flew 17 coordinated flights to sample low-level inflow and upper troposphere outflow air near thunderstorms and to sample convective outflow air as it chemically aged during the next 24 hours. The DLR Falcon aircraft observed the fresh storm outflow and also obtained measurements of aged outflow. In total, 19 cases of active thunderstorms and over 6 cases of photochemical aging were flown. The DC3 aircraft, based in Salina, Kansas, were equipped with instruments to measure a variety of gases, aerosols, and cloud particle characteristics in situ as well as the NASA DC-8 measuring the ozone and aerosol distribution by lidar. The aircraft targeted storms predicted to occur within range of coverage by ground-based radar pairs, lightning mapping arrays (LMAs), and frequent launches of balloon-borne instruments that could measure the storm's physical, kinematic, and lightning characteristics. This coverage occurred in three regions: 1) northeastern Colorado, 2) central Oklahoma to western Texas, and 3) northern Alabama. DC3 demonstrated that it is possible to sample with two aircraft the inflow and outflow of storms, which were simultaneously sampled by the ground radars, LMAs, and soundings. The DC3 data set is extensive and rich. This presentation will summarize the overall statistics of the DC3 measurements giving a general idea of storm characteristics, transport of trace gases, and photochemical aging of species. Examples will be given of specific thunderstorm cases, including a Colorado case where a biomass-burning plume was ingested by a storm, and of sampling a

  1. Benard convection in gaps and cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, U.

    1981-04-01

    The article contains two parts. In the first part a condensed review of the most striking phenomena in Benard convection in laterally confined fluid layers is given. In the second part recent experimental and theoretical work on Benard convection in gaps is presented an analysed. (orig.) [de

  2. Convective mixing and accretion in white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koester, D.

    1976-01-01

    The evolution of convection zones in cooling white dwarfs with helium envelopes and outer hydrogen layers is calculated with a complete stellar evolution code. It is shown that white dwarfs of spectral type DB cannot be formed from DA stars by convective mixing. However, for cooler temperatures (Tsub(e) [de

  3. Modelling of Convective Process of Water Desorption from Polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stakic, M.; Nikolic, A.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a mathematical model developed to evaluate the influence of structural and operational factors on convective dehydration process (desorption of liquid phase from capillary-porous material), as well as the possibility to utilize this model for the case of water desorption from polystyrene cation resin CG-8. The model accounts for unsteady one-dimensional simultaneous heat and mass transfer between the gas (air) and the solid phase (resin). The identification of effective transport properties for the considered fixed bed of material (resin CG 8) is discussed. To this purpose available data from the literature are used. (author)

  4. Radial convection of finite ion temperature, high amplitude plasma blobs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiesenberger, M.; Madsen, Jens; Kendl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We present results from simulations of seeded blob convection in the scrape-off-layer of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We consistently incorporate high fluctuation amplitude levels and finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects using a fully nonlinear global gyrofluid model. This is in line......-field transport compared to blobs simulated with the local model. The maximal blob amplitude is significantly higher in the global simulations than in the local ones. When the ion temperature is comparable to the electron temperature, global blob simulations show a reduced blob coherence and a decreased cross...

  5. Southern Ocean Convection and tropical telleconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, I.; Cabre, A.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2014-12-01

    We show that Southern Ocean (SO) temperatures in the latest generation of Earth System Models exhibit two major modes of variation, one driven by deep convection, the other by tropical variability. We perform a CMIP5 model intercomparison to understand why different climate models represent SO variability so differently in long, control simulations. We show that multiyear variability in Southern Ocean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) can in turn influence oceanic and atmospheric conditions in the tropics on short (atmospheric) time-scales. We argue that the strength and pattern of SO-tropical teleconnections depends on the intensity of SO deep convection. Periodic convection in the SO is a feature of most CMIP5 models under preindustrial forcing (deLavergne et al., 2014). Models show a wide distribution in the spatial extent, periodicity and intensity of their SO convection, with some models convecting most of the time, and some showing very little convection. In a highly convective coupled model, we find that multidecadal variability in SO and global SSTs, as well as SO heat storage are driven by Weddell Sea convective variability, with convective decades relatively warm due to the heat released from the deep southern ocean and non-convective decades cold due to the subsurface storage of heat. Furthermore, pulses of SO convection drive SST and sea ice variations, influencing absorbed shortwave and emitted longwave radiation, wind, cloud and precipitation patterns, with climatic implications for the low latitudes via fast atmospheric teleconnections. We suggest that these high-low latitude teleconnection mechanisms are relevant for understanding hiatus decades. Additionally, Southern Ocean deep convection varied significantly during past, natural climate changes such as during the last deglaciation. Weddell Sea open convection was recently weakened, likely as a consequence of anthropogenic forcing and the resulting surface freshening. Our study opens up the

  6. Analysis of the electrolyte convection inside the concentration boundary layer during structured electrodeposition of copper in high magnetic gradient fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Jörg; Tschulik, Kristina; Büttner, Lars; Uhlemann, Margitta; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-03-19

    To experimentally reveal the correlation between electrodeposited structure and electrolyte convection induced inside the concentration boundary layer, a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field, generated by a magnetized Fe-wire, has been applied to an electrochemical system. The influence of Lorentz and magnetic field gradient force to the local transport phenomena of copper ions has been studied using a novel two-component laser Doppler velocity profile sensor. With this sensor, the electrolyte convection within 500 μm of a horizontally aligned cathode is presented. The electrode-normal two-component velocity profiles below the electrodeposited structure show that electrolyte convection is induced and directed toward the rim of the Fe-wire. The measured deposited structure directly correlates to the observed boundary layer flow. As the local concentration of Cu(2+) ions is enhanced due to the induced convection, maximum deposit thicknesses can be found at the rim of the Fe-wire. Furthermore, a complex boundary layer flow structure was determined, indicating that electrolyte convection of second order is induced. Moreover, the Lorentz force-driven convection rapidly vanishes, while the electrolyte convection induced by the magnetic field gradient force is preserved much longer. The progress for research is the first direct experimental proof of the electrolyte convection inside the concentration boundary layer that correlates to the deposited structure and reveals that the magnetic field gradient force is responsible for the observed structuring effect.

  7. Convective penetration in a young sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Jane; Baraffe, Isabelle; Goffrey, Tom; MUSIC developers group

    2018-01-01

    To interpret the high-quality data produced from recent space-missions it is necessary to study convection under realistic stellar conditions. We describe the multi-dimensional, time implicit, fully compressible, hydrodynamic, implicit large eddy simulation code MUSIC. We use MUSIC to study convection during an early stage in the evolution of our sun where the convection zone covers approximately half of the solar radius. This model of the young sun possesses a realistic stratification in density, temperature, and luminosity. We approach convection in a stellar context using extreme value theory and derive a new model for convective penetration, targeted for one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations. This model provides a scenario that can explain the observed lithium abundance in the sun and in solar-like stars at a range of ages.

  8. Numerical simulations of convectively excited gravity waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatzmaier, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Magneto-convection and gravity waves are numerically simulated with a nonlinear, three-dimensional, time-dependent model of a stratified, rotating, spherical fluid shell heated from below. A Solar-like reference state is specified while global velocity, magnetic field, and thermodynamic perturbations are computed from the anelastic magnetohydrodynamic equations. Convective overshooting from the upper (superadiabatic) part of the shell excites gravity waves in the lower (subadiabatic) part. Due to differential rotation and Coriolis forces, convective cell patterns propagate eastward with a latitudinally dependent phase velocity. The structure of the excited wave motions in the stable region is more time-dependent than that of the convective motions above. The magnetic field tends to be concentrated over giant-cell downdrafts in the convective zone but is affected very little by the wave motion in the stable region

  9. Modelling deep convection and its impacts on the tropical tropopause layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Hosking

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The UK Met Office's Unified Model is used at a climate resolution (N216, ~0.83°×~0.56°, ~60 km to assess the impact of deep tropical convection on the structure of the tropical tropopause layer (TTL. We focus on the potential for rapid transport of short-lived ozone depleting species to the stratosphere by rapid convective uplift. The modelled horizontal structure of organised convection is shown to match closely with signatures found in the OLR satellite data. In the model, deep convective elevators rapidly lift air from 4–5 km up to 12–14 km. The influx of tropospheric air entering the TTL (11–12 km is similar for all tropical regions with most convection stopping below ~14 km. The tropical tropopause is coldest and driest between November and February, coinciding with the greatest upwelling over the tropical warm pool. As this deep convection is co-located with bromine-rich biogenic coastal emissions, this period and location could potentially be the preferential gateway for stratospheric bromine.

  10. Numerical simulations of Jupiter’s moist convection layer: Structure and dynamics in statistically steady states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, K.; Nakajima, K.; Odaka, M.; Kuramoto, K.; Hayashi, Y.-Y.

    2014-02-01

    A series of long-term numerical simulations of moist convection in Jupiter’s atmosphere is performed in order to investigate the idealized characteristics of the vertical structure of multi-composition clouds and the convective motions associated with them, varying the deep abundances of condensable gases and the autoconversion time scale, the latter being one of the most questionable parameters in cloud microphysical parameterization. The simulations are conducted using a two-dimensional cloud resolving model that explicitly represents the convective motion and microphysics of the three cloud components, H2O, NH3, and NH4SH imposing a body cooling that substitutes the net radiative cooling. The results are qualitatively similar to those reported in Sugiyama et al. (Sugiyama, K. et al. [2011]. Intermittent cumulonimbus activity breaking the three-layer cloud structure of Jupiter. Geophys. Res. Lett. 38, L13201. doi:10.1029/2011GL047878): stable layers associated with condensation and chemical reaction act as effective dynamical and compositional boundaries, intense cumulonimbus clouds develop with distinct temporal intermittency, and the active transport associated with these clouds results in the establishment of mean vertical profiles of condensates and condensable gases that are distinctly different from the hitherto accepted three-layered structure (e.g., Atreya, S.K., Romani, P.N. [1985]. Photochemistry and clouds of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. In: Recent Advances in Planetary Meteorology. Cambridge Univ. Press, London, pp. 17-68). Our results also demonstrate that the period of intermittent cloud activity is roughly proportional to the deep abundance of H2O gas. The autoconversion time scale does not strongly affect the results, except for the vertical profiles of the condensates. Changing the autoconversion time scale by a factor of 100 changes the intermittency period by a factor of less than two, although it causes a dramatic increase in the amount of

  11. Mixed convection heat transfer experiments using analogy concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Bong Jin; Chung, Bum Jin; Lee, Won Jea

    2009-01-01

    A Series of the turbulent mixed convective heat transfer experiments in a vertical cylinder was carried out. In order to achieve high Gr and/or Ra with small scale test rigs, the analogy concept was adopted. Using the concept, heat transfer systems were simulated by mass transfer systems, and large Grashof numbers could be achieved with reasonable facility heights. The tests were performed with buoyancy-aided flow and opposed flow for Reynolds numbers from 4,000 to 10,000 with a constant Grashof number, Gr H of 6.2 x 10 9 and Prandtl number of about 2,000. The test results reproduced the typical of the mixed convection heat transfer phenomena in a turbulent situation and agree well with the experimental study performed by Y. Palratan et al. The analogy experimental method simulated the mixed convection heat transfer phenomena successfully and seems to be a useful tool for heat transfer studies for VHTR as well as the systems with high buoyancy condition and high Prandtl number

  12. Magnetic Fields in the Solar Convection Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yuhong

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of the dynamic evolution of magnetic flux tubes in the solar convection zone are reviewed with focus on emerging flux tubes responsible for the formation of solar active regions. The current prevailing picture is that active regions on the solar surface originate from strong toroidal magnetic fields generated by the solar dynamo mechanism at the thin tachocline layer at the base of the solar convection zone. Thus the magnetic fields need to traverse the entire convection zone before they reach the photosphere to form the observed solar active regions. This review discusses results with regard to the following major topics: 1. the equilibrium properties of the toroidal magnetic fields stored in the stable overshoot region at the base of the convection zone, 2. the buoyancy instability associated with the toroidal magnetic fields and the formation of buoyant magnetic flux tubes, 3. the rise of emerging flux loops through the solar convective envelope as modeled by the thin flux tube calculations which infer that the field strength of the toroidal magnetic fields at the base of the solar convection zone is significantly higher than the value in equipartition with convection, 4. the minimum twist needed for maintaining cohesion of the rising flux tubes, 5. the rise of highly twisted kink unstable flux tubes as a possible origin of d -sunspots, 6. the evolution of buoyant magnetic flux tubes in 3D stratified convection, 7. turbulent pumping of magnetic flux by penetrative compressible convection, 8. an alternative mechanism for intensifying toroidal magnetic fields to significantly super-equipartition field strengths by conversion of the potential energy associated with the superadiabatic stratification of the solar convection zone, and finally 9. a brief overview of our current understanding of flux emergence at the surface and post-emergence evolution of the subsurface magnetic fields.

  13. Consumerism and the Sister Carrie's American Dream%Consumerism and the Sister Carrie''s American Dream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢亚丽

    2017-01-01

    From the aspect of consumerism to this text analyze Sister Carrie's"American dream"destruction. The author wholly and deeply analyzes the embodiment of consumerism in Dreiser's Sister Carrie and Dreiser's outlook and values under the effect of consumerism. To prove that the reason for destruction of Carrie's American dream is consumerism.

  14. Prandtl-number Effects in High-Rayleigh-number Spherical Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orvedahl, Ryan J.; Calkins, Michael A.; Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Hindman, Bradley W.

    2018-03-01

    Convection is the predominant mechanism by which energy and angular momentum are transported in the outer portion of the Sun. The resulting overturning motions are also the primary energy source for the solar magnetic field. An accurate solar dynamo model therefore requires a complete description of the convective motions, but these motions remain poorly understood. Studying stellar convection numerically remains challenging; it occurs within a parameter regime that is extreme by computational standards. The fluid properties of the convection zone are characterized in part by the Prandtl number \\Pr = ν/κ, where ν is the kinematic viscosity and κ is the thermal diffusion; in stars, \\Pr is extremely low, \\Pr ≈ 10‑7. The influence of \\Pr on the convective motions at the heart of the dynamo is not well understood since most numerical studies are limited to using \\Pr ≈ 1. We systematically vary \\Pr and the degree of thermal forcing, characterized through a Rayleigh number, to explore its influence on the convective dynamics. For sufficiently large thermal driving, the simulations reach a so-called convective free-fall state where diffusion no longer plays an important role in the interior dynamics. Simulations with a lower \\Pr generate faster convective flows and broader ranges of scales for equivalent levels of thermal forcing. Characteristics of the spectral distribution of the velocity remain largely insensitive to changes in \\Pr . Importantly, we find that \\Pr plays a key role in determining when the free-fall regime is reached by controlling the thickness of the thermal boundary layer.

  15. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-01-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem. (letter)

  16. Energetics of load carrying in Nepalese porters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, Guillaume J; Schepens, Bénédicte; Willems, Patrick A; Heglund, Norman C

    2005-06-17

    Nepalese porters routinely carry head-supported loads equal to 100 to 200% of their body weight (Mb) for many days up and down steep mountain footpaths at high altitudes. Previous studies have shown that African women carry head-supported loads of up to 60% of their Mb far more economically than army recruits carrying equivalent loads in backpacks. Here we show that Nepalese porters carry heavier loads even more economically than African women. Female Nepalese porters, for example, carry on average loads that are 10% of their Mb heavier than the maximum loads carried by the African women, yet do so at a 25% smaller metabolic cost.

  17. Canonical Models of Geophysical and Astrophysical Flows: Turbulent Convection Experiments in Liquid Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Ribeiro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Planets and stars are often capable of generating their own magnetic fields. This occurs through dynamo processes occurring via turbulent convective stirring of their respective molten metal-rich cores and plasma-based convection zones. Present-day numerical models of planetary and stellar dynamo action are not carried out using fluids properties that mimic the essential properties of liquid metals and plasmas (e.g., using fluids with thermal Prandtl numbers Pr < 1 and magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm ≪ 1. Metal dynamo simulations should become possible, though, within the next decade. In order then to understand the turbulent convection phenomena occurring in geophysical or astrophysical fluids and next-generation numerical models thereof, we present here canonical, end-member examples of thermally-driven convection in liquid gallium, first with no magnetic field or rotation present, then with the inclusion of a background magnetic field and then in a rotating system (without an imposed magnetic field. In doing so, we demonstrate the essential behaviors of convecting liquid metals that are necessary for building, as well as benchmarking, accurate, robust models of magnetohydrodynamic processes in Pm ≪  Pr < 1 geophysical and astrophysical systems. Our study results also show strong agreement between laboratory and numerical experiments, demonstrating that high resolution numerical simulations can be made capable of modeling the liquid metal convective turbulence needed in accurate next-generation dynamo models.

  18. Experimental transient natural convection heat transfer from a vertical cylindrical tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Seara, Jose; Uhia, Francisco J.; Alberto Dopazo, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper heat transfer experimental data is presented and compared to general correlations proposed in the literature for transient laminar free convection from a vertical cylindrical tank. The experimental data has been obtained from heating and cooling experiments carried out with a cylindrical full-scale hot water storage tank working under real operating conditions. The experimental device and the data acquisition system are described. The calculation procedures established to obtain the experimental values of the heat transfer coefficients, as well as the data reduction process, are detailed. The local convection and radiation heat transfer coefficients are obtained from different heating power conditions for local Rayleigh numbers within the range of 1x10 5 -3x10 8 . The great quantity of available experimental data allows a detailed analysis with a reliable empirical base. The experimental local convection heat transfer coefficients are correlated and compared to correlations proposed in open literature for engineering calculations. - Highlights: → Experimental data of transient local convection heat transfer coefficients from a cylindrical tank for heating and cooling processes is obtained. → The transient behaviour of the convection coefficients is dependent on temperature difference evolutions between the surface and the air. → The Nu.Ra -1/4 ratio decreases proportionally in (T s -T ∞ ) -0.9 . → A new correlation based on the semi-infinite region theory for laminar transient free convection is proposed.

  19. Snow precipitation on Mars driven by cloud-induced night-time convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Hinson, David P.; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Navarro, Thomas; Millour, Ehouarn; Forget, François; Montmessin, Franck

    2017-09-01

    Although it contains less water vapour than Earth's atmosphere, the Martian atmosphere hosts clouds. These clouds, composed of water-ice particles, influence the global transport of water vapour and the seasonal variations of ice deposits. However, the influence of water-ice clouds on local weather is unclear: it is thought that Martian clouds are devoid of moist convective motions, and snow precipitation occurs only by the slow sedimentation of individual particles. Here we present numerical simulations of the meteorology in Martian cloudy regions that demonstrate that localized convective snowstorms can occur on Mars. We show that such snowstorms--or ice microbursts--can explain deep night-time mixing layers detected from orbit and precipitation signatures detected below water-ice clouds by the Phoenix lander. In our simulations, convective snowstorms occur only during the Martian night, and result from atmospheric instability due to radiative cooling of water-ice cloud particles. This triggers strong convective plumes within and below clouds, with fast snow precipitation resulting from the vigorous descending currents. Night-time convection in Martian water-ice clouds and the associated snow precipitation lead to transport of water both above and below the mixing layers, and thus would affect Mars' water cycle past and present, especially under the high-obliquity conditions associated with a more intense water cycle.

  20. Inhibition of ordinary and diffusive convection in the water condensation zone of the ice giants and implications for their thermal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedson, A. James; Gonzales, Erica J.

    2017-11-01

    We explore the conditions under which ordinary and double-diffusive thermal convection may be inhibited by water condensation in the hydrogen atmospheres of the ice giants and examine the consequences. The saturation of vapor in the condensation layer induces a vertical gradient in the mean molecular weight that stabilizes the layer against convective instability when the abundance of vapor exceeds a critical value. In this instance, the layer temperature gradient can become superadiabatic and heat must be transported vertically by another mechanism. On Uranus and Neptune, water is inferred to be sufficiently abundant for inhibition of ordinary convection to take place in their respective condensation zones. We find that suppression of double-diffusive convection is sensitive to the ratio of the sedimentation time scale of the condensates to the buoyancy period in the condensation layer. In the limit of rapid sedimentation, the layer is found to be stable to diffusive convection. In the opposite limit, diffusive convection can occur. However, if the fluid remains saturated, then layered convection is generally suppressed and the motion is restricted in form to weak, homogeneous, oscillatory turbulence. This form of diffusive convection is a relatively inefficient mechanism for transporting heat, characterized by low Nusselt numbers. When both ordinary and layered convection are suppressed, the condensation zone acts effectively as a thermal insulator, with the heat flux transported across it only slightly greater than the small value that can be supported by radiative diffusion. This may allow a large superadiabatic temperature gradient to develop in the layer over time. Once the layer has formed, however, it is vulnerable to persistent erosion by entrainment of fluid into the overlying convective envelope of the cooling planet, potentially leading to its collapse. We discuss the implications of our results for thermal evolution models of the ice giants, for

  1. First Principles Analysis of Convection in the Earth's Mantle, Eustatic Sea Level and Earth Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsland, G. L.

    2011-12-01

    Steady state convection (convection whereby heat leaving the mantle at the top is equal to the heat entering the mantle across the core mantle boundary and that created within the mantle) of the Earth's mantle is, to a very good approximation, both a constant mass and constant volume process. Mass or volume which moves to one place; e.g., an oceanic ridge; must be accompanied by mass or volume removed from another place. The location of removal, whether from underneath of an ocean or a continent, determines the relationship between oceanic ridge volume and eustatic sea level. If all of the volume entering a ridge were to come from under an oceanic basin then the size of the ridge would not affect eustatic sea level as it would be compensated by a lowering of the sea floor elsewhere. If the volume comes from under a continent then the hypsometry of the continent becomes important. Thus, eustatic sea level is not simply related to convection rate and oceanic ridge volume as posited by Hays and Pitman(1973). Non-steady state convection is still a constant mass process but is not a constant volume process. The mantle experiences a net gain of heat, warms and expands during periods of relatively slow convection (that being convection rate which is less than that necessary to transport incoming and internally created heat to the surface). Conversely, the mantle has a net loss of heat, cools and contracts during periods of relatively rapid convection. The Earth itself expands and contracts as the mantle does. During rapid convection more volume is delivered from the interior of the mantle to the Earth's ridge system than during slow convection. The integral of the difference of ridge system volume between fast and slow convection over a fast-slow convection cycle is a measure of the difference in volume of the mantle over a cycle. The magnitude of the Earth's volume expansion and contraction as calculated from published values for the volume of ocean ridges and is about

  2. Consumerism and the Sister Carrie's American Dream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢亚丽

    2017-01-01

    From the aspect of consumerism to this text analyze Sister Carrie's"American dream"destruction. The author wholly and deeply analyzes the embodiment of consumerism in Dreiser's Sister Carrie and Dreiser's outlook and values under the effect of consumerism. To prove that the reason for destruction of Carrie's American dream is consumerism.

  3. Local Dynamic Stability Associated with Load Carrying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Current study confirmed the sensitivity of local dynamic stability measure in load carrying situation. It was concluded that load carrying tasks were associated with declined local dynamic stability, which may result in increased risk of fall accident. This finding has implications in preventing fall accidents associated with occupational load carrying.

  4. An experimental study of mixed convection; Contribution a l'etude experimentale de la convection mixte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez, M.

    1998-10-20

    The aim of our study is to establish a reliable database for improving thermal hydraulic codes, in the field of turbulent flows with buoyancy forces. The flow considered is mixed convection in the Reynolds and Richardson number range: Re = 10{sup 3} to 6.10{sup 4} and Ri = 10{sup -4} to 1. Experiments are carried out in an upward turbulent flow between vertical parallel plates at different wall temperatures. Part 1 gives a detailed database of turbulent mixed flow of free and forced convection. Part 2 presents the installation and the calibration system intended for probes calibration. Part 3 describes the measurement technique (constant temperature probe and cold-wire probe) and the method for measuring the position of the hot-wire anemometer from the wall surface. The measurement accuracy is within 0.001 mm in the present system. Part 4 relates the development of a method for near wall measurements. This correction procedure for hot-wire anemometer close to wall has been derived on the basis of a two-dimensional numerical study. The method permits to obtain a quantitative correction of the wall influence on hot-wires and takes into account the velocity profile and the effects the wall material has on the heat loss. Part 5 presents the experimental data obtained in the channel in forced and mixed convection. Results obtained in the forced convection regime serve as a verification of the measurement technique close to the wall and give the conditions at the entrance of the test section. The effects of the buoyancy force on the mean velocity and temperature profiles are confirmed. The buoyancy strongly affects the fluid structure and deforms the distribution of mean velocity. The velocity profiles are asymmetric. The second section of part 5 gives an approach of analytical wall functions with buoyancy forces, on the basis of the experimental data obtained in the test section. (author)

  5. Asymptotic solution of natural convection problem in a square cavity heated from below

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grundmann, M; Mojtabi, A; vantHof, B

    Studies a two-dimensional natural convection in a porous, square cavity using a regular asymptotic development in powers of the Rayleigh number. Carries the approximation through to the 34th order. Analyses convergence of the resulting series for the Nusselt number in both monocellular and

  6. Free-convective flow of fluid in a thin porous contour and geothermal anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magomedbekov Kh.G.; Ramazanov, M.M.; Vagabov, M.V.

    1996-01-24

    The problem of free convection in a thin porous contour, placed in uniform impermeable massif is considered. The approximate analitical solution of conjugate problem is obtained. The critical Rayleigh number is determined, by exceeding of which the steady fluid circulation in an annulus is established. The computations of abnormal heat flow near surface are carried out, stipulated by thermoconvection in a contour.

  7. Indirect involvement of armorphous carbon layer on convective heat transfer enhancement using carbon nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.; Lefferts, Leonardus; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an experimental heat transfer investigation was carried out to investigate the combined influence of both amorphous carbon (a-C) layer thickness and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the convective heat transfer behavior. Synthesis of these carbon nanostructures was achieved using catalytic

  8. Boundary Layer Control of Rotating Convection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E. M.; Stellmach, S.; Noir, J.; Hansen, U.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    Rotating convection is ubiquitous in the natural universe, and is likely responsible for planetary processes such magnetic field generation. Rapidly rotating convection is typically organized by the Coriolis force into tall, thin, coherent convection columns which are aligned with the axis of rotation. This organizational effect of rotation is thought to be responsible for the strength and structure of magnetic fields generated by convecting planetary interiors. As thermal forcing is increased, the relative influence of rotation weakens, and fully three-dimensional convection can exist. It has long been assumed that rotational effects will dominate convection dynamics when the ratio of buoyancy to the Coriolis force, the convective Rossby number, Roc, is less than unity. We investigate the influence of rotation on turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection via a suite of coupled laboratory and numerical experiments over a broad parameter range: Rayleigh number, 10310; Ekman number, 10-6≤ E ≤ ∞; and Prandtl number, 1≤ Pr ≤ 100. In particular, we measure heat transfer (as characterized by the Nusselt number, Nu) as a function of the Rayleigh number for several different Ekman and Prandtl numbers. Two distinct heat transfer scaling regimes are identified: non-rotating style heat transfer, Nu ~ Ra2/7, and quasigeostrophic style heat transfer, Nu~ Ra6/5. The transition between the non-rotating regime and the rotationally dominant regime is described as a function of the Ekman number, E. We show that the regime transition depends not on the global force balance Roc, but on the relative thicknesses of the thermal and Ekman boundary layers. The transition scaling provides a predictive criterion for the applicability of convection models to natural systems such as Earth's core.

  9. Post shut-down decay heat removal from nuclear reactor core by natural convection loops in sodium pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajamani, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Sundararajan, T., E-mail: tsundar@iitm.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Prasad, B.V.S.S.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Parthasarathy, U.; Velusamy, K. [Nuclear Engineering Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Transient simulations are performed for a worst case scenario of station black-out. • Inter-wrapper flow between various sub-assemblies reduces peak core temperature. • Various natural convection paths limits fuel clad temperatures below critical level. - Abstract: The 500 MWe Indian pool type Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) has a passive core cooling system, known as the Safety Grade Decay Heat Removal System (SGDHRS) which aids to remove decay heat after shut down phase. Immediately after reactor shut down the fission products in the core continue to generate heat due to beta decay which exponentially decreases with time. In the event of a complete station blackout, the coolant pump system may not be available and the safety grade decay heat removal system transports the decay heat from the core and dissipates it safely to the atmosphere. Apart from SGDHRS, various natural convection loops in the sodium pool carry the heat away from the core and deposit it temporarily in the sodium pool. The buoyancy driven flow through the small inter-wrapper gaps (known as inter-wrapper flow) between fuel subassemblies plays an important role in carrying the decay heat from the sub-assemblies to the hot sodium pool, immediately after reactor shut down. This paper presents the transient prediction of flow and temperature evolution in the reactor subassemblies and the sodium pool, coupled with the safety grade decay heat removal system. It is shown that with a properly sized decay heat exchanger based on liquid sodium and air chimney stacks, the post shutdown decay heat can be safely dissipated to atmospheric air passively.

  10. Measuring Convective Mass Fluxes Over Tropical Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, David

    2017-04-01

    Deep convection forms the upward branches of all large-scale circulations in the tropics. Understanding what controls the form and intensity of vertical convective mass fluxes is thus key to understanding tropical weather and climate. These mass fluxes and the corresponding conditions supporting them have been measured by recent field programs (TPARC/TCS08, PREDICT, HS3) in tropical disturbances considered to be possible tropical storm precursors. In reality, this encompasses most strong convection in the tropics. The measurements were made with arrays of dropsondes deployed from high altitude. In some cases Doppler radar provided additional measurements. The results are in some ways surprising. Three factors were found to control the mass flux profiles, the strength of total surface heat fluxes, the column-integrated relative humidity, and the low to mid-tropospheric moist convective instability. The first two act as expected, with larger heat fluxes and higher humidity producing more precipitation and stronger lower tropospheric mass fluxes. However, unexpectedly, smaller (but still positive) convective instability produces more precipitation as well as more bottom-heavy convective mass flux profiles. Furthermore, the column humidity and the convective instability are anti-correlated, at least in the presence of strong convection. On spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers, the virtual temperature structure appears to be in dynamic balance with the pattern of potential vorticity. Since potential vorticity typically evolves on longer time scales than convection, the potential vorticity pattern plus the surface heat fluxes then become the immediate controlling factors for average convective properties. All measurements so far have taken place in regions with relatively flat sea surface temperature (SST) distributions. We are currently seeking funding for a measurement program in the tropical east Pacific, a region that exhibits strong SST gradients and

  11. Transient Mixed Convection Validation for NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Barton [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Schultz, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-19

    The results of this project are best described by the papers and dissertations that resulted from the work. They are included in their entirety in this document. They are: (1) Jeff Harris PhD dissertation (focused mainly on forced convection); (2) Blake Lance PhD dissertation (focused mainly on mixed and transient convection). This dissertation is in multi-paper format and includes the article currently submitted and one to be submitted shortly; and, (3) JFE paper on CFD Validation Benchmark for Forced Convection.

  12. Transient Mixed Convection Validation for NGNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Barton; Schultz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The results of this project are best described by the papers and dissertations that resulted from the work. They are included in their entirety in this document. They are: (1) Jeff Harris PhD dissertation (focused mainly on forced convection); (2) Blake Lance PhD dissertation (focused mainly on mixed and transient convection). This dissertation is in multi-paper format and includes the article currently submitted and one to be submitted shortly; and, (3) JFE paper on CFD Validation Benchmark for Forced Convection.

  13. Relationships Between Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes on Intraseasonal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20degN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  14. Scrape-off layer profile modifications by convective cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myra, J.R.; DIppolito, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Convective cells (CC close-quote s) are important in understanding density profile modifications induced by ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antennas. This has motivated the present work in which the effect of CC close-quote s on transport in the scrape-off layer is studied, in the regime where the density gradient scale length L n and the cell size L are comparable. Monte Carlo simulations show that closed cell convection acts to flatten the density profile, and that open cells enhance the particle flow to the wall, depleting the density and yielding profiles similar to those measured near ICRF antennas. A new one-dimensional, two-branch model of CC transport is shown to agree well with the simulations. The model gives rise to two characteristic scale lengths, only one of which is retained in the enhanced diffusion models that are applicable for L n >L. The two-branch model is expected to be useful in analyzing ICRF experiments. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  15. Carbon-nanotube nanofluid thermophysical properties and heat transfer by natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y; Inagaki, T; Suzuki, S; Yamauchi, N

    2014-01-01

    We measured the thermophysical properties of suspensions of carbon nanotubes in water as a type of nanofluid, and experimentally investigated their heat transfer characteristics in a horizontal, closed rectangular vessel. Using a previously constructed system for high- reliability measurement, we quantitatively determined their thermophysical properties and the temperature dependence of these properties. We also investigated the as yet unexplained mechanism of heat transport in carbon-nanotube nanofluids and their flow properties from a thermal perspective. The results indicated that these nanofluids are non-Newtonian fluids, whose high viscosity impedes convection and leads to a low heat transfer coefficient under natural convection, despite their high thermal conductivity

  16. Thermally driven convective cells and tokamak edge turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, D.R.; Diamond, P.H.

    1987-07-01

    A unified theory for the dynamics of thermally driven convective cell turbulence is presented. The cells are excited by the combined effects of radiative cooling and resistivity gradient drive. The model also includes impurity dynamics. Parallel thermal and impurity flows enhanced by turbulent radial duffusion regulate and saturate overlapping cells, even in regimes dominated by thermal instability. Transport coefficients and fluctuation levels characteristic of the saturated turbulence are calculated. It is found that the impurity radiation increases transport coefficients for high density plasmas, while the parallel conduction damping, elevated by radial diffusion, in turn quenches the thermal instability. The enhancement due to radiative cooling provides a resolution to the dilemma of explaining the experimental observation that potential fluctuations exceed density fluctuations in the edge plasma (e PHI/T/sub e/ > n/n 0 )

  17. Natural convection in closed vertical cylinders with particular reference to gas cooled reactor standpipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, I.D.

    1975-09-01

    The access to the core for fuel assemblies and control rods of the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor is through the top cap by means of standpipes. The standpipe is essentially a cylindrical, vertical tube with cooled side wall, closed upper end and an orifice at the lower end which is exposed to the hot core fluid. This creates confined natural convection flow in the empty standpipe and this is the subject of this thesis. The investigation is carried out using analytical and experimental methods. For the analytical work, solution of laminar and turbulent flow is attempted using finite-difference computer techniques. The laminar flow performance is evaluated using two different finite-difference procedures, and the results are compared to each other and to existing analytical and experimental results for the open thermosyphon with cool inflow and hot sidewall, i.e. the complementary problem to the present one. For turbulent flow a two equation turbulence model is employed which provides transport equations for the kinetic energy of turbulence and its dissipation rate. The experimental rig is a full scale replica of the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor control rod mechanism standpipe. Carbon dioxide and helium are used as the working fluids for the series of tests. (author)

  18. Convection in complex shaped vessel; Convection dans des enceintes de forme complexe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The 8 november 2000, the SFT (Societe Francaise de Thermique) organized a technical day on the convection in complex shaped vessels. Nine papers have been presented in the domains of the heat transfers, the natural convection, the fluid distribution, the thermosyphon effect, the steam flow in a sterilization cycle and the transformers cooling. Eight papers are analyzed in ETDE and one paper dealing with the natural convection in spent fuels depository is analyzed in INIS. (A.L.B.)

  19. Convective Radio Occultations Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biondi, R. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Deep convective systems are destructive weather phenomena that annually cause many deaths and injuries as well as much damage, thereby accounting for major economic losses in several countries. The number and intensity of such phenomena have increased over the last decades in some areas of the globe. Damage is mostly caused by strong winds and heavy rain parameters that are strongly connected to the structure of the particular storm. Convection over land is usually stronger and deeper than over the ocean and some convective systems, known as supercells, also develop tornadoes through processes that remain mostly unclear. The intensity forecast and monitoring of convective systems is one of the major challenges for meteorology because in situ measurements during extreme events are too sparse or unreliable and most ongoing satellite missions do not provide suitable time/space coverage.

  20. Antartic observations of plasma convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the use of whistler duct tracking as a diagnostic for the behaviour of plasma in the plasmasphere. As a setting for the results given in the thesis, a broad review is presented which embraces pertinent aspects of previous experimental and theoretical studies of the plasmasphere. From a study of 24 hours of continuous whistler data recorded at Sanae, (L = 3,98), it is shown that associated with quiet magnetic conditions (Av Ksub(p)=1), there exists two plasmasphere bulges centred on about 1700 and 0100 UT. There is evidence that these plasmasphere bulge structures are part of a ground-state or reference base drift pattern. Electric field measurements provide some evidence that quiet time plasmasphere drift behaviour is controlled by the internal ionospheric current systems of dynamo origin, rather than being controlled by magnetospheric convection. Finally, this thesis describes an application of the whistler duct tracking technique to whistler data recorded simultaneously at two ground-based stations (Sanae (L = 3,98) and Halley (L = 4,23)). The identification of common whistler components on each station's data set provides a means of estimating the lifetimes of the associated whistler ducts. Duct lifetimes of as little as 30 minutes are found. Such short lived ducts have important implications for current theories of duct formation

  1. Perturbative studies of toroidal momentum transport using neutral beam injection modulation in the Joint European Torus: Experimental results, analysis methodology, and first principles modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantica, P.; Tala, T.; Ferreira, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Perturbative experiments have been carried out in the Joint European Torus [Fusion Sci. Technol. 53(4) (2008)] in order to identify the diffusive and convective components of toroidal momentum transport. The torque source was modulated either by modulating tangential neutral beam power...... or by modulating in antiphase tangential and normal beams to produce a torque perturbation in the absence of a power perturbation. The resulting periodic perturbation in the toroidal rotation velocity was modeled using time-dependent transport simulations in order to extract empirical profiles of momentum...

  2. Dynamics of acoustic-convective drying of sunflower cake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilin, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    The dynamics of drying sunflower cake by a new acoustic-convective method has been studied. Unlike the conventional (thermal-convective) method, the proposed method allows moisture to be extracted from porous materials without applying heat to the sample to be dried. Kinetic curves of drying by the thermal-convective and acoustic-convective methods were obtained and analyzed. The advantages of the acoustic-convective extraction of moisture over the thermal-convective method are discussed. The relaxation times of drying were determined for both drying methods. An intermittent drying mode which improves the efficiency of acoustic-convective extraction of moisture is considered.

  3. Experimental and numerical analysis of convective heat losses from spherical cavity receiver of solar concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shewale Vinod C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spherical cavity receiver of solar concentrator is made up of Cu tubing material having cavity diameter 385 mm to analyze the different heat losses such as conduction, convection and radiation. As the convection loss plays major role in heat loss analysis of cavity receiver, the experimental analysis is carried out to study convective heat loss for the temperature range of 55-75°C at 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° inclination angle of downward facing cavity receiver. The numerical analysis is carried out to study convective heat loss for the low temperature range (55-75°C as well as high temperature range (150-300 °C for no wind condition only. The experimental set-up mainly consists of spherical cavity receiver which is insulated with glass wool insulation to reduce the heat losses from outside surface. The numerical analysis is carried out by using CFD software and the results are compared with the experimental results and found good agreement. The result shows that the convective loss increases with decrease in cavity inclination angle and decreases with decrease in mean cavity receiver temperature. The maximum losses are obtained at 0° inclination angle and the minimum losses are obtained at 90° inclination angle of cavity due to increase in stagnation zone in to the cavity from 0° to 90° inclination. The Nusselt number correlation is developed for the low temperature range 55-75°C based on the experimental data. The analysis is also carried out to study the effect of wind speed and wind direction on convective heat losses. The convective heat losses are studied for two wind speeds (3 m/s and 5 m/s and four wind directions [α is 0° (Side-on wind, 30°, 60°, and 90° (head-on wind]. It is found that the convective heat losses for both wind speed are higher than the losses obtained by no wind test. The highest heat losses are found for wind direction α is 60° with respect to receiver stand and lowest heat losses are found

  4. Rayleigh-Benard Natural Convection Cell Formation and Nusselt number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Je Young; Chung, Bum Jin

    2013-01-01

    The experimental results lie within the predictions of the existing heat transfer correlations for the Rayleigh-Benard natural convections even though the material properties were different. For shorter separation distances, the heat transfers enhance due to the active interaction between heated and cooled plumes. For a step temperature difference, the time dependent Nusselt number variations were investigated. Both experimental and numerical results showed that with time the Nusselt number decreases monotonically to a minimum point presenting the onset of convection. As the hot and cold plumes increase and convey the heat to the other plates, the Nusselt number increases to the local maximum point, presenting the vertical movements of the plumes. Then, the Nusselt number fluctuates with the formation of square cells and larger vortices. This also predicted by the mass transfer experiment. The experiments and calculations show similar trend but the timings were different. These discrepancies are caused by the disturbances inherent in both systems. The molten pool is formed in a hypothetical severe accident condition at the lower head of reactor vessel and is stratified into two layers by the density difference: an upper metallic layer and a lower oxide pool. Rayleigh-Benard natural convection occurs in the metallic layer of relocated molten pool. This study aimed at the investigation of the time-dependent cell formation and Nusselt number variation in Rayleigh-Benard natural convection. Time dependent variation of Nusselt number was also measured experimentally and analyzed numerically to investigate the relationship between the cell formation and Nusselt number. Based on the analogy, heat transfer experiments were replaced by mass transfer experiments using a sulfuric acid-copper sulfate (H 2 SO 4 -CuSO 4 ) electroplating system. Numerical analysis using the commercial CFD program FLUENT 6.3 were carried out with the same material properties and heating conditions

  5. Measuring Social carrying Capacity: An Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    López-Bonilla, Jesús Manuel; López-Bonilla, Luis Miguel

    2007-01-01

    The tourist carrying capacity commands a growing interest given that it is closely linked with sustainable tourist development. The justification of the utility of this concept is given by means of a simple and efficient methodological proposal, by analysing the social carrying capacity. To this end, an empirical application is carried out in the Western Andalusia. In some of the cases analysed, the satisfaction of the tourist is found to decline when the levels of the tourist use are higher ...

  6. The understanding of the R7T7 glass blocks long term behavior: chemical and transport coupling in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomat, L.

    2008-04-01

    The long term behavior of nuclear waste glass blocks depends highly on chemical reactions which occur at the surface in contact with water. Studies carried out on inactive fractured glass blocks show that fracture networks play a significant part in reactive surface area. Nevertheless, the complexity of results interpretation, due to a weak knowledge of fracture networks and local lixiviation conditions, does not allow us to comprehend the physical and chemical mechanisms involved. Model cracks are a key step to study chemical and transport coupling in fractured media. Crack lixiviation in aggressive conditions (pH≥11) show that the crack's position (horizontal or vertical) determines the dominant transport mechanism (respectively diffusion or convection induced by gravity). This gravity driven flow seems to be negligible in lower pH conditions. The convective velocity is estimated by a 1D model of reactive transport. Two other parameters are studied: the influence of thermal gradient and the influence of interconnected cracks on alteration. A strong retroactive effect of convection, due to thermal gradient, on the alteration kinetic is observed inside the crack. These works lead to a complete alteration experiment of a 163 crack network subject to a thermal gradient. The use of the geochemical software, HYTEC, within the framework of this study shows the potential of the software which is however limited by the kinetics law used. (author)

  7. CONVECTION IN CONDENSIBLE-RICH ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, F. [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Pierrehumbert, R. T., E-mail: fding@uchicago.edu [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    Condensible substances are nearly ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres. For the most familiar case—water vapor in Earth’s present climate—the condensible gas is dilute, in the sense that its concentration is everywhere small relative to the noncondensible background gases. A wide variety of important planetary climate problems involve nondilute condensible substances. These include planets near or undergoing a water vapor runaway and planets near the outer edge of the conventional habitable zone, for which CO{sub 2} is the condensible. Standard representations of convection in climate models rely on several approximations appropriate only to the dilute limit, while nondilute convection differs in fundamental ways from dilute convection. In this paper, a simple parameterization of convection valid in the nondilute as well as dilute limits is derived and used to discuss the basic character of nondilute convection. The energy conservation properties of the scheme are discussed in detail and are verified in radiative-convective simulations. As a further illustration of the behavior of the scheme, results for a runaway greenhouse atmosphere for both steady instellation and seasonally varying instellation corresponding to a highly eccentric orbit are presented. The latter case illustrates that the high thermal inertia associated with latent heat in nondilute atmospheres can damp out the effects of even extreme seasonal forcing.

  8. Combined Lorentz force and ultrasound Doppler velocimetry in a vertical convection liquid metal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürner, Till; Vogt, Tobias; Resagk, Christian; Eckert, Sven; Schumacher, Jörg

    2017-11-01

    We report experimental studies on turbulent vertical convection flow in the liquid metal alloy gallium-indium-tin. Flow measurements were conducted by a combined use of local Lorentz force velocimetry (LLFV) and ultrasound Doppler velocimetry (UDV). It is known that the forced convection flow in a duct generates a force on the LLFV magnet system, that grows proportional to the flow velocity. We show that for the slower flow of natural convection LLFV retains this linear dependence in the range of micronewtons. Furthermore experimental results on the scaling of heat and momentum transport with the thermal driving are presented. The results cover a range of Rayleigh numbers 3 ×105 Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft under Grant No. GRK 1567.

  9. Visualization and simulation of density driven convection in porous media using magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, James A.; Pinder, George F.; Gonyea, Jay V.; Hipko, Scott; Watts, Richard

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is used to observe solute transport in a 40 cm long, 26 cm diameter sand column that contained a central core of low permeability silica surrounded by higher permeability well-sorted sand. Low concentrations (2.9 g/L) of Magnevist, a gadolinium based contrast agent, produce density driven convection within the column when it starts in an unstable state. The unstable state, for this experiment, exists when higher density contrast agent is present above the lower density water. We implement a numerical model in OpenFOAM to reproduce the observed fluid flow and transport from a density difference of 0.3%. The experimental results demonstrate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging in observing three-dimensional gravity-driven convective-dispersive transport behaviors in medium scale experiments.

  10. A Finite Element Model for convection-dominatel transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmo, E.G.D. do; Galeao, A.C.N.R.

    1987-08-01

    A new Protev-Galerkin Finite Element Model which automatically incorporates the search for the appropriate upwind direction is presented. It is also shown that modifying the Petrov-Galerkin weightin functions associated with elements adjascent to downwing boudaries effectively eliminates numerical oscillations normally obtained near boundary layers. (Author) [pt

  11. Structures, profile consistency, and transport scaling in electrostatic convection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    Two mechanisms at the origin of profile consistency in models of electrostatic turbulence in magnetized plasmas are considered. One involves turbulent diffusion in collisionless plasmas and the subsequent turbulent equipartition of Lagrangian invariants. By the very nature of its definition...

  12. Convective transport and stability in films of binary mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Madruga Sánchez, Santiago; Bribesh, Fathi; Uwe, Thiele

    2011-01-01

    Thin polymer films are increasingly used in advanced technological applications. The use of these films as coatings is often limited by their lack of stability due to their wettability properties on the substrates

  13. The Concept of Carrying Capacity in Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Zelenka

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Carrying capacity is often pragmatically, theoretically as well as purely intuitively considered as a concept in the context of tourism sustainability. The carrying capacity application has the greatest potential in protected areas, in frequently visited cultural and natural attractions, and in relation to sustaining of the lifestyle of the local community and tourism destination potential in general. Despite its importance, partial applications, determination of basic theoretical principles, and specifying connection to the other theoretical concepts in tourism (particularly destination life cycle, LAC concept, visitors management, there still is a rightful opinion of some authors suggesting that there is no consistent theory of tourism carrying capacity. This theory would be the base for sophisticated practical carrying capacity applications. This paper is therefore focused on introduction of the theoretical concept of carrying capacity, which can be discussed and possibly further elaborated.

  14. Numerical simulation of the electro convective onset and complex flows of dielectric liquid in an annulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Dolfred Vijay; Lee, Heon Deok; Alapati, Suresh; Suh, Yong Kweon [Dong A Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    We conducted a numerical study on the onset of electro-convection as well as the complex flow phenomena of dielectric liquid subjected to unipolar autonomous charge injection in the annular gap between two concentric circular cylindrical electrodes. The Nernst Planck equations governing the charge density transport, the Poisson equation for the electric potential and the Navier Stokes equations for the fluid flow are solved numerically using the finite volume method. The developed code is validated by comparing the critical stability parameter values for the onset of electro convection with those obtained from the linear stability analysis. We identify in a parameter space the stable hydrostatic state and the electro convection state. The electro convection is again divided into three regimes: stationary, oscillatory and chaotic. For inner cylinder radius 1.0, i r {>=} we observed an increase in the number of charged plumes and vortex pairs with stability parameter T before the electro convection becomes chaotic. For outer injection, although the onset of electroconvection starts at T higher than the inner injection, the onset of chaotic motion occurs at lower T.

  15. Numerical simulation of double-diffusive mixed convective flow in rectangular enclosure with insulated moving lid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teamah, M.A. [Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria University, Mech. Eng. Dept, Alexandria (Egypt); El-Maghlany, W.M. [Faculty of Engineering, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt)

    2010-09-15

    The present study is concerned with the mixed convection in a rectangular lid-driven cavity under the combined buoyancy effects of thermal and mass diffusion. Double-diffusive convective flow in a rectangular enclosure with moving upper surface is studied numerically. Both upper and lower surfaces are being insulated and impermeable. Constant different temperatures and concentration are imposed along the vertical walls of the enclosure, steady state laminar regime is considered. The transport equations for continuity, momentum, energy and spices transfer are solved. The numerical results are reported for the effect of Richardson number, Lewis number, and buoyancy ratio on the iso-contours of stream line, temperature, and concentration. In addition, the predicted results for both local and average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are presented and discussed for various parametric conditions. This study was done for 0.1 <= Le <= 50 and Prandtl number Pr = 0.7. Through out the study the Grashof number and aspect ratio are kept constant at 10{sup 4} and 2 respectively and -10 <= N <= 10, while Richardson number has been varied from 0.01 to 10 to simulate forced convection dominated flow, mixed convection and natural convection dominated flow. (authors)

  16. Mathematical Simulation of Convective Heat Transfer in the Low-Temperature Storage of Liquefied Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shestakov Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the results of mathematical modeling of convective heat transfer in the low-temperature storage of liquefied natural gas. Regime of natural convection in an enclosure with different intensity of the heat flux at the external borders are investigated. Was examined two-dimensional nonstationary problem within the model of Navier-Stokes in dimensionless variables “vorticity - stream function - temperature”. Distributions of hydrodynamic parameters and temperatures that characterize the basic regularities of the processes are obtained. Circulating flows are determined and carried out the analysis of vortices formation mechanism and the temperature distribution in solution at conditions of natural convection when the Grashof number (Gr = 106. A significant influence of heat transfer rate on solutions boundary on flow structure and temperature field in LNG storage tanks.

  17. Response of the convecting high-latitude F layer to a powerful HF wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Mingaleva

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model of the high-latitude ionosphere, which takes into account the convection of the ionospheric plasma, has been developed and utilized to simulate the F-layer response at auroral latitudes to high-power radio waves. The model produces the time variations of the electron density, positive ion velocity, and ion and electron temperature profiles within a magnetic field tube carried over an ionospheric heater by the convection electric field. The simulations have been performed for the point with the geographic coordinates of the ionospheric HF heating facility near Tromso, Norway, when it is located near the midnight magnetic meridian. The calculations have been made for equinox, at high-solar-activity, and low-geomagnetic-activity conditions. The results indicate that significant variations of the electron temperature, positive ion velocity, and electron density profiles can be produced by HF heating in the convecting high-latitude F layer.

  18. Response of the convecting high-latitude F layer to a powerful HF wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Mingaleva

    Full Text Available A numerical model of the high-latitude ionosphere, which takes into account the convection of the ionospheric plasma, has been developed and utilized to simulate the F-layer response at auroral latitudes to high-power radio waves. The model produces the time variations of the electron density, positive ion velocity, and ion and electron temperature profiles within a magnetic field tube carried over an ionospheric heater by the convection electric field. The simulations have been performed for the point with the geographic coordinates of the ionospheric HF heating facility near Tromso, Norway, when it is located near the midnight magnetic meridian. The calculations have been made for equinox, at high-solar-activity, and low-geomagnetic-activity conditions. The results indicate that significant variations of the electron temperature, positive ion velocity, and electron density profiles can be produced by HF heating in the convecting high-latitude F layer.

  19. Intensive probing of clear air convective fields by radar and instrumented drone aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Clear air convective fields were probed in three summer experiments (1969, 1970, and 1971) on an S-band monopulse tracking radar at Wallops Island, Virginia, and a drone aircraft with a takeoff weight of 5.2 kg, wingspan of 2.5 m, and cruising glide speed of 10.3 m/sec. The drone was flown 23.2 km north of the radar and carried temperature, pressure/altitude, humidity, and vertical and airspeed velocity sensors. Extensive time-space convective field data were obtained by taking a large number of RHI and PPI pictures at short intervals of time. The rapidly changing overall convective field data obtained from the radar could be related to the meteorological information telemetered from the drone at a reasonably low cost by this combined technique.

  20. Combined effects of crucible geometry and Marangoni convection on silicon Czochralski crystal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, F. [Unit of Developpement of Silicon Technologie, Algiers (Algeria); Bouabdallah, A.; Zizi, M. [LTSE Laboratory, University of Science and Technology USTHB., Babezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Hanchi, S. [UER Mecanique/ E.M.P/ B.P, El Bahri/Alger (Algeria); Alemany, A. [Laboratoire EPM, CNRS, Grenoble (France)

    2009-08-15

    In order to understand the influence of crucible geometry combined with natural convection and Marangoni convection on melt flow pattern, temperature and pressure fields in silicon Czochralski crystal growth process, a set of numerical simulations was conducted. We carry out calculation enable us to determine temperature, pressure and velocity fields in function of Grashof and Marangoni numbers. The essential results show that the hemispherical geometry of crucible seems to be adapted for the growth of a good quality crystal and the pressure field is strongly affected by natural and Marangoni convection and it is more sensitive than temperature. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. The role of a convective surface in models of the radiative heat transfer in nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, M.M., E-mail: mansurdu@yahoo.com; Al-Mazroui, W.A.; Al-Hatmi, F.S.; Al-Lawatia, M.A.; Eltayeb, I.A.

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • The role of a convective surface in modelling with nanofluids is investigated over a wedge. • Surface convection significantly controls the rate of heat transfer in nanofluid. • Increased volume fraction of nanoparticles to the base-fluid may not always increase the rate of heat transfer. • Effect of nanoparticles solid volume fraction depends on the types of constitutive materials. • Higher heat transfer in nanofluids is found in a moving wedge rather than in a static wedge. - Abstract: Nanotechnology becomes the core of the 21st century. Nanofluids are important class of fluids which help advancing nanotechnology in various ways. Convection in nanofluids plays a key role in enhancing the rate of heat transfer either for heating or cooling nanodevices. In this paper, we investigate theoretically the role of a convective surface on the heat transfer characteristics of water-based nanofluids over a static or moving wedge in the presence of thermal radiation. Three different types of nanoparticles, namely copper Cu, alumina Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and titanium dioxide TiO{sub 2} are considered in preparation of nanofluids. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are made dimensionless with the similarity transformations. Numerical simulations are carried out through the very robust computer algebra software MAPLE 13 to investigate the effects of various pertinent parameters on the flow field. The obtained results presented graphically as well as in tabular form and discussed from physical and engineering points of view. The results show that the rate of heat transfer in a nanofluid in the presence of thermal radiation significantly depends on the surface convection parameter. If the hot fluid side surface convection resistance is lower than the cold fluid side surface convection resistance, then increased volume fraction of the nanoparticles to the base fluid may reduces the heat transfer rate rather than increases from the surface of

  2. Improved scheme for parametrization of convection in the Met Office's Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneguz, Elena; Thomson, David; Witham, Claire; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta

    2015-04-01

    NAME is a Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model used by the Met Office to predict the dispersion of both natural and man-made contaminants in the atmosphere, e.g. volcanic ash, radioactive particles and chemical species. Atmospheric convection is responsible for transport and mixing of air resulting in a large exchange of heat and energy above the boundary layer. Although convection can transport material through the whole troposphere, convective clouds have a small horizontal length scale (of the order of few kilometres). Therefore, for large-scale transport the horizontal scale on which the convection exists is below the global NWP resolution used as input to NAME and convection must be parametrized. Prior to the work presented here, the enhanced vertical mixing generated by non-resolved convection was reproduced by randomly redistributing Lagrangian particles between the cloud base and cloud top with probability equal to 1/25th of the NWP predicted convective cloud fraction. Such a scheme is essentially diffusive and it does not make optimal use of all the information provided by the driving meteorological model. To make up for these shortcomings and make the parametrization more physically based, the convection scheme has been recently revised. The resulting version, presented in this paper, is now based on the balance equation between upward, entrainment and detrainment fluxes. In particular, upward mass fluxes are calculated with empirical formulas derived from Cloud Resolving Models and using the NWP convective precipitation diagnostic as closure. The fluxes are used to estimate how many particles entrain, move upward and detrain. Lastly, the scheme is completed by applying a compensating subsidence flux. The performance of the updated convection scheme is benchmarked against available observational data of passive tracers. In particular, radioxenon is a noble gas that can undergo significant long range transport: this study makes use of observations of

  3. Vertical natural convection: application of the unifying theory of thermal convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, C.S.; Ooi, A.; Lohse, Detlef; Chung, D.

    2015-01-01

    Results from direct numerical simulations of vertical natural convection at Rayleigh numbers 1.0×10 5 –1.0×10 9 and Prandtl number 0.709 support a generalised applicability of the Grossmann–Lohse (GL) theory, which was originally developed for horizontal natural (Rayleigh–Bénard) convection. In

  4. Transport phenomena an introduction to advanced topics

    CERN Document Server

    Glasgow, Larry A

    2010-01-01

    Enables readers to apply transport phenomena principles to solve advanced problems in all areas of engineering and science This book helps readers elevate their understanding of, and their ability to apply, transport phenomena by introducing a broad range of advanced topics as well as analytical and numerical solution techniques. Readers gain the ability to solve complex problems generally not addressed in undergraduate-level courses, including nonlinear, multidimensional transport, and transient molecular and convective transport scenarios. Avoiding rote memorization, the author em

  5. Water in geodynamical models of mantle convection and plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-González, J.; Van Hunen, J.; Chotalia, K.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Rozel, A.; Tackley, P. J.; Nakagawa, T.

    2017-12-01

    The presence of water in the the mantle has a significant effect in the dynamical and thermal evolution of Earth, which partially explains the differences with other planets and is a key factor for the presence of life on Earth. First, a small amount of water can decrease the mantle viscosity by a several orders of magnitude, thereby changing the convection regime and affecting the thermal evolution. Second, the presence of water significantly changes the solidus curve, with crucial implications for melting. Third, water in the mantle can change the Clapeyron slope of mantle materials, which changes the depth at which phase transitions take place. The thermal and dynamical evolution of Earth under the presence of water in the mantle has been the focus of recent studies, but many questions remain unanswered. In this project we intend to investigate how the maximum water capacity of different mantle regions affects water transport and Earth's convective regime. We will study the effect phase transitions under the presence of water, which can change the buoyancy of slabs in the transition zone. We present preliminary results numerical models of global mantle convection for the whole history of earth using the numerical geodynamics software tool StagYY. We will use a new parametrisation of dehydration processes, obtained from high-resolution numerical simulations, to implement a more accurate description of the water released from the slab as it travels through the mantle. We have integrated recent experimental results of the water capacity of deep mantle minerals to study the water circulation and the total water budget. We use data from the most recent experiments and ab-inito calculations to implement a realistic rheology.

  6. Numerical Studies on Natural Convection Heat Losses from Open Cubical Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural convection heat losses occurring from cubical open cavities are analysed in this paper. Open cubical cavities of sides 0.1 m, 0.2 m, 0.25 m, 0.5 m, and 1 m with constant temperature back wall boundary conditions and opening ratio of 1 are studied. The Fluent CFD software is used to analyse the three-dimensional (3D cavity models. The studies are carried out for cavities with back wall temperatures between 35°C and 100°C. The effect of cavity inclination on the convective loss is analysed for angles of 0° (cavity facing sideways, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° (cavity facing vertically downwards. The Rayleigh numbers involved in this study range between 4.5 × 105 and 1.5 × 109. The natural convection loss is found to increase with an increase in back wall temperature. The natural convection loss is observed to decrease with an increase in cavity inclination; the highest convective loss being at 0° and the lowest at 90° inclination. This is observed for all cavities analysed here. Nusselt number correlations involving the effect of Rayleigh number and the cavity inclination angle have been developed from the current studies. These correlations can be used for engineering applications such as electronic cooling, low- and medium-temperature solar thermal systems, passive architecture, and also refrigeration systems.

  7. Specialists' meeting on evaluation of decay heat removal by natural convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-02-01

    Decay heat removal by natural convection (DHRNC) is essential to enhancing the safety of liquid metal fast reactors (LMFRs). Various design concepts related to DHRNC have been proposed and experimental and analytical studies have been carried out in a number of countries. The purpose of this Specialists' Meeting on 'Decay Heat Removal by Natural Convection' organized by the International Working Group on Fast Reactors IAEA, is to exchange information about the state of the art related to methodologies on evaluation of DHRNC features (experimental studies and code developments) and to discuss problems which need to be solved in order to evaluate DHRNC properly and reasonably. The following main topical areas were discussed by delegates: Overview; Experimental studies and code validation; Design study. Two main DHR systems for LMFR are under consideration: (i) direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) with immersed DFIX in main vessel, intermediate sodium loop and sodium-air heat exchanger; and (ii) auxiliary cooling system which removes heat from the outside surface of the reactor vessel by natural convection of air (RVACS). The practicality and economic viability of the use of RVACS is possible up to a modular type reactor or a middle size reactor based on current technology. For the large monolithic plant concepts DRACS is preferable. The existing experimental results and the codes show encouraging results so that the decay heat removal by pure natural convection is feasible. Concerning the objective, 'passive safety', the DHR by pure natural convection is essential feature to enhance the reliability of DHR.

  8. CONVECTIVE BURSTS AND THE COUPLING OF SATURN'S EQUATORIAL STORMS AND INTERIOR ROTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Aurnou, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Temporal variations of Saturn's equatorial jet and magnetic field hint at rich dynamics coupling the atmosphere and the deep interior. However, it has been assumed that rotation of the interior dynamo must be steady over tens of years of modern observations. Here we use a numerical convection model and scaling estimates to show how equatorial convective bursts can transfer angular momentum to the deeper interior. The numerical model allows angular momentum transfer between a fluid outer spherical shell and a rigid inner sphere. Convection drives a prograde equatorial jet exhibiting quasiperiodic bursts that fill the equatorial volume outside the tangent cylinder. For each burst strong changes in the equatorial surface velocity are associated with retrograde torque on the inner sphere. Our results suggest that Saturn's Great White Spot, a giant storm that was observed to fill the equatorial region in 1990, could mobilize a volume of fluid carrying roughly 15% of Saturn's moment of inertia. Conservation of angular momentum then implies that a 20% change in the equatorial jet angular velocity could change the average interior rotation rate by about 0.1%—roughly an order of magnitude less than the apparent rotation rate changes associated with Saturn's kilometric radio (SKR) signal. However, if the SKR signal originates outside the liquid metal core in a 'planetary tachocline' that separates the layer of fast zonal flow from the magnetically controlled and slowly convecting deep interior, then convective bursts can provide a possible mechanism for the observed ∼1% SKR changes.

  9. Effect of Wind Flow on Convective Heat Losses from Scheffler Solar Concentrator Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nene, Anita Arvind; Ramachandran, S.; Suyambazhahan, S.

    2018-05-01

    Receiver is an important element of solar concentrator system. In a Scheffler concentrator, solar rays get concentrated at focus of parabolic dish. While radiation losses are more predictable and calculable since strongly related to receiver temperature, convective looses are difficult to estimate in view of additional factors such as wind flow direction, speed, receiver geometry, prior to current work. Experimental investigation was carried out on two geometries of receiver namely cylindrical and conical with 2.7 m2 Scheffler to find optimum condition of tilt to provide best efficiency. Experimental results showed that as compared to cylindrical receiver, conical receiver gave maximum efficiency at 45° tilt angle. However effect of additional factors like wind speed, wind direction on especially convective losses could not be separately seen. The current work was undertaken to investigate further the same two geometries using computation fluid dynamics using FLUENT to compute convective losses considering all variables such at tilt angle of receiver, wind velocity and wind direction. For cylindrical receiver, directional heat transfer coefficient (HTC) is remarkably high to tilt condition meaning this geometry is critical to tilt leading to higher convective heat losses. For conical receiver, directional average HTC is remarkably less to tilt condition leading to lower convective heat loss.

  10. Specialists' meeting on evaluation of decay heat removal by natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    Decay heat removal by natural convection (DHRNC) is essential to enhancing the safety of liquid metal fast reactors (LMFRs). Various design concepts related to DHRNC have been proposed and experimental and analytical studies have been carried out in a number of countries. The purpose of this Specialists' Meeting on 'Decay Heat Removal by Natural Convection' organized by the International Working Group on Fast Reactors IAEA, is to exchange information about the state of the art related to methodologies on evaluation of DHRNC features (experimental studies and code developments) and to discuss problems which need to be solved in order to evaluate DHRNC properly and reasonably. The following main topical areas were discussed by delegates: Overview; Experimental studies and code validation; Design study. Two main DHR systems for LMFR are under consideration: (i) direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) with immersed DFIX in main vessel, intermediate sodium loop and sodium-air heat exchanger; and (ii) auxiliary cooling system which removes heat from the outside surface of the reactor vessel by natural convection of air (RVACS). The practicality and economic viability of the use of RVACS is possible up to a modular type reactor or a middle size reactor based on current technology. For the large monolithic plant concepts DRACS is preferable. The existing experimental results and the codes show encouraging results so that the decay heat removal by pure natural convection is feasible. Concerning the objective, 'passive safety', the DHR by pure natural convection is essential feature to enhance the reliability of DHR

  11. Parallelization of Reversible Ripple-carry Adders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal; Axelsen, Holger Bock

    2009-01-01

    The design of fast arithmetic logic circuits is an important research topic for reversible and quantum computing. A special challenge in this setting is the computation of standard arithmetical functions without the generation of \\emph{garbage}. Here, we present a novel parallelization scheme...... wherein $m$ parallel $k$-bit reversible ripple-carry adders are combined to form a reversible $mk$-bit \\emph{ripple-block carry adder} with logic depth $\\mathcal{O}(m+k)$ for a \\emph{minimal} logic depth $\\mathcal{O}(\\sqrt{mk})$, thus improving on the $mk$-bit ripple-carry adder logic depth $\\mathcal...

  12. Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    ABSTRACT Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage Rebecca Allen Geological CO2 storage is an engineering feat that has been undertaken around the world for more than two decades, thus accurate modeling of flow and transport behavior is of practical importance. Diffusive and convective transport are relevant processes for buoyancy-driven convection of CO2 into underlying fluid, a scenario that has received the attention of numerous modeling studies. While most studies focus on Darcy-scale modeling of this scenario, relatively little work exists at the pore-scale. In this work, properties evaluated at the pore-scale are used to investigate the transport behavior modeled at the Darcy-scale. We compute permeability and two different forms of tortuosity, namely hydraulic and diffusive. By generating various pore ge- ometries, we find hydraulic and diffusive tortuosity can be quantitatively different in the same pore geometry by up to a factor of ten. As such, we emphasize that these tortuosities should not be used interchangeably. We find pore geometries that are characterized by anisotropic permeability can also exhibit anisotropic diffusive tortuosity. This finding has important implications for buoyancy-driven convection modeling; when representing the geological formation with an anisotropic permeabil- ity, it is more realistic to also account for an anisotropic diffusivity. By implementing a non-dimensional model that includes both a vertically and horizontally orientated 5 Rayleigh number, we interpret our findings according to the combined effect of the anisotropy from permeability and diffusive tortuosity. In particular, we observe the Rayleigh ratio may either dampen or enhance the diffusing front, and our simulation data is used to express the time of convective onset as a function of the Rayleigh ratio. Also, we implement a lattice Boltzmann model for thermal convective flows, which we treat as an analog for

  13. The role of the velocity gradient in laminar convective heat transfer through a tube with a uniform wall heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liangbi; Zhang Qiang; Li Xiaoxia

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of convective heat transfer. For this purpose, the reason why thermal diffusivity should be placed before the Laplacian operator of the heat flux, and the role of the velocity gradient in convective heat transfer are analysed. The background to these analyses is that, when the energy conservation equation of convective heat transfer is used to explain convective heat transfer there are two points that are difficult for teachers to explain and for undergraduates to understand: thermal diffusivity is placed before the Laplacian operator of temperature; on the wall surface (the fluid side) the velocity is zero, a diffusion equation of temperature is gained from energy conservation equation, however, temperature cannot be transported. Consequently, the real physical meaning of thermal diffusivity is not clearly reflected in the energy conservation equation, and whether heat transfer occurs through a diffusion process or a convection process on the wall surface is not clear. Through a simple convective heat transfer case: laminar convective heat transfer in a tube with a uniform wall heat flux on the tube wall, this paper explains these points more clearly. The results declare that it is easier for teachers to explain and for undergraduates to understand these points when a description of heat transfer in terms of the heat flux is used. In this description, thermal diffusivity is placed before the Laplacian operator of the heat flux; the role of the velocity gradient in convective heat transfer appears, on the wall surface, the fact whether heat transfer occurs through a diffusion process or a convection process can be explained and understood easily. The results are not only essential for teachers to improve the efficiency of university-level physics education regarding heat transfer, but they also enrich the theories for understanding heat transfer

  14. Reverse convection in helium and other fluids in the high speed rotating frame: negative and positive buoyancy effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igra, R.; Scurlock, R.G.; Wu, Y.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental studies of thermo-syphon flows in radial tubes and loops between the axis and the periphery of a rotating helium cryostat have shown that when heat is supplied at an intermediate radius, the heat is carried radially inwards as A flow and radially outwards as B flow. The results with helium suggest that while the steady state patterns of the A and B flows are complex, the heat is divided approximately equally between the conventional A flow and the reverse B flow. A model of convective heating in the rotating frame is presented and two necessary conditions for reverse convection are identified and discussed. The model predicts reverse convection in liquid nitrogen and this is confirmed by experimental measurement. An array of radial ducts is proposed for the cooling of a superconducting AC generator in order to counter the effects of reverse convection in the helium refrigerant

  15. Mixed Convection of Variable Properties Al2O3-EG-Water Nanofluid in a Two-Dimensional Lid-Driven Enclosure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Sheikhzadeh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, mixed convection of Al2O3-EG-Water nanofluid in a square lid-driven enclosure is investigated numerically. The focus of this study is on the effects of variable thermophysical properties of the nanofluid on the heat transfer characteristics. The top moving and the bottom stationary horizontal walls are insulated, while the vertical walls are kept at different constant temperatures. The study is carried out for Richardson numbers of 0.01–1000, the solid volume fractions of 0–0.05 and the Grashof number of 104. The transport equations are solved numerically with a finite volume approach using the SIMPLER algorithm. The results show that the Nusselt number is mainly affected by the viscosity, density and conductivity variations. For low Richardson numbers, although viscosity increases by increasing the nanoparticles volume fraction, due to high intensity convection of enhanced conductivity nanofluid, the average Nusselt number increases for both constant and variable cases. However, for high Richardson numbers, as the volume fraction of nanoparticles increases heat transfer enhancement occurs for the constant properties cases but deterioration in heat transfer occurs for the variable properties cases. The distinction is due to underestimation of viscosity of the nanofluid by the constant viscosity model in the constant properties cases and states important effects of temperature dependency of thermophysical properties, in particular the viscosity distribution in the domain.

  16. Gun Carrying by High School Students in Boston, MA: Does Overestimation of Peer Gun Carrying Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M.; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1700 high school students in Boston, MA. Over 5% of students reported carrying a…

  17. Large-scale Instability during Gravitational Collapse with Neutrino Transport and a Core-Collapse Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, A. G.; Chechetkin, V. M.

    2018-04-01

    Most of the energy released in the gravitational collapse of the cores of massive stars is carried away by neutrinos. Neutrinos play a pivotal role in explaining core-collape supernovae. Currently, mathematical models of the gravitational collapse are based on multi-dimensional gas dynamics and thermonuclear reactions, while neutrino transport is considered in a simplified way. Multidimensional gas dynamics is used with neutrino transport in the flux-limited diffusion approximation to study the role of multi-dimensional effects. The possibility of large-scale convection is discussed, which is interesting both for explaining SN II and for setting up observations to register possible high-energy (≳10MeV) neutrinos from the supernova. A new multi-dimensional, multi-temperature gas dynamics method with neutrino transport is presented.

  18. Test of the 'glymphatic' hypothesis demonstrates diffusive and aquaporin-4-independent solute transport in rodent brain parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alex J; Yao, Xiaoming; Dix, James A; Jin, Byung-Ju; Verkman, Alan S

    2017-08-21

    Transport of solutes through brain involves diffusion and convection. The importance of convective flow in the subarachnoid and paravascular spaces has long been recognized; a recently proposed 'glymphatic' clearance mechanism additionally suggests that aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channels facilitate convective transport through brain parenchyma. Here, the major experimental underpinnings of the glymphatic mechanism were re-examined by measurements of solute movement in mouse brain following intracisternal or intraparenchymal solute injection. We found that: (i) transport of fluorescent dextrans in brain parenchyma depended on dextran size in a manner consistent with diffusive rather than convective transport; (ii) transport of dextrans in the parenchymal extracellular space, measured by 2-photon fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, was not affected just after cardiorespiratory arrest; and (iii) Aqp4 gene deletion did not impair transport of fluorescent solutes from sub-arachnoid space to brain in mice or rats. Our results do not support the proposed glymphatic mechanism of convective solute transport in brain parenchyma.

  19. Joint proposal for US/USSR on nonlinear dynamics and plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: disrupted surfaces in reversed field pinches; particle transport in tokamaks; Lagrangian particle transport in nonstationary convective patterns; relativistic particle motion in electromagnetic fields; and computer softural

  20. Analysis of the contribution of sedimentation to bacterial mass transport in a parallel plate flow chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jiuyi; Busscher, Henk J.; Norde, Willem; Sjollema, Jelmer

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate bacterium-substratum interactions, understanding of bacterial mass transport is necessary. Comparisons of experimentally observed initial deposition rates with mass transport rates in parallel-plate-flow-chambers (PPFC) predicted by convective-diffusion yielded deposition

  1. Terminology for mass transport and exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassingthwaighte, J B; Chinard, F P; Crone, C

    1986-01-01

    Virtually all fields of physiological research now encompass various aspects of solute transport by convection, diffusion, and permeation across membranes. Accordingly, this set of terms, symbols, definitions, and units is proposed as a means of clear communication among workers in the physiologi......Virtually all fields of physiological research now encompass various aspects of solute transport by convection, diffusion, and permeation across membranes. Accordingly, this set of terms, symbols, definitions, and units is proposed as a means of clear communication among workers...... in the physiological, engineering, and physical sciences. The goal is to provide a setting for quantitative descriptions of physiological transport phenomena....

  2. Tritium transport in lithium ceramics porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, S.W.; Ambrose, V.

    1991-01-01

    A random network model has been utilized to analyze the problem of tritium percolation through porous Li ceramic breeders. Local transport in each pore channel is described by a set of convection-diffusion-reaction equations. Long range transport is described by a matrix technique. The heterogeneous structure of the porous medium is accounted for via Monte Carlo methods. The model was then applied to an analysis of the relative contribution of diffusion and convective flow to tritium transport in porous lithium ceramics. 15 refs., 4 figs

  3. Effect of rotational speed modulation on heat transport in a fluid layer with temperature dependent viscosity and internal heat source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Bhadauria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a theoretical investigation has been carried out to study the combined effect of rotation speed modulation and internal heating on thermal instability in a temperature dependent viscous horizontal fluid layer. Rayleigh–Bénard momentum equation with Coriolis term has been considered to describe the convective flow. The system is rotating about it is own axis with non-uniform rotational speed. In particular, a time-periodic and sinusoidally varying rotational speed has been considered. A weak nonlinear stability analysis is performed to find the effect of modulation on heat transport. Nusselt number is obtained in terms of amplitude of convection and internal Rayleigh number, and depicted graphically for showing the effects of various parameters of the system. The effect of modulated rotation speed is found to have a stabilizing effect for different values of modulation frequency. Further, internal heating and thermo-rheological parameters are found to destabilize the system.

  4. Natural convection in tunnels at Yucca Mountain and impact on drift seepage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Peterson, P.

    2010-04-15

    The decay heat from radioactive waste that is to be disposed in the once proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM) will significantly influence the moisture conditions in the fractured rock near emplacement tunnels (drifts). Additionally, large-scale convective cells will form in the open-air drifts and will serve as an important mechanism for the transport of vaporized pore water from the fractured rock in the drift center to the drift end. Such convective processes would also impact drift seepage, as evaporation could reduce the build up of liquid water at the tunnel wall. Characterizing and understanding these liquid water and vapor transport processes is critical for evaluating the performance of the repository, in terms of water-induced canister corrosion and subsequent radionuclide containment. To study such processes, we previously developed and applied an enhanced version of TOUGH2 that solves for natural convection in the drift. We then used the results from this previous study as a time-dependent boundary condition in a high-resolution seepage model, allowing for a computationally efficient means for simulating these processes. The results from the seepage model show that cases with strong natural convection effects are expected to improve the performance of the repository, since smaller relative humidity values, with reduced local seepage, form a more desirable waste package environment.

  5. FINGERING CONVECTION AND CLOUDLESS MODELS FOR COOL BROWN DWARF ATMOSPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremblin, P.; Amundsen, D. S.; Mourier, P.; Baraffe, I.; Chabrier, G.; Drummond, B.; Homeier, D.; Venot, O.

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to improve the current understanding of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs, especially cold ones with spectral types T and Y, whose modeling is a current challenge. Silicate and iron clouds are believed to disappear at the photosphere at the L/T transition, but cloudless models fail to reproduce correctly the spectra of T dwarfs, advocating for the addition of more physics, e.g., other types of clouds or internal energy transport mechanisms. We use a one-dimensional radiative/convective equilibrium code ATMO to investigate this issue. This code includes both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium chemistry and solves consistently the PT structure. Included opacity sources are H 2 -H 2 , H 2 -He, H 2 O, CO, CO 2 , CH 4 , NH 3 , K, Na, and TiO, VO if they are present in the atmosphere. We show that the spectra of Y dwarfs can be accurately reproduced with a cloudless model if vertical mixing and NH 3 quenching are taken into account. T dwarf spectra still have some reddening in, e.g., J–H, compared to cloudless models. This reddening can be reproduced by slightly reducing the temperature gradient in the atmosphere. We propose that this reduction of the stabilizing temperature gradient in these layers, leading to cooler structures, is due to the onset of fingering convection, triggered by the destabilizing impact of condensation of very thin dust

  6. FINGERING CONVECTION AND CLOUDLESS MODELS FOR COOL BROWN DWARF ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremblin, P.; Amundsen, D. S.; Mourier, P.; Baraffe, I.; Chabrier, G.; Drummond, B. [Astrophysics Group, University of Exeter, EX4 4QL Exeter (United Kingdom); Homeier, D. [Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, CRAL, UMR CNRS 5574, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Venot, O., E-mail: tremblin@astro.ex.ac.uk, E-mail: pascal.tremblin@cea.fr [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-05-01

    This work aims to improve the current understanding of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs, especially cold ones with spectral types T and Y, whose modeling is a current challenge. Silicate and iron clouds are believed to disappear at the photosphere at the L/T transition, but cloudless models fail to reproduce correctly the spectra of T dwarfs, advocating for the addition of more physics, e.g., other types of clouds or internal energy transport mechanisms. We use a one-dimensional radiative/convective equilibrium code ATMO to investigate this issue. This code includes both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium chemistry and solves consistently the PT structure. Included opacity sources are H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}-He, H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, K, Na, and TiO, VO if they are present in the atmosphere. We show that the spectra of Y dwarfs can be accurately reproduced with a cloudless model if vertical mixing and NH{sub 3} quenching are taken into account. T dwarf spectra still have some reddening in, e.g., J–H, compared to cloudless models. This reddening can be reproduced by slightly reducing the temperature gradient in the atmosphere. We propose that this reduction of the stabilizing temperature gradient in these layers, leading to cooler structures, is due to the onset of fingering convection, triggered by the destabilizing impact of condensation of very thin dust.

  7. Numerical simulations of downward convective overshooting in giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chun-Lin; Deng, Li-Cai; Chan, Kwing-Lam

    2009-09-01

    An attempt at understanding downward overshooting in the convective envelopes of post-main-sequence stars has been made on the basis of three-dimensional large-eddy simulations, using artificially modified OPAL opacity and taking into account radiation and ionization in the equation of state. Two types of star, an intermediate-mass star and a massive star, were considered. To avoid a long thermal relaxation time of the intermediate-mass star, we increased the stellar energy flux artificially while trying to maintain a structure close to the one given by a 1D stellar model. A parametric study of the flux factor was performed. For the massive star, no such process was necessary. Numerical results were analysed when the system reached the statistical steady state. It was shown that the penetration distance in pressure scaleheights is of the order of unity. The scaling relations between penetration distance, input flux and vertical velocity fluctuations studied by Singh et al. were checked. The anisotropy of the turbulent convection and the diffusion models of the third-order moments representing the non-local transport were also investigated. These models are dramatically affected by the velocity fields and no universal constant parameters seem to exist. The limitations of the numerical results were also discussed.

  8. Convective heat transfer analysis in aggregates rotary drum reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, Laurédan; Huchet, Florian; Dumoulin, Jean; Baudru, Yvan; Tamagny, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Heat transport characterisation inside rotary drum dryer has a considerable importance linked to many industrial applications. The present paper deals with the heat transfer analysis from experimental apparatus installed in a large-scale rotary drum reactor applied to the asphalt materials production. The equipment including in-situ thermal probes and external visualization by mean of infrared thermography gives rise to the longitudinal evaluation of inner and external temperatures. The assessment of the heat transfer coefficients by an inverse methodology is resolved in order to accomplish a fin analysis of the convective mechanism inside baffled (or flights) rotary drum. The results are discussed and compared with major results of the literature. -- Highlights: ► A thermal and flow experimentation is performed on a large-scale rotary drum. ► Four working points is chosen in the frame of asphalt materials production. ► Evaluation of the convective transfer mechanisms is calculated by inverse method. ► The drying stage is performed in the combustion area. ► Wall/aggregates heat exchanges have a major contribution in the heating stage

  9. CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER IN CYCLONE DEVICE WITH EXTERNAL GAS RECIRCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Karpov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the convective heat transfer on the surface of a hollow cylinder or several billets in a cyclone device with the new principle of external gas recirculation. According to this principle, transport of coolant from the lateral surface of the chamber, where the temperature is the highest, in the axial region is being fulfilled due to the pressure drop between the wall and axial areas of cyclonic flow. Dependency analysis of average and local heat transfer coefficients from operational and geometrical parameters has been performed; the generalized similarity equations for the calculation of the latter have been suggested. It is demonstrated that in case of download of a cyclone chamber with several billets, the use of the considered scheme of the external recirculation due to the specific characteristics of aerodynamics practically does not lead to noticeable changes in the intensity of convective heat transfer. Both experimental data and the numerical simulation results obtained with the use of OpenFOAM platform were used in the work. The investigations fulfilled will expand the area of the use of cyclone heating devices.

  10. Convective mixing in helium white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauclair, G.; Fontaine, G.

    1979-01-01

    The conditions under which convective mixing episodes take place between the helium envelopes and the underlying carbon layers in helium-rich white dwarfs are investigated. It is found that, for essentially any value of the initial helium content less than the maximum mass a helium convection zone can have, mixing does occur, and leads, in the vast majority of cases, to an almost pure carbon superficial composition. Mixing products that show only traces of carbon while retaining helium-dominated envelopes are possible only if the initial helium content is quite close to the maximum possible mass of the helium convection zone. In the presence of turbulence, this restriction could be relaxed, however, and the helium-rich lambda4670 stars may possibly be explained in this fashion

  11. Controls on sublithospheric small-scale convection on Curie depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likerman, Jeremias; Zlotnik, Sergio; Chun-Feng, Li

    2017-04-01

    As the ocean lithosphere cools and thickens, its bottom layer goes unstable leading to sub-lithospheric small-scale convection (SSC). Since SSC was originally proposed, there have been considerable efforts regarding the understanding of the physics that rules the thermal instabilities of the SSC (e.g. Dumoulin et al, 1999; Solomatov and Moresi, 2000). Over the last several years, it is understood that the interaction between the plate movement and the SSC tends to form longitudinal (LRs or also called 'Richter rolls') and transverse rolls (TRs), of which the axis is parallel and perpendicular to the plate motion, respectively. The geometry of these rolls have been been recently inferred by Li et al (2013) using Curie depths from the North Atlantic as proxies for plates temperatures. They showed that Curie depths have a large oscillating and heterogeneous patterns that could be related to SSC. In the North Atlantic transverse rolls seem predominant. In this work we analyze, by means of 3D dynamical numerical simulations, the influence of SSC on the Curie depths patterns observed in the North Atlantic and Pacific plates. We investigate the behaviour of the Curie isotherms trying to determine if SSC is able to reproduce the observed data, and the influence of several poorly constrained rheological parameters. Our numerical simulations show that: a) using realistic laboratory-constrained rheologies and temperature it is possible to modify temperatures as low as those at Curie depths; b) transverse rolls are generated as well as longitudinal rolls on those isotherms; c) the spreading rate is a first order control on the developing of transverse rolls. References Dumoulin, C., Doin, M. P., & Fleitout, L. (1999). Heat transport in stagnant lid convection with temperature-and pressure-dependent Newtonian or non-Newtonian rheology. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 104(B6), 12759-12777. Li, C. F., Wang, J., Lin, J., & Wang, T. (2013). Thermal evolution of the

  12. MODELING OF CONVECTIVE FLOWS IN PNEUMOBASED OBJECTS. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khrustalyov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computer modeling process of three-dimensional forced convection proceeding from computation of thermodynamic parameters of pneumo basic buildings (pneumo supported structures is presented. The mathematical model of numerical computation method of temperature and velocity fields, pressure profile in the object is developed using the package Solid works and is provided by grid methods on specified software. Special Navier–Stokes, Clapeyron–Mendeleev, continuity and thermal-conductivity equations are used to calculate parameters in the building with four supply and exhaust channels. Differential equations are presented by algebraic equation systems, initial-boundary conditions are changed by differential conditions for mesh functions and their solutions are performed by algebraic operations. In this article the following is demonstrated: in pneumo basic buildings convective and heat flows are identical structures near the surfaces in unlimited space, but in single-multiply shells (envelopescirculation lines take place, geometrical sizes of which depend on thermal-physical characteristics of gas(airin envelopes, radiation reaction with heated surfaces of envelopes with  sphere, earth surface, neighboring buildings. Natural surveys of pneumo-basic buildings of different purposes were carried out in Minsk, in different cities of Belarus and Russia, including temperature fields of external and internal surfaces of air envelopes, relative humidity, thermal (heatflows, radiation characteristics and others.The results of research work are illustrated with diagrams of temperature, velocity, density and pressure dependent on coordinates and time.

  13. Natural Convective Heat Transfer from Narrow Plates

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    Natural Convective Heat Transfer from Narrow Plates deals with a heat transfer situation that is of significant practical importance but which is not adequately dealt with in any existing textbooks or in any widely available review papers. The aim of the book is to introduce the reader to recent studies of natural convection from narrow plates including the effects of plate edge conditions, plate inclination, thermal conditions at the plate surface and interaction of the flows over adjacent plates. Both numerical and experimental studies are discussed and correlation equations based on the results of these studies are reviewed.

  14. Might electrical earthing affect convection of light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budrikis, Z.L.

    1982-01-01

    Partial convection of light by moving media was predicted by Fresnel and verified by Fizeau, Zeeman and others. It is accepted as an important argument in favour of the Special Theory of Relativity. The suggestion is made here that the convection is partial only when the propagating medium is moved with respect to its electrically earthed surroundings and that it would be total if an earthed shield was co-moving with the medium. This is based on a reinterpretation of Maxwell's equations wherein they are seen as macroscopic relationships that are in each case valid only in respect of a particular inertial frame of reference, the local electrical earth frame. (Auth.)

  15. Topology Optimisation for Coupled Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Aage, Niels

    stabilised finite elements implemented in a parallel multiphysics analysis and optimisation framework DFEM [1], developed and maintained in house. Focus is put on control of the temperature field within the solid structure and the problems can therefore be seen as conjugate heat transfer problems, where heat...... conduction governs in the solid parts of the design domain and couples to convection-dominated heat transfer to a surrounding fluid. Both loosely coupled and tightly coupled problems are considered. The loosely coupled problems are convection-diffusion problems, based on an advective velocity field from...

  16. Lattice BGK simulation of natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yu; Ohashi, Hirotada; Akiyama, Mamoru

    1995-01-01

    Recently a new thermal lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook fluid model was suggested by the authors. In this study, this new model was applied into the numerical simulation of natural convection, namely the Rayleigh Benard flow. The critical number for the onset of convective phenomenon was numerically measured and compared with that of theoretical prediction. A gravity dependent deviation was found in the numerical simulation, which is explained as an unavoidable consequence of the incorporation of gravity force in the lattice BGK system. (author)

  17. Convective diffusion of nanoparticles from the epithelial barrier toward regional lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhin, Stanislav S; Labib, Mohamed E

    2013-11-01

    Drug delivery using nanoparticles as drug carriers has recently attracted the attention of many investigators. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to the lymph nodes is especially important to prevent cancer metastasis or infection, and to diagnose disease stage. However, systemic injection of nanoparticles often results in organ toxicity because they reach and accumulate in all the lymph nodes in the body. An attractive strategy would be to deliver the drug-loaded nanoparticles to a subset of draining lymph nodes corresponding to a specific site or organ to minimize systemic toxicity. In this respect, mucosal delivery of nanoparticles to regional draining lymph nodes of a selected site creates a new opportunity to accomplish this task with minimal toxicity. One example is the delivery of nanoparticles from the vaginal lumen to draining lymph nodes to prevent the transmission of HIV in women. Other known examples include mucosal delivery of vaccines to induce immunity. In all cases, molecular and particle transport by means of diffusion and convective diffusion play a major role. The corresponding transport processes have common inherent regularities and are addressed in this review. Here we use nanoparticle delivery from the vaginal lumen to the lymph nodes as an example to address the many aspects of associated transport processes. In this case, nanoparticles penetrate the epithelial barrier and move through the interstitium (tissue) to the initial lymphatics until they finally reach the lymph nodes. Since the movement of interstitial liquid near the epithelial barrier is retarded, nanoparticle transport was found to take place through special foci present in the epithelium. Immediately after nanoparticles emerge from the foci, they move through the interstitium due to diffusion affected by convection (convective diffusion). Specifically, the convective transport of nanoparticles occurs due to their convection together with interstitial fluid through the

  18. Abstraction carrying code and resource-awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Hermenegildo, Manuel V.; Albert Albiol, Elvira; López García, Pedro; Puebla Sánchez, Alvaro Germán

    2005-01-01

    Proof-Carrying Code (PCC) is a general approach to mobile code safety in which the code supplier augments the program with a certifícate (or proof). The intended benefit is that the program consumer can locally validate the certifícate w.r.t. the "untrusted" program by means of a certifícate checker—a process which should be much simpler, eíñcient, and automatic than generating the original proof. Abstraction Carrying Code (ACC) is an enabling technology for PCC in which an abstract mod...

  19. Turbulence induced radial transport of toroidal momentum in boundary plasma of EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, N.; Yan, N.; Xu, G. S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wang, L.; Ding, S. Y.; Chen, R.; Chen, L.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Shao, L. M.; Wang, Z. X.

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence induced toroidal momentum transport in boundary plasma is investigated in H-mode discharge using Langmuir-Mach probes on EAST. The Reynolds stress is found to drive an inward toroidal momentum transport, while the outflow of particles convects the toroidal momentum outwards in the edge plasma. The Reynolds stress driven momentum transport dominates over the passive momentum transport carried by particle flux, which potentially provides a momentum source for the edge plasma. The outflow of particles delivers a momentum flux into the scrape-off layer (SOL) region, contributing as a momentum source for the SOL flows. At the L-H transitions, the outward momentum transport suddenly decreases due to the suppression of edge turbulence and associated particle transport. The SOL flows start to decelerate as plasma entering into H-mode. The contributions from turbulent Reynolds stress and particle transport for the toroidal momentum transport are identified. These results shed lights on the understanding of edge plasma accelerating at L-H transitions.

  20. Meridional flow in the solar convection zone. I. Measurements from gong data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kholikov, S. [National Solar Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Serebryanskiy, A. [Ulugh Beg Astronomical Institute, Uzbek Academy of Science, Tashkent 100052 (Uzbekistan); Jackiewicz, J., E-mail: kholikov@noao.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Large-scale plasma flows in the Sun's convection zone likely play a major role in solar dynamics on decadal timescales. In particular, quantifying meridional motions is a critical ingredient for understanding the solar cycle and the transport of magnetic flux. Because the signal of such features can be quite small in deep solar layers and be buried in systematics or noise, the true meridional velocity profile has remained elusive. We perform time-distance helioseismology measurements on several years worth of Global Oscillation Network Group Doppler data. A spherical harmonic decomposition technique is applied to a subset of acoustic modes to measure travel-time differences to try to obtain signatures of meridional flows throughout the solar convection zone. Center-to-limb systematics are taken into account in an intuitive yet ad hoc manner. Travel-time differences near the surface that are consistent with a poleward flow in each hemisphere and are similar to previous work are measured. Additionally, measurements in deep layers near the base of the convection zone suggest a possible equatorward flow, as well as partial evidence of a sign change in the travel-time differences at mid-convection zone depths. This analysis on an independent data set using different measurement techniques strengthens recent conclusions that the convection zone may have multiple 'cells' of meridional flow. The results may challenge the common understanding of one large conveyor belt operating in the solar convection zone. Further work with helioseismic inversions and a careful study of systematic effects are needed before firm conclusions of these large-scale flow structures can be made.

  1. The amplitude of the deep solar convection and the origin of the solar supergranulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Recent observations and models have raised questions about our understanding of the dynamics of the deep solar convection. In particular, the amplitude of low wavenumber convective motions appears to be too high in both local area radiative magnetohydrodynamic and global spherical shell magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In global simulations this results in weaker than needed rotational constraints and consequent non solar-like differential rotation profiles. In deep local area simulations it yields strong horizontal flows in the photosphere on scales much larger than the observed supergranulation. We have undertaken numerical studies that suggest that solution to this problem is closely related to the long standing question of the origin of the solar supergranulation. Two possibilities have emerged. One suggests that small scale photospherically driven motions dominate convecive transport even at depth, descending through a very nearly adiabatic interior (more more nearly adiabatic than current convection models achieve). Convection of this form can meet Rossby number constraints set by global scale motions and implies that the solar supergranulation is the largest buoyantly driven scale of motion in the Sun. The other possibility is that large scale convection driven deeep in the Sun dynamically couples to the near surface shear layer, perhaps as its origin. In this case supergranulation would be the largest non-coupled convective mode, or only weakly coupled and thus potentially explaining the observed excess power in the prograde direction. Recent helioseismic results lend some support to this. We examind both of these possibilities using carefully designed numerical experiments, and weigh thier plausibilities in light of recent observations.

  2. Auroral streamers: characteristics of associated precipitation,convection and field-aligned currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sergeev

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available During the long-duration steady convection activity on 11 December 1998, the development of a few dozen auroral streamers was monitored by Polar UVI instrument in the dark northern nightside ionosphere. On many occasions the DMSP spacecraft crossed the streamer-conjugate regions over the sunlit southern auroral oval, permitting the investigation of the characteristics of ion and electron precipitation, ionospheric convection and field-aligned currents associated with the streamers. We confirm the conjugacy of streamer-associated precipitation, as well as their association with ionospheric plasma streams having a substantial equatorward convection component. The observations display two basic types of streamer-associated precipitation. In its polewardmost half, the streamer-associated (field-aligned accelerated electron precipitation coincides with the strong (≥2–7μA/m2 upward field-aligned currents on the westward flank of the convection stream, sometimes accompanied by enhanced proton precipitation in the adjacent region. In the equatorward portion of the streamer, the enhanced precipitation includes both electrons and protons, often without indication of field-aligned acceleration. Most of these characteristics are consistent with the model describing the generation of the streamer by the narrow plasma bubbles (bursty bulk flows which are contained on dipolarized field lines in the plasma sheet, although the mapping is strongly distorted which makes it difficult to quantitatively interprete the ionospheric image. The convective streams in the ionosphere, when well-resolved, had the maximal convection speeds ∼0.5–1km/s, total field-aligned currents of a few tenths of MA, thicknesses of a few hundreds km and a potential drop of a few kV across the stream. However, this might represent only a small part of the associated flux transport in the equatorial plasma sheet.

    Key words. Ionosphere (electric fiels and

  3. Transport Statistics - Transport - UNECE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable Energy Statistics Trade Transport Themes UNECE and the SDGs Climate Change Gender Ideas 4 Change UNECE Weekly Videos UNECE Transport Areas of Work Transport Statistics Transport Transport Statistics About us Terms of Reference Meetings and Events Meetings Working Party on Transport Statistics (WP.6

  4. Transgenic cassava lines carrying heterologous alternative oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Afuape

    2013-07-03

    Jul 3, 2013 ... production of flowers, apomixis (Nassar et al., 2000; ... In order to increase the stress tolerance capacity of ... stress-related procedure due to the activities of auxin ... the evaluation of the transgenic lines for rate of OES .... Some transgenic lines carrying the 35S-AOX fragment amplified using 35S303F1 and.

  5. Infections That Pets Carry (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... how to protect your family from infections. How Pets Spread Infections Like people, all animals carry germs . Illnesses common among housepets — ... get an infection that can be passed to people. Safely Caring for Your Pet Here are some tips to help your family ...

  6. Construction of expression vectors carrying mouse peroxisomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to construct expression vectors carrying mouse peroxisomal protein gene (PEP-cDNA) in prokaryotic and mammalian expression vectors in ... pGEX6p2-PEP and pUcD3-FLAG-PEP constructed vectors were transformed into the one shot TOP10 and JM105 bacterial competent cells, respectively.

  7. Magnetoacoustic waves in current-carrying plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, M.H.

    1980-04-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental investigations of the characteristics of magnetoacoustic waves in non-uniform, current-carrying plasmas are reviewed. Dissipative MHD and collisionless theories are considered. Also discussed is the use of magnetoacoustic waves in plasma diagnostics and plasma heating

  8. Construction of expression vectors carrying mouse peroxisomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... The aim of this study was to construct expression vectors carrying mouse peroxisomal protein gene. (PEP-cDNA) in prokaryotic and mammalian expression vectors in chimeric cDNA types, encompassing. GST and FLAG with PEP-cDNA. PEP-cDNA was sub-cloned in pGEX6p2 prokaryotic expression ...

  9. Transgenic cassava lines carrying heterologous alternative oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Afuape

    2013-07-03

    Jul 3, 2013 ... Organized embryogenic callus development: In our experiment, somatic embryos were developed from leaf lobes collected from transgenic cassava lines carrying the AtAOX1a gene. Immature leaf lobes measuring about 1 to 6 mm obtained from about six weeks old in vitro derived plants were used.

  10. High Ra, high Pr convection with viscosity gradients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. High Ra, high Pr convection with viscosity gradients. Weak upward flow through mesh. Top fluid more viscous. Unstable layer Instability Convection.

  11. Stretched flow of Carreau nanofluid with convective boundary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. January 2016 physics pp. 3–17. Stretched flow of Carreau nanofluid with ... fluid over a flat plate subjected to convective surface condition. ... the steady laminar boundary layer flow over a permeable plate with a convective boundary.

  12. Formation of convective cells in the scrape-off layer of the Castor tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeckel, J.; Hron, M.; Adamek, J.; Brotankova, J.; Dejarnac, R.; Duran, I.; Panek, R.; Stejskal, P.; Zacek, F.; Devynck, P.; Gunn, J.; Martines, E.; Bonhomme, G.; Van Oost, G.; Hansen, T.; Gorler, T.; Svoboda, V.

    2004-01-01

    We describe experiments with a biased electrode inserted into the scrape-off layer (SOL) of the CASTOR tokamak. The resulting radial and poloidal electric field and plasma density modification are measured by means of Langmuir probe arrays with high temporal and spatial resolutions. Poloidally and radially localized stationary structures of the electric field (convective cells) are identified and a related significant modification of the particle transport in the SOL is observed. (authors)

  13. Comparative analysis of heat transfer correlations for forced convection boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guglielmini, G.; Nannei, E.; Pisoni, C.

    1978-01-01

    A critical survey was conducted of the most relevant correlations of boiling heat transfer in forced convection flow. Most of the investigations carried out on partial nucleate boiling and fully developed nucleate boiling have led to the formulation of correlations that are not able to cover a wide range of operating conditions, due to the empirical approach of the problem. A comparative analysis is therefore required in order to delineate the relative accuracy of the proposed correlations, on the basis of the experimental data presently available. The survey performed allows the evaluation of the accuracy of the different calculating procedure; the results obtained, moreover, indicate the most reliable heat transfer correlations for the different operating conditions investigated. This survey was developed for five pressure range (up to 180bar) and for both saturation and subcooled boiling condition

  14. Natural convection heat transfer from a vertical circular tube sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharne, S.P.; Gaitonde, U.N.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine natural convection heat transfer coefficients (a) on a plain vertical circular plate, and (b) on a similar plate with a square array of non-conducting tubes fixed in it. The experiments were carried out using air as the heat transfer medium. The diameter of the brass plates used was 350 mm. The diameter of the bakelite tubes used was 19.2 mm. The range of Rayleigh numbers was from 1.06x10 8 to 1.66x10 8 . The results show that the heat transfer coefficients in case (a) are very close to those obtained using standard correlations for vertical flat plates, whereas for case (b) the heat transfer coefficients are at least 50 percent higher than those predicted by the Churchill-Chu correlation. It is hence concluded that the disturbance to boundary layer caused by the presence of tubes enhances the heat transfer coefficient significantly. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  15. An infinite-dimensional model of free convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iudovich, V.I. (Rostovskii Gosudarstvennyi Universitet, Rostov-on-Don (USSR))

    1990-12-01

    An infinite-dimensional model is derived from the equations of free convection in the Boussinesq-Oberbeck approximation. The velocity field is approximated by a single mode, while the heat-conduction equation is conserved fully. It is shown that, for all supercritical Rayleigh numbers, there exist exactly two secondary convective regimes. The case of ideal convection with zero viscosity and thermal conductivity is examined. The averaging method is used to study convection regimes at high Reynolds numbers. 10 refs.

  16. Role of residual kidney function and convective volume on change in beta2-microglobulin levels in hemodiafiltration patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penne, E. Lars; van der Weerd, Neelke C.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; van den Dorpel, Marinus A.; Grooteman, Muriel P. C.; Nubé, Menso J.; ter Wee, Piet M.; Lévesque, Renée; Bots, Michiel L.

    2010-01-01

    Removal of beta2-microglobulin (beta2M) can be increased by adding convective transport to hemodialysis (HD). The aim of this study was to investigate the change in beta2M levels after 6-mo treatment with hemodiafiltration (HDF) and to evaluate the role of residual kidney function (RKF) and the

  17. Role of residual kidney function and convective volume on change in β2-microglobulin levels in hemodiafiltration patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L. Penne (Lars); N.C. van der Weerd (Neelke); P.J. Blankestijn (Peter); M.A. van den Dorpel (Marinus); M.P.C. Grooteman (Muriel); M.J. Nubé (Menso); P.M. ter Wee (Piet); R. Lévesque (Renée); M.L. Bots (Michiel)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground and objectives: Removal of β2-microglobulin (β2M) can be increased by adding convective transport to hemodialysis (HD). The aim of this study was to investigate the change in β2M levels after 6-mo treatment with hemodiafiltration (HDF) and to evaluate the role of residual

  18. Understanding and representing the effect of wind shear on the turbulent transfer in the convective boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronda, R.J.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Pino, D.

    2012-01-01

    Goal of this study is to quantify the effect of wind shear on the turbulent transport in the dry Convective Boundary Layer (CBL). Questions addressed include the effect of wind shear on the depth of the mixed layer, the effect of wind shear on the depth and structure of the capping inversion, and

  19. Education: DNA replication using microscale natural convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priye, Aashish; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2012-12-07

    There is a need for innovative educational experiences that unify and reinforce fundamental principles at the interface between the physical, chemical, and life sciences. These experiences empower and excite students by helping them recognize how interdisciplinary knowledge can be applied to develop new products and technologies that benefit society. Microfluidics offers an incredibly versatile tool to address this need. Here we describe our efforts to create innovative hands-on activities that introduce chemical engineering students to molecular biology by challenging them to harness microscale natural convection phenomena to perform DNA replication via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Experimentally, we have constructed convective PCR stations incorporating a simple design for loading and mounting cylindrical microfluidic reactors between independently controlled thermal plates. A portable motion analysis microscope enables flow patterns inside the convective reactors to be directly visualized using fluorescent bead tracers. We have also developed a hands-on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) exercise based on modeling microscale thermal convection to identify optimal geometries for DNA replication. A cognitive assessment reveals that these activities strongly impact student learning in a positive way.

  20. Evolution of Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sugai, H.

    1984-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally by control of the end losses in the 'scrape off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface...

  1. Free convection film flows and heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, Deyi

    2010-01-01

    Presents development of systematic studies for hydrodynamics and heat and mass transfer in laminar free convection, accelerating film boiling and condensation of Newtonian fluids, and accelerating film flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids. This book provides a system of analysis models with a developed velocity component method.

  2. Penetrative convection at high Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppaladoddi, Srikanth; Wettlaufer, John S.

    2018-04-01

    We study penetrative convection of a fluid confined between two horizontal plates, the temperatures of which are such that a temperature of maximum density lies between them. The range of Rayleigh numbers studied is Ra=[0.01 ,4 ]106,108 and the Prandtl numbers are Pr=1 and 11.6. An evolution equation for the growth of the convecting region is obtained through an integral energy balance. We identify a new nondimensional parameter, Λ , which is the ratio of temperature difference between the stable and unstable regions of the flow; larger values of Λ denote increased stability of the upper stable layer. We study the effects of Λ on the flow field using well-resolved lattice Boltzmann simulations and show that the characteristics of the flow depend sensitively upon it. For the range Λ = , we find that for a fixed Ra the Nusselt number, Nu, increases with decreasing Λ . We also investigate the effects of Λ on the vertical variation of convective heat flux and the Brunt-Väisälä frequency. Our results clearly indicate that in the limit Λ →0 the problem reduces to that of the classical Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

  3. Radiative-convective equilibrium model intercomparison project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Allison A.; Reed, Kevin A.; Satoh, Masaki; Stevens, Bjorn; Bony, Sandrine; Ohno, Tomoki

    2018-03-01

    RCEMIP, an intercomparison of multiple types of models configured in radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE), is proposed. RCE is an idealization of the climate system in which there is a balance between radiative cooling of the atmosphere and heating by convection. The scientific objectives of RCEMIP are three-fold. First, clouds and climate sensitivity will be investigated in the RCE setting. This includes determining how cloud fraction changes with warming and the role of self-aggregation of convection in climate sensitivity. Second, RCEMIP will quantify the dependence of the degree of convective aggregation and tropical circulation regimes on temperature. Finally, by providing a common baseline, RCEMIP will allow the robustness of the RCE state across the spectrum of models to be assessed, which is essential for interpreting the results found regarding clouds, climate sensitivity, and aggregation, and more generally, determining which features of tropical climate a RCE framework is useful for. A novel aspect and major advantage of RCEMIP is the accessibility of the RCE framework to a variety of models, including cloud-resolving models, general circulation models, global cloud-resolving models, single-column models, and large-eddy simulation models.

  4. Vortex statistics in turbulent rotating convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Geurts, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The vortices emerging in rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water at Rayleigh number Ra=6.0×108 are investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and by direct numerical simulation. The so-called Q criterion is used to detect the vortices from velocity fields. This

  5. Phenomenology of convection-parameterization closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-I. Yano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Closure is a problem of defining the convective intensity in a given parameterization. In spite of many years of efforts and progress, it is still considered an overall unresolved problem. The present article reviews this problem from phenomenological perspectives. The physical variables that may contribute in defining the convective intensity are listed, and their statistical significances identified by observational data analyses are reviewed. A possibility is discussed for identifying a correct closure hypothesis by performing a linear stability analysis of tropical convectively coupled waves with various different closure hypotheses. Various individual theoretical issues are considered from various different perspectives. The review also emphasizes that the dominant physical factors controlling convection differ between the tropics and extra-tropics, as well as between oceanic and land areas. Both observational as well as theoretical analyses, often focused on the tropics, do not necessarily lead to conclusions consistent with our operational experiences focused on midlatitudes. Though we emphasize the importance of the interplays between these observational, theoretical and operational perspectives, we also face challenges for establishing a solid research framework that is universally applicable. An energy cycle framework is suggested as such a candidate.

  6. Oscillatory Convection in Rotating Liquid Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Vincent; Grannan, Alex; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    We have performed laboratory experiments in a aspect ratio Γ = 2 cylinder using liquid gallium (Pr = 0 . 023) as the working fluid. The Ekman number varies from E = 4 ×10-5 to 4 ×10-6 and the Rayleigh number varies from Ra = 3 ×105 to 2 ×107 . Using heat transfer and temperature measurements within the fluid, we characterize the different styles of low Pr rotating convective flow. The convection threshold is first overcome in the form of a container scale inertial oscillatory mode. At stronger forcing, wall-localized modes develop, coexisting with the inertial oscillatory modes in the bulk. When the strength of the buoyancy increases further, the bulk flow becomes turbulent while the wall modes remain. Our results imply that rotating convective flows in liquid metals do not develop in the form of quasi-steady columns, as in Pr = 1 planetary and stellar dynamo models, but in the form of oscillatory motions. Therefore, convection driven dynamo action in low Pr fluids can differ substantively than that occurring in typical Pr = 1 numerical models. Our results also suggest that low wavenumber, wall modes may be dynamically and observationally important in liquid metal dynamo systems. We thank the NSF Geophysics Program for support of this project.

  7. Natural convection in horizontal fluid layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suo-Antilla, A.J.

    1977-02-01

    The experimental work includes developing and using a thermal convection cell to obtain measurements of the heat flux and turbulent core temperature of a horizontal layer of fluid heated internally and subject to both stabilizing and destabilizing temperature differences. The ranges of Rayleigh numbers tested were 10 7 equal to or less than R/sub I/ equal to or less than 10 13 and -10 10 equal to or less than R/sub E/ equal to or less than 10 10 . Power integral methods were found to be adequate for interpolating and extrapolating the data. The theoretical work consists of the derivation, solution and use of the mean field equations for study of thermally driven convection in horizontal layers of infinite extent. The equations were derived by a separation of variables technique where the horizontal directions were described by periodic structures and the vertical being some function of z. The derivation resulted in a coupled set of momentum and energy equations. The equations were simplified by using the infinite Prandtl number limit and neglecting direct intermodal interaction. Solutions to these equations are used to predict the existence of multi-wavenumber flows at all supercritical Rayleigh numbers. Subsequent inspection of existing experimental photographs of convecting fluids confirms their existence. The onset of time dependence is found to coincide with the onset of the second convective mode. Each mode is found to consist of two wavenumbers and typically the velocity and temperature fields of the right modal branch are found to be out of phase

  8. Solar Hot Water Heating by Natural Convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate laboratory experiment in which a solar collector is used to heat water for domestic use. The working fluid is moved by natural convection so no pumps are required. Experimental apparatus is simple in design and operation so that data can be collected quickly and easily. (Author/JN)

  9. A 'backward' free-convective boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiken, H.K.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper the cooling of a low-heat-resistance sheet that moves downwards is considered. The free-convective velocities are assumed to be much larger than the velocity of the sheet. As a result the motion of the fluid is mainly towards the point where the sheet enters the system and a ‘backward’

  10. Natural convection inside an irregular porous cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, Jorge I. LLagostera; Trevisan, Osvair Vidal

    1990-01-01

    Natural convection flow induced by heating from below in a irregular porous cavity is investigated numerically. The influence of the modified Rayleigh number and geometric ratios on heat transfer and fluid flow is studied. Global and local Nusselt for Rayleigh numbers covering the range 0 - 1600 and for several geometric ratios. The fluid flow and the temperature field are illustrated by contour maps. (author)

  11. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  12. Preserving Symmetry in Convection-Diffusion Schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, R.W.C.P.; Veldman, A.E.P.; Drikakis, D.; Geurts, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    We propose to perform turbulent flow simulations in such manner that the difference operators do have the same symmetry properties as the corresponding differential operators. That is, the convective operator is represented by a skew-symmetric difference operator and the diffusive operator is

  13. Theories for convection in stellar atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordlund, Aa.

    1976-02-01

    A discussion of the fundamental differences between laboratory convection in a stellar atmosphere is presented. The shortcomings of laterally homogeneous model atmospheres are analysed, and the extent to which these shortcoming are avoided in the two-component representation is discussed. Finally a qualitative discussion on the scaling properties of stellar granulation is presented. (Auth.)

  14. Influence of convective conditions on three dimensional mixed convective hydromagnetic boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauf, A., E-mail: raufamar@ciitsahiwal.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Siddiq, M.K. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Abbasi, F.M. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Meraj, M.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Ashraf, M. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Shehzad, S.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan)

    2016-10-15

    The present work deals with the steady laminar three-dimensional mixed convective magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. A uniform magnetic field is applied normal to the flow direction. Similarity variables are implemented to convert the non-linear partial differential equations into ordinary ones. Convective boundary conditions are utilized at surface of the sheet. A numerical technique of Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg (RFK45) is used to obtain the results of velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The physical dimensionless parameters are discussed through tables and graphs. - Highlights: • Mixed convective boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid is taken into account. • Impact of magnetic field is examined. • Convective heat and mass conditions are imposed. • Numerical solutions are presented and discussed.

  15. A Coupled Model for Natural Convection and Condensation in Heated Subsurface Enclosures Embedded in Fractured Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    In heated tunnels such as those designated for emplacement of radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, axial temperature gradients may cause natural convection processes that can significantly influence the moisture conditions in the tunnels and in the surrounding fractured rock. Large-scale convection cells would provide an effective mechanism for axial vapor transport, driving moisture out of the formation away from the heated tunnel section into cool end sections (where no waste is emplaced). To study such processes, we have developed and applied an enhanced version of TOUGH2 (Pruess et al., 1999) adding a new module that solves for natural convection in open cavities. The new TOUGH2 simulator simultaneously handles (1) the flow and energy transport processes in the fractured rock; (2) the flow and energy transport processes in the cavity; and (3) the heat and mass exchange at the rock-cavity interface. The new module is applied to simulate the future thermal-hydrological (TH) conditions within and near a representative waste emplacement tunnel at Yucca Mountain. Particular focus is on the potential for condensation along the emplacement section, a possible result of heat output differences between individual waste packages

  16. Testing particle filters on convective scale dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslehner, Mylene; Craig, George. C.; Janjic, Tijana

    2014-05-01

    Particle filters have been developed in recent years to deal with highly nonlinear dynamics and non Gaussian error statistics that also characterize data assimilation on convective scales. In this work we explore the use of the efficient particle filter (P.v. Leeuwen, 2011) for convective scale data assimilation application. The method is tested in idealized setting, on two stochastic models. The models were designed to reproduce some of the properties of convection, for example the rapid development and decay of convective clouds. The first model is a simple one-dimensional, discrete state birth-death model of clouds (Craig and Würsch, 2012). For this model, the efficient particle filter that includes nudging the variables shows significant improvement compared to Ensemble Kalman Filter and Sequential Importance Resampling (SIR) particle filter. The success of the combination of nudging and resampling, measured as RMS error with respect to the 'true state', is proportional to the nudging intensity. Significantly, even a very weak nudging intensity brings notable improvement over SIR. The second model is a modified version of a stochastic shallow water model (Würsch and Craig 2013), which contains more realistic dynamical characteristics of convective scale phenomena. Using the efficient particle filter and different combination of observations of the three field variables (wind, water 'height' and rain) allows the particle filter to be evaluated in comparison to a regime where only nudging is used. Sensitivity to the properties of the model error covariance is also considered. Finally, criteria are identified under which the efficient particle filter outperforms nudging alone. References: Craig, G. C. and M. Würsch, 2012: The impact of localization and observation averaging for convective-scale data assimilation in a simple stochastic model. Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc.,139, 515-523. Van Leeuwen, P. J., 2011: Efficient non-linear data assimilation in geophysical

  17. Novel Natural Convection Heat Sink Design Concepts From First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    CONVECTION HEAT SINK DESIGN CONCEPTS FROM FIRST PRINCIPLES by Derek E. Fletcher June 2016 Thesis Advisor: Garth Hobson Second Reader...COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NOVEL NATURAL CONVECTION HEAT SINK DESIGN CONCEPTS FROM FIRST PRINCIPLES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...CONVECTION HEAT SINK DESIGN CONCEPTS FROM FIRST PRINCIPLES Derek E. Fletcher Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy B.S., Southwestern

  18. International symposium on transient convective heat transfer: book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The international symposium on convective heat transfer was held on 19-23 August 1996, in Cesme, Izmir, Turkey. The spesialists discussed forced convection, heat exchangers, free convection and multiphase media and phase change at the meeting. Almost 53 papers were presented in the meeting

  19. Large-Scale Flows and Magnetic Fields Produced by Rotating Convection in a Quasi-Geostrophic Model of Planetary Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guervilly, C.; Cardin, P.

    2017-12-01

    Convection is the main heat transport process in the liquid cores of planets. The convective flows are thought to be turbulent and constrained by rotation (corresponding to high Reynolds numbers Re and low Rossby numbers Ro). Under these conditions, and in the absence of magnetic fields, the convective flows can produce coherent Reynolds stresses that drive persistent large-scale zonal flows. The formation of large-scale flows has crucial implications for the thermal evolution of planets and the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. In this work, we explore this problem with numerical simulations using a quasi-geostrophic approximation to model convective and zonal flows at Re 104 and Ro 10-4 for Prandtl numbers relevant for liquid metals (Pr 0.1). The formation of intense multiple zonal jets strongly affects the convective heat transport, leading to the formation of a mean temperature staircase. We also study the generation of magnetic fields by the quasi-geostrophic flows at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

  20. Basal melting driven by turbulent thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbanipour Esfahani, Babak; Hirata, Silvia C.; Berti, Stefano; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2018-05-01

    Melting and, conversely, solidification processes in the presence of convection are key to many geophysical problems. An essential question related to these phenomena concerns the estimation of the (time-evolving) melting rate, which is tightly connected to the turbulent convective dynamics in the bulk of the melt fluid and the heat transfer at the liquid-solid interface. In this work, we consider a convective-melting model, constructed as a generalization of the Rayleigh-Bénard system, accounting for the basal melting of a solid. As the change of phase proceeds, a fluid layer grows at the heated bottom of the system and eventually reaches a turbulent convection state. By means of extensive lattice-Boltzmann numerical simulations employing an enthalpy formulation of the governing equations, we explore the model dynamics in two- and three-dimensional configurations. The focus of the analysis is on the scaling of global quantities like the heat flux and the kinetic energy with the Rayleigh number, as well as on the interface morphology and the effects of space dimensionality. Independently of dimensionality, we find that the convective-melting system behavior shares strong resemblances with that of the Rayleigh-Bénard one, and that the heat flux is only weakly enhanced with respect to that case. Such similarities are understood, at least to some extent, considering the resulting slow motion of the melting front (with respect to the turbulent fluid velocity fluctuations) and its generally little roughness (compared to the height of the fluid layer). Varying the Stefan number, accounting for the thermodynamical properties of the material, also seems to have only a mild effect, which implies the possibility of extrapolating results in numerically delicate low-Stefan setups from more convenient high-Stefan ones. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings for the geophysically relevant problem of modeling Arctic ice melt ponds.

  1. Transports of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousselier, Yves

    1982-01-01

    Transport safety depends on the packaging, and the degree of safety must be adapted to the potential hazards of the substance carried. The various kinds of packagings and their strength are examined and the transport of irradiated fuels from the safety angle is taken as example and a comparison is made with the transport of conventional dangerous substances [fr

  2. Research on Water Resources Design Carrying Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghua Qin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Water resources carrying capacity (WRCC is a recently proposed management concept, which aims to support sustainable socio-economic development in a region or basin. However, the calculation of future WRCC is not well considered in most studies, because water resources and the socio-economic development mode for one area or city in the future are quite uncertain. This paper focused on the limits of traditional methods of WRCC and proposed a new concept, water resources design carrying capacity (WRDCC, which incorporated the concept of design. In WRDCC, the population size that the local water resources can support is calculated based on the balance of water supply and water consumption, under the design water supply and design socio-economic development mode. The WRDCC of Chengdu city in China is calculated. Results show that the WRDCC (population size of Chengdu city in development modeI (II, III will be 997 ×104 (770 × 104, 504 × 104 in 2020, and 934 × 104 (759 × 104, 462 × 104 in 2030. Comparing the actual population to the carrying population (WRDCC in 2020 and 2030, a bigger gap will appear, which means there will be more and more pressure on the society-economic sustainable development.

  3. Impact of geographic variations of the convective and dehydration center on stratospheric water vapor over the Asian monsoon region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Asian monsoon region is the most prominent moisture center of water vapor in the lower stratosphere (LS during boreal summer. Previous studies have suggested that the transport of water vapor to the Asian monsoon LS is controlled by dehydration temperatures and convection mainly over the Bay of Bengal and Southeast Asia. However, there is a clear geographic variation of convection associated with the seasonal and intra-seasonal variations of the Asian monsoon circulation, and the relative influence of such a geographic variation of convection vs. the variation of local dehydration temperatures on water vapor transport is still not clear. Using satellite observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS and a domain-filling forward trajectory model, we show that almost half of the seasonal water vapor increase in the Asian monsoon LS are attributable to geographic variations of convection and resultant variations of the dehydration center, of which the influence is comparable to the influence of the local dehydration temperature increase. In particular, dehydration temperatures are coldest over the southeast and warmest over the northwest Asian monsoon region. Although the convective center is located over Southeast Asia, an anomalous increase of convection over the northwest Asia monsoon region increases local diabatic heating in the tropopause layer and air masses entering the LS are dehydrated at relatively warmer temperatures. Due to warmer dehydration temperatures, anomalously moist air enters the LS and moves eastward along the northern flank of the monsoon anticyclonic flow, leading to wet anomalies in the LS over the Asian monsoon region. Likewise, when convection increases over the Southeast Asia monsoon region, dry anomalies appear in the LS. On a seasonal scale, this feature is associated with the monsoon circulation, convection and diabatic heating marching towards the northwest Asia monsoon region from June to August. The

  4. The understanding of the R7T7 glass blocks long term behavior: chemical and transport coupling in fractured media; Comprehension de l'alteration a long terme des colis de verre R7T7: etude du couplage chimie transport dans un milieu fissure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomat, L

    2008-04-15

    The long term behavior of nuclear waste glass blocks depends highly on chemical reactions which occur at the surface in contact with water. Studies carried out on inactive fractured glass blocks show that fracture networks play a significant part in reactive surface area. Nevertheless, the complexity of results interpretation, due to a weak knowledge of fracture networks and local lixiviation conditions, does not allow us to comprehend the physical and chemical mechanisms involved. Model cracks are a key step to study chemical and transport coupling in fractured media. Crack lixiviation in aggressive conditions (pH{>=}11) show that the crack's position (horizontal or vertical) determines the dominant transport mechanism (respectively diffusion or convection induced by gravity). This gravity driven flow seems to be negligible in lower pH conditions. The convective velocity is estimated by a 1D model of reactive transport. Two other parameters are studied: the influence of thermal gradient and the influence of interconnected cracks on alteration. A strong retroactive effect of convection, due to thermal gradient, on the alteration kinetic is observed inside the crack. These works lead to a complete alteration experiment of a 163 crack network subject to a thermal gradient. The use of the geochemical software, HYTEC, within the framework of this study shows the potential of the software which is however limited by the kinetics law used. (author)

  5. The understanding of the R7T7 glass blocks long term behavior: chemical and transport coupling in fractured media; Comprehension de l'alteration a long terme des colis de verre R7T7: etude du couplage chimie transport dans un milieu fissure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomat, L

    2008-04-15

    The long term behavior of nuclear waste glass blocks depends highly on chemical reactions which occur at the surface in contact with water. Studies carried out on inactive fractured glass blocks show that fracture networks play a significant part in reactive surface area. Nevertheless, the complexity of results interpretation, due to a weak knowledge of fracture networks and local lixiviation conditions, does not allow us to comprehend the physical and chemical mechanisms involved. Model cracks are a key step to study chemical and transport coupling in fractured media. Crack lixiviation in aggressive conditions (pH{>=}11) show that the crack's position (horizontal or vertical) determines the dominant transport mechanism (respectively diffusion or convection induced by gravity). This gravity driven flow seems to be negligible in lower pH conditions. The convective velocity is estimated by a 1D model of reactive transport. Two other parameters are studied: the influence of thermal gradient and the influence of interconnected cracks on alteration. A strong retroactive effect of convection, due to thermal gradient, on the alteration kinetic is observed inside the crack. These works lead to a complete alteration experiment of a 163 crack network subject to a thermal gradient. The use of the geochemical software, HYTEC, within the framework of this study shows the potential of the software which is however limited by the kinetics law used. (author)

  6. Solutal convection induced by dissolution. Influence on erosion dynamics and interface shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanu, Michael; Philippi, Julien; Cohen, Caroline; Derr, Julien; Courrech du Pont, Sylvain

    2017-04-01

    Rock fractures invaded by a water flow, are often subjected to dissolution, which let grow and evolve the initial fracture network, by evacuating the eroded minerals under a solute form. In the case of fast kinetic of dissolution, local erosion rate is set by the advection of the solute. The erosion velocity decreases indeed with the solute concentration at the interface and vanishes when this concentration reaches the saturation value. Even in absence of an imposed or external flow, advection can drive the dissolution, when buoyancy effects due to gravity induce a solutal convection flow, which controls the erosive dynamics and modifies the shape of the dissolving interface. Here, we investigate using model experiments with fast dissolving materials and numerical simulations in simplified situations, solutal convection induced by dissolution. Results are interpreted regarding a linear stability analysis of the corresponding solutal Rayleigh-Benard instability. A dissolving surface is suspended above a water height, initially at rest. In a first step, solute flux is transported through a growing diffusion layer. Then after an onset time, once the layer exceeds critical width, convection flow starts under the form of falling plumes. A dynamic equilibrium results in average from births and deaths of intermittent plumes, setting the size of the solute concentration boundary layer at the interface and thus the erosion velocity. Solutal convection can also induce a pattern on the dissolving interface. We show experimentally with suspended and inclined blocks of salt and sugar, that in a linear stage, the first wavelength of the dissolution pattern corresponds to the wavelength of the convection instability. Then pattern evolves to more complex shapes due to non-linear interactions between the flow and the eroded interface. More generally, we inquire what are the conditions to observe a such solutal convection instability in geological situations and if the properties of

  7. Convective heat transfer enhancement using Carbon nanofibers (CNFs): influence of amorphous carbon layer on heat transfer performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.; Lefferts, Leonardus; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, an experimental heat transfer investigation was carried out to investigate the combined influence of both amorphous carbon (a-C) layer thickness and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the convective heat transfer behavior. Synthesis of these carbon nano structures was achieved using catalytic

  8. NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CONVECTION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radice, David; Ott, Christian D. [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, Mailcode 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abdikamalov, Ernazar [Department of Physics, School of Science and Technology, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Couch, Sean M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Haas, Roland [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Schnetter, Erik, E-mail: dradice@caltech.edu [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2016-03-20

    We present results from high-resolution semiglobal simulations of neutrino-driven convection in core-collapse supernovae. We employ an idealized setup with parameterized neutrino heating/cooling and nuclear dissociation at the shock front. We study the internal dynamics of neutrino-driven convection and its role in redistributing energy and momentum through the gain region. We find that even if buoyant plumes are able to locally transfer heat up to the shock, convection is not able to create a net positive energy flux and overcome the downward transport of energy from the accretion flow. Turbulent convection does, however, provide a significant effective pressure support to the accretion flow as it favors the accumulation of energy, mass, and momentum in the gain region. We derive an approximate equation that is able to explain and predict the shock evolution in terms of integrals of quantities such as the turbulent pressure in the gain region or the effects of nonradial motion of the fluid. We use this relation as a way to quantify the role of turbulence in the dynamics of the accretion shock. Finally, we investigate the effects of grid resolution, which we change by a factor of 20 between the lowest and highest resolution. Our results show that the shallow slopes of the turbulent kinetic energy spectra reported in previous studies are a numerical artifact. Kolmogorov scaling is progressively recovered as the resolution is increased.

  9. NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CONVECTION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radice, David; Ott, Christian D.; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Couch, Sean M.; Haas, Roland; Schnetter, Erik

    2016-01-01

    We present results from high-resolution semiglobal simulations of neutrino-driven convection in core-collapse supernovae. We employ an idealized setup with parameterized neutrino heating/cooling and nuclear dissociation at the shock front. We study the internal dynamics of neutrino-driven convection and its role in redistributing energy and momentum through the gain region. We find that even if buoyant plumes are able to locally transfer heat up to the shock, convection is not able to create a net positive energy flux and overcome the downward transport of energy from the accretion flow. Turbulent convection does, however, provide a significant effective pressure support to the accretion flow as it favors the accumulation of energy, mass, and momentum in the gain region. We derive an approximate equation that is able to explain and predict the shock evolution in terms of integrals of quantities such as the turbulent pressure in the gain region or the effects of nonradial motion of the fluid. We use this relation as a way to quantify the role of turbulence in the dynamics of the accretion shock. Finally, we investigate the effects of grid resolution, which we change by a factor of 20 between the lowest and highest resolution. Our results show that the shallow slopes of the turbulent kinetic energy spectra reported in previous studies are a numerical artifact. Kolmogorov scaling is progressively recovered as the resolution is increased

  10. Kinetic characteristics of the gait of a musician carrying or not his instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bolli Mota

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The integrity of the locomotor system can be compromised by the transport of certain objects, especially when done in an inadequate manner. Due to their weight and size, the transport of musical instruments can contribute to body dysfunctions in musicians who frequently have to carry their instruments, influencing balance andbody posture. Thus, the soil reaction force was investigated during the gait of a musician carrying or not his instrument. Two AMTI (Advanced Mechanical Technologies, Inc. platforms were used for kinetic data acquisition. A total of 40 measurements were obtainedfor gait and balance: 20 without carrying the instrument and 20 while carrying the instrument. The t test showed significant differences between the two situations for all variables analyzed. The results suggest that the locomotor system suffers alterationswhen carrying any kind of load, as was the case here in which the subject carried 7.75% of his own weight.

  11. Convective boundary layer heights over mountainous terrain - A review of concepts -

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wekker, Stephan; Kossmann, Meinolf

    2015-12-01

    Mountainous terrain exerts an important influence on the Earth's atmosphere and affects atmospheric transport and mixing at a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. The vertical scale of this transport and mixing is determined by the height of the atmospheric boundary layer, which is therefore an important parameter in air pollution studies, weather forecasting, climate modeling, and many other applications. It is recognized that the spatio-temporal structure of the daytime convective boundary layer (CBL) height is strongly modified and more complex in hilly and mountainous terrain compared to flat terrain. While the CBL over flat terrain is mostly dominated by turbulent convection, advection from multi-scale thermally driven flows plays an important role for the CBL evolution over mountainous terrain. However, detailed observations of the CBL structure and understanding of the underlying processes are still limited. Characteristics of CBL heights in mountainous terrain are reviewed for dry, convective conditions. CBLs in valleys and basins, where hazardous accumulation of pollutants is of particular concern, are relatively well-understood compared to CBLs over slopes, ridges, or mountain peaks. Interests in the initiation of shallow and deep convection, and of budgets and long-range transport of air pollutants and trace gases, have triggered some recent studies on terrain induced exchange processes between the CBL and the overlying atmosphere. These studies have helped to gain more insight into CBL structure over complex mountainous terrain, but also show that the universal definition of CBL height over mountains remains an unresolved issue. The review summarizes the progress that has been made in documenting and understanding spatio-temporal behavior of CBL heights in mountainous terrain and concludes with a discussion of open research questions and opportunities for future research.

  12. Thermal histories of convective earth models and constraints on radiogenic heat production in the earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, G.F.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal histories have been calculated for simple models of the earth which assume that heat is transported by convection throughout the interior. The application of independent constraints to these solutions limits the acceptable range of the ratio of present radiogenic heat production in the earth to the present surface heat flux. The models use an empirical relation between the rate of convective heat transport and the temperature difference across a convecting fluid. This is combined with an approximate proportionality between effective mantle viscosity and T/sup -n/, where T is temperature and it is argued that n is about 30 throughout the mantle. The large value of n causes T to be strongly buffered against changes in the earth's energy budget and shortens by an order of magnitude the response time of surface heat flux to changes in energy budget as compared to less temperature-dependent heat transport mechanisms. Nevertheless, response times with n=30 are still as long as 1 or 2 b.y. Assuming that the present heat flux is entirely primordial (i.e., nonradiogenic) in a convective model leads back to unrealistically high temperatures about 1.7 b.y. ago. Inclusion of exponentially decaying (i.e., radiogenic) heat sources moves the high temperatures further into the past and leads to a transition from 'hot' to 'cool' calculated thermal histories for the case when the present rate of heat production is near 50% of the present rate of heat loss. Requiring the calculated histories to satisfy minimal geological constraints limits the present heat production/heat loss ratio to between about 0.3 and 0.85. Plausible stronger constraints narrow this range to between 0.45 and 0.65. These results are compatible with estimated radiogentic heat production rates in some meteorites and terrestrial rocks, with a whole-earth K/U ratio of 1--2 x 10 4 giving optimal agreement

  13. Lightning Prediction using Electric Field Measurements Associated with Convective Events at a Tropical Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, S.; Chakraborty, R.; Maitra, A.

    2017-12-01

    Nowcasting of lightning activities during intense convective events using a single electric field monitor (EFM) has been carried out at a tropical location, Kolkata (22.65oN, 88.45oE). Before and at the onset of heavy lightning, certain changes of electric field (EF) can be related to high liquid water content (LWC) and low cloud base height (CBH). The present study discusses the utility of EF observation to show a few aspects of convective events. Large convective cloud showed by high LWC and low CBH can be detected from EF variation which could be a precursor of upcoming convective events. Suitable values of EF gradient can be used as an indicator of impending lightning events. An EF variation of 0.195 kV/m/min can predict lightning within 17.5 km radius with a probability of detection (POD) of 91% and false alarm rate (FAR) of 8% with a lead time of 45 min. The total number of predicted lightning strikes is nearly 9 times less than that measured by the lightning detector. This prediction technique can, therefore, give an estimate of cloud to ground (CG) and intra cloud (IC) lighting occurrences within the surrounding area. This prediction technique involving POD, FAR and lead time information shows a better prediction capability compared to the techniques reported earlier. Thus an EFM can be effectively used for prediction of lightning events at a tropical location.

  14. Natural Convection Heat Transfer in Concentric Horizontal Annuli Containing a Saturated Porous Medi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed F. Alfahaid, R.Y. Sakr

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural convection in horizontal annular porous media has become a subject receiving increasing attention due to its practical importance in the problem of insulators, such as ducting system in high temperature gas-cooled reactors, heating systems, thermal energy storage systems, under ground cable systems, etc. This paper presents a numerical study for steady state thermal convection in a fully saturated porous media bounded by two horizontal concentric cylinders, the cylinders are impermeable to fluid motion and maintained at different, uniform temperatures.  The solution scheme is based on two-dimensional model, which is governed by Darcy-Oberbeck-Boussinesq equations. The finite element method using Galerkin technique is developed and employed to solve the present problem. A numerical simulation is carried out to examine the parametric effects of Rayleigh number and radius ratio on the role played by natural convection heat transfer in the porous annuli. The numerical results obtained from the present model were compared with the available published results and good agreement is observed. The average Nusselt number at the heating surface of the inner cylinder is correlated to Rayleigh number and radius ratio.Keywords: Natural convection, numerical investigation, saturated porous media, finite element method, concentric horizontal annuli.

  15. Periodic mixed convection in horizontal porous layer heated from below by isoflux heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeid, Nawaf H.; Pop, I.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical study for transient mixed convection in a two-dimensional horizontal porous layer heated from below by a constant heat flux source is carried out in the present paper. The transient thermal field, flow field and average Nusselt number are presented for a wide range of the Peclet number, Pe, for the particular case of Rayleigh number Ra=10x2 and the ratio of heater length to the porous layer thickness A=1, 3 and 5. It is found that for A=3 and A=5 with small values of the Peclet number, the free convection mode is dominated, while for large values, of the Peclet number, the forced convection mode is dominated. However, for moderate values the oscillatory mixed convection is observed and a periodic variation of the average Nusselt number is obtained. When the heater length is equal to the porous layer thickness (A=1) the steady-state results are obtained for the range of Pe=0.01-10. (author)

  16. Laminar free convection with variable fluid properties in vertical ducts having uniform wall temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aihara, Toshio; Maruyama, Shigenao; Choi, Jun-Seop.

    1985-01-01

    Recently, the research on free convection in vertical ducts has become active again concerning the problem of cooling in nuclear reactor accidents and the cooling of electronic equipment. Generally, in the convection heat transfer in ducts, when the wall temperature is high, the fluid temperature in the ducts conspicuously changes, accordingly, the temperature dependence of the properties cannot be neglected. In this study, about the laminar free convection in parallel plates and a circular pipe having uniform wall temperature, the numerical analysis taking the temperature dependence of all properties into account was carried out, thus the effect of the temperature dependence of properties exerted on free convection heat transfer was clarified, and the relation to the solution in constant properties was examined. Moreover, by introducing a new representative dimension, it was attempted to express mean heat transfer coefficient which is independent of the form of ducts in unified way. The mean Nusselt number of the constant property solution using entrance pressure condition agreed very well with the exact numerical solution. (Kako, I.)

  17. High-latitude convection on open and closed field lines for large IMF B(y)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J. J.; Crooker, N. U.; Gorney, D. J.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    S3-3 electric field observations for August 23, 1976, show a single convection cell engulfing the northern polar cap. The flow direction is that for a positive IMF B(y) component. The particle data indicate that nearly half the duskside sunward flow occurs on closed field lines whereas the dawnside flow is entirely on open field lines. This is interpreted in terms of an IMF B(y)-induced deformation in the polar cap boundary, where the deformation moves with the convective flow. Thus, convection streamlines cross the deformed polar cap boundary, but no flow crosses the boundary because it is carried by the flow. Since southern hemisphere convection is expected to occur with the opposite sense of rotation, closed field lines that will be forced to tilt azimuthally are predicted. On the nightside the tilt produces a y component of the magnetic field in the same direction as the IMF for either sign of IMF B(y). This interpretation is consistent with observations of a greater y component in the plasma sheet than the tail lobes, which are difficult to understand in terms of the common explanation of IMF penetration. Alternatives to this interpretation are also discussed.

  18. A new method for simultaneous measurement of convective and radiative heat flux in car underhood applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaled, M; Garnier, B; Peerhossaini, H; Harambat, F

    2010-01-01

    A new experimental technique is presented that allows simultaneous measurement of convective and radiative heat flux in the underhood. The goal is to devise an easily implemented and accurate experimental method for application in the vehicle underhood compartment. The new method is based on a technique for heat-flux measurement developed by the authors (Heat flow (flux) sensors for measurement of convection, conduction and radiation heat flow 27036-2, © Rhopoint Components Ltd, Hurst Green, Oxted, RH8 9AX, UK) that uses several thermocouples in the thickness of a thermal resistive layer (foil heat-flux sensor). The method proposed here uses a pair of these thermocouples with different radiative properties. Measurements validating this novel technique are carried out on a flat plate with a prescribed constant temperature in both natural- and forced-convection flow regimes. The test flat plate is instrumented by this new technique, and also with a different technique that is intrusive but very accurate, used as reference here (Bardon J P and Jarny Y 1994 Procédé et dispositif de mesure transitoire de température et flux surfacique Brevet n°94.011996, 22 February). Discrepancies between the measurements by the two techniques are less than 10% for both convective and radiative heat flux. Error identification and sensitivity analysis of the new method are also presented

  19. Planform structure and heat transfer in turbulent free convection over horizontal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerthan, S. Ananda; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2000-04-01

    This paper deals with turbulent free convection in a horizontal fluid layer above a heated surface. Experiments have been carried out on a heated surface to obtain and analyze the planform structure and the heat transfer under different conditions. Water is the working fluid and the range of flux Rayleigh numbers (Ra) covered is 3×107-2×1010. The different conditions correspond to Rayleigh-Bénard convection, convection with either the top water surface open to atmosphere or covered with an insulating plate, and with an imposed external flow on the heated boundary. Without the external flow the planform is one of randomly oriented line plumes. At large Rayleigh number Ra and small aspect ratio (AR), these line plumes seem to align along the diagonal, presumably due to a large scale flow. The side views show inclined dyelines, again indicating a large scale flow. When the external flow is imposed, the line plumes clearly align in the direction of external flow. The nondimensional average plume spacing, Raλ1/3, varies between 40 and 90. The heat transfer rate, for all the experiments conducted, represented as RaδT-1/3, where δT is the conduction layer thickness, varies only between 0.1-0.2, showing that in turbulent convection the heat transfer rates are similar under the different conditions.

  20. Behaviors and transitions along the path to magnetostrophic convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grannan, A. M.; Vogt, T.; Horn, S.; Hawkins, E. K.; Aggarwal, A.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    The generation of magnetic fields in planetary and stellar interiors are believed to be controlled primarily by turbulent convection constrained by Coriolis and Lorentz forces in their electrically conducting fluid layers. Yet relatively few laboratory experiments are capable of investigating the different regimes of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic convection. In this work, we perform one laboratory experiment in a cylinder at a fixed heat flux using the liquid metal gallium in order to investigate, sequentially: Rayleigh-Bènard convection without any imposed constraints, magnetoconvection with a Lorentz constraint imposed by vertical magnetic field, rotating convection with a Coriolis constraint imposed by rotation, and finally the magnetostrophic convective regime where both Coriolis and Lorentz are imposed and equal. Using an array of internal and external temperature probes, we show that each regime along the path to magnetostrophic convection is unique. The behaviors and transitions in the dominant modes of convection as well as their fundamental frequencies and wavenumbers are investigated.

  1. Complete Spinal Accessory Nerve Palsy From Carrying Climbing Gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Jess M; Warme, Winston J

    2015-09-01

    We report an unusual case of spinal accessory nerve palsy sustained while transporting climbing gear. Spinal accessory nerve injury is commonly a result of iatrogenic surgical trauma during lymph node excision. This particular nerve is less frequently injured by blunt trauma. The case reported here results from compression of the spinal accessory nerve for a sustained period-that is, carrying a load over the shoulder using a single nylon rope for 2.5 hours. This highlights the importance of using proper load-carrying equipment to distribute weight over a greater surface area to avoid nerve compression in the posterior triangle of the neck. The signs and symptoms of spinal accessory nerve palsy and its etiology are discussed. This report is particularly relevant to individuals involved in mountaineering and rock climbing but can be extended to anyone carrying a load with a strap over one shoulder and across the body. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Moisture Vertical Structure, Deep Convective Organization, and Convective Transition in the Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiro, K. A.; Neelin, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    Constraining precipitation processes in climate models with observations is crucial to accurately simulating current climate and reducing uncertainties in future projections. Results from the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAmazon) field campaign (2014-2015) provide evidence that deep convection is strongly controlled by the availability of moisture in the free troposphere over the Amazon, much like over tropical oceans. Entraining plume buoyancy calculations confirm that CWV is a good proxy for the conditional instability of the environment, yet differences in convective onset as a function of CWV exist over land and ocean, as well as seasonally and diurnally over land. This is largely due to variability in the contribution of lower tropospheric humidity to the total column moisture. Boundary layer moisture shows a strong relationship to the onset during the day, which largely disappears during nighttime. Using S-Band radar, these transition statistics are examined separately for unorganized and mesoscale-organized convection, which exhibit sharp increases in probability of occurrence with increasing moisture throughout the column, particularly in the lower free troposphere. Retrievals of vertical velocity from a radar wind profiler indicate updraft velocity and mass flux increasing with height through the lower troposphere. A deep-inflow mixing scheme motivated by this — corresponding to deep inflow of environmental air into a plume that grows with height — provides a weighting of boundary layer and free tropospheric air that yields buoyancies consistent with the observed onset of deep convection across seasons and times of day, across land and ocean sites, and for all convection types. This provides a substantial improvement relative to more traditional constant mixing assumptions, and a dramatic improvement relative to no mixing. Furthermore, it provides relationships that are as strong or stronger for mesoscale-organized convection as for unorganized convection.

  3. Porous media geometry and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Pierre

    1992-01-01

    The goal of ""Porous Media: Geometry and Transports"" is to provide the basis of a rational and modern approach to porous media. This book emphasizes several geometrical structures (spatially periodic, fractal, and random to reconstructed) and the three major single-phase transports (diffusion, convection, and Taylor dispersion).""Porous Media"" serves various purposes. For students it introduces basic information on structure and transports. Engineers will find this book useful as a readily accessible assemblage of al the major experimental results pertaining to single-phase tr

  4. Force convective solar drying system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruslan, M.H.; Othman, M.Y.; Baharuddin Yatim; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Ibarahim, Z.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents design and performance of V-groove back-pass solar collector for solar drying system. In this study three V-groove back-pass solar collector each with dimension of 4.6 m x 1.0 m x 0.15 m have been fabricated for solar drying system. An outdoor test at mean solar intensity for 600-800 Wm -2 by using 0.15m 3 s -1 of air flow rate which also been suggested by (Zeroul et al. 1994) was carried out at Solar Research Energy Park. Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. Analysis on the collector performance based on daily data was reported that the value of FR ) e and FRUL was 0.709 ± 0.001 and 5.89 ± 0.31 Wm -2o C -1 respectively with 60-70 o C of output temperature (Ruslan et al. 2001). The three V-groove collectors each with dimension 4.6 m x 0.15 m were connected in series array mounted on the roof of a solar assisted drying system. By using two electric fans of 85W and 2700 rpm each, the speed of air was regulated at 0.11 kgs -1 to 0.31 kgs -1 using a voltage regulator. Performance of the collector based on the thermal analysis showed that at mean daily solar radiation 700 Wm -2 , the output temperature of 52 o C to 73 o C could be achieved using 0.11-0.31 kgs -1 of flow rate. Thermal analysis also showed that the efficiencies of 45% to 61% could be obtains using the same flow rate and solar radiation. Analysis of daily data showed that for radiation from 300 Wm -2 to 1000 Wm -2 the power generated from the collector was within 1.5 kW to 8.9 kW. The study concluded that the levels of the levels of the solar radiation and flow rate used influenced the performance of the collector

  5. Experimental investigation on TBAB clathrate hydrate slurry flows in a horizontal tube: Forced convective heat transfer behaviors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenji, Song [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, CAS, No. 2 Nengyuan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate, CAS, No. 2 Nengyuan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Rui, Xiao; Chong, Huang; Shihui, He; Kaijun, Dong; Ziping, Feng [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, CAS, No. 2 Nengyuan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate, CAS, No. 2 Nengyuan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2009-11-15

    Tetra-n-butyl-ammonium bromide (TBAB) clathrate hydrate slurry (CHS) is one kind of secondary refrigerants, which is promising to be applied into air-conditioning or latent-heat transportation systems as a thermal storage or cold carrying medium for energy saving. It is a solid-liquid two phase mixture which is easy to produce and has high latent heat and good fluidity. In this paper, the heat transfer characteristics of TBAB slurry were investigated in a horizontal stainless steel tube under different solid mass fractions and flow velocities with constant heat flux. One velocity region of weakened heat transfer was found. Moreover, TBAB CHS was treated as a kind of Bingham fluids, and the influences of the solid particles, flow velocity and types of flow on the forced convective heat transfer coefficients of TBAB CHS were investigated. At last, criterial correlations of Nusselt number for laminar and turbulent flows in the form of power function were summarized, and the error with experimental results was within {+-}20%. (author)

  6. Study of plasma convection and wall interactions in magnetic-confinement systems. Progress report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, T.M.; Klevans, E.H.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of plasma interactions with magnetic fields and end walls have been carried out. The final effort for studying flow on open-ended theta pinches has resulted in: (1) new understanding of collisional flow processes; and (2) has presented unique measurements of density and temperature near the end wall. An orignal effort to use Nd-glass lasers for Thomson scattering diagnostics is reported. Laser system conversion and efficiencies of frequency doubling are reported. The development of a compact toroid discharged is reported; this will be used as a plasma source to study transport, convection and wass interactions at plasma conditions appropriate for large scale fusion experiments. Computer codes predict compact toroid plasma scaling and magnetic field distribution resulting from guiding coils added at the ends of the theta pinch coil. The development of a multi-pass Fabry-Perot interferometer using visible light from a He-Ne laser is reported here. Theoretical study has been completed on an extension of a collisionless plasma flow model to include collision effects. Initial studies directed to analysis of plasma wall interactions are reported

  7. Coupling of convection and circulation at various resolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Hohenegger

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A correct representation of the coupling between convection and circulation constitutes a prerequisite for a correct representation of precipitation at all scales. In this study, the coupling between convection and a sea breeze is investigated across three main resolutions: large-eddy resolution where convection is fully explicit, convection-permitting resolution where convection is partly explicit and coarse resolution where convection is parameterised. The considered models are the UCLA-LES, COSMO and ICON. Despite the use of prescribed surface fluxes, comparison of the simulations reveals that typical biases associated with a misrepresentation of convection at convection-permitting and coarser resolutions significantly alter the characteristics of the sea breeze. The coarse-resolution simulations integrated without convective parameterisation and the convection-permitting simulations simulate a too slow propagation of the breeze front as compared to the large-eddy simulations. From the various factors affecting the propagation, a delayed onset and intensification of cold pools primarily explains the differences. This is a direct consequence of a delayed development of convection when the grid spacing is coarsened. Scaling the time the sea breeze reaches the centre of the land patch by the time precipitation exceeds 2 mm day−1, used as a measure for significant evaporation, yields a collapse of the simulations onto a simple linear relationship although subtle differences remain due to the use of different turbulence and microphysical schemes. Turning on the convection scheme significantly disrupts the propagation of the sea breeze due to a misrepresented timing (too early triggering and magnitude (too strong precipitation evaporation in one of the tested convection schemes of the convective processes.

  8. Natural convection in heat-generating fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bol'shov, Leonid A; Kondratenko, Petr S; Strizhov, Valerii F

    2001-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of convective heat transfer from a heat-generating fluid confined to a closed volume are reviewed. Theoretical results are inferred from analytical estimates based on the relevant conservation laws and the current understanding of the convective heat-transfer processes. Four basic and one asymptotic regime of heat transfer are identified depending on the heat generation rate. Limiting heat-transfer distribution patterns are found for the lower boundary. Heat transfer in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry is analyzed. Quasi-steady-state heat transfer from a cooling-down fluid without internal heat sources is studied separately. Experimental results and theoretical predictions are compared. (reviews of topical problems)

  9. Topology optimisation of natural convection problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Aage, Niels; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of the density-based topology optimisation approach for the design of heat sinks and micropumps based on natural convection effects. The problems are modelled under the assumptions of steady-state laminar flow using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations...... coupled to the convection-diffusion equation through the Boussinesq approximation. In order to facilitate topology optimisation, the Brinkman approach is taken to penalise velocities inside the solid domain and the effective thermal conductivity is interpolated in order to accommodate differences...... in thermal conductivity of the solid and fluid phases. The governing equations are discretised using stabilised finite elements and topology optimisation is performed for two different problems using discrete adjoint sensitivity analysis. The study shows that topology optimisation is a viable approach...

  10. Natural convection heat transfer in SIGMA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Dong; Lee, Gang Hee; Suh, Kune Yull

    2004-01-01

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) results in core melt formation and relocation at various locations within the reactor core over a considerable period of time. If there is no effective cooling mechanism, the core debris may heat up and commence natural circulation. The high temperature pool of molten core material will threaten the structural integrity of the reactor vessel. The extent and urgency of this threat depend primarily upon the intensity of the internal heat sources and upon the consequent distribution of the heat fluxes on the vessel walls in contact with the molten core material pools. In such a steady molten pool convection state, the thermal loads against the vessel would be determined by the in-vessel heat transfer distribution involving convective and conductive heat transfer from the decay-heated core material pool to the lower head wall in contact with the core material. In this study, upward and downward heat transfer fraction ratio is focused on

  11. Convection and crystal settling in sills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Fergus G. F.; Henderson, C. Michael B.

    1992-02-01

    It has been advocated that convective and crystal settling processes play significant, and perhaps crucial, roles in magmatic differentiation. The fluid dynamics of magma chambers have been extensively studied in recent years, both theoretically and experimentally, but there is disagreement over the nature and scale of the convection, over its bearing on fractionation and possibly over whether it occurs at all. The differential distribution of modal olivine with height in differentiated alkaline basic sills provides critical evidence to resolve this controversy, at least for small to medium-large magma chambers. Our own and others' published data for such sills show that, irrespective of overall olivine content, modal olivine contents tend to increase in a roughly symmetrical manner inwards from the upper and lower margins of the sill, i.e. the distribution patterns are more often approximately D-shaped rather than the classic S-shape generally ascribed to gravity settling. We concur with the majority of other authors that this is an original feature of the filling process which has survived more or less unchanged since emplacement. We therefore conclude that the magmas have not undergone turbulent convection and that gravity settling has usually played only a minor modifying role since the intrusion of these sills. We offer a possible explanation for the apparent contradiction between fluid dynamical theory and the petrological evidence by suggesting that such sills rarely fill by the rapid injection of a single pulse of magma. Rather, they form from a series of pulses or a continuous pulsed influx over a protracted interval during which marginal cooling severely limits the potential for thermal convection.

  12. Natural convective heat transfer from square cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novomestský, Marcel, E-mail: marcel.novomestsky@fstroj.uniza.sk; Smatanová, Helena, E-mail: helena.smatanova@fstroj.uniza.sk; Kapjor, Andrej, E-mail: andrej.kapjor@fstroj.uniza.sk [University of Žilina, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Power Engineering, Univerzitná 1, 010 26 Žilina (Slovakia)

    2016-06-30

    This article is concerned with natural convective heat transfer from square cylinder mounted on a plane adiabatic base, the cylinders having an exposed cylinder surface according to different horizontal angle. The cylinder receives heat from a radiating heater which results in a buoyant flow. There are many industrial applications, including refrigeration, ventilation and the cooling of electrical components, for which the present study may be applicable.

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans carried by Odontomachus bauri ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Santos de Jesus

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common causative agent of cryptococcosis worldwide. Although this fungus has been isolated from a variety of organic substrates, several studies suggest that hollow trees constitute an important natural niche for C. neoformans. A previously surveyed hollow of a living pink shower tree (Cassia grandis positive for C. neoformans in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was chosen for further investigation. Odontomachus bauri ants (trap-jaw ants found inside the hollow were collected for evaluation as possible carriers of Cryptococcus spp. Two out of 10 ants were found to carry phenoloxidase-positive colonies identified as C. neoformans molecular types VNI and VNII. The ants may have acted as a mechanical vector of C. neoformans and possibly contributed to the dispersal of the fungi from one substrate to another. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the association of C. neoformans with ants of the genus Odontomachus.

  14. Tropical Cyclone Signatures in Atmospheric Convective Available Potential Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studholme, Joshua; Gulev, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Tropical cyclones play an important role in the climate system providing transports of energy and water vapor, forcing the ocean, and also affecting mid-latitude circulation phenomena. Tropical cyclone tracks experience strong interannual variability and in addition, longer term trend-like changes in all ocean basins. Analysis of recent historical data reveal a poleward shift in the locations of tropical cyclone tracks in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres (Kossin et al. 2014, Nature, 509, 349-352). The physical consequences of these alterations are largely unconstrained. For example, the increasing encroachment of tropical cyclone activity into the extra-tropical environment presents a novel and still poorly understood paradigm for tropical-extratropical interactions. In this respect, the role that the atmospheric convective available potential energy (CAPE) plays in the dynamics of tropical cyclones is highly interesting. The two characteristic global-scale spatial patterns in CAPE are identified using EOF analysis. The first pattern shows an abundance of CAPE in the centre of the Pacific and corresponds to the El Nino Southern Oscillation. The second one is capturing positive CAPE anomalies in the oceanic tropics and negative anomalies over equatorial Africa. Associated with these buoyancy patterns, alterations in tropical cyclone activity occur in all basins forming both zonal and meridional patterns. Atmospheric buoyancy is the trigger for deep convection, and subsequently cyclone genesis. This is the mechanism of impact upon location at the start of cyclone tracks. It is found to have less impact upon where cyclones subsequently move, whether or not they undergo extratropical transition and when and where they experience lysis. It is shown that CAPE plays a critical role in the general circulation in the tropics which in turn is the larger steering context for embedded systems within the Walker and Hadley cells. So this lack of `latter life' impact

  15. Marangoni Convection during Free Electron Laser Nitriding of Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höche, Daniel; Müller, Sven; Rapin, Gerd; Shinn, Michelle; Remdt, Elvira; Gubisch, Maik; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Pure titanium was treated by free electron laser (FEL) radiation in a nitrogen atmosphere. As a result, nitrogen diffusion occurs and a TiN coating was synthesized. Local gradients of interfacial tension due to the local heating lead to a Marangoni convection, which determines the track properties. Because of the experimental inaccessibility of time-dependent occurrences, finite element calculations were performed, to determine the physical processes such as heat transfer, melt flow, and mass transport. In order to calculate the surface deformation of the gas-liquid interface, the level set approach was used. The equations were modified and coupled with heat-transfer and diffusion equations. The process was characterized by dimensionless numbers such as the Reynolds, Peclet, and capillary numbers, to obtain more information about the acting forces and the coating development. Moreover, the nitrogen distribution was calculated using the corresponding transport equation. The simulations were compared with cross-sectional micrographs of the treated titanium sheets and checked for their validity. Finally, the process presented is discussed and compared with similar laser treatments.

  16. Agglomeration of dust in convective clouds initialized by nuclear bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, D. P.; Sarma, R. A.

    Convective clouds initialized by nuclear bursts are modeled using a two-dimensional axisymmetric cloud model. Dust transport through the atmosphere is studied using five different sizes ranging from 1 to 10,000 μm in diameter. Dust is transported in the model domain by advection and sedimentation. Water is allowed to condense onto dust particles in regions of supersaturation in the cloud. The agglomeration of dust particles resulting from the collision of different size dust particles is modeled. The evolution of the dust mass spectrum due to agglomeration is modeled using a numerical scheme which is mass conserving and has low implicit diffusion. Agglomeration moves mass from the small particles with very small fall velocity to the larger sizes which fall to the ground more readily. Results indicate that the dust fallout can be increased significantly due to this process. In preliminary runs using stable and unstable environmental soundings, at 30 min after detonation the total dust in the domain was 11 and 30%, respectively, less than a control case without agglomeration.

  17. Role of alveolar topology on acinar flows and convective mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofemeier, Philipp; Sznitman, Josué

    2014-06-01

    Due to experimental challenges, computational simulations are often sought to quantify inhaled aerosol transport in the pulmonary acinus. Commonly, these are performed using generic alveolar topologies, including spheres, toroids, and polyhedra, to mimic the complex acinar morphology. Yet, local acinar flows and ensuing particle transport are anticipated to be influenced by the specific morphological structures. We have assessed a range of acinar models under self-similar breathing conditions with respect to alveolar flow patterns, convective flow mixing, and deposition of fine particles (1.3 μm diameter). By tracking passive tracers over cumulative breathing cycles, we find that irreversible flow mixing correlates with the location and strength of the recirculating vortex inside the cavity. Such effects are strongest in proximal acinar generations where the ratio of alveolar to ductal flow rates is low and interalveolar disparities are most apparent. Our results for multi-alveolated acinar ducts highlight that fine 1 μm inhaled particles subject to alveolar flows are sensitive to the alveolar topology, underlining interalveolar disparities in particle deposition patterns. Despite the simplicity of the acinar models investigated, our findings suggest that alveolar topologies influence more significantly local flow patterns and deposition sites of fine particles for upper generations emphasizing the importance of the selected acinar model. In distal acinar generations, however, the alveolar geometry primarily needs to mimic the space-filling alveolar arrangement dictated by lung morphology.

  18. Modeling mantle convection in the spherical annulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernlund, John W.; Tackley, Paul J.

    2008-12-01

    Most methods for modeling mantle convection in a two-dimensional (2D) circular annular domain suffer from innate shortcomings in their ability to capture several characteristics of the spherical shell geometry of planetary mantles. While methods such as rescaling the inner and outer radius to reduce anomalous effects in a 2D polar cylindrical coordinate system have been introduced and widely implemented, such fixes may have other drawbacks that adversely affect the outcome of some kinds of mantle convection studies. Here we propose a new approach that we term the "spherical annulus," which is a 2D slice that bisects the spherical shell and is quantitatively formulated at the equator of a spherical polar coordinate system after neglecting terms in the governing equations related to variations in latitude. Spherical scaling is retained in this approximation since the Jacobian function remains proportional to the square of the radius. We present example calculations to show that the behavior of convection in the spherical annulus compares favorably against calculations performed in other 2D annular domains when measured relative to those in a fully three-dimensional (3D) spherical shell.

  19. Experimental study of convective heat transfer during cooling with low air velocity in a stack of objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Amara, Sami; Laguerre, Onrawee [Cemagref - Refrigeration Processes Engineering Research Unit, parc de Tourvoie, BP 44, 92163 cedex, Antony (France); Flick, Denis [National Agronomic Institute - INAPG, 16 rue Claude Bernard, 75231 cedex 05, Paris (France)

    2004-12-01

    During cooling with low air velocity (u{<=}0.2 m.s{sup -1}) of a stack of foodstuffs (a few centimeters dimension), the radiation and conduction between products can be of the same order of magnitude as convection. A method was developed to quantify these various transfer modes. The experiment was carried out using an in-line spherical arrangement; however, the same methodology can be applied to other product shapes. The results confirm that the heat transfers by radiation and conduction cannot be neglected. In addition, the convective heat transfer coefficient varies not only with air velocity but also with the product position in the stack. (authors)

  20. About the possible options for models of convective heat transfer in closed volumes with local heating source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimov Vyacheslav I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of mathematical modeling of convective heat transfer in air area surrounded on all sides enclosing structures, in the presence of heat source at the lower boundary of the media are presented. Solved the system of differential equations of unsteady Navier-Stokes equations with the appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The process of convective heat transfer is calculated using the models of turbulence Prandtl and Prandtl-Reichard. Takes into account the processes of heat exchange region considered with the environment. Is carried out the analysis of the dimensionless heat transfer coefficient at interfaces “air – enclosures”. The distributions average along the gas temperature range are obtained.