WorldWideScience

Sample records for convective transport carried

  1. Convective transport resistance in the vitreous humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, Anita; Sadhal, Satwindar; Ratanakijsuntorn, Komsan; Moats, Rex; Tang, Yang; Hughes, Patrick; Robinson, Michael; Lee, Susan

    2012-11-01

    It has been established by MRI visualization experiments that the convection of nanoparticles and large molecules with high rate of water flow in the vitreous humor will experience resistance, depending on the respective permeabilities of the injected solute. A set of experiments conducted with Gd-DTPA (Magnevist, Bayer AG, Leverkusen, Germany) and 30 nm gadolinium-based particles (Gado CELLTrackTM, Biopal, Worcester, MA) as MRI contrast agents showed that the degree of convective transport in this Darcy-type porous medium varies between the two solutes. These experiments consisted of injecting a mixture of the two (a 30 μl solution of 2% Magnevist and 1% nanoparticles) at the middle of the vitreous of an ex vivo whole bovine eye and subjecting the vitreous to water flow rate of 100 μl/min. The water (0.9% saline solution) was injected at the top of the eye, and was allowed to drain through small slits cut at the bottom of the eyeball. After 50 minutes of pumping, MRI images showed that the water flow carried the Gd-DTPA farther than the nanoparticles, even though the two solutes, being mixed, were subjected to the same convective flow conditions. We find that the convected solute lags the water flow, depending on the solute permeability. The usual convection term needs to be adjusted to allow for the filtration effect on the larger particles in the form (1- σ) u . ∇ c with important implications for the modeling of such systems.

  2. Chemically generated convective transport of micron sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Das, Sambeeta; Altemose, Alicia; Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-11-01

    A variety of chemical and biological applications require manipulation of micron sized objects like cells, viruses, and large molecules. Increasing the size of particles up to a micron reduces performance of techniques based on diffusive transport. Directional transport of cargo toward detecting elements reduces the delivery time and improves performance of sensing devices. We demonstrate how chemical reactions can be used to organize fluid flows carrying particles toward the assigned destinations. Convection is driven by density variations caused by a chemical reaction occurring at a catalyst or enzyme-covered target site. If the reaction causes a reduction in fluid density, as in the case of catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, then fluid and suspended cargo is drawn toward the target along the bottom surface. The intensity of the fluid flow and the time of cargo delivery are controlled by the amount of reagent in the system. After the reagent has been consumed, the fluid pump stops and particles are found aggregated on and around the enzyme-coated patch. The pumps are reusable, being reactivated upon injection of additional reagent. The developed technique can be implemented in lab-on-a-chip devices for transportation of micro-scale object immersed in solution.

  3. Numerically determined transport laws for fingering ("thermohaline") convection in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Traxler, Adrienne; Stellmach, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional simulations of fingering convection performed in a parameter regime close to the one relevant for astrophysics, and reveal the existence of simple asymptotic scaling laws for turbulent heat and compositional transport. These laws can straightforwardly be extrapolated to the true astrophysical regime. Our investigation also indicates that thermocompositional "staircases," a key consequence of fingering convection in the ocean, cannot form spontaneously in stellar interiors. Our proposed empirically-determined transport laws thus provide simple prescriptions for mixing by fingering convection in a variety of astrophysical situations, and should, from here on, be used preferentially over older and less accurate parameterizations. They also establish that fingering convection does not provide sufficient extra mixing to explain observed chemical abundances in RGB stars.

  4. Differences in deep convective transport characteristics between quasi-isolated strong convection and mesoscale convective systems using seasonal WRF simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelbach, B. C.; Mullendore, G. L.; Starzec, M.

    2014-10-01

    We utilize the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with chemistry to simulate mass transport during the 2007 convective season in the U.S. Southern Great Plains at convection-allowing scale. Resolved storms are classified using an object-based classification scheme. This scheme uses model-derived radar reflectivity to classify storm type as quasi-isolated strong convection (QISC) or mesoscale convective system (MCS). Differences between QISCs and MCSs are investigated by analysis of two transport parameters for each convective object: the level of maximum detrainment (LMD) and the detrainment mass flux. Analysis of the mean LMD showed differences between the two regimes is statistically significantly different in May, as the mean QISC LMD is 440 m higher than the mean MCS LMD in May, and statistically insignificant in July where the mean QISC LMD is only 350 m higher. The detrainment flux per deeply convective object showed statistically significant differences between the two regimes in both May (MCS 4.8 times greater than QISC) and July (MCS 6.8 times greater than QISC). Over the entire study period, MCS storms accounted for 72% of the total mass detrainment, even though QISCs were twice as common as MCSs. However, differences in the detrainment flux per unit area of deep convection showed that QISCs exhibited stronger flux (1.1 times greater) than MCSs in both months. Analysis of tropopause-relative LMDs showed that QISCs detrained the maximum amount of mass closer to the tropopause altitude than MCSs for both months. However, only in May is the difference statistically significant (430 m closer).

  5. Sensitivity of Cross-Tropopause Convective Transport to Tropopause Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, E.; Mullendore, G. L.

    2016-12-01

    An idealized three-dimensional cloud-resolving model is used to simulate cross-tropopause boundary layer mass transport in a midlatitude supercell. A ten-hour simulation is conducted to encompass the growth and decay cycle, with focus on irreversible transport above the tropopause. However, several tropopause definitions are present in the literature, and the impact of tropopause definition on irreversible cross-tropopause transport has not been quantified. Six previously published tropopause definitions are evaluated to determine the sensitivity of tropopause definition on midlatitude irreversible cross-tropopause transport. These definitions include specific values of altitude, temperature lapse rate (i.e., WMO definition), potential vorticity, stratospheric tracer concentration, static stability, and curvature of static stability. This investigation highlights the challenge of defining a tropopause during active deep convection and shows that some definitions (e.g., potential vorticity) may not be appropriate for cross-tropopause transport studies that resolve deep convection.

  6. Convective heat transport in compressible fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Akira; Onuki, Akira

    2002-07-01

    We present hydrodynamic equations of compressible fluids in gravity as a generalization of those in the Boussinesq approximation used for nearly incompressible fluids. They account for adiabatic processes taking place throughout the cell (the piston effect) and those taking place within plumes (the adiabatic temperature gradient effect). Performing two-dimensional numerical analysis, we reveal some unique features of plume generation and convection in transient and steady states of compressible fluids. As the critical point is approached, the overall temperature changes induced by plume arrivals at the boundary walls are amplified, giving rise to overshoot behavior in transient states and significant noise in the temperature in steady states. The velocity field is suggested to assume a logarithmic profile within boundary layers. Random reversal of macroscopic shear flow is examined in a cell with unit aspect ratio. We also present a simple scaling theory for moderate Rayleigh numbers.

  7. Evaluation of cloud convection and tracer transport in a three-dimensional chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Feng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the performance of cloud convection and tracer transport in a global off-line 3-D chemical transport model. Various model simulations are performed using different meteorological (reanalyses (ERA-40, ECMWF operational and ECMWF Interim to diagnose the updraft mass flux, convective precipitation and cloud top height.

    The diagnosed upward mass flux distribution from TOMCAT agrees quite well with the ECMWF reanalysis data (ERA-40 and ERA-Interim below 200 hPa. Inclusion of midlevel convection improves the agreement at mid-high latitudes. However, the reanalyses show strong convective transport up to 100 hPa, well into the tropical tropopause layer (TTL, which is not captured by TOMCAT. Similarly, the model captures the spatial and seasonal variation of convective cloud top height although the mean modelled value is about 2 km lower than observed.

    The ERA-Interim reanalyses have smaller archived upward convective mass fluxes than ERA-40, and smaller convective precipitation, which is in better agreement with satellite-based data. TOMCAT captures these relative differences when diagnosing convection from the large-scale fields. The model also shows differences in diagnosed convection with the version of the operational analyses used, which cautions against using results of the model from one specific time period as a general evaluation.

    We have tested the effect of resolution on the diagnosed modelled convection with simulations ranging from 5.6° × 5.6° to 1° × 1°. Overall, in the off-line model, the higher model resolution gives stronger vertical tracer transport, however, it does not make a large change to the diagnosed convective updraft mass flux (i.e., the model results using the convection scheme fail to capture the strong convection transport up to 100 hPa as seen in the archived convective mass fluxes. Similarly, the resolution of the forcing winds in the higher resolution CTM does not make a

  8. Carry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koijen, Ralph S.J.; Moskowitz, Tobias J.; Heje Pedersen, Lasse;

    that include global equities, global bonds, currencies, commodities, US Treasuries, credit, and equity index options. This predictability underlies the strong returns to "carry trades" that go long high-carry and short low-carry securities, applied almost exclusively to currencies, but shown here...

  9. Structures, profile consistency, and transport scaling in electrostatic convection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    that for interchange modes, profile consistency is in fact due to mixing by persistent large-scale convective cells. This mechanism is not a turbulent diffusion, cannot occur in collisionless systems, and is the analog of the well-known laminar "magnetic flux expulsion" in magneiohydrodynamics. This expulsion process...... involves a "pinch" across closed streamlines and further results in the formation of pressure fingers along the-separatrix of the convective cells. By nature, these coherent structures are dissipative because the mixing process that leads to their formation relies on a finite amount of collisional...... diffusion. Numerical simulations of two-dimensional interchange modes confirm the role of laminar expulsion by convective cells, for profile consistency and structure formation. They also show that the fingerlike pressure structures ultimately control the rate of heat transport across the plasma layer...

  10. Why convective heat transport in the solar nebula was inefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassen, P.

    1993-01-01

    The radial distributions of the effective temperatures of circumstellar disks associated with pre-main sequence (T Tauri) stars are relatively well-constrained by ground-based and spacecraft infrared photometry and radio continuum observations. If the mechanisms by which energy is transported vertically in the disks are understood, these data can be used to constrain models of the thermal structure and evolution of solar nebula. Several studies of the evolution of the solar nebula have included the calculation of the vertical transport of heat by convection. Such calculations rely on a mixing length theory of transport and some assumption regarding the vertical distribution of internal dissipation. In all cases, the results of these calculations indicate that transport by radiation dominates that by convection, even when the nebula is convectively unstable. A simple argument that demonstrates the generality (and limits) of this result, regardless of the details of mixing length theory or the precise distribution of internal heating is presented. It is based on the idea that the radiative gradient in an optically thick nebula generally does not greatly exceed the adiabatic gradient.

  11. Heat transport measurements in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Yuanming [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We present experimental heat transport measurements of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with rotation about a vertical axis. The fluid, water with Prandtl number ({sigma}) about 6, was confined in a cell which had a square cross section of 7.3 cm x 7.3 cm and a height of 9.4 cm. Heat transport was measured for Rayleigh numbers 2 x 10{sup 5} < Ra < 5 x 10{sup 8} and Taylor numbers 0 < Ta < 5 x 10{sup 9}. We show the variation of normalized heat transport, the Nusselt number, at fixed dimensional rotation rate {Omega}{sub D}, at fixed Ra varying Ta, at fixed Ta varying Ra, and at fixed Rossby number Ro. The scaling of heat transport in the range 10{sup 7} to about 10{sup 9} is roughly 0.29 with a Ro dependent coefficient or equivalently is also well fit by a combination of power laws of the form a Ra{sup 1/5} + b Ra{sup 1/3} . The range of Ra is not sufficient to differentiate single power law or combined power law scaling. The overall impact of rotation on heat transport in turbulent convection is assessed.

  12. Long- range transport of Xe-133 emissions under convective and non-convective conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta; Gheddou, Abdelhakim

    2015-04-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 80 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases, in particular xenon isotopes, supported by the atmospheric transport modeling (ATM). The aim of this study is to investigate the long-range transport of Xe-133 emissions under convective and non-convective conditions. For that purpose a series of 14 days forward simulations was conducted using the Lagrangian Particle Diffusion Model FLEXPART, designed for calculating the long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollution from point sources. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. The geographical localization to some extent justifies the assumption that the only source of Xe-133 observed at the neighbouring stations, comes from the ANSTO facility. In the simulations the analysed wind data provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used with the spatial resolution of 0.5 degree. Studies have been performed to link Xe-133 emissions with detections at the IMS stations supported by the ATM, and to assess the impact of atmospheric convection on non-detections at the IMS stations. The results of quantitative and qualitative comparison will be presented.

  13. Convective transport in a porous medium layer saturated with a Maxwell nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Umavathi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A linear and weakly non-linear stability analys is has been carried out to study the onset of convection in a horizontal layer of a porous medium saturated with a Maxwell nanofluid. To simulate the momentum equation in porous media, a modified Darcy–Maxwell nanofluid model incorporating the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis has been used. A Galerkin method has been employed to investigate the stationary and oscillatory convections; the stability boundaries for these cases are approximated by simple and useful analytical expressions. The stability of the system is investigated by varying various parameters viz., nanoparticle concentration Rayleigh number, Lewis number, modified diffusivity ratio, porosity, thermal capacity ratio, viscosity ratio, conductivity ratio, Vadász number and relaxation parameter. A representation of Fourier series method has been used to study the heat and mass transport on the non-linear stability analysis. The effect of transient heat and mass transport on various parameters is also studied. It is found that for stationary convection Lewis number, viscosity ratio and conductivity ratio have a stabilizing effect while nanoparticle concentration Rayleigh number Rn destabilizes the system. For oscillatory convection we observe that the conductivity ratio stabilizes the system whereas nanoparticle concentration Rayleigh number, Lewis number, Vadász number and relaxation parameter destabilize the system. The viscosity ratio increases the thermal Rayleigh number for oscillatory convection initially thus delaying the onset of convection and later decreases thus advancing the onset of convection hence showing a dual effect. For steady finite amplitude motions, the heat and mass transport decreases with an increase in the values of nanoparticle concentration Rayleigh number, Lewis number, viscosity ratio and conductivity ratio. The mass transport increases with an increase in Vadász number and relaxation

  14. Optimal Heat Transport in Rayleigh-B\\'enard Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Sondak, David; Waleffe, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Steady flows that optimize heat transport are obtained for two-dimensional Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection with no-slip horizontal walls for a variety of Prandtl numbers $Pr$ and Rayleigh number up to $Ra\\sim 10^9$. Power law scalings of $Nu\\sim Ra^{\\gamma}$ are observed with $\\gamma\\approx 0.31$, where the Nusselt number $Nu$ is a non-dimensional measure of the vertical heat transport. Any dependence of the scaling exponent on $Pr$ is found to be extremely weak. On the other hand, the presence of two local maxima of $Nu$ with different horizontal wavenumbers at the same $Ra$ leads to the emergence of two different flow structures as candidates for optimizing the heat transport. For $Pr \\lesssim 7$, optimal transport is achieved at the smaller maximal wavenumber. In these fluids, the optimal structure is a plume of warm rising fluid which spawns left/right horizontal arms near the top of the channel, leading to downdrafts adjacent to the central updraft. For $Pr > 7$ at high-enough Ra, the optimal structure is a...

  15. Energy transport by thermocapillary convection during Sessile-Water-droplet evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, H; Ward, C A

    2010-09-24

    The energy transport mechanisms of a sessile-water droplet evaporating steadily while maintained on a Cu substrate are compared. Buoyancy-driven convection is eliminated, but thermal conduction and thermocapillary convection are active. The dominant mode varies along the interface. Although neglected in previous studies, near the three-phase line, thermocapillary convection is by far the larger mode of energy transport, and this is the region where most of the droplet evaporation occurs.

  16. Iterative methods for stationary convection-dominated transport problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bova, S.W.; Carey, G.F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1994-12-31

    It is well known that many iterative methods fail when applied to nonlinear systems of convection-dominated transport equations. Most successful methods for obtaining steady-state solutions to such systems rely on time-stepping through an artificial transient, combined with careful construction of artificial dissipation operators. These operators provide control over spurious oscillations which pollute the steady state solutions, and, in the nonlinear case, may become amplified and lead to instability. In the present study, we investigate Taylor Galerkin and SUPG-type methods and compare results for steady-state solutions to the Euler equations of gas dynamics. In particular, we consider the efficiency of different iterative strategies and present results for representative two-dimensional calculations.

  17. Assessment of Plasma Transport and Convection at High Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The high-latitude ionosphere is strongly coupled to the thermosphere and magnetosphere. The magnetospheric coupling occurs via electric fields, field-aligned currents, and particle precipitation. Owing to the interaction of the shocked solar wind with the geomagnetic field, an electric potential difference is generated across the tail of the magnetosphere, with the resulting electric field pointing from dawn to dusk. Energetic particle precipitation from the magnetosphere in the auroral region leads to the creation of ionization and to electron, ion, and neutral gas heating. In order to assess the current understanding of plasma transport and convection at high latitudes, it is necessary to take account of the strong coupling between the ionosphere, thermosphere, and magnetosphere.

  18. Convective Transport of Trace Gases in the Maritime Continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Neil

    2015-04-01

    Passage of air through the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) is the major route for troposphere to stratosphere transport. The UK CAST (Co-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics) campaign took place in the West Pacific in January/February 2014. The field campaign was based mainly in Guam (13.5oN, 144.8oE) and had three components: CAST with the NERC FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft; the NASA ATTREX project based around the Global Hawk; the NCAR-led CONTRAST campaign based around the Gulfstream V (HIAPER) aircraft. Together, these aircraft were able to make detailed measurements of atmospheric structure and composition from the ocean surface to 20 km. The CAST team also made ground-based and ozonesonde measurements at the ARM site on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea during February 2014, and halocarbon measurements were made at several West Pacific sites. I will present an overview of the CAST campaign along with the results of high resolution global Unified Model studies and NAME (Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment) trajectory calculations to look at the transport of air into the TTL in convective systems over the Maritime continent and West Pacific. I will focus on the transport of air from in and around the boundary layer and will assess the possible importance of natural and anthropogenic emissions for TTL composition.

  19. New variational bounds on convective transport. II. Computations and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Andre; Tobasco, Ian; Doering, Charles R.

    2016-11-01

    We study the maximal rate of scalar transport between parallel walls separated by distance h, by an incompressible fluid with scalar diffusion coefficient κ. Given velocity vector field u with intensity measured by the Péclet number Pe =h2 1/2 / κ (where is space-time average) the challenge is to determine the largest enhancement of wall-to-wall scalar flux over purely diffusive transport, i.e., the Nusselt number Nu . Variational formulations of the problem are studied numerically and optimizing flow fields are computed over a range of Pe . Implications of this optimal wall-to-wall transport problem for the classical problem of Rayleigh-Bénard convection are discussed: the maximal scaling Nu Pe 2 / 3 corresponds, via the identity Pe2 = Ra (Nu - 1) where Ra is the usual Rayleigh number, to Nu Ra 1 / 2 as Ra -> ∞ . Supported in part by National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship DGE-0813964, awards OISE-0967140, PHY-1205219, DMS-1311833, and DMS-1515161, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

  20. GENERALIZED UPWIND SCHEME WITH FRACTIONAL STEPS FOR 3-D PROBLEM OF CONVECTION DOMINATING GROUNDWATER TRANSPORT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚磊华

    1997-01-01

    A generalized upwind scheme with fractional steps for 3-D mathematical models of convection dominating groundwater quality is suggested. The mass transport equation is split into a convection equation and a dispersive equation. The generalized upwind scheme is used to solve the convection equation and the finite element method is used to compute the dispersive equation. These procedures which not only overcome the phenomenon of the negative concentration and numerical dispersion appear frequently with normal FEM or FDM to solve models of convection dominating groundwater transport but also avoid the step for computing each node velocity give a more suitable method to calculate the concentrations of the well points.

  1. Uncertainties related to the representation of momentum transport in shallow convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlemmer, Linda; Bechtold, Peter; Sandu, Irina; Ahlgrimm, Maike

    2017-04-01

    The vertical transport of horizontal momentum by convection has an important impact on the general circulation of the atmosphere as well as on the life cycle and track of cyclones. So far convective momentum transport (CMT) has mostly been studied for deep convection, whereas little is known about its characteristics and importance in shallow convection. In this study CMT by shallow convection is investigated by analyzing both data from large-eddy simulations (LES) and simulations performed with the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). In addition, the central terms underlying the bulk mass-flux parametrization of CMT are evaluated offline. Further, the uncertainties related to the representation of CMT are explored by running the stochastically perturbed parametrizations (SPP) approach of the IFS. The analyzed cases exhibit shallow convective clouds developing within considerable low-level wind shear. Analysis of the momentum fluxes in the LES data reveals significant momentum transport by the convection in both cases, which is directed down-gradient despite substantial organization of the cloud field. A detailed inspection of the convection parametrization reveals a very good representation of the entrainment and detrainment rates and an appropriate representation of the convective mass and momentum fluxes. To determine the correct values of mass-flux and in-cloud momentum at the cloud base in the parametrization yet remains challenging. The spread in convection-related quantities generated by the SPP is reasonable and addresses many of the identified uncertainties.

  2. Influence of Convective Momentum Transport on Tropical Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.

    2012-12-01

    Convective momentum transport (CMT) has been found to play an important role during the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Influences of CMT on tropical waves are analytically studied in a two-layer model, which captures the first-order baroclinic structure in the vertical. Since CMT is the momentum exchange between the lower and the upper troposphere during convection, the easterly and westerly vertical shears of background zonal winds lead to different CMT influences. Generally, CMT plays more important roles than a damping term to tropical waves. CMT is a critical factor for determining the meridional scale of tropical waves and leads to kinetic energy transfer against the direction of background wind shear in the vertical. CMT can also be favorable for internal instability and induce upscale momentum transfer. Specifically, due to CMT, the meridional scale in the two-layer model is wider than the Rossby radius of deformation (RL, the meridional scale of tropical waves in the classical theory) over the Indo-Pacific warm pool, but narrower than RL from the central to the eastern Pacific Ocean and over the Atlantic Ocean. Such variation is consistent with observations. CMT results in minor modifications to the speeds of Rossby waves, inertial gravity waves, and Kelvin waves. Nevertheless, CMT has significant influences on the mixed Rossby-gravity (MRG) waves, especially over the Indo-Pacific warm pool where the vertical wind shear in easterly. Westward propagating MRG waves with small wavenumber become unstable under the influence of CMT. The phase relation between the convergence and geopotential is no longer in quadrature, which is different from classical MRG waves. As a result, there is a net source of mechanical energy within one period and there is an upscale momentum transfer from the perturbed field to large scale velocities. This theoretical study sheds lights on the relation between CMT and slow variations in the atmosphere, including MJO.

  3. Evaluation of the atmospheric transport in a GCM using radon measurements: sensitivity to cumulus convection parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zhang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The radioactive species radon (222Rn has long been used as a test tracer for the numerical simulation of large scale transport processes. In this study, radon transport experiments are carried out using an atmospheric GCM with a finite-difference dynamical core, the van Leer type FFSL advection algorithm, and two state-of-the-art cumulus convection parameterization schemes. Measurements of surface concentration and vertical distribution of radon collected from the literature are used as references in model evaluation.

    The simulated radon concentrations using both convection schemes turn out to be consistent with earlier studies with many other models. Comparison with measurements indicates that at the locations where significant seasonal variations are observed in reality, the model can reproduce both the monthly mean surface radon concentration and the annual cycle quite well. At those sites where the seasonal variation is not large, the model is able to give a correct magnitude of the annual mean. In East Asia, where radon simulations are rarely reported in the literature, detailed analysis shows that our results compare reasonably well with the observations.

    The most evident changes caused by the use of a different convection scheme are found in the vertical distribution of the tracer. The scheme associated with weaker upward transport gives higher radon concentration up to about 6 km above the surface, and lower values in higher altitudes. In the lower part of the atmosphere results from this scheme does not agree as well with the measurements as the other scheme. Differences from 6 km to the model top are even larger, although we are not yet able to tell which simulation is better due to the lack of observations at such high altitudes.

  4. Evaluation of the atmospheric transport in a GCM using radon measurements: sensitivity to cumulus convection parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zhang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The radioactive species radon (222Rn has long been used as a test tracer for the numerical simulation of large scale transport processes. In this study, radon transport experiments are carried out using an atmospheric GCM with a finite-difference dynamical core, the van Leer type FFSL advection algorithm and two state-of-the-art cumulus convection parameterization schemes. Measurements of surface concentration and vertical distribution of radon collected from literature are used as references in model evaluation.

    The simulated radon concentrations using both convection schemes turn out to be consistent with earlier studies with many other models. Comparison with measurements indicates that at the locations where significant seasonal variations are observed in reality, the model can reproduce both the monthly mean surface radon concentration and the annual cycle quite well. At those sites where the seasonal variation is not large, the model is able to give a correct magnitude of the annual mean. In East Asia, where radon simulations are rarely reported in literature, detailed analysis shows that our results compare reasonably well with the observations.

    The most evident changes caused by the use of a different convection scheme are found in the vertical distribution of the tracer. The scheme associated with a weaker upward transport gives higher radon concentration up to about 6 km above the surface, and lower values in higher altitudes. In the lower part of the atmosphere results from this scheme does not agree as well with the measurements as the other scheme. Differences from 6 km to the model top are even larger, although we are not yet able to tell which simulation is better due to the lack of observations at such high altitudes.

  5. Optimal Design of Capsule Transporting Pipeline carrying Spherical Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asim, Taimoor; Mishra, Rakesh; Ubbi, Kuldip

    2012-05-01

    A capsule pipeline transports material or cargo in capsules propelled by fluid flowing through a pipeline. The cargo may either be contained in capsules (such as wheat enclosed inside sealed cylindrical containers), or may itself be the capsules (such as coal compressed into the shape of a cylinder or sphere). As the concept of capsule transportation is relatively new, the capsule pipelines need to be designed optimally for commercial viability. An optimal design of such a pipeline would have minimum pressure drop due to the presence of the solid medium in the pipeline, which corresponds to minimum head loss and hence minimum pumping power required to drive the capsules and the transporting fluid. The total cost for the manufacturing and maintenance of such pipelines is yet another important variable that needs to be considered for the widespread commercial acceptance of capsule transporting pipelines. To address this, the optimisation technique presented here is based on the least-cost principle. Pressure drop relationships have been incorporated to calculate the pumping requirements for the system. The maintenance and manufacturing costs have been computed separately to analyse their effects on the optimisation process. A design example has been included to show the usage of the model presented. The results indicate that for a specific throughput, there exists an optimum diameter of the pipeline for which the total cost for the piping system is at its minimum.

  6. Diapycnal Transport and Pattern Formation in Double-Diffusive Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    not be able to prevent an eventual melting of sea ice and subsequent onset of convection indefinitely. Temperature and salt diffusivities in the...156 Figure 3.54. Model 21C, Time Series. Convection occurs two years after sea ice completely melts away at year...cover in the domain, saw simultaneous sea ice melting and convection. These three cases were all similar. The combination of initial sea ice cover

  7. Laminar flow and convective transport processes scaling principles and asymptotic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, Howard

    1992-01-01

    Laminar Flow and Convective Transport Processes: Scaling Principles and Asymptotic Analysis presents analytic methods for the solution of fluid mechanics and convective transport processes, all in the laminar flow regime. This book brings together the results of almost 30 years of research on the use of nondimensionalization, scaling principles, and asymptotic analysis into a comprehensive form suitable for presentation in a core graduate-level course on fluid mechanics and the convective transport of heat. A considerable amount of material on viscous-dominated flows is covered.A unique feat

  8. Modelling the chemistry and transport of bromoform within a sea breeze driven convective system during the SHIVA Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Hamer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We carry out a case study of the transport and chemistry of bromoform and its product gases (PGs in a sea breeze driven convective episode on 19 November 2011 along the North West coast of Borneo during the "Stratospheric ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere" (SHIVA campaign. We use ground based, ship, aircraft and balloon sonde observations made during the campaign, and a 3-D regional online transport and chemistry model capable of resolving clouds and convection explicitly that includes detailed bromine chemistry. The model simulates the temperature, wind speed, wind direction fairly well for the most part, and adequately captures the convection location, timing, and intensity. The simulated transport of bromoform from the boundary layer up to 12 km compares well to aircraft observations to support our conclusions. The model makes several predictions regarding bromine transport from the boundary layer to the level of convective detrainment (11 to 12 km. First, the majority of bromine undergoes this transport as bromoform. Second, insoluble organic bromine carbonyl species are transported to between 11 and 12 km, but only form a small proportion of the transported bromine. Third, soluble bromine species, which include bromine organic peroxides, hydrobromic acid (HBr, and hypobromous acid (HOBr, are washed out efficiently within the core of the convective column. Fourth, insoluble inorganic bromine species (principally Br2 are not washed out of the convective column, but are also not transported to the altitude of detrainment in large quantities. We expect that Br2 will make a larger relative contribution to the total vertical transport of bromine atoms in scenarios with higher CHBr3 mixing ratios in the boundary layer, which have been observed in other regions. Finally, given the highly detailed description of the chemistry, transport and washout of bromine compounds within our simulations, we make a series of recommendations about

  9. Modelling the chemistry and transport of bromoform within a sea breeze driven convective system during the SHIVA Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, P. D.; Marécal, V.; Hossaini, R.; Pirre, M.; Warwick, N.; Chipperfield, M.; Samah, A. A.; Harris, N.; Robinson, A.; Quack, B.; Engel, A.; Krüger, K.; Atlas, E.; Subramaniam, K.; Oram, D.; Leedham, E.; Mills, G.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Sala, S.; Keber, T.; Bönisch, H.; Peng, L. K.; Nadzir, M. S. M.; Lim, P. T.; Mujahid, A.; Anton, A.; Schlager, H.; Catoire, V.; Krysztofiak, G.; Fühlbrügge, S.; Dorf, M.; Sturges, W. T.

    2013-08-01

    We carry out a case study of the transport and chemistry of bromoform and its product gases (PGs) in a sea breeze driven convective episode on 19 November 2011 along the North West coast of Borneo during the "Stratospheric ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere" (SHIVA) campaign. We use ground based, ship, aircraft and balloon sonde observations made during the campaign, and a 3-D regional online transport and chemistry model capable of resolving clouds and convection explicitly that includes detailed bromine chemistry. The model simulates the temperature, wind speed, wind direction fairly well for the most part, and adequately captures the convection location, timing, and intensity. The simulated transport of bromoform from the boundary layer up to 12 km compares well to aircraft observations to support our conclusions. The model makes several predictions regarding bromine transport from the boundary layer to the level of convective detrainment (11 to 12 km). First, the majority of bromine undergoes this transport as bromoform. Second, insoluble organic bromine carbonyl species are transported to between 11 and 12 km, but only form a small proportion of the transported bromine. Third, soluble bromine species, which include bromine organic peroxides, hydrobromic acid (HBr), and hypobromous acid (HOBr), are washed out efficiently within the core of the convective column. Fourth, insoluble inorganic bromine species (principally Br2) are not washed out of the convective column, but are also not transported to the altitude of detrainment in large quantities. We expect that Br2 will make a larger relative contribution to the total vertical transport of bromine atoms in scenarios with higher CHBr3 mixing ratios in the boundary layer, which have been observed in other regions. Finally, given the highly detailed description of the chemistry, transport and washout of bromine compounds within our simulations, we make a series of recommendations about the physical and

  10. MHD Mixed Convection Heat Transfer in a Vertical Channel with Temperature-Dependent Transport Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Kerehalli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is carried out to study the effects of temperature-dependent transport properties on the fully developed free and forced MHD convection flow in a vertical channel. In this model, viscous and Ohmic dissipation terms are also included. The governing nonlinear equations (in non-dimensional form are solved numerically by a second order finite difference scheme. A parametric study is performed in order to illustrate the interactive influences of the model parameters; namely, the magnetic parameter, the variable viscosity parameter, the mixed convection parameter, the variable thermal conductivity parameter, the Brinkmann number and the Eckert number. The velocity field, the temperature field, the skin friction and the Nusselt number are evaluated for several sets of values of these parameters. For some special cases, the obtained numerical results are compared with the available results in the literature: Good agreement is found. Of all the parameters, the variable thermo-physical transport property has the strongest effect on the drag, heat transfer characteristics, the stream-wise velocity, and the temperature field.

  11. Retrieval of dispersive and convective transport phenomena in fluids using stationary and nonstationary time domain analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. B.; St.john, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Simultaneously occuring dispersive and convective components of fluid kinematics are obtained by a time domain analysis of optically retrieved temporal histories of the transport phenomena. Utilizing triangulation of collimated optical fields of view from two radiometers to obtain the temporal histories of the intensity fluctuations associated with the transport phenomena has enabled investigators to retrieve the local convective transport by employing correlation statistics. The location of the peak in the covariance curve determines the transit time from which the convection velocity is calculated; whereas, the change in shape of the peak in the covariance curve determines the change in average frequency of the wave packet from which the dispersion velocity is calculated. Thus, two-component analysis requires the maximum possible enhancement of the delineation for the transport. The convection velocity is the result of a fixed reference frame calculation whereas, the dispersion velocity is the result of a moving reference frame calcuation.

  12. The Role of Downward Momentum Transport in the Generation of Convective Downbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pryor, K

    2006-01-01

    A downburst index has been developed to assess the magnitude of convective downbursts associated with heavy precipitation-producing (HP) convective systems. The index, designed for use during the warm season over the central and eastern continental United States, is composed of relevant parameters that represent the simultaneous physical processes of convective updraft development and downburst generation, incorporating positive buoyant energy or convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the vertical equivalent potential temperature gradient between the surface and the mid-troposphere. In addition to large CAPE and the presence of a vertical equivalent potential temperature gradient gradient, previous research has identified other favorable conditions for downburst generation during cold-season convection events. A primary mechanism in downburst generation associated with synoptically forced convective systems is the downward transport of higher momentum possessed by winds in the mid-troposphere.

  13. Cross-Saharan transport of water vapor via recycled cold pool outflows from moist convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzeciak, Tomasz M.; Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Marsham, John H.

    2017-02-01

    Very sparse data have previously limited observational studies of meteorological processes in the Sahara. We present an observed case of convectively driven water vapor transport crossing the Sahara over 2.5 days in June 2012, from the Sahel in the south to the Atlas in the north. A daily cycle is observed, with deep convection in the evening generating moist cold pools that fed the next day's convection; the convection then generated new cold pools, providing a vertical recycling of moisture. Trajectories driven by analyses were able to capture the direction of the transport but not its full extent, particularly at night when cold pools are most active, and analyses missed much of the water content of cold pools. The results highlight the importance of cold pools for moisture transport, dust and clouds, and demonstrate the need to include these processes in models in order to improve the representation of Saharan atmosphere.

  14. Evaluation of Convective Transport in the GEOS-5 Chemistry and Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Ott, Lesley E.; Shi, Jainn J.; Tao. Wei-Kuo; Mari, Celine; Schlager, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Chemistry and Climate Model (CCM) consists of a global atmospheric general circulation model and the combined stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry package from the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical transport model. The subgrid process of convective tracer transport is represented through the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert parameterization in the GEOS-5 CCM. However, substantial uncertainty for tracer transport is associated with this parameterization, as is the case with all global and regional models. We have designed a project to comprehensively evaluate this parameterization from the point of view of tracer transport, and determine the most appropriate improvements that can be made to the GEOS-5 convection algorithm, allowing improvement in our understanding of the role of convective processes in determining atmospheric composition. We first simulate tracer transport in individual observed convective events with a cloud-resolving model (WRF). Initial condition tracer profiles (CO, CO2, O3) are constructed from aircraft data collected in undisturbed air, and the simulations are evaluated using aircraft data taken in the convective anvils. A single-column (SCM) version of the GEOS-5 GCM with online tracers is then run for the same convective events. SCM output is evaluated based on averaged tracer fields from the cloud-resolving model. Sensitivity simulations with adjusted parameters will be run in the SCM to determine improvements in the representation of convective transport. The focus of the work to date is on tropical continental convective events from the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) field mission in August 2006 that were extensively sampled by multiple research aircraft.

  15. Convection in axially symmetric accretion discs with microscopic transport coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Malanchev, K L; Shakura, N I

    2016-01-01

    The vertical structure of stationary thin accretion discs is calculated from the energy balance equation with heat generation due to microscopic ion viscosity {\\eta} and electron heat conductivity {\\kappa}, both depending on temperature. In the optically thin discs it is found that for the heat conductivity increasing with temperature, the vertical temperature gradient exceeds the adiabatic value at some height, suggesting convective instability in the upper disc layer. There is a critical Prandtl number, Pr = 4/9, above which a Keplerian disc become fully convective. The vertical density distribution of optically thin laminar accretion discs as found from the hydrostatic equilibrium equation cannot be generally described by a polytrope but in the case of constant viscosity and heat conductivity. In the optically thick discs with radiation heat transfer, the vertical disc structure is found to be convectively stable for both absorption dominated and scattering dominated opacities, unless a very steep dependen...

  16. Scalings of field correlations and heat transport in turbulent convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra K; Mishra, Pankaj K; Pandey, Ambrish; Paul, Supriyo

    2012-01-01

    Using direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection under free-slip boundary condition, we show that the normalized correlation function between the vertical velocity field and the temperature field, as well as the normalized viscous dissipation rate, scales as Ra-0.22 for moderately large Rayleigh number Ra. This scaling accounts for the Nusselt number Nu exponent of approximately 0.3, as observed in experiments. Numerical simulations also reveal that the aforementioned normalized correlation functions are constants for the convection simulation under periodic boundary conditions.

  17. Convective transport over the central United States and its role in regional CO and ozone budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Ellis, William G., Jr.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Scala, John R.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Mcnamara, Donna P.; Simpson, Joanne

    1994-01-01

    We have constructed a regional budget for boundary layer carbon monoxide over the central United States (32.5 deg - 50 deg N, 90 deg - 105 deg W), emphasizing a detailed evaluation of deep convective vertical fluxes appropriate for the month of June. Deep convective venting of the boundary layer (upward) dominates other components of the CO budget, e.g., downward convective transport, loss of CO by oxidation, anthropogenic emissions, and CO produced from oxidation of methane, isoprene, and anthropogenic nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). Calculations of deep convective venting are based on the method pf Pickering et al.(1992a) which uses a satellite-derived deep convective cloud climatology along with transport statistics from convective cloud model simulations of observed prototype squall line events. This study uses analyses of convective episodes in 1985 and 1989 and CO measurements taken during several midwestern field campaigns. Deep convective venting of the boundary layer over this moderately polluted region provides a net (upward minus downward) flux of 18.1 x 10(exp 8) kg CO/month to the free troposphere during early summer. Shallow cumulus and synoptic-scale weather systems together make a comparable contribution (total net flux 16.2 x 10(exp 8) kg CO/month). Boundary layer venting of CO with other O3 precursors leads to efficient free troposheric O3 formation. We estimate that deep convective transport of CO and other precursors over the central United States in early summer leads to a gross production of 0.66 - 1.1 Gmol O3/d in good agreement with estimates of O3 production from boundary layer venting in a continental-scale model (Jacob et al., 1993a, b). On this respect the central U.S. region acts as s `chimney' for the country, and presumably this O3 contributes to high background levels of O3 in the eastern United States and O3 export to the North Atlantic.

  18. Bounds on heat transport in Bénard-Marangoni convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrom, George; Doering, Charles R

    2010-04-01

    For Pearson's model of Bénard-Marangoni convection, the Nusselt number Nu is proven to be bounded as a function Marangoni number Ma according to Nuconduction solution from 56.77 to 58.36 when the Prandtl number is infinite.

  19. Transport across the tropical tropopause layer and convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissier, Ann-Sophie; Legras, Bernard; Tzella, Alexandra

    2015-04-01

    We investigate how air parcels detrained from convective sources enter the TTL. The approach is based on the comparison of unidimensional trajectories and Lagrangian backward and forward trajectories, using TRACZILLA and ERA-Interim. Backward trajectories are launched at 380K and run until they hit a deep convective cloud. Forward trajectories are launched at the top of high convective clouds identified by brightness temperature from CLAUS dataset. 1D trajectories are computed using Gardiner's method. Results show that the warm pool region during winter and the Bay of Bengal / Sea of China during summer are the prevalent sources as already identified in many previous studies and we quantify the respective role of the various regions. We show that the 1D model explains qualitatively and often quantitatively the 3d results. We also show that in spite of generating very high convection, Africa is quite ineffective as providing air that remains in the TTL while on the opposite the Tibetan Plateau is the most effective region in this respect although its total contribution is minor. Finally, we compare ERA-Interim, JRA-55 and MERRA reanalysis and find large similarities between the two formers.

  20. Parallel measurement of conductive and convective thermal transport of micro/nanowires based on Raman mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man; Li, Changzheng; Wang, Jianmei; Xiao, Xiangheng; Yue, Yanan

    2015-06-01

    Heat conduction and convection are coupled effects in thermal transport of low-dimensional materials especially at micro/nanoscale. However, the parallel measurement is a challenge due to the limitation of characterization pathways. In this work, we report a method to study conductive and convective thermal transport of micro/nanowires simultaneously by using steady-state Joule-heating and Raman mapping. To examine this method, the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fiber (36 μm in diameter) is characterized and its temperature dependence of thermal properties including thermal conductivity and convection coefficient in ambient air is studied. Preliminary results show that thermal conductivity of the CNTs fiber increases from 26 W/m K to 34 W/m K and convection coefficient decreases from 1143 W/m2 K to 1039 W/m2 K with temperature ranging from 312 to 444 K. The convective heat dissipation to the air could be as high as 60% of the total Joule heating power. Uncertainty analysis is performed to reveal that fitting errors can be further reduced by increasing sampling points along the fiber. This method features a fast/convenient way for parallel measurement of both heat conduction and convection of micro/nanowires which is beneficial to comprehensively understanding the coupled effect of micro/nanoscale heat conduction and convection.

  1. Sensitivity of CO2 Simulation in a GCM to the Convective Transport Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z.; Pawson, S.; Collatz, G. J.; Gregg, W. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Baker, D.; Ott, L.

    2014-01-01

    Convection plays an important role in the transport of heat, moisture and trace gases. In this study, we simulated CO2 concentrations with an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). Three different convective transport algorithms were used. One is a modified Arakawa-Shubert scheme that was native to the GCM; two others used in two off-line chemical transport models (CTMs) were added to the GCM here for comparison purposes. Advanced CO2 surfaced fluxes were used for the simulations. The results were compared to a large quantity of CO2 observation data. We find that the simulation results are sensitive to the convective transport algorithms. Overall, the three simulations are quite realistic and similar to each other in the remote marine regions, but are significantly different in some land regions with strong fluxes such as Amazon and Siberia during the convection seasons. Large biases against CO2 measurements are found in these regions in the control run, which uses the original GCM. The simulation with the simple diffusive algorithm is better. The difference of the two simulations is related to the very different convective transport speed.

  2. Investigation of Convective Downburst Hazards to Marine Transportation

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Convective downbursts are known to produce potentially hazardous weather conditions. Currently, severity indices are used to estimate the strength of a potential downburst, but this information does not readily translate to the variables affected by downburst events. The effects of downbursts are often associated with aviation because of rapid changes in wind direction and speed, but can also be observed in marine conditions. Three recently observed downburst events have been selected as case...

  3. Convection in axially symmetric accretion discs with microscopic transport coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanchev, K. L.; Postnov, K. A.; Shakura, N. I.

    2017-01-01

    The vertical structure of stationary thin accretion discs is calculated from the energy balance equation with heat generation due to microscopic ion viscosity η and electron heat conductivity κ, both depending on temperature. In the optically thin discs it is found that for the heat conductivity increasing with temperature, the vertical temperature gradient exceeds the adiabatic value at some height, suggesting convective instability in the upper disc layer. There is a critical Prandtl number, Pr = 4/9, above which a Keplerian disc become fully convective. The vertical density distribution of optically thin laminar accretion discs as found from the hydrostatic equilibrium equation cannot be generally described by a polytrope but in the case of constant viscosity and heat conductivity. In the optically thick discs with radiation heat transfer, the vertical disc structure is found to be convectively stable for both absorption-dominated and scattering-dominated opacities, unless a very steep dependence of the viscosity coefficient on temperature is assumed. A polytropic-like structure in this case is found for Thomson scattering-dominated opacity.

  4. One-dimensional model of oxygen transport impedance accounting for convection perpendicular to the electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainka, J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Computacao Cientifica (LNCC), CMC 6097, Av. Getulio Vargas 333, 25651-075 Petropolis, RJ, Caixa Postal 95113 (Brazil); Maranzana, G.; Thomas, A.; Dillet, J.; Didierjean, S.; Lottin, O. [Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee (LEMTA), Universite de Lorraine, 2, avenue de la Foret de Haye, 54504 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); LEMTA, CNRS, 2, avenue de la Foret de Haye, 54504 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2012-10-15

    A one-dimensional (1D) model of oxygen transport in the diffusion media of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is presented, which considers convection perpendicular to the electrode in addition to diffusion. The resulting analytical expression of the convecto-diffusive impedance is obtained using a convection-diffusion equation instead of a diffusion equation in the case of classical Warburg impedance. The main hypothesis of the model is that the convective flux is generated by the evacuation of water produced at the cathode which flows through the porous media in vapor phase. This allows the expression of the convective flux velocity as a function of the current density and of the water transport coefficient {alpha} (the fraction of water being evacuated at the cathode outlet). The resulting 1D oxygen transport impedance neglects processes occurring in the direction parallel to the electrode that could have a significant impact on the cell impedance, like gas consumption or concentration oscillations induced by the measuring signal. However, it enables us to estimate the impact of convection perpendicular to the electrode on PEMFC impedance spectra and to determine in which conditions the approximation of a purely diffusive oxygen transport is valid. Experimental observations confirm the numerical results. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Heat transport in the geostrophic regime of rotating Rayleigh-B{\\'e}nard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Ecke, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    We report experimental measurements of heat transport in rotating Rayleigh-B{\\'e}nard convection in a cylindrical convection cell with aspect ratio $\\Gamma = 1/2$. The fluid was helium gas with Prandtl number Pr = 0.7. The range of control parameters was Rayleigh number $4 \\times 10^9 < {\\rm Ra} < 4 \\times 10^{11}$ and Ekman number $2 \\times 10^{-7} < {\\rm Ek} < 3 \\times 10^{-5}$(corresponding to Taylor number $4 \\times 10^9 < {\\rm Ta} < 1 \\times 10^{14}$ and convective Rossby number $0.07 < {\\rm Ro} < 5$). We determine the crossover from weakly rotating turbulent convection to rotation dominated geostrophic convection through experimental measurements of the normalized heat transport Nu. The heat transport for the rotating state in the geostrophic regime, normalized by the zero-rotation heat transport, is consistent with scaling of $({\\rm RaEk}^{-7/4})^\\beta$ with $\\beta \\approx 1$. A phase diagram is presented that encapsulates measurements on the potential geostrophic turbulence reg...

  6. A test of sensitivity to convective transport in a global atmospheric CO2 simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, H.; Kawa, S. R.; Chin, M.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Rasch, P.; Wu, S.

    2006-11-01

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO2 distributions. Global CO2 in the year 2000 is simulated using the CTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA's Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO2 by adopting the same CO2 emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et al. (convective transport scheme denoted as Conv1). Conv1 approximates the convective transport by using the bulk convective mass fluxes to redistribute trace gases. The alternate approximation, Conv2, partitions fluxes into updraft and downdraft, as well as into entrainment and detrainment, and has potential to yield a more realistic simulation of vertical redistribution through deep convection. Replacing Conv1 by Conv2 results in an overestimate of CO2 over biospheric sink regions. The largest discrepancies result in a CO2 difference of about 7.8 ppm in the July NH boreal forest, which is about 30% of the CO2 seasonality for that area. These differences are compared to those produced by emission scenario variations constrained by the framework of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to account for possible land use change and residual terrestrial CO2 sink. It is shown that the overestimated CO2 driven by Conv2 can be offset by introducing these supplemental emissions.

  7. Differential Rotation and Angular Momentum Transport Caused by Thermal Convection in a Rotating Spherical Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehiro, S.; Sasaki, Y.; Hayashi, Y.-Y.; Yamada, M.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate generation mechanisms of differential rotation and angular momentum transport caused by Boussinesq thermal convection in a rotating spherical shell based on weakly nonlinear numerical calculations for various values of the Prandtl and Ekman numbers under a setup similar to the solar convection layer. When the Prandtl number is of order unity or less and the rotation rate of the system is small (the Ekman number is larger than O(10-2)), the structure of thermal convection is not governed by the Taylor-Proudman theorem; banana-type convection cells emerge which follow the spherical shell boundaries rather than the rotation axis. Due to the Coriolis effect, the velocity field associated with those types of convection cells accompanies the Reynolds stress which transports angular momentum from high-latitudes to the equatorial region horizontally, and equatorial prograde flows are produced. The surface and internal distributions of differential rotation realized in this regime are quite similar to those observed in the Sun with helioseismology. These results may suggest that we should apply larger values of the eddy diffusivities than those believed so far when we use a low resolution numerical model for thermal convection in the solar interior.

  8. Convective heat transport in stratified atmospheres at low and high Mach number

    CERN Document Server

    Anders, Evan H

    2016-01-01

    Convection in astrophysical systems is stratified and often occurs at high Rayleigh number (Ra) and low Mach number (Ma). Here we study stratified convection in the context of plane-parallel, polytropically stratified atmospheres. We hold the density stratification ($n_{\\rho}$) and Prandtl number (Pr) constant while varying Ma and Ra to determine the behavior of the Nusselt number (Nu), which quantifies the efficiency of convective heat transport. As Ra increases and $\\text{Ma} \\rightarrow 1$, a scaling of Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{0.45}$ is observed. As Ra increases to a regime where Ma $\\geq 1$, this scaling gives way to a weaker Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{0.19}$. In the regime of Ma $\\ll 1$, a consistent Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{0.31}$ is retrieved, reminiscent of the Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{2/7}$ seen in Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection.

  9. Investigation of Convective Downburst Hazards to Marine Transportation

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, D

    2007-01-01

    Convective downbursts are known to produce potentially hazardous weather conditions. Currently, severity indices are used to estimate the strength of a potential downburst, but this information does not readily translate to the variables affected by downburst events. The effects of downbursts are often associated with aviation because of rapid changes in wind direction and speed, but can also be observed in marine conditions. Three recently observed downburst events have been selected as case studies to evaluate the effects of the downbursts on the marine environment. The information gathered on these events includes wind speed, gusts and direction at the surface, air temperature and pressure, water level, and Wet Microburst Severity Index (WMSI) values. Correlation between the WMSI values, the maximum wind gust, and the change in water level is suggested.

  10. Astrobiological and Geological Implications of Convective Transport in Icy Outer Planet Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Robert T.; Zhong, Shi-Jie; Barr, Amy

    2005-01-01

    The oceans of large icy outer planet satellites are prime targets in the search for extraterrestrial life in our solar system. The goal of our project has been to develop models of ice convection in order to understand convection as an astrobiologically relevant transport mechanism within icy satellites, especially Europa. These models provide valuable constraints on modes of surface deformation and thus the implications of satellite surface geology for astrobiology, and for planetary protection. Over the term of this project, significant progress has been made in three areas: (1) the initiation of convection in large icy satellites, which we find probably requires tidal heating; (2) the relationship of surface features on Europa to internal ice convection, including the likely role of low-melting-temperature impurities; and (3) the effectiveness of convection as an agent of icy satellite surface-ocean material exchange, which seems most plausible if tidal heating, compositional buoyancy, and solid-state convection work in combination. Descriptions of associated publications include: 3 published papers (including contributions to 1 review chapter), 1 manuscript in revision, 1 manuscript in preparation (currently being completed under separate funding), and 1 published popular article. A myriad of conference abstracts have also been published, and only those from the past year are listed.

  11. New variational bounds on convective transport. I. Formulation and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobasco, Ian; Souza, Andre N.; Doering, Charles R.

    2016-11-01

    We study the maximal rate of scalar transport between parallel walls separated by distance h, by an incompressible fluid with scalar diffusion coefficient κ. Given velocity vector field u with intensity measured by the Péclet number Pe =h2 1/2 / κ (where is space-time average) the challenge is to determine the largest enhancement of wall-to-wall scalar flux over purely diffusive transport, i.e., the Nusselt number Nu . Variational formulations of the problem are presented and it is determined that Nu ∞ . Moreover, this scaling for optimal transport-possibly modulo logarithmic corrections-is asymptotically sharp: admissible steady flows with Nu >=c' Pe 2 / 3 /[ log Pe ] 2 are constructed. The structure of (nearly) maximally transporting flow fields is discussed. Supported in part by National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship DGE-0813964, awards OISE-0967140, PHY-1205219, DMS-1311833, and DMS-1515161, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

  12. Examination of Scale-Awareness of Convective Transport for Parameterization Development in Mesoscale and Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Fan, J.; Zhang, G. J.; Xu, K.

    2013-12-01

    Cumulus convection plays a key role in atmospheric circulation. The results of global climate models, which have been widely used in climate research, are highly sensitive to cumulus parameterizations used for modeling cumulus clouds. Existing parameterization schemes have relied upon a number of assumptions whose validity is questionable at high spatial resolutions. In this study, we intended to develop a scale-aware cumulus parameterization based on the conventional Zhang-McFarlane scheme which is suitable for a broad range of uses, ranging from meso-scale to climate models. We conduct analyses from cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations, including two cases from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), to understand scale-dependencies of convective cloud properties following the unified parameterization framework of Arakawa and Wu (2013), but with a more complete set of considerations such as including downdrafts and at different convective stages for eddy flux approximations. Our preliminary results show that downdrafts could make a significant contribution to eddy flux transport at the developed stage of convection. The eddy transported by updrafts and downdrafts with respect to the environmental background increased with the increasing of grid-spacing, but do not change with fraction. There are large differences between the explicit calculation of eddy flux and that from approximations used in cumulus parameterization at grid-spacings of less than 64 km. Much of this difference is due to the sub-grid inhomogeneity of updrafts and downdrafts.

  13. A test of sensitivity to convective transport in a global atmospheric CO2 simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, H.; Kawa, S. R.; M. Chin; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Rasch, P.; Wu, S.

    2011-01-01

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO2 distributions. Global CO2 in the year 2000 is simulated using the CTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA's Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO2 by adopting the same CO2 emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et...

  14. Salt tectonics and shallow subseafloor fluid convection: models of coupled fluid-heat-salt transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    Thermohaline convection associated with salt domes has the potential to drive significant fluid flow and mass and heat transport in continental margins, but previous studies of fluid flow associated with salt structures have focused on continental settings or deep flow systems of importance to petroleum exploration. Motivated by recent geophysical and geochemical observations that suggest a convective pattern to near-seafloor pore fluid flow in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoMex), we devise numerical models that fully couple thermal and chemical processes to quantify the effects of salt geometry and seafloor relief on fluid flow beneath the seafloor. Steady-state models that ignore halite dissolution demonstrate that seafloor relief plays an important role in the evolution of shallow geothermal convection cells and that salt at depth can contribute a thermal component to this convection. The inclusion of faults causes significant, but highly localized, increases in flow rates at seafloor discharge zones. Transient models that include halite dissolution show the evolution of flow during brine formation from early salt-driven convection to later geothermal convection, characteristics of which are controlled by the interplay of seafloor relief and salt geometry. Predicted flow rates are on the order of a few millimeters per year or less for homogeneous sediments with a permeability of 10−15 m2, comparable to compaction-driven flow rates. Sediment permeabilities likely fall below 10−15 m2 at depth in the GoMex basin, but such thermohaline convection can drive pervasive mass transport across the seafloor, affecting sediment diagenesis in shallow sediments. In more permeable settings, such flow could affect methane hydrate stability, seafloor chemosynthetic communities, and the longevity of fluid seeps.

  15. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization – Part I: Convection and Cloud Properties Simulated with Spectral Bin and Bulk Microphysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Yi-Chin; Xu, Kuan-Man; North, Kirk; Collis, Scott M.; Dong, Xiquan; Zhang, Guang J.; Chen, Qian; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    The ultimate goal of this study is to improve representation of convective transport by cumulus parameterization for meso-scale and climate models. As Part I of the study, we perform extensive evaluations of cloud-resolving simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complexes in mid-latitude continent and tropical regions using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with spectral-bin microphysics (SBM) and with two double-moment bulk microphysics schemes: a modified Morrison (MOR) and Milbrandt and Yau (MY2). Compared to observations, in general, SBM gives better simulations of precipitation, vertical velocity of convective cores, and the vertically decreasing trend of radar reflectivity than MOR and MY2, and therefore will be used for analysis of scale-dependence of eddy transport in Part II. The common features of the simulations for all convective systems are (1) the model tends to overestimate convection intensity in the middle and upper troposphere, but SBM can alleviate much of the overestimation and reproduce the observed convection intensity well; (2) the model greatly overestimates radar reflectivity in convective cores (SBM predicts smaller radar reflectivity but does not remove the large overestimation); and (3) the model performs better for mid-latitude convective systems than tropical system. The modeled mass fluxes of the mid latitude systems are not sensitive to microphysics schemes, but are very sensitive for the tropical case indicating strong microphysics modification to convection. Cloud microphysical measurements of rain, snow and graupel in convective cores will be critically important to further elucidate issues within cloud microphysics schemes.

  16. Intermittent convective transport carried by propagating electromagnetic filamentary structures in nonuniformly magnetized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.S.; Naulin, Volker; Fundamenski, W.

    2010-01-01

    Drift-Alfvén vortex filaments associated with electromagnetic turbulence were recently identified in reversed field pinch devices. Similar propagating filamentary structures were observed in the Earth magnetosheath, magnetospheric cusp and Saturn’s magnetosheath by spacecrafts. The characteristic......, heat, and momentum in the fusion plasmas can be interpreted in terms of the ballistic motion of these solitary electromagnetic filamentary structures....

  17. Convective instability and mass transport of diffusion layers in a Hele-Shaw geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Backhaus, Scott; Ecke, R E

    2010-01-01

    We consider experimentally the instability and mass transport of a porous-medium flow in a Hele-Shaw geometry. In an initially stable configuration, a lighter fluid (water) is located over a heavier fluid (propylene glycol). The fluids mix via diffusion with some regions of the resulting mixture being heavier than either pure fluid. Density-driven convection occurs with downward penetrating dense fingers that transport mass much more effectively than diffusion alone. We investigate the initial instability and the quasi steady state. The convective time and velocity scales, finger width, wave number selection, and normalized mass transport are determined for 6,000

  18. A test of sensitivity to convective transport in a global atmospheric CO{sub 2} simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, H. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States). UMBC Goddard Earth Science and Technology Center; Kawa, S.R.; Chin, M.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Rasch, P. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Wu, S. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO{sub 2} distributions. Global CO{sub 2} in the year 2000 is simulated using the CTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA's Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO{sub 2} by adopting the same CO{sub 2} emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et al. (convective transport scheme denoted as Conv1). Conv1 approximates the convective transport by using the bulk convective mass fluxes to redistribute trace gases. The alternate approximation, Conv2, partitions fluxes into updraft and downdraft, as well as into entrainment and detrainment, and has potential to yield a more realistic simulation of vertical redistribution through deep convection.Replacing Conv1 by Conv2 results in an overestimate of CO{sub 2} over biospheric sink regions. The largest discrepancies result in a CO{sub 2} difference of about 7.8 ppm in the July NH boreal forest, which is about 30% of the CO{sub 2} seasonality for that area. These differences are compared to those produced by emission scenario variations constrained by the framework of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to account for possible land use change and residual terrestrial CO{sub 2} sink. It is shown that the overestimated CO{sub 2} driven by Conv2 can be offset by introducing these supplemental emissions.

  19. Modeling the convective transport of pollutants from eastern Colorado, USA into Rocky Mountain National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, A.; Schumacher, R. S.; Denning, S.

    2015-12-01

    Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) is a Class I Airshed designated under the Clean Air Act. Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition in the Park has been a known problem since weekly measurements of wet deposition of inorganic N began in the 1980s by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP). The addition of N from urban and agriculture emissions along the Colorado Front Range to montane ecosystems degrades air quality/visibility, water quality, and soil pH levels. Based on NADP data during summers 1994-2014, wet N deposition at Beaver Meadows in RMNP exhibited a bimodal gamma distribution. In this study, we identified meteorological transport mechanisms for 3 high wet-N deposition events (all events were within the secondary peak of the gamma distribution) using the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The NARR was used to identify synoptic-scale influences on the transport; the WRF model was used to analyze the convective transport of pollutants from a concentrated animal feeding operation near Greeley, Colorado, USA. The WRF simulation included a passive tracer from the feeding operation and a convection-permitting horizontal spacing of 4/3 km. The three cases suggest (a) synoptic-scale moisture and flow patterns are important for priming summer transport events and (b) convection plays a vital role in the transport of Front Range pollutants into RMNP.

  20. Carbon dioxide sequestration: Modeling the diffusive and convective transport under a CO2 cap

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    A rise in carbon dioxide levels from industrial emissions is contributing to the greenhouse effect and global warming. CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers is a strategy to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels. Scientists and researchers rely on numerical simulators to predict CO2 storage by modeling the fluid transport behaviour. Studies have shown that after CO2 is injected into a saline aquifer, undissolved CO2 rises due to buoyant forces and will spread laterally away from the injection site under an area of low permeability. CO2 from this ‘capped\\' region diffuses into the fluid underlying it, and the resulting CO2-fluid mixture increases in density. This increase in density leads to gravity-driven convection. Accordingly, diffusive-convective transport is important to model since it predicts an enhanced storage capacity of the saline aquifer. This work incorporates the diffusive and convective transport processes into the transport modeling equation, and uses a self-generated code. Discretization of the domain is done with a cell-centered finite difference method. Cases are set up using similar parameters from published literature in order to compare results. Enhanced storage capacity is predicted in this work, similar to work done by others. A difference in the onset of convective transport between this work and published results is noticed and discussed in this paper. A sensitivity analysis is performed on the density model used in this work, and on the diffusivity value assumed. The analysis shows that the density model and diffusivity value is a key component on simulation results. Also, perturbations are added to porosity and permeability in order to see the effect of perturbations on the onset of convection, and results agree with similar findings by others. This work provides a basis for studying other cases, such as the impact of heterogeneity on the diffusion-convective transport. An extension of this work may involve the use of an equation of state to

  1. Representation of tropical deep convection in atmospheric models – Part 2: Tracer transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hoyle

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The tropical transport processes of 14 different models or model versions were compared, within the framework of the SCOUT-O3 (Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere project. The tested models range from the regional to the global scale, and include numerical weather prediction (NWP, chemical transport, and chemistry-climate models. Idealised tracers were used in order to prevent the model's chemistry schemes from influencing the results substantially, so that the effects of modelled transport could be isolated. We find large differences in the vertical transport of very short-lived tracers (with a lifetime of 6 h within the tropical troposphere. Peak convective outflow altitudes range from around 300 hPa to almost 100 hPa among the different models, and the upper tropospheric tracer mixing ratios differ by up to an order of magnitude. The timing of convective events is found to be different between the models, even among those which source their forcing data from the same NWP model (ECMWF. The differences are less pronounced for longer lived tracers, however they could have implications for modelling the halogen burden of the lowermost stratosphere through transport of species such as bromoform, or short-lived hydrocarbons into the lowermost stratosphere. The modelled tracer profiles are strongly influenced by the convective transport parameterisations, and different boundary layer mixing parameterisations also have a large impact on the modelled tracer profiles. Preferential locations for rapid transport from the surface into the upper troposphere are similar in all models, and are mostly concentrated over the western Pacific, the Maritime Continent and the Indian Ocean. In contrast, models do not indicate that upward transport is highest over western Africa.

  2. EFFICIENT, INTEGRATED TRANSPORT SYSTEM KEY TO PORT'S SUCCESS:Houston Sufficient support infrastructure, carrying capacity needed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ALAN DANIELS

    2005-01-01

    @@ An efficient, integrated transport system iskey to the Port of Vancouver s success. "There are many ways that we can optimizethe efficiency and carrying capacity of ourtransportation infrastructure in Canada: throughtechnology, by working together, by thinkingdifferently," said Captain Gordon Houston,President & CEO of the Vancouver Port Authority.

  3. Optimal wall spacing for heat transport in thermal convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishkina, Olga [Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    The simulation of RB flow for Ra up to 1 x 10{sup 10} is computationally expensive in terms of computing power and hard disk storage. Thus, we gratefully acknowledge the computational resources supported by Leibniz-Rechenzentrum Munich. Compared to Γ=1 situation, a new physical picture of heat transport is identified here at Γ{sub opt} for any explored Ra. Therefore, a detailed comparison between Γ=1 and Γ=Γ{sub opt} is valuable for our further research, for example, their vertical temperature and velocity profiles. Additionally, we plan to compare the fluid with different Pr under geometrical confinement, which are computationally expensive for the situations of Pr<<1 and Pr>>1.

  4. Off-line algorithm for calculation of vertical tracer transport in the troposphere due to deep convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belikov, D.A.; Maksyutov, S.; Krol, M.C.; Fraser, A.; Rigby, M.; Bian, H.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; Bergmann, D.; Bousquet, P.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Chipperfield, M.P.; Fortems-Cheiney, A.; Gloor, E.; Haynes, K.; Hess, P.; Houweling, S.; Kawa, S.R.; Law, R.M.; Loh, Z.; Meng, L.; Palmer, P.I.; Patra, P.K.; Prinn, R.G.; Saito, R.; Wilson, C.

    2013-01-01

    A modified cumulus convection parametrisation scheme is presented. This scheme computes the mass of air transported upward in a cumulus cell using conservation of moisture and a detailed distribution of convective precipitation provided by a reanalysis dataset. The representation of vertical

  5. Off-line algorithm for calculation of vertical tracer transport in the troposphere due to deep convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belikov, D.A.; Maksyutov, S.; Krol, M.C.; Fraser, A.; Rigby, M.; Bian, H.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; Bergmann, D.; Bousquet, P.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Chipperfield, M.P.; Fortems-Cheiney, A.; Gloor, E.; Haynes, K.; Hess, P.; Houweling, S.; Kawa, S.R.; Law, R.M.; Loh, Z.; Meng, L.; Palmer, P.I.; Patra, P.K.; Prinn, R.G.; Saito, R.; Wilson, C.

    2013-01-01

    A modified cumulus convection parametrisation scheme is presented. This scheme computes the mass of air transported upward in a cumulus cell using conservation of moisture and a detailed distribution of convective precipitation provided by a reanalysis dataset. The representation of vertical transpo

  6. A regional estimate of convective transport of CO from biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Scala, John R.; Thompson, Anne M.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    1992-01-01

    A regional-scale estimate of the fraction of biomass burning emissions that are transported to the free troposphere by deep convection is presented. The focus is on CO and the study region is a part of Brazil that underwent intensive deforestation in the 1980s. The method of calculation is stepwise, scaling up from a prototype convective event, the dynamics of which are well-characterized, to the vertical mass flux of carbon monoxide over the region. Given uncertainties in CO emissions from biomass burning and the representativeness of the prototype event, it is estimated that 10-40 percent of CO emissions from the burning region may be rapidly transported to the free troposphere over the burning region. These relatively fresh emissions will produce O3 efficiently in the free troposphere where O3 has a longer lifetime than in the boundary layer.

  7. AN EXPANDED CHARACTERISTIC-MIXED FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR A CONVECTION-DOMINATED TRANSPORT PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Guo; Huan-zhen Chen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an Expanded Characteristic-mixed Finite Element Method for approximating the solution to a convection dominated transport problem. The method is a combination of characteristic approximation to handle the convection part in time and an expanded mixed finite element spatial approximation to deal with the diffusion part.The scheme is stable since fluid is transported along the approximate characteristics on the discrete level. At the same time it expands the standard mixed finite element method in the sense that three variables are explicitly treated: the scalar unknown, its gradient, and its flux. Our analysis shows the method approximates the scalar unknown, its gradient,and its flux optimally and simultaneously. We also show this scheme has much smaller time-truncation errors than those of standard methods. A numerical example is presented to show that the scheme is of high performance.

  8. Heat transport in Rayleigh-Bénard convection and angular momentum transport in Taylor-Couette flow: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauckmann, Hannes J.; Eckhardt, Bruno; Schumacher, Jörg

    2017-03-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard convection and Taylor-Couette flow are two canonical flows that have many properties in common. We here compare the two flows in detail for parameter values where the Nusselt numbers, i.e. the thermal transport and the angular momentum transport normalized by the corresponding laminar values, coincide. We study turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in air at Rayleigh number Ra=107 and Taylor-Couette flow at shear Reynolds number ReS=2×104 for two different mean rotation rates but the same Nusselt numbers. For individual pairwise related fields and convective currents, we compare the probability density functions normalized by the corresponding root mean square values and taken at different distances from the wall. We find one rotation number for which there is very good agreement between the mean profiles of the two corresponding quantities temperature and angular momentum. Similarly, there is good agreement between the fluctuations in temperature and velocity components. For the heat and angular momentum currents, there are differences in the fluctuations outside the boundary layers that increase with overall rotation and can be related to differences in the flow structures in the boundary layer and in the bulk. The study extends the similarities between the two flows from global quantities to local quantities and reveals the effects of rotation on the transport.

  9. Cloud-scale model intercomparison of chemical constituent transport in deep convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Barth

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Transport and scavenging of chemical constituents in deep convection is important to understanding the composition of the troposphere and therefore chemistry-climate and air quality issues. High resolution cloud chemistry models have been shown to represent convective processing of trace gases quite well. To improve the representation of sub-grid convective transport and wet deposition in large-scale models, general characteristics, such as species mass flux, from the high resolution cloud chemistry models can be used. However, it is important to understand how these models behave when simulating the same storm. The intercomparison described here examines transport of six species. CO and O3, which are primarily transported, show good agreement among models and compare well with observations. Models that included lightning production of NOx reasonably predict NOx mixing ratios in the anvil compared with observations, but the NOx variability is much larger than that seen for CO and O3. Predicted anvil mixing ratios of the soluble species, HNO3, H2O2, and CH2O, exhibit significant differences among models, attributed to different schemes in these models of cloud processing including the role of the ice phase, the impact of cloud-modified photolysis rates on the chemistry, and the representation of the species chemical reactivity. The lack of measurements of these species in the convective outflow region does not allow us to evaluate the model results with observations.

  10. Convective Transport of Very-short-lived Bromocarbons to the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qing; Atlas, Elliot Leonard; Blake, Donald Ray; Dorf, Marcel; Pfeilsticker, Klaus August; Schauffler, Sue Myhre

    2014-01-01

    We use the NASA GEOS Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM) to quantify the contribution of two most important brominated very short-lived substances (VSLS), bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2), to stratospheric bromine and its sensitivity to convection strength. Model simulations suggest that the most active transport of VSLS from the marine boundary layer through the tropopause occurs over the tropical Indian Ocean, the Western Pacific warm pool, and off the Pacific coast of Mexico. Together, convective lofting of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 and their degradation products supplies 8 ppt total bromine to the base of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL, 150 hPa), similar to the amount of VSLS organic bromine available in the marine boundary layer (7.8-8.4 ppt) in the above active convective lofting regions. Of the total 8 ppt VSLS-originated bromine that enters the base of TTL at 150 hPa, half is in the form of source gas injection (SGI) and half as product gas injection (PGI). Only a small portion (< 10%) the VSLS-originated bromine is removed via wet scavenging in the TTL before reaching the lower stratosphere. On global and annual average, CHBr3 and CH2Br2, together, contribute 7.7 pptv to the present-day inorganic bromine in the stratosphere. However, varying model deep convection strength between maximum and minimum convection conditions can introduce a 2.6 pptv uncertainty in the contribution of VSLS to inorganic bromine in the stratosphere (BryVSLS). Contrary to the conventional wisdom, minimum convection condition leads to a larger BryVSLS as the reduced scavenging in soluble product gases, thus a significant increase in PGI (2-3 ppt), greatly exceeds the relative minor decrease in SGI (a few 10ths ppt.

  11. Effect of secondary convective cells on turbulence intensity profiles, flow generation, and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, S.; Kwon, J. M.; Rhee, T. [National Fusion Research Institute, Eoeun-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Eoeun-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences and Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0429 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    This paper reports the results of gyrokinetic simulation studies of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence which investigate the role of non-resonant modes in turbulence spreading, turbulence regulation, and self-generated plasma rotation. Non-resonant modes, which are those without a rational surface within the simulation domain, are identified as nonlinearly driven, radially extended convective cells. Even though the amplitudes of such convective cells are much smaller than that of the resonant, localized turbulence eddies, we find from bicoherence analysis that the mode-mode interactions in the presence of such convective cells increase the efficiency of turbulence spreading associated with nonlocality phenomena. Artificial suppression of the convective cells shows that turbulence spreading is reduced, and that the turbulence intensity profile is more localized. The more localized turbulence intensity profile produces stronger Reynolds stress and E Multiplication-Sign B shear flows, which in turn results in more effective turbulence self-regulation. This suggests that models without non-resonant modes may significantly underestimate turbulent fluctuation levels and transport.

  12. Convective Heat Transfer in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor of the Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This simulation involved a two-dimensional axisymmetric model of a full motor initial grain of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) of the Space Transportation System (STS). It was conducted with CFD (computational fluid dynamics) commercial code FLUENT. This analysis was performed to: a) maintain continuity with most related previous analyses, b) serve as a non-vectored baseline for any three-dimensional vectored nozzles, c) provide a relatively simple application and checkout for various CFD solution schemes, grid sensitivity studies, turbulence modeling and heat transfer, and d) calculate nozzle convective heat transfer coefficients. The accuracy of the present results and the selection of the numerical schemes and turbulence models were based on matching the rocket ballistic predictions of mass flow rate, head end pressure, vacuum thrust and specific impulse, and measured chamber pressure drop. Matching these ballistic predictions was found to be good. This study was limited to convective heat transfer and the results compared favorably with existing theory. On the other hand, qualitative comparison with backed-out data of the ratio of the convective heat transfer coefficient to the specific heat at constant pressure was made in a relative manner. This backed-out data was devised to match nozzle erosion that was a result of heat transfer (convective, radiative and conductive), chemical (transpirating), and mechanical (shear and particle impingement forces) effects combined.

  13. The impact of overshooting deep convection on local transport and mixing in the tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS)

    OpenAIRE

    Frey, W.; Schofield, R; P. Hoor; Kunkel, D.; F. Ravegnani; A. Ulanovsky; S. Viciani; F. D'Amato; T. P. Lane

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the simulated downward transport and mixing of stratospheric air into the upper tropical troposphere as observed on a research flight during the SCOUT-O3 campaign in connection to a deep convective system. We use the Advanced Research Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model with a horizontal resolution of 333 m to examine this downward transport. The simulation reproduces the deep convective system, its timing and overshooting ...

  14. The impact of overshooting deep convection on local transport and mixing in the tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS)

    OpenAIRE

    Frey, W.; Schofield, R; P. Hoor; Kunkel, D.; F. Ravegnani; A. Ulanovsky; S. Viciani; F. D'Amato; T. P. Lane

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the simulated downward transport and mixing of stratospheric air into the upper tropical troposphere as observed on a research flight during the SCOUT-O3 campaign in connection with a deep convective system. We use the Advanced Research Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model with a horizontal resolution of 333 m to examine this downward transport. The simulation reproduces the deep convective system, its timing and overshooting altitudes re...

  15. Heat transport in Rayleigh-Benard convection and angular momentum transport in Taylor-Couette flow: a comparative study

    CERN Document Server

    Brauckmann, Hannes; Schumacher, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Rayleigh-Benard convection and Taylor-Couette flow are two canonical flows that have many properties in common. We here compare the two flows in detail for parameter values where the Nusselt numbers, i.e. the thermal transport and the angular momentum transport normalized by the corresponding laminar values, coincide. We study turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection in air at Rayleigh number Ra=1e7 and Taylor-Couette flow at shear Reynolds number Re_S=2e4 for two different mean rotation rates but the same Nusselt numbers. For individual pairwise related fields and convective currents, we compare the probability density functions normalized by the corresponding root mean square values and taken at different distances from the wall. We find one rotation number for which there is very good agreement between the mean profiles of the two corresponding quantities temperature and angular momentum. Similarly, there is good agreement between the fluctuations in temperature and velocity components. For the heat and angula...

  16. CO Signatures in Subtropical Convective Clouds and Anvils During CRYSTAL-FACE: An Analysis of Convective Transport and Entertainment Using Observations and a Cloud-Resolving Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jimena P.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Jost, Hans-Jurg; Loewenstein, Max; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Campos, Teresa L.; Weinstock, Elliot M.; Sayres, David S.; Smith, Jessica B.; Pittman, Jasna V.; hide

    2006-01-01

    Convective systems are an important mechanism in the transport of boundary layer air into the upper troposphere. The Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) campaign, in July 2002, was developed as a comprehensive atmospheric mission to improve knowledge of subtropical cirrus systems and their roles in regional and global climate. In situ measurements of carbon monoxide (CO), water vapor (H20v), and total water (H20t) aboard NASA's . WB-57F aircraft and CO aboard the U.S. Navy's Twin Otter aircraft were obtained to study the role of convective transport. Three flights sampled convective outflow on 11, 16 and 29 July found varying degrees of CO enhancement relative to the fiee troposphere. A cloud-resolving model used the in situ observations and meteorological fields to study these three systems. Several methods of filtering the observations were devised here using ice water content, relative humidity with respect to ice, and particle number concentration as a means to statistically sample the model results to represent the flight tracks. A weighted histogram based on ice water content observations was then used to sample the simulations for the three flights. In addition, because the observations occurred in the convective outflow cirrus and not in the storm cores, the model was used to estimate the maximum CO within the convective systems. In general, anvil-level air parcels contained an estimated 20-40% boundary layer air in the analyzed storms.

  17. CO Signatures in Subtropical Convective Clouds and Anvils during CRYSTAL-FACE: An Analysis of Convective Transport and Entrainment using Observations and a Cloud-Resolving Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jimena P.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Loewenstein, Max; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Campos, Teresa L.; Weinstock, Elliot M.; Sayres, David S.; Smith, Jessica B.; Pittman, Jasna V.

    2006-01-01

    Convective systems are an important mechanism in the transport of boundary layer air into the upper troposphere. The Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) campaign, in July 2002, was developed as a comprehensive atmospheric mission to improve knowledge of subtropical cirrus systems and their roles in regional and global climate. In situ measurements of carbon monoxide (CO), water vapor (H2Ov), and total water (H2Ot) aboard NASA's WB-57F aircraft and CO aboard the U.S. Navy's Twin Otter aircraft were obtained to study the role of convective transport. Three flights sampled convective outflow on 11, 16 and 29 July found varying degrees of CO enhancement relative to the free troposphere. A cloud-resolving model used the in situ observations and meteorological fields to study these three systems. Several methods of filtering the observations were devised here using ice water content, relative humidity with respect to ice, and particle number concentration as a means to statistically sample the model results to represent the flight tracks. A weighted histogram based on ice water content observations was then used to sample the simulations for the three flights. In addition, because the observations occurred in the convective outflow cirrus and not in the storm cores, the model was used to estimate the maximum CO within the convective systems. In general, anvil-level air parcels contained an estimated 20-40% boundary layer air in the analyzed storms.

  18. Off-line algorithm for calculation of vertical tracer transport in the troposphere due to deep convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Belikov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A modified cumulus convection parametrisation scheme is presented. This scheme computes the mass of air transported upward in a cumulus cell using conservation of moisture and a detailed distribution of convective precipitation provided by a reanalysis dataset. The representation of vertical transport within the scheme includes entrainment and detrainment processes in convective updrafts and downdrafts. Output from the proposed parametrisation scheme is employed in the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES global chemical transport model driven by JRA-25/JCDAS reanalysis. The simulated convective precipitation rate and mass fluxes are compared with observations and reanalysis data. A simulation of the short-lived tracer 222Rn is used to further evaluate the performance of the cumulus convection scheme. Simulated distributions of 222Rn are validated against observations at the surface and in the free troposphere, and compared with output from models that participated in the TransCom-CH4 Transport Model Intercomparison. From this comparison, we demonstrate that the proposed convective scheme can successfully reproduce deep cloud convection.

  19. Non-axisymmetric vertical shear and convective instabilities as a mechanism of angular momentum transport

    CERN Document Server

    Volponi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Discs with a rotation profile depending on radius and height are subject to an axisymmetric linear instability, the vertical shear instability. Here we show that non-axisymmetric perturbations, while eventually stabilized, can sustain huge exponential amplifications with growth rate close to the axisymmetric one. Transient growths are therefore to all effects genuine instabilities. The ensuing angular momentum transport is positive. These growths occur when the product of the radial times the vertical wavenumbers (both evolving with time) is positive for a positive local vertical shear, or negative for a negative local vertical shear. We studied, as well, the interaction of these vertical shear induced growths with a convective instability. The asymptotic behaviour depends on the relative strength of the axisymmetric vertical shear (s_v) and convective (s_c) growth rates. For s_v > s_c we observed the same type of behaviour described above - large growths occur with asymptotic stabilization. When s_c > s_v th...

  20. Gravity-driven convection studies in compound semiconductor crystal growth by physical vapor transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Akutagawa, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results are summarized, and it is pointed out that gravity-driven convection can alter the diffusive-advective mass transport behavior in the growth of crystals by physical vapor transport. Specially designed and constructed transparent furnaces are described which are being used to study the effects of gravity in the crystal growth of the compound semiconductors PbTe and CdTe. The theory underlying vapor transport behavior is reviewed, with attention given to the vapor-solid behavior of compound materials, to one-dimensional mass transport, and to gravity-induced (natural) convection. In the transparent furnaces, the quartz capillary tube mounted along the axis of the main quartz ampoule is used to measure the temperature at the growth surface (vapor-solid crystal interface) and the source, as well as the complete temperature profile along the axis of the tube. The light-pipe works to remove heat from the growth end of the ampoule by radiative heat transfer. The ampoules are sealed after being evacuated to the low 10 to the -8th torr range with a cryogenic vacuum pump.

  1. Influence of atmospheric convection on the long and short-range transport of Xe133 emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta; Krysta, Monika; Gheddou, Abdelhakim; Nikkinen, Mika

    2014-05-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 79 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases supported by the atmospheric transport modelling (ATM). The ATM system is based on the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model, FLEXPART, designed for calculating the long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollution from point sources. In the operational configuration only the transport of the passive tracer is simulated. The question arises whether including other atmospheric processes, like convection, will improve results. To answer this question a series of forward simulations was conducted, assuming the maximum transport of 14 days. Each time 2 runs were performed: one with convection and one without convection. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. Due to the fact that CTBTO has recently received a noble gas emission inventory from the ANSTO facility we had a chance to do more accurate simulations. Studies have been performed to link Xe133 emissions with detections at the IMS stations supported by the ATM. The geographical localization to some extend justifies the assumption that the only source of Xe133 observed at the neighbouring stations, e.g. AUX04, AUX09 and NZX46, comes from the ANSTO facility. In simulations the analysed wind data provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used with the spatial resolution of 0.5 degree. The results of quantitative and qualitative comparison will be presented.

  2. Regional modelling of tracer transport by tropical convection – Part 2: Sensitivity to model resolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Arteta

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The general objective of this series of two papers is to evaluate long duration limited-area simulations with idealised tracers as a possible tool to assess the tracer transport in chemistry-transport models (CTMs. In this second paper we analyse the results of three simulations using different horizontal and vertical resolutions. The goal is to study the impact of the model spatial resolution on convective transport of idealized tracer in the tropics. The reference simulation (REF uses a 60 km horizontal resolution and 300 m vertically in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS. A 20 km horizontal resolution simulation (HR is run as well as a simulation with 850 m vertical resolution in the UTLS (CVR. The simulations are run for one month during the SCOUT-O3 field campaign. Aircraft data, TRMM rainrate estimates and radiosoundings have been used to evaluate the simulations. They show that the HR configuration gives generally a better agreement with the measurements than the REF simulation. The CVR simulation gives generally the worst results. The vertical distribution of the tropospheric tracers for the simulations has a similar shape with a ~15 km altitude maximum for the 6h-lifetime tracer of 0.4 ppbv for REF, 1.2 for HR and 0.04 for CVR. These differences are related to the dynamics produced by the three simulations that leads to larger values of the upward velocities on average for HR and lower for CVR compared to REF. HR simulates more frequent and stronger convection leading to enhanced fluxes compared to REF and higher detrainment levels compared to CVR. HR provides also occasional overshoots over the cold point dynamical barrier. For the stratospheric tracers the differences between the three simulations are small. The diurnal cycle of the fluxes of all tracers in the Tropical Tropopause Layer exhibits a maximum linked to the maximum of convective activity.

  3. Influence of the Andes Mountains on South American moisture transport, convection, and precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Insel, Nadja; Poulsen, Christopher J. [University of Michigan, Department of Geological Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ehlers, Todd A. [University of Michigan, Department of Geological Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Mountain ranges are known to have a first-order control on mid-latitude climate, but previous studies have shown that the Andes have little effect on the large-scale circulation over South America. We use a limited-domain general circulation model (RegCM3) to evaluate the effect of the Andes on regional-scale atmospheric dynamics and precipitation. We present experiments in which Andean heights are specified at 250 m, and 25, 50, 75, and 100% of their modern values. Our experiments indicate that the Andes have a significant influence on moisture transport between the Amazon Basin and the central Andes, deep convective processes, and precipitation over much of South America through mechanical forcing of the South American low-level jet (LLJ) and topographic blocking of westerly flow from the Pacific Ocean. When the Andes are absent, the LLJ is absent and moisture transport over the central Andes is mainly northeastward. As a result, deep convection is suppressed and precipitation is low along the Andes. Above 50% of the modern elevation, a southward flowing LLJ develops along the eastern Andean flanks and transports moisture from the tropics to the subtropics. Moisture drawn from the Amazon Basin provides the latent energy required to drive convection and precipitation along the Andean front. Large northerly moisture flux and reduced low-level convergence over the Amazon Basin leads to a reduction in precipitation over much of the basin. Our model results are largely consistent with proxy evidence of Andean climate change, and have implications for the timing and rate of Andean surface uplift. (orig.)

  4. Off-line algorithm for calculation of vertical tracer transport in the troposphere due to deep convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Belikov

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A modified cumulus convection parametrisation scheme is presented. This scheme computes the mass of air transported upward in a cumulus cell using conservation of moisture and a detailed distribution of convective precipitation provided by a reanalysis dataset. The representation of vertical transport within the scheme includes entrainment and detrainment processes in convective updrafts and downdrafts. Output from the proposed parametrisation scheme is employed in the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES global chemical transport model driven by JRA-25/JCDAS reanalysis. The simulated convective precipitation rate and mass fluxes are compared with observations and reanalysis data. A simulation of the short-lived tracer 222Rn is used to further evaluate the performance of the cumulus convection scheme. Simulated distributions of 222Rn are evaluated against observations at the surface and in the free troposphere, and compared with output from models that participated in the TransCom-CH4 Transport Model Intercomparison. From this comparison, we demonstrate that the proposed convective scheme in general is consistent with observed and modeled results.

  5. On the locality of parallel transport of heat carrying electrons in the SOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chankin, A.V., E-mail: Alex.Chankin@ipp.mpg.de; Coster, D.P.

    2015-08-15

    A continuum Vlasov–Fokker–Planck code KIPP is used to assess the degree of locality of parallel transport of heat carrying electrons (HCE) in collisional SOLs. It is shown that for typical SOL collisionalities, the HCE are marginally collisionless which puts into question successful parameterization of kinetic code results of transport parameters such as parallel heat flux and ion–electron thermoforce in the present 2D fluid codes. A kinetic solution for the case of 90% recycling at the target and factor 10T{sub e} drop along the field line is also presented, showing the degree of heat flux ‘limiting’ upstream and ‘enhancement’ downstream, compared to predictions of the Braginskii’s (or Spitzer–Härm’s) formulas. Possible causes of these features are discussed.

  6. What do we learn on bromoform transport and chemistry in deep convection from fine scale modelling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marécal

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Bromoform is one of the main sources of halogenated Very Short-Lived Species (VSLS that possibly contributes when degradated to the inorganic halogen loading in the stratosphere. Because of its short lifetime of about four weeks, its pathway to the stratosphere is mainly the transport by convection up to the tropical tropopause layer (TTL and then by radiative ascent in the low stratosphere. Some of its degradation product gases (PGs that are soluble can be scavenged and not reach the TTL.

    In this paper we present a detailed modelling study of the transport and the degradation of bromoform and its PGs in convection. We use a 3-D-cloud resolving model coupled with a chemistry model including gaseous and aqueous chemistry. We run idealised simulations up to 10 days, initialised using a tropical radiosounding for atmospheric conditions and using outputs from a global chemistry-transport model for chemical species. Bromoform is initialised only in the low levels. The first simulation is run with stable atmospheric conditions. It shows that the sum of the bromoform and its PGs significantly decreases with time because of dry deposition and that PGs are mainly in the form of HBr after 2 days of simulation. The other simulation is similar to the first simulation but includes perturbations of temperature and of moisture leading to the development of a convective cloud reaching the TTL. Results of this simulation show an efficient vertical transport of the bromoform from the boundary layer in the upper troposphere and TTL (mixing ratio up to 45% of the initial boundary layer mixing ratio. The organic PGs, which are for the most abundant of them not very soluble, are also uplifted efficiently. For the inorganic PGs, which are more abundant than organic PGs, their mixing ratios in the upper troposphere and in the TTL depend on the partitioning between inorganic soluble and inorganic non soluble species in the convective cloud. Important soluble

  7. Numerical study of tracers transport by a mesoscale convective system over West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Pinty

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional cloud-resolving model is used to investigate the vertical transport from the lower to the upper troposphere in a mesoscale convective system (MCS that occurred over Niger on 15 August 2004. The redistribution of five passive tracers initially confined in horizontally homogeneous layers is analyzed. The monsoon layer tracer (0–1.5 km is the most efficiently transported in the upper troposphere with concentrations 3 to 4 times higher than the other tracers in the anvil. On the contrary the African Easterly Jet tracer (~3 km has the lowest contribution above 5 km. The vertical profiles of the mid-troposphere tracers (4.5–10 km in the MCS exhibit two peaks: one in their initial layers, and the second one at 13–14 km altitude, underlying the importance of mid-tropospheric air in feeding the upper troposphere. Mid-tropospheric tracers also experience efficient transport by convective downdrafts with a consequent increase of their concentrations at the surface. The concentration of the upper troposphere–lower stratosphere tracer exhibits strong gradients at the edge of the cloud, meaning almost no entrainment of this tracer into the cloud. No downward transport from the upper troposphere is simulated below 5 km. A proxy for lightning produced NOx is transported preferentially in the forward anvil in the upper troposphere. Additionally, lateral inflows significantly contribute to the updraft and downdraft airflows emphasizing the three-dimensional structure of the West African MCSs.

  8. Compositional Convection-Driven Differentiation in the Skaergaard Intrusion: A Reaction- Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenthal, E.; McBirney, A.

    2007-12-01

    Considerable debate has focused on the role of thermal versus compositional convection and late-stage melt and volatile migration in the differentiation of layered intrusions, including the Skaergaard Intrusion. The result of these coupled processes is a hierarchy of structures from textural re-equilibration, to mm-scale rhythmic layering, to large-scale mobilization and recrystallization involving melt and volatiles. In the Skaergaard Intrusion, there is evidence that the base of the intrusion crystallized from melts strongly enriched in iron, presumably derived from the walls and/or roof. To investigate the scenario that iron-rich melts migrated from or through the crystallizing walls and ponded on the floor, we developed a two-dimensional reaction-transport model having the projected cross-section of the intrusion. Simulations of coupled flow and reaction of melt, heat, and minerals were performed using the RCTMAG code developed by the authors. Processes include conservation of fluid mass, energy, advective and diffusive multicomponent transport, and crystallization/melting. Crystal-melt equilibria and compositions are treated using distribution coefficients based on literature values or derived from lab and/or field data. Permeability and porosity changes are coupled to crystallization and melting, with the resulting volume changes affecting flow. Simulations show that iron-rich melt develops within the sidewall mush and tends to migrate through the mush toward the base. Compositional convection dominates over thermal convection because heat loss through the walls and roof lead to crystallization and melt compositional changes, affecting density more than temperature. Chemical and thermal diffusion within the mush has subtle effects on mineral compositions and modes, primarily because water and alkalis diffuse faster than other components. The propensity for melt to migrate through the mush is clearly aided by the increase in iron and volatiles, counteracting

  9. Effects of Convective Solute and Impurity Transport in Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Thomas, Bill R.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution optical interferometry was used to investigate the effects of forced solution convection on the crystal growth kinetics of the model protein lysozyme. Most experiments were conducted with 99.99% pure protein solutions. To study impurity effects, approx. 1% of lysozyme dimer (covalently bound) was added in some cases. We show that the unsteady kinetics, corresponding to bunching of growth steps, can be characterized by the Fourier components of time traces of the growth rate. Specific Fourier spectra are uniquely determined by the solution conditions (composition, temperature, and flow rate) and the growth layer source activity. We found that the average step velocity and growth rate increase by approx. I0% with increasing flow rate, as a result of the enhanced solute supply to the interface. More importantly, faster convective transport results in lower fluctuation amplitudes. This observation supports our rationale for system-dependent effects of transport on the structural perfection of protein crystals. We also found that solution flow rates greater than 500 microns/s result in stronger fluctuations while the average growth rate is decreased. This can lead to growth cessation at low supersaturations. With the intentionally contaminated solutions, these undesirable phenomena occurred at about half the flow rates required in pure solutions. Thus, we conclude that they are due to enhanced convective supply of impurities that are incorporated into the crystal during growth. Furthermore, we found that the impurity effects are reduced at higher crystal growth rates. Since the exposure time of terraces is inversely proportional to the growth rate, this observation suggests that the increased kinetics instability results from impurity adsorption on the interface. Finally, we provide evidence relating earlier observations of "slow protein crystal growth kinetics" to step bunch formation in response to nonsteady step generation.

  10. AC losses in monofilamentary MgB{sub 2} round wire carrying alternating transport currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, K [Research Institute of Superconductor Science and Systems, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kawano, T [Department of Electrical and Electronic Systems Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Osaka, R [Department of Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nakamura, T [Department of Electrical Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Sugano, M [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Takahashi, M; Wakuda, T, E-mail: kajikawa@sc.kyushu-u.ac.j [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd, Hitachi 319-1292 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    AC losses in a monofilamentary MgB{sub 2} round wire with niobium and copper metal sheaths and carrying alternating transport currents are evaluated at several temperatures and frequencies. First, the transport current losses are observed electrically using a lock-in amplifier. Experimental results show that the AC losses decrease with an increase in the temperature if the amplitude of the transport current normalized by the corresponding critical current is maintained constant. On the other hand, the AC losses increase slightly with the frequency. Next, the AC losses are calculated numerically by a finite difference method. The numerical results for the superconductor filament show a good agreement with the results of the conventional theoretical expression formulated using the Bean model over a wide range of current amplitudes. It is also found that the AC losses in the niobium sheath are negligible whereas those in the copper sheath are comparable with those in the superconductor. On the basis of the numerical calculations, an expression is analytically derived for estimating the eddy current loss occurring in a metal sheath. The derived expression well reproduces the AC loss properties of both the copper and niobium sheaths.

  11. AC losses in monofilamentary MgB2 round wire carrying alternating transport currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, K.; Kawano, T.; Osaka, R.; Nakamura, T.; Sugano, M.; Takahashi, M.; Wakuda, T.

    2010-04-01

    AC losses in a monofilamentary MgB2 round wire with niobium and copper metal sheaths and carrying alternating transport currents are evaluated at several temperatures and frequencies. First, the transport current losses are observed electrically using a lock-in amplifier. Experimental results show that the AC losses decrease with an increase in the temperature if the amplitude of the transport current normalized by the corresponding critical current is maintained constant. On the other hand, the AC losses increase slightly with the frequency. Next, the AC losses are calculated numerically by a finite difference method. The numerical results for the superconductor filament show a good agreement with the results of the conventional theoretical expression formulated using the Bean model over a wide range of current amplitudes. It is also found that the AC losses in the niobium sheath are negligible whereas those in the copper sheath are comparable with those in the superconductor. On the basis of the numerical calculations, an expression is analytically derived for estimating the eddy current loss occurring in a metal sheath. The derived expression well reproduces the AC loss properties of both the copper and niobium sheaths.

  12. Silicon nanopore membrane (SNM) for islet encapsulation and immunoisolation under convective transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shang; Faleo, Gaetano; Yeung, Raymond; Kant, Rishi; Posselt, Andrew M.; Desai, Tejal A.; Tang, Qizhi; Roy, Shuvo

    2016-03-01

    Problems associated with islet transplantation for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) such as shortage of donor cells, use of immunosuppressive drugs remain as major challenges. Immune isolation using encapsulation may circumvent the use of immunosuppressants and prolong the longevity of transplanted islets. The encapsulating membrane must block the passage of host’s immune components while providing sufficient exchange of glucose, insulin and other small molecules. We report the development and characterization of a new generation of semipermeable ultrafiltration membrane, the silicon nanopore membrane (SNM), designed with approximately 7 nm-wide slit-pores to provide middle molecule selectivity by limiting passage of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, the use of convective transport with a pressure differential across the SNM overcomes the mass transfer limitations associated with diffusion through nanometer-scale pores. The SNM exhibited a hydraulic permeability of 130 ml/hr/m2/mmHg, which is more than 3 fold greater than existing polymer membranes. Analysis of sieving coefficients revealed 80% reduction in cytokines passage through SNM under convective transport. SNM protected encapsulated islets from infiltrating cytokines and retained islet viability over 6 hours and remained responsive to changes in glucose levels unlike non-encapsulated controls. Together, these data demonstrate the novel membrane exhibiting unprecedented hydraulic permeability and immune-protection for islet transplantation therapy.

  13. Design and synthesis of a peptide-PEG transporter tool for carrying adenovirus vector into cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Mitsuko; Kida, Shinya; Hojo, Keiko; Eto, Yusuke; Gaob, Jian-Qing; Kurachi, Shinnosuke; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Takao; Mayumi, Tadanori; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Kawasaki, Koichi

    2005-02-01

    The adenovirus vector is a promising carrier for the efficient transfer of genes into cells via the coxackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and integrins (alphavbeta3 and alphavbeta5). The clinical use of the adenovirus vector remains problematic however. Successful administration of this vector is associated with side effects because antibodies to this vector are commonly found throughout the human body. To make the adenovirus vector practicable for clinical use, it is necessary to design an auxiliary transporter. The present study describes the use of Arg-Gly-Asp(RGD)-related peptide, a peptide that binds to integrins, as an auxiliary transporter to aid efficient transport of adenovirus vector. Furthermore, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was also used as a tool to modify the adenovirus such that the risk of side effects incurred during clinical application was reduced. The present study describes the design, preparation and use of (acetyl-Tyr-Gly-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr-Pro-(beta)Ala)(2)Lys-PEG-(beta)Ala-Cys-NH(2)[(Ac-YGGRGDTP(beta)A)(2)K-PEG-(beta)AC] as an efficient peptide-PEG transporter tool for carrying adenovirus vector into cells. (Ac-YGGRGDTP(beta)A)(2)K-PEG-(beta)AC was coupled with 6-maleimidohexanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester and the resulting 6-[(Ac-YGGRGDTP(beta)A)(2)K-PEG-(beta)AC-succinimido]hexanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester reacted with adenovirus. The modified adenovirus with the peptide-PEG hybrid exhibited high gene expression even in a CAR-negative cell line, DC2.4.

  14. Effect of repulsive interactions on the rate of doublet formation of colloidal nanoparticles in the presence of convective transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattuada, Marco; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we have performed a systematic investigation of the effect of electrostatic repulsive interactions on the aggregation rate of colloidal nanoparticles to from doublets in the presence of a convective transport mechanism. The aggregation rate has been computed by solving numerically the Fuchs-Smoluchowski diffusion-convection equation. Two convective transport mechanisms have been considered: extensional flow field and gravity-induced relative sedimentation. A broad range of conditions commonly encountered in the applications of colloidal dispersions has been analyzed. The relative importance of convective to diffusive contributions has been quantified by using the Peclet number Pe. The simulation results indicate that, in the presence of repulsive interactions, the evolution of the aggregation rate as a function of Pe can always be divided into three distinct regimes, no matter which convective mechanism is considered. At low Pe values the rate of aggregation is independent of convection and is dominated by repulsive interactions. At high Pe values, the rate of aggregation is dominated by convection, and independent of repulsive interactions. At intermediate Pe values, a sharp transition between these two regimes occurs. During this transition, which occurs usually over a 10-100-fold increase in Pe values, the aggregation rate can change by several orders of magnitude. The interval of Pe values where this transition occurs depends upon the nature of the convective transport mechanism, as well as on the height and characteristic lengthscale of the repulsive barrier. A simplified model has been proposed that is capable of quantitatively accounting for the simulations results. The obtained results reveal unexpected features of the effect of ionic strength and particle size on the stability of colloidal suspensions under shear or sedimentation, which have relevant consequences in industrial applications.

  15. Tracing troposphere-to-stratosphere transport above a mid-latitude deep convective system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Hegglin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the project SPURT (trace gas measurements in the tropopause region a variety of trace gases have been measured in situ in order to investigate the role of dynamical and chemical processes in the extra-tropical tropopause region. In this paper we report on a flight on 10 November 2001 leading from Hohn, Germany (52° N to Faro, Portugal (37° N through a strongly developed deep stratospheric intrusion. This streamer was associated with a large convective system over the western Mediterranean with potentially significant troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. Along major parts of the flight we measured unexpectedly high NOy mixing ratios. Also H2O mixing ratios were significantly higher than stratospheric background levels confirming the extraordinary chemical signature of the probed air masses in the interior of the streamer. Backward trajectories encompassing the streamer enable to analyze the origin and physical characteristics of the air masses and to trace troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. Near the western flank of the intrusion features caused by long range transport, such as tropospheric filaments characterized by sudden drops in the O3 and NOy mixing ratios and enhanced CO and H2O can be reconstructed in great detail using the reverse domain filling technique. These filaments indicate a high potential for subsequent mixing with the stratospheric air. At the south-western edge of the streamer a strong gradient in the NOy and the O3 mixing ratios coincides very well with a sharp gradient in potential vorticity in the ECMWF fields. In contrast, in the interior of the streamer the observed highly elevated NOy and H2O mixing ratios up to a potential temperature level of 365 K and potential vorticity values of maximum 10 PVU cannot be explained in terms of resolved troposphere-to-stratosphere transport along the backward trajectories

  16. The role of convective tracer transport for the NO{sub x} content in the North Atlantic flight corridor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, I.; Sausen, R. [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    The effect of convective tracer transport on the NO{sub x} distribution at cruising altitudes is studied by means of the atmosphere general circulation model ECHAM which was extended by a simplified (linear) NO{sub x} chemistry module. NO{sub x} originates from several sources including aircraft emissions. Two numerical simulations have been performed: one including convective tracer transport and one without this process. The differences in the NO{sub x} distribution of these two runs are discussed. (author) 8 refs.

  17. Porous medium convection at large Rayleigh number: Studies of coherent structure, transport, and reduced dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Baole

    Buoyancy-driven convection in fluid-saturated porous media is a key environmental and technological process, with applications ranging from carbon dioxide storage in terrestrial aquifers to the design of compact heat exchangers. Porous medium convection is also a paradigm for forced-dissipative infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, exhibiting spatiotemporally chaotic dynamics if not "true" turbulence. The objective of this dissertation research is to quantitatively characterize the dynamics and heat transport in two-dimensional horizontal and inclined porous medium convection between isothermal plane parallel boundaries at asymptotically large values of the Rayleigh number Ra by investigating the emergent, quasi-coherent flow. This investigation employs a complement of direct numerical simulations (DNS), secondary stability and dynamical systems theory, and variational analysis. The DNS confirm the remarkable tendency for the interior flow to self-organize into closely-spaced columnar plumes at sufficiently large Ra (up to Ra ≃ 105), with more complex spatiotemporal features being confined to boundary layers near the heated and cooled walls. The relatively simple form of the interior flow motivates investigation of unstable steady and time-periodic convective states at large Ra as a function of the domain aspect ratio L. To gain insight into the development of spatiotemporally chaotic convection, the (secondary) stability of these fully nonlinear states to small-amplitude disturbances is investigated using a spatial Floquet analysis. The results indicate that there exist two distinct modes of instability at large Ra: a bulk instability mode and a wall instability mode. The former usually is excited by long-wavelength disturbances and is generally much weaker than the latter. DNS, strategically initialized to investigate the fully nonlinear evolution of the most dangerous secondary instability modes, suggest that the (long time) mean inter-plume spacing in

  18. Diffusive and convective transport through hollow fiber membranes for liver cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, E; De Bartolo, L; Barbieri, G; Rende, M; Giorno, L; Morelli, S; Drioli, E

    2005-05-25

    For an efficient membrane bioreactor design, transport phenomena determining the overall mass flux of metabolites, catabolites, cell regulatory factors, and immune-related soluble factors, need to be clarified both experimentally and theoretically. In this work, experiments and calculations aimed at discerning the simultaneous influence of both diffusive and convective mechanisms to the transport of metabolites. In particular, the transmembrane mass flux of glucose, bovine serum albumin (BSA), APO-transferrin, immunoglobulin G, and ammonia was experimentally measured, under pressure and concentration gradients, through high-flux microporous hydrophilic poly-ether-sulphone (PES-HFMs) and poly-sulphone hollow fiber membranes (PS-HFMs). These data were analyzed by means of a model based on the mechanism of capillary pore diffusion, assuming that solute spherical molecules pass through an array of solvent-filled cylindrical pores with a diffusive permeation corrected for friction and steric hindrances. Additionally, resistances to the mass transfer were taken into account. Convective permeation data were discussed in terms of morphological properties of the polymeric membranes, molecular Stokes radius, and solute-membrane interactions according to information given by contact angle measurements. The observed steady-state hydraulic permeance of PS-HFMs was 0.972 L/m2hmbar, about 15.6-fold lower than that measured for PES-HFMs (15.2 L/m2h); in general, PS-HFMs provided a significant hindrance to the transport of target species. Diffusion coefficients of metabolites were found to be similar to the corresponding values in water through PES-HFMs, but significantly reduced through PS-HFMs (D(Glucose)(Membrane)=2.8x10(-6)+/-0.6x10(-6)cm2/s, D(BSA)(Membrane)=6.4 x 10(-7)+/-1 x 10(-7)cm(/s, D(Apotransferrin)(Membrane)=2.3 x 10(-7)+/-0.25 x 10(-7)cm2/s).

  19. Dynamics and mass transport of solutal convection in a closed porous media system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Baole; Akhbari, Daria; Hesse, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Most of the recent studies of CO2 sequestration are performed in open systems where the constant partial pressure of CO2 in the vapor phase results in a time-invariant saturated concentration of CO2 in the brine (Cs). However, in some closed natural CO2 reservoirs, e.g., Bravo Dome in New Mexico, the continuous dissolution of CO2 leads to a pressure drop in the gas that is accompanied by a reduction of Cs and thereby affects the dynamics and mass transport of convection in the brine. In this talk, I discuss the characteristics of convective CO2 dissolution in a closed system. The gas is assumed to be ideal and its solubility given by Henry's law. An analytical solution shows that the diffusive base state is no longer self-similar and that diffusive mass transfer declines rapidly. Scaling analysis reveals that the volume ratio of brine and gas η determines the behavior of the system. DNS show that no constant flux regime exists for η > 0 nevertheless, the quantity F /Cs2 remains constant, where F is the dissolution flux. The onset time is only affected by η when the Rayleigh number Ra is small. In this case, the drop in Cs during the initial diffusive regime significantly reduces the effective Ra and therefore delays the onset.

  20. Transport of gaseous pollutants by convective boundary layer around a human body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licina, Dusan; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Sekhar, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the ability of the human convective boundary layer to transport pollution in a quiescent indoor environment. The impact of the source location in the vicinity of a human body is examined in relation to pollution distribution in the breathing zone and the thickness...... of the pollution boundary layer. The study, in addition, evaluates the effects of the room air temperature, table positioning, and seated body inclination. The human body is represented by a thermal manikin that has a body shape, size, and surface temperature that resemble those of a real person. The results show...... at the upper back or behind the chair. The results also indicate that a decrease in personal exposure to pollutants released from or around the human body increases the extent to which the pollution spreads to the surroundings. Reducing the room air temperature or backward body inclination intensifies...

  1. Radon-222 as a test of convective transport in a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Daniel J.; Prather, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    A three-dimensional tracer model based on the Goddard Institude of Space Studies GCM is used to simulate the distribution of Rn-222 over North America to test the ability of the model to describe the transport of pollutants in the boundary layer and the exchange of mass between the boundary layer and the free troposphere. The model results are compared with surface observations from five sites in the U.S., showing that Rn-222 concentrations are primarily regulated by dry convection. The simulations show satisfactory agreement with observations although the model underpredicts observations at night and the simulated Rn-222 concentrations over the northeastern U.S. are too high in the spring and too low in the fall.

  2. Asymptotic Behavior of Heat Transport for a Class of Exact Solutions in Rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Grooms, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The non-hydrostatic, quasigeostrophic approximation for rapidly rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection admits a class of exact `single mode' solutions. These solutions correspond to steady laminar convection with a separable structure consisting of a horizontal planform characterized by a single wavenumber multiplied by a vertical amplitude profile, with the latter given as the solution of a nonlinear boundary value problem. The heat transport associated with these solutions is studied in the regime of strong thermal forcing (large reduced Rayleigh number $\\widetilde{Ra}$). It is shown that the Nusselt number $Nu$, a nondimensional measure of the efficiency of heat transport by convection, for this class of solutions is bounded below by $Nu\\gtrsim \\widetilde{Ra}^{3/2}$, independent of the Prandtl number, in the limit of large reduced Rayleigh number. Matching upper bounds include only logarithmic corrections, showing the accuracy of the estimate. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear boundary value problem for ...

  3. Nanofluidic Transport over a Curved Surface with Viscous Dissipation and Convective Mass Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Zaffar; Iqbal, Z.; Azhar, Ehtsham; Maraj, E. N.

    2017-03-01

    This article is a numerical investigation of boundary layer flow of nanofluid over a bended stretching surface. The study is carried out by considering convective mass flux condition. Contribution of viscous dissipation is taken into the account along with thermal radiation. Suitable similarity transformations are employed to simplify the system of nonlinear partial differential equations into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Computational results are extracted by means of a shooting method embedded with a Runge-Kutta Fehlberg technique. Key findings include that velocity is a decreasing function of curvature parameter K. Moreover, Nusselt number decreases with increase in curvature of the stretching surface while skin friction and Sherwood number enhance with increase in K.

  4. Nanofluidic transport over a curved surface with viscous dissipation and convective mass flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehmood, Zaffar; Iqbal, Z.; Azhar, Ehtsham; Maraj, E.N. [HITEC Univ., Taxila (Pakistan). Dept. of Mathematics

    2017-06-01

    This article is a numerical investigation of boundary layer flow of nanofluid over a bended stretching surface. The study is carried out by considering convective mass flux condition. Contribution of viscous dissipation is taken into the account along with thermal radiation. Suitable similarity transformations are employed to simplify the system of nonlinear partial differential equations into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Computational results are extracted by means of a shooting method embedded with a Runge-Kutta Fehlberg technique. Key findings include that velocity is a decreasing function of curvature parameter K. Moreover, Nusselt number decreases with increase in curvature of the stretching surface while skin friction and Sherwood number enhance with increase in K.

  5. Transport Phenomena Projects: Natural Convection between Porous, Concentric Cylinders--A Method to Learn and to Innovate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatadjian, Esteban; Lesage, Francois; Mota, Jose Paulo B.

    2013-01-01

    A project that involves the numerical simulation of transport phenomena is an excellent method to teach this subject to senior/graduate chemical engineering students. The subject presented here has been used in our senior/graduate course, it concerns the study of natural convection heat transfer between two concentric, horizontal, saturated porous…

  6. Influence of hydrodynamic slip on convective transport in flow past a circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Nidhil M. A.; Kumar, Anuj; Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2017-06-01

    The presence of a finite tangential velocity on a hydrodynamically slipping surface is known to reduce vorticity production in bluff body flows substantially while at the same time enhancing its convection downstream and into the wake. Here, we investigate the effect of hydrodynamic slippage on the convective heat transfer (scalar transport) from a heated isothermal circular cylinder placed in a uniform cross-flow of an incompressible fluid through analytical and simulation techniques. At low Reynolds (Re≪ 1) and high Péclet (Pe≫ 1) numbers, our theoretical analysis based on Oseen and thermal boundary layer equations allows for an explicit determination of the dependence of the thermal transport on the non-dimensional slip length l_s. In this case, the surface-averaged Nusselt number, Nu transitions gradually between the asymptotic limits of Nu ˜ Pe^{1/3} and Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} for no-slip (l_s → 0) and shear-free (l_s → ∞) boundaries, respectively. Boundary layer analysis also shows that the scaling Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} holds for a shear-free cylinder surface in the asymptotic limit of Re≫ 1 so that the corresponding heat transfer rate becomes independent of the fluid viscosity. At finite Re, results from our two-dimensional simulations confirm the scaling Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} for a shear-free boundary over the range 0.1 ≤ Re ≤ 10^3 and 0.1≤ Pr ≤ 10. A gradual transition from the lower asymptotic limit corresponding to a no-slip surface, to the upper limit for a shear-free boundary, with l_s, is observed in both the maximum slip velocity and the Nu. The local time-averaged Nusselt number Nu_{θ } for a shear-free surface exceeds the one for a no-slip surface all along the cylinder boundary except over the downstream portion where unsteady separation and flow reversal lead to an appreciable rise in the local heat transfer rates, especially at high Re and Pr. At a Reynolds number of 10^3, the formation of secondary recirculating eddy pairs results in

  7. Influence of hydrodynamic slip on convective transport in flow past a circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Nidhil M. A.; Kumar, Anuj; Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2017-02-01

    The presence of a finite tangential velocity on a hydrodynamically slipping surface is known to reduce vorticity production in bluff body flows substantially while at the same time enhancing its convection downstream and into the wake. Here, we investigate the effect of hydrodynamic slippage on the convective heat transfer (scalar transport) from a heated isothermal circular cylinder placed in a uniform cross-flow of an incompressible fluid through analytical and simulation techniques. At low Reynolds (Re≪ 1 ) and high Péclet (Pe≫ 1 ) numbers, our theoretical analysis based on Oseen and thermal boundary layer equations allows for an explicit determination of the dependence of the thermal transport on the non-dimensional slip length l_s . In this case, the surface-averaged Nusselt number, Nu transitions gradually between the asymptotic limits of Nu ˜ Pe^{1/3} and Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} for no-slip (l_s → 0 ) and shear-free (l_s → ∞) boundaries, respectively. Boundary layer analysis also shows that the scaling Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} holds for a shear-free cylinder surface in the asymptotic limit of Re≫ 1 so that the corresponding heat transfer rate becomes independent of the fluid viscosity. At finite Re, results from our two-dimensional simulations confirm the scaling Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} for a shear-free boundary over the range 0.1 ≤ Re≤ 10^3 and 0.1≤ Pr≤ 10 . A gradual transition from the lower asymptotic limit corresponding to a no-slip surface, to the upper limit for a shear-free boundary, with l_s , is observed in both the maximum slip velocity and the Nu. The local time-averaged Nusselt number Nu_{θ } for a shear-free surface exceeds the one for a no-slip surface all along the cylinder boundary except over the downstream portion where unsteady separation and flow reversal lead to an appreciable rise in the local heat transfer rates, especially at high Re and Pr. At a Reynolds number of 10^3 , the formation of secondary recirculating eddy pairs results in

  8. Study of large eddy simulation of the effects of boundary layer convection on tracer uplift and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qian; Wang, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Using large eddy model (LEM) and observed data from Dunhuang meteorological station during the intensive period of land-atmosphere interaction field experiment over arid region of North-west China, a series of sensitivity experiments have been performed to investigate the effects of the surface heat flux and wind shear on the strength and the organization of boundary layer convection as well as the growth of the convective boundary layer (CBL). The results show that surface heat flux increases with constant wind shear will give rise to a thicker and warmer CBL, stronger convections and larger thermal eddies due to intense surface turbulence transporting more energy to the upper layer. On the other hand wind shear increases with constant surface heat flux lead to a thicker and warmer CBL because of the entrainment of warm air from the inversion layer to the mixed layer, while the boundary layer convection became weaker with broken thermal eddies. To investigate the quantitative linkage of surface heat flux, wind shear with the tracer uplift rate and transport height, a passive tracer with a constant value of 100 was added at all model levels below the 100 m in all simulations. The least square analysis reveals that the tracer uplift rate increases linearly with the surface heat flux when wind shear is less than 10.5×10-3 s-1 owing to the enhancement of the downward transport of higher momentum. However, the tracer uplift rate decreases with increasing wind shear when the surface heat flux is less than 462.5 W/m2 because of the weakened convection. The passive tracer in the model is also shown to be transported to the higher altitude with increasing surface heat flux and under constant wind shear. However, under a constant surface heat flux, the tracer transport height increases with increasing wind shear only when the shear is above a certain threshold and this threshold depend on the magnitude of surface heat fluxes.

  9. Role of convective transport on tropospheric ozone chemistry revealed by aircraft observations during the wet season of the AMMA campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ancellet

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available During the wet season of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA campaign, airborne measurements of several chemical species were made onboard the French Falcon-20 (FF20 aircraft. The scientific flights were planned in order to document, on one hand the regional distribution of trace gas species related to the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere, and on the other hand their spatial variability in the outflow of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs. The main objectives of this paper are the analysis of the main transport processes responsible for the observed variability, and the discussion of differences and similarities related to the convective transport by 4 different MCSs. This work is needed before using this data set for future studies of the convective transport of chemical species or for modeling work in the frame of the AMMA project. Regarding the regional distribution, five air masses types have been identified using the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, and by considering relationship between the measured trace gas concentrations (O3, CO, NOx, H2O, and hydroperoxides. This paper specifically discusses the advantage of hydroperoxide measurements in order to document the impact of recent or aged convection. The highest values of O3 are found to be related to transport from the subtropical tropopause region into the mid-troposphere at latitudes as low as 10° N. The lowest ozone values have been always explained by recent uplifting from the monsoon layer where O3 is photochemically destroyed. Regarding the analysis of the MCS outflow, the CO and H2O2 enhancements are related to the age and the southernmost position of the MCS. The analysis of the long range transport of the air masses where convection occurred, shows a connection with the Persian Gulf emissions for the largest CO concentrations in MCS outflow. However for our

  10. Bounds on Heat Transport in Rapidly Rotating Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Grooms, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The heat transport in rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection is considered in the limit of rapid rotation (small Ekman number $E$) and strong thermal forcing (large Rayleigh number $Ra$). The analysis proceeds from a set of asymptotically reduced equations appropriate for rotationally constrained dynamics; the conjectured range of validity for these equations is $Ra \\lesssim E^{-8/5}$. A rigorous bound on heat transport of $Nu \\le 20.56Ra^3E^4$ is derived in the limit of infinite Prandtl number using the background method. We demonstrate that the exponent in this bound cannot be improved on using a piece-wise monotonic background temperature profile like the one used here. This is true for finite Prandtl numbers as well, i.e. $Nu \\lesssim Ra^3$ is the best upper bound for this particular setup of the background method. The feature that obstructs the availability of a better bound in this case is the appearance of small-scale thermal plumes emanating from (or entering) the thermal boundary layer.

  11. Carbon Sequestration in Saline Aquifers: Modeling Diffusive and Convective Transport Of a Carbon-­Dioxide Cap

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2011-05-01

    An increase in the earth’s surface temperature has been directly linked to the rise of carbon dioxide (CO2) levels In the atmosphere and an enhanced greenhouse effect. CO2 sequestration is one of the proposed mitigation Strategies in the effort to reduce atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Globally speaking, saline aquifers provide an adequate storage capacity for the world’s carbon emissions, and CO2 sequestration projects are currently underway in countries such as Norway, Germany, Japan, USA, and others. Numerical simulators serve as predictive tools for CO2 storage, yet must model fluid transport behavior while coupling different transport processes together accurately. With regards to CO2 sequestration, an extensive amount of research has been done on the diffusive-convective transport that occurs under a cap of CO2-saturated fluid, which results after CO2 is injected into an aquifer and spreads laterally under an area of low permeability. The diffusive-convective modeling reveals an enhanced storage capacity in saline aquifers, due to the density increase between pure fluid and CO2‐saturated fluid. This work presents the transport modeling equations that are used for diffusive- convective modeling. A cell-centered finite difference method is used, and simulations are run using MATLAB. Two cases are explored in order to compare the results from this work’s self-generated code with the results published in literature. Simulation results match relatively well, and the discrepancy for a delayed onset time of convective transport observed in this work is attributed to numerical artifacts. In fact, onset time in this work is directly attributed to the instability of the physical system: this instability arises from non-linear coupling of fluid flow, transport, and convection, but is triggered by numerical errors in these simulations. Results from this work enable the computation of a value for the numerical constant that appears in the onset time equation that

  12. The role of convection, overshoot, and gravity waves for the transport of dust in M dwarf and brown dwarf atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Freytag, Bernd; Ludwig, Hans-Guenter; Homeier, Derek; Steffen, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Observationally, spectra of brown dwarfs indicate the presence of dust in their atmospheres while theoretically it is not clear what prevents the dust from settling and disappearing from the regions of spectrum formation. Consequently, standard models have to rely on ad hoc assumptions about the mechanism that keeps dust grains aloft in the atmosphere. We apply hydrodynamical simulations to develop an improved physical understanding of the mixing properties of macroscopic flows in M dwarf and brown dwarf atmospheres, in particular of the influence of the underlying convection zone. We performed 2D radiation hydrodynamics simulations including a description of dust grain formation and transport with the CO5BOLD code. The simulations cover the very top of the convection zone and the photosphere including the dust layers for effective temperatures between 900K and 2800K, all with logg=5 assuming solar chemical composition. Convective overshoot occurs in the form of exponentially declining velocities with small s...

  13. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization, Part II: Analysis of Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yi-Chin; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Guang J.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    Following Part I, in which 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complex in the mid-latitude continental and the tropical regions are conducted and evaluated, we examine the scale-dependence of eddy transport of water vapor, evaluate different eddy transport formulations, and improve the representation of convective transport across all scales by proposing a new formulation that more accurately represents the CRM-calculated eddy flux. CRM results show that there are strong grid-spacing dependencies of updraft and downdraft fractions regardless of altitudes, cloud life stage, and geographical location. As for the eddy transport of water vapor, updraft eddy flux is a major contributor to total eddy flux in the lower and middle troposphere. However, downdraft eddy transport can be as large as updraft eddy transport in the lower atmosphere especially at the mature stage of 38 mid-latitude continental convection. We show that the single updraft approach significantly underestimates updraft eddy transport of water vapor because it fails to account for the large internal variability of updrafts, while a single downdraft represents the downdraft eddy transport of water vapor well. We find that using as few as 3 updrafts can account for the internal variability of updrafts well. Based on evaluation with the CRM simulated data, we recommend a simplified eddy transport formulation that considers three updrafts and one downdraft. Such formulation is similar to the conventional one but much more accurately represents CRM-simulated eddy flux across all grid scales.

  14. Resolution-dependent behavior of subgrid-scale vertical transport in the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Heng; Gustafson, William I.; Hagos, Samson M.; Wu, Chien-Ming; Wan, Hui

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the behavior of quasi-equilibrium-based convection parameterizations at higher resolution, we use a diagnostic framework to examine the resolution-dependence of subgrid-scale vertical transport of moist static energy as parameterized by the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization (ZM). Grid-scale input to ZM is supplied by coarsening output from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations onto subdomains ranging in size from 8 × 8 to 256 × 256 km2. Then the ZM-based parameterization of vertical transport of moist static energy for scales smaller than the subdomain size (w'h'>¯ZM) are compared to those directly calculated from the CRM simulations (w'h'>¯CRM) for different subdomain sizes. The ensemble mean w'h'>¯CRM decreases by more than half as the subdomain size decreases from 128 to 8 km across while w'h'>¯ZM decreases with subdomain size only for strong convection cases and increases for weaker cases. The resolution dependence of w'h'>¯ZM is determined by the positive-definite grid-scale tendency of convective available potential energy (CAPE) in the convective quasi-equilibrium (QE) closure. Further analysis shows the actual grid-scale tendency of CAPE (before taking the positive definite value) and w'h'>¯CRM behave very similarly as the subdomain size changes because they are both tied to grid-scale advective tendencies. We can improve the resolution dependence of w'h'>¯ZM significantly by averaging the grid-scale tendency of CAPE over an appropriately large area surrounding each subdomain before taking its positive definite value. Even though the ensemble mean w'h'>¯CRM decreases with increasing resolution, its variability increases dramatically. w'h'>¯ZM cannot capture such increase in the variability, suggesting the need for stochastic treatment of convection at relatively high spatial resolution (8 or 16 km).

  15. Heat-transport enhancement in rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stephan; Wei, Ping; Ahlers, Guenter

    2016-04-01

    We present new Nusselt-number (Nu) measurements for slowly rotating turbulent thermal convection in cylindrical samples with aspect ratio Γ =1.00 and provide a comprehensive correlation of all available data for that Γ . In the experiment compressed gasses (nitrogen and sulfur hexafluride) as well as the fluorocarbon C6F14 (3M Fluorinert FC72) and isopropanol were used as the convecting fluids. The data span the Prandtl-number (Pr) range 0.74 transport Nur(1 /Ro ) ≡Nu (1 /Ro ) /Nu (0 ) as a function of the dimensionless inverse Rossby number 1 /Ro at constant Ra is reported. For Pr ≈0.74 and the smallest Ra =3.6 ×108 the maximum enhancement Nur ,max-1 due to rotation is about 0.02. With increasing Ra, Nur ,max-1 decreased further, and for Ra ≳2 ×109 heat-transport enhancement was no longer observed. For larger Pr the dependence of Nur on 1/Ro is qualitatively similar for all Pr. As noted before, there is a very small increase of Nur for small 1/Ro, followed by a decrease by a percent or so, before, at a critical value 1 /Roc , a sharp transition to enhancement by Ekman pumping takes place. While the data revealed no dependence of 1 /Roc on Ra, 1 /Roc decreased with increasing Pr. This dependence could be described by a power law with an exponent α ≃-0.41 . Power-law dependencies on Pr and Ra could be used to describe the slope SRo+=∂ Nur/∂ (1 /Ro ) just above 1 /Roc . The Pr and Ra exponents were β1=-0.16 ±0.08 and β2=-0.04 ±0.06 , respectively. Further increase of 1/Ro led to further increase of Nur until it reached a maximum value Nur ,max. Beyond the maximum, the Taylor-Proudman (TP) effect, which is expected to lead to reduced vertical fluid transport in the bulk region, lowered Nur. Nur ,max was largest for the largest Pr. For Pr =28.9 , for example, we measured an increase of the heat transport by up to 40% (Nur-1 =0.40 ) for the smallest Ra =2.2

  16. Convective and Diffusive O2 Transport Components of Peak Oxygen Uptake Following Long-duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, Carl J.; Moore, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Spaceflight reduces aerobic capacity and may be linked with maladaptations in the O2 transport pathway. The aim was to 1) evaluate the cardiorespiratory adaptations following 6 months aboard the International Space Station and 2) model the contributions of convective (Q (raised dot) O2) and peripheral diffusive (DO2) components of O2 transport to changes in peak O2 uptake (V (raised dot) O2PEAK). To date, 1 male astronaut (XX yrs) completed an incremental exercise test to measure V (raised dot) O2PEAK prior to and 2 days post-flight. Cardiac output (Q (raised dot) ) was measured at three submaximal work rates via carbon dioxide rebreathing. The Q (raised dot) :V (raised dot) O2 relationship was extrapolated to V (raised dot) O2PEAK to determine Q (raised dot) PEAK. Hemoglobin concentration was measured at rest via a venous blood sample. These measurements were used to model the changes in Q (raised dot) O2 and DO2 using Fick's principle of mass conservation and Law of Diffusion as established by Wagner and colleagues (Annu. Rev. Physiol 58: 21-50, 1996 and J. Appl. Physiol. 73: 1067-1076, 1992). V (raised dot) O2PEAK decreased postflight from 3.72 to 3.45 l min-1, but Q (raised dot) PEAK increased from 24.5 to 27.7 l min-1. The decrease in V (raised dot) O2PEAK post-flight was associated with a 21.2% decrease in DO2, an 18.6% decrease in O2 extraction, but a 3.4% increase in Q (raised dot) O2. These preliminary data suggest that long-duration spaceflight reduces peripheral diffusing capacity and that it largely contributes to the post-flight decrease in aerobic capacity.

  17. The impact of ENSO on water vapor isotopologues in the tropical pacific: Evidence for changes in long-range transport and convective activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonson Sutanto, Samuel; Hoffmann, Georg; Scheepmaker, Remco A.; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    ENSO (El Niño-Southern Oscillation) is characterized by quasi-periodic changes of tropical sea surface temperature (SST), near-global atmospheric circulation and associated changes in precipitation patterns. Due to the profound effects of ENSO on the global water cycle and on the associated fractionation processes of the water isotopologues, many isotope-based studies have been carried out to study the ENSO variability in the tropics. These studies conclude that "the isotope amount effect'' is a key factor controlling the isotopic signature of water vapor and precipitation close to the surface. The goal of this study is to investigate the hydrologic processes governing the changes in isotopic composition of water vapor at the surface and at higher altitudes during ENSO events. We used the isotopic composition of water vapor modeled by an isotope-enabled GCM (ECHAM4), and measured by the TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) instrument onboard the Aura satellite. The isotopic composition of precipitation was modeled by ECHAM4 and observed by the GNIP network (Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation). The amount of precipitation was modeled by ECHAM4 and ERA-Interim (ECMWF Re-Analysis), and measured by the TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) satellite. Our results agree with previous studies focusing on the lower atmosphere: rainout processes, less rain re-evaporation of falling droplets, and increase of convective updrafts and diffusive exchange within the convective systems (all these processes contribute to "the isotope amount effect'') isotopically deplete the water vapor during wet conditions (e.g. El Niño in Central Pacific and La Niña in West Pacific). However, we find that the isotope signal of water vapor at higher altitudes (e.g. 500 hPa) associated with ENSO events diverges from the near surface signature. Analysis suggests that at higher altitudes, transport of enriched water vapor from lower atmospheric layers through convective updrafts

  18. TRACKING AND TRACING SOLUTION FOR DANGEROUS GOODS CARRIED BY INTERMODAL TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kvet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problem of designing a complex tracking and tracing solution for dangerous goods transportation with the support of modern information technologies. This research activity presents a part of the “ChemLogTT” [2] project solved at the University of Žilina. The main goal of our contribution is to present basic conception of a complex developed software tool for monitoring and analyzing mentioned dangerous goods transportation.

  19. The impact of overshooting deep convection on local transport and mixing in the tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Frey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examine the simulated downward transport and mixing of stratospheric air into the upper tropical troposphere as observed on a research flight during the SCOUT-O3 campaign in connection to a deep convective system. We use the Advanced Research Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF-ARW model with a horizontal resolution of 333 m to examine this downward transport. The simulation reproduces the deep convective system, its timing and overshooting altitudes reasonably well compared to radar and aircraft observations. Passive tracers initialised at pre-storm times indicate the downward transport of air from the stratosphere to the upper troposphere as well as upward transport from the boundary layer into the cloud anvils and overshooting tops. For example, a passive ozone tracer (i.e. a tracer not undergoing chemical processing shows an enhancement in the upper troposphere of up to about 30 ppbv locally in the cloud, while the in situ measurements show an increase of 50 ppbv. However, the passive carbon monoxide tracer exhibits an increase, while the observations show a decrease of about 10 ppbv, indicative of an erroneous model representation of the transport processes in the tropical tropopause layer. Furthermore, it could point to insufficient entrainment and detrainment in the model. The simulation shows a general moistening of air in the lower stratosphere but it also exhibits local dehydration features. Here we use the model to explain the processes causing the transport and also expose areas of inconsistencies between the model and observations.

  20. The impact of overshooting deep convection on local transport and mixing in the tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, W.; Schofield, R.; Hoor, P.; Kunkel, D.; Ravegnani, F.; Ulanovsky, A.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Lane, T. P.

    2015-06-01

    In this study we examine the simulated downward transport and mixing of stratospheric air into the upper tropical troposphere as observed on a research flight during the SCOUT-O3 campaign in connection with a deep convective system. We use the Advanced Research Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model with a horizontal resolution of 333 m to examine this downward transport. The simulation reproduces the deep convective system, its timing and overshooting altitudes reasonably well compared to radar and aircraft observations. Passive tracers initialised at pre-storm times indicate the downward transport of air from the stratosphere to the upper troposphere as well as upward transport from the boundary layer into the cloud anvils and overshooting tops. For example, a passive ozone tracer (i.e. a tracer not undergoing chemical processing) shows an enhancement in the upper troposphere of up to about 30 ppbv locally in the cloud, while the in situ measurements show an increase of 50 ppbv. However, the passive carbon monoxide tracer exhibits an increase, while the observations show a decrease of about 10 ppbv, indicative of an erroneous model representation of the transport processes in the tropical tropopause layer. Furthermore, it could point to insufficient entrainment and detrainment in the model. The simulation shows a general moistening of air in the lower stratosphere, but it also exhibits local dehydration features. Here we use the model to explain the processes causing the transport and also expose areas of inconsistencies between the model and observations.

  1. Anomalous convection diffusion and wave coupling transport of cells on comb frame with fractional Cattaneo-Christov flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Zheng, Liancun; Liu, Fawang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-09-01

    An improved Cattaneo-Christov flux model is proposed which can be used to capture the effects of the time and spatial relaxations, the time and spatial inhomogeneous diffusion and the spatial transition probability of cell transport in a highly non-homogeneous medium. Solutions are obtained by numerical discretization method where the time and spatial fractional derivative are discretized by the L1-approximation and shifted Grünwald definition, respectively. The solvability, stability and convergence of the numerical method for the special case of the Cattaneo-Christov equation are proved. Results indicate that the fractional convection diffusion-wave equation is an evolution equation which displays the coexisting characteristics of parabolicity and hyperbolicity. In other words, for α in (0, 1), the cells transport occupies the characteristics of coupling convection diffusion and wave spreading. Moreover, the effects of pertinent time parameter, time and spatial fractional derivative parameters, relaxation parameter, weight coefficient and the convection velocity on the anomalous transport of cells are shown graphically and analyzed in detail.

  2. Total AC loss of YBCO coated conductor carrying AC transport current in AC transverse magnetic field with various orientations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amemiya, Naoyuki [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Jiang, Zhenan [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Iijima, Yasuhiro [Materials Research Laboratory, Fujikura Ltd, 1-5-1 Kiba, Koto, Tokyo 135-8512 (Japan); Kakimoto, Kazuomi [Materials Research Laboratory, Fujikura Ltd, 1-5-1 Kiba, Koto, Tokyo 135-8512 (Japan); Saitoh, Takashi [Materials Research Laboratory, Fujikura Ltd, 1-5-1 Kiba, Koto, Tokyo 135-8512 (Japan)

    2004-08-01

    Using an electro-magnetic method, we measured the total AC loss of a YBCO coated conductor carrying an AC transport current in an AC transverse magnetic field with various orientations. We measured the magnetization loss (energy flow from the external magnetic field) and the transport loss (energy flow from the transport current circuit) independently during simultaneous application of an AC transverse magnetic field and AC transport current. Their sum gave us the total AC loss. The transport loss increases with increasing AC transverse magnetic field, and the magnetization loss increases with increasing AC transport current. The AC transverse magnetic field and the AC self magnetic field interact with each other at the conductor edges. This nonlinear interaction is a possible cause of the increase in AC loss. Due to the high aspect ratio of YBCO coated conductors, this increase in AC loss due to the interaction between the AC transverse and AC self magnetic fields is observed even when the transverse magnetic field is nearly parallel to the conductor wide-face. When the total AC losses for various transport currents and various field orientations are plotted against a transverse magnetic field component which is perpendicular to the conductor wide-face, the plots with different field angles but identical transport current all agree quite well with each other. The total AC loss is dominated by the self magnetic field and the perpendicular component of the transverse magnetic field, both of which mostly penetrate from the conductor edges.

  3. Convective transport of very-short-lived bromocarbons to the stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Liang

    2014-01-01

    CH2Br2, together, contribute ∼7.7 pptv to the present-day inorganic bromine in the stratosphere. However, varying model deep convection strength between maximum and minimum convection conditions can introduce a ∼2.6 pptv uncertainty in the contribution of VSLS to inorganic bromine in the stratosphere (BryVSLS. Contrary to the conventional wisdom, minimum convection condition leads to a larger BryVSLS as the reduced scavenging in soluble product gases, thus a significant increase in PGI (2–3 ppt, greatly exceeds the relative minor decrease in SGI (a few 10ths ppt.

  4. The Effect of Online Hemodiafiltration on Infections: Results from the CONvective TRAnsport STudy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire H den Hoedt

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis (HD patients have a high risk of infections. The uremic milieu has a negative impact on several immune responses. Online hemodiafiltration (HDF may reduce the risk of infections by ameliorating the uremic milieu through enhanced clearance of middle molecules. Since there are few data on infectious outcomes in HDF, we compared the effects of HDF with low-flux HD on the incidence and type of infections.We used data of the 714 HD patients (age 64 ±14, 62% men, 25% Diabetes Mellitus, 7% catheters participating in the CONvective TRAnsport STudy (CONTRAST, a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of HDF as compared to low-flux HD. The events were adjudicated by an independent event committee. The risk of infectious events was compared with Cox regression for repeated events and Cox proportional hazard models. The distributions of types of infection were compared between the groups.Thirty one percent of the patients suffered from one or more infections leading to hospitalization during the study (median follow-up 1.96 years. The risk for infections during the entire follow-up did not differ significantly between treatment arms (HDF 198 and HD 169 infections in 800 and 798 person-years respectively, hazard ratio HDF vs. HD 1.09 (0.88-1.34, P = 0.42. No difference was found in the occurrence of the first infectious event (either fatal, non-fatal or type specific. Of all infections, respiratory infections (25% in HDF, 28% in HD were most common, followed by skin/musculoskeletal infections (21% in HDF, 13% in HD.HDF as compared to HD did not result in a reduced risk of infections, larger studies are needed to confirm our findings.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00205556.

  5. Electron heat transport in current carrying and currentless thermonuclear plasmas. Tokamaks and stellarators compared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, M.

    1996-01-16

    In the first experiment the plasma current in the RTP tokamak is varied. Here the underlying idea was to check whether at a low plasma current, transport in the tokamak resembles transport in stellarators more than at higher currents. Secondly, experiments have been done to study the relation of the diffusivity {chi} to the temperature and its gradient in both W7-AS and RTP. In this case the underlying idea was to find the explanation for the phenomenon observed in both tokamaks and stellarators that the quality of the confinement degrades when more heating is applied. A possible explanation is that the diffusivity increases with the temperature or its gradient. Whereas in standard tokamak and stellarator experiments the temperature and its gradient are strongly correlated, a special capability of the plasma heating system of W7-AS and RTP can force them to decouple. (orig.).

  6. Characterization of the 222Rn family turbulent transport in the convective atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Galmarini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of turbulent transport and radioactive decay on the distribution of 222Rn and its progeny in convective atmospheric boundary layers (CBL is investigated. Large eddy simulation is used to simulate their dispersion in steady state CBL and in unsteady conditions represented by the growth of a CBL within a pre-existing reservoir layer. The exact decomposition of the concentration and flux budget equations under steady state conditions allowed us to determine which processes are responsible for the vertical distribution of 222Rn and its progeny. Their mean concentrations are directly correlated with their half-life, e.g. 222Rn and 210Pb are the most abundant whereas 218Po show the lowest concentrations. 222Rn flux decreases linearly with height and its flux budget is similar to the one of inert emitted scalar, i.e., a balance between on the one hand the gradient and the buoyancy production terms, and on the other hand the pressure and dissipation at smaller scales which tends to destroy the fluxes. While 222Rn exhibits the typical bottom-up behavior, the maximum flux location of the daughters is moving upwards while their rank in the 222Rn progeny is increasing leading to a typical top-down behavior for 210Pb. We also found that the relevant radioactive decaying contributions of 222Rn short-lived daughters (218Po and 214Pb act as flux sources leading to deviations from the linear flux shape. In addition, while analyzing the vertical distribution of the radioactive decay contributions to the concentrations, e.g. the decaying zone, we found a variation in height of 222Rn daughters' radioactive transformations. Under unsteady conditions, the same behaviors reported under steady state conditions are found: deviation of the fluxes from the linear shape for 218Po, enhanced discrepancy in height of the radioactive transformation contributions for all the daughters. In addition, 222Rn and its progeny concentrations decrease due to the

  7. An Investigation of Neutrino-Driven Convection and the Core Collapse Supernova Mechanism Using Multigroup Neutrino Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzacappa, A; Bruenn, S W; Blondin, J M; Guidry, M W; Strayer, M R; Umar, A S

    1996-01-01

    We investigate neutrino-driven convection in core collapse supernovae and its ramifications for the explosion mechanism. We begin with an ``optimistic'' 15 solar mass precollapse model, which is representative of the class of stars with compact iron cores. This model is evolved through core collapse and bounce in one dimension using multigroup (neutrino-energy--dependent) flux-limited diffusion (MGFLD) neutrino transport and Lagrangian hydrodynamics, providing realistic initial conditions for the postbounce convection and evolution. Our two-dimensional simulation begins at 106 ms after bounce at a time when there is a well-developed gain region, and proceeds for 400 ms. We couple two-dimensional (PPM) hydrodynamics to one-dimensional MGFLD neutrino transport. At 225 ms after bounce we see large-scale convection behind the shock, characterized by high-entropy, mushroom-like, expanding upflows and dense, low-entropy, finger-like downflows. The upflows reach the shock and distort it from sphericity. The radial c...

  8. On the theory of the electric field and current density in a superconductor carrying transport current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, W.J. [LEI 700 Technology Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (United States)]. E-mail: wjamescarrjr@att.net

    2005-09-15

    A theory is given to explain the physics behind the flow of low-frequency ac transport current around a closed superconducting circuit, where the circuit consists of two long, straight, parallel, uniform conductors, connected to each other at one end and to an applied emf at the other end. Thus one conductor is the return path for the other. A question of interest is what drives the current at any given point in the circuit. The answer given here is a surface charge, where the purpose of the surface charge is to spread the local emf around the circuit, so that at each point in the conductor it produces, together with the electric field of the vector potential, the electric field necessary for the current to flow. But it is then necessary to explain how the surface charge gets there, which is the central problem of the present analysis. The conclusion is that the total current density consists of the superposition of a large transport current and a very much smaller current system of a different symmetry. The transport current density is defined as a two-dimensional current density with no divergence. It flows uniformly along the conductor length, but can vary over the cross-section. The small additional current density has a much different symmetry, being three-dimensional and diverging at the surface of the conductor. Based on a slightly modified Bean model the transport current is treated as supercurrent having the value {+-}J {sub c}, while the small additional system of current is like normal current, with a density given by the electric field divided by a resistivity. The electric field is computed from the sum of the negative time derivative of the vector potential and the negative gradient of the scalar potential due to the surface charge. It has components parallel and perpendicular to the long axis of the conductor. Thus the small normal current density has a perpendicular component which flows into or out of the surface thereby creating the surface charge

  9. Application of divided convective-dispersive transport model to simulate conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Ernő; Klincsik, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    We have created a divided convective-dispersive transport (D-CDT) model that can be used to provide an accurate simulation of conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel (HSFCW-C). This model makes a fitted response curve from the sum of two independent CDT curves, which show the contributions of the main and side streams. The analytical solutions of both CDT curves are inverse Gaussian distribution functions. We used Fréchet distribution to provide a fast optimization mathematical procedure. As a result of our detailed analysis, we concluded that the most important role in the fast upward part of the tracer response curve is played by the main stream, with high porous velocity and dispersion. This gives the first inverse Gaussian distribution function. The side stream shows slower transport processes in the micro-porous system, and this shows the impact of back-mixing and dead zones, too. The significance of this new model is that it can simulate transport processes in this kind of systems more accurately than the conventionally used convective-dispersive transport (CDT) model. The calculated velocity and dispersion coefficients with the D-CDT model gave differences of 24-54% (of velocity) and 22-308% (of dispersion coeff.) from the conventional CDT model, and were closer to actual hydraulic behaviour.

  10. Effect of the magnetic material on AC losses in HTS conductors in AC magnetic field carrying AC transport current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xing-Xing; Huang, Chen-Guang; Yong, Hua-Dong; Zhou, You-He

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the AC losses in several typical superconducting composite conductors using the H-formulation model. A single superconducting strip with ferromagnetic substrate or cores and a stack of coated conductors with ferromagnetic substrates are studied. We consider all the coated conductors carrying AC transport currents and simultaneously exposed to perpendicular AC magnetic fields. The influences of the amplitude, frequency, phase difference and ferromagnetic materials on the AC losses are investigated. The results show that the magnetization losses of single strip and stacked strips have similar characteristics. The ferromagnetic substrate can increase the magnetization loss at low magnetic field, and decrease the loss at high magnetic field. The ferromagnetic substrate can obviously increase the transport loss in stacked strips. The trends of total AC losses of single strip and stacked strips are similar when they are carrying current or exposed to a perpendicular magnetic field. The effect of the frequency on the total AC losses of single strip is related to the amplitude of magnetic field. The AC losses decrease with increasing frequency in low magnetic field region while increase in high magnetic field region. As the phase difference changes, there is a periodic variation for the AC losses. Moreover, when the strip is under only the transport current and magnetic field, the ferromagnetic cores will increase the AC losses for large transport current or field.

  11. Southern Ocean deep convection in global climate models: A driver for variability of subpolar gyres and Drake Passage transport on decadal timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Erik; Rickard, Graham; Morgenstern, Olaf; Martin, Torge; Osprey, Annette; Joshi, Manoj

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the individual and joint decadal variability of Southern Ocean state quantities, such as the strength of the Ross and Weddell Gyres, Drake Passage transport, and sea ice area, using the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research UK Chemistry and Aerosols (NIWA-UKCA) model and CMIP5 models. Variability in these quantities is stimulated by strong deep reaching convective events in the Southern Ocean, which produce an Antarctic Bottom Water-like water mass and affect the large-scale meridional density structure in the Southern Ocean. An increase in the (near) surface stratification, due to freshwater forcing, can be a precondition for subsequent strong convection activity. The combination of enhanced-gyre driven sea ice and freshwater export, as well as ongoing subsurface heat accumulation, lead to a time lag between changes in oceanic freshwater and heat content. This causes an ongoing weakening of the stratification until sudden strong mixing events emerge and the heat is released to the atmosphere. We find that strong convection reduces sea ice cover, weakens the subpolar gyres, increases the meridional density gradient and subsequently results in a positive Drake Passage transport anomaly. Results of available CMIP5 models confirm that variability in sea ice, Drake Passage transport, and the Weddell Gyre strength is enhanced if models show strong open ocean convective events. Consistent relationships between convection, sea ice, Drake Passage transport, and Ross Gyre strength variability are evident in most models, whether or not they host open ocean convection.

  12. An adaptive moving grid method for solving convection dominated transport equations in chemical engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelling, R.; Bickel, J.; Nieken, U.; Zegeling, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Convection dominated processes in chemical engineering are frequently accompanied by steep propagating fronts. Numerical simulation of corresponding models with uniform fixed grids requires an excessive amount of grid points along the expected range of the front movement. In this contribution the im

  13. A simple parameterization for the turbulent kinetic energy transport terms in the convective boundary layer derived from large eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhales, Franciano Scremin; Rizza, Umberto; Degrazia, Gervásio Annes; Acevedo, Otávio Costa

    2013-02-01

    In this work a parametrization for the transport terms of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget equation, valid for a convective boundary layer (CBL) is presented. This is a hard task to accomplish from experimental data, especially because of the difficulty associated to the measurements of pressure turbulent fluctuations, which are necessary to determine the pressure correlation TKE transport term. Thus, employing a large eddy simulation (LES) a full diurnal planetary boundary layer (PBL) cycle was simulated. In this simulation a forcing obtained from experimental data is used, so that the numerical experiment represents a more realistic case than a stationary PBL. For this study all terms of the TKE budget equation were determined for a CBL. From these data, polynomials that describe the TKE transport terms’ vertical profiles were adjusted. The polynomials found are a good description of the LES data, and from them it is shown that a simple formulation that directly relates the transport terms to the TKE magnitude has advantages on other parameterizations commonly used in CBL numerical models. Furthermore, the present study shows that the TKE turbulent transport term dominates over the TKE transport by pressure perturbations and that for most of the CBL these two terms have opposite signs.

  14. Effect of Melt Convection and Solid Transport on Macrosegregation and Grain Structure in Equiaxed Al-Cu Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerko, Rodney S.; deGroh, Henry C., III; Beckermann, Christoph; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Macrosegregation in metal casting can be caused by thermal and solutal melt convection, and the transport of unattached solid crystals. These free grains can be a result of, for example, nucleation in the bulk liquid or dendrite fragmentation. In an effort to develop a comprehensive numerical model for the casting of alloys, an experimental study has been conducted to generate benchmark data with which such a solidification model could be tested. The specific goal of the experiments was to examine equiaxed solidification in situations where sinking of grains is (and is not) expected. The objectives were: 1) experimentally study the effects of solid transport and thermosolutal convection on macrosegregation and grain size distribution patterns; and 2) provide a complete set of controlled thermal boundary conditions, temperature data, segregation data, and grain size data, to validate numerical codes. The alloys used were Al-1 wt. pct. Cu, and Al-10 wt. pct. Cu with various amounts of the grain refiner TiB2 added. Cylindrical samples were either cooled from the top, or the bottom. Several trends in the data stand out. In attempting to model these experiments, concentrating on experiments that show clear trends or differences is recommended.

  15. Effects of Melt Convection and Solid Transport on Macrosegregation and Grain Structure in Equiaxed Al-Cu Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerko, Rodney S.; deGroh, Henry C., III; Beckermann, Christoph

    2000-01-01

    Macrosegregation in metal casting can be caused by thermal and solutal melt convection, and the transport of unattached solid crystals resulting from nucleation in the bulk liquid or dendrite fragmentation. To develop a comprehensive numerical model for the casting of alloys, an experimental study has been conducted to generate benchmark data with which such a solidification model could be tested. The objectives were: (1) experimentally study the effects of solid transport and thermosolutal convection on macrosegregation and grain size; and (2) provide a complete set of boundary conditions temperature data, segregation data, and grain size data - to validate numerical models. Through the control of end cooling and side wall heating, radial temperature gradients in the sample and furnace were minimized. Thus the vertical crucible wall was adiabatic. Samples at room temperature were 24 cc and 95 mm long. The alloys used were Al-1 wt. pct. Cu, and Al- 10 wt. pct. Cu; the starting point for solidification was isothermal at 710 and 685 C respectively. To induce an equiaxed structure various amounts of the grain refiner TiB2 were added. Samples were either cooled from the top, or the bottom. Several trends in the data stand out. In attempting to model these experiments, concentrating on these trends or differences may be beneficial.

  16. Convective Instability and Mass Transport of the Diffusion Layer in CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, S.

    2011-12-01

    The long-term fate of supercritical (sc) CO2 in saline aquifers is critical to the security of carbon sequestration, an important option for eliminating or reducing the emissions of this most prevalent greenhouse gas. scCO2 is less dense than brine and floats to the top of the aquifer where it is trapped in a metastable state by a geologic feature such as a low permeability cap rock. Dissolution into the underlying brine creates a CO2-brine mixture that is denser than brine, eliminating buoyancy and removing the threat of CO2 escaping back to the atmosphere. If molecular diffusion were the only dissolution mechanism, the CO2 waste stream from a typical large coal-fired electrical power plant may take upward of 10,000 years to no longer pose a threat, however, a convective instability of the dense diffusion boundary layer between the scCO2 and the brine can dramatically increase the dissolution rates, shortening the lifetime of the scCO2 waste pool. We present results of 2D and 3D similitude-correct, laboratory-scale experiments using an analog fluid system. The experiments and flow visualization reveal the onset of the convective instability, the dynamics of the fluid flows during the convective processes, and the long-term mass transfer rates.

  17. Measurement of the economic-financial impacts of trade-offs between inventory carrying costs and transport costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Ventura Amaral

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The economic-financial performance is affected by logistics and, thus, the logistics area seeks solutions that best address the balance between incurred costs and services offered. This balance is achieved only when the potential logistics results are exploited with an evaluation that assesses total cost and cost trade-offs. As logistics research is used to emphasizing operational aspects of trade-offs, this paper attempted to deal with another dimension: the economic-financial one. In this context, the goal of the present study was to offer a model for the measurement of the economic-financial impacts of trade-offs between inventory carrying costs and transport costs. A measurement model was in fact proposed and employed in a simulated example of logistics solution. The results of this paper offer the arrangement for the measurement of the potential effects on economic result and on cash flow of trade-offs between inventory carrying costs and transport costs. The results also show that these effects change depending on the logistics solution.

  18. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencs, László; Laczai, Nikoletta; Ajtony, Zsolt

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective-diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass - m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min- 1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology.

  19. Transportation of MHD nanofluid free convection in a porous semi annulus using numerical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, M.; Ganji, D. D.

    2017-02-01

    Nanofluid free convection in presence of Lorentz forces in a permeable semi annulus is simulated using Control Volume based Finite Element Method. Impact of porous media on governing equations is considered by means of Darcy law. Brownian motion impact on properties of nanofluid is taken into account using Koo-Kleinstreuer-Li (KKL) model. Important parameters are inclination angle (ξ) , CuO-water volume fraction (ϕ) , Hartmann (Ha) and Rayleigh (Ra) numbers for porous medium. A formula for Nuave is provided. Results indicated that temperature gradient detracts with enhance of Ha but it enhances with rise of ξ, Ra . Heat transfer augmentation enhances with rise of Lorentz forces.

  20. Thermo-Magneto-Convective Transport around a Square Cylinder in a Square Duct under Strong Axial Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Chatterjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A quasi two-dimensional numerical study is performed to analyze the thermo-magneto-convective transport of liquid metal around a square cylinder in a square duct subjected to a strong externally imposed axial magnetic field. The channel bottom wall is considered heated while the top wall is maintained at the free stream temperature keeping the cylinder adiabatic. The Reynolds and Hartmann numbers are kept in the range and . The flow dynamics in the aforementioned range of parameters reveals the existence of four different regimes out of which the first three ones are similar to the classical non-MHD 2-D cylinder wakes while the fourth one is characterized by the vortices evolved from the duct side walls due to the boundary layer separation which strongly disturbs the Kármán vortex street. The flow dynamics and heat transfer rate from the heated channel wall are observed to depend on the imposed magnetic field strength. With increasing magnetic field, the flow becomes stabilized resulting in a degradation in the forced convection heat transfer. A special case at a very high Reynolds number with Ha = 2160 is also considered to show the development of a Kelvin–Helmholtz-type instability that substantially affects the heat transfer rate.

  1. Heat transport in boiling turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Lakkaraju, Rajaram; Oresta, Paolo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to several mechanisms many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubbles compounds with that of the liquid to give rise to a much enhanced natural convection. In this paper we focus specifically on this enhancement and present a numerical study of the resulting two-phase Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection process. We make no attempt to model other aspects of the boiling process such as bubble nucleation and detachment. We consider a cylindrical cell with a diameter equal to its height. The cell base and top are held at temperatures above and below the boiling point of the liquid, respectively. By keeping the temperature difference constant and changing the liquid pressure we study the effect of the liquid superheat in a Rayleigh number range that, in the absence of boiling, would be between $2\\times10^6$ and $5\\times10^9$. We find a...

  2. Meridional Circulation in Solar and Stellar Convection Zones

    CERN Document Server

    Featherstone, Nicholas A

    2015-01-01

    We present a series of 3-D nonlinear simulations of solar-like convection, carried out using the Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code, that are designed to isolate those processes that drive and shape meridional circulations within stellar convection zones. These simulations have been constructed so as to span the transition between solar-like differential rotation (fast equator/slow poles) and ``anti-solar' differential rotation (slow equator/fast poles). Solar-like states of differential rotation, arising when convection is rotationally constrained, are characterized by a very different convective Reynolds stress than anti-solar regimes, wherein convection only weakly senses the Coriolis force. We find that the angular momentum transport by convective Reynolds stress plays a central role in establishing the meridional flow profiles in these simulations. We find that the transition from single-celled to multi-celled meridional circulation profiles in strong and weak regimes of rotational constraint is lin...

  3. Evidence of Inward Toroidal Momentum Convection in the JET Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Ferreira, J.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the Joint European Torus tokamak to determine the diffusive and convective momentum transport. Torque, injected by neutral beams, was modulated to create a periodic perturbation in the toroidal rotation velocity. Novel transport analysis shows the magnitude an...

  4. Stormwater run-off and pollutant transport related to the activities carried out in a modern waste management park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, M; Hogland, W

    2001-02-01

    Stormwater run-off from twelve different areas and roads has been characterized in a modern waste disposal site, where several waste management activities are carried out. Using nonparametric statistics, medians and confidence intervals of the medians, 22 stormwater quality parameters were calculated. Suspended solids, chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, as well as run-off from several areas, showed measured values above standard limits for discharge into recipient waters--even higher than those of leachate from covered landfill cells. Of the heavy metals analyzed, copper, zinc and nickel were the most prevalent, being detected in every sample. Higher concentrations of metals such as zinc, nickel, cobalt, iron and cadmium were found in run-off from composting areas, compared to areas containing stored and exposed scrap metal. This suggests that factors other than the total amount of exposed material affect the concentration of metals in run-off, such as binding to organic compounds and hydrological transport efficiency. The pollutants transported by stormwater represent a significant environmental threat, comparable to leachate. Careful design, monitoring and maintenance of stormwater run-off drainage systems and infiltration elements are needed if infiltration is to be used as an on-site treatment strategy.

  5. Multidimensional supernova simulations with approximative neutrino transport. II. Convection and the advective-acoustic cycle in the supernova core

    CERN Document Server

    Scheck, L; Foglizzo, T; Kifonidis, K

    2007-01-01

    By 2D hydrodynamic simulations including a detailed equation of state and neutrino transport, we investigate the interplay between different non-radial hydrodynamic instabilities that play a role during the postbounce accretion phase of collapsing stellar cores. The convective mode of instability, which is driven by negative entropy gradients caused by neutrino heating or by time variations of the shock strength, can be identified clearly by the development of typical Rayleigh-Taylor mushrooms. However, in cases where the gas in the postshock region is rapidly advected towards the gain radius, the growth of such a buoyancy instability can be suppressed. In such a situation the shocked flow nevertheless can develop non-radial asymmetry with an oscillatory growth of the amplitude. This phenomenon was previously termed ``standing accretion shock instability'' (SASI) by Blondin et al. (2003). It is shown here that the oscillation period of the SASI observed in our simulations agrees well with the one estimated fo...

  6. Soret and Dufour effects on peristaltic transport in curved channel with radial magnetic field and convective conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, T.; Quratulain; Rafiq, M.; Alsaadi, Fuad; Ayub, M.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses the impact of convective heat and mass conditions in the peristaltic transport of fluid in a complaint wall curved channel. Formulation for flow of third grade fluid is made. Soret and Dufour effects are considered. Fluid is conducting through applied magnetic field in radial direction. Lubrication approach is employed. Solutions for stream function, temperature and concentration fields are derived. The effects of pertinent parameters in the solutions are analyzed graphically. It is found that the velocity profile is not symmetric about the central line in curved channel. The velocity and temperature are reduced by increasing magnetic field strength. The number and size of streamlines are decreased in the presence of magnetic field effect.

  7. Influences of rotation and thermophoresis on MHD peristaltic transport of Jeffrey fluid with convective conditions and wall properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, T.; Rafiq, M.; Ahmad, B.

    2016-07-01

    This article aims to predict the effects of convective condition and particle deposition on peristaltic transport of Jeffrey fluid in a channel. The whole system is in a rotating frame of reference. The walls of channel are taken flexible. The fluid is electrically conducting in the presence of uniform magnetic field. Non-uniform heat source/sink parameter is also considered. Mass transfer with chemical reaction is considered. Relevant equations for the problems under consideration are first modeled and then simplified using lubrication approach. Resulting equations for stream function and temperature are solved exactly whereas mass transfer equation is solved numerically. Impacts of various involved parameters appearing in the solutions are carefully analyzed.

  8. Wall shear stress and near-wall convective transport: Comparisons with vascular remodelling in a peripheral graft anastomosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambaruto, A. M.; Doorly, D. J.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2010-08-01

    Fluid dynamic properties of blood flow are implicated in cardiovascular diseases. The interaction between the blood flow and the wall occurs through the direct transmission of forces, and through the dominating influence of the flow on convective transport processes. Controlled, in vitro testing in simple geometric configurations has provided much data on the cellular-level responses of the vascular walls to flow, but a complete, mechanistic explanation of the pathogenic process is lacking. In the interim, mapping the association between local haemodynamics and the vascular response is important to improve understanding of the disease process and may be of use for prognosis. Moreover, establishing the haemodynamic environment in the regions of disease provides data on flow conditions to guide investigations of cellular-level responses. This work describes techniques to facilitate comparison between the temporal alteration in the geometry of the vascular conduit, as determined by in vivo imaging, with local flow parameters. Procedures to reconstruct virtual models from images by means of a partition-of-unity implicit function formulation, and to align virtual models of follow-up scans to a common coordinate system, are outlined. A simple Taylor series expansion of the Lagrangian dynamics of the near-wall flow is shown to provide both a physical meaning to the directional components of the flow, as well as demonstrating the relation between near-wall convection in the wall normal direction and spatial gradients of the wall shear stress. A series of post-operative follow-up MRI scans of two patient cases with bypass grafts in the peripheral vasculature are presented. These are used to assess how local haemodynamic parameters relate to vascular remodelling at the location of the distal end-to-side anastomosis, i.e. where the graft rejoins the host artery. Results indicate that regions of both low wall shear stress and convective transport towards the wall tend to be

  9. Soret and Dufour effects on MHD peristaltic transport of Jeffrey fluid in a curved channel with convective boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of present article is to examine the peristaltic flow of Jeffrey fluid in a curved channel. An electrically conducting fluid in the presence of radial applied magnetic field is considered. Analysis of heat and mass transfer is carried out. More generalized realistic constraints namely the convective conditions are utilized. Soret and Dufour effects are retained. Problems formulation is given for long wavelength and low Reynolds number assumptions. The expressions of velocity, temperature, heat transfer coefficient, concentration and stream function are computed. Effects of emerging parameters arising in solutions are analyzed in detail. It is found that velocity is not symmetric about centreline for curvature parameter. Also maximum velocity decreases with an increase in the strength of magnetic field. Further it is noticed that Soret and Dufour numbers have opposite behavior for temperature and concentration. PMID:28222160

  10. CFD Analysis of nanofluid forced convection heat transport in laminar flow through a compact pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kitae; Park, Cheol; Kim, Sedon; Song, Heegun; Jeong, Hyomin

    2017-08-01

    In the present paper, developing laminar forced convection flows were numerically investigated by using water-Al2O3 nano-fluid through a circular compact pipe which has 4.5mm diameter. Each model has a steady state and uniform heat flux (UHF) at the wall. The whole numerical experiments were processed under the Re = 1050 and the nano-fluid models were made by the Alumina volume fraction. A single-phase fluid models were defined through nano-fluid physical and thermal properties calculations, Two-phase model(mixture granular model) were processed in 100nm diameter. The results show that Nusselt number and heat transfer rate are improved as the Al2O3 volume fraction increased. All of the numerical flow simulations are processed by the FLUENT. The results show the increment of thermal transfer from the volume fraction concentration.

  11. Role of Joule heating in dispersive mixing effects in electrophoretic cells: convective-diffusive transport aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, M A; Arce, P

    2000-03-01

    This contribution addresses the problem of solute dispersion in a free convection electrophoretic cell for the batch mode of operation, caused by the Joule heating generation. The problem is analyzed by using the two-problem approach originally proposed by Bosse and Arce (Electrophoresis 2000, 21, 1018-1025). The approach identifies the carrier fluid problem and the solute problem. This contribution is focused on the latter. The strategy uses a sequential coupling between the energy, momentum and mass conservation equations and, based on geometrical and physical assumptions for the system, leads to the derivation of analytical temperature and velocity profiles inside the cell. These results are subsequently used in the derivation of the effective dispersion coefficient for the cell by using the method of area averaging. The result shows the first design equation that relates the Joule heating effect directly to the solute dispersion in the cell. Some illustrative results are presented and discussed and their implication to the operation and design of the device is addressed. Due to the assumptions made, the equation may be viewed as an upper boundary for applications such as free flow electrophoresis.

  12. Angular momentum transport by internal gravity waves III - Wave excitation by core convection and the Coriolis effect

    CERN Document Server

    Pantillon, Florian P; Charbonnel, Corinne

    2007-01-01

    This is the third in a series of papers that deal with angular momentum transport by internal gravity waves. We concentrate on the waves excited by core convection in a 3Msun, Pop I main sequence star. Here, we want to examine the role of the Coriolis acceleration in the equations of motion that describe the behavior of waves and to evaluate its impact on angular momentum transport. We use the so-called traditional approximation of geophysics, which allows variable separation in radial and horizontal components. In the presence of rotation, the horizontal structure is described by Hough functions instead of spherical harmonics. The Coriolis acceleration has two main effects on waves. It transforms pure gravity waves into gravito-inertial waves that have a larger amplitude closer to the equator, and it introduces new waves whose restoring force is mainly the conservation of vorticity. Taking the Coriolis acceleration into account changes the subtle balance between prograde and retrograde waves in non-rotating ...

  13. Convective mass transport dominates surfactant adsorption in a microfluidic Y-junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijlwijk, Kelly; Huang, Wenqian; Vuist, Jan Eise; Berton-Carabin, Claire; Schroën, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Surfactant adsorption during emulsification can be quantified by measuring the acting interfacial tension using a Y-junction microfluidic device. To obtain insight into the surfactant transport mechanism to the interface, the effect of shear force on the acting interfacial tension was assessed by

  14. Differential Rotation in Solar Convective Dynamo Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuhong

    2015-01-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan & Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  15. Differential rotation in solar convective dynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuhong; Fang, Fang

    2016-10-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan and Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  16. Hydrodynamics and convection enhanced macromolecular fluid transport in soft biological tissues: Application to solid tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Bibaswan; Sekhar, G P Raja

    2016-04-21

    This work addresses a theoretical framework for transvascular exchange and extravascular transport of solute macromolecules through soft interstitial space inside a solid tumor. Most of the soft biological tissues show materialistic properties similar to deformable porous material. They exhibit mechanical behavior towards the fluid motion since the solid phase of the tumor tissue gets compressed by the drag force that is associated with the extracellular fluid flow. This paper presents a general view about the transvascular and interstitial transport of solute nutrients inside a tumor in the macroscopic level. Modified Starling׳s equation is used to describe transvascular nutrient transport. On the macroscopic level, motion of extracellular fluid within the tumor interstitium is modeled with the help of biphasic mixture theory and a spherical symmetry solution is given as a simpler case. This present model describes the average interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), extracellular fluid velocity (EFV) and flow rate of extracellular fluid, as well as the deformation of the solid phase of the tumor tissue as an immediate cause of extracellular fluid flow. When the interstitial transport is diffusion dominated, an analytical treatment of advection-diffusion-reaction equation finds the overall nutrient distribution. We propose suitable criteria for the formation of necrosis within the tumor interstitium. This study introduces some parameters that represent the nutrient supply from tumor blood vessels into the tumor extracellular space. These transport parameters compete with the reversible nutrient metabolism of the tumor cells present in the interstitium. The present study also shows that the effectiveness factor corresponding to a first order nutrient metabolism may reach beyond unity if the strength of the distributive solute source assumes positive non-zero values.

  17. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: a case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, H.; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, G. S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-20

    The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep, continental convective clouds in the mid-latitudes is studied for a severe storm case in Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. A new passive-tracer based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize the convective transport based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases. The passive gas concentration in the upper troposphere convective outflow results from a mixture of 47% from the lower level (0-3 km), 21% entrained from the upper troposphere, and 32% from mid-atmosphere based on observations. The transport analysis framework is applied to aerosols to estimate aerosol transport and wet-scavenging efficiency. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% and 68% for aerosol mass (Dp < 1μm) and aerosol number (0.03< Dp < 2.5μm), respectively. Little chemical selectivity to wet scavenging is seen among observed submicron sulfate (84%), organic (82%), and ammonium (80%) aerosols, while nitrate has a much lower scavenging efficiency of 57% likely due to the uptake of nitric acid. Observed larger size particles (0.15 - 2.5μm) are scavenged more efficiently (84%) than smaller particles (64%; 0.03 - 0.15μm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the WRF model. Compared to the observation based analysis, the standard model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency for both mass and number concentrations with low biases of 31% and 40%, respectively. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulation results, so that the bias in scavenging efficiency in mass and number concentrations is reduced to <10%. This supports the hypothesis that secondary activation is an important process for wet removal of aerosols in deep convective storms.

  18. Three-dimensional benchmark for variable-density flow and transport simulation: matching semi-analytic stability modes for steady unstable convection in an inclined porous box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Clifford I.; Simmons, Craig T.; Robinson, Neville I.

    2010-01-01

    This benchmark for three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulators of variable-density groundwater flow and solute or energy transport consists of matching simulation results with the semi-analytical solution for the transition from one steady-state convective mode to another in a porous box. Previous experimental and analytical studies of natural convective flow in an inclined porous layer have shown that there are a variety of convective modes possible depending on system parameters, geometry and inclination. In particular, there is a well-defined transition from the helicoidal mode consisting of downslope longitudinal rolls superimposed upon an upslope unicellular roll to a mode consisting of purely an upslope unicellular roll. Three-dimensional benchmarks for variable-density simulators are currently (2009) lacking and comparison of simulation results with this transition locus provides an unambiguous means to test the ability of such simulators to represent steady-state unstable 3D variable-density physics.

  19. Reactive Transport Modeling of the Enhancement of Density-Driven CO2 Convective Mixing in Carbonate Aquifers and its Potential Implication on Geological Carbon Sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Akand; Sun, Alexander Y; Yang, Changbing

    2016-01-01

    We study the convection and mixing of CO2 in a brine aquifer, where the spread of dissolved CO2 is enhanced because of geochemical reactions with the host formations (calcite and dolomite), in addition to the extensively studied, buoyancy-driven mixing. The nonlinear convection is investigated under the assumptions of instantaneous chemical equilibrium, and that the dissipation of carbonate rocks solely depends on flow and transport and chemical speciation depends only on the equilibrium thermodynamics of the chemical system. The extent of convection is quantified in term of the CO2 saturation volume of the storage formation. Our results suggest that the density increase of resident species causes significant enhancement in CO2 dissolution, although no significant porosity and permeability alterations are observed. Early saturation of the reservoir can have negative impact on CO2 sequestration.

  20. New evidence and modeling studies of cross-tropopause transport of water substance by deep convective storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    Water vapor in the stratosphere can intercept substantial amount of terrestrial infrared radiation, thus causing exasperation of global warming at the surface due to increasing CO2. It also serves as the source material for making stratospheric odd hydrogen species that may cause ozone depletion through certain catalytic cycles. It is therefore very important to identify the process via which water vapor is transported across the tropopause into the stratosphere. Transport of water substance into the stratosphere by deep convective storms have been investigated by the author since around 2000, and in 2003 he proposed that it is the internal gravity wave breaking at the storm top that causes the water substance to penetrate through the tropopause and enter the stratosphere. Since then increasing evidence, including the observation of above-anvil cirrus plumes, jumping cirrus at the storm top, and the so-called pancake clouds, have been suggested as the manifestation of this wave breaking phenomenon. Cloud-resolving model studies did show the clear connection between these phenomena and wave breaking. Still there are several unresolved questions such as whether or not the jumping cirrus eventually evolves into plumes and whether the pancake clouds really exist. In this paper, I will show new aircraft and satellite observational evidence that confirm the above questions. These evidence demonstrate that the jumping cirrus can indeed evolve into plumes as observed by satellite storm images and that new rapid scan satellite storm images reveal the existence of the pancake clouds. New high resolution model simulations show cloud top features that match the observation very well and thus vindicating the role of gravity wave breaking in this process. Model results also give an estimate of the cross-tropopause transport of water substance that is much larger than previously thought.

  1. The Role of Thermal Convection in Heat and Mass Transport in the Subarctic Snow Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    vapor diffusion have been developed (Bader et al. 1939, Yosida et al. 1955, Giddings and LaChapelle 1962, Yen 1963, de Quervain 1972, Palm and...not agree, other authors (Yosida et al. 1955, Yen 1963, de Quervain 1972, Palm and Tveitereid 1979, Fedoseeva and Fedoseev 1988) concluded that the...for the diffusion model to produce the measured mass transport. Yen (1963), de Quervain (1972), Palm and Tveitereid (1979), and Fedoseeva and Fedoseev

  2. Effects of regional-scale and convective transports on tropospheric ozone chemistry revealed by aircraft observations during the wet season of the AMMA campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ancellet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA fourth airborne campaign was conducted in July–August 2006 to study the chemical composition of the middle and upper troposphere in West Africa with the major objective to better understand the processing of chemical emissions by the West African Monsoon (WAM and its associated regional-scale and vertical transports. In particular, the french airborne experiment was organized around two goals. The first was to characterize the impact of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs on the ozone budget in the upper troposphere and the evolution of the chemical composition of these convective plumes as they move westward toward the Atlantic Ocean. The second objective was to discriminate the impact of remote sources of pollution over West Africa, including transport from the middle east, Europe, Asia and from southern hemispheric fires. Observations of O3, CO, NOx, H2O and hydroperoxide above West Africa along repeated meridional transects were coupled with transport analysis based on the FLEXPART lagrangian model. The cross analysis of trace gas concentrations and transport pathways revealed 5 types of air masses: convective uplift of industrial and urban emissions, convective uplift of biogenic emissions, slow advection from Cotonou polluted plumes near the coast, meridional transport of upper tropospheric air from the subtropical barrier region, and meridional transport of Southern Hemisphere (SH biomass burning emissions. O3/CO correlation plots and the correlation plots of H2O2 with a OH proxy revealed not only a control of the trace gas variability by transport processes but also significant photochemical reactivity in the mid- and upper troposphere. The study of four MCSs outflow showed contrasted chemical composition and air mass origins depending on the MCSs lifetime and latitudinal position. Favorables conditions for ozone

  3. Hydromagnetic transport phenomena from a stretching or shrinking nonlinear nanomaterial sheet with Navier slip and convective heating: A model for bio-nano-materials processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M.J., E-mail: jashim_74@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, American International University-Bangladesh, Banani Dhaka 1213 (Bangladesh); Bég, O. Anwar [Gort Engovation Research (Propulsion/Biomechanics), Gabriel' s Wing House, 15 Southmere Ave., Bradford, BD7 3NU England (United Kingdom); Amin, N. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-11-15

    Steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic laminar free convective boundary layer slip flow of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid from a translating stretching/shrinking sheet in a quiescent fluid is studied. A convective heating boundary condition is incorporated. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and following the implementation of a linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg fourth fifth order method from Maple. Validation of the Maple solutions is achieved with previous non-magnetic published results. The effects of the emerging thermophysical parameters; namely, stretching/shrinking, velocity slip, magnetic field, convective heat transfer and buoyancy ratio parameters, on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration (nanoparticle fraction) are depicted graphically and interpreted at length. It is found that velocity increases whilst temperature and concentration reduce with the velocity slip. Magnetic field causes to reduce velocity and enhances temperature and concentration. Velocity, temperature as well as concentration rises with convective heating parameter. The study is relevant to the synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids of potential interest in wound treatments, skin repair and smart coatings for biological devices. - Highlights: • This paper analyses MHD slip flow of nofluid with convective boundary conditions. • Group method is used to transform governing equations into similarity equations. • The Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method is used for numerical computations. • The study is relevant to synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids.

  4. A Lagrangian view of convective sources for transport of air across the Tropical Tropopause Layer: distribution, times and the radiative influence of clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tzella

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The tropical tropopause layer (TTL is a key region controlling transport between the troposphere and the stratosphere. The efficiency of transport across the TTL depends on the continuous interaction between the large-scale advection and the small-scale intermittent convection that reaches the Level of Zero radiative Heating (LZH. The wide range of scales involved presents a significant challenge to determine the sources of convection and quantify transport across the TTL. Here, we use a simple Lagrangian model, termed TTL detrainment model, that combines a large ensemble of 200-day back trajectory calculations with high-resolution fields of brightness temperatures (provided by the CLAUS dataset in order to determine the ensemble of trajectories that are detrained from convective sources. The trajectories are calculated using the ECMWF ERA-Interim winds and radiative heating rates, and in order to establish the radiative influence of clouds, the latter rates are derived both under all-sky and clear-sky conditions.

    We show that most trajectories are detrained near the mean LZH with the horizontal distributions of convective sources being highly-localized, even within the space defined by deep convection. As well as modifying the degree of source localization, the radiative heating from clouds facilitates the rapid upwelling of air across the TTL. However, large-scale motion near the fluctuating LZH can lead a significant proportion of trajectories to alternating clear-sky and cloudy regions, thus generating a large dispersion in the vertical transport times. The distributions of vertical transport times are wide and skewed and are largely insensitive to a bias of about ±1 km (∓5 K in the altitude of cloud top heights (the main sensitivity appearing in the times to escape the immediate neighbourhood of the LZH while some seasonal and regional transport characteristics are apparent for times up to 60 days. The strong horizontal

  5. Effect of polymer additives on heat transport and large-scale circulation in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Hong-Na; Cai, Wei-Hua; Li, Si-Ning; Li, Feng-Chen

    2017-07-01

    The present paper presents direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) in an enclosed cell filled with the polymer solution in order to investigate the viscoelastic effect on the characteristics of heat transport and large-scale circulation (LSC) of RBC. To overcome the difficulties in numerically solving a high Weissenberg number (Wi) problem of viscoelastic fluid flow with strong elastic effect, the log-conformation reformulation method was implemented. Numerical results showed that the addition of polymers reduced the heat flux and the amount of heat transfer reduction (HTR) behaves nonmonotonically, which firstly increases but then decreases with Wi. The maximum HTR reaches around 8.7 % at the critical Wi. The nonmonotonic behavior of HTR as a function of Wi was then corroborated with the modifications of the period of LSC and turbulent energy as well as viscous boundary layer thickness. Finally, a standard turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget analysis was done for the whole domain, the boundary layer region, and the bulk region. It showed that the role change of elastic stress contributions to TKE is mainly responsible for this nonmonotonic behavior of HTR.

  6. Forced convection and transport effects during hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, James L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chavez, Craig A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espinoza, Miguel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Black, Marcie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maskaly, Karlene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boman, Mats [UPPSALA UNIV

    2009-01-01

    This work explores mass transport processes during HP-LCYD, including the transverse forced-flow of precursor gases through a nozzle to enhance fiber growth rates. The use of laser trapping and suspension of nano-scale particles in the precursor flow is also described, providing insights into the nature of the gas flow, including jetting from the fiber tip and thermodiffusion processes near the reaction zone. The effects of differing molecular-weight buffer gases is also explored in conjunction with the Soret effect, and it is found that nucleation at the deposit surface (and homogeneous nucleation in the gas phase) can be enhanced/ retarded, depending on the buffer gas molecular weight. To demonstrate that extensive microstructures can be grown simultaneously, three-dimensional fiber arrays are also grown in-parallel using diffractive optics--without delatory effects from neighboring reaction sites.

  7. Flight Experiments of Physical Vapor Transport of ZnSe: Growth of Crystals in Various Convective Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    2015-01-01

    A low gravity material experiment will be performed in the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR) on International Space Station (ISS). The flight experiment will conduct crystal growths of ZnSe and related ternary compounds, such as ZnSeS and ZnSeTe, by physical vapor transport (PVT). The main objective of the project is to determine the relative contributions of gravity-driven fluid flows to the compositional distribution, incorporation of impurities and defects, and deviation from stoichiometry observed in the grown crystals as results of buoyancy-driven convection and growth interface fluctuations caused by irregular fluid-flows on Earth. The investigation consists of extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research efforts and concurrent flight experimentation. The objectives of the ground-based studies are (1) obtain the experimental data and conduct the analyses required to define the optimum growth parameters for the flight experiments, (2) perfect various characterization techniques to establish the standard procedure for material characterization, (3) quantitatively establish the characteristics of the crystals grown on Earth as a basis for subsequent comparative evaluations of the crystals grown in a low-gravity environment and (4) develop theoretical and analytical methods required for such evaluations. ZnSe and related ternary compounds have been grown by vapor transport technique with real time in-situ non-invasive monitoring techniques. The grown crystals have been characterized extensively by various techniques to correlate the grown crystal properties with the growth conditions. This talk will focus on the ground-based studies on the PVT crystal growth of ZnSe and related ternary compounds, especially the effects of different growth orientations related to gravity direction on the grown crystals.

  8. Impact of internal transport on the convective mass transfer from a droplet into a submerging falling film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landel, Julien R.; Thomas, Amalia; McEvoy, Harry; Dalziel, Stuart B.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the convective mass transfer of dilute passive tracers contained in small viscous drops into a submerging falling film. This problem has applications in industrial cleaning, domestic dishwashers, and decontamination of hazardous material. The film Peclet number is very high, whereas the drop Peclet number varies from 0.1 to 1. The characteristic transport time in the drop is much larger than in the film. We model the mass transfer using an analogy with Newton's law of cooling. This empirical model is supported by an analytical model solving the quasi-steady two-dimensional advection-diffusion equation in the film that is coupled with a time-dependent one-dimensional diffusion equation in the drop. We find excellent agreement between our experimental data and the two models, which predict an exponential decrease in time of the drop concentration. The transport characteristic time is related to the drop diffusion time scale, as diffusion within the drop is the limiting process. Our theoretical model not only predicts the well-known relationship between the Sherwood number and the external Reynolds number in the case of a well-mixed drop Sh ~ Re1/3, it also predicts a correction in the case of a non-uniform drop concentration. The correction depends on Re, the film Schmidt number, the drop aspect ratio and the diffusivity ratio between the two phases. This prediction is in good agreement with experimental data. This material is based upon work supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under Contract No. HDTRA1-12-D-0003-0001.

  9. Connecting Surface Emissions, Convective Uplifting, and Long-Range Transport of Carbon Monoxide in the Upper Troposphere: New Observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Su, Hui; Neary, Lori; McConnell, John C.; Richards, Nigel A. D.

    2007-01-01

    Two years of observations of upper tropospheric (UT) carbon monoxide (CO) from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder are analyzed; in combination with the CO surface emission climatology and data from the NCEP analyses. It is shown that spatial distribution, temporal variation and long-range transport of UT CO are closely related to the surface emissions, deep-convection and horizontal winds. Over the Asian monsoon region, surface emission of CO peaks in boreal spring due to high biomass burning in addition to anthropogenic emission. However, the UT CO peaks in summer when convection is strongest and surface emission of CO is dominated by anthropogenic source. The long-range transport of CO from Southeast Asia across the Pacific to North America, which occurs most frequently during boreal summer, is thus a clear imprint of Asian anthropogenic pollution influencing global air quality.

  10. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencs, László, E-mail: bencs.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Laczai, Nikoletta [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Ajtony, Zsolt [Institute of Food Science, University of West Hungary, H-9200 Mosonmagyaróvár, Lucsony utca 15–17 (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective–diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass — m{sub 0}) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m{sub 0} values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm{sup 3} min{sup −1}) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m{sub 0}(mini-flow)-to-m{sub 0}(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m{sub 0} data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m{sub 0} values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology. - Highlights: • A calculation scheme for convective–diffusive vapor loss in GFAAS is described. • Residence time (τ) formulas were compared for sensitivity (m{sub 0}) in a THGA furnace. • Effects of the sample/platform dimension and dosing hole on τ were assessed. • Theoretical m{sub 0} of 18 analytes were

  11. Transport of heat in caloric vestibular stimulation. Conduction, convection or radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, H; Hüttenbrink, K B; Delank, K W

    1991-01-01

    Experiments in temporal bone specimens were carried out under strictly controlled conditions: temperature (37 degrees C) and humidity kept constant; standardized irrigation of the external ear canal by an automated system (in 15 s, 50 ml of water, 11 degrees C above temperature of specimen), thermistor probes of 0.2 mm diameter placed in different parts of the specimens. In the intact temporal bone such an irrigation causes a rise in temperature with a gradient from the external ear canal across the bony bridge to the lateral semicircular canal as expected with heat conduction. After removal of the bony bridge, which is the main route for heat conduction, the rise in temperature in the lateral semicircular canal is greater and faster than in the intact specimen. This effect again is drastically reduced by placing a reflecting shield between tympanic membrane and labyrinth. In the intact middle ear inserting a reflecting shield or filling the cavity with gel also reduces the heat transfer to the labyrinth, although the bony routes for heat conduction are left untouched. The experiments prove that radiation plays an important part in heat transfer in caloric stimulation.

  12. Hydromagnetic transport phenomena from a stretching or shrinking nonlinear nanomaterial sheet with Navier slip and convective heating: A model for bio-nano-materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M. J.; Bég, O. Anwar; Amin, N.

    2014-11-01

    Steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic laminar free convective boundary layer slip flow of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid from a translating stretching/shrinking sheet in a quiescent fluid is studied. A convective heating boundary condition is incorporated. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and following the implementation of a linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth fifth order method from Maple. Validation of the Maple solutions is achieved with previous non-magnetic published results. The effects of the emerging thermophysical parameters; namely, stretching/shrinking, velocity slip, magnetic field, convective heat transfer and buoyancy ratio parameters, on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration (nanoparticle fraction) are depicted graphically and interpreted at length. It is found that velocity increases whilst temperature and concentration reduce with the velocity slip. Magnetic field causes to reduce velocity and enhances temperature and concentration. Velocity, temperature as well as concentration rises with convective heating parameter. The study is relevant to the synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids of potential interest in wound treatments, skin repair and smart coatings for biological devices.

  13. Experimental container shape dependence and heat transport scaling of Rayleigh-Bénard convection of high-Prandtl-number fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Stephen; Fonda, Enrico; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    Both experiments and simulations on Rayleigh-Bénard convection with fluids of Prandtl numbers 5 and below have shown that the container shape influences the flow structure. Here, we investigate similar dependences of convection of fluids with Prandtl numbers of up to 104. The convection cells have aspect ratio of order unity, and we use cubic and cylindrical shapes. Visual analysis using a noninvasive photochromic dye technique indicates the distinct large-scale flow patterns in both square and cylindrical test cells. The stability of these flow patterns is explored. Also presented are results on the Nusselt-Rayleigh scaling for moderate Rayleigh numbers.

  14. Stochastic-convective transport with nonlinear reaction and mixing: application to intermediate-scale experiments in aerobic biodegradation in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, T. R.; Murphy, E. M.; Chilakapati, A.; Seeboonruang, U.

    2001-03-01

    Aerobic biodegradation of benzoate by Pseudomonas cepacia sp. in a saturated heterogeneous porous medium was simulated using the stochastic-convective reaction (SCR) approach. A laboratory flow cell was randomly packed with low permeability silt-size inclusions in a high permeability sand matrix. In the SCR upscaling approach, the characteristics of the flow field are determined by the breakthrough of a conservative tracer. Spatial information on the actual location of the heterogeneities is not used. The mass balance equations governing the nonlinear and multicomponent reactive transport are recast in terms of reactive transports in each of a finite number of discrete streamtubes. The streamtube ensemble members represent transport via a steady constant average velocity per streamtube and a conventional Fickian dispersion term, and their contributions to the observed breakthroughs are determined by flux-averaging the streamtube solute concentrations. The resulting simulations were compared to those from a high-resolution deterministic simulation of the reactive transport, and to alternative ensemble representations involving (i) effective Fickian travel time distribution function, (ii) purely convective streamtube transport, and (iii) streamtube ensemble subset simulations. The results of the SCR simulation compare favorably to that of a sophisticated high-resolution deterministic approach.

  15. Examining the Impact of Prandtl Number and Surface Convection Models on Deep Solar Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, B. D.; Augustson, K.; Featherstone, N. A.; Miesch, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulent motions within the solar convection zone play a central role in the generation and maintenance of the Sun's magnetic field. This magnetic field reverses its polarity every 11 years and serves as the source of powerful space weather events, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, which can affect artificial satellites and power grids. The structure and inductive properties are linked to the amplitude (i.e. speed) of convective motion. Using the NASA Pleiades supercomputer, a 3D fluids code simulates these processes by evolving the Navier-Stokes equations in time and under an anelastic constraint. This code simulates the fluxes describing heat transport in the sun in a global spherical-shell geometry. Such global models can explicitly capture the large-scale motions in the deep convection zone but heat transport from unresolved small-scale convection in the surface layers must be parameterized. Here we consider two models for heat transport by surface convection, including a conventional turbulent thermal diffusion as well as an imposed flux that carries heat through the surface in a manner that is independent of the deep convection and the entropy stratification it establishes. For both models, we investigate the scaling of convective amplitude with decreasing diffusion (increasing Rayleigh number). If the Prandtl number is fixed, we find that the amplitude of convective motions increases with decreasing diffusion, possibly reaching an asymptotic value in the low diffusion limit. However, if only the thermal diffusion is decreased (keeping the viscosity fixed), we find that the amplitude of convection decreases with decreasing diffusion. Such a high-Prandtl-number, high-Peclet-number limit may be relevant for the Sun if magnetic fields mix momentum, effectively acting as an enhanced viscosity. In this case, our results suggest that the amplitude of large-scale convection in the Sun may be substantially less than in current models that employ an

  16. Advanced subgrid-scale modeling for convection-dominated species transport at fluid interfaces with application to mass transfer from rising bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Andre; Bothe, Dieter

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a novel subgrid scale (SGS) model for simulating convection-dominated species transport at deformable fluid interfaces. One possible application is the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of mass transfer from rising bubbles. The transport of a dissolving gas along the bubble-liquid interface is determined by two transport phenomena: convection in streamwise direction and diffusion in interface normal direction. The convective transport for technical bubble sizes is several orders of magnitude higher, leading to a thin concentration boundary layer around the bubble. A true DNS, fully resolving hydrodynamic and mass transfer length scales results in infeasible computational costs. Our approach is therefore a DNS of the flow field combined with a SGS model to compute the mass transfer between bubble and liquid. An appropriate model-function is used to compute the numerical fluxes on all cell faces of an interface cell. This allows to predict the mass transfer correctly even if the concentration boundary layer is fully contained in a single cell layer around the interface. We show that the SGS-model reduces the resolution requirements at the interface by a factor of ten and more. The integral flux correction is also applicable to other thin boundary layer problems. Two flow regimes are investigated to validate the model. A semi-analytical solution for creeping flow is used to assess local and global mass transfer quantities. For higher Reynolds numbers ranging from Re = 100 to Re = 460 and Péclet numbers between Pe =104 and Pe = 4 ṡ106 we compare the global Sherwood number against correlations from literature. In terms of accuracy, the predicted mass transfer never deviates more than 4% from the reference values.

  17. Pulsation driving and convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoci, Victoria

    2015-08-01

    Convection in stellar envelopes affects not only the stellar structure, but has a strong impact on different astrophysical processes, such as dynamo-generated magnetic fields, stellar activity and transport of angular momentum. Solar and stellar observations from ground and space have shown that the turbulent convective motion can also drive global oscillations in many type of stars, allowing to study stellar interiors at different evolutionary stages. In this talk I will concentrate on the influence of convection on the driving of stochastic and coherent pulsations across the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and give an overview of recent studies.

  18. Left ventricular mass in dialysis patients, determinants and relation with outcome. Results from the COnvective TRansport STudy (CONTRAST.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira M Mostovaya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Left ventricular mass (LVM is known to be related to overall and cardiovascular mortality in end stage kidney disease (ESKD patients. The aims of the present study are 1 to determine whether LVM is associated with mortality and various cardiovascular events and 2 to identify determinants of LVM including biomarkers of inflammation and fibrosis. DESIGN SETTING PARTICIPANTS & MEASUREMENTS: Analysis was performed with data of 327 ESKD patients, a subset from the CONvective TRAnsport STudy (CONTRAST. Echocardiography was performed at baseline. Cox regression analysis was used to assess the relation of LVM tertiles with clinical events. Multivariable linear regression models were used to identify factors associated with LVM. RESULTS: Median age was 65 (IQR: 54-73 years, 203 (61% were male and median LVM was 227 (IQR: 183-279 grams. The risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.11-2.99, cardiovascular death (HR = 3.66, 95% CI: 1.35-10.05 and sudden death (HR = 13.06; 95% CI: 6.60-107 was increased in the highest tertile (>260 grams of LVM. In the multivariable analysis positive relations with LVM were found for male gender (B = 38.8±10.3, residual renal function (B = 17.9±8.0, phosphate binder therapy (B = 16.9±8.5, and an inverse relation for a previous kidney transplantation (B = -41.1±7.6 and albumin (B = -2.9±1.1. Interleukin-6 (Il-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, hepcidin-25 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF were not related to LVM. CONCLUSION: We confirm the relation between a high LVM and outcome and expand the evidence for increased risk of sudden death. No relationship was found between LVM and markers of inflammation and fibrosis. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN38365125.

  19. Mixed convective heat and mass transfer analysis for peristaltic transport in an asymmetric channel with Soret and Dufour effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F M Abbasi; A Alsaedi; T Hayat

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation addresses the simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer in the mixed convection peristaltic flow of viscous fluid in an asymmetric channel. The channel walls exhibit the convective boundary conditions. In addition, the effects due to Soret and Dufour are taken into consideration. Resulting problems are solved for the series solutions. Numerical values of heat and mass transfer rates are displayed and studied. Results indicate that the concentration and temperature of the fluid increase whereas the mass transfer rate at the wall decreases with increase of the mass transfer Biot number. Furthermore, it is observed that the temperature decreases with the increase of the heat transfer Biot number.

  20. Carrying Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Henning; Andersen, Jan; Kjærgård, Bente

    2012-01-01

    A spatial planning act was introduced inIndonesia 1992 and renewed in 2008. It emphasised the planning role of decentralised authorities. The spatial planning act covers both spatial and environmental issues. It defines the concept of carrying capacity and includes definitions of supportive...... carrying capacity (SCC) and assimilative carrying capacity (ACC). The act mandates that the latter two aspects must be taken into consideration in the local spatial plans. The present study aimed at developing a background for a national guideline for carrying capacity in Indonesian provinces and districts...... standard or governmental political objective exists. In most cases it was possible to select a set of indicators, including thresholds that are workable in a carrying capacity planning at the local administrative levels. Not all relevant sectors at the decentralized level were included. Indicators of SCC...

  1. Carrying Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Henning; Andersen, Jan; Kjærgård, Bente

    2012-01-01

    A spatial planning act was introduced inIndonesia 1992 and renewed in 2008. It emphasised the planning role of decentralised authorities. The spatial planning act covers both spatial and environmental issues. It defines the concept of carrying capacity and includes definitions of supportive...... and ACC may increase the political focus on resources and environmental issues and may help to move local authorities towards a more holistic spatial planning approach. A carrying capacity approach could be an inspiration for local spatial planning in developing countries. A spatial planning act...... was introduced inIndonesia 1992 and renewed in 2008. It emphasised the planning role of decentralised authorities. The spatial planning act covers both spatial and environmental issues. It defines the concept of carrying capacity and includes definitions of supportive carrying capacity (SCC) and assimilative...

  2. Interaction of convective flow generated by human body with room ventilation flow: impact on transport of pollution to the breathing zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licina, Dusan; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Sekhar, Chandra

    2014-01-01

    concentration by factor of 5.5. Downward flow of 0.175 m/s does not change airflow patterns and pollutant concentration in the breathing zone, while the velocity of 0.425 m/s offsets the thermal plume and minimizes the concentration. Since the downward flow at 0.30 m/s collides with the CBL at the forehead......This study aims to investigate the interaction between the human convective boundary layer (CBL) and uniform airflow from two directions and with different velocities. The study has two objectives: first, to characterize the velocity field in the breathing zone of a thermal manikin under its...... interaction with opposing flow from above and assisting flow from below; and secondly, implication of such a flow interaction on the particle transport from the feet to the breathing zone is examined. The results reveal that the human body heat transports the pollution to the breathing zone and increases...

  3. Numerical study on passive convective mass transfer enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, G. P.; Muhammed Rafi, K. M.; Deepu, M.

    2017-04-01

    Passive mixing mechanisms are widely used for heat and mass transfer enhancement. Vortices generated in flowfield lead to gradients that favour convective mass transfer. Computations on enhancement of convective mass transfer of sublimating solid fuel by baroclinic torque generated vortices in the wake of a swept ramp placed in high speed flow is presented here. Advection Upstream Splitting Method (AUSM) based computational scheme employed in the present study, to solve compressible turbulent flow field involving species transport, could capture the complex flow features resulted by vortex boundary layer and shock boundary layer interactions. Convective mass transfer is found to get improved in regions near boundary layer by horseshoe vortex and further transported to other regions by counter rotating vortex pair. Vortices resulted by flow expansion near aft wall of wedge and recompression wave-boundary layer interactions also promotes convective mass transport. Extensive computations have been carried out to reveal the role of vortices dominance at various lateral sweep angles in promotion of convective mass transfer in turbulent boundary layer.

  4. An intravascular bioartificial pancreas device (iBAP) with silicon nanopore membranes (SNM) for islet encapsulation under convective mass transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shang; Blaha, Charles; Moses, Willieford; Park, Jaehyun; Wright, Nathan; Groszek, Joey; Fissell, William; Vartanian, Shant; Posselt, Andrew M; Roy, Shuvo

    2017-05-16

    Diffusion-based bioartificial pancreas (BAP) devices are limited by poor islet viability and functionality due to inadequate mass transfer resulting in islet hypoxia and delayed glucose-insulin kinetics. While intravascular ultrafiltration-based BAP devices possess enhanced glucose-insulin kinetics, the polymer membranes used in these devices provide inadequate ultrafiltrate flow rates and result in excessive thrombosis. Here, we report the silicon nanopore membrane (SNM), which exhibits a greater hydraulic permeability and a superior pore size selectivity compared to polymer membranes for use in BAP applications. Specifically, we demonstrate that the SNM-based intravascular BAP with ∼10 and ∼40 nm pore sized membranes support high islet viability (>60%) and functionality (insulin response to glucose stimulation) at clinically relevant islet densities (5700 and 11 400 IE per cm(2)) under convection in vitro. In vivo studies with ∼10 nm pore sized SNM in a porcine model showed high islet viability (>85%) at clinically relevant islet density (5700 IE per cm(2)), c-peptide concentration of 144 pM in the outflow ultrafiltrate, and hemocompatibility under convection. These promising findings offer insights on the development of next generation of full-scale intravascular devices to treat T1D patients in the future.

  5. Pilot Testing of a Sampling Methodology for Assessing Seed Attachment Propensity and Transport Rate in a Soil Matrix Carried on Boot Soles and Bike Tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Nigel; Dietz, Kristina Charlotte; Bride, Ian; Passfield, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Land managers of natural areas are under pressure to balance demands for increased recreation access with protection of the natural resource. Unintended dispersal of seeds by visitors to natural areas has high potential for weedy plant invasions, with initial seed attachment an important step in the dispersal process. Although walking and mountain biking are popular nature-based recreation activities, there are few studies quantifying propensity for seed attachment and transport rate on boot soles and none for bike tires. Attachment and transport rate can potentially be affected by a wide range of factors for which field testing can be time-consuming and expensive. We pilot tested a sampling methodology for measuring seed attachment and transport rate in a soil matrix carried on boot soles and bike tires traversing a known quantity and density of a seed analog (beads) over different distances and soil conditions. We found % attachment rate on boot soles was much lower overall than previously reported, but that boot soles had a higher propensity for seed attachment than bike tires in almost all conditions. We believe our methodology offers a cost-effective option for researchers seeking to manipulate and test effects of different influencing factors on these two dispersal vectors.

  6. Effect of increased convective clearance by on-line hemodiafiltration on all cause and cardiovascular mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients – the Dutch CONvective TRAnsport STudy (CONTRAST: rationale and design of a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN38365125

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nubé Menso J

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high incidence of cardiovascular disease in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD is related to the accumulation of uremic toxins in the middle and large-middle molecular weight range. As online hemodiafiltration (HDF removes these molecules more effectively than standard hemodialysis (HD, it has been suggested that online HDF improves survival and cardiovascular outcome. Thus far, no conclusive data of HDF on target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are available. Therefore, the CONvective TRAnsport STudy (CONTRAST has been initiated. Methods CONTRAST is a Dutch multi-center randomised controlled trial. In this trial, approximately 800 chronic hemodialysis patients will be randomised between online HDF and low-flux HD, and followed for three years. The primary endpoint is all cause mortality. The main secondary outcome variables are fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events. Conclusion The study is designed to provide conclusive evidence whether online HDF leads to a lower mortality and less cardiovascular events as compared to standard HD.

  7. Parametrization of convective transport in the boundary layer and its impact on the representation of diurnal cycle of wind and dust emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hourdin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the impact of the representation of the boundary layer transport in a climate model on the representation of the near surface wind and dust emission, with a focus on the Sahel/Sahara region. We show that the combination of vertical turbulent diffusion with a representation of the thermal cells of the convective boundary layer by a mass flux scheme leads to a more realistic representation of the diurnal cycle of wind in spring, with a maximum near surface wind in the morning. This maximum occurs when the thermal plumes reach the low level jet that forms during the night at a few hundred meters above surface. The horizontal momentum in the jet is transported downward to the surface by compensating subsidences around thermal plumes in typically less than one hour. This leads to a rapid increase of wind speed at surface and therefore of dust emissions owing to the strong non linearity of emission laws. The numerical experiments are performed with a zoomed and nudged configuration of the LMDZ general circulation model, coupled to the emission module of the CHIMERE Chemistry Transport Model, in which winds are relaxed toward that of the ERAI reanalyzes. The new set of parameterizations leads to a strong improvement of the representation of the diurnal cycle of wind when compared to a previous version of LMDZ as well as to the reanalyzes used for nudging themselves. It also reinforces dust emissions in better agreement with observations, but the aerosol optical thickness is still significantly underestimated.

  8. Momentum, heat, and neutral mass transport in convective atmospheric pressure plasma-liquid systems and implications for aqueous targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alexander; Anderson, Carly; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 μ m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results from this study include the presence of a 10 K temperature drop in the gas boundary layer adjacent to the interface that arises from convective cooling. Though the temperature magnitudes may vary among atmospheric discharge types (different amounts of plasma-gas heating), this relative difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures is expected to be present for any system in which convection is significant. Accounting for the resulting difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures has a significant impact on reaction kinetics; factor of two changes in terminal aqueous species concentrations like H2O2, NO2- , and NO3- are observed in this study if the effect of evaporative cooling is not included.

  9. Anomalously Weak Solar Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical- harmonic degree l..Within the wavenumber band l convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers l convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  10. Sediment transport to the deep canyons and open-slope of the western Gulf of Lions during the 2006 intense cascading and open-sea convection period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanques, A.; Puig, P.; Durrieu de Madron, X.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.; Pasqual, C.; Martín, J.; Calafat, A.; Heussner, S.; Canals, M.

    2012-11-01

    An array of mooring lines deployed between 300 and 1900 m depth along the Lacaze-Duthiers and Cap de Creus canyons and in the adjacent southern open slope was used to study the water and sediment transport on the western Gulf of Lions margin during the 2006 intense cascading period. Deep-reaching cascading pulses occurred in early January, in late January and from early March to mid-April. Dense water and sediment transport to the deep environments occurred not only through submarine canyons, but also along the southern open slope. During the deep cascading pulses, temporary upper and mid-canyon and open slope deposits were an important source of sediment to the deep margin. Significant sediment transport events at the canyon head only occurred in early January because of higher sediment availability on the shelf after the stratified and calm season, and in late February because of the interaction of dense shelf water cascading with a strong E-SE storm. During the January deep cascading pulses, increases in suspended sediment concentration within the canyon were greater and earlier at 1000 m depth than at 300 m depth, whereas during the March-April deep cascading pulses sediment concentration only increased below 300 m depth, indicating resuspension and redistribution of sediments previously deposited at upper and mid-canyon depths. Deeper than 1000 m depth, net fluxes show that most of the suspended sediment left the canyon and flowed along the southern open slope towards the Catalan margin, whereas a small part flowed down-canyon and was exported basinward. Additionally, on the mid- and lower-continental slope there was an increase in the near-bottom currents induced by deep open-sea convection processes and the propagation of eddies. This, combined with the arrival of deep cascading pulses, also generated moderate suspended sediment transport events in the deeper slope regions.

  11. Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in anExperimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFDPredictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaraman, Buvaneswari; Finlayson, Elizabeth U.; Sohn, MichaelD.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Price, Phillip N.; Wood, Emily E.; Sextro,Richard G.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2006-01-01

    We compare computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions using a steady-state Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model with experimental data on airflow and pollutant dispersion under mixed-convection conditions in a 7 x 9 x 11m high experimental facility. The Rayleigh number, based on height, was O(10{sup 11}) and the atrium was mechanically ventilated. We released tracer gas in the atrium and measured the spatial distribution of concentrations; we then modeled the experiment using four different levels of modeling detail. The four computational models differ in the choice of temperature boundary conditions and the choice of turbulence model. Predictions from a low-Reynolds-number k-{var_epsilon} model with detailed boundary conditions agreed well with the data using three different model-measurement comparison metrics. Results from the same model with a single temperature prescribed for each wall also agreed well with the data. Predictions of a standard k-{var_epsilon} model were about the same as those of an isothermal model; neither performed well. Implications of the results for practical applications are discussed.

  12. Analytical Solution for Peristaltic Transport of Viscous Nanofluid in an Asymmetric Channel with Full Slip and Convective Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebaid, Abdelhalim; Aly, Emad H.; Vajravelu, K.

    2017-07-01

    The peristaltic flow of nanofluids is a relatively new area of research. Scientists are of the opinion that the no-slip conditions at the boundaries are no longer valid and consequently, the first and the second order slip conditions should be addressed. In this paper, the effects of slip conditions and the convective boundary conditions at the boundary walls on the peristaltic flow of a viscous nanofluid are investigated for. Also, the exact analytical solutions are obtained for the model. The obtained results are presented through graphs and discussed. The results reveal that the two slip parameters have strong effects on the temperature and the nanoparticles volume fraction profiles. Moreover, it has been seen that the temperature and nanoparticles volume fraction profiles attain certain values when the first slip condition exceeds a specified value. However, no limit value for the second slip parameter has been detected. Further, the effects of the various emerging parameters on the flow and heat transfer characteristics have been presented.

  13. Nanoparticle transport effect on magnetohydrodynamic mixed convection of electrically conductive nanofluids in micro-annuli with temperature-dependent thermophysical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvandi, A.; Moshizi, S. A.; Ganji, D. D.

    2017-04-01

    This is a numerical investigation of nanoparticle transport effect on magnetohydrodynamic mixed convective heat transfer of electrically conductive nanofluids in micro-annuli with temperature-dependent thermophysical properties. The modified Buongiorno's non-homogeneous model is applied for the nanoparticle-fluid suspension to simulate the migration of nanoparticles into the base fluid, originating from the thermophoresis (nanoparticle migration because of temperature gradient) and Brownian motion (nanoparticle slip velocity because of concentration gradient). Due to surface roughness at the solid-fluid interface in micro-annuli, the wall surfaces are subjected to a linear slip condition to assess the non-equilibrium region near the interface. The fluid flow has been assumed to be fully developed, and the governing equations including continuity, momentum, energy, and nanoparticle transport equation are reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations, before they have been solved numerically. The results are presented with and without considering the dependency of thermophysical properties upon the temperature. It is indicated that ignoring the temperature dependency of thermophysical properties does not significantly affect the flow fields and heat transfer behavior of nanofluids, but it changes the relative magnitudes. Furthermore, in the presence of magnetic field, smaller nanoparticles are more appropriate than larger ones.

  14. CFD assessment of the effect of convective mass transport on the intracellular clearance of intracellular triglycerides in macrosteatotic hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmush, Gabriel; Santos, Lucas; Yarmush, Joshua; Koundinyan, Srivathsan; Saleem, Mubasher; Nativ, Nir I; Yarmush, Martin L; Berthiaume, Francois; Maguire, Timothy J; Guaghan, Chris

    2017-08-01

    Donor livers available to transplant for patients with end-stage liver disease are in severe shortage. One possible avenue to expand the donor pool is to recondition livers that would be otherwise discarded due to excessive fat content. Severely steatotic livers (also known as fatty livers) are highly susceptible to ischemia-reperfusion injury and as a result, primary liver non-function post-transplantation. Prior studies in isolated perfused rat livers suggest that "defatting" may be possible in a timeframe of a few hours; thus, it is conceivable that fatty liver grafts could be recovered by machine perfusion to clear stored fat from the organ prior to transplantation. However, studies using hepatoma cells and adult hepatocytes made fatty in culture report that defatting may take several days. Because cell culture studies were done in static conditions, we hypothesized that the defatting kinetics are highly sensitive to flow-mediated transport of metabolites. To investigate this question, we experimentally evaluated the effect of increasing flow rate on the defatting kinetics of cultured HepG2 cells and developed an in silico combined reaction-transport model to identify possible rate-limiting steps in the defatting process. We found that in cultured fatty HepG2 cells, the time required to clear stored fat down to lean control cells can be reduced from 48 to 4-6 h by switching from static to flow conditions. The flow required resulted in a fluid shear of .008 Pa, which did not adversely affect hepatic function. The reaction-transport model suggests that the transport of L-carnitine, which is the carrier responsible for taking free fatty acids into the mitochondria, is the key rate-limiting process in defatting that was modulated by flow. Therefore, we can ensure higher levels of L-carnitine uptake by the cells by choosing flow rates that minimize the limiting mass transport while minimizing shear stress.

  15. A transilient matrix for moist convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2011-08-15

    A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

  16. A study on the structure of the convective atmosphere over the Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX-99

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U C Mohanty; N V Sam; S Das; A N V Satyanarayana

    2003-06-01

    Convective activity is one of the major processes in the atmosphere influencing the local and large scale weather in the tropics. The latent heat released by the cumulus cloud is known to drive monsoon circulation, which on the other hand supplies the moisture that maintains the cumulus clouds. An investigation is carried out on the convective structure of the atmosphere during active and suppressed periods of convection using data sets obtained from the Bay of Bengal and Monsoon Experiment (BOBMEX). The cumulus convection though being a small-scale phenomenon, still influences its embedding environment by interaction through various scales. This study shows the variation in the kinematic and convective parameters during the transition from suppressed to active periods of convection. Convergence in the lower levels and strong upward vertical velocity, significant during active convection are associated with the formation of monsoon depressions. The apparent heat source due to latent heat release and the vertical transport of the eddy heat by cumulus convection, and the apparent moisture sink due to net condensation and vertical divergence of the eddy transport of moisture, are estimated through residuals of the thermodynamic equation and examined in relation to monsoon activity during BOBMEX.

  17. Parameterizing convective organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Earle Mapes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lateral mixing parameters in buoyancy-driven deep convection schemes are among the most sensitive and important unknowns in atmosphere models. Unfortunately, there is not a true optimum value for plume mixing rate, but rather a dilemma or tradeoff: Excessive dilution of updrafts leads to unstable stratification bias in the mean state, while inadequate dilution allows deep convection to occur too easily, causing poor space and time distributions and variability. In this too-small parameter space, compromises are made based on competing metrics of model performance. We attempt to escape this “entrainment dilemma” by making bulk plume parameters (chiefly entrainment rate depend on a new prognostic variable (“organization,” org meant to reflect the rectified effects of subgrid-scale structure in meteorological fields. We test an org scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5 with a new unified shallow-deep convection scheme (UW-ens, a 2-plume version of the University of Washington scheme. Since buoyant ascent involves natural selection, subgrid structure makes convection systematically deeper and stronger than the pure unorganized case: plumes of average (or randomly sampled air rising in the average environment. To reflect this, org is nonnegative, but we leave it dimensionless. A time scale characterizes its behavior (here ∼3 h for a 2o model. Currently its source is rain evaporation, but other sources can be added easily. We also let org be horizontally transported by advection, as a mass-weighted mean over the convecting layer. Linear coefficients link org to a plume ensemble, which it assists via: 1 plume base warmth above the mean temperature 2 plume radius enhancement (reduced mixing, and 3 increased probability of overlap in a multi-plume scheme, where interactions benefit later generations (this part has only been implemented in an offline toy column model. Since rain evaporation is a source for org, it functions as a time

  18. Local models of stellar convection III: The Strouhal number

    CERN Document Server

    Käpylä, P J; Ossendrijver, M; Tuominen, I

    2004-01-01

    (Abbreviated) We determine the Strouhal number (St), a nondimensional measure of the correlation time, from numerical models of convection. The Strouhal number arises in the mean-field theories of angular momentum transport and dynamos, where its value determines the validity of certain widely used approximations, such as the first order smoothing (FOSA). More specifically, the relevant transport coefficients can be calculated by means of a cumulative series expansion if St < 1 (e.g. Knobloch 1978). We use two independent methods to estimate St. Firstly, we apply the minimal tau-approximation (MTA) in the equation of the time derivative of the Reynolds stress. In this approach the time derivative is essentially replaced by a term containing a relaxation time which can be interpreted as the correlation time of the turbulence. In this approach, the turnover time is estimated simply from the energy carrying scale of the convection and a typical velocity. In the second approach, we determine the correlation an...

  19. Angular momentum transport by internal gravity waves. IV - Wave generation by surface convection zone, from the pre-main sequence to the early-AGB in intermediate mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Talon, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of papers that deal with angular momentum transport by internal gravity waves in stellar interiors. Here, we want to examine the potential role of waves in other evolutionary phases than the main sequence. We study the evolution of a 3Msun Population I model from the pre-main sequence to the early-AGB phase and examine whether waves can lead to angular momentum redistribution and/or element diffusion at the external convection zone boundary. We find that, although waves produced by the surface convection zone can be ignored safely for such a star during the main sequence, it is not the case for later evolutionary stages. In particular, angular momentum transport by internal waves could be quite important at the end of the sub-giant branch and during the early-AGB phase. Wave-induced mixing of chemicals is expected during the early-AGB phase.

  20. Mushroom spore dispersal by convectively-driven winds

    CERN Document Server

    Dressaire, Emilie; Song, Boya; Roper, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of fungal species rely on mushroom spores to spread across landscapes. It has long been thought that spores depend on favorable airflows for dispersal -- that active control of spore dispersal by the parent fungus is limited to an impulse delivered to the spores to carry them clear of the gill surface. Here we show that evaporative cooling of the air surrounding the mushroom pileus creates convective airflows capable of carrying spores at speeds of centimeters per second. Convective cells can transport spores from gaps that may be only a centimeter high, and lift spores ten centimeters or more into the air. The work reveals how mushrooms tolerate and even benefit from crowding, and provides a new explanation for their high water needs.

  1. Mobile Lid Convection Beneath Enceladus' South Polar Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Amy C.

    2008-01-01

    Enceladus' south polar region has a large heat flux, 55-110 milliwatts per square meter (or higher), that is spatially associated with cryovolcanic and tectonic activity. Tidal dissipation and vigorous convection in the underlying ice shell are possible sources of heat; however, prior predictions of the heat flux carried by stagnant lid convection range from F(sub conv) 15 to 30 milliwatts per square meter, too low to explain the observed heat flux. The high heat flux and increased cryovolcanic and tectonic activity suggest that near-surface ice in the region has become rheologically and mechanically weakened enough to permit convective plumes to reach close to the surface. If the yield strength of Enceladus' lithosphere is less than 1-10 kPa, convection may instead occur in the mobile lid" regime, which is characterized by large heat fluxes and large horizontal velocities in the near-surface ice. I show that model ice shells with effective surface viscosities between 10(exp 16) and 10(exp 17) Pa s and basal viscosities between 10(exp 13) and 10(exp 15) Pa s have convective heat fluxes comparable to that observed by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer. If this style of convection is occurring, the south polar terrain should be spreading horizontally with v1-10 millimeter per year and should be resurfaced in 0.1-10 Ma. On the basis of Cassini imaging data, the south polar terrain is 0.5 Ma old, consistent with the mobile lid hypothesis. Maxwell viscoelastic tidal dissipation in such ice shells is not capable of generating enough heat to balance convective heat transport. However, tidal heat may also be generated in the near-surface along faults as suggested by Nimmo et al. and/or viscous dissipation within the ice shell may occur by other processes not accounted for by the canonical Maxwell dissipation model.

  2. Internally heated convection and Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Goluskin, David

    2016-01-01

    This Brief describes six basic models of buoyancy-driven convection in a fluid layer: three configurations of internally heated convection and three configurations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The author discusses the main quantities that characterize heat transport in each model, along with the constraints on these quantities. This presentation is the first to place the various models in a unified framework, and similarities and differences between the cases are highlighted. Necessary and sufficient conditions for convective motion are given. For the internally heated cases only, parameter-dependent lower bounds on the mean fluid temperature are proven, and results of past simulations and laboratory experiments are summarized and reanalyzed. The author poses several open questions for future study.

  3. A strategy for representing the effects of convective momentum transport in multiscale models: Evaluation using a new superparameterized version of the Weather Research and Forecast model (SP-WRF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulich, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a general method for the treatment of convective momentum transport (CMT) in large-scale dynamical solvers that use a cyclic, two-dimensional (2-D) cloud-resolving model (CRM) as a "superparameterization" of convective-system-scale processes. The approach is similar in concept to traditional parameterizations of CMT, but with the distinction that both the scalar transport and diagnostic pressure gradient force are calculated using information provided by the 2-D CRM. No assumptions are therefore made concerning the role of convection-induced pressure gradient forces in producing up or down-gradient CMT. The proposed method is evaluated using a new superparameterized version of the Weather Research and Forecast model (SP-WRF) that is described herein for the first time. Results show that the net effect of the formulation is to modestly reduce the overall strength of the large-scale circulation, via "cumulus friction." This statement holds true for idealized simulations of two types of mesoscale convective systems, a squall line, and a tropical cyclone, in addition to real-world global simulations of seasonal (1 June to 31 August) climate. In the case of the latter, inclusion of the formulation is found to improve the depiction of key synoptic modes of tropical wave variability, in addition to some aspects of the simulated time-mean climate. The choice of CRM orientation is also found to importantly affect the simulated time-mean climate, apparently due to changes in the explicit representation of wide-spread shallow convective regions.

  4. Effect of convective transport in porous media on the conditions of organic matter maturation and generation of hydrocarbons in trap rocks complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurie Khachay, Professor; Mindubaev, Mansur

    2016-04-01

    One of the main problems of the study of the intrusion thermal effects on the maturation of the organic matter is to estimate the volume, intensity, thermal effects of the intrusion and its redistribution in porous media by convection. A numerical algorithm for solving the problem of the developed convection in two-dimensional and three-dimensional models of the porous medium depending on the incline angle is developed. It is defined that the convective stability in the medium decreases with increasing incline angle. It was found that depending on the incline angle the structure of convection from many cells for a flat horizontal layer changes and it transfers to more elongated structures along the layer. It is shown that depending on the incline angles, invading sill and imbedding volume of the porous medium it can be realized either stationary or non-stationary convection that provides a principal different thermal conditions of hydrocarbons maturation in the motherboard porous medium. We give numerical examples of the influence of the incline angle on the flow structure inside the porous inclusion. By the stationary convection the volume of the boundary layers between the convective sells increases. That can lead to increasing of the part of motherboard rocks that are outer the temperature conditions of oil catalysis and as a consequence to the overestimation of the deposits.

  5. Influence of pyrolysis gas convective transport on the temperature field of thermally decomposing resin composite%热分解气体对流传输对树脂基复合材料温度场的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈敏孙; 江厚满; 刘泽金

    2011-01-01

    The one-dimensional temperature field model of thermally decomposing resin composite irradiated by laser was solved with the commonly-used finite difference method.By comparing the simulation result with the experimental result which was reported by related literature, the influence of the pyrolysis gas convective transport on the temperature field of resin composite was studied.The analysis indicates that the simulation temperature field considering the convective transport of pyrolysis gas matches better than the simulation temperature field without considering the convective transport of pyrolysis gas with the experimental temperature, namely the convective transport of pyrolysis gas has a large influence on the temperature field of resin composite.Therefore, while constructing a three-dimensional temperature field model of thermally decomposing resin composite irradiated by laser, on the premise of without introducing any mechanical quantities, the convective transport of pyrolysis gas should be considered.%用有限差分法对激光辐照下复合材料树脂基热解时的一维温度场模型进行数值求解,将数值模拟结果与相关文献中给出的实验结果进行对比.结果表明:考虑了对流传输效应的数值模拟结果比没有考虑对流传输效应的数值模拟结果与实验结果符合的更好,即热分解气体的对流传输对树脂基复合材料的温度场有较大的影响.因此,在不引入力学量的前提下,建立激光辐照下复合材料树脂基热解时的三维温度场模型时,需要考虑热分解气体的对流传输效应.

  6. Plumes in stellar convection zones

    CERN Document Server

    Zahn, J P

    1999-01-01

    All numerical simulations of compressible convection reveal the presence of strong downwards directed flows. Thanks to helioseismology, such plumes have now been detected also at the top of the solar convection zone, on super- granular scales. Their properties may be crudely described by adopting Taylor's turbulent entrainment hypothesis, whose validity is well established under various conditions. Using this model, one finds that the strong density stratification does not prevent the plumes from traversing the whole convection zone, and that they carry upwards a net energy flux (Rieutord & Zahn 1995). They penetrate to some extent in the adjacent stable region, where they establish a nearly adiabatic stratification. These plumes have a strong impact on the dynamics of stellar convection zones, and they play probably a key role in the dynamo mechanism.

  7. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.S.

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of {approximately} 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for {gamma}-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of {approximately} 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches {approximately} 60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  8. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Douglas Scott [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of ~ 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for γ-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of ~ 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches ~60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  9. Helioseismology challenges models of solar convection

    CERN Document Server

    Gizon, Laurent; 10.1073/pnas.1208875109

    2012-01-01

    Convection is the mechanism by which energy is transported through the outermost 30% of the Sun. Solar turbulent convection is notoriously difficult to model across the entire convection zone where the density spans many orders of magnitude. In this issue of PNAS, Hanasoge et al. (2012) employ recent helioseismic observations to derive stringent empirical constraints on the amplitude of large-scale convective velocities in the solar interior. They report an upper limit that is far smaller than predicted by a popular hydrodynamic numerical simulation.

  10. Introductory Analysis of Benard-Marangoni Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto, J. A.; Perez-Munuzuri, V.; Romero-Cano, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    We describe experiments on Benard-Marangoni convection which permit a useful understanding of the main concepts involved in this phenomenon such as, for example, Benard cells, aspect ratio, Rayleigh and Marangoni numbers, Crispation number and critical conditions. In spite of the complexity of convection theory, we carry out a simple and…

  11. National Convective Weather Diagnostic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current convective hazards identified by the National Convective Weather Detection algorithm. The National Convective Weather Diagnostic (NCWD) is an automatically...

  12. On laminar convection in solar type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bruevich, E A

    2010-01-01

    We present a new model of large-scale multilayer convection in solar type stars. This model allows us to understand such self-similar structures observed at solar surface as granulation, supergranulation and giant cells. We study the slow-rotated hydrogen star without magnetic field with the spherically-symmetric convective zone. The photon's flux comes to the convective zone from the central thermonuclear zone of the star. The interaction of these photons with the fully ionized hydrogen plasma with $T>10^5K$ is carried out by the Tomson scattering of photon flux on protons and electrons. Under these conditions plasma is optically thick relative to the Tomson scattering. This fact is the fundamental one for the multilayer convection formation. We find the stationary solution of the convective zone structure. This solution describes the convective layers responsible to the formation of the structures on the star's surface.

  13. A functional polymorphism in a serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) interacts with 9/11 to predict gun-carrying behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J C; Beaver, Kevin M; Boutwell, Brian B

    2013-01-01

    On September 11, 2001, one of the deadliest terrorist attacks in US history took place on American soil and people around the world were impacted in myriad ways. Building on prior literature which suggests individuals are more likely to purchase a gun for self-protection if they are fearful of being victimized, the authors hypothesized that the terrorist attacks of 9/11 would lead to an increase in gun carrying among US residents. At the same time, a line of research has shown that a polymorphism in the 5-HTT gene (i.e., 5-HTTLPR) interacts with environmental stressors to predict a range of psychopathologies and behaviors. Thus, it was hypothesized that 9/11 and 5-HTTLPR would interact to predict gun carrying. The results supported both hypotheses by revealing a positive association between 9/11 and gun carrying (b = .426, odds ratio = 1.531, standard error for b = .194, z = 2.196, p = .028) in the full sample of respondents (n = 15,052) and a statistically significant interaction between 9/11 and 5-HTTLPR in the prediction of gun carrying (b = -1.519, odds ratio = .219, standard error for b = .703, z = -2.161, p = .031) in the genetic subsample of respondents (n = 2,350). This is one of the first studies to find an association between 9/11 and gun carrying and, more importantly, is the first study to report a gene-environment interaction (GxE) between a measured gene and a terrorist attack.

  14. A functional polymorphism in a serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR interacts with 9/11 to predict gun-carrying behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J C Barnes

    Full Text Available On September 11, 2001, one of the deadliest terrorist attacks in US history took place on American soil and people around the world were impacted in myriad ways. Building on prior literature which suggests individuals are more likely to purchase a gun for self-protection if they are fearful of being victimized, the authors hypothesized that the terrorist attacks of 9/11 would lead to an increase in gun carrying among US residents. At the same time, a line of research has shown that a polymorphism in the 5-HTT gene (i.e., 5-HTTLPR interacts with environmental stressors to predict a range of psychopathologies and behaviors. Thus, it was hypothesized that 9/11 and 5-HTTLPR would interact to predict gun carrying. The results supported both hypotheses by revealing a positive association between 9/11 and gun carrying (b = .426, odds ratio = 1.531, standard error for b = .194, z = 2.196, p = .028 in the full sample of respondents (n = 15,052 and a statistically significant interaction between 9/11 and 5-HTTLPR in the prediction of gun carrying (b = -1.519, odds ratio = .219, standard error for b = .703, z = -2.161, p = .031 in the genetic subsample of respondents (n = 2,350. This is one of the first studies to find an association between 9/11 and gun carrying and, more importantly, is the first study to report a gene-environment interaction (GxE between a measured gene and a terrorist attack.

  15. Deciphering Core Collapse Supernovae Is Convection the Key?; 1, prompt convection

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzacappa, A; Bruenn, S W; Blondin, J M; Guidry, M W; Strayer, M R; Umar, A S

    1996-01-01

    We couple two-dimensional hydrodynamics to detailed one-dimensional multigroup flux-limited diffusion neutrino transport to investigate prompt convection in core collapse supernovae. Our initial conditions, time-dependent boundary conditions, and neutrino distributions for computing neutrino heating, cooling, and deleptonization rates are obtained from one-dimensional simulations that implement multigroup flux-limited diffusion neutrino transport and one-dimensional hydrodynamics. The development and evolution of prompt convection and its ramifications for the shock dynamics are investigated for both 15 and 25 solar mass models, representative of the two classes of stars with compact and extended iron cores, respectively. In the absence of neutrino transport, prompt convection develops and dissipates on a time scale $\\sim$15 ms for both models. Prompt convection seeds convection behind the shock, which causes distortions in the shock's sphericity, but on the average, the shock radius is not boosted significan...

  16. A new family of implicit fourth order compact schemes for unsteady convection-diffusion equation with variable convection coefficient

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Shuvam

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new family of implicit compact finite difference schemes for computation of unsteady convection-diffusion equation with variable convection coefficient is proposed. The schemes are fourth order accurate in space and second or lower order accurate in time depending on the choice of weighted time average parameter. The proposed schemes, where transport variable and its first derivatives are carried as the unknowns, combine virtues of compact discretization and Pad\\'{e} scheme for spatial derivative. These schemes which are based on five point stencil with constant coefficients, named as \\emph{(5,5) Constant Coefficient 4th Order Compact} [(5,5)CC-4OC], give rise to a diagonally dominant system of equations and shows higher accuracy and better phase and amplitude error characteristics than some of the standard methods. These schemes are capable of using a grid aspect ratio other than unity and are unconditionally stable. They efficiently capture both transient and steady solutions of linear and ...

  17. Observation of deep convection initiation from shallow convection environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothon, Marie; Couvreux, Fleur; Guichard, Françoise; Campistron, Bernard; Chong, Michel; Rio, Catherine; Williams, Earle

    2010-05-01

    In the afternoon of 10 July 2006, deep convective cells initiated right in the field of view of the Massachusetts Institute Technology (MIT) C-band Doppler radar. This radar, with its 3D exploration at 10 min temporal resolution and 250 m radial resolution, allows us to track the deep convective cells and also provides clear air observations of the boundary layer structure prior to deep convection initiation. Several other observational platforms were operating then which allow us to thoroughly analyse this case: Vertically pointing aerosol lidar, W-band radar and ceilometer from the ARM Mobile Facility, along with radiosoundings and surface measurements enable us to describe the environment, from before their initiation to after the propagation of of one propagating cell that generated a circular gust front very nicely caught by the MIT radar. The systems considered here differ from the mesoscale convective systems which are often associated with African Easterly Waves, increasing CAPE and decreasing CIN. The former have smaller size, and initiate more locally, but there are numerous and still play a large role in the atmospheric circulation and scalar transport. Though, they remain a challenge to model. (See the presentation by Guichard et al. in the same session, for a model set up based on the same case, with joint single-column model and Large Eddy Simulation, which aims at better understanding and improving the parametrisation of deep convection initiation.) Based on the analysis of the observations mentioned above, we consider here the possible sources of deep convection initiation that day, which showed a typical boundary-layer growth in semi-arid environment, with isolated deep convective events.

  18. Internal Wave Generation by Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoanet, Daniel Michael

    In nature, it is not unusual to find stably stratified fluid adjacent to convectively unstable fluid. This can occur in the Earth's atmosphere, where the troposphere is convective and the stratosphere is stably stratified; in lakes, where surface solar heating can drive convection above stably stratified fresh water; in the oceans, where geothermal heating can drive convection near the ocean floor, but the water above is stably stratified due to salinity gradients; possible in the Earth's liquid core, where gradients in thermal conductivity and composition diffusivities maybe lead to different layers of stable or unstable liquid metal; and, in stars, as most stars contain at least one convective and at least one radiative (stably stratified) zone. Internal waves propagate in stably stratified fluids. The characterization of the internal waves generated by convection is an open problem in geophysical and astrophysical fluid dynamics. Internal waves can play a dynamically important role via nonlocal transport. Momentum transport by convectively excited internal waves is thought to generate the quasi-biennial oscillation of zonal wind in the equatorial stratosphere, an important physical phenomenon used to calibrate global climate models. Angular momentum transport by convectively excited internal waves may play a crucial role in setting the initial rotation rates of neutron stars. In the last year of life of a massive star, convectively excited internal waves may transport even energy to the surface layers to unbind them, launching a wind. In each of these cases, internal waves are able to transport some quantity--momentum, angular momentum, energy--across large, stable buoyancy gradients. Thus, internal waves represent an important, if unusual, transport mechanism. This thesis advances our understanding of internal wave generation by convection. Chapter 2 provides an underlying theoretical framework to study this problem. It describes a detailed calculation of the

  19. Topology Optimisation for Coupled Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    This thesis deals with topology optimisation for coupled convection problems. The aim is to extend and apply topology optimisation to steady-state conjugate heat transfer problems, where the heat conduction equation governs the heat transfer in a solid and is coupled to thermal transport...... in a surrounding uid, governed by a convection-diffusion equation, where the convective velocity field is found from solving the isothermal incompressible steady-state Navier-Stokes equations. Topology optimisation is also applied to steady-state natural convection problems. The modelling is done using stabilised...... finite elements, the formulation and implementation of which was done partly during a special course as prepatory work for this thesis. The formulation is extended with a Brinkman friction term in order to facilitate the topology optimisation of fluid flow and convective cooling problems. The derived...

  20. Turbulent Compressible Convection with Rotation. Part 1; Flow Structure and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummell, Nicholas H.; Hurlburt, Neal E.; Toomre, Juri

    1996-01-01

    The effects of Coriolis forces on compressible convection are studied using three-dimensional numerical simulations carried out within a local modified f-plane model. The physics is simplified by considering a perfect gas occupying a rectilinear domain placed tangentially to a rotating sphere at various latitudes, through which a destabilizing heat flux is driven. The resulting convection is considered for a range of Rayleigh, Taylor, and Prandtl (and thus Rossby) numbers, evaluating conditions where the influence of rotation is both weak and strong. Given the computational demands of these high-resolution simulations, the parameter space is explored sparsely to ascertain the differences between laminar and turbulent rotating convection. The first paper in this series examines the effects of rotation on the flow structure within the convection, its evolution, and some consequences for mixing. Subsequent papers consider the large-scale mean shear flows that are generated by the convection, and the effects of rotation on the convective energetics and transport properties. It is found here that the structure of rotating turbulent convection is similar to earlier nonrotating studies, with a laminar, cellular surface network disguising a fully turbulent interior punctuated by vertically coherent structures. However, the temporal signature of the surface flows is modified by inertial motions to yield new cellular evolution patterns and an overall increase in the mobility of the network. The turbulent convection contains vortex tubes of many scales, including large-scale coherent structures spanning the full vertical extent of the domain involving multiple density scale heights. Remarkably, such structures align with the rotation vector via the influence of Coriolis forces on turbulent motions, in contrast with the zonal tilting of streamlines found in laminar flows. Such novel turbulent mechanisms alter the correlations which drive mean shearing flows and affect the

  1. Convective transport of formaldehyde to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and associated scavenging in thunderstorms over the central United States during the 2012 DC3 study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, A.; Barth, M. C.; Bela, M.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J.; Li, Y.; Pickering, K.; Apel, E.; Hornbrook, R.; Hills, A.; Riemer, D. D.; Blake, N.; Blake, D. R.; Schroeder, J. R.; Luo, Z. J.; Crawford, J. H.; Olson, J.; Rutledge, S.; Betten, D.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G.; Campos, T.; Flocke, F.; Weinheimer, A.; Cantrell, C.; Pollack, I.; Peischl, J.; Froyd, K.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Woods, S.

    2016-06-01

    We have developed semi-independent methods for determining CH2O scavenging efficiencies (SEs) during strong midlatitude convection over the western, south-central Great Plains, and southeastern regions of the United States during the 2012 Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Study. The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) was employed to simulate one DC3 case to provide an independent approach of estimating SEs and the opportunity to study CH2O retention in ice when liquid drops freeze. Measurements of CH2O in storm inflow and outflow were acquired on board the NASA DC-8 and the NSF/National Center for Atmospheric Research Gulfstream V (GV) aircraft employing cross-calibrated infrared absorption spectrometers. This study also relied heavily on the nonreactive tracers i-/n-butane and i-/n-pentane measured on both aircraft in determining lateral entrainment rates during convection as well as their ratios to ensure that inflow and outflow air masses did not have different origins. Of the five storm cases studied, the various tracer measurements showed that the inflow and outflow from four storms were coherently related. The combined average of the various approaches from these storms yield remarkably consistent CH2O scavenging efficiency percentages of: 54% ± 3% for 29 May; 54% ± 6% for 6 June; 58% ± 13% for 11 June; and 41 ± 4% for 22 June. The WRF-Chem SE result of 53% for 29 May was achieved only when assuming complete CH2O degassing from ice. Further analysis indicated that proper selection of corresponding inflow and outflow time segments is more important than the particular mixing model employed.

  2. National Convective Weather Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NCWF is an automatically generated depiction of: (1) current convection and (2) extrapolated signficant current convection. It is a supplement to, but does NOT...

  3. A continuous and prognostic convection scheme based on buoyancy, PCMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérémy, Jean-François; Piriou, Jean-Marcel

    2016-04-01

    A new and consistent convection scheme (PCMT: Prognostic Condensates Microphysics and Transport), providing a continuous and prognostic treatment of this atmospheric process, is described. The main concept ensuring the consistency of the whole system is the buoyancy, key element of any vertical motion. The buoyancy constitutes the forcing term of the convective vertical velocity, which is then used to define the triggering condition, the mass flux, and the rates of entrainment-detrainment. The buoyancy is also used in its vertically integrated form (CAPE) to determine the closure condition. The continuous treatment of convection, from dry thermals to deep precipitating convection, is achieved with the help of a continuous formulation of the entrainment-detrainment rates (depending on the convective vertical velocity) and of the CAPE relaxation time (depending on the convective over-turning time). The convective tendencies are directly expressed in terms of condensation and transport. Finally, the convective vertical velocity and condensates are fully prognostic, the latter being treated using the same microphysics scheme as for the resolved condensates but considering the convective environment. A Single Column Model (SCM) validation of this scheme is shown, allowing detailed comparisons with observed and explicitly simulated data. Four cases covering the convective spectrum are considered: over ocean, sensitivity to environmental moisture (S. Derbyshire) non precipitating shallow convection to deep precipitating convection, trade wind shallow convection (BOMEX) and strato-cumulus (FIRE), together with an entire continental diurnal cycle of convection (ARM). The emphasis is put on the characteristics of the scheme which enable a continuous treatment of convection. Then, a 3D LAM validation is presented considering an AMMA case with both observations and a CRM simulation using the same initial and lateral conditions as for the parameterized one. Finally, global

  4. Condensation-inhibited convection in hydrogen-rich atmospheres: Stability against double-diffusive processes and thermal profiles for Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune

    CERN Document Server

    Leconte, Jérémy; Hersant, Franck; Guillot, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    In an atmosphere, a cloud condensation region is characterized by a strong vertical gradient in the abundance of the related condensing species. On Earth, the ensuing gradient of mean molecular weight has relatively few dynamical consequences because N$_2$ is heavier than water vapor, so that only the release of latent heat significantly impacts convection. On the contrary, in an hydrogen dominated atmosphere (e.g. giant planets), all condensing species are significantly heavier than the background gas. This can stabilize the atmosphere against convection near a cloud deck if the enrichment in the given species exceeds a critical threshold. This raises two questions. What is transporting energy in such a stabilized layer, and how affected can the thermal profile of giant planets be? To answer these questions, we first carry out a linear analysis of the convective and double-diffusive instabilities in a condensable medium showing that an efficient condensation can suppress double-diffusive convection. This sug...

  5. The impact of deep overshooting convection on the water vapour and trace gas distribution in the TTL and lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, W.; Schofield, R.; Hoor, P. M.; Ravegnani, F.; Ulanovsky, A.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Lane, T. P.

    2014-12-01

    Overshooting convection penetrating the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and the lower stratosphere has a significant impact on the redistribution of water vapour and further trace gases. This is of importance for the stratospheric water vapour budget, which plays a central role in radiative and chemical processes. Modelling studies and in situ measurements show the hydration potential of convective overshooting partly by direct injection of ice particles into the stratosphere and subsequent sublimation. However, processes leading to dehydration of the TTL may also impact the stratospheric humidity by limiting the amount of water vapour carried aloft. While the large scale drives some of the dehydrating processes, others are of convective origin, for example gravity waves and cooling associated with overshooting turrets. Furthermore, downdrafts may transport dry and ozone rich air masses from the stratosphere into the TTL. Improving our understanding of overshooting convection and its influence on TTL water vapour will ultimately place better constraints on the budget of water vapour in the stratosphere.In this study we use three-dimensional cloud resolving (WRF-ARW) simulations of a deep convective thunderstorm (Hector) to study the redistribution of water vapour and trace gases in the upper TTL/lower stratosphere. Passive tracers are initialised to investigate the transport of air masses. The simulations focus on an Hector event that has been probed by aircraft during the SCOUT-O3 field campaign. Observations were performed in and around overshoots that even penetrated the stratosphere. These observations as well as the model simulations show downward transport and mixing of air masses from the stratosphere, though less strong and more localised in the simulation. Furthermore, the simulations shows a layering of hydrated and dehydrated air masses post-convection in the upper TTL and lower stratosphere. Here we use the model to explain the processes causing the

  6. Cellular convection in vertical annuli of fast breeder reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemanath, M.G. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)], E-mail: hemanath@igcar.gov.in; Meikandamurthy, C.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Rajan, K.K.; Rajan, M.; Vaidyanathan, G. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2007-08-15

    In the pool type fast reactors the roof structure is penetrated by a number of pumps and heat exchangers that are cylindrical in shape. Sandwiched between the free surface of sodium and the roof structure, is stagnant argon gas, which can flow in the annular space between the components and roof structure, as a thermosyphon. These thermosyphons not only transport heat from sodium to roof structure, but also result in cellular convection in vertical annuli resulting in circumferential temperature asymmetry of the penetrating components. There is need to know the temperature asymmetry as it can cause tilting of the components. Experiments were carried out in an annulus model to predict the circumferential temperature difference with and without sodium in the test vessel. Three-dimensional analysis was also carried out using PHOENICS CFD code and compared with the experiment. This paper describes the experimental details, the theoretical analysis and their comparison.

  7. Internal Wave Generation by Turbulent Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoanet, D.; Le Bars, M.; Burns, K. J.; Vasil, G. M.; Quataert, E.; Brown, B. P.; Oishi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent measurements suggest that a portion of the Earth's core may be stably stratified. If this is the case, then the Earth's core joins the many planetary and stellar objects which have a stably stratified region adjacent to a convective region. The stably stratified region admits internal gravity waves which can transport angular momentum, energy, and affect magnetic field generation. We describe experiments & simulations of convective excitation of internal waves in water, exploiting its density maximum at 4C. The simulations show that waves are excited within the bulk of the convection zone, opposed to at the interface between the convective and stably stratified regions. We will also present 3D simulations using a compressible fluid. These simulations provide greater freedom in choosing the thermal equilibrium of the system, and are run at higher Rayleigh number.

  8. Internal Gravity Wave Excitation by Turbulent Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoanet, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the flux of internal gravity waves (IGWs) generated by turbulent convection in stars. We solve for the IGW eigenfunctions analytically near the radiative-convective interface in a local, Boussinesq, and cartesian domain. We consider both discontinuous and smooth transitions between the radiative and convective regions and derive Green's functions to solve for the IGWs in the radiative region. We find that if the radiative-convective transition is smooth, the IGW flux ~ F_conv (d/H), where F_conv is the flux carried by the convective motions, d is the width of the transition region, and H is the pressure scale height. This can be much larger than the standard result in the literature for a discontinuous radiative-convective transition, which gives a wave flux ~ F_conv M, where M is the convective Mach number. However, in the smooth transition case, the most efficiently excited perturbations will break immediately when they enter the radiative region. The flux of IGWs which do not break and are abl...

  9. Natural Convection in Enclosed Porous or Fluid Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatdjian, Esteban; Lesage, François; Mota, José Paulo B.

    2014-01-01

    In Saatdjian, E., Lesage, F., and Mota, J.P.B, "Transport Phenomena Projects: A Method to Learn and to Innovate, Natural Convection Between Porous, Horizontal Cylinders," "Chemical Engineering Education," 47(1), 59-64, (2013), the numerical solution of natural convection between two porous, concentric, impermeable cylinders was…

  10. Natural convection in superposed fluid-porous layers

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Aniruddha

    2013-01-01

    Natural Convection in Composite Fluid-Porous Domains provides a timely overview of the current state of understanding on the phenomenon of convection in composite fluid-porous layers. Natural convection in horizontal fluid-porous layers has received renewed attention because of engineering problems such as post-accident cooling of nuclear reactors, contaminant transport in groundwater, and convection in fibrous insulation systems. Because applications of the problem span many scientific domains, the book serves as a valuable resource for a wide audience.

  11. Analysis of Sister Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙淑珍

    2004-01-01

    Chapter Ⅰ Introduction  Sitting in the rocking chair,Carrie dreams her future.This is the deep impression the novel"Sister Carrie"gives us,which is written by Theodore Dreiser(1871-1945),the great American realism writer.  ……

  12. The Carry Loom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalow, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Presents instructions for building a simple, inexpensive, one-piece loom that is easy for students and teachers to work with, transport, and store. A short list of books for weaving instruction is appended. (Author/SJL)

  13. Seismic Sounding of Convection in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasoge, Shravan; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2015-01-01

    Our Sun, primarily composed of ionized hydrogen and helium, has a surface temperature of 5777~K and a radius $R_\\odot \\approx 696,000$ km. In the outer $R_\\odot/3$, energy transport is accomplished primarily by convection. Using typical convective velocities $u\\sim100\\,\\rm{m\\,s^{-1}}$ and kinematic viscosities of order $10^{-4}$ m$^{2}$s$^{-1}$, we obtain a Reynolds number $Re \\sim 10^{14}$. Convection is thus turbulent, causing a vast range of scales to be excited. The Prandtl number, $Pr$, of the convecting fluid is very low, of order $10^{-7}$\\,--\\,$10^{-4}$, so that the Rayleigh number ($\\sim Re^2 Pr$) is on the order of $10^{21}\\,-\\,10^{24}$. Solar convection thus lies in extraordinary regime of dynamical parameters, highly untypical of fluid flows on Earth. Convective processes in the Sun drive global fluid circulations and magnetic fields, which in turn affect its visible outer layers ("solar activity") and, more broadly, the heliosphere ("space weather"). The precise determination of the depth of sola...

  14. Convective overshoot at stiffly stable interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin; Oishi, Jeffrey; Lecoanet, Daniel; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey

    2016-11-01

    Convective overshoot is an important non-local mixing and transport process in stars, extending the influence of turbulent stellar convection beyond the unstable portions of the atmosphere. In the Sun, overshoot into the tachocline at the base of the convection zone has been ascribed a major role in the storage and organization of the global-scale magnetic fields within the solar dynamo. In massive stars, overshooting convection plays an important role in setting the lifespan of the star by mixing fuel into the nuclear burning core. Here we narrowly consider the properties of convective overshoot across very stiff interfaces within fully compressible dynamics across convection zones with significant stratification. We conduct these studies using the Dedalus pseudospectral framework. We extend prior studies of overshoot substantially and find that the depth of overshoot in DNS simulations of a typical plume is well-predicted by a simple buoyancy equilibration model. The implications of this model, extended into the stellar regime, are that very little overshoot should occur under solar conditions. This would seem to sharply limit the role of the tachocline within the global solar dynamo.

  15. Stochastic Convection Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Joao; Reynolds, Carolyn; Suselj, Kay; Matheou, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    computational fluid dynamics, radiation, clouds, turbulence, convection, gravity waves, surface interaction, radiation interaction, cloud and aerosol microphysics, complexity (vegetation, biogeochemistry, radiation versus turbulence/convection stochastic approach, non-linearities, Monte Carlo, high resolutions, large-Eddy Simulations, cloud structure, plumes, saturation in tropics, forecasting, parameterizations, stochastic, radiation-clod interaction, hurricane forecasts

  16. Convection and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Houdek, G

    2010-01-01

    In this short review on stellar convection dynamics I address the following, currently very topical, issues: (1) the surface effects of the Reynolds stresses and nonadiabaticity on solar-like pulsation frequencies, and (2) oscillation mode lifetimes of stochastically excited oscillations in red giants computed with different time-dependent convection formulations.

  17. Numerical Study of a Cold Particle Submitted to Mixed Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bot, Cédric

    2011-05-01

    During material forming process (metal, glass, polymer), one stage is the solidification of the material, from a bulk melt part. Occurrence of solid particles in the melt material may alter the properties of the final product, as aggregation of particles potentially induces a local weakness (bad shape, mechanical or thermal properties, for example). Considering one particle, a wide range of thermal and dynamic phenomena can be observed: a particle settling is mainly due to Archimedes forces. Free convection due to gravity effects can increase the fluid flow (which is defined as an assisting flow) or may limit it (defined as an opposing flow). A high fluid-particle relative velocity also implies forced convection. The competition between the two thermal phenomena (so-called mixed convection) widely influences the particle transport. Many works have studied the fluid velocity field induced by a cylinder or a spherical particle in a isothermal medium, and have highlighted transitions of flow regime (a laminar flow at low velocity, a deviation in the particle transport at a moderate velocity and various flow structures at a high velocity). Some studies have taken into account heat transfer between the particle and the fluid, and focused on the thermal effects upon the particle fluid velocity. Experiments are difficult (or impossible) to lead, since some materials (like metals for example) do not allow visualizing the particle in the melt fluid. We propose in the present study to carry out the numerical 3D-simulation of a cold particle submitted to a fluid flow, in order to link the fluid-particle thermal transfer and the fluid flow properties. A volume of fluid method is used, on a fixed Cartesian grid to determine the particle transport, the fluid flow and heat transfers in both the fluid and the particle. The domain must be large enough to avoid wall effects. The mixed convection is quantified by the Richardson number (Ri). The aim of this paper will consist in

  18. From convection rolls to finger convection in double-diffusive turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yantao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Double diffusive convection (DDC), which is the buoyancy driven flow with fluid density depending on two scalar components, is ubiquitous in many natural and engineering enviroments. Of great interests are scalers transfer rate and flow structures. Here we systematically investigate DDC flow between two horizontal plates, driven by an unstable salinity gradient and stabilized by a temperature gradient. Counterintuitively, when increasing the stabilizing temperature gradient, the salinity flux first increases, even though the velocity monotonically decreases, before it finally breaks down to the purely diffusive value. The enhanced salinity transport is traced back to a transition in the overall flow pattern, namely from large scale convection rolls to well-organised vertically-oriented salt fingers. We also show and explain that the unifying theory of thermal convection originally developed by Grossmann and Lohse for Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection can be directly applied to DDC flow for a wide range of contro...

  19. Parameterization of convective transport in the boundary layer and its impact on the representation of the diurnal cycle of wind and dust emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hourdin

    2015-06-01

    boundary layer by a mass flux scheme leads to realistic representation of the diurnal cycle of wind in spring, with a maximum near-surface wind in the morning. This maximum occurs when the thermal plumes reach the low-level jet that forms during the night at a few hundred meters above surface. The horizontal momentum in the jet is transported downward to the surface by compensating subsidence around thermal plumes in typically less than 1 h. This leads to a rapid increase of wind speed at surface and therefore of dust emissions owing to the strong nonlinearity of emission laws. The numerical experiments are performed with a zoomed and nudged configuration of the LMDZ general circulation model coupled to the emission module of the CHIMERE chemistry transport model, in which winds are relaxed toward that of the ERA-Interim reanalyses. The new set of parameterizations leads to a strong improvement of the representation of the diurnal cycle of wind when compared to a previous version of LMDZ as well as to the reanalyses used for nudging themselves. It also generates dust emissions in better agreement with current estimates, but the aerosol optical thickness is still significantly underestimated.

  20. Convective aggregation in realistic convective-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the real-world relevance of idealized-model convective self-aggregation, five 15 day cases of real organized convection in the tropics are simulated. These include multiple simulations of each case to test sensitivities of the convective organization and mean states to interactive radiation, interactive surface fluxes, and evaporation of rain. These simulations are compared to self-aggregation seen in the same model configured to run in idealized radiative-convective equilibrium. Analysis of the budget of the spatial variance of column-integrated frozen moist static energy shows that control runs have significant positive contributions to organization from radiation and negative contributions from surface fluxes and transport, similar to idealized runs once they become aggregated. Despite identical lateral boundary conditions for all experiments in each case, systematic differences in mean column water vapor (CWV), CWV distribution shape, and CWV autocorrelation length scale are found between the different sensitivity runs, particularly for those without interactive radiation, showing that there are at least some similarities in sensitivities to these feedbacks in both idealized and realistic simulations (although the organization of precipitation shows less sensitivity to interactive radiation). The magnitudes and signs of these systematic differences are consistent with a rough equilibrium between (1) equalization due to advection from the lateral boundaries and (2) disaggregation due to the absence of interactive radiation, implying disaggregation rates comparable to those in idealized runs with aggregated initial conditions and noninteractive radiation. This points to a plausible similarity in the way that radiation feedbacks maintain aggregated convection in both idealized simulations and the real world.Plain Language SummaryUnderstanding the processes that lead to the organization of tropical rainstorms is an important challenge for weather

  1. Observing Convective Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-06-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  2. Heat transport by turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection for $\\Pra\\ \\simeq 0.8$ and $4\\times 10^{11} \\alt \\Ra\\ \\alt 2\\times10^{14}$: Ultimate-state transition for aspect ratio $\\Gamma = 1.00$

    CERN Document Server

    He, Xiaozhou; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Ahlers, Guenter

    2012-01-01

    We report experimental results for heat-transport measurements by turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection in a cylindrical sample of aspect ratio $\\Gamma \\equiv D/L = 1.00$ ($D = 1.12$ m is the diameter and $L = 1.12$ m the height). They are for the Rayleigh-number range $4\\times10^{11} \\alt \\Ra \\alt 2\\times10^{14}$ and for Prandtl numbers \\Pra\\ between 0.79 and 0.86. For $\\Ra \\Ra_1^*$ the data rise above the classical-state power-law and show greater scatter. In analogy to similar behavior observed for $\\Gamma = 0.50$, we interpret this observation as the onset of the transition to the ultimate state. Within our resolution this onset occurs at nearly the same value of $\\Ra_1^*$ as it does for $\\Gamma = 0.50$. This differs from an earlier estimate by Roche {\\it et al.} which yielded a transition at $\\Ra_U \\simeq 1.3\\times 10^{11} \\Gamma^{-2.5\\pm 0.5}$. A $\\Gamma$-independent $\\Ra^*_1$ would suggest that the boundary-layer shear transition is induced by fluctuations on a scale less than the sample dimensions r...

  3. Airborne measurements of BrO and the sum of HOBr and Br2 over the Tropical West Pacific from 1 to 15 km during the CONvective TRansport of Active Species in the Tropics (CONTRAST) experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dexian; Huey, L. Gregory; Tanner, David J.; Salawitch, Ross J.; Anderson, Daniel C.; Wales, Pamela A.; Pan, Laura L.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Apel, Eric C.; Blake, Nicola J.; Campos, Teresa L.; Donets, Valeria; Flocke, Frank M.; Hall, Samuel R.; Hanisco, Thomas F.; Hills, Alan J.; Honomichl, Shawn B.; Jensen, Jørgen B.; Kaser, Lisa; Montzka, Denise D.; Nicely, Julie M.; Reeves, J. Michael; Riemer, Daniel D.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Ullmann, Kirk; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Wolfe, Glenn M.

    2016-10-01

    A chemical ionization mass spectrometer was used to measure BrO and HOBr + Br2 over the Tropical West Pacific Ocean within the altitude range of 1 to 15 km, during the CONvective TRansport of Active Species in the Tropics (CONTRAST) campaign in 2014. Isolated episodes of elevated BrO (up to 6.6 pptv) and/or HOBr + Br2 (up to 7.3 pptv) were observed in the tropical free troposphere (TFT) and were associated with biomass burning. However, most of the time we did not observe significant BrO or HOBr + Br2 in the TFT and the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) above our limits of detection (LOD). The 1 min average LOD for BrO ranged from 0.6 to 1.6 pptv and for HOBr + Br2 ranged from 1.3 to 3.5 pptv. During one flight, BrO observations from the TTL to the extratropical lowermost stratosphere were used to infer a profile of inorganic bromine (Bry). Based on this profile, we estimated the product gas injection of bromine species into the stratosphere to be 2 pptv. Analysis of Bry partitioning further indicates that BrO levels are likely very low in the TFT environment and that future studies should target the measurement of HBr or atomic Br.

  4. Mantle Convection in a Microwave Oven: New Perspectives for the Internally Heated Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limare, A.; Fourel, L.; Surducan, E.; Neamtu, C.; Surducan, V.; Vilella, K.; Farnetani, C. G.; Kaminski, E. C.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal evolution of silicate planets is primarily controlled by the balance between internal heating - due to radioactive decay - and heat transport by mantle convection. In the Earth, the problem is particularly complex due to the heterogeneous distribution of heat sources in the mantle and the non-linear coupling between this distribution and convective mixing. To investigate the behaviour of such systems, we have developed a new technology based on microwave absorption to study internally-heated convection in the laboratory. This prototype offers the ability to reach the high Rayleigh-Roberts and Prandtl numbers that are relevant for planetary convection. Our experimental results obtained for a uniform distribution of heat sources were compared to numerical calculations reproducing exactly experimental conditions (3D Cartesian geometry and temperature-dependent physical properties), thereby providing the first cross validation of experimental and numerical studies of convection in internally-heated systems. We find that the thermal boundary layer thickness and interior temperature scale with RaH-1/4, where RaH is the Rayleigh-Roberts number, as theoretically predicted by scaling arguments on the dissipation of kinetic energy. Our microwave-based method offers new perspectives for the study of internally-heated convection in heterogeneous systems which have been out of experimental reach until now. We are able to selectively heat specific regions in the convecting layer, through the careful control of the absorption properties of different miscible fluids. This is analogous to convection in the presence of chemical reservoirs with different concentration of long-lived radioactive isotopes. We shall show results for two different cases: the stability of continental lithosphere over a convective fluid and the evolution of a hidden enriched reservoir in the lowermost mantle.

  5. Sister Carrie in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷希

    2015-01-01

    Sister Carrie has received many Chinese scholar's attention, and it has quantity relevance researches. Therefore, it is valuable to study why it is popular in China and it's education meaning for Chinese people. In addition, to analysis the domestic re-searches and find it's exist problems can help us make a new breakthrough from the study.

  6. Convective heat transfer during dendritic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Huang, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    Axial growth rate measurements were carried out at 17 levels of supercooling between 0.043 C and 2 C, a temperature range in which convection, instead of diffusion, becomes the controlling mechanism of heat transfer in the dentritic growth process. The growth velocity, normalized to that expected for pure diffusive heat transfer, displays a dependence on orientation. The ratio of the observed growth velocity to that for convection-free growth and the coefficients of supercooling are formulated. The dependence of normalized growth rate in supercooling is described for downward growing dendrites. These experimental correlations can be justified theoretically only to a limited extent.

  7. Introductory analysis of Benard-Marangoni convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroto, J A [Group of Physics and Chemistry of Linares, Escuela Politecnica Superior, St Alfonso X El Sabio, 28, University of Jaen, E-23700 Linares, Jaen (Spain); Perez-Munuzuri, V [Group of Nonlinear Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Romero-Cano, M S [Group of Complex Fluids Physics, Department of Applied Physics, University of Almeria, E-04120 Almeria (Spain)

    2007-03-15

    We describe experiments on Benard-Marangoni convection which permit a useful understanding of the main concepts involved in this phenomenon such as, for example, Benard cells, aspect ratio, Rayleigh and Marangoni numbers, Crispation number and critical conditions. In spite of the complexity of convection theory, we carry out a simple and introductory analysis which has the additional advantage of providing very suggestive experiments. As a consequence, we recommend our device for use as a laboratory experiment for undergraduate students of the thermodynamics of nonlinear and fluid physics.

  8. Peristaltic flow in an asymmetric channel with convective boundary conditions and Joule heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abbasi Fahad Munir; Hayat Tasawar; Ahmad Bashir

    2014-01-01

    The peristaltic transport of viscous fluid in an asymmetric channel is concentrated. The channel walls exhibit convective boundary conditions. Both cases of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluids are considered. Mathematical analysis has been presented in a wave frame of reference. The resulting problems are non-dimensionalized. Long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations are employed. Joule heating effect on the thermal equation is retained. Analytic solutions for stream function and temperature are constructed. Numerical integration is carried out for pressure rise per wavelength. Effects of influential flow parameters have been pointed out through graphs.

  9. Transperitoneal transport of sodium during hypertonic peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Fugleberg, S; Brahm, J

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms of transperitoneal sodium transport during hypertonic peritoneal dialysis were evaluated by kinetic modelling. A total of six nested mathematical models were designed to elucidate the presence or absence of diffusive, non-lymphatic convective and lymphatic convective solute transport....... Experimental results were obtained from 26 non-diabetic patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The model validation procedure demonstrated that only diffusive and non-lymphatic convective transport mechanisms were identifiable in the transperitoneal transport of sodium. Non-lymphatic convective sodium...

  10. Basics of lava-lamp convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyüre, Balázs; Jánosi, Imre M.

    2009-10-01

    Laboratory experiments are reported in an immiscible two-fluid system, where thermal convection is initiated by heating at the bottom and cooling at the top. The lava-lamp regime is characterized by a robust periodic exchange process where warm blobs rise from the bottom, attach to the top surface for a while, then cold blobs sink down again. Immiscibility allows to reach real steady (dynamical equilibrium) states which can be sustained for several days. Two modes of lava-lamp convection could be identified by recording and evaluating temperature time series at the bottom and at the top of the container: a “slow” mode is determined by an effective heat transport speed at a given temperature gradient, while a second mode of constant periodicity is viscosity limited. Contrasting of laboratory and geophysical observations yields the conclusion that the frequently suggested lava-lamp analogy fails for the accepted models of mantle convection.

  11. Convection and Mixing in Giant Planet Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Vazan, Allona; Kovetz, Attay; Podolak, Morris

    2015-01-01

    The primordial internal structures of gas giant planets are unknown. Often giant planets are modeled under the assumption that they are adiabatic, convective, and homogeneously mixed, but this is not necessarily correct. In this work, we present the first self-consistent calculation of convective transport of both heat and material as the planets evolve. We examine how planetary evolution depends on the initial composition and its distribution, whether the internal structure changes with time, and if so, how it affects the evolution. We consider various primordial distributions, different compositions, and different mixing efficiencies and follow the distribution of heavy elements in a Jupiter-mass planet as it evolves. We show that a heavy-element core cannot be eroded by convection if there is a sharp compositional change at the core-envelope boundary. If the heavy elements are initially distributed within the planet according to some compositional gradient, mixing occurs in the outer regions resulting in a...

  12. On the convective overstability in protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Latter, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the driving of low-level hydrodynamical activity in protoplanetary-disc dead zones. A small adverse radial entropy gradient, ordinarily stabilised by rotation, excites oscillatory convection (`convective overstability') when thermal diffusion, or cooling, is neither too strong nor too weak. I revisit the linear theory of the instability, discuss its prevalence in protoplanetary discs, and show that unstable modes are exact nonlinear solutions in the local Boussinesq limit. Overstable modes cannot grow indefinitely, however, as they are subject to a secondary parametric instability that limits their amplitudes to relatively low levels. If parasites set the saturation level of the ensuing turbulence then the convective overstability is probably too weak to drive significant angular momentum transport or to generate vortices. But I also discuss an alternative, and far more vigorous, saturation route that generates radial `layers' or `zonal flows' (witnessed also in semiconvection). Numerical ...

  13. Convective heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kakac, Sadik; Pramuanjaroenkij, Anchasa

    2014-01-01

    Intended for readers who have taken a basic heat transfer course and have a basic knowledge of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and differential equations, Convective Heat Transfer, Third Edition provides an overview of phenomenological convective heat transfer. This book combines applications of engineering with the basic concepts of convection. It offers a clear and balanced presentation of essential topics using both traditional and numerical methods. The text addresses emerging science and technology matters, and highlights biomedical applications and energy technologies. What’s New in the Third Edition: Includes updated chapters and two new chapters on heat transfer in microchannels and heat transfer with nanofluids Expands problem sets and introduces new correlations and solved examples Provides more coverage of numerical/computer methods The third edition details the new research areas of heat transfer in microchannels and the enhancement of convective heat transfer with nanofluids....

  14. Transparent electric convection heater

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, A.; Luck, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    An optically transparent electrically heated convection heater for use as a space heater in homes, offices, shops. Typically, said convection heater consists of a transparent layer 1 upon which is deposited a layer of a transparent electrically conductive material 2 such as indium-tin-oxide, electrodes 3 and 3a are formed on opposite edges of the transparent electrically conductive layer 2 and electrical wires 4 and 4a are connected to the electrodes. The transparent electrically conductive l...

  15. Entropy Production in Convective Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersing, Nele; Wellmann, Florian; Niederau, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Exploring hydrothermal reservoirs requires reliable estimates of subsurface temperatures to delineate favorable locations of boreholes. It is therefore of fundamental and practical importance to understand the thermodynamic behavior of the system in order to predict its performance with numerical studies. To this end, the thermodynamic measure of entropy production is considered as a useful abstraction tool to characterize the convective state of a system since it accounts for dissipative heat processes and gives insight into the system's average behavior in a statistical sense. Solving the underlying conservation principles of a convective hydrothermal system is sensitive to initial conditions and boundary conditions which in turn are prone to uncertain knowledge in subsurface parameters. There exist multiple numerical solutions to the mathematical description of a convective system and the prediction becomes even more challenging as the vigor of convection increases. Thus, the variety of possible modes contained in such highly non-linear problems needs to be quantified. A synthetic study is carried out to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in a finite porous layer heated from below. Various two-dimensional models are created such that their corresponding Rayleigh numbers lie in a range from the sub-critical linear to the supercritical non-linear regime, that is purely conductive to convection-dominated systems. Entropy production is found to describe the transient evolution of convective processes fairly well and can be used to identify thermodynamic equilibrium. Additionally, varying the aspect ratio for each Rayleigh number shows that the variety of realized convection modes increases with both larger aspect ratio and higher Rayleigh number. This phenomenon is also reflected by an enlarged spread of entropy production for the realized modes. Consequently, the Rayleigh number can be correlated to the magnitude of entropy production. In cases of moderate

  16. Nonlinear thermal convection in a viscoelastic nanofluid saturated porous medium under gravity mod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palle Kiran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper carried out a nonlinear thermal convection in a porous medium saturated with viscoelastic nanofluid under vibrations. The Darcy model has been used for the porous medium, while the nanofluid layer incorporates the effect of Brownian motion along with thermophoresis. An Oldroyd-B type constitutive equation was used to describe the rheological behavior of viscoelastic nanofluids. The non-uniform vertical vibrations of the system, which can be realized by oscillating the system vertically, is considered to vary sinusoidally with time. In order to find the heat and mass transports for unsteady state, a nonlinear analysis, using a minimal representation of the truncated Fourier series of two terms, has been performed. Effect of various parameters has been investigated on heat and mass transport and then presented graphically. It is found that gravity modulation can be used effectively to regulate either heat or mass transports in the system.

  17. Photospheric Magnetic Flux Transport - Supergranules Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.; Rightmire-Upton, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Observations of the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's photosphere show that active region magnetic flux is carried far from its origin by a combination of flows. These flows have previously been identified and modeled as separate axisymmetric processes: differential rotation, meridional flow, and supergranule diffusion. Experiments with a surface convective flow model reveal that the true nature of this transport is advection by the non-axisymmetric cellular flows themselves - supergranules. Magnetic elements are transported to the boundaries of the cells and then follow the evolving boundaries. The convective flows in supergranules have peak velocities near 500 m/s. These flows completely overpower the superimposed 20 m/s meridional flow and 100 m/s differential rotation. The magnetic elements remain pinned at the supergranule boundaries. Experiments with and without the superimposed axisymmetric photospheric flows show that the axisymmetric transport of magnetic flux is controlled by the advection of the cellular pattern by underlying flows representative of deeper layers. The magnetic elements follow the differential rotation and meridional flow associated with the convection cells themselves -- supergranules rule!

  18. The influence of convective current generator on the global current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Morozov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical generalization of classical model of the global circuit with taking into account the convective current generator, working in the planetary boundary layer was considered. Convective current generator may be interpreted as generator, in which the electromotive force is generated by processes, of the turbulent transport of electrical charge. It is shown that the average potential of ionosphere is defined not only by the thunderstorm current generators, working at the present moment, but by the convective current generator also. The influence of the convective processes in the boundary layer on the electrical parameters of the atmosphere is not only local, but has global character as well. The numerical estimations, made for the case of the convective-unstable boundary layer demonstrate that the increase of the average potential of ionosphere may be of the order of 10% to 40%.

  19. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hohenegger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM. Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle.

    Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and mid-latitude continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  20. Experimental and numerical investigation of wave ferrofluid convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozhko, A.A. [Department of Physics, Perm State University, Bukirev Str. 15, 614990 Perm (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: bozhko@psu.ru; Putin, G.F. [Department of Physics, Perm State University, Bukirev Str. 15, 614990 Perm (Russian Federation); Tynjaelae, T. [Department of Energy and Environmental Engineering, Lappeenranta Univeristy of Technology, P.O. Box 20, Lappeenranta 53851 (Finland); Sarkomaa, P. [Department of Energy and Environmental Engineering, Lappeenranta Univeristy of Technology, P.O. Box 20, Lappeenranta 53851 (Finland)

    2007-09-15

    The stability of buoyancy-driven shear flow in an inclined layer of a ferrocolloid is investigated for different values of inclinations and homogeneous longitudinal magnetic fields. Near the onset of Rayleigh convection of ferrofluid layer inclined with respect to gravity, the wave oscillatory regimes were observed in experiments and numerical simulations. Visualization of convection patterns is provided by a temperature-sensitive liquid crystal film. As experiments testify, the origin of traveling wave regimes in ferrofluid is due to concentration gradients caused by gravity sedimentation of the magnetic particles. To study the effects of initial concentration gradient of particles, on convective instabilities, finite volume numerical simulations using a two-phase mixture model were carried out for the same setup. The most fascinating effect in ferrofluid convection is spontaneous formation of localized states, those where the convection chaotically focuses in confined regions and is absent in the remainder of cavity.

  1. Internal convection in thermoelectric generator models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apertet, Y.; Ouerdane, H.; Goupil, C.; Lecæur, Ph

    2012-11-01

    Coupling between heat and electrical currents is at the heart of thermoelectric processes. In a thermoelectric system this may be seen, from a thermal viewpoint, as an additional thermal flux linked to the appearance of an electrical current. Since this additional flux is associated with the global displacement of charge carriers in the system, it can be qualified as convective in opposition to the conductive part related to both phonon transport and heat transport by electrons under open circuit condition as, e.g., in the Wiedemann-Franz relation. In this article we demonstrate that considering the convective part of the thermal flux allows both new insight into the thermoelectric energy conversion and the derivation of the maximum power condition for generators with realistic thermal coupling.

  2. Diamagnetic pumping in a rotating convection zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchatinov, L. L.; Nepomnyashchikh, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Solar dynamo models require some mechanism for magnetic field concentration near the base of the convection zone in order to generate super-kilogauss toroidal fields with sufficiently large (∼ 1024 Mx) magnetic flux. We consider the downward diamagnetic pumping near the base of the convection zone as a possible concentration mechanism and derive the pumping velocities with allowance for the effect of rotation. Transport velocities for poloidal and toroidal fields differ in rotating fluid. The toroidal field is transported downward along the radius only but the pumping velocity for the poloidal field has an equatorward meridional component also. Previous results for cases of slow and rapid rotation are reproduced and the diamagnetic pumping expressions adapted for use in dynamo models are presented.

  3. Diamagnetic pumping in a rotating convection zone

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchatinov, L

    2016-01-01

    Solar dynamo models require some mechanism for magnetic field concentration near the base of the convection zone in order to generate super-kilogauss toroidal fields with sufficiently large (~10^{24} Mx) magnetic flux. We consider the downward diamagnetic pumping near the base of the convection zone as a possible concentration mechanism and derive the pumping velocities with allowance for the effect of rotation. Transport velocities for poloidal and toroidal fields differ in rotating fluid. The toroidal field is transported downward along the radius only but the pumping velocity for the poloidal field has an equatorward meridional component also. Previous results for cases of slow and rapid rotation are reproduced and the diamagnetic pumping expressions adapted for use in dynamo models are presented.

  4. Generation of internal gravity waves by penetrative convection

    CERN Document Server

    Pinçon, C; Goupil, M J

    2015-01-01

    The rich harvest of seismic observations over the past decade provides evidence of angular momentum redistribution in stellar interiors that is not reproduced by current evolution codes. In this context, transport by internal gravity waves can play a role and could explain discrepancies between theory and observations. The efficiency of the transport of angular momentum by waves depends on their driving mechanism. While excitation by turbulence throughout the convective zone has already been investigated, we know that penetrative convection into the stably stratified radiative zone can also generate internal gravity waves. Therefore, we aim at developing a semianalytical model to estimate the generation of IGW by penetrative plumes below an upper convective envelope. We derive the wave amplitude considering the pressure exerted by an ensemble of plumes on the interface between the radiative and convective zones as source term in the equation of momentum. We consider the effect of a thermal transition from a c...

  5. Active control of convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bau, H.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  6. The influence of convection parameterisations under alternate climate conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Harald; Tost, Holger

    2013-04-01

    In the last decades several convection parameterisations have been developed to consider the impact of small-scale unresolved processes in Earth System Models associated with convective clouds. Global model simulations, which have been performed under current climate conditions with different convection schemes, significantly differ among each other in the simulated precipitation patterns due to the parameterisation assumptions and formulations, e.g. the simplified treatment of the cloud microphysics. Additionally, the simulated transport of short-lived trace gases strongly depends on the chosen convection parameterisation due to the differences in the vertical redistribution of mass. Furthermore, other meteorological parameters like the temperature or the specific humidity show substantial differences in convectively active regions. This study presents uncertainties of climate change scenarios caused by different convection parameterisations. For this analysis two experiments (reference simulation with a CO2 concentration of 348 ppm; 2xCO2-simulation with a CO2 concentration of 696 ppm) are calculated with the ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric chemistry (EMAC) model applying four different convection schemes (Tiedtke, ECMWF, Emanuel and Zhang-McFarlane - Hack) and two resolutions (T42 and T63), respectively. The results indicate that the equilibrium climate sensitivity is independent of the chosen convection parameterisation. However, the regional temperature increase, induced by a doubling of the carbon dioxide concentration, demonstrates differences of up to a few Kelvin at the surface as well as in the UTLS for the ITCZ region depending on the selected convection parameterisation. The interaction between cloud and convection parameterisations results in a large disagreement of precipitation patterns. Although every 2xCO2 -experiment simulates an increase in global mean precipitation rates, the change of regional precipitation patterns differ widely. Finally, analysing

  7. Sidewall effects in Rayleigh–Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Lohse, Detlef; Verzicco, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the temperature boundary conditions at the sidewall on the heat transport in Rayleigh–Bénard (RB) convection using direct numerical simulations. For relatively low Rayleigh numbers Ra the heat transport is higher when the sidewall is isothermal, kept at a temperature

  8. "Christian carrying goomies".

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Dr. Passingan Usurup tells critics of his pragmatic approach on condom promotion that he is a Christian carrying condoms for Christ. He is head of the University of Papua New Guinea Medical Center and is credited with developing an AIDS/HIV policy for the Papua New Guinea Defence Force. The condoms were named Goomy and promoted at launching in 1992 in a blue packet under the slogan "The bond that guards." Goomy was chosen as the name because it is pidgin for rubber, chewing gum, and anything associated with rubber. Blue packets were chosen over the calls of most soldiers for a camouflage design because of its universal appeal as the color of the sea and sky and because it was the preference of women in the airlines. Once firmly ensconced in his role at the University, Usurup plans to develop a policy for students and staff and help to conduct AIDS prevention and education activities on campus. He will encourage students to test for HIV rather than highlighting the gloom and doom of infection and disease.

  9. Mathematical models of convection

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Victor K; Goncharova, Olga N; Pukhnachev, Vladislav V

    2012-01-01

    Phenomena of convection are abundant in nature as well as in industry. This volume addresses the subject of convection from the point of view of both, theory and application. While the first three chapters provide a refresher on fluid dynamics and heat transfer theory, the rest of the book describes the modern developments in theory. Thus it brings the reader to the ""front"" of the modern research. This monograph provides the theoretical foundation on a topic relevant to metallurgy, ecology, meteorology, geo-and astrophysics, aerospace industry, chemistry, crystal physics, and many other fiel

  10. Antibiotic multiresistance plasmid pRSB101 isolated from a wastewater treatment plant is related to plasmids residing in phytopathogenic bacteria and carries eight different resistance determinants including a multidrug transport system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanowski, Rafael; Krahn, Irene; Linke, Burkhard; Goesmann, Alexander; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2004-11-01

    Ten different antibiotic resistance plasmids conferring high-level erythromycin resistance were isolated from an activated sludge bacterial community of a wastewater treatment plant by applying a transformation-based approach. One of these plasmids, designated pRSB101, mediates resistance to tetracycline, erythromycin, roxythromycin, sulfonamides, cephalosporins, spectinomycin, streptomycin, trimethoprim, nalidixic acid and low concentrations of norfloxacin. Plasmid pRSB101 was completely sequenced and annotated. Its size is 47 829 bp. Conserved synteny exists between the pRSB101 replication/partition (rep/par) module and the pXAC33-replicon from the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri. The second pRSB101 backbone module encodes a three-Mob-protein type mobilization (mob) system with homology to that of IncQ-like plasmids. Plasmid pRSB101 is mobilizable with the help of the IncP-1alpha plasmid RP4 providing transfer functions in trans. A 20 kb resistance region on pRSB101 is located within an integron-containing Tn402-like transposon. The variable region of the class 1 integron carries the genes dhfr1 for a dihydrofolate reductase, aadA2 for a spectinomycin/streptomycin adenylyltransferase and bla(TLA-2) for a so far unknown Ambler class A extended spectrum beta-lactamase. The integron-specific 3'-segment (qacEDelta1-sul1-orf5Delta) is connected to a macrolide resistance operon consisting of the genes mph(A) (macrolide 2'-phosphotransferase I), mrx (hydrophobic protein of unknown function) and mphR(A) (regulatory protein). Finally, a putative mobile element with the tetracycline resistance genes tetA (tetracycline efflux pump) and tetR was identified upstream of the Tn402-specific transposase gene tniA. The second 'genetic load' region on pRSB101 harbours four distinct mobile genetic elements, another integron belonging to a new class and footprints of two more transposable elements. A tripartite multidrug (MDR) transporter consisting of an ATP

  11. Acousto-Convective Drying of Pine Nuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilin, A. A.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2014-07-01

    An experimental investigation of the process of drying pine nut grains has been carried out by three methods: acousto-convective, thermoconvective, and thermal. A qualitative and a quantitative comparison of the dynamics of the processes of moisture extraction from the nut grains for the considered drying methods have been made. To elucidate the mechanism of moisture extraction from the pine nut grains, we carried out a separate investigation of the process of drying the nut shell and the kernel. The obtained experimental data on the acousto-convective drying of nuts are well described by the relaxation model, the data on the thermoconvective drying are well described by the bilinear law, and the data on the thermal drying are well described by the combined method consisting of three time steps characterized by different kinetic regimes of drying.

  12. CDM Convective Forecast Planning guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CDM Convective Forecast Planning (CCFP) guidance product provides a foreast of en-route aviation convective hazards. The forecasts are updated every 2 hours and...

  13. Heat transport in bubbling turbulent convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakkaraju, R.; Stevens, R.J.A.M.; Oresta, P.; Verzicco, R.; Lohse, D.; Prosperetti, A.

    2013-01-01

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to numerous mechanisms, many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubble compounds with that of the liquid to giv

  14. Internal Wave Generation by Convection

    OpenAIRE

    Lecoanet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In nature, it is not unusual to find stably stratified fluid adjacent to convectively unstable fluid. This can occur in the Earth's atmosphere, where the troposphere is convective and the stratosphere is stably stratified; in lakes, where surface solar heating can drive convection above stably stratified fresh water; in the oceans, where geothermal heating can drive convection near the ocean floor, but the water above is stably stratified due to salinity gradients; possible in the Earth's liq...

  15. Neutrino-driven Turbulent Convection and Standing Accretion Shock Instability in Three-Dimensional Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Abdikamalov, E; Radice, D; Roberts, L F; Haas, R; Reisswig, C; Moesta, P; Klion, H; Schnetter, E

    2014-01-01

    We conduct a series of numerical experiments into the nature of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics in the postbounce stalled-shock phase of core-collapse supernovae using 3D general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of a $27$-$M_\\odot$ progenitor star with a neutrino leakage/heating scheme. We vary the strength of neutrino heating and find three cases of 3D dynamics: (1) neutrino-driven convection, (2) initially neutrino-driven convection and subsequent development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), (3) SASI dominated evolution. This confirms previous 3D results of Hanke et al. 2013, ApJ 770, 66 and Couch & Connor 2014, ApJ 785, 123. We carry out simulations with resolutions differing by up to a factor of $\\sim$4 and demonstrate that low resolution is artificially favorable for explosion in the 3D convection-dominated case, since it decreases the efficiency of energy transport to small scales. Low resolution results in higher radial convective fluxes of energy and enthalpy, more ful...

  16. Velocity amplitudes in global convection simulations: The role of the Prandtl number and near-surface driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Bridget; Miesch, Mark S.; Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the velocity amplitude in global simulations of solar convection, U, may be systematically over-estimated. Motivated by these recent results, we explore the factors that determine U and we consider how these might scale to solar parameter regimes. To this end, we decrease the thermal diffusivity κ along two paths in parameter space. If the kinematic viscosity ν is decreased proportionally with κ (fixing the Prandtl number Pr = ν / κ), we find that U increases but asymptotes toward a constant value, as found by Featherstone and Hindman (2016). However, if ν is held fixed while decreasing κ (increasing Pr), we find that U systematically decreases. We attribute this to an enhancement of the thermal content of downflow plumes, which allows them to carry the solar luminosity with slower flow speeds. We contrast this with the case of Rayleigh-Bénard convection which is not subject to this luminosity constraint. This dramatic difference in behavior for the two paths in parameter space (fixed Pr or fixed ν) persists whether the heat transport by unresolved, near-surface convection is modeled as a thermal conduction or as a fixed flux. The results suggest that if solar convection can operate in a high-Pr regime, then this might effectively limit the velocity amplitude. Small-scale magnetism is a possible source of enhanced viscosity that may serve to achieve this high-Pr regime.

  17. Theory and simulations of rotating convection

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, Adrian J; Lithwick, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    We study thermal convection in a rotating fluid, with the ultimate goal of explaining the structure of convection zones in rotating stars and planets. We first derive mixing-length theory for rapidly-rotating convection, arriving at the results of Stevenson (1979) via simple physical arguments. The theory predicts the properties of convection as a function of the imposed heat flux and rotation rate, independent of microscopic diffusivities. In particular, it predicts the mean temperature gradient; the rms velocity and temperature fluctuations; and the size of the eddies that dominate heat transport. We test all of these predictions with high resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. The results agree remarkably well with the theory across more than two orders of magnitude in rotation rate. For example, the temperature gradient is predicted to scale as the rotation rate to the 4/5th power at fixed flux, and the simulations yield $0.75\\pm 0.06$. We conclude that the mixing length theory is a soli...

  18. Transperitoneal transport of creatinine. A comparison of kinetic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleberg, S; Graff, J; Joffe, P;

    1994-01-01

    Six kinetic models of transperitoneal creatinine transport were formulated and validated on the basis of experimental results obtained from 23 non-diabetic patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The models were designed to elucidate the presence or absence of diffusive, non-lymphatic convective...... including all three forms of transport is superior to other models. We conclude that the best model of transperitoneal creatinine transport includes diffusion, non-lymphatic convective transport and lymphatic convective transport....

  19. Perturbative studies of toroidal momentum transport using neutral beam injection modulation in the Joint European Torus: Experimental results, analysis methodology, and first principles modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantica, P.; Tala, T.; Ferreira, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Perturbative experiments have been carried out in the Joint European Torus [Fusion Sci. Technol. 53(4) (2008)] in order to identify the diffusive and convective components of toroidal momentum transport. The torque source was modulated either by modulating tangential neutral beam power or by modu...

  20. Convection in Icy Satellites: Implications for Habitability and Planetary Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, A. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    Solid-state convection and endogenic resurfacing in the outer ice shells of the icy Galilean satellites (especially Europa) may contribute to the habitability of their internal oceans and to the detectability of any biospheres by spacecraft. If convection occurs in an ice I layer, fluid motions are confined beneath a thick stagnant lid of cold, immobile ice that is too stiff to participate in convection. The thickness of the stagnant lid varies from 30 to 50% of the total thickness of the ice shell, depending on the grain size of ice. Upward convective motions deliver approximately 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 13) kg yr(sup -1) of ice to the base of the stagnant lid, where resurfacing events driven by compositional or tidal effects (such as the formation of domes or ridges on Europa, or formation of grooved terrain on Ganymede) may deliver materials from the stagnant lid onto the surface. Conversely, downward convective motions deliver the same mass of ice from the base of the stagnant lid to the bottom of the satellites ice shells. Materials from the satellites surfaces may be delivered to their oceans by downward convective motions if material from the surface can reach the base of the stagnant lid during resurfacing events. Triggering convection from an initially conductive ice shell requires modest amplitude (a few to tens of kelvins) temperature anomalies to soften the ice to permit convection, which may require tidal heating. Therefore, tidal heating, compositional buoyancy, and solid-state convection in combination may be required to permit mass transport between the surfaces and oceans of icy satellites. Callisto and probably Ganymede have thick stagnant lids with geologically inactive surfaces today, so forward contamination of their surfaces is not a significant issue. Active convection and breaching of the stagnant lid is a possibility on Europa today, so is of relevance to planetary protection policy.

  1. A new model for mixing by double-diffusive convection (semi-convection): I. The conditions for layer formation

    CERN Document Server

    Mirouh, Giovanni M; Stellmach, Stephan; Traxler, Adrienne L; Wood, Toby S

    2011-01-01

    The process referred to as "semi-convection" in astrophysics and "double-diffusive convection in the diffusive regime" in Earth and planetary sciences, occurs in stellar and planetary interiors in regions which are stable according to the Ledoux criterion but unstable according to the Schwarzschild criterion. In this series of papers, we analyze the results of an extensive suite of 3D numerical simulations of the process, and ultimately propose a new 1D prescription for heat and compositional transport in this regime which can be used in stellar or planetary structure and evolution models. In a preliminary study of the phenomenon, Rosenblum et al. (2011) showed that, after saturation of the primary instability, a system can evolve in one of two possible ways: the induced turbulence either remains homogeneous, with very weak transport properties, or transitions into a thermo-compositional staircase where the transport rate is much larger (albeit still smaller than in standard convection). In this paper, we sho...

  2. The Spectral Amplitude of Stellar Convection and its Scaling in the High-Rayleigh-Number Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Featherstone, Nicholas A

    2015-01-01

    Convection plays a central role in the dynamics of any stellar interior, and yet its operation remains largely-hidden from direct observation. As a result, much of our understanding concerning stellar convection necessarily derives from theoretical and computational models. The Sun is, however, exceptional in that regard. The wealth of observational data afforded by its proximity provides a unique testbed for comparing convection models against observations. When such comparisons are carried out, surprising inconsistencies between those models and observations become apparent. Both photospheric and helioseismic measurements suggest that convection simulations may overestimate convective flow speeds on large spatial scales. Moreover, many solar convection simulations have difficulty reproducing the observed solar differential rotation due to this apparent overestimation. We present a series of 3-dimensional (3-D) stellar convection simulations designed to examine how the amplitude and spectral distribution of ...

  3. Convection heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bejan, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Written by an internationally recognized authority on heat transfer and thermodynamics, this second edition of Convection Heat Transfer contains new and updated problems and examples reflecting real-world research and applications, including heat exchanger design. Teaching not only structure but also technique, the book begins with the simplest problem solving method (scale analysis), and moves on to progressively more advanced and exact methods (integral method, self similarity, asymptotic behavior). A solutions manual is available for all problems and exercises.

  4. Characteristics of the Correlation between Regional Water Vapor Transport along with the Convective Action and Variation of the Pacific Subtropical High in 1998%1998年区域性水汽输送及对流活动与副高活动变异的相关特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐祥德; 周丽; 张胜军; 苗秋菊

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of the convective action over the low-latitude region, the water vapor transport around the West Pacific subtropical high (WPSH), and its convective action on the seasonal northward jump and southward withdrawal of the WPSH in summer by using the daily data set of NCEP and TBB for 1998. The research shows that in summer, the WPSH moves northward when the convection over the low-latitude tropical region intensifies and the subsidence region of the meridional vertically vertical circulation in meridional direction circulation over the region of 110°-150°E moves northward. Furthermore, as revealed by diagnostic analysis, the subtropical high moves northward after the obvious weakening of the longitudinal water vapor transport over the region around the subtropical high, but withdraws southward a pentad after the reduction of the latitudinal water vapor transport over the tropical West Pacific region. The research results show that the northward jump and southward withdrawal of the WPSH are closely related to the release of the convective latent heat at low latitudes and the water vapor transport at boundaries around WPSH and its convective action. The numerical simulation further validates the above-mentioned correlation between the variation of the action of the subtropical high and the preceding water vapor transport along with the convection characteristics.%根据1998年NCEP逐日资料和TBB逐日资料,探讨了低纬度对流活动和副高周边水汽输送及其对流活动对夏季西太平洋副热带高压季节性北跳、南撤的影响效应.研究表明:低纬热带对流加强,且110°-150°E地区的南北向垂直经圈环流下沉区北移,夏季西太平洋副热带高压有北跳现象.另外,诊断结果亦表明西太平洋副高周边纬向水汽输送的显著减弱亦预示将出现副高的北跳,而西太平洋地区低纬经向水汽输送减少一候之后,副高南撤.研究结果表明西太平洋副

  5. EFFECT OF CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY CONDITIONS AT BOTTOM WALL ON NATURAL CONVECTIONS IN A SQUARE CAVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASWATHA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Simulations were carried out for natural convection in a square cavity using finite volume based computational procedure with biased quadratic elements to investigate the influence of convective boundary conditions at bottom wall. Parametric study has been carried out for a wide range of Rayleigh number (Ra (103 ≤ Ra ≤ 108, Prandtl number (Pr (0.7 ≤ Pr ≤ 17 and heat transfer coefficient (h (0.1 ≤ h ≤ 104 W/m2 K. It is observed from the present study that the heat transfer is primarily due to conduction for Rayleigh number up to 104. Convection dominant heat transfer is observed at higher Ra values. The intensity of circulation increases with increase in Ra number. The average heat transfer rate at the bottom wall is found to be invariant for all values of heat transfer coefficient for Ra up to 104. The power law correlations between average Nusselt number and Rayleigh numbers are presented for convection dominated regimes.

  6. The Solar Convection Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Kurt T.

    2000-01-01

    I helped to complete a research project with NASA scientists Dr. David Hathaway (my mentor), Rick Bogart, and John Beck from the SOHO/SOI collaboration. Our published paper in 'Solar Physics' was titled 'The Solar Convection Spectrum' (April 2000). Two of my undergraduate students were named on the paper--Gavrav Khutri and Josh Petitto. Gavrav also wrote a short paper for the National Conference of Undergraduate Research Proceedings in 1998 using a preliminary result. Our main result was that we show no evidence of a scale of convection named 'mesogranulation'. Instead, we see only direct evidence for the well-known scales of convection known as graduation and supergranulation. We are also completing work on vertical versus horizontal flow fluxes at the solar surface. I continue to work on phase relationships of solar activity indicators, but I have not yet written a paper with my students on this topic. Along with my research results, I have developed and augmented undergraduate courses at Birmingham-Southern College by myself and with other faculty. We have included new labs and observations, speakers from NASA and elsewhere, new subject material related to NASA and space science. I have done a great deal of work in outreach, mostly as President and other offices in the Birmingham Astronomical Society. My work includes speaking, attracting speakers, giving workshops, and governing.

  7. Thermal Vibrational Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershuni, G. Z.; Lyubimov, D. V.

    1998-08-01

    Recent increasing awareness of the ways in which vibrational effects can affect low-gravity experiments have renewed interest in the study of thermal vibrational convection across a wide range of fields. For example, in applications where vibrational effects are used to provide active control of heat and mass transfer, such as in heat exchangers, stirrers, mineral separators and crystal growth, a sound understanding of the fundamental theory is required. In Thermal Vibrational Convection, the authors present the theory of vibrational effects caused by a static gravity field, and of fluid flows which appear under vibration in fluid-filled cavities. The first part of the book discusses fluid-filled cavities where the fluid motion only appears in the presence of temperature non-uniformities, while the second considers those situations where the vibrational effects are caused by a non-uniform field. Throughout, the authors concentrate on consideration of high frequency vibrations, where averaging methods can be successfully applied in the study of the phenomena. Written by two of the pioneers in this field, Thermal Vibrational Convection will be of great interest to scientists and engineers working in the many areas that are concerned with vibration, and its effect on heat and mass transfer. These include hydrodynamics, hydro-mechanics, low gravity physics and mechanics, and geophysics. The rigorous approach adopted in presenting the theory of this fascinating and highly topical area will facilitate a greater understanding of the phenomena involved, and will lead to the development of more and better-designed experiments.

  8. Natural convection in eccentric spherical annuli

    CERN Document Server

    Gallegos, A D

    2015-01-01

    A fluid between two spheres, concentric or not, at different temperatures will flow in the presence of a constant gravitational force. Although there is no possible hydrostatic state, energy transport is dominated by diffusion if temperature difference between the spheres is small enough. In this conductive regime the average Nusselt number remains approximately constant for all Rayleigh numbers below some critical value. Above the critical Rayleigh number, plumes appear and thermal convection takes place. We study this phenomenon, in particular the case where the inner sphere is displaced from the centre, using a two-component thermal lattice Boltzmann method to characterize the convective instability, the evolution of the flow patterns and the dependence of the Nusselt number on the Rayleigh number beyond the transition.

  9. Observation of dendritic growth under the influence of forced convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchupkina, O.; Shevchenko, N.; Eckert, S.

    2015-06-01

    The directional solidification of Ga-25wt%In alloys within a Hele-Shaw cell was visualized by X-ray radioscopy. The investigations are focused on the impact of melt convection on the dendritic growth. Natural convection occurs during a bottom up solidification because lighter solute is rejected during crystallization. Forced convection was produced by a specific electromagnetic pump. The direction of forced melt flow is almost horizontal at the solidification front. Melt flow induces various effects on grain morphology primarily caused by convective transport of solute, such as a facilitation of the growth of primary trunks or lateral branches, dendrite remelting, fragmentation or freckle formation depending on the dendrite orientation, the flow direction and intensity. Forced flow eliminates solutal plumes and damps local fluctuations of solute. A preferential growth of the secondary arms occurs at the upstream side of the dendrites, whereas high solute concentration at the downstream side inhibits the formation of secondary branches.

  10. Reynolds stress and heat flux in spherical shell convection

    CERN Document Server

    Käpylä, P J; Guerrero, G; Brandenburg, A; Chatterjee, P

    2010-01-01

    Context. Turbulent fluxes of angular momentum and heat due to rotationally affected convection play a key role in determining differential rotation of stars. Aims. We compute turbulent angular momentum and heat transport as functions of the rotation rate from stratified convection. We compare results from spherical and Cartesian models in the same parameter regime in order to study whether restricted geometry introduces artefacts into the results. Methods. We employ direct numerical simulations of turbulent convection in spherical and Cartesian geometries. In order to alleviate the computational cost in the spherical runs and to reach as high spatial resolution as possible, we model only parts of the latitude and longitude. The rotational influence, measured by the Coriolis number or inverse Rossby number, is varied from zero to roughly seven, which is the regime that is likely to be realised in the solar convection zone. Cartesian simulations are performed in overlapping parameter regimes. Results. For slow ...

  11. Evidence for Corotating Convection in Saturn's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelson, M. G.; Southwood, D. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2006-05-01

    Saturn's magnetic field exhibits a high degree of azimuthal symmetry, yet the field and plasma signatures of the magnetosphere are modulated at a period close to that of planetary rotation. How, then, is a clear periodicity imposed on the magnetic field and plasma of the planetary magnetosphere? In this talk, Cassini magnetometer data are used to develop a scenario for the dynamics of the Saturn magnetosphere. The proposal is that mass transport, accomplished in the inner magnetosphere by interchange motion, feeds into the outer magnetosphere where ballooning driven by centrifugal stress leads to outward transport, field reconnection and plasma loss in a favored local time sector; flux is transported inward in other regions. The model is closely related to the concept of corotating convection proposed by Dessler, Hill, and co-workers for Jupiter. The proposed mechanism can be consistent with aspects of the empirical camshaft model introduced by Espinosa et al., 2003 to explain Pioneer and Voyager magnetometer data. Anomalous transport here proposed could originate from a localized ionospheric conductivity anomaly. The resulting cyclic stress modulates the current in the current sheet and can account for its north-south excursions. The convection patterns proposed also imply that corotating, field-aligned currents would be a basic feature of the Saturn system.

  12. Magnetic Control of Convection during Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2004-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular Crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for bio-chemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and Sedimentation as is achieved in "microgravity", we have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, f o d o n of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. We postulate that limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with counteracts on for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately positioning the crystal growth cell so that the magnetic susceptibility

  13. Plasma transport driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X.; Delamere, P. A.; Otto, A.

    2016-06-01

    Two important differences between the giant magnetospheres (i.e., Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetospheres) and the terrestrial magnetosphere are the internal plasma sources and the fast planetary rotation. Thus, there must be a radially outward flow to transport the plasma to avoid infinite accumulation of plasma. This radial outflow also carries the magnetic flux away from the inner magnetosphere due to the frozen-in condition. As such, there also must be a radial inward flow to refill the magnetic flux in the inner magnetosphere. Due to the similarity between Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability and the centrifugal instability, we use a three-dimensional RT instability to demonstrate that an interchange instability can form a convection flow pattern, locally twisting the magnetic flux, consequently forming a pair of high-latitude reconnection sites. This process exchanges a part of the flux tube, thereby transporting the plasma radially outward without requiring significant latitudinal convection of magnetic flux in the ionosphere.

  14. Experimental investigation on heat transport in gravel-sand materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maureschat, Gerald; Heller, Alfred

    1997-01-01

    out in a small size experiment. The experiment consists of a highly insulated box filled with two kinds of sand material crossed by a plastic heat pipe. Heat transfer is measured under dry and water satured conditions in a cross-section.The conclusions are clear. To obtain necessary heat conduction......The project is a basic study on the expected thermal behaviour of gravel storage initiated as a part of a research and demonstration gravel storage for seasonal heat storage.The goal of the investigation is to determine the heat transfer between heat pipes and sand-gravel storage media by carrying...... media no convectional heat transport is found. It would be relevant to extend the investigation to media that enables convectional heat transport. A last conclusion is that such experiments, necessary for proper designing of sand-gravel storage types, are a very cheap form of collecting information...

  15. The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, M. C.; Brune, W. H.; Cantrell, C. A.; Rutledge, S. A.; Crawford, J. H.; Huntrieser, H.; Homeyer, C. R.; Nault, B.; Cohen, R. C.; Pan, L.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field experiment took place in the central U.S. in May and June 2012 and had the objectives of characterizing the effect of thunderstorms on the chemical composition of the lower atmosphere and determining the chemical aging of upper troposphere (UT) convective outflow plumes. DC3 employed ground-based radars, lightning mapping arrays, and weather balloon soundings in conjunction with aircraft measurements sampling the composition of the inflow and outflow of a variety of thunderstorms in northeast Colorado, West Texas to central Oklahoma, and northern Alabama. A unique aspect of the DC3 strategy was to locate and sample the convective outflow a day after active convection in order to measure the chemical transformations within the UT convective plume. The DC3 data are being analyzed to investigate transport and dynamics of the storms, scavenging of soluble trace gases and aerosols, production of nitrogen oxides by lightning, relationships between lightning flash rates and storm parameters, and chemistry in the UT that is affected by the convection. In this presentation, we give an overview of the DC3 field campaign and highlight results from the campaign that are relevant to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region. These highlights include stratosphere-troposphere exchange in connection with thunderstorms, the 0-12 hour chemical aging and new particle formation in the UT outflow of a dissipating mesoscale convective system observed on June 21, 2012, and UT chemical aging in convective outflow as sampled the day after convection occurred and modeled in the Weather Research and Forecasting coupled with Chemistry model.

  16. Titan Balloon Convection Model Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative research effort is directed at determining, quantitatively, the convective heat transfer coefficients applicable to a Montgolfiere balloon operating...

  17. On fast carry select adders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanna, M.; Whitaker, S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for a high-speed carry select adder with very long bit lengths utilizing a conflict-free bypass scheme. The proposed scheme has almost half the number of transistors and is faster than a conventional carry select adder. A comparative study is also made between the proposed adder and a Manchester carry chain adder which shows that the proposed scheme has the same transistor count, without suffering any performance degradation, compared to the Manchester carry chain adder.

  18. On fast carry select adders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanna, M.; Whitaker, S.

    This paper presents an architecture for a high-speed carry select adder with very long bit lengths utilizing a conflict-free bypass scheme. The proposed scheme has almost half the number of transistors and is faster than a conventional carry select adder. A comparative study is also made between the proposed adder and a Manchester carry chain adder which shows that the proposed scheme has the same transistor count, without suffering any performance degradation, compared to the Manchester carry chain adder.

  19. Bidispersive-inclined convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulone, Giuseppe; Straughan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    A model is presented for thermal convection in an inclined layer of porous material when the medium has a bidispersive structure. Thus, there are the usual macropores which are full of a fluid, but there are also a system of micropores full of the same fluid. The model we employ is a modification of the one proposed by Nield & Kuznetsov (2006 Int. J. Heat Mass Transf. 49, 3068–3074. (doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2006.02.008)), although we consider a single temperature field only. PMID:27616934

  20. Zoned mantle convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarède, Francis; Van Der Hilst, Rob D

    2002-11-15

    We review the present state of our understanding of mantle convection with respect to geochemical and geophysical evidence and we suggest a model for mantle convection and its evolution over the Earth's history that can reconcile this evidence. Whole-mantle convection, even with material segregated within the D" region just above the core-mantle boundary, is incompatible with the budget of argon and helium and with the inventory of heat sources required by the thermal evolution of the Earth. We show that the deep-mantle composition in lithophilic incompatible elements is inconsistent with the storage of old plates of ordinary oceanic lithosphere, i.e. with the concept of a plate graveyard. Isotopic inventories indicate that the deep-mantle composition is not correctly accounted for by continental debris, primitive material or subducted slabs containing normal oceanic crust. Seismological observations have begun to hint at compositional heterogeneity in the bottom 1000 km or so of the mantle, but there is no compelling evidence in support of an interface between deep and shallow mantle at mid-depth. We suggest that in a system of thermochemical convection, lithospheric plates subduct to a depth that depends - in a complicated fashion - on their composition and thermal structure. The thermal structure of the sinking plates is primarily determined by the direction and rate of convergence, the age of the lithosphere at the trench, the sinking rate and the variation of these parameters over time (i.e. plate-tectonic history) and is not the same for all subduction systems. The sinking rate in the mantle is determined by a combination of thermal (negative) and compositional buoyancy and as regards the latter we consider in particular the effect of the loading of plates with basaltic plateaux produced by plume heads. Barren oceanic plates are relatively buoyant and may be recycled preferentially in the shallow mantle. Oceanic plateau-laden plates have a more pronounced

  1. Stellar fibril magnetic systems. II - Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations. III - Convective counterflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of magnetic fibrils in the convective zone of a star is investigated analytically, deriving mean-field equations for the two-dimensional transverse motion of an incompressible fluid containing numerous small widely spaced circular cylinders. The equations of Parker (1982) are extended to account for the inertial effects of local flow around the cylinders. The linear field equation for the stream function at the onset of convection is then rewritten, neglecting large-scale heat transport, and used to construct a model of convective counterflow. The Kelvin impulse and fluid momentum, convective motion initiated by a horizontal impulse, and the effects of a viscous boundary layer are considered in appendices.

  2. Influence of dissolved oxygen convection on well sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Casey, C.C.; Lowery, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Convective transport of dissolved oxygen (D.O.) from shallow to deeper parts of wells was observed as the shallow water in wells in South Carolina became cooler than the deeper water in the wells due to seasonal changes. Wells having a relatively small depth to water were more susceptible to thermally induced convection than wells where the depth to water was greater because the shallower water levels were more influenced by air temperature. The potential for convective transport of D.O. to maintain oxygenated conditions in a well screened in an anaerobic aquifer was diminished as ground water exchange through the well screen increased and as oxygen demand increased. Transport of D.O. to the screened interval can adversely affect the ability of passive samplers to produce accurate concentrations of oxygen-sensitive solutes such as iron, other redox indicators, and microbiological data. A comparison of passive sampling to low-flow sampling in a well undergoing convection, however, showed general agreement of volatile organic compound concentrations. During low-flow sampling, the pumped water may be a mixture of convecting water from within the well casing and aquifer water moving inward through the screen. This mixing of water during low-flow sampling can substantially increase equilibration times, can cause false stabilization of indicator parameters, can give false indications of the redox state, and can provide microbiological data that are not representative of the aquifer conditions. Data from this investigation show that simple in-well devices can effectively mitigate convective transport of oxygen. The devices can range from inflatable packers to simple, inexpensive baffle systems. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  3. On the Nature of the Transition Between Roll and Cellular Organization in the Convective Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salesky, Scott T.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2017-04-01

    Both observational and numerical studies of the convective boundary layer (CBL) have demonstrated that when surface heat fluxes are small and mean wind shear is strong, convective updrafts tend to organize into horizontal rolls aligned within 10-20° of the geostrophic wind direction. However, under large surface heat fluxes and weak to negligible shear, convection tends to organize into open cells, similar to turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. Using a suite of 14 large-eddy simulations (LES) spanning a range of -z_i/L between zero (neutral) and 1041 (highly convective), where z_i is the CBL depth and L is the Obukhov length, the transition between roll- and cellular-type convection is investigated systematically for the first time using LES. Mean vertical profiles including velocity variances and turbulent transport efficiencies, as well the "roll factor," which characterizes the rotational symmetry of the vertical velocity field, indicate the transition occurs gradually over a range of -z_i/L; however, the most significant changes in vertical profiles and CBL organization occur from near-neutral conditions up to about -z_i/L ≈ 15-20. Turbulent transport efficiencies and quadrant analysis are used to characterize the turbulent transport of momentum and heat with increasing -z_i/L. It is found that turbulence transports heat efficiently from weakly to highly convective conditions; however, turbulent momentum transport becomes increasingly inefficient as -z_i/L increases.

  4. Role of natural convection in the dissolution of sessile droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Erik; Visser, Claas Willem; Hofhuis, Kevin; Kooij, E Stefan; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    The dissolution process of small (initial (equivalent) radius $R_0 Ra_t$, where $Ra_t = 12$ is the transition Ra-number as extracted from the data. For $Ra < Ra_t$ and smaller, convective transport is progressively overtaken by diffusion and the above scaling relations break down.

  5. Modeling of dendritic growth in the presence of convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Mingfang; DAI; Ting; LEE; Sungyoon; HONG; Chunpyo

    2005-01-01

    A two-dimensional coupling modified cellular automaton (MCA)-transport model has been employed to investigate the asymmetrical dendritic growth behavior in a flowing melt. In the present model, the cellular automaton method for crystal growth is incorporated with a transport model, for numerical calculating of the fluid flow and mass transport by both convection and diffusion. The MCA takes into account the effects of the thermal, the constitutional and the curvature undercoolings on dendritic growth. It also considers the preferred growth orientation of crystal and solute redistribution during solidification. In the transport model, the SIMPLE scheme and a fully implicit finite volume method are employed to solve the governing equations of momentum and species transfers. The present model was applied to simulating the evolution of a single dendrite and multi-dendrites of an Al-3mass%Cu alloy in a forced flow. The simulated results show that dendritic growth morphology is strongly influenced by melt convection.

  6. Eye Formation in Rotating Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Oruba, L; Dormy, E

    2016-01-01

    We consider rotating convection in a shallow, cylindrical domain. We examine the conditions under which the resulting vortex develops an eye at its core; that is, a region where the poloidal flow reverses and the angular momentum is low. For simplicity, we restrict ourselves to steady, axisymmetric flows in a Boussinesq fluid. Our numerical experiments show that, in such systems, an eye forms as a passive response to the development of a so-called eyewall, a conical annulus of intense, negative azimuthal vorticity that can form near the axis and separates the eye from the primary vortex. We also observe that the vorticity in the eyewall comes from the lower boundary layer, and relies on the fact the poloidal flow strips negative vorticity out of the boundary layer and carries it up into the fluid above as it turns upward near the axis. This process is effective only if the Reynolds number is sufficiently high for the advection of vorticity to dominate over diffusion. Finally we observe that, in the vicinity o...

  7. Eye formation in rotating convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruba, L.; Davidson, P. A.; Dormy, E.

    2017-02-01

    We consider rotating convection in a shallow, cylindrical domain. We examine the conditions under which the resulting vortex develops an eye at its core; that is, a region where the poloidal flow reverses and the angular momentum is low. For simplicity, we restrict ourselves to steady, axisymmetric flows in a Boussinesq fluid. Our numerical experiments show that, in such systems, an eye forms as a passive response to the development of a so-called eyewall, a conical annulus of intense, negative azimuthal vorticity that can form near the axis and separates the eye from the primary vortex. We also observe that the vorticity in the eyewall comes from the lower boundary layer, and relies on the fact the poloidal flow strips negative vorticity out of the boundary layer and carries it up into the fluid above as it turns upward near the axis. This process is effective only if the Reynolds number is sufficiently high for the advection of vorticity to dominate over diffusion. Finally we observe that, in the vicinity of the eye and the eyewall, the buoyancy and Coriolis forces are negligible, and so although these forces are crucial to driving and shaping the primary vortex, they play no direct role in eye formation in a Boussinesq fluid.

  8. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canaan, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array.

  9. Convective Dynamo Simulation with a Grand Minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Augustson, Kyle; Miesch, Mark; Toomre, Juri

    2015-01-01

    The global-scale dynamo action achieved in a simulation of a Sun-like star rotating at thrice the solar rate is assessed. The 3-D MHD Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code, augmented with a viscosity minimization scheme, is employed to capture convection and dynamo processes in this G-type star. The simulation is carried out in a spherical shell that encompasses 3.8 density scale heights of the solar convection zone. It is found that dynamo action with a high degree of time variation occurs, with many periodic polarity reversals occurring roughly every 6.2 years. The magnetic energy also rises and falls with a regular period. The magnetic energy cycles arise from a Lorentz-force feedback on the differential rotation, whereas the processes leading to polarity reversals are more complex, appearing to arise from the interaction of convection with the mean toroidal fields. Moreover, an equatorial migration of toroidal field is found, which is linked to the changing differential rotation, and potentially to a no...

  10. Transport phenomena II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Transport Phenomena II covers forced convention, temperature distribution, free convection, diffusitivity and the mechanism of mass transfer, convective mass transfer, concentration

  11. Some Properties of the Kinetic Energy Flux and Dissipation in Turbulent Stellar Convection Zones

    CERN Document Server

    Meakin, Casey

    2010-01-01

    We investigate simulated turbulent flow within thermally driven stellar convection zones. Different driving sources are studied, including cooling at the top of the convectively unstable region, as occurs in surface convection zones; and heating at the base by nuclear burning. The transport of enthalpy and kinetic energy, and the distribution of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation are studied. We emphasize the importance of global constraints on shaping the quasi-steady flow characteristics, and present an analysis of turbulent convection which is posed as a boundary value problem that can be easily incorporated into standard stellar evolution codes for deep, efficient convection. Direct comparison is made between the theoretical analysis and the simulated flow and very good agreement is found. Some common assumptions traditionally used to treat quasi-steady turbulent flow in stellar models are briefly discussed. The importance and proper treatment of convective boundaries are indicated.

  12. Membrane requirements for high-flux and convective therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowry, Sudhir Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, high-flux dialysis (HF-HD) has now surpassed low-flux dialysis (LF-HD) as the predominant treatment modality, recognition that removal of larger uremic retention solutes is desirable for the treatment of patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). An even more advanced form of HF-HD in terms of removal of a broad spectrum of uremic toxins is on-line hemodiafiltration (HDF), involving convective transport mechanisms for solute removal. With the modality reaching considerable technical maturity over the last two decades, on-line HDF is now recognized for its clinical efficiency and effectiveness, versatility and safety. Such has been the success of on-line HDF that, in Europe, more patients are treated with on-line HDF than even peritoneal dialysis. Fabrication of high-flux membranes for convective therapies is more than a matter of simply making the membrane 'more open' or of increasing the membrane pore size which is not the only determinant for achieving higher convection. While convective transport of larger uremic retention solutes primarily demands membranes with high hydraulic permeability and sieving capabilities, the making of a modern dialysis membrane involves several other considerations that culminate in the delivery of an effective and safe therapy. In this communication I outline the essential membrane requirements and principles for solute removal by convection, as well of meeting additional features related to the therapy. The basic principles of the membrane manufacturing processes by which desired membrane morphology is derived for the separation phenomena involved in dialysis are further described. An awareness of this enables one to appreciate that, depending on the individual constituents and variations of the manufacturing processes, fabrication of all high-flux membranes entails achieving a balance between the ideal or desired criteria for blood purification. Dialysis membranes for convective therapies, even from the same

  13. A new lattice Boltzmann equation to simulate density-driven convection of carbon dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    The storage of CO2 in fluid-filled geological formations has been carried out for more than a decade in locations around the world. After CO2 has been injected into the aquifer and has moved laterally under the aquifer\\'s cap-rock, density-driven convection becomes an important transport process to model. However, the challenge lies in simulating this transport process accurately with high spatial resolution and low CPU cost. This issue can be addressed by using the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) to formulate a model for a similar scenario when a solute diffuses into a fluid and density differences lead to convective mixing. The LBE is a promising alternative to the traditional methods of computational fluid dynamics. Rather than discretizing the system of partial differential equations of classical continuum mechanics directly, the LBE is derived from a velocity-space truncation of the Boltzmann equation of classical kinetic theory. We propose an extension to the LBE, which can accurately predict the transport of dissolved CO2 in water, as a step towards fluid-filled porous media simulations. This is achieved by coupling two LBEs, one for the fluid flow and one for the convection and diffusion of CO2. Unlike existing lattice Boltzmann equations for porous media flow, our model is derived from a system of moment equations and a Crank-Nicolson discretization of the velocity-truncated Boltzmann equation. The forcing terms are updated locally without the need for additional central difference approximation. Therefore our model preserves all the computational advantages of the single-phase lattice Boltzmann equation and is formally second-order accurate in both space and time. Our new model also features a novel implementation of boundary conditions, which is simple to implement and does not suffer from the grid-dependent error that is present in the standard "bounce-back" condition. The significance of using the LBE in this work lies in the ability to efficiently

  14. Convective heat transfer during dendritic solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Huang, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments on succinonitrile are described in which the dependence of dendritic growth velocity is studied as a function of orientation with respect to gravity. Growth rate measurements were carried out at a relatively small supercooling, requiring high specimen purity as well as extreme thermal stability and precision temperature measurement. The normalized growth velocity showed a dependence on orientation described by the ratio of observed growth velocity to that expected for convection-free growth being equal to 3.52 times the n-th power of Cos half the orientation angle, where n lies between 0.5 and 0.75.

  15. Natural convective boundary layer flow of a nano-fluid past a convectively heated vertical plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA 99258 (United States); Khan, W.A. [Department of Engineering Sciences, PN Engineering College, National University of Sciences and Technology, Karachi 75350 (Pakistan)

    2012-03-15

    Natural convective flow of a nano-fluid over a convectively heated vertical plate is investigated using a similarity analysis of the transport equations followed by their numerical computations. The transport model employed includes the effect of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The analysis shows that velocity, temperature and solid volume fraction of the nano-fluid profiles in the respective boundary layers depend, besides the Prandtl and Lewis numbers, on four additional dimensionless parameters, namely a Brownian motion parameter Nb, a thermophoresis parameter Nt, a buoyancy-ratio parameter Nr and convective parameter Nc. In addition to the study of these parameters on the boundary layer flow characteristics (velocity, temperature, solid volume fraction of the nano-fluid, skin friction, and heat transfer), correlations for the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers have been developed based on a regression analysis of the data. These linear regression models provide a highly accurate (with a maximum standard error of 0.004) representation of the numerical data and can be conveniently used in engineering practice. (authors)

  16. Numerical simulation and experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer of molten salt around fine wire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; YuanWei; LI; XiaoLi; LI; Qiang; WU; YuTing; MA; ChongFang

    2013-01-01

    In order to get the natural convection heat transfer mechanism of molten salt, the experimental investigation of natural convective heat transfer of LiNO3was studied after it was simulated by numerical calculation. Experiment was carried out on the nat-ural convection heat transfer of air and water around the fine wire using the method of Joule heating. The results showed that the natural convection heat transfer of air and water around the fine wire agreed well with Fand’s correlation. Based on the aforementioned experiment, the natural convection heat transfer of molten salt LiNO3was studied by experiment and the same results were got. Therefore, the natural convection heat transfer of molten salt can be calculated by Fand’s correlation, which takes into consideration the effect of viscosity dissipation.

  17. Structure functions in rotating Rayleigh–Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2011-01-01

    A combined numerical–experimental investigation on the scaling of velocity structure functions in turbulent rotating Rayleigh–B´enard convection is carried out. Direct numerical simulations in a cylindrical domain and a horizontally periodic domain are compared with experiments using a cylindrical t

  18. Convection in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Nield, Donald A

    1992-01-01

    This book provides a user-friendly introduction to the topic of convection in porous media The authors as- sume that the reader is familiar with the basic elements of fluid mechanics and heat transfer, but otherwise the book is self-contained The book will be useful both as a review (for reference) and as a tutorial work, suitable as a textbook in a graduate course or seminar The book brings into perspective the voluminous research that has been performed during the last two decades The field has recently exploded because of worldwide concern with issues such as energy self-sufficiency and pollution of the environment Areas of application include the insulation of buildings and equipment, energy storage and recovery, geothermal reservoirs, nuclear waste disposal, chemical reactor engineering, and the storage of heat-generating materials such as grain and coal Geophysical applications range from the flow of groundwater around hot intrusions to the stability of snow against avalanches

  19. Convection in Porous Media

    CERN Document Server

    Nield, Donald A

    2013-01-01

    Convection in Porous Media, 4th Edition, provides a user-friendly introduction to the subject, covering a wide range of topics, such as fibrous insulation, geological strata, and catalytic reactors. The presentation is self-contained, requiring only routine mathematics and the basic elements of fluid mechanics and heat transfer. The book will be of use not only to researchers and practicing engineers as a review and reference, but also to graduate students and others entering the field. The new edition features approximately 1,750 new references and covers current research in nanofluids, cellular porous materials, strong heterogeneity, pulsating flow, and more. Recognized as the standard reference in the field Includes a comprehensive, 250-page reference list Cited over 2300 times to date in its various editions Serves as an introduction for those entering the field and as a comprehensive reference for experienced researchers Features new sections on nanofluids, carbon dioxide sequestration, and applications...

  20. An Analysis of English Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙淑珍

    2004-01-01

    @@ Chapter Ⅰ Introduction Sitting in the rocking chair,Carrie dreams her future.This is the deep impression the novel"Sister Carrie"gives us,which is written by Theodore Dreiser(1871-1945),the great American realism writer.

  1. Effects of void-induced convection on interface morphology and segregation during low-g solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsi, S.; Alexander, J.I.D. [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Kassemi, M. [NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). National Center for Microgravity Research

    2004-11-01

    Recent microgravity experiments have been hampered by convection caused by unwanted voids and/or bubbles in the melt. In this work, a numerical model is developed to describe how thermocapillary convection generated by a void can affect a typical Bridgman solidification process in microgravity. The model is based on the quasi-steady Navier-Stokes equations for a Newtonian fluid coupled with the conservation equations for transport of energy and species. Numerical solutions for a variety of operating conditions indicate that void-generated thermocapillary convection can have a drastic effect on both interface morphology and solutal transport. (author)

  2. Investigation of the influence of free convection on the heat transfer of cylinders with different aspect ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henselowsky, C.; Kuhlmann, H. C.; Rath, H. J.

    2002-09-01

    Electrically heated cylindrical wires are used in research and industry for fluid velocity and turbulence measurements. At very low free-stream velocities (u≤0.1 m/s), hot-wire measurements are significantly influenced by buoyant convection. Below a certain Reynolds number Re* this effect degrades the accuracy of the measurements. To assess the contribution of free-convection heat transfer to the heat balance of hot-wires in cross flow, measurements under normal gravity and microgravity (µg) conditions are compared keeping all other parameters constant. Under gravity conditions, the acceleration of gravity, the hot-wire axis and the direction of the free stream are all perpendicular to each other. The microgravity experiments were carried out in the Drop-Tower Bremen in which the residual acceleration is less than 10-5 g during a period of 4.7 s. The present investigation is concerned with a velocity range of 0≤u≤0.35 m/s corresponding to a Reynolds number range Reconvection for Re→0 and forced-convection-dominated heat transfer for Re=0.1. At intermediate Reynolds numbers both transport mechanisms must be considered.

  3. Mixed convection in fluid superposed porous layers

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, John M

    2017-01-01

    This Brief describes and analyzes flow and heat transport over a liquid-saturated porous bed. The porous bed is saturated by a liquid layer and heating takes place from a section of the bottom. The effect on flow patterns of heating from the bottom is shown by calculation, and when the heating is sufficiently strong, the flow is affected through the porous and upper liquid layers. Measurements of the heat transfer rate from the heated section confirm calculations. General heat transfer laws are developed for varying porous bed depths for applications to process industry needs, environmental sciences, and materials processing. Addressing a topic of considerable interest to the research community, the brief features an up-to-date literature review of mixed convection energy transport in fluid superposed porous layers.

  4. Carrying Capacity:An Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Shaofeng

    2004-01-01

    The concept of carrying capacity is derived from ecology, with widespread contentions of its theoretical connotations and applications in the international academic community, especially the impact of human activities on the environment.Disputes on carrying capacity have been occurring not only among biologists and ecologists, but also among mainstream economists. Based on their efforts,the author makes an attempt to describe its origin,connotations, problems, measurement, and at the same time note the latest international progress in this field.

  5. Particle Energization During Magnetic Storms with Steady Magnetospheric Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, J.; Kepko, L.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Li, W.; McPherron, R. L.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic electrons pose a space weather hazard to satellites in the radiation belts. Although about half of all geomagnetic storms result in relativistic electron flux enhancements, other storms decrease relativistic electron flux, even under similar solar wind drivers. Radiation belt fluxes depend on a complex balance between transport, loss, and acceleration. A critically important aspect of radiation belt enhancements is the role of the 'seed' population--plasma sheet particles heated and transported Earthward by magnetotail processes--which can become accelerated by wave-particle interactions with chorus waves. While the effect of substorms on seed electron injections has received considerable focus, in this study we explore how quasi-steady convection during steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) events affects the transport and energization of electrons. SMC events are long-duration intervals of enhanced convection without any substorm expansions, and are an important mechanism in coupling magnetotail plasma populations to the inner magnetosphere. We detail the behavior of the seed electron population for stormtime SMC events using the Van Allen Probes in the outer radiation belt and THEMIS in the plasma sheet and inner magnetosphere. Together, the two missions provide the ability to track particle transport and energization from the plasma sheet into the radiation belts. We present SMC events with Van Allen Probes/THEMIS conjunctions and compare plasma sheet fast flows/enhanced transport to radiation belt seed electron enhancements. Finally we utilize statistical analyses to quantify the relative importance of SMC events on radiation belt electron acceleration in comparison to isolated substorms.

  6. Thermal evidence for Taylor columns in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Eric M; Aurnou, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    We investigate flow structures in rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection experiments in water using thermal measurements. We focus on correlations between time series measurements of temperature in the top and bottom boundaries. Distinct anticorrelations are observed for rapidly rotating convection, which are argued to attest to heat transport by convective Taylor columns. In support of this argument, these quasigeostrophic flow structures are directly observed in flow visualizations, and their thermal signature is qualitatively reproduced by a simple model of heat transport by columnar flow. Weakly rotating and nonrotating convection produces positively correlated temperature changes across the layer, indicative of heat transport by large-scale circulation. We separate these regimes using a transition parameter that depends on the Rayleigh and Ekman numbers, RaE3/2.

  7. Turbulent convection in the Sun: modeling in unstructured meshes

    CERN Document Server

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Ham, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We adopted an unstructured hydrodynamical solver CharLES to the problem of global convection in the Sun. With the aim to investigate the properties of solar turbulent convection and reproduce differential rotation pattern. We performed simulations in two spherical shells, with 1.3 and 10 million cells. In the first, coarse mesh, the solution does not reproduce realistic convection, and is dominated by numerical effects. In the second mesh, thermal conduction leads to cooling of bottom layers, that could not be compensated by solar irradiance. More simulations in the 10M cells mesh should be performed to investigate the influence of transport coefficients and numerical effects. Our estimate of the code performance suggests, that realistic simulations in even finer grids could be performed for reasonable computational cost.

  8. Role of convection in determining the budget of odd hydrogen in the upper troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, W. J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Johnson, C. E.; Derwent, R. G.

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents a model study of the changes in upper tropospheric HOx ( = OH + HO2) due to upward convective transport of surface pollutants. The model used is a three-dimensional global Lagrangian tropospheric chemistry transport model of 70 chemical species and 150 reactions including nonmethane hydrocarbon chemistry. It is driven by meteorological data from the U.K. Meterological Office with a 6 hour time resolution. We find that the effect of convection is to increase upper tropospheric (300-200 hPa) HOx globally by over 50%. The effect is greatest over the tropical continents where convection and VOC emissions from vegetation are colocated. The convection of isoprene, and hydroperoxides has the greatest effect. Convecting formaldehyde and acetone has a lesser effect. The contribution from isoprene depends more on the convection of its degradation products than the convection of isoprene itself. The upper tropospheric HOx budget is shown to be very sensitive to the model implementation of convective wet deposition.

  9. Convective cooling of photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, E.; Gibbons, C. [Energy Engineering Group, Mechanical Engineering Department, Cork Institute of Technology, Bishopstown, Cork (Ireland)

    2004-07-01

    Most solar cells presently on the market are based on silicon wafers, the so-called first generation technology. As this technology has matured costs have become increasingly dominated by material costs. In the last ten years, continuous work has brought the efficiency of standard cells to the 25% region. A switch to second generation or thin film technology cells now seems imminent. Thin film technology eliminates the silicon wafer and offer the prospect of reducing material and manufacturing costs, but they exhibit lower efficiencies of around 10% for a commercial device. Third generation or tandem cells are currently at a 'proof of concept' research level, with a theoretical conversion rate of 86.8% being asserted Whatever the material construction and manufacturing method of cells, the thermal effect of overheating will prevail in the semiconductor and it is accepted that a lowered temperature will bring about an increase in conversion efficiency. The aim of this project is to improve the efficiency of PV electrical output, by convectively cooling the cells through perforations in them. As the cells heat up they lose efficiency. As the panel heats up a loss in efficiency of 0.5% per C increase in temperature has been recorded. (orig.)

  10. G-jitter induced magnetohydrodynamics flow of nanofluid with constant convective thermal and solutal boundary conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed J Uddin

    Full Text Available Taking into account the effect of constant convective thermal and mass boundary conditions, we present numerical solution of the 2-D laminar g-jitter mixed convective boundary layer flow of water-based nanofluids. The governing transport equations are converted into non-similar equations using suitable transformations, before being solved numerically by an implicit finite difference method with quasi-linearization technique. The skin friction decreases with time, buoyancy ratio, and thermophoresis parameters while it increases with frequency, mixed convection and Brownian motion parameters. Heat transfer rate decreases with time, Brownian motion, thermophoresis and diffusion-convection parameters while it increases with the Reynolds number, frequency, mixed convection, buoyancy ratio and conduction-convection parameters. Mass transfer rate decreases with time, frequency, thermophoresis, conduction-convection parameters while it increases with mixed convection, buoyancy ratio, diffusion-convection and Brownian motion parameters. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper on this topic and hence the results are new. We believe that the results will be useful in designing and operating thermal fluids systems for space materials processing. Special cases of the results have been compared with published results and an excellent agreement is found.

  11. G-jitter induced magnetohydrodynamics flow of nanofluid with constant convective thermal and solutal boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammed J; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, Ahmad Izani Md

    2015-01-01

    Taking into account the effect of constant convective thermal and mass boundary conditions, we present numerical solution of the 2-D laminar g-jitter mixed convective boundary layer flow of water-based nanofluids. The governing transport equations are converted into non-similar equations using suitable transformations, before being solved numerically by an implicit finite difference method with quasi-linearization technique. The skin friction decreases with time, buoyancy ratio, and thermophoresis parameters while it increases with frequency, mixed convection and Brownian motion parameters. Heat transfer rate decreases with time, Brownian motion, thermophoresis and diffusion-convection parameters while it increases with the Reynolds number, frequency, mixed convection, buoyancy ratio and conduction-convection parameters. Mass transfer rate decreases with time, frequency, thermophoresis, conduction-convection parameters while it increases with mixed convection, buoyancy ratio, diffusion-convection and Brownian motion parameters. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper on this topic and hence the results are new. We believe that the results will be useful in designing and operating thermal fluids systems for space materials processing. Special cases of the results have been compared with published results and an excellent agreement is found.

  12. Tropical convection and climate sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ian Nobuo

    Surface temperature has become a popular measure of climate change, but it does not provide the most critical test of climate models. This thesis presents new methods to evaluate climate models based on processes determining the climate sensitivity to radiative forcing from atmospheric greenhouse gases. Cloud radiative feedbacks depend on temperature and relative humidity profiles in addition to surface temperature, through the dependence of cloud type on boundary layer buoyancy. Buoyancy provides a reference to which the onset of deep convection is invariant, and gives a compact description of sea surface temperature changes and cloud feedbacks suitable for diagnostics and as a basis for simplified climate models. This thesis also addresses uncertainties in climate sensitivity involving terrestrial ecosystem responses to global warming. Different diagnostics support different conclusions about atmospheric transport model errors that could imply either stronger or weaker northern terrestrial carbon sinks. Equilibrium boundary layer concepts were previously used in idealized tropical climate models, and are extended here to develop a diagnostic of boundary layer trace gas transport and mixing. Hypotheses linking surface temperature to climate and precipitation sensitivity were tested in this thesis using comprehensive and idealized climate model simulations, and observational datasets. The results do not support the thermostat hypothesis that predicts deep cloud cover will increase with radiative forcing and limit sea surface temperatures to the maximum present-day warm pool temperature. Warm pool temperatures increased along with or even faster than the tropical average over the past several decades, while diagnosed deep cloud cover has not significantly increased, in agreement with global warming simulations. Precipitation sensitivity also depends on more than surface temperature alone, including thermodynamic profiles and air-sea temperature differences. The

  13. An Analysis of Thermally-Related Surface Rainfall Budgets Associated with Convective and Stratiform Rainfall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yushu; Xiaofan LI

    2011-01-01

    Both water vapor and heat processes play key roles in producing surface rainfall.While the water vapor effects of sea surface temperature and cloud radiative and microphysical processes on surface rainfall have been investigated in previous studies,the thermal effects on rainfall are analyzed in this study using a series of two-dimensional equilibrium cloud-resolving model experiments forced by zonally-uniform,constant,large-scale zonal wind and zero large-scale vertical velocity.The analysis of thermally-related surface rainfall budget reveals that the model domain mean surface rain rate is primarily associated with the mean infrared cooling rate.Convective rainfall and transport of hydrometeor concentration from convective regions to raining stratiform regions corresponds to the heat divergence over convective regions,whereas stratiform rainfall corresponds to the transport of hydrometeor concentration from convective regions and heat divergence over raining stratiform regions.The heat divergence over convective regions is mainly balanced by the heat convergence over rainfall-free regions,which is,in turn,offset by the radiative cooling over rainfall-free regions.The sensitivity experiments of rainfall to the effects of sea surface temperature and cloud radiative and microphysical processes show that the sea surface temperature and cloud processes affect convective rainfall through the changes in infrared cooling rate over rainfall-free regions and transport rate of heat from convective regions to rainfall-free regions.

  14. Primary instabilities in convective cells due to nonuniform heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancho, A. M.; Herrero, H.; Burguete, J.

    1997-09-01

    We study a convection problem in a container with a surface open to the air and heated by a long wire placed at the bottom. Coupled buoyancy and thermocapillarity effects are taken into account. A basic convective state appears as soon as a temperature gradient with horizontal component different from zero is applied. It consists of two big rolls that fill the convective cell and are parallel to the heater. A numerical solution allows us to determine this basic state. A linear stability analysis on this solution is carried out. For different values of the applied temperature gradient the basic rolls undergo a stationary bifurcation. The thresholds depend on the fluid properties, on the geometry of the heater, and on the heat exchange on the free surface. This confirms the results obtained in recent experiments.

  15. Confinement and dynamical regulation in two-dimensional convective turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2003-01-01

    In this work the nature of confinement improvement implied by the self-consistent generation of mean flows in two-dimensional convective turbulence is studied. The confinement variations are linked to two distinct regulation mechanisms which are also shown to be at the origin of low-frequency bur......In this work the nature of confinement improvement implied by the self-consistent generation of mean flows in two-dimensional convective turbulence is studied. The confinement variations are linked to two distinct regulation mechanisms which are also shown to be at the origin of low......-frequency bursting in the fluctuation level and the convective heat flux integral, both resulting in a state of large-scale intermittency. The first one involves the control of convective transport by sheared mean flows. This regulation relies on the conservative transfer of kinetic energy from tilted fluctuations...... to the mean component of the flow. Bursting can also result from the quasi-linear modification of the linear instability drive which is the mean pressure gradient. For each bursting process the relevant zero-dimensional model equations are given. These are finally coupled in a minimal model of convection...

  16. Extended Subadiabatic Layer in Simulations of Overshooting Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käpylä, Petri J.; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Brandenburg, Axel; Arlt, Rainer; Käpylä, Maarit J.; Lagg, Andreas; Olspert, Nigul; Warnecke, Jörn

    2017-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of hydrodynamic overshooting convection in local Cartesian domains. We find that a substantial fraction of the lower part of the convection zone (CZ) is stably stratified according to the Schwarzschild criterion while the enthalpy flux is outward directed. This occurs when the heat conduction profile at the bottom of the CZ is smoothly varying, based either on a Kramers-like opacity prescription as a function of temperature and density or a static profile of a similar shape. We show that the subadiabatic layer arises due to nonlocal energy transport by buoyantly driven downflows in the upper parts of the CZ. Analysis of the force balance of the upflows and downflows confirms that convection is driven by cooling at the surface. We find that the commonly used prescription for the convective enthalpy flux being proportional to the negative entropy gradient does not hold in the stably stratified layers where the flux is positive. We demonstrate the existence of a non-gradient contribution to the enthalpy flux, which is estimated to be important throughout the convective layer. A quantitative analysis of downflows indicates a transition from a tree-like structure where smaller downdrafts merge into larger ones in the upper parts to a structure in the deeper parts where a height-independent number of strong downdrafts persist. This change of flow topology occurs when a substantial subadiabatic layer is present in the lower part of the CZ.

  17. Geothermal convection: a mechanism for dolomitization at Enewetak Atoll?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A.M.; Sanford, W.; Whitaker, F.; Smart, P.

    2000-01-01

    Geothermal convection in carbonate platforms could drive massive dolomitization by supplying mass transport of magnesium over long periods and at temperatures high enough to overcome kinetic limitations. Reactive-transport simulations based on Enewetak Atoll show dolomitization in a thin band at a permeability contrast near the base of the platform, which is consistent with field observations of dolomitized Eocene deposits. Dolomitization is predicted at approximately 6% per My at temperatures of 45–60°C, and complete dolomitization could be accomplished in ∼16 My. Calcium enrichment of pore fluids and upward transport of these fluids is established early, prior to 30 ky.

  18. Convective Weather Avoidance with Uncertain Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Sinan; Windhorst, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Convective weather events have a disruptive impact on air traffic both in terminal area and in en-route airspaces. In order to make sure that the national air transportation system is safe and efficient, it is essential to respond to convective weather events effectively. Traffic flow control initiatives in response to convective weather include ground delay, airborne delay, miles-in-trail restrictions as well as tactical and strategic rerouting. The rerouting initiatives can potentially increase traffic density and complexity in regions neighboring the convective weather activity. There is a need to perform rerouting in an intelligent and efficient way such that the disruptive effects of rerouting are minimized. An important area of research is to study the interaction of in-flight rerouting with traffic congestion or complexity and developing methods that quantitatively measure this interaction. Furthermore, it is necessary to find rerouting solutions that account for uncertainties in weather forecasts. These are important steps toward managing complexity during rerouting operations, and the paper is motivated by these research questions. An automated system is developed for rerouting air traffic in order to avoid convective weather regions during the 20- minute - 2-hour time horizon. Such a system is envisioned to work in concert with separation assurance (0 - 20-minute time horizon), and longer term air traffic management (2-hours and beyond) to provide a more comprehensive solution to complexity and safety management. In this study, weather is dynamic and uncertain; it is represented as regions of airspace that pilots are likely to avoid. Algorithms are implemented in an air traffic simulation environment to support the research study. The algorithms used are deterministic but periodically revise reroutes to account for weather forecast updates. In contrast to previous studies, in this study convective weather is represented as regions of airspace that pilots

  19. Quantifying the effects of resolution on convective organisation in cloud-system resolving simulations of West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bethan; Stier, Philip; Birch, Cathryn

    2016-04-01

    Convection transports moisture, momentum, heat and aerosols through the troposphere, and so the variability of convection is a major driver of global weather and climate. Convection in the tropics is organised across a wide range of spatiotemporal scales, from the few kilometres and hours associated with individual cloud systems, through the mesoscale of squall lines and cloud clusters, to the synoptic scale of tropical cyclones. Global and limited area models often fail to represent many of these scales of organisation, and the interaction between the scales remains poorly understood. In this work we devise a new metric to quantify the degree of convective organisation. We apply this metric to data from simulations of the West African Monsoon region from the CASCADE project, where simulations were performed using the Met Office Unified Model at 12 km horizontal grid length with parameterised convection, and at 12, 4 and 1.5 km horizontal grid lengths with permitted convection. This allows us to perform quantitative analysis of convective organisation across model configurations that experience the same large-scale state and differ only in horizontal grid length and representation of deep convection. We show that our analysis technique can be usefully applied to high-resolution, cloud-system resolving, large-domain simulations of tropical convection. We use our technique to quantify the effects of horizontal grid length and of convective parameterisation on the degree of organisation in the simulated convection, and investigate the spatiotemporal variability of the convective organisation in the different model configurations. We then determine relationships between the degree of convective organisation and precipitation. Further, we compare our results against equivalent parameters derived from satellite data to identify how well each of the model configurations performs against observations. Through the use of this new metric, this work provides a quantitative

  20. Effects of argon flow on impurities transport in a directional solidification furnace for silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zaoyang; Liu, Lijun; Ma, Wencheng; Kakimoto, Koichi

    2011-03-01

    A global simulation including coupled oxygen and carbon transport was carried out to study the argon flow effects on the impurities transport in a directional solidification furnace for silicon solar cells. The simulation is based on a fully coupled calculation of the thermal and flow fields in a furnace including argon gas flow and melt convection. Five chemical reactions are considered in the impurity transport model. The effects of both the argon flow rate and the furnace pressure were examined. It was found that the argon flow has an important effect on the silicon melt convection, which will further influence the evaporation characteristic of SiO at the melt free surface. The amount of SiO carried away by the argon flow increases with increase in the argon flow rate while the CO gas can be prevented from being transported to the melt free surface. There exists a peak value for the concentration of impurities in the furnace chamber regarding argon flow rate due to the correlation among SiO evaporated, reacted and taken away. The pressure also influences the impurity transport in the furnace by modifying the pattern of argon flow. The numerical results demonstrate a method to control the oxygen and carbon transport in a directional solidification furnace by adjusting the argon flow rate and the furnace pressure.

  1. Parameterization of convective clouds mesoscale convective systems, and convective-generated cirrus. Final report, September 15, 1990--October 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotton, W.R.

    1993-11-05

    The overall goal of this research is to develop a scheme to parameterize diabatic heating, moisture/water substance, and momentum transports, and precipitation from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) for use in general circulation models (GCMs). Our approach is to perform explicit cloud-resolving simulations of MCSs in the spirit of the GEWEX Cloud Systems Study (GCSS), by using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) developed at Colorado State University (CSU). We then perform statistical analyses (conditional sampling, ensemble-averages, trajectory analyses) of simulated MCSs to assist in fabricating a parameterization scheme, calibrating coefficients, and provide independent tests of the efficacy of the parameterization scheme. A cloud-resolving simulation of ordinary cumulonimbi forced by sea breeze fronts has been completed. Analysis of this case and comparison with parameterized convection simulations has resulted in a number of refinements in the scheme. Three three-dimensional, cloud-resolving simulations of MCSs have been completed. Statistical analyses of model-output data are being performed to assist in developing a parameterization scheme of MCSs in general circulation models.

  2. Naturalistic Elements in Sister Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳晖

    2007-01-01

    @@ Theodore Dreiser is considered to be a controversial writer.His first novel.Sister Carrie makes a new way of presenting re-ality.This paper discusses the naturalistic elements from the de-tailed description of the environment in that society.

  3. The hypohydrostatic rescaling and its impacts on modeling of atmospheric convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauluis, Olivier [New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York, NY (United States); Frierson, Dargan M.W. [University of Chicago, Department of Geophysical Sciences, Chicago, IL (United States); Garner, Stephen T.; Held, Isaac M. [Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory/NOAA, Princeton, NJ (United States); Vallis, Geoffrey K. [Princeton University, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2006-11-15

    The atmospheric circulation spans a wide range of spatial scales, including the planetary scale ({proportional_to}10,000 km), synoptic scale ({proportional_to}2,000 km), mesoscale ({proportional_to}200 km), and convective scales (< 20 km). The wide scale separation between convective motions, responsible for the vertical energy transport, and the planetary circulation, responsible for the meridional energy transport, has prevented explicit representation of convective motions in global atmospheric models. Kuang et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett. 32: L02809, 2005) have suggested a way to circumvent this limitation through a rescaling that they refer to as Diabatic Acceleration and REscaling (DARE). We focus here on a modified version of the procedure that we refer to as hypohydrostatic rescaling. These two strategies are equivalent for inviscid and adiabatic flow in the traditional meteorological setting in which the vertical component of the Coriolis acceleration is ignored, but they differ when atmospheric physics is taken into account. It is argued here that, while the hypohydrostatic rescaling preserves the dynamics of the planetary scale circulation, it increases the horizontal scale of convective motions. This drastically reduces the computational cost for explicit simulation of hypohydrostatic convection in a global atmospheric model. A key question is whether explicit simulations of hypohydrostatic convection could offer a valid alternative to convective parameterization in global models. To do so, radiative-convective equilibrium is simulated with a high-resolution non-hydrostatic model using different model resolutions and values of the rescaling parameter. When the behavior of hypohydrostatic convection is compared with coarse-resolution simulations of convection, the latter set of simulations reproduce more accurately the result from a reference high-resolution simulation. This is particularly true for the convective velocity and cloud ice distributions

  4. Prokaryotic dynamics and heterotrophic metabolism in a deep convection site of Eastern Mediterranean Sea (the Southern Adriatic Pit)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzaro, M.; La Ferla, R.; Maimone, G.; Monticelli, L. S.; Zaccone, R.; Civitarese, G.

    2012-08-01

    We report on investigations of prokaryotic abundance, biomass, extracellular enzymatic activity, prokaryotic heterotrophic production and respiration in the full water column (˜1200 m) of a deep convection site (the Southern Adriatic Pit), carried out on six cruises in 2006-2008. Prokaryotic abundance (PA) varied vertically and temporally and ranged from 1.2 to 20.4×105 cell ml-1. Cell volumes, generally increased with depth; the lowest mean cell volume was observed in a period with no active convective process (Feb-07) and the highest in a period of stratification (Jun-08) following the convection process occurred in Feb-08. Prokaryotic biomass decreased with the depth and was related with both seasonal cycles of organic matter and hydrological processes. The picophytoplankton ranged in the upper layer (UL) from 0.089 to 10.71×104 cell ml-1. Cells were also recorded till 500 m depth in Feb-08 and this finding could be linked to water convection occurred in the Southern Adriatic Pit in that month. In UL the variations of enzymatic activities as well as leucine-aminopeptidase/ß-glucosidase ratio showed a seasonal trend probably linked to the productive processes of the photic layer. An inverse relation between alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) and phosphate concentrations was found (APA=0.0003PO4-1.7714, R2=0.333, Psupply of preformed C transported within the deep water masses. Overall, in 2007 when no convective phenomenon was observed, the variability of prokaryotic metabolism was governed by the seasonal cycle of the organic matter, while in Nov-06 and Jun-08 the dynamics of deep water ventilation influenced the trend along the water column of many microbial parameters. The yearly trophic balance of the study site appeared to move towards autotrophy only in UL, whilst in the whole water column, the prokaryotic carbon demand exceeded POC availability rained down from euphotic zone. This mismatch was balanced by the DOC entrapped in the "younger waters" of

  5. Magnetic Helicity in a Cyclic Convective Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Zhang, Mei; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is a fundamental agent for magnetic self-organization in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamos. As a conserved quantity in ideal MHD, it establishes a strict topological coupling between large and small-scale magnetic fields. The generation of magnetic fields on scales larger than the velocity field is linked to an upscale transfer of magnetic helicity, either locally in spectral space as in the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in MHD turbulence or non-locally, as in the turbulent alpha-effect of mean-field dynamo theory. Thus, understanding the generation, transport, and dissipation of magnetic helicity is an essential prerequisite to understanding manifestations of magnetic self-organization in the solar dynamo, including sunspots, the prominent dipole and quadrupole moments, and the 22-year magnetic activity cycle. We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in a convective dynamo model that exhibits regular magnetic cycles. The cycle is marked by coherent bands of toroidal field that persist within the convection zone and that are antisymmetric about the equator. When these toriodal bands interact across the equator, it initiates a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that contributes to the reversal of the dipole moment. Thus, the polar field reversals are preceeded by a brief reversal of the subsurface magnetic helicity. There is some evidence that the Sun may exhibit a similar magnetic helicity reversal prior to its polar field reversals.

  6. Superstructures in Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Richard; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-11-01

    We study the heat transfer and the flow structures in Rayleigh-Bénard convection as function of the Rayleigh number Ra and the aspect ratio. We consider three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) in a laterally periodic geometry with aspect ratios up to Γ =Lx /Lz =Ly /Lz = 64 at Ra =108 , where Lx and Ly indicate the horizontal domain sizes and Lz the height. We find that the heat transport convergences relatively quickly with increasing aspect ratio. In contrast, we find that the large scale flow structures change significantly with increasing aspect ratio due to the formation of superstructures. For example, at Ra =108 we find the formation of basically only one large scale circulation roll in boxes with an aspect ratio up to 8. For larger boxes we find the formation of multiple of these extremely large convection rolls. We illustrate this by movies of horizontal cross-section of the bulk and the boundary layer and analyze them by using spectra in the boundary layer and the bulk. In addition, we study the effect of the large scale flow structures on the mean and higher order temperature and velocity statistics in the boundary layer and the bulk by comparing the simulation results obtained in different aspect ratio boxes. Foundation for fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), Netherlands Center for Multiscale Catalytic Energy Conversion (MCEC), SURFsara, Gauss Large Scale project.

  7. Properties of Carry Value Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakanta Pal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carry Value Transformation (CVT is a model of discrete deterministic dynamical system. In the present study, it has been proved that (1 the sum of any two nonnegative integers is the same as the sum of their CVT and XOR values. (2 the number of iterations leading to either CVT=0 or XOR=0 does not exceed the maximum of the lengths of the two addenda expressed as binary strings. A similar process of addition of modified Carry Value Transformation (MCVT and XOR requires a maximum of two iterations for MCVT to be zero. (3 an equivalence relation is shown to exist on Z×Z which divides the CV table into disjoint equivalence classes.

  8. Hall Effect on Bénard Convection of Compressible Viscoelastic Fluid through Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation made on the effect of Hall currents on thermal instability of a compressible Walter’s B′ elasticoviscous fluid through porous medium is considered. The analysis is carried out within the framework of linear stability theory and normal mode technique. For the case of stationary convection, Hall currents and compressibility have postponed the onset of convection through porous medium. Moreover, medium permeability hasten postpone the onset of convection, and magnetic field has duel character on the onset of convection. The critical Rayleigh numbers and the wave numbers of the associated disturbances for the onset of instability as stationary convection have been obtained and the behavior of various parameters on critical thermal Rayleigh numbers has been depicted graphically. The magnetic field, Hall currents found to introduce oscillatory modes, in the absence of these effects the principle of exchange of stabilities is valid.

  9. Rapid PCR thermocycling using microscale thermal convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muddu, Radha; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2011-03-05

    Many molecular biology assays depend in some way on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify an initially dilute target DNA sample to a detectable concentration level. But the design of conventional PCR thermocycling hardware, predominantly based on massive metal heating blocks whose temperature is regulated by thermoelectric heaters, severely limits the achievable reaction speed(1). Considerable electrical power is also required to repeatedly heat and cool the reagent mixture, limiting the ability to deploy these instruments in a portable format. Thermal convection has emerged as a promising alternative thermocycling approach that has the potential to overcome these limitations(2-9). Convective flows are an everyday occurrence in a diverse array of settings ranging from the Earth's atmosphere, oceans, and interior, to decorative and colorful lava lamps. Fluid motion is initiated in the same way in each case: a buoyancy driven instability arises when a confined volume of fluid is subjected to a spatial temperature gradient. These same phenomena offer an attractive way to perform PCR thermocycling. By applying a static temperature gradient across an appropriately designed reactor geometry, a continuous circulatory flow can be established that will repeatedly transport PCR reagents through temperature zones associated with the denaturing, annealing, and extension stages of the reaction (Figure 1). Thermocycling can therefore be actuated in a pseudo-isothermal manner by simply holding two opposing surfaces at fixed temperatures, completely eliminating the need to repeatedly heat and cool the instrument. One of the main challenges facing design of convective thermocyclers is the need to precisely control the spatial velocity and temperature distributions within the reactor to ensure that the reagents sequentially occupy the correct temperature zones for a sufficient period of time(10,11). Here we describe results of our efforts to probe the full 3-D velocity and

  10. A numerical study of natural convection in eccentric spherical annuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Angel; Malaga, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    A fluid between two spheres, concentric or not, at different temperatures will flow in the presence of a constant gravitational force. Although there is no possible hydrostatic state, energy transport is dominated by diffusion if temperature difference between the spheres is small enough. By the use of a full three-dimensional thermal lattice Boltzmann model we study the transition between the conductive, the steady convective, and the unsteady convective regimes. We use the concentric case to validate the results by comparing with experiments and numerical simulations found in the literature, and then we extend our numerical experiments to the eccentric case to observe the general behavior of the different regimes. We analyze the energy transport characterized by the relation between Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers as well as the arising flow patterns. This work was partially supported by UNAM-DGAPA-PAPIIT Grant Number IN115216.

  11. Transient Convection, Diffusion, and Adsorption in Surface-Based Biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rasmus; Bruus, Henrik; Callisen, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and computational investigation of convection, diffusion, and adsorption in surface-based biosensors. In particular, we study the transport dynamics in a model geometry of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. The work, however, is equally relevant for other...... microfluidic surface-based biosensors, operating under flow conditions. A widely adopted approximate quasi-steady theory to capture convective and diffusive mass transport is reviewed, and an analytical solution is presented. An expression of the Damköhler number is derived in terms of the nondimensional...... concentration to the maximum surface capacity is critical for reliable use of the quasi-steady theory. Finally, our results provide users of surface-based biosensors with a tool for correcting experimentally obtained adsorption rate constants....

  12. A nonlinear model for rotationally constrained convection with Ekman pumping

    CERN Document Server

    Julien, Keith; Calkins, Michael A; Knobloch, Edgar; Marti, Philippe; Stellmach, Stephan; Vasil, Geoffrey M

    2016-01-01

    It is a well established result of linear theory that the influence of differing mechanical boundary conditions, i.e., stress-free or no-slip, on the primary instability in rotating convection becomes asymptotically small in the limit of rapid rotation. This is accounted for by the diminishing impact of the viscous stresses exerted within Ekman boundary layers and the associated vertical momentum transport by Ekman pumping. By contrast, in the nonlinear regime recent experiments and supporting simulations are now providing evidence that the efficiency of heat transport remains strongly influenced by Ekman pumping in the rapidly rotating limit. In this paper, a reduced model is developed for the case of low Rossby number convection in a plane layer geometry with no-slip upper and lower boundaries held at fixed temperatures. A complete description of the dynamics requires the existence of three distinct regions within the fluid layer: a geostrophically balanced interior where fluid motions are predominately ali...

  13. First steps toward a self-consistent model of differential rotation in the tachocline and convection zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, M. E.

    2003-04-01

    The tachocline is characterized by large gradient Richardson number and a fluid-dynamical parameter regime like that of the Earth's stratosphere. It follows that any turbulence present will be layerwise-two-dimensional and potential-vorticity-transporting, not momentum-transporting. Such regimes are well understood from terrestrial ozone-layer studies. In particular, if horizontal Reynolds stresses are significant in such regimes, then they are unlikely to conform to any "horizontal eddy viscosity" paradigm (as fully explained in McIntyre 2003, Gough Festschrift paper at www.atm.damtp.cam.ac.uk/people/mem/). It follows, as argued in Gough and McIntyre 1998 (same website, and Nature 394, 755) that the helioseismically-inferred near-solid rotation beneath the tachocline can only be due to a poloidal, probably primordial dipolar, interior magnetic field. Gough and McIntyre estimated its strength as very roughly of order 1 gauss. The existence of this field allows several other pieces of the convection-zone/tachocline jigsaw puzzle to fall into place. They include "tachocline sound-speed anomaly" and the confinement of the tachocline ventilation circulation, which must be gyroscopically pumped from above by the turbulent Reynolds and Maxwell stresses interior to the convection zone and which would therefore burrow further downwards in the absence of the interior poloidal field. The talk will summarize these ideas and try to carry them forward by formulating and discussing the simplest tenable model of the dynamical coupling between convection zone and tachocline, taking account of magneto-rotational instabilities.

  14. A stochastic parameterization for deep convection using cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, L.; Steinheimer, M.; Bechtold, P.; Geleyn, J.

    2012-12-01

    Cumulus parameterizations used in most operational weather and climate models today are based on the mass-flux concept which took form in the early 1970's. In such schemes it is assumed that a unique relationship exists between the ensemble-average of the sub-grid convection, and the instantaneous state of the atmosphere in a vertical grid box column. However, such a relationship is unlikely to be described by a simple deterministic function (Palmer, 2011). Thus, because of the statistical nature of the parameterization challenge, it has been recognized by the community that it is important to introduce stochastic elements to the parameterizations (for instance: Plant and Craig, 2008, Khouider et al. 2010, Frenkel et al. 2011, Bentsson et al. 2011, but the list is far from exhaustive). There are undoubtedly many ways in which stochastisity can enter new developments. In this study we use a two-way interacting cellular automata (CA), as its intrinsic nature possesses many qualities interesting for deep convection parameterization. In the one-dimensional entraining plume approach, there is no parameterization of horizontal transport of heat, moisture or momentum due to cumulus convection. In reality, mass transport due to gravity waves that propagate in the horizontal can trigger new convection, important for the organization of deep convection (Huang, 1988). The self-organizational characteristics of the CA allows for lateral communication between adjacent NWP model grid-boxes, and temporal memory. Thus the CA scheme used in this study contain three interesting components for representation of cumulus convection, which are not present in the traditional one-dimensional bulk entraining plume method: horizontal communication, memory and stochastisity. The scheme is implemented in the high resolution regional NWP model ALARO, and simulations show enhanced organization of convective activity along squall-lines. Probabilistic evaluation demonstrate an enhanced spread in

  15. Plasma convection in the magnetotail lobes: statistical results from Cluster EDI measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Haaland

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A major part of the plasma in the Earth's magnetotail is populated through transport of plasma from the solar wind via the magnetotail lobes. In this paper, we present a statistical study of plasma convection in the lobes for different directions of the interplanetary magnetic field and for different geomagnetic disturbance levels. The data set used in this study consists of roughly 340 000 one-minute vector measurements of the plasma convection from the Cluster Electron Drift Instrument (EDI obtained during the period February 2001 to June 2007. The results show that both convection magnitude and direction are largely controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. For a southward IMF, there is a strong convection towards the central plasma sheet with convection velocities around 10 km s−1. During periods of northward IMF, the lobe convection is almost stagnant. A By dominated IMF causes a rotation of the convection patterns in the tail with an oppositely directed dawn-dusk component of the convection for the northern and southern lobe. Our results also show that there is an overall persistent duskward component, which is most likely a result of conductivity gradients in the footpoints of the magnetic field lines in the ionosphere.

  16. Evidence for Tropopause Layer Moistening by Convection During CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, A.; Fridlind, A.; Jensen, E.; Miloshevich, L.; Heymsfield, G.; McGill, M.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements and analysis of the impact of deep convection on tropopause layer moisture are easily confounded by difficulties making precise observations with sufficient spatial coverage before and after convective events and difficulties distinguishing between changes due to local convection versus large-scale advection. The interactions between cloud microphysics and dynamics in the convective transport of moisture into the tropopause layer also result in a sufficiently complex and poorly characterized system to allow for considerable freedom in theoretical models of stratosphere-troposphere exchange. In this work we perform detailed large-eddy simulations with an explicit cloud microphysics model to study the impact of deep convection on tropopause layer moisture profiles observed over southern Florida during CRYSTALFACE. For four days during the campaign (July 11, 16, 28, and 29) we initialize a 100-km square domain with temperature and moisture profiles measured prior to convection at the PARSL ground site, and initiate convection with a warm bubble that produces an anvil at peak elevations in agreement with lidar and radar observations on that day. Comparing the moisture field after the anvils decay with the initial state, we find that convection predominantly moistens the tropopause layer (as defined by minimum temperature and minimum potential temperature lapse rate), although some drying is also predicted in localized layers. We will also present results of sensitivity tests designed to separate the roles of cloud microphysics and dynamics.

  17. Mantle convection and plate tectonics: toward an integrated physical and chemical theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackley

    2000-06-16

    Plate tectonics and convection of the solid, rocky mantle are responsible for transporting heat out of Earth. However, the physics of plate tectonics is poorly understood; other planets do not exhibit it. Recent seismic evidence for convection and mixing throughout the mantle seems at odds with the chemical composition of erupted magmas requiring the presence of several chemically distinct reservoirs within the mantle. There has been rapid progress on these two problems, with the emergence of the first self-consistent models of plate tectonics and mantle convection, along with new geochemical models that may be consistent with seismic and dynamical constraints on mantle structure.

  18. Solutions manual and computer programs for physical and computational aspects of convective heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1989-01-01

    This book is designed to accompany Physical and Computational Aspects of Convective Heat Transfer by T Cebeci and P Bradshaw and contains solutions to the exercises and computer programs for the numerical methods contained in that book Physical and Computational Aspects of Convective Heat Transfer begins with a thorough discussion of the physical aspects of convective heat transfer and presents in some detail the partial differential equations governing the transport of thermal energy in various types of flows The book is intended for senior undergraduate and graduate students of aeronautical, chemical, civil and mechanical engineering It can also serve as a reference for the practitioner

  19. DOMINANT PHYSICAL PROCESSES ASSOCIATED WITH PHASE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SURFACE RAINFALL AND CONVECTIVE AVAILABLE POTENTIAL ENERGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofan LI

    2009-01-01

    A lag correlation analysis is conducted with a 21-day TOGA COARE cloud-resolving model simulation data to identify the phase relation between surface rainfall and convective available potential energy (CAPE) and associated physical processes. The analysis shows that the maximum negative lag correlations between the model domain mean CAPE and rainfall occurs around lag hour 6. The minimum mean CAPE lags mean and convective rainfall through the vapor condensation and depositions, water vapor convergence, and heat divergence whereas it lags stratiform rainfall via the transport of hydrometeor concentration from convective regions to raining stratiform regions, vapor condensation and depositions, water vapor storage, and heat divergence over raining stratiform regions.

  20. Topology Optimization for Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    2011-01-01

    This report deals with the topology optimization of convection problems.That is, the aim of the project is to develop, implement and examine topology optimization of purely thermal and coupled thermomechanical problems,when the design-dependent eects of convection are taken into consideration.......This is done by the use of a self-programmed FORTRAN-code, which builds on an existing 2D-plane thermomechanical nite element code implementing during the course `41525 FEM-Heavy'. The topology optimizationfeatures have been implemented from scratch, and allows the program to optimize elastostatic mechanical...

  1. Model inter-comparison on transport and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamaschi, P. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra (Italy); Meirink, J.F. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute KNMI, De Bilt (Netherlands); Mueller, J.F. [Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Brussels (Belgium); Koerner, S.; Heimann, M. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemie, Jena (Germany); Bousquet, P.; Ramonet, M. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environment LSCE, Gif sur Yvette (France); Dlugokencky, E.J. [NOAA Earth Science Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division, Boulder, CO (United States); Kaminski, U. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Meteorologisches Observatorium Hohenpeissenberg (Germany); Vecchi, R.; Marcazzan, G. [Istituto di Fisica Generale Applicata, Universita' degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Meinhardt, F. [Umweltbundesamt, Messstelle Schauinsland, Kirchzarten (Germany); Sartorius, H. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Freiburg (Germany); Zahorowski, W. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia)

    2006-07-01

    A comprehensive inter-comparison of 5 atmospheric chemistry transport models (TM5, TM4, TM3, IMAGES, and LMDZ) has been performed. The main objective was to analyze differences in model transport, in particular vertical mixing (boundary layer and convective transport), synoptic variations, and large scale global circulation (including inter-hemispheric exchange and stratospheric tropospheric exchange (STE)). For this purpose simulations of various tracers with very different atmospheric lifetimes {tau} have been carried out: 222Rn ({tau} = 3.8 days), SF6 ({tau} {approx}3000 years), and CH4 ({tau} = {approx}9 years), using prescribed boundary conditions for all models. Furthermore, OH fields from various model simulations with full chemistry have been compared.

  2. Joule-Thomson effect and internal convection heat transfer in turbulent He II flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walstrom, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    The temperature rise in highly turbulent He II flowing in tubing was measured in the temperature range 1.6-2.1 K. The effect of internal convection heat transport on the predicted temperature profiles is calculated from the two-fluid model with mutual friction. The model predictions are in good agreement with the measurements, provided that the pressure gradient term is retained in the expression for internal convection heat flow.

  3. Analysis on a Severe Convective Weather Process in Summer in Beihai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The research aimed to analyze a strong convective weather process in Beihai in summer. [Method] By using Micaps conventional data and the single station site information of Beihai, radar data, a strong convective weather process in Beihai City in August, 2010 was analyzed. [Result] 850 and 700 hPa cyclonic low-pressure circulation in the north of Vietnam and Beibu Gulf coast was favorable for the transportation of Bengal Bay southwest airflow, which provided the sufficient water vapor condition ...

  4. Joule-Thomson effect and internal convection heat transfer in turbulent He II flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walstrom, P. L.

    1988-03-01

    The temperature rise in highly turbulent He II flowing in tubing was measured in the temperature range 1.6-2.1 K. The effect of internal convection heat transport on the predicted temperature profiles is calculated from the two-fluid model with mutual friction. The model predictions are in good agreement with the measurements, provided that the pressure gradient term is retained in the expression for internal convection heat flow.

  5. Thermophoresis in natural convection with variable properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraj, S.; Dinesh, K. K.; Pillai, K. L.

    The present paper deals with thermophoresis in natural convection with variable properties for a laminar flow over a cold vertical flat plate. Variation of properties like density, viscosity and thermal conductivity with temperature is included in the formulation of the problem. Selection of components for the property ratio is made by fitting the property values between the desired temperature limits. For a selected fluid, Prandtl number variation with temperature is neglected and the Prandtl number corresponding to film temperature is used for the analysis. Solution is carried out by finite difference method. Variation of wall concentration and wall flux along the length of plate is studied. The effect of thermophoretic coefficient on wall concentration is also studied. Results are presented in the form of graphs. The result is compared with similarity solution by Runge-Kutta method and found to be accurate upto second decimal place.

  6. Role of Deep Convection in Establishing the Isotopic Composition of Water Vapor in the Tropical Transition Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jamison A.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.

    2006-01-01

    The transport of H2O and HDO within deep convection is investigated with 3-D large eddy simulations (LES) using bin microphysics. The lofting and sublimation of HDO-rich ice invalidate the Rayleigh fractionation model of isotopologue distribution within deep convection. Bootstrapping the correlation of the ratio of HDO to H2O (deltaD) to water vapor mixing ratio (q(sub v)) through a sequence of convective events produced non-Rayleigh correlations resembling observations. These results support two mechanisms for stratospheric entry. Deep convection can inject air with water vapor of stratospheric character directly into the tropical transition layer (TTL). Alternatively, moister air detraining from convection may be dehydrated via cirrus formation n the TTL to produce stratospheric water vapor. Significant production of subsaturated air in the TTL via convective dehydration is not observed in these simulations, nor is it necessary to resolve the stratospheric isotope paradox.

  7. Role of Deep Convection in Establishing the Isotopic Composition of Water Vapor in the Tropical Transition Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jamison A.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.

    2006-01-01

    The transport of H2O and HDO within deep convection is investigated with 3-D large eddy simulations (LES) using bin microphysics. The lofting and sublimation of HDO-rich ice invalidate the Rayleigh fractionation model of isotopologue distribution within deep convection. Bootstrapping the correlation of the ratio of HDO to H2O (deltaD) to water vapor mixing ratio (q(sub v)) through a sequence of convective events produced non-Rayleigh correlations resembling observations. These results support two mechanisms for stratospheric entry. Deep convection can inject air with water vapor of stratospheric character directly into the tropical transition layer (TTL). Alternatively, moister air detraining from convection may be dehydrated via cirrus formation n the TTL to produce stratospheric water vapor. Significant production of subsaturated air in the TTL via convective dehydration is not observed in these simulations, nor is it necessary to resolve the stratospheric isotope paradox.

  8. A self-consistent dynamo model for fully convective stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rakesh Kumar; Christensen, Ulrich; Morin, Julien; Gastine, Thomas; Reiners, Ansgar; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Wolk, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    The tachocline region inside the Sun, where the rigidly rotating radiative core meets the differentially rotating convection zone, is thought to be crucial for generating the Sun's magnetic field. Low-mass fully convective stars do not possess a tachocline and were originally expected to generate only weak small-scale magnetic fields. Observations, however, have painted a different picture of magnetism in rapidly-rotating fully convective stars: (1) Zeeman broadening measurements revealed average surface field of several kiloGauss (kG), which is similar to the typical field strength found in sunspots. (2) Zeeman-Doppler-Imaging (ZDI) technique discovered large-scale magnetic fields with a morphology often similar to the Earth's dipole-dominated field. (3) Comparison of Zeeman broadening and ZDI results showed that more than 80% of the magnetic flux resides at small scales. So far, theoretical and computer simulation efforts have not been able to reproduce these features simultaneously. Here we present a self-consistent global model of magnetic field generation in low-mass fully convective stars. A distributed dynamo working in the model spontaneously produces a dipole-dominated surface magnetic field of the observed strength. The interaction of this field with the turbulent convection in outer layers shreds it, producing small-scale fields that carry most of the magnetic flux. The ZDI technique applied to synthetic spectropolarimetric data based on our model recovers most of the large-scale field. Our model simultaneously reproduces the morphology and magnitude of the large-scale field as well as the magnitude of the small-scale field observed on low-mass fully convective stars.

  9. Properties of shallow convection from Large-Eddie simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denby, Leif; Herzog, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Utilizing Large-Eddie simulations (LES) of isolated individual convective clouds in an idealised conditionally unstable atmosphere and large-domain LES simulations of radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE) from the RICO measuring campaign (Rauber et al. 2007), vertical profiles of individual clouds and statistical properties of the cloud ensemble have been extracted and compared against predictions by an 1D entraining parcel model and against the cloud-ensemble model of the CCFM (Wagner and Graf 2010) convection scheme (which comprises a solution of a Lotka-Volterra population dynamics system). For the simulations of isolated clouds it was possible to achieve agreement with the entraining parcel model when simulations were carried out with 2D axisymmetry and the entrainment rate was prescribed using an entraining profile estimated from LES simulation using a passive tracer (in place of the traditional Morton- Turner entrainment rate parameterisation), this agreement was not achieved when comparing against 3D simulations. Integrating the entraining parcel model using the horizontal mean environment profile of the RCE simulation (and so the vertical profile as would be predicted by a climate model) it was not possible to achieve the variation in cloud-top height seen in the RCE simulation, even when greatly increasing the entrainment rate. However, if the near-environment of a convective cloud was used as the environmental profile the variation in cloud-top height was achieved (by varying the cloud-base state variables within values extracted from RCE simulation). This indicates that the near-cloud environment is significantly different that the horizontal mean environment and must be taken into account if the effect of entrainment is to be correctly captured in parameterisations for convection. Finally, size-distribution of convective clouds extracted from RCE simulation showed qualitative agreement with predictions of CCFM's spectrum model.

  10. Nature, theory and modelling of geophysical convective planetary boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical convective planetary boundary layers (CPBLs) are still poorly reproduced in oceanographic, hydrological and meteorological models. Besides the mean flow and usual shear-generated turbulence, CPBLs involve two types of motion disregarded in conventional theories: 'anarchy turbulence' comprised of the buoyancy-driven plumes, merging to form larger plumes instead of breaking down, as postulated in conventional theory (Zilitinkevich, 1973), large-scale organised structures fed by the potential energy of unstable stratification through inverse energy transfer in convective turbulence (and performing non-local transports irrespective of mean gradients of transporting properties). C-PBLs are strongly mixed and go on growing as long as the boundary layer remains unstable. Penetration of the mixed layer into the weakly turbulent, stably stratified free flow causes turbulent transports through the CPBL outer boundary. The proposed theory, taking into account the above listed features of CPBL, is based on the following recent developments: prognostic CPBL-depth equation in combination with diagnostic algorithm for turbulence fluxes at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries (Zilitinkevich, 1991, 2012, 2013; Zilitinkevich et al., 2006, 2012), deterministic model of self-organised convective structures combined with statistical turbulence-closure model of turbulence in the CPBL core (Zilitinkevich, 2013). It is demonstrated that the overall vertical transports are performed mostly by turbulence in the surface layer and entrainment layer (at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries) and mostly by organised structures in the CPBL core (Hellsten and Zilitinkevich, 2013). Principal difference between structural and turbulent mixing plays an important role in a number of practical problems: transport and dispersion of admixtures, microphysics of fogs and clouds, etc. The surface-layer turbulence in atmospheric and marine CPBLs is strongly enhanced by the velocity shears in

  11. Uncertainties in atmospheric chemistry modelling due to convection parameterisations and subsequent scavenging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tost

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Moist convection in global modelling contributes significantly to the transport of energy, momentum, water and trace gases and aerosols within the troposphere. Since convective clouds are on a scale too small to be resolved in a global model their effects have to be parameterised. However, the whole process of moist convection and especially its parameterisations are associated with uncertainties. In contrast to previous studies on the impact of convection on trace gases, which had commonly neglected the convective transport for some or all compounds, we investigate this issue by examining simulations with five different convection schemes. This permits an uncertainty analysis due to the process formulation, without the inconsistencies inherent in entirely neglecting deep convection or convective tracer transport for one or more tracers.

    Both the simulated mass fluxes and tracer distributions are analysed. Investigating the distributions of compounds with different characteristics, e.g., lifetime, chemical reactivity, solubility and source distributions, some differences can be attributed directly to the transport of these compounds, whereas others are more related to indirect effects, such as the transport of precursors, chemical reactivity in certain regions, and sink processes.

    The model simulation data are compared with the average regional profiles of several measurement campaigns, and in detail with two campaigns in fall and winter 2005 in Suriname and Australia, respectively.

    The shorter-lived a compound is, the larger the differences and consequently the uncertainty due to the convection parameterisation are, as long as it is not completely controlled by local production that is independent of convection and its impacts (e.g. water vapour changes. Whereas for long-lived compounds like CO or O3 the mean differences between the simulations are less than 25%, differences for short-lived compounds reach

  12. How Large Scale Flows in the Solar Convection Zone may Influence Solar Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, D. H.

    2004-01-01

    Large scale flows within the solar convection zone are the primary drivers of the Sun s magnetic activity cycle. Differential rotation can amplify the magnetic field and convert poloidal fields into toroidal fields. Poleward meridional flow near the surface can carry magnetic flux that reverses the magnetic poles and can convert toroidal fields into poloidal fields. The deeper, equatorward meridional flow can carry magnetic flux toward the equator where it can reconnect with oppositely directed fields in the other hemisphere. These axisymmetric flows are themselves driven by large scale convective motions. The effects of the Sun s rotation on convection produce velocity correlations that can maintain the differential rotation and meridional circulation. These convective motions can influence solar activity themselves by shaping the large-scale magnetic field pattern. While considerable theoretical advances have been made toward understanding these large scale flows, outstanding problems in matching theory to observations still remain.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS OF THE INTENSIFICATION CONVECTIVE DRYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Gavrilenkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Identified and analyzed the relationship of the intensity convective drying and air pollution emissions of heat. The ways to reduce the thermal pollution of the atmosphere at convective drying.

  14. Convection in stellar envelopes a changing paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Spruit, H C

    1996-01-01

    Progress in the theory of stellar convection over the past decade is reviewed. The similarities and differences between convection in stellar envelopes and laboratory convection at high Rayleigh numbers are discussed. Direct numerical simulation of the solar surface layers, with no other input than atomic physics, the equations of hydrodynamics and radiative transfer is now capable of reproducing the observed heat flux, convection velocities, granulation patterns and line profiles with remarkably accuracy. These results show that convection in stellar envelopes is an essentially non-local process, being driven by cooling at the surface. This differs distinctly from the traditional view of stellar convection in terms of local concepts such as cascades of eddies in a mean superadiabatic gradient. The consequences this has for our physical picture of processes in the convective envelope are illustrated with the problems of sunspot heat flux blocking, the eruption of magnetic flux from the base of the convection ...

  15. Chaotic dynamics of corotating magnetospheric convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Danny; Mu, Jian-Lin

    1994-01-01

    The corotating plasma convection system of the Jovian magnetosphere is analyzed. The macroscopic (mhd) model introduced by Summers and Mu, (1992) that incorporates the effects of microdiffusion is extended by including previously neglected density effects. We reduce the governing partial differential equations to a third-order ordinary differential system by the Galerkin technique of mode truncation. We carry out such a severe truncation partly in the interests of tractability, and leave open the question of the efficacy of adding additional modes. Exhaustive numerical integrations are carried out to calculate the long-term solutions, and we discover that a rich array of plasma motions is possible, dependent on the value of the height-integrated ionospheric Pederson conductivity Sigma. If Sigma is less than a certain critical value Sigma(sub c), then plasma motion can be expected to be chaotic (or periodic), while if Sigma is greater than Sigma(sub c), then steady state convection is expected. In the former case, whether the plasma motion is chaotic or periodic (and, if periodic, the magnitude of the period) can be very sensitive to the value of Sigma. The value of Sigma(sub c), which is a function of a parameter q that occurs in the assumed form of the stationary radial profile (varies as L(exp -q) of the plasma mass per unit magnetic flux, lies well within the accepted range of values of Sigma for Jupiter, i.e. Sigma greater than or equal to 0.1 mho and less than or equal to 10 mho.

  16. Adiabatic and diabatic aerosol transport to the Jungfraujoch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugauer, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Furger, M.; Jost, D.T.; Schwikowski, M.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Synoptic scale vertical motion, here detected by the geopotential height of the 500 hPa surface, mainly accounts for the aerosol transport to the Jungfraujoch in winter. In summer, diabatic convection provides the dominant vertical transport mechanism. Nevertheless, synoptic scale adiabatic motion still determines whether diabatic convection can develop. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  17. "Ultimate state" of two-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection between free-slip fixed temperature boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Whitehead, Jared P

    2011-01-01

    Rigorous upper limits on the vertical heat transport in two dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection between stress-free isothermal boundaries are derived from the Boussinesq approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The Nusselt number Nu is bounded in terms of the Rayleigh number Ra according to $Nu \\leq 0.2295 Ra^{5/12}$ uniformly in the Prandtl number Pr. This Nusselt number scaling challenges some theoretical arguments regarding the asymptotic high Rayleigh number heat transport by turbulent convection.

  18. Effects of external environment on thermocapillary convection of high prandtl number fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ruquan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations have been carried out to investigate the influence of external environment on thermocapillary convection in high Prandtl number (Pr=68 liquid. The geometric model of physical problem is that the the liquid bridge surrounded by ambient air under zero or ground gravity. The interface velocity, temperature, heat flux and flow pattern in the liquid bridge are presented and discussed under different conditions by changing the external environment. The buoyancy convection produces a symmetrical vortex in the liquid bridge. The ambient air affects the distributions of the temperature velocity and heat flux on the interface by changing the thermocapillary convection.

  19. Representation of Boundary Layer Moisture Transport in Cloud-Resolving Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeng, C. L.; Arakawa, A.

    2012-12-01

    One of the important roles of the PBL is to transport moisture from the surface to the cloud layer. However, how this transport process can be accounted for in cloud-resolving models (CRMs) is not sufficiently clear and has rarely been examined. A typical CRM can resolve the bulk feature of large convection systems but not the small-scale convection and turbulence motions that carry a large portion of the moisture fluxes. We use a large-eddy simulation of a tropical deep convection system as a benchmark to examine the subgrid-scale (SGS) moisture transport into a cloud system. First we show that most of the PBL moisture transport to the cloud layer occurs in small areas under low-level updrafts, with rain, or under thick clouds. To represent this spatial distribution of the moisture transport in CRMs, we propose and (a priori) test an updraft-downdraft scheme, which expresses the SGS flux in terms of the differences between the mean SGS updraft-downdraft properties. We show that this SGS scheme works extremely well for CRMs with a 1 to 10 km horizontal grid spacing. The closure issue is to estimate the mean SGS updraft-downdraft properties in terms of the CRM resolved flow field.he figure shows the contours of SGS latent heat fluxes at z~300m with a cutoff width of 4 km. The top panel is retrieved from a LES of a tropical deep convection system and bottom panel calculated from the updraft-downdraft scheme with A1=0.4 and the mean SGS updraft-downdraft properties diagnosed from the LES.

  20. How stratified is mantle convection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puster, Peter; Jordan, Thomas H.

    1997-04-01

    We quantify the flow stratification in the Earth's mid-mantle (600-1500 km) in terms of a stratification index for the vertical mass flux, Sƒ (z) = 1 - ƒ(z) / ƒref (z), in which the reference value ƒref(z) approximates the local flux at depth z expected for unstratified convection (Sƒ=0). Although this flux stratification index cannot be directly constrained by observations, we show from a series of two-dimensional convection simulations that its value can be related to a thermal stratification index ST(Z) defined in terms of the radial correlation length of the temperature-perturbation field δT(z, Ω). ST is a good proxy for Sƒ at low stratifications (SƒUniformitarian Principle. The bound obtained here from global tomography is consistent with local seismological evidence for slab flux into the lower mantle; however, the total material flux has to be significantly greater (by a factor of 2-3) than that due to slabs alone. A stratification index, Sƒ≲0.2, is sufficient to exclude many stratified convection models still under active consideration, including most forms of chemical layering between the upper and lower mantle, as well as the more extreme versions of avalanching convection governed by a strong endothermic phase change.

  1. Natural convection from circular cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Boetcher, Sandra K S

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a concise, yet thorough, reference for all heat transfer coefficient correlations and data for all types of cylinders: vertical, horizontal, and inclined. This book covers all natural convection heat transfer laws for vertical and inclined cylinders and is an excellent resource for engineers working in the area of heat transfer engineering.

  2. Numerical simulation of natural convection in a differentially heated tall enclosure using a spectral element method

    OpenAIRE

    Pitz, DB; Chew, JW

    2015-01-01

    Natural convection in differentially heated enclosures is a benchmark problem used to investigate the physics of buoyant flows and to validate numerical methods. Such configurations are also of interest in engineering applications such as cooling of electronic components and air flow around buildings. In this work a spectral element method is used to carry out direct numerical simulations of natural convection in a tall enclosure of aspect ratio 4 with isothermal vertical walls and adiabatic ...

  3. Nonadiabatic analysis of strange-modes in hot massive stars with time-dependent convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonoi Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We carry out nonadiabatic analysis of strange-modes in hot massive stars with time-dependent convection (TDC. We find that the instability of the modes excited at the Fe bump is weaker with TDC than with frozen-in convection (FC. But the instability still remains with TDC, and could be a possible candidate for the trigger of luminous blue variable (LBV phenomena.

  4. Subcritical convection in an internally heated layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Linyan; Zikanov, Oleg

    2017-06-01

    Thermal convection in a horizontal layer with uniform internal heating and stress-free constant-temperature boundaries is analyzed numerically. The work is motivated by the questions arising in the development of liquid metal batteries, in which convection is induced by the Joule heating of electrolyte. It is demonstrated that three-dimensional convection cells exist at subcritical Rayleigh numbers.

  5. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-01

    , combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.

  6. Rotating thermal convection at very large Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stephan; van Gils, Dennis; Ahlers, Guenter; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2016-11-01

    The large scale thermal convection systems in geo- and astrophysics are usually influenced by Coriolis forces caused by the rotation of their celestial bodies. To better understand the influence of rotation on the convective flow field and the heat transport at these conditions, we study Rayleigh-Bénard convection, using pressurized sulfur hexaflouride (SF6) at up to 19 bars in a cylinder of diameter D=1.12 m and a height of L=2.24 m. The gas is heated from below and cooled from above and the convection cell sits on a rotating table inside a large pressure vessel (the "Uboot of Göttingen"). With this setup Rayleigh numbers of up to Ra =1015 can be reached, while Ekman numbers as low as Ek =10-8 are possible. The Prandtl number in these experiment is kept constant at Pr = 0 . 8 . We report on heat flux measurements (expressed by the Nusselt number Nu) as well as measurements from more than 150 temperature probes inside the flow. We thank the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for financial support through SFB963: "Astrophysical Flow Instabilities and Turbulence". The work of GA was supported in part by the US National Science Foundation through Grant DMR11-58514.

  7. ON THE VIGOR OF MANTLE CONVECTION IN SUPER-EARTHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagoshi, Takehiro [Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3173-25 Showa-machi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0001 (Japan); Tachinami, Chihiro [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Kameyama, Masanori [Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Ogawa, Masaki, E-mail: miyagoshi@jamstec.go.jp, E-mail: ctchnm.geo@gmail.com, E-mail: kameyama@sci.ehime-u.ac.jp, E-mail: cmaogawa@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth Sciences and Astronomy, University of Tokyo at Komaba, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    Numerical models are presented to clarify how adiabatic compression affects thermal convection in the mantle of super-Earths ten times the Earth's mass. The viscosity strongly depends on temperature, and the Rayleigh number is much higher than that of the Earth's mantle. The strong effect of adiabatic compression reduces the activity of mantle convection; hot plumes ascending from the bottom of the mantle lose their thermal buoyancy in the middle of the mantle owing to adiabatic decompression, and do not reach the surface. A thick lithosphere, as thick as 0.1 times the depth of the mantle, develops along the surface boundary, and the efficiency of convective heat transport measured by the Nusselt number is reduced by a factor of about four compared with the Nusselt number for thermal convection of incompressible fluid. The strong effect of adiabatic decompression is likely to inhibit hot spot volcanism on the surface and is also likely to affect the thermal history of the mantle, and hence, the generation of magnetic field in super-Earths.

  8. Stability of Unsteady Mixed Convection in a Horizontal Concentric Annulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Kahveci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, stability of unsteady mixed convection in a horizontal annulus between two concentric cylinders was investigated numerically. The surfaces of the cylinders were considered to be at fixed temperatures and it was assumed that the hot inner cylinder is rotating at a constant angular velocity. The buoyancy forces were formulated utilizing the Boussinesq approximation. The governing equations of fluid flow and heat transfer in the annulus were solved with a finite element method for different values of the geometric (radius ratio and transport parameters (Rayleigh number and Reynolds number. Development of the convective flow and heat transfer was expressed by the average Nusselt number for the outer cylinder. The results show that, for a narrow gap annulus, convective flow induces flow bifurcation and becomes unstable for high values of the Rayleigh number. Flow becomes more unstable with an increase in the Reynolds number. For a wide gap annulus, flow is stable for all values of the Rayleigh number if the rotation effects are small. On the other hand, convective flow becomes unstable for the modest and high values of the Ra number with an increase in the Re number.

  9. Evidence of Convective Redistribution of Carbon Monoxide in Aura Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyin, Michael; Douglass, Anne; Schoeberl, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Vertical convective transport is a key element of the tropospheric circulation. Convection lofts air from the boundary layer into the free troposphere, allowing surface emissions to travel much further, and altering the rate of chemical processes such as ozone production. This study uses satellite observations to focus on the convective transport of CO from the boundary layer to the mid and upper troposphere. Our hypothesis is that strong convection associated with high rain rate regions leads to a correlation between mid level and upper level CO amounts. We first test this hypothesis using the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model. We find the correlation is robust and increases as the precipitation rate (the strength of convection) increases. We next examine three years of CO profiles from the Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instruments aboard EOS Aura. Rain rates are taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B-42 multi-satellite product. Again we find a correlation between mid-level and upper tropospheric CO, which increases with rain rate. Our result shows the critical importance of tropical convection in coupling vertical levels of the troposphere in the transport of trace gases. The effect is seen most clearly in strong convective regions such as the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone.

  10. Mining key elements for severe convection prediction based on CNN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Pan, Ning; Zhang, Changan; Sha, Hongzhou; Zhang, Bolei; Liu, Liang; Zhang, Meng

    2017-04-01

    Severe convective weather is a kind of weather disasters accompanied by heavy rainfall, gust wind, hail, etc. Along with recent developments on remote sensing and numerical modeling, there are high-volume and long-term observational and modeling data accumulated to capture massive severe convective events over particular areas and time periods. With those high-volume and high-variety weather data, most of the existing studies and methods carry out the dynamical laws, cause analysis, potential rule study, and prediction enhancement by utilizing the governing equations from fluid dynamics and thermodynamics. In this study, a key-element mining method is proposed for severe convection prediction based on convolution neural network (CNN). It aims to identify the key areas and key elements from huge amounts of historical weather data including conventional measurements, weather radar, satellite, so as numerical modeling and/or reanalysis data. Under this manner, the machine-learning based method could help the human forecasters on their decision-making on operational weather forecasts on severe convective weathers by extracting key information from the real-time and historical weather big data. In this paper, it first utilizes computer vision technology to complete the data preprocessing work of the meteorological variables. Then, it utilizes the information such as radar map and expert knowledge to annotate all images automatically. And finally, by using CNN model, it cloud analyze and evaluate each weather elements (e.g., particular variables, patterns, features, etc.), and identify key areas of those critical weather elements, then help forecasters quickly screen out the key elements from huge amounts of observation data by current weather conditions. Based on the rich weather measurement and model data (up to 10 years) over Fujian province in China, where the severe convective weathers are very active during the summer months, experimental tests are conducted with

  11. Hydra-TH Extensions for Multispecies and Thermosolutal Convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stagg, Alan K [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States; Yoon, Su-Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) work conducted for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 Milestone THM.CFD.P11.02: Hydra-TH Extensions for Multispecies and Thermosolutal Convection. A critical requirement for modeling reactor thermal hydraulics is to account for species transport within the fluid. In particular, this capability is needed for modeling transport and diffusion of boric acid within water for emergency, reactivity-control scenarios. To support this need, a species transport capability has been implemented in Hydra-TH for binary systems (for example, solute within a solvent). A species transport equation is solved for the species (solute) mass fraction, and both thermal and solutal buoyancy effects are handled with specification of a Boussinesq body force. Species boundary conditions can be specified with a Dirichlet condition on mass fraction or a Neumann condition on diffusion flux. To enable enhanced species/fluid mixing in turbulent flow, the molecular diffusivity for the binary system is augmented with a turbulent diffusivity in the species transport calculation. The new capabilities are demonstrated by comparison of Hydra-TH calculations to the analytic solution for a thermosolutal convection problem, and excellent agreement is obtained.

  12. Intraseasonal Variations in Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2009-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20oN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  13. Benard convection in the presence of micro particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadji, Layachi

    2009-11-01

    We study Benard convection in water containing a small volume fraction of micro particles. The investigation is motivated by recent experiments of natural convection of aqueous suspensions [1] conducted at an average temperature of 20 degrees C in which the authors report a decrease in Nusselt number compared to pure water. This effect has been attributed to density inversion in the base state taking place near the lower boundary caused by the sedimentation of the aluminum oxide particles, the density of which is greater than that of water. We attempt to elucidate these findings by carrying a stability analysis on a model of convection for a liquid suspension having a nonlinear equation of state. The model accounts for the coupled effects of Brownian motion, sedimentation and thermophoresis. The balance of the latter yields a nonlinear base profile for the concentration of particles. Density inversion occurs near either the lower or the top boundary depending on the balance between sedimentation and thermophoresis and on the size and density of the particles. Parameter range for the onset and stability of the resulting double layer convection is given and the implications the results may have on the heat transfer in nanofluids are discussed.[4pt] [1] B. H. Chang, A.F. Mills, E. Hernandez, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 51 (2008) 1332-1341.

  14. Heat transfers in porous media. Conduction, convection, radiant transfer; Transferts de chaleur dans les milieux poreux. Conduction, convection, rayonnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bories, S.; Mojtabi, A.; Prat, M.; Quintard, M. [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, 31 (France)

    2008-10-15

    Multiple physico-chemical and transport phenomena take place in porous media. The study of these phenomena requires the knowledge of fluid storage, transfer and mechanical properties of these media. Like all polyphasic heterogenous systems, these properties depend on the morphology of the matrix and of the phenomena interacting in the different phases. This makes the heat transfers in porous media a particularly huge field of researches. This article makes a synthesis of these researches. Content: 1 - classification and characterization of porous media; 2 - modeling of transfer phenomena; 3 - heat transfer by conduction: concept of equivalent thermal conductivity (ETC), modeling of conduction heat transfer, ETC determination; 4 - heat transfer by convection: modeling of convection heat transfer, natural convection (in confined media, along surfaces or impermeable bodies immersed in a saturated porous medium), forced and mixed convection; 5 - radiant heat transfer: energy status equation, approximate solutions of the radiant transfer equation, use of the approximate solutions: case of fibrous insulating materials; 6 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  15. On-road-vehicle carrying capacity for urban transport management——Taking Wuhan for example%基于在驶量环境承载力的城市交通管理——以武汉市为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王真; 许翠琳; 王亮

    2012-01-01

    As a part of urban complex ecological system,urban traffic system function as the "blood system" of a city.The traffic carrying capacity could influence the urban development and living environment.This paper introduces an on-road-vehicle carrying capacity model based on road,energy and atmospheric environment analysis.And it has applied to Wuhan.The results show that the maximum on-road-vehicle is 407 thousand in Wuhan within the limitation of road,energy and air quality;NOx capacity is the main limit of the transportation system in Wuhan.%城市交通系统是城市复合生态系统中的一部分,城市交通承载力的大小影响城市发展的速度与生活环境.构建了由路网资源、燃油供给和大气环境模块组成的基于"在驶量承载力"的城市交通承载力宏观定量模型,并选择武汉市城区作为案例.研究得到2009年武汉市城区交通承载力为40.7万辆,NOx容量是制约武汉市未来交通发展的主要限制因子.

  16. Terminology for mass transport and exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassingthwaighte, J B; Chinard, F P; Crone, C

    1986-01-01

    Virtually all fields of physiological research now encompass various aspects of solute transport by convection, diffusion, and permeation across membranes. Accordingly, this set of terms, symbols, definitions, and units is proposed as a means of clear communication among workers in the physiologi......Virtually all fields of physiological research now encompass various aspects of solute transport by convection, diffusion, and permeation across membranes. Accordingly, this set of terms, symbols, definitions, and units is proposed as a means of clear communication among workers...

  17. Generalized Convective Quasi-Equilibrium Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Plant, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Arakawa and Schubert proposed convective quasi-equilibrium as a basic principle for closing their spectrum mass-flux convection parameterization. In deriving this principle, they show that the cloud work function is a key variable that controls the growth of convection. Thus, this closure hypothesis imposes a steadiness of the cloud work function tendency. This presentation shows how this principle can be generalized so that it can also encompasses both the CAPE and the moisture-convergence closures. Note that the majority of the current mass-flux convection parameterization invokes a CAPE closure, whereas the moisture-convergence closure was extremely popular historically. This generalization, in turn, includes both closures as special cases of convective quasi-equilibrium. This generalization further suggests wide range of alternative possibilities for convective closure. In general, a vertical integral of any function depending on both large-scale and convective-scale variables can be adopted as an alternative closure variables, leading to an analogous formulation as Arakawa and Schubert's convective quasi-equilibrium formulation. Among those, probably the most fascinating possibility is to take a vertical integral of the convective-scale moisture for the closure. Use of a convective-scale variable for closure has a particular appeal by not suffering from a loss of predictability of any large-scale variables. That is a main problem with any of the current convective closures, not only for the moisture-convergence based closure as often asserted.

  18. Modeling and Simulation of Nanoparticle Transport in Multiphase Flows in Porous Media: CO2 Sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-09-03

    Geological storage of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in deep saline aquifers has recently received tremendous attention in the scientific literature. Injected CO2 plume buoyantly accumulates at the top part of the deep aquifer under a sealing cap rock, and some concern that the high-pressure CO2 could breach the seal rock. However, CO2 will diffuse into the brine underneath and generate a slightly denser fluid that may induce instability and convective mixing. Onset times of instability and convective mixing performance depend on the physical properties of the rock and fluids, such as permeability and density contrast. The novel idea is to adding nanoparticles to the injected CO2 to increase density contrast between the CO2-rich brine and the underlying resident brine and, consequently, decrease onset time of instability and increase convective mixing. As far as it goes, only few works address the issues related to mathematical and numerical modeling aspects of the nanoparticles transport phenomena in CO2 storages. In the current work, we will present mathematical models to describe the nanoparticles transport carried by injected CO2 in porous media. Buoyancy and capillary forces as well as Brownian diffusion are important to be considered in the model. IMplicit Pressure Explicit Saturation-Concentration (IMPESC) scheme is used and a numerical simulator is developed to simulate the nanoparticles transport in CO2 storages.

  19. The effect of water to mantle rheology and convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändli, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Water has a significant influence to mantle rheology and therefore also to the convection of the mantle and the plate tectonics. The viscosity of the mantle can be decreased by up to two orders of magnitude when water is present. Another effect of the water is the change in the solidus of the mantle and therefore the melting regime. These two effects of water in the mantle have a significant influence on mantle convection and plate tectonics. The influx of water to the mantle is driven by plate tectonics as wet oceanic lithosphere is subducted into the mantle, then water is brought back to the lithosphere and the surface by MOR-, arc- and hotspot volcanism. Studies show that the amount of water in the mantle is about three times bigger than the water in the oceans. To model this water cycle multiple additions to our simulation code StagYY are necessary. A water diffusion to complement the water transport due to advection, and water dependent viscosity law are implemented. This additions to StagYY will be followed by implementations of a pressure-temperature law for maximum water content, additional transport mechanisms for water, water dependent solidus functions and the implementation of recent values for plate velocities and water capacities in subducting slabs. This will allow us to research the influence of water to the mantle convection and rheology over the past 200Ma.

  20. Engineering photochemical smog through convection towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, S.; Prueitt, M.L.; Bossert, J.E.; Mroz, E.J.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jacobson, M.Z.; Turco, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Dept.

    1995-02-01

    Reverse convection towers have attracted attention as a medium for cleansing modern cities. Evaporation of an aqueous mist injected at the tower opening could generate electrical power by creating descent, and simultaneously scavenge unsightly and unhealthful particulates. The study offered here assesses the influence to tower water droplets on the photochemical component of Los Angeles type smog. The primary radical chain initiator OH is likely removed into aqueous phases well within the residence time of air in the tower, and then reacts away rapidly. Organics do not dissolve, but nighttime hydrolysis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} depletes the nitrogen oxides. A lack of HOx would slow hydrocarbon oxidation and so also ozone production. Lowering of NOx would also alter ozone production rates, but the direction is uncertain. SO{sub 2} is available in sufficient quantities in some urban areas to react with stable oxidants, and if seawater were the source of the mist, the high pH would lead to fast sulfur oxidation kinetics. With an accommodation coefficient of 10{sup {minus}3}, however, ozone may not enter the aqueous phase efficiently. Even if ozone is destroyed or its production suppressed, photochemical recovery times are on the order of hours, so that tower processing must be centered on a narrow midday time window. The cost of building the number of structures necessary for this brief turnover could be prohibitive. The increase in humidity accompanying mist evaporation could be controlled with condensers, but might otherwise counteract visibility enhancements by recreating aqueous aerosols. Quantification of the divergent forcings convection towers must exert upon the cityscape would call for coupled three dimensional modeling of transport, microphysics, and photochemistry. 112 refs.

  1. Large-scale thermal convection of viscous fluids in a faulted system: 3D test case for numerical codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Fabien; Cacace, Mauro; Fischer, Thomas; Kolditz, Olaf; Wang, Wenqing; Watanabe, Norihiro

    2017-04-01

    In contrast to simple homogeneous 1D and 2D systems, no appropriate analytical solutions exist to test onset of thermal convection against numerical models of complex 3D systems that account for variable fluid density and viscosity as well as permeability heterogeneity (e.g. presence of faults). Owing to the importance of thermal convection for the transport of energy and minerals, the development of a benchmark test for density/viscosity driven flow is crucial to ensure that the applied numerical models accurately simulate the physical processes at hands. The presented study proposes a 3D test case for the simulation of thermal convection in a faulted system that accounts for temperature dependent fluid density and viscosity. The linear stability analysis recently developed by Malkovsky and Magri (2016) is used to estimate the critical Rayleigh number above which thermal convection of viscous fluids is triggered. The numerical simulations are carried out using the finite element technique. OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012) and Moose (Gaston et al., 2009) results are compared to those obtained using the commercial software FEFLOW (Diersch, 2014) to test the ability of widely applied codes in matching both the critical Rayleigh number and the dynamical features of convective processes. The methodology and Rayleigh expressions given in this study can be applied to any numerical model that deals with 3D geothermal processes in faulted basins as by example the Tiberas Basin (Magri et al., 2016). References Kolditz, O., Bauer, S., Bilke, L., Böttcher, N., Delfs, J. O., Fischer, T., U. J. Görke, T. Kalbacher, G. Kosakowski, McDermott, C. I., Park, C. H., Radu, F., Rink, K., Shao, H., Shao, H.B., Sun, F., Sun, Y., Sun, A., Singh, K., Taron, J., Walther, M., Wang,W., Watanabe, N., Wu, Y., Xie, M., Xu, W., Zehner, B., 2012. OpenGeoSys: an open-source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical/chemical (THM/C) processes in porous media. Environmental

  2. High-resolution simulations of shallow and deep convection over land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, J. P.; Teixeira, J.; Soares, P. M.; Miranda, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    The GCSS WG4 (Grabowski, 2006) case was chosen to study the transition from shallow to deep convection over land. The case was based on an idealization of observations made during the TRMM-LBA (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission - Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere experiment) in Rondonia, Brazil, on February 23, 1999. The case considered is a daytime convective development over land, which starts with the growth of a mixed boundary layer, evolving to shallow convective clouds with a later transition from shallow to deep precipitating convection. High resolution simulations of this case have been performed using the French community non-hydrostatic model MesoNH. Different model setups were used, with an emphasis on the sensitivity to model resolution, domain size and to the choice of microphysical parametrizations. A single column model (SCM) is also being developed in order to perform a simulation of the same case. The SCM model includes prognostic equations for the wind components, the thermodynamic variables and the turbulent kinetic energy. The sub-grid turbulent and convective fluxes are parameterized using the Eddy- Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach (EDMF) which combines the effects of local and non-local transport in a unified scheme. The comparison between the SCM and the Cloud Resolving Model will provide clues to the improvement of the EDMF framework in order to include the effects of deep convection, since currently it is only suitable to represent dry and shallow cumulus convection.

  3. The role of radiation in organizing convection in weak temperature gradient simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, Sharon L.; Sentić, Stipo; Herman, Michael J.

    2016-03-01

    Using a cloud system resolving model with the large scale parameterized by the weak temperature gradient approximation, we investigated the influence of interactive versus noninteractive radiation on the characteristics of convection and convective organization. The characteristics of convecting environments are insensitive to whether radiation is interactive compared to when it is not. This is not the case for nonconvecting environments; interactive radiative cooling profiles show strong cooling at the top of the boundary layer which induces a boundary layer circulation that ultimately exports moist entropy (or analogously moist static energy) from dry domains. This upgradient transport is associated with a negative gross moist stability, and it is analogous to boundary layer circulations in radiative convective equilibrium simulations of convective self-aggregation. This only occurs when radiation cools interactively. Whether radiation is static or interactive also affects the existence of multiple equilibria-steady states which either support precipitating convection or which remain completely dry depending on the initial moisture profile. Interactive radiation drastically increases the range of parameters which permit multiple equilibria compared to static radiation; this is consistent with the observation that self-aggregation in radiative-convective equilibrium simulations is more readily attained with interactive radiation. However, the existence of multiple equilibria in absence of interactive radiation suggests that other mechanisms may result in organization.

  4. Experimental investigation of horizontal convection

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz Córdoba, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Fluid circulation driven by buoyancy forces due to a thermal gradient on a horizontal boundary, known as horizontal convection, is experimentally studied. For that purpose, a methacrylate box with inner dimensions 300x150x150 mm3 (LxWxH) whose bottom is composed by a heat exchanger and a printed circuit board is lled with water. The heat exchanger provides a uniform temperature boundary condition while the printed circuit board provides a boundary condition of uniform heat ...

  5. Ice Nucleation in Deep Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew; Stevens, David; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The processes controlling production of ice crystals in deep, rapidly ascending convective columns are poorly understood due to the difficulties involved with either modeling or in situ sampling of these violent clouds. A large number of ice crystals are no doubt generated when droplets freeze at about -40 C. However, at higher levels, these crystals are likely depleted due to precipitation and detrainment. As the ice surface area decreases, the relative humidity can increase well above ice saturation, resulting in bursts of ice nucleation. We will present simulations of these processes using a large-eddy simulation model with detailed microphysics. Size bins are included for aerosols, liquid droplets, ice crystals, and mixed-phase (ice/liquid) hydrometers. Microphysical processes simulated include droplet activation, freezing, melting, homogeneous freezing of sulfate aerosols, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. We are focusing on the importance of ice nucleation events in the upper part of the cloud at temperatures below -40 C. We will show that the ultimate evolution of the cloud in this region (and the anvil produced by the convection) is sensitive to these ice nucleation events, and hence to the composition of upper tropospheric aerosols that get entrained into the convective column.

  6. A Generalized Evolution Criterion in Nonequilibrium Convective Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiyanagi, Masakazu; Nisizima, Kunisuke

    1989-04-01

    A general evolution criterion, applicable to transport processes such as the conduction of heat and mass diffusion, is obtained as a direct version of the Le Chatelier-Braun principle for stationary states. The present theory is not based on any radical departure from the conventional one. The generalized theory is made determinate by proposing the balance equations for extensive thermodynamic variables which will reflect the character of convective systems under the assumption of local equilibrium. As a consequence of the introduction of source terms in the balance equations, there appear additional terms in the expression of the local entropy production, which are bilinear in terms of the intensive variables and the sources. In the present paper, we show that we can construct a dissipation function for such general cases, in which the premises of the Glansdorff-Prigogine theory are accumulated. The new dissipation function permits us to formulate a generalized evolution criterion for convective systems.

  7. Convective heat flux in a laser-heated thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P. K. S.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis is performed to estimate the convective heating to the wall in a laser-heated thruster on the basis of a solution of the laminar boundary-layer equations with variable transport properties. A local similiarity approximation is used, and it is assumed that the gas phase is in equilibrium. For the thruster described by Wu (1976), the temperature and pressure distributions along the nozzle are obtained from the core calculation. The similarity solutions and heat flux are obtained from the freestream conditions of the boundary layer, in order to determine if it is necessary to couple the boundary losses directly to the core calculation. In addition, the effects of mass injection on the convective heat transfer across the boundary layer with large density-viscosity product gradient are examined.

  8. Transitions in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitz, S

    2010-01-01

    Numerical simulations of rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection are presented for both no slip and free slip boundaries. The goal is to find a criterion distinguishing convective flows dominated by the Coriolis force from those nearly unaffected by rotation. If one uses heat transport as an indicator of which regime the flow is in, one finds that the transition between the flow regimes always occurs at the same value of a certain combination of Reynolds, Prandtl and Ekman numbers for both boundary conditions. If on the other hand one uses the helicity of the velocity field to identify flows nearly independent of rotation, one finds the transition at a different location in parameter space.

  9. Stability-Controllable Second-Order Difference Scheme for Convection Term

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    A new finite difference scheme-SCSD scheme has been propsed based on CD( Central Difference) scheme and SUD(Second-order Upwind Difference)scheme.Its basic feature is controllable convective stability and always second-order accuracy(Stability-Controllable Second-order Difference),It has been proven that this Scheme is convective-Stable if the grid Peclet number|PΔ|≤2/β(0≤β≤1).The advantage of this new scheme has been discussed based on the modified wavenumber analysis by using Fourier transform.This scheme has been applied to the 2-D incompressible convective-diffusive equation and 2-D compressible Euler equation,and corresponding finite difference equations have been derived.Numerical examples of 1-D Burgers equation and 2-D transport equation have been presented to show its good accuracy and controllable convective stability.

  10. Countering Solutal Buoyant Convection with High Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2002-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemist, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitant, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in microgravity, we have been able to dramatically effect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. We postulate that limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately positioning the crystal growth cell so that the magnetic susceptibility

  11. Using Strong Magnetic Fields to Control Solutal Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in microgravity , we have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. We postulate that limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately positioning the crystal growth cell so that the magnetic susceptibility

  12. Infections That Pets Carry (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Infections That Pets Carry KidsHealth > For Parents > Infections That Pets Carry ... how to protect your family from infections. How Pets Spread Infections Like people, all animals carry germs . ...

  13. Detailed cloud resolving model simulations of the impacts of Saharan air layer dust on tropical deep convection – Part 1: Dust acts as ice nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Gong

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies suggest that the Saharan Air Layer (SAL, an elevated layer (850–500 hPa of Saharan air and mineral dust, has strong impacts on the microphysical as well as dynamical properties of tropical deep convective cloud systems along its track. In this case study, numerical simulations using a two-dimensional Detailed Cloud Resolving Model (DCRM were carried out to investigate the dust-cloud interactions in the tropical deep convection, focusing on the dust role as Ice Nuclei (IN.

    The simulations showed that mineral dust considerably enhanced heterogeneous nucleation and freezing at temperatures warmer than −40 °C, resulting in more ice hydrometeors number concentration and reduced precipitating size of ice particles. Because of the lower in the saturation over ice as well as more droplet freezing, total latent heating increased, and consequently the updraft velocity was stronger.

    On the other hand, the increased ice deposition consumed more water vapor at middle troposphere, which induces a competition for water vapor between heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing and nucleation. As a result, dust suppressed the homogeneous droplet freezing and nucleation due to the heterogeneous droplet freezing and the weakened transport of water vapor at lower stratosphere, respectively. These effects led to decreased number concentration of ice cloud particles in the upper troposphere, and consequently lowered the cloud top height during the stratus precipitating stage.

    Acting as IN, mineral dust also influenced precipitation in deep convection. It initiated earlier the collection because dust-related heterogeneous nucleation and freezing at middle troposphere occur earlier than homogeneous nucleation at higher altitudes. Nevertheless, the convective precipitation was suppressed by reduced collection of large graupel particles and insufficient fallout related to decreased sizes of precipitating ice hydrometeors

  14. Condensation-inhibited convection in hydrogen-rich atmospheres . Stability against double-diffusive processes and thermal profiles for Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, Jérémy; Selsis, Franck; Hersant, Franck; Guillot, Tristan

    2017-02-01

    In an atmosphere, a cloud condensation region is characterized by a strong vertical gradient in the abundance of the related condensing species. On Earth, the ensuing gradient of mean molecular weight has relatively few dynamical consequences because N2 is heavier than water vapor, so that only the release of latent heat significantly impacts convection. On the contrary, in a hydrogen dominated atmosphere (e.g., giant planets), all condensing species are significantly heavier than the background gas. This can stabilize the atmosphere against convection near a cloud deck if the enrichment in the given species exceeds a critical threshold. This raises two questions. What is transporting energy in such a stabilized layer, and how affected can the thermal profile of giant planets be? To answer these questions, we first carry out a linear analysis of the convective and double-diffusive instabilities in a condensable medium showing that an efficient condensation can suppress double-diffusive convection. This suggests that a stable radiative layer can form near a cloud condensation level, leading to an increase in the temperature of the deep adiabat. Then, we investigate the impact of the condensation of the most abundant species (water) with a steady-state atmosphere model. Compared to standard models, the temperature increase can reach several hundred degrees at the quenching depth of key chemical tracers. Overall, this effect could have many implications for our understanding of the dynamical and chemical state of the atmosphere of giant planets, for their future observations (with Juno for example), and for their internal evolution.

  15. Modeling of thermosolutal convection during Bridgman solidification of semiconductor alloys in relation with experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelian, Carmen; Duffar, Thierry

    2004-05-01

    Thermosolutal convection during vertical Bridgman directional solidification of Ga 1- xIn xSb alloys has been studied by numerical simulation. The transient analysis of heat, momentum and species transport has been performed by using the finite element code FIDAP ®. In the case of vertical Bridgman configuration, the thermal convection is driven by the radial temperature gradients. The solute (InSb) rejected at the solid-liquid interface, which is heavier than the GaSb component, damps the thermally driven convection. The solutal effect on the melt convection has been analyzed for low ( x=0.01) and high ( x=0.1) doped Ga 1- xIn xSb alloys. It is found that the damping effect is negligible for Ga 0.99In 0.01Sb alloy grown at low pulling rates ( V= 1 μm/s ), but cannot be neglected if the pulling rate is increased. In the case of concentrated alloys, the low level of convection intensity leads to an increase of radial segregation and interface curvature during the whole growth process as also shown by experiments. The effect of solutal buoyancy force on the melt convection is analyzed for the horizontal Bridgman configuration under microgravity conditions. An inverse but lower solutal effect on the melt convection, as compared with vertical Bridgman arrangement, is observed. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data, and show that convective transport can be observed even for low (2×10 -6g0) residual gravity levels.

  16. Analysis of strange-mode instability with time-dependent convection in hot massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sonoi, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    We carry out nonadiabatic analysis of strange-modes in hot massive stars with time-dependent convection (TDC) for the first time. Although convective luminosity in envelopes of hot massive stars is not as dominative as in stars near the red edge of the classical Cepheid instability strip in the Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, we have found that the strange-mode instability can be affected by the treatment of convection. However, existence of the instability around and over the Humphreys-Davidson (H-D) limit is independent of the treatment. This implies that the strange-mode instability could be responsible for the lack of observed stars over the H-D limit regardless of uncertainties on convection theories.

  17. Thermal turbulent convection: thermal plumes and fluctuations; Convection thermique turbulente: panaches et fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibert, M

    2007-10-15

    In this study we investigate the phenomenon of thermal turbulent convection in new and unprecedented ways. The first system we studied experimentally is an infinite vertical channel, where a constant vertical mean gradient of temperature exists. Inside this channel the average mass flux is null. The results obtained from our measurements reveal that the flow is mainly inertial; indeed the dissipative coefficients (here the viscosity) play a role only to define a coherence length L. This length is the distance over which the thermal plumes can be considered as 'free falling' objects. The horizontal transport, of heat and momentum, is entirely due to fluctuations. The associated 'mixing length' is small compared to the channel width. In the other hand, the vertical heat transport is due to coherent structures: the heat plumes. Those objects were also investigated in a Lagrangian study of the flow in the bulk of a Rayleigh-Benard cell. The probe, which has the same density as the fluid used in this experiment, is a sphere of 2 cm in diameter with embarked thermometers and radio-emitter. The heat plumes transport it, which allows a statistical study of such objects. (author)

  18. Mechanisms for convection triggering by cold pools

    CERN Document Server

    Torri, Giuseppe; Tian, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cold pools are fundamental ingredients of deep convection. They contribute to organizing the sub-cloud layer and are considered key elements in triggering convective cells. It was long known that this could happen mechanically, through lifting by the cold pools' fronts. More recently, it has been suggested that convection could also be triggered thermodynamically, by accumulation of moisture around the edges of cold pools. A method based on Lagrangian tracking is here proposed to disentangle the signatures of both forcings and quantify their importance in a given environment. Results from a simulation of radiative-convective equilibrium over the ocean show that parcels reach their level of free convection through a combination of both forcings, each being dominant at different stages of the ascent. Mechanical forcing is an important player in lifting parcels from the surface, whereas thermodynamic forcing reduces the inhibition encountered by parcels before they reach their level of free convection.

  19. The Spectral Amplitude of Stellar Convection and Its Scaling in the High-Rayleigh-number Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Hindman, Bradley W.

    2016-02-01

    Convection plays a central role in the dynamics of any stellar interior, and yet its operation remains largely hidden from direct observation. As a result, much of our understanding concerning stellar convection necessarily derives from theoretical and computational models. The Sun is, however, exceptional in that regard. The wealth of observational data afforded by its proximity provides a unique test bed for comparing convection models against observations. When such comparisons are carried out, surprising inconsistencies between those models and observations become apparent. Both photospheric and helioseismic measurements suggest that convection simulations may overestimate convective flow speeds on large spatial scales. Moreover, many solar convection simulations have difficulty reproducing the observed solar differential rotation owing to this apparent overestimation. We present a series of three-dimensional stellar convection simulations designed to examine how the amplitude and spectral distribution of convective flows are established within a star’s interior. While these simulations are nonmagnetic and nonrotating in nature, they demonstrate two robust phenomena. When run with sufficiently high Rayleigh number, the integrated kinetic energy of the convection becomes effectively independent of thermal diffusion, but the spectral distribution of that kinetic energy remains sensitive to both of these quantities. A simulation that has converged to a diffusion-independent value of kinetic energy will divide that energy between spatial scales such that low-wavenumber power is overestimated and high-wavenumber power is underestimated relative to a comparable system possessing higher Rayleigh number. We discuss the implications of these results in light of the current inconsistencies between models and observations.

  20. Effect of thermosolutal convection on directional solidification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suresh V Garimella; James E Simpson

    2001-02-01

    The impact of thermosolutal convection during directional solidification is explored via results of numerical investigations. Results from fully transient numerical simulations of directional solidification in a differentially heated cavity under terrestrial conditions and Bridgman crystal growth in space are discussed. The pivotal role of both thermal and solutal convection in the solidification process is illustrated by examining these two cases. In particular, radial and longitudinal macrosegregation resulting from this thermosolutal convection is discussed.

  1. Application of upwind convective finite elements to practical conduction/forced convection thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    Three practical problems in conduction/forced convection heat transfer are analyzed using a simplified engineering formulation of convective finite elements. Upwind and conventional finite element solutions are compared for steady-state and transient applications.

  2. Rotating convection in a viscoelastic magnetic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, L.M. [Departamento de Fíisica y Matemática Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31080 Pamplona (Spain); Laroze, D., E-mail: dlarozen@uta.cl [Instituto de Alta Investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D, Arica (Chile); Díaz, P. [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad de La Frontera, Casilla 54 D, Temuco (Chile); Martinez-Mardones, J. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile); Mancini, H.L. [Departamento de Fíisica y Matemática Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31080 Pamplona (Spain)

    2014-09-01

    We report theoretical and numerical results on convection for a magnetic fluid in a viscoelastic carrier liquid under rotation. The viscoelastic properties are given by the Oldroyd model. We obtain explicit expressions for the convective thresholds in terms of the parameters of the system in the case of idealized boundary conditions. We also calculate numerically the convective thresholds for the case of realistic boundary conditions. The effects of the rheology and of the rotation rate on the instability thresholds for a diluted magnetic suspension are emphasized. - Highlights: • Ferrofluids. • Thermal convection. • Viscoelastic model. • Realistic boundary conditions.

  3. Modeling of heat explosion with convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belk, Michael; Volpert, Vitaly

    2004-06-01

    The work is devoted to numerical simulations of the interaction of heat explosion with natural convection. The model consists of the heat equation with a nonlinear source term describing heat production due to an exothermic chemical reaction coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation. We show how complex regimes appear through successive bifurcations leading from a stable stationary temperature distribution without convection to a stationary symmetric convective solution, stationary asymmetric convection, periodic in time oscillations, and finally aperiodic oscillations. A simplified model problem is suggested. It describes the main features of solutions of the complete problem.

  4. A Study of Detrainment from Deep Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, I. B.; Krueger, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty in the results of Global Climate Model simulations has been attributed to errors and simplifications in how parameterizations of convection coarsely represent the processes of entrainment, detrainment, and mixing between convective clouds and their environment. Using simulations of convection we studied these processes at a resolution high enough to explicitly resolve them. Two of several recently developed analysis techniques that allow insight into these processes at their appropriate scale are an Eulerian method of directly measuring entrainment and detrainment, and a Lagrangian method that uses particle trajectories to map convective mass flux over height and a cloud variable of interest. The authors of the Eulerian technique used it to show that the dynamics of shells of cold, humid air that surround shallow convective updrafts have important effects on the properties of air entrained and detrained from the updrafts. There is some evidence for the existence of such shells around deep convective updrafts as well, and that detrainment is more important than entrainment in determining the ultimate effect of the deep convection on the large scale environment. We present results from analyzing a simulation of deep convection through the Eulerian method as well as using Lagrangian particle trajectories to illustrate the role of the shell in the process of detrainment and mixing between deep convection and its environment.

  5. A Brief Analysis of Sister Carrie's Character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hanying

    2010-01-01

    Carrie is always dreaming while the rocking chair is rocking again and again, this is the deep impression on us after we read "Sister Carrie" which is the first novel of Theodore Dreiser. In this novel the protagonist Sister Carrie is a controversial person. This paper tries to analyze the character of Sister Carrie in order to find out…

  6. Upper Troposphere Lower Stratosphere structure during convective systems using GPS radio occultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo

    The deep convective systems play a fundamental role in atmospheric circulation and climate. Thunderstorms and meso-scale convective systems produce fast vertical transport, redistributing water vapor and trace gases and influencing the thermal structure of the upper troposphere and lower...... stratosphere (UTLS) contributing to the troposphere-stratosphere transport and affecting the Earth global circulation and the climate changes. The Global Positioning System (GPS) Radio Occultation (RO) technique enables measurement of atmospheric density structure in any meteorological condition...... to the analysis of tropical storms for the future mission ACES will also be evaluated. Using data from the past and ongoing GPS RO missions we have defined an algorithm to detect the clouds top of the convective systems and their thermal structure. Other satellite and in-situ measurements co-located with GPS ROs...

  7. Dynamics of Large-Scale Convective Onset in the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Scott Wayne

    The role of large-scale circulation anomalies in the convective onset of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) over the Indian Ocean during the Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) field campaign, conducted Oct. 2011--Feb. 2012, is explained using radar and rawinsonde observations, reanalysis, and regional model simulations. Convective onset was characterized by two episodic and rapid increases in the vertical growth of the cumuliform cloud population over the Indian Ocean: First, the areal coverage of moderately deep (~5 km) convection increased; about 1 week later, the areal coverage of deep (up to the tropopause) convection increased rapidly. Deep tropospheric wavenumber 1 anomalies in zonal wind and vertical velocity circumnavigated the tropics repeatedly during DYNAMO. MJO convective onset occurred when the upward branch of this wavenumber 1 circulation arrived over the Indian Ocean because a reduction in large-scale subsidence cooled the troposphere and steepened the lapse rate below 500 hPa. This made the environment more conducive to development of moderately deep convection. The moderately deep convection moistened the environment during week-long transition periods by transporting moisture vertically from the boundary layer to the free troposphere and detraining it into the clear-air environment, particularly between 650--850 mb. Regional cloud-permitting model simulations of convection during MJO onsets reproduced the distinct transition periods. The modeling results confirmed that rapid cooling of the environment enhanced the areal coverage of, and thus total vertical transport of water within, moderately deep convection at the beginning of transition periods. Evaporation of cloud condensate via entrainment or dissipation of clouds was directly responsible for environmental moistening. Cooling of the climatologically stable layer between 700--850 mb was particularly important because it allowed a greater number of cumulus elements growing

  8. Irradiated stars with convective envelopes

    CERN Document Server

    Lucy, L B

    2016-01-01

    The structure of low-mass stars irradiated by a close companion is considered. Irradiation modifies the surface boundary conditions and thereby also the adiabatic constants of their outer convection zones. This then changes the models' radii and luminosities. For short-period M dwarf binaries with components of similar mass, the radius inflation due to their mutual irradiation is found to be < 0.4%. This is an order of magnitude too small to explain the anomalous radii found for such binaries. Although stronger irradiation of an M dwarf results in a monotonically increasing radius, a saturation effect limits the inflation to < 5%.

  9. Simulations of stellar convection with CO5BOLD

    CERN Document Server

    Freytag, Bernd; Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Wedemeyer-Böhm, Sven; Schaffenberger, Werner; Steiner, Oskar

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution images of the solar surface show a granulation pattern of hot rising and cooler downward-sinking material -- the top of the deep-reaching solar convection zone. Convection plays a role for the thermal structure of the solar interior and the dynamo acting there, for the stratification of the photosphere, where most of the visible light is emitted, as well as for the energy budget of the spectacular processes in the chromosphere and corona. Convective stellar atmospheres can be modeled by numerically solving the coupled equations of (magneto)hydrodynamics and non-local radiation transport in the presence of a gravity field. The CO5BOLD code described in this article is designed for so-called "realistic" simulations that take into account the detailed microphysics under the conditions in solar or stellar surface layers (equation-of-state and optical properties of the matter). These simulations indeed deserve the label "realistic" because they reproduce the various observables very well -- with on...

  10. Thermocapillary Convection Due to a Stationary Bubble - A Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the velocity and temperature fields at steady state due to thermocapillary convection around a gas bubble that is stationary in a liquid. A linear temperature field is imposed in the undisturbed liquid. Our interest is in investigating the effect of convective transport of momentum and energy on the velocity and temperature fields. We assume the pertinent physical properties to be constant, and that buoyant convection is negligible. Suitably defined Reynolds and Marangoni numbers are assumed to be small compared with unity. When both the Reynolds and Marangoni numbers are set equal to zero, a solution can be found. In this solution, far from the bubble, the velocity field decays as the inverse of the distance from the bubble, and the disturbance temperature field decays as the inverse of the square of this distance. We now attempt to obtain a solution when the Reynolds number is zero, but the Marangoni number is small, but non-zero, by a perturbation expansion in the Marangoni number. When the temperature field is expanded in a regular perturbation series in the Marangoni number, we show that the problem for the first correction field is ill-posed. The governing equation for this perturbation field contains an inhomogeneity, and the corresponding particular solution neither decays far from the bubble, nor can be canceled by a homogeneous solution. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  11. Transitions in turbulent rotating convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaei, Hadi; Alards, Kim; Kunnen, Rudie; Toschi, Federico; Clercx, Herman; Fluid Dynamics Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to explore the flow transition from one state to the other in rotating Rayleigh-Bènard convection using Lagrangian acceleration statistics. 3D particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) is employed in a water-filled cylindrical tank of equal height and diameter. The measurements are performed at the center and close to the top plate at a Rayleigh number Ra = 1.28e9 and Prandtl number Pr = 6.7 for different rotation rates. In parallel, direct numerical simulation (DNS) has been performed to provide detailed information on the boundary layers. We report the acceleration pdfs for different rotation rates and show how the transition from weakly to strongly rotating Rayleigh-Bènard affects the acceleration pdfs in the bulk and boundary layers. We observe that the shapes of the acceleration PDFs as well as the isotropy in the cell center are largely unaffected while crossing the transition point. However, acceleration pdfs at the top show a clear change at the transition point. Using acceleration pdfs and DNS data, we show that the transition between turbulent states is actually a boundary layer transition between Prandtl-Blasius type (typical of non-rotating convection) and Ekman type.

  12. CFD Analysis of Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient on External Surfaces of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea de Lieto Vollaro

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Convective heat transfer coefficients for external building surfaces are essential in building energy simulation (BES to calculate convective heat gains and losses from building facades and roofs to the environment. These coefficients are complex functions of: building geometry, building surroundings, local air flow patterns and temperature differences. A microclimatic analysis in a typical urban configuration, has been carried out using Ansys Fluent Version 14.0, an urban street canyon, with a given H/W ratio, has been considered to simulate a three-dimensional flow field and to calculate the thermal fluid dynamics parameters that characterize the street canyon. In this paper, the convective heat transfer coefficient values on the windward external façade of the canyon and on the windward and leeward inner walls are analyzed and a comparison with values from experimental and numerical correlations is carried out.

  13. Relationship of O(+) Field-Aligned Flows and Densities to Convection Speed in the Polar Cap at 5000 km Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, B. A.; Horwitz, J. L.; Creel, B.; Elliott, H. A.; Comfort, R. H.; Su, Y. J.; Moore, T. E.; Craven, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of thermal O(+) ion number fluxes, densities, field-aligned velocities, and convective velocities from the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) on POLAR obtained near 5000 km altitude over the Southern hemisphere are examined. We find that the O(+) parallel velocities and densities are strongly related to the convection speeds. The polar cap densities decrease rapidly with convection speed, with a linear least square fit formula to bin averaged data giving the relationship log(N(sub (sub _)O(+))) = -0.33* V(sub (sub _)conv)) + 0.07, with a linear regression coefficient of r = -0.96. The parallel bulk flow velocities are on average slightly downward (0 - 2 km/s) for V(sub (sub _)conv) km/s, but tend to be upward (0 - 4 km/s) for average V(sub (sub _)conv) > 2.5 km/s. We interpret these relationships in terms of the Cleft Ion Fountain paradigm [e.g., Horwitz and Lockwood, 1985]. The densities decline with convection speed owing to increased spreading and resulting dilution from the restricted cleft source over the polar cap area with convection speed. The parallel velocities tend to be downward for low convection speeds because they fall earthward after initial cleft injection at shorter distances into the polar cap for low convection speeds. At the higher convection speeds, the initially-upward flows are transported further into the polar cap and thus occupy a larger area of the polar cap.

  14. Analysis of the electrolyte convection inside the concentration boundary layer during structured electrodeposition of copper in high magnetic gradient fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Jörg; Tschulik, Kristina; Büttner, Lars; Uhlemann, Margitta; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-03-19

    To experimentally reveal the correlation between electrodeposited structure and electrolyte convection induced inside the concentration boundary layer, a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field, generated by a magnetized Fe-wire, has been applied to an electrochemical system. The influence of Lorentz and magnetic field gradient force to the local transport phenomena of copper ions has been studied using a novel two-component laser Doppler velocity profile sensor. With this sensor, the electrolyte convection within 500 μm of a horizontally aligned cathode is presented. The electrode-normal two-component velocity profiles below the electrodeposited structure show that electrolyte convection is induced and directed toward the rim of the Fe-wire. The measured deposited structure directly correlates to the observed boundary layer flow. As the local concentration of Cu(2+) ions is enhanced due to the induced convection, maximum deposit thicknesses can be found at the rim of the Fe-wire. Furthermore, a complex boundary layer flow structure was determined, indicating that electrolyte convection of second order is induced. Moreover, the Lorentz force-driven convection rapidly vanishes, while the electrolyte convection induced by the magnetic field gradient force is preserved much longer. The progress for research is the first direct experimental proof of the electrolyte convection inside the concentration boundary layer that correlates to the deposited structure and reveals that the magnetic field gradient force is responsible for the observed structuring effect.

  15. The excitation of solar-like oscillations in a δ Sct star by efficient envelope convection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoci, V.; Handler, G.; Kallinger, T.

    2011-01-01

    Delta Scuti (δSct) stars are opacity-driven pulsators with masses of 1.5-2.5Msolar, their pulsations resulting from the varying ionization of helium. In less massive stars such as the Sun, convection transports mass and energy through the outer 30per cent of the star and excites a rich spectrum o...

  16. Modelling deep convection and its impacts on the tropical tropopause layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Hosking

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The UK Met Office's Unified Model is used at a high global resolution (N216, ~0.83° × ~0.56°, ~60 km to assess the impact of deep tropical convection on the structure of the tropical tropopause layer (TTL. We focus on the potential for rapid transport of short-lived ozone depleting species to the stratosphere by rapid convective uplift. The modelled horizontal structure of organised convection is shown to match closely with signatures found in the OLR satellite data. In the model, deep convective elevators rapidly lift air from 4–5 km up to 12–14 km. The influx of tropospheric air entering the TTL (11–12 km is similar for all tropical regions with most convection stopping below ~14 km. The tropical tropopause is coldest and driest between November and February, coinciding with the greatest upwelling over the tropical warm pool. As this deep convection is co-located with bromine-rich biogenic coastal emissions, this period and location could potentially be the preferential gateway for stratospheric bromine.

  17. Convective heat transfer and flow characteristics of Cu-water nanofluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Qiang(李强); XUAN; Yimin(宣益民)

    2002-01-01

    An experimental system is built to investigate convective heat transfer and flow characteristics of the nanofluid in a tube. Both the convective heat transfer coefficient and friction factor of Cu-water nanofluid for the laminar and turbulent flow are measured. The effects of such factors as the volume fraction of suspended nanoparticles and the Reynolds number on the heat transfer and flow characteristics are discussed in detail. The experimental results show that the suspended nanoparticles remarkably increase the convective heat transfer coefficient of the base fluid and show that the friction factor of the sample nanofluid with the low volume fraction of nanoparticles is almost not changed. Compared with the base fluid, for example, the convective heat transfer coefficient is increased about 60% for the nanofluid with 2.0 vol% Cu nanoparticles at the same Reynolds number. Considering the factors affecting the convective heat transfer coefficient of the nano- fluid, a new convective heat transfer correlation for nanofluid under single-phase flows in tubes is established. Comparison between the experimental data and the calculated results indicate that the correlation describes correctly the energy transport of the nanofluid.

  18. Convective heat transfer in engine coolers influenced by electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, C.; Kühndel, J.

    2017-08-01

    In engine coolers of off-highway vehicles, convective heat transfer at the coolant side limits both efficiency and performance density of the apparatus. Here, due to restrictions in construction and design, backwater areas and stagnation regions cannot be avoided. Those unwanted changes in flow characteristics are mainly triggered by flow deflections and sudden cross-sectional expansions. In application, mixtures of water and glysantine are used as appropriate coolants. Such coolants typically show an electrical conductivity of a few S/m. Coolant flow and convective heat transfer can then be controlled using Lorentz forces. These body forces are generated within the conducting fluid by the interactions of an electrical current density and a localized magnetic field, both of which are externally superimposed. In future application, this could be achieved by inserting electrodes in the cooler wall and a corresponding arrangement of permanent magnets. In this paper we perform numerical simulations of such magnetohydrodynamic flow in three model geometries that frequently appear in engine cooling applications: Carnot-Borda diffusor, 90° bend, and 180° bend. The simulations are carried out using the software package ANSYS Fluent. The present study demonstrates that, depending on the electromagnetic interaction parameter and the specific geometric arrangement of electrodes and magnetic field, Lorentz forces are suitable to break up eddy waters and separation zones and thus significantly increase convective heat transfer in these areas. Furthermore, the results show that hydraulic pressure losses can be reduced due to the pumping action of the Lorentz forces.

  19. Pattern Formation and Secondary Instabilities for Convection in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, R. P.; Fiering, J.

    1996-11-01

    In recent work(Howle et al. Nature 362), 230 (1993); JFM to appear we showed that the pattern formation for convection in porous media could be studied by means of a simple shadowgraph if there is a line of sight through the medium which does not encounter curved fluid-medium interfaces. This work focused primarily on pattern formation near onset and was carried out in relatively small aspect ratios, Γ (the ratio of the horizontal dimension of the layer to the height, d). We present new studies with both higher Γ, and at high enough Rayleigh number R to encounter the secondary instabilities for the convection roll patterns. In a Γ = radius/d = 10.7 cylindrical experiment with a medium made from stacked bars, we find well aligned convection rolls with wavelength, λ in good agreement with theory. The alignment direction is determined by the periodic structure of the medium. In two other experiments, also with bar stackings for the medium, we have studied the secondary instabilities. The experiments have Γ = 4 and 8, respectively (with square planform), and consist of 8 and 4 layers of bars. In both cases, the instability is to cross rolls. In the Γ = 8 case, the strong symmetry of the system leads to heteroclinic orbits between different patterns.

  20. Differences between laminar convections through parallel plain planes with uniform wall temperature and heat flux in terms of process parameter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Using the process parameter description,we analyzed the difference between the characteristics of laminar convections through parallel plain planes with uniform temperature and heat flux.The results show the following.(1)On the wall surface of the developing region,under uniform heat flux boundary condition,the heat flux normal to the wall surface is transported through a convection process although the velocity is zero;the velocity gradient contributes to this transport,but under uniform temperature boundary condition,the heat flux normal to the wall surface is transported through a difussion process.(2)Inside the flow of the developing region,whether under uniform temperature or heat flux boundary condition,the heat flux along the main flow direction and the heat flux normal to the wall surface are transported through a convection process,and the contributions of velocity and velocity gradient are dependent on the thermal boundary condition.(3)On the wall surface of the fully developed region,under uniform heat flux boundary condition,the heat flux normal to the wall surface is transported through a convection process;the velocity gradient contributes to this transport,but under uniform temperature boundary condition,the heat flux normal to the wall surface is transported through a diffusion process.(4)Inside the flow of the fully developed region,under uniform temperature boundary condition,the heat flux along the main flow direction and the heat flux normal to the wall surface are transported through a convection process,and the velocity and velocity gradient contribute to these transports;under uniform heat flux boundary condition,the heat flux along the main flow direction and the heat flux normal to the wall surface are transported through a convection process.Furthermore,the transport of the heat flux along the main flow direction is a no-net convection process;the velocity gradient contributes to the transport of the heat flux only in the normal direction

  1. Spurious multiple equilibria introduced by convective adjustment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Toom, M.; Dijkstra, H.A.; Wubs, F.W.

    2011-01-01

    The application of bifurcation analysis to ocean climate models is substantially hampered by difficulties associated with the use of convective adjustment, i.e. a parameterisation of convection in which the vertical diffusion of heat and salt is greatly enhanced whenever the water column becomes sta

  2. Zero-Prandtl-number convection with slow rotation

    OpenAIRE

    Maity, Priyanka; Kumar, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of our investigations of the primary instability and the flow patterns near onset in zero-Prandtl-number Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection with uniform rotation about a vertical axis. The investigations are carried out using direct numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic equations with stress-free horizontal boundaries in rectangular boxes of size $(2\\pi/k_x) \\times (2\\pi/k_y) \\times 1$ for different values of the ratio $\\eta = k_x/k_y$. The primary instability is found to...

  3. Convection of Moist Saturated Air: Analytical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Zakinyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the steady-state stationary thermal convection of moist saturated air in a lower atmosphere has been studied theoretically. Thermal convection was considered without accounting for the Coriolis force, and with only the vertical temperature gradient. The analytical solution of geophysical fluid dynamics equations, which generalizes the formulation of the moist convection problem, is obtained in the two-dimensional case. The stream function is derived in the Boussinesq approximation with velocity divergence taken as zero. It has been shown that the stream function is asymmetrical in vertical direction contrary to the dry and moist unsaturated air convection. It has been demonstrated that the convection in moist atmosphere strongly depends on the vapor mass fraction gradient.

  4. Topology Optimisation for Coupled Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Aage, Niels

    conduction governs in the solid parts of the design domain and couples to convection-dominated heat transfer to a surrounding fluid. Both loosely coupled and tightly coupled problems are considered. The loosely coupled problems are convection-diffusion problems, based on an advective velocity field from......The work focuses on applying topology optimisation to forced and natural convection problems in fluid dynamics and conjugate (fluid-structure) heat transfer. To the authors' knowledge, topology optimisation has not yet been applied to natural convection flow problems in the published literature...... and the current work is thus seen as contributing new results to the field. In the literature, most works on the topology optimisation of weakly coupled convection-diffusion problems focus on the temperature distribution of the fluid, but a selection of notable exceptions also focusing on the temperature...

  5. Convection in Oblate Solar-Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junfeng; Liang, Chunlei

    2016-01-01

    We present the first global 3D simulations of thermal convection in the oblate envelopes of rapidly-rotating solar-type stars. This has been achieved by exploiting the capabilities of the new Compressible High-ORder Unstructured Spectral difference (CHORUS) code. We consider rotation rates up to 85\\% of the critical (breakup) rotation rate, which yields an equatorial radius that is up to 17\\% larger than the polar radius. This substantial oblateness enhances the disparity between polar and equatorial modes of convection. We find that the convection redistributes the heat flux emitted from the outer surface, leading to an enhancement of the heat flux in the polar and equatorial regions. This finding implies that lower-mass stars with convective envelopes may not have darker equators as predicted by classical gravity darkening arguments. The vigorous high-latitude convection also establishes elongated axisymmetric circulation cells and zonal jets in the polar regions. Though the overall amplitude of the surface...

  6. Convection in Condensible-rich Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Condensible substances are nearly ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres. For the most familiar case-water vapor in Earth's present climate-the condensible gas is dilute, in the sense that its concentration is everywhere small relative to the noncondensible background gases. A wide variety of important planetary climate problems involve nondilute condensible substances. These include planets near or undergoing a water vapor runaway and planets near the outer edge of the conventional habitable zone, for which CO2 is the condensible. Standard representations of convection in climate models rely on several approximations appropriate only to the dilute limit, while nondilute convection differs in fundamental ways from dilute convection. In this paper, a simple parameterization of convection valid in the nondilute as well as dilute limits is derived and used to discuss the basic character of nondilute convection. The energy conservation properties of the scheme are discussed in detail and are verified in radiative-co...

  7. Post shut-down decay heat removal from nuclear reactor core by natural convection loops in sodium pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajamani, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Sundararajan, T., E-mail: tsundar@iitm.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Prasad, B.V.S.S.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Parthasarathy, U.; Velusamy, K. [Nuclear Engineering Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Transient simulations are performed for a worst case scenario of station black-out. • Inter-wrapper flow between various sub-assemblies reduces peak core temperature. • Various natural convection paths limits fuel clad temperatures below critical level. - Abstract: The 500 MWe Indian pool type Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) has a passive core cooling system, known as the Safety Grade Decay Heat Removal System (SGDHRS) which aids to remove decay heat after shut down phase. Immediately after reactor shut down the fission products in the core continue to generate heat due to beta decay which exponentially decreases with time. In the event of a complete station blackout, the coolant pump system may not be available and the safety grade decay heat removal system transports the decay heat from the core and dissipates it safely to the atmosphere. Apart from SGDHRS, various natural convection loops in the sodium pool carry the heat away from the core and deposit it temporarily in the sodium pool. The buoyancy driven flow through the small inter-wrapper gaps (known as inter-wrapper flow) between fuel subassemblies plays an important role in carrying the decay heat from the sub-assemblies to the hot sodium pool, immediately after reactor shut down. This paper presents the transient prediction of flow and temperature evolution in the reactor subassemblies and the sodium pool, coupled with the safety grade decay heat removal system. It is shown that with a properly sized decay heat exchanger based on liquid sodium and air chimney stacks, the post shutdown decay heat can be safely dissipated to atmospheric air passively.

  8. Intense convection over West Africa during AMMA SOP3 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenouo, André; Sall, Saïdou Moustapha; Badiane, Daouda; Gaye, Amadou Thierno; Kamga Mkankam, F.

    2016-11-01

    ERA-Interim product from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) assimilation of African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) resources, Meteosat satellite images, and synoptic observations were used to study local- and regional-scale environments associated with intense convective systems during the AMMA-SOP3 experiment over West Africa in the Northern Hemisphere of summer 2006. The convective system, from the 21st to 23rd of August 2006, was more active at 0000 and 1800 UTC showing diurnal cycle of deep convection over West Africa where the African easterly waves (AEWs) are developed downstream. Downstream barotropic and baroclinic energy conversions associated with strong AEWs are important for the maintenance of AEW activity in West Africa. Barotropic energy conversions dominate south of the African easterly jet (AEJ), while baroclinic energy conversions are most important north of the AEJ. From a dynamical viewpoint, the low-level vorticity presents strong positive values over the sea and Sahara zone, indicating that exists on the cyclonic shear side of the African easterly jet, which is consistent with baroclinic growth. The 925-hPa equivalent potential temperature structure show a maximum over the Sahara which corresponds to the depression observed in this region. A mosaic of three hourly infrared (IR) satellite images, depicts a very distinct signal from an initial region of convection, developing through several stages and moving off the African coast. These observations, along with those available from the World Weather Watch, provide an opportunity to carry out numerical weather prediction (NWP) studies over West Africa utilizing high resolution limited area models.

  9. 25 CFR 167.6 - Carrying capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carrying capacities. 167.6 Section 167.6 Indians BUREAU... Carrying capacities. (a) The Commissioner of Indian Affairs on June 26, 1943, promulgated the authorized carrying capacity for each land management district of the Navajo Reservation. (b) Recommended...

  10. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carrying capacity. 1437.402 Section 1437.402... Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will establish a carrying capacity for all grazed forage present in the county for purposes of administering...

  11. A FEMINIST READING OF SISTER CARRIE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高陈科

    2011-01-01

    In the history of American literature, Sister Carrie has always been a controversial character. The critics regard Carrie either as a "fallen woman" or as a "new women". This thesis aims to offer a feminist reading of the image of Sister Carrie in the con

  12. Local Dynamic Stability Associated with Load Carrying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Current study confirmed the sensitivity of local dynamic stability measure in load carrying situation. It was concluded that load carrying tasks were associated with declined local dynamic stability, which may result in increased risk of fall accident. This finding has implications in preventing fall accidents associated with occupational load carrying.

  13. Density-driven convection during flooding of warm, permeable intertidal sediments: the ecological importance of the convective turnover pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, C.

    2000-02-01

    Vertical temperature profiles during exposure and flooding of a sandy tidal flat were investigated at a single site in the Sado estuary (Portugal), and compared with the change in benthic nitrogen pools. Data from April 1994 (night and day flood periods), July and November 1994 were analysed in order to study possible convective transport induced by the changing thermal regime on a tidal time scale. An ecological consequence of the flooding of warm, permeable sediment beds by cool water was the reversal of porewater density gradients, leading to a quick exchange of porewater for flood water, in what constitutes a rapid, powerful pathway for benthic solute removal in tidal ecosystems. The matrix-averaged interstitial velocity of up- and down-draught plumes of water ranged between 10 -7 and 10 -6 m s -1 over a depth scale of 6-10 cm. The Peclet number ranged from 1.4 to 28 in heavily bioturbated environments ( DBs for N solutes=5×10 -9 m2 s-1), and from 70 to 1400 in non-bioturbated environments ( DBs for N solutes ≈10 -10 m 2 s -1). The results indicate that convective turnover of porewaters in permeable tidal flats is abrupt, may occur with daily frequency, and may have three orders of magnitude more impact on sediment-water fluxes than diffusion alone. Convective flow is a major component of sediment-water fluxes in tidal areas and crucial to accurate budget studies on the sandy intertidal. On the basis of these results and recent literature, the potential ecological importance of the Convective Turnover Pump is discussed, showing it to be a very powerful potential accelerator of organic matter diagenesis in tidal systems due to its frequency and range of action.

  14. Analysis of Solidification in the Presence of High Rayleigh Number Convection in an Enclosure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    A simple and convenient analysis of the process of time-dependent solidification in an enclosed liquid cooled from the side in the presence of natural convection is presented.the influence of each parameter on the process of solidification is carried out systematically,The accuracy of this model is justified by comparing its predicting values with the previous results.

  15. Asymptotic solution of natural convection problem in a square cavity heated from below

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grundmann, M; Mojtabi, A; vantHof, B

    1996-01-01

    Studies a two-dimensional natural convection in a porous, square cavity using a regular asymptotic development in powers of the Rayleigh number. Carries the approximation through to the 34th order. Analyses convergence of the resulting series for the Nusselt number in both monocellular and multicell

  16. Indirect involvement of armorphous carbon layer on convective heat transfer enhancement using carbon nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.; Lefferts, L.; Meer, van der T.H.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an experimental heat transfer investigation was carried out to investigate the combined influence of both amorphous carbon (a-C) layer thickness and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the convective heat transfer behavior. Synthesis of these carbon nanostructures was achieved using catalytic

  17. Cooling of Water in a Flask: Convection Currents in a Fluid with a Density Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, S.; White, J. A.; Roman, F. L.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of density inversion on the convective flow of water in a spherical glass flask cooled with the help of an ice-water bath is shown. The experiment was carried out by temperature measurements (cooling curves) taken at three different heights along the vertical diameter of the flask. Flows inside the flask are visualized by seeding the…

  18. Asymptotic solution of natural convection problem in a square cavity heated from below

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grundmann, M; Mojtabi, A; vantHof, B

    1996-01-01

    Studies a two-dimensional natural convection in a porous, square cavity using a regular asymptotic development in powers of the Rayleigh number. Carries the approximation through to the 34th order. Analyses convergence of the resulting series for the Nusselt number in both monocellular and multicell

  19. Cooling of Water in a Flask: Convection Currents in a Fluid with a Density Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, S.; White, J. A.; Roman, F. L.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of density inversion on the convective flow of water in a spherical glass flask cooled with the help of an ice-water bath is shown. The experiment was carried out by temperature measurements (cooling curves) taken at three different heights along the vertical diameter of the flask. Flows inside the flask are visualized by seeding the…

  20. Sensitivity of the simulated precipitation to changes in convective relaxation time scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Mishra

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the sensitivity of the simulated precipitation to changes in convective relaxation time scale (TAU of Zhang and McFarlane (ZM cumulus parameterization, in NCAR-Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3. In the default configuration of the model, the prescribed value of TAU, a characteristic time scale with which convective available potential energy (CAPE is removed at an exponential rate by convection, is assumed to be 1 h. However, some recent observational findings suggest that, it is larger by around one order of magnitude. In order to explore the sensitivity of the model simulation to TAU, two model frameworks have been used, namely, aqua-planet and actual-planet configurations. Numerical integrations have been carried out by using different values of TAU, and its effect on simulated precipitation has been analyzed.

    The aqua-planet simulations reveal that when TAU increases, rate of deep convective precipitation (DCP decreases and this leads to an accumulation of convective instability in the atmosphere. Consequently, the moisture content in the lower- and mid- troposphere increases. On the other hand, the shallow convective precipitation (SCP and large-scale precipitation (LSP intensify, predominantly the SCP, and thus capping the accumulation of convective instability in the atmosphere. The total precipitation (TP remains approximately constant, but the proportion of the three components changes significantly, which in turn alters the vertical distribution of total precipitation production. The vertical structure of moist heating changes from a vertically extended profile to a bottom heavy profile, with the increase of TAU. Altitude of the maximum vertical velocity shifts from upper troposphere to lower troposphere. Similar response was seen in the actual-planet simulations. With an increase in TAU from 1 h to 8 h, there was a significant improvement in the simulation of the seasonal mean precipitation. The

  1. Marangoni Convection in Binary Mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, J; Oron, A; Behringer, Robert P.; Oron, Alexander; Zhang, Jie

    2006-01-01

    Marangoni instabilities in binary mixtures are different from those in pure liquids. In contrast to a large amount of experimental work on Marangoni convection in pure liquids, such experiments in binary mixtures are not available in the literature, to our knowledge. Using binary mixtures of sodium chloride/water, we have systematically investigated the pattern formation for a set of substrate temperatures and solute concentrations in an open system. The flow patterns evolve with time, driven by surface-tension fluctuations due to evaporation and the Soret effect, while the air-liquid interface does not deform. A shadowgraph method is used to follow the pattern formation in time. The patterns are mainly composed of polygons and rolls. The mean pattern size first decreases slightly, and then gradually increases during the evolution. Evaporation affects the pattern formation mainly at the early stage and the local evaporation rate tends to become spatially uniform at the film surface. The Soret effect becomes i...

  2. Natural convection between concentric spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    1992-01-01

    A finite-difference solution for steady natural convective flow in a concentric spherical annulus with isothermal walls has been obtained. The stream function-vorticity formulation of the equations of motion for the unsteady axisymmetric flow is used; interest lying in the final steady solution. Forward differences are used for the time derivatives and second-order central differences for the space derivatives. The alternating direction implicit method is used for solution of the discretization equations. Local one-dimensional grid adaptation is used to resolve the steep gradients in some regions of the flow at large Rayleigh numbers. The break-up into multi-cellular flow is found at high Rayleigh numbers for air and water, and at significantly low Rayleigh numbers for liquid metals. Excellent agreement with previous experimental and numerical data is obtained.

  3. Transient transport processes in deformable porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cs. Mészáros; (A). Bálint

    2011-01-01

    The basic partial differential equations relevant for convection-diffusion and convection-diffusion-wave phenomena are presented and solved analytically by using the MAPLE symbolic computer algebra system.The possible general nonlinear character of the constitutive equation of the convection-discussion process is replaced by a direct posteriori stochastic refinement of its solution represented for Dirichlet-type boundary conditions.A thermodynamic analysis is performed for connecting the relaxation time constants and Jacobi-determinants of deformations at transient transport processes.Finally,a new procedure for general description of coupled transport processes on the basis of the formalism originally developed for convection-free phenomena is presented by matrix analysis methods in the Fourier space.

  4. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-12-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem.

  5. Modelling multicomponent solute transport in structured soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beinum, van G.W.

    2007-01-01

    The mobility of contaminants in soil is an important factor in determining their ability to spread into the wider environment. For non-volatile substances, transport within the soil is generally dominated by transport of dissolved fractions in the soil water phase, via either diffusion or convection

  6. An experimental study of mixed convection; Contribution a l'etude experimentale de la convection mixte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez, M.

    1998-10-20

    The aim of our study is to establish a reliable database for improving thermal hydraulic codes, in the field of turbulent flows with buoyancy forces. The flow considered is mixed convection in the Reynolds and Richardson number range: Re = 10{sup 3} to 6.10{sup 4} and Ri = 10{sup -4} to 1. Experiments are carried out in an upward turbulent flow between vertical parallel plates at different wall temperatures. Part 1 gives a detailed database of turbulent mixed flow of free and forced convection. Part 2 presents the installation and the calibration system intended for probes calibration. Part 3 describes the measurement technique (constant temperature probe and cold-wire probe) and the method for measuring the position of the hot-wire anemometer from the wall surface. The measurement accuracy is within 0.001 mm in the present system. Part 4 relates the development of a method for near wall measurements. This correction procedure for hot-wire anemometer close to wall has been derived on the basis of a two-dimensional numerical study. The method permits to obtain a quantitative correction of the wall influence on hot-wires and takes into account the velocity profile and the effects the wall material has on the heat loss. Part 5 presents the experimental data obtained in the channel in forced and mixed convection. Results obtained in the forced convection regime serve as a verification of the measurement technique close to the wall and give the conditions at the entrance of the test section. The effects of the buoyancy force on the mean velocity and temperature profiles are confirmed. The buoyancy strongly affects the fluid structure and deforms the distribution of mean velocity. The velocity profiles are asymmetric. The second section of part 5 gives an approach of analytical wall functions with buoyancy forces, on the basis of the experimental data obtained in the test section. (author)

  7. Heat transport within the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2011-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to interpret Earth's dynamic processes based upon heat transport concepts derived from ordinary experience. But, ordinary experience can be misleading, especially when underlain by false assumptions. Geodynamic considerations traditionally have embraced three modes of heat transport: conduction, convection, and radiation. Recently, I introduced a fourth, "mantle decompression thermal tsunami" that, I submit, is responsible for emplacing heat at the base of the Earth's crust. Here, I review thermal transport within the Earth and speculate that there might be a fifth mode: "heat channeling", involving heat transport from the core to "hot-spots" such as those that power the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland.

  8. Heat Transport by Coherent Rayleigh-B\\'enard Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Waleffe, Fabian; Smith, Leslie M

    2015-01-01

    Steady but generally unstable solutions of the 2D Boussinesq equations are obtained for no-slip boundary conditions and Prandtl number 7. The primary solution that bifurcates from the conduction state at Rayleigh number $Ra \\approx 1708$ has been calculated up to $Ra\\approx 5. 10^6$ and shows heat flux $Nu \\sim 0.143\\, Ra^{0.28}$ with a delicate spiral structure in the temperature field. Another solution that maximizes $Nu$ over the horizontal wavenumber has been calculated up to $Ra=10^9$ and its heat flux scales as $Nu \\sim 0.115\\, Ra^{0.31}$ for $10^7 < Ra \\le 10^9$, quite similar to 3D turbulent data. The latter is a simple yet multi-scale coherent solution whose horizontal wavenumber scales as $0.133 \\, Ra^{0.217}$ in that range. That optimum solution is unstable to larger scale perturbations and in particular to mean shear flows, yet it appears to be relevant as a backbone for turbulent solutions, possibly setting the scale, strength and spacing of elemental plumes.

  9. Carbon-nanotube nanofluid thermophysical properties and heat transfer by natural convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Suzuki, S.; Inagaki, T.; Yamauchi, N.

    2014-11-01

    We measured the thermophysical properties of suspensions of carbon nanotubes in water as a type of nanofluid, and experimentally investigated their heat transfer characteristics in a horizontal, closed rectangular vessel. Using a previously constructed system for high- reliability measurement, we quantitatively determined their thermophysical properties and the temperature dependence of these properties. We also investigated the as yet unexplained mechanism of heat transport in carbon-nanotube nanofluids and their flow properties from a thermal perspective. The results indicated that these nanofluids are non-Newtonian fluids, whose high viscosity impedes convection and leads to a low heat transfer coefficient under natural convection, despite their high thermal conductivity.

  10. Heat transfer in vertical Bridgman growth of oxides - Effects of conduction, convection, and internal radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, S.; Derby, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    In the present investigation of crystalline phase internal radiation and heat conduction during the vertical Bridgman growth of a YAG-like oxide crystal, where transport through the melt is dominated by convection and conduction, heat is also noted to be conducted through ampoule walls via natural convection and enclosure radiation. The results of a quasi-steady-state axisymmetric Galerkin FEM indicate that heat transfer through the system is powerfully affected by the optical absorption coefficient of the crystal. The coupling of internal radiation through the crystal with conduction through the ampoule walls promotes melt/crystal interface shapes that are highly reflected near the ampoule wall.

  11. Modeling of Diffusive Convective and Electromechanical Processes in PEM fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Mads

    and chemical species. Since analytical solutions to these three dimensional convections diffusion problems can rarely be obtained, the CFX code makes use of a finite volume discretization and numerical techniques, in order to obtain a solution. The model developed solves the convective and diffusive transport...... the fuel cells polarization curve and efficiency under operation. It is shown that the conductivity and the effective porosity of the catalyst layer, may strongly affect the performance of the fuel cell, and that it therefore should be considered when fuel cell models are made....

  12. Three Dimensional Radiative Transfer In Tropical Deep Convective Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Giuseppe, F.

    In this study the focus is on the interaction between short-wave radiation with a field of tropical deep convective events generated using a 3D cloud resolving model (CRM) to assess the significance of 3D radiative transport (3DRT). It is not currently un- derstood what magnitude of error is involved when a two stream approximation is used to describe the radiative transfer through such a cloud field. It seems likely that deep convective clouds could be the most complex to represent, and that the error in neglecting horizontal transport could be relevant in these cases. The field here con- sidered has an extention of roughly 90x90 km, approximately equivalent to the grid box dimension of many global models. The 3DRT results are compared both with the calculations obtained by an Independent Pixel Approximation (IPA) approch and by the Plane Parallel radiative scheme (PP) implemented in ECMWF's Forecast model. The differences between the three calculations are used to assess both problems in current GCM's representation of radiative heating and inaccuracies in the dynamical response of CRM simulations due to the Independent Column Approximation (ICA). The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the main 3DRT/1D differences is the starting point for the future attempt to develop a parameterization procedure.

  13. Effect of rotational speed modulation on heat transport in a fluid layer with temperature dependent viscosity and internal heat source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Bhadauria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a theoretical investigation has been carried out to study the combined effect of rotation speed modulation and internal heating on thermal instability in a temperature dependent viscous horizontal fluid layer. Rayleigh–Bénard momentum equation with Coriolis term has been considered to describe the convective flow. The system is rotating about it is own axis with non-uniform rotational speed. In particular, a time-periodic and sinusoidally varying rotational speed has been considered. A weak nonlinear stability analysis is performed to find the effect of modulation on heat transport. Nusselt number is obtained in terms of amplitude of convection and internal Rayleigh number, and depicted graphically for showing the effects of various parameters of the system. The effect of modulated rotation speed is found to have a stabilizing effect for different values of modulation frequency. Further, internal heating and thermo-rheological parameters are found to destabilize the system.

  14. Simultaneous magnetically directed drug convection and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yathindranath, V; Hegmann, T [Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Van Lierop, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Potter, K; Fowler, C B [DVBIC/DCoE AFIP, Traumatic Brain Injury Research Center, Department of Biophysics, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Moore, D F, E-mail: johan@physics.umanitoba.c [Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC 20307 (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IO NPs) are of interest for their usefulness in biomedical applications. In this work, we have synthesized iron oxide nanocomposites surface-modified with different biocompatible polymers. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was physisorbed onto these IO NPs along with an excipient during freeze-drying. The mass transport of the protein attached to the iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles (IO cs-NPs) under a gradient magnetic field of an MRI instrument was observed in vitro and in an egg as a model system for a biological fluid. From the in vitro experiments in agarose gels, it was observed that the protein gets separated from the core during mass transport for some cs-IO, but co-migration was observed for PEG-modified IO cs-NPs. These experiments demonstrated proof-of-concept for the use of IO cs-NPs in magnetically directed drug convection.

  15. Relationships Between Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes on Intraseasonal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20degN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  16. Multicloud convective parametrizations with crude vertical structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khouider, Boualem [University of Victoria, Mathematics and Statistics, PO BOX 3045 STN CSC, Victoria, BC (Canada); Majda, Andrew J. [New York University, Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere/Ocean Sciences, Courant Institute, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Recent observational analysis reveals the central role of three multi-cloud types, congestus, stratiform, and deep convective cumulus clouds, in the dynamics of large scale convectively coupled Kelvin waves, westward propagating two-day waves, and the Madden-Julian oscillation. The authors have recently developed a systematic model convective parametrization highlighting the dynamic role of the three cloud types through two baroclinic modes of vertical structure: a deep convective heating mode and a second mode with low level heating and cooling corresponding respectively to congestus and stratiform clouds. The model includes a systematic moisture equation where the lower troposphere moisture increases through detrainment of shallow cumulus clouds, evaporation of stratiform rain, and moisture convergence and decreases through deep convective precipitation and a nonlinear switch which favors either deep or congestus convection depending on whether the troposphere is moist or dry. Here several new facets of these multi-cloud models are discussed including all the relevant time scales in the models and the links with simpler parametrizations involving only a single baroclinic mode in various limiting regimes. One of the new phenomena in the multi-cloud models is the existence of suitable unstable radiative convective equilibria (RCE) involving a larger fraction of congestus clouds and a smaller fraction of deep convective clouds. Novel aspects of the linear and nonlinear stability of such unstable RCE's are studied here. They include new modes of linear instability including mesoscale second baroclinic moist gravity waves, slow moving mesoscale modes resembling squall lines, and large scale standing modes. The nonlinear instability of unstable RCE's to homogeneous perturbations is studied with three different types of nonlinear dynamics occurring which involve adjustment to a steady deep convective RCE, periodic oscillation, and even heteroclinic chaos in

  17. Scaling and universality in turbulent convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celani, Antonio; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Mazzino, Andrea; Vergassola, Massimo

    2002-02-01

    Anomalous correlation functions of the temperature field in two-dimensional turbulent convection are shown to be universal with respect to the choice of external sources. Moreover, they are equal to the anomalous correlations of the concentration field of a passive tracer advected by the convective flow itself. The statistics of velocity differences is found to be universal, self-similar, and close to Gaussian. These results point to the conclusion that temperature intermittency in two-dimensional turbulent convection may be traced back to the existence of statistically preserved structures, as it is in passive scalar turbulence.

  18. Transient Mixed Convection Validation for NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Barton [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Schultz, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-19

    The results of this project are best described by the papers and dissertations that resulted from the work. They are included in their entirety in this document. They are: (1) Jeff Harris PhD dissertation (focused mainly on forced convection); (2) Blake Lance PhD dissertation (focused mainly on mixed and transient convection). This dissertation is in multi-paper format and includes the article currently submitted and one to be submitted shortly; and, (3) JFE paper on CFD Validation Benchmark for Forced Convection.

  19. Sister Carrie:A Material Pursuer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马春花

    2015-01-01

    Sister Carrie dramatized by Dreiser is totally a material pursuer. She is selfish and accumulates money in a crazy way. What she does inevitably centers on materials. Living with Drouet and later Hurstwood, Carrie gets what she wants and enjoys the luxurious life in an easy way. However, with the satisfaction of some of her desires, Carrie ’s desires grow and expand. With enough food and clothes, she needs luxury. Hurstwood’s failure in business leads Carrie to the stage and finally she makes a suc⁃cess and becomes a famous actress in Broadway. She gets more money, but her desires grow even higher. Nothing can satisfy her. In this essay, the author tries to analyze Carrie according to Freud’s and Guo Weilu’s theories and prove that Carrie is totally a material pursuer.

  20. Measuring Social Carrying Capacity: An Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    López-Bonilla, Jesús Manuel; López-Bonilla, Luis Miguel

    2007-01-01

    The tourist carrying capacity commands a growing interest given that it is closely linked with sustainable tourist development. The justification of the utility of this concept is given by means of a simple and efficient methodological proposal, by analysing the social carrying capacity. To this end, an empirical application is carried out in the Western Andalusia. In some of the cases analysed, the satisfaction of the tourist is found to decline when the levels of the tourist use are higher ...

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL CARRYING CAPACITY BASED ON SPATIAL PLANNING

    OpenAIRE

    Luthfi Muta'ali

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this research were to examine environmental carrying capacity analyzed based on aspects of spatial planning and eco-region. The result showed that Kulonprogo Regency has low value of environmental carrying capacity and can only support as much as 79.81% of its total population. Analysis of variance showed significant difference of environmental carrying capacity of protected and cultivated area. The main factor among 12 variables determining the degree of environmen...

  2. Reynolds stress and heat flux in spherical shell convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Mantere, M. J.; Guerrero, G.; Brandenburg, A.; Chatterjee, P.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Turbulent fluxes of angular momentum and enthalpy or heat due to rotationally affected convection play a key role in determining differential rotation of stars. Their dependence on latitude and depth has been determined in the past from convection simulations in Cartesian or spherical simulations. Here we perform a systematic comparison between the two geometries as a function of the rotation rate. Aims: Here we want to extend the earlier studies by using spherical wedges to obtain turbulent angular momentum and heat transport as functions of the rotation rate from stratified convection. We compare results from spherical and Cartesian models in the same parameter regime in order to study whether restricted geometry introduces artefacts into the results. In particular, we want to clarify whether the sharp equatorial profile of the horizontal Reynolds stress found in earlier Cartesian models is also reproduced in spherical geometry. Methods: We employ direct numerical simulations of turbulent convection in spherical and Cartesian geometries. In order to alleviate the computational cost in the spherical runs, and to reach as high spatial resolution as possible, we model only parts of the latitude and longitude. The rotational influence, measured by the Coriolis number or inverse Rossby number, is varied from zero to roughly seven, which is the regime that is likely to be realised in the solar convection zone. Cartesian simulations are performed in overlapping parameter regimes. Results: For slow rotation we find that the radial and latitudinal turbulent angular momentum fluxes are directed inward and equatorward, respectively. In the rapid rotation regime the radial flux changes sign in accordance with earlier numerical results, but in contradiction with theory. The latitudinal flux remains mostly equatorward and develops a maximum close to the equator. In Cartesian simulations this peak can be explained by the strong "banana cells". Their effect in the

  3. Experimental and numerical analysis of convective heat losses from spherical cavity receiver of solar concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shewale Vinod C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spherical cavity receiver of solar concentrator is made up of Cu tubing material having cavity diameter 385 mm to analyze the different heat losses such as conduction, convection and radiation. As the convection loss plays major role in heat loss analysis of cavity receiver, the experimental analysis is carried out to study convective heat loss for the temperature range of 55-75°C at 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° inclination angle of downward facing cavity receiver. The numerical analysis is carried out to study convective heat loss for the low temperature range (55-75°C as well as high temperature range (150-300 °C for no wind condition only. The experimental set-up mainly consists of spherical cavity receiver which is insulated with glass wool insulation to reduce the heat losses from outside surface. The numerical analysis is carried out by using CFD software and the results are compared with the experimental results and found good agreement. The result shows that the convective loss increases with decrease in cavity inclination angle and decreases with decrease in mean cavity receiver temperature. The maximum losses are obtained at 0° inclination angle and the minimum losses are obtained at 90° inclination angle of cavity due to increase in stagnation zone in to the cavity from 0° to 90° inclination. The Nusselt number correlation is developed for the low temperature range 55-75°C based on the experimental data. The analysis is also carried out to study the effect of wind speed and wind direction on convective heat losses. The convective heat losses are studied for two wind speeds (3 m/s and 5 m/s and four wind directions [α is 0° (Side-on wind, 30°, 60°, and 90° (head-on wind]. It is found that the convective heat losses for both wind speed are higher than the losses obtained by no wind test. The highest heat losses are found for wind direction α is 60° with respect to receiver stand and lowest heat losses are found

  4. Numerical Investigation of Nanofluid Thermocapillary Convection Based on Two-Phase Mixture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanni; Xu, Zelin

    2017-08-01

    Numerical investigation of nanofluid thermocapillary convection in a two-dimensional rectangular cavity was carried out, in which the two-phase mixture model was used to simulate the nanoparticles-fluid mixture flow, and the influences of volume fraction of nanoparticles on the flow characteristics and heat transfer performance were discussed. The results show that, with the increase of nanoparticle volume fraction, thermocapillary convection intensity weakens gradually, and the heat conduction effect strengthens; meanwhile, the temperature gradient at free surface increases but the free surface velocity decreases gradually. The average Nusselt number of hot wall and the total entropy generation decrease with nanoparticle volume fraction increasing.

  5. Experimental Study on Convective Boiling Heat Transfer in Vertical Narrow Gap Annular Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Bin; He Anding; Wang Yueshe; Zhou Fangde

    2001-01-01

    Experiments are conducted to investigate the characteristics of single-phase forced-flow convection and boiling heat transfer of R113 flowing through annular tube with gap of 1, 1.5 and 2.5 mm, and also the visualization test are carried out to get two-phase flow regime. The data show that the Nusselt numbers for the narrow-gap are higher than those predicted by traditional large channel correlation and boiling heat transfer is enhanced. Based on the data obtained in this investigation, correlations for single-phase, forced convection and flow boiling in annular tube of different gap size has been developed.

  6. Convection in complex shaped vessel; Convection dans des enceintes de forme complexe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The 8 november 2000, the SFT (Societe Francaise de Thermique) organized a technical day on the convection in complex shaped vessels. Nine papers have been presented in the domains of the heat transfers, the natural convection, the fluid distribution, the thermosyphon effect, the steam flow in a sterilization cycle and the transformers cooling. Eight papers are analyzed in ETDE and one paper dealing with the natural convection in spent fuels depository is analyzed in INIS. (A.L.B.)

  7. NUMERICAL STUDY ON MIXED CONVECTIVE FLOW IN A SOLAR COLLECTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In a solar energy heat collector forced convection and free convection will occur concurrently. In this paper, the mixed convective flow was investigated. The dimensionless equation was derived and the results was verified by experiments. The numerical solution shows that error is less than 5% if the effect of free convection is ignored.

  8. Potential negative effects of groundwater dynamics on dry season convection in the Amazon River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Heng; Lo, Min-Hui; Chou, Chia

    2016-02-01

    Adding a groundwater component to land surface models affects modeled precipitation. The additional water supply from the subsurface contributes to increased water vapor in the atmosphere, resulting in modifications of atmospheric convection. This study focuses on how groundwater dynamics affect atmospheric convection in the Amazon River basin (ARB) during July, typically the driest month. Coupled groundwater-land-atmosphere model simulations show that groundwater storage increases evapotranspiration rates (latent heat fluxes) and lowers surface temperatures, which increases the surface pressure gradient and thus, anomalous surface divergence. Therefore, the convection over the Southern Hemispheric ARB during the dry season becomes weaker when groundwater dynamics are included in the model. Additionally, the changes in atmospheric vertical water vapor advection are associated with decreases in precipitation that results from downwelling transport anomalies. The results of this study highlight the importance of subsurface hydrological processes in the Amazon climate system, with implications for precipitation changes during the dry season, observed in most current climate models.

  9. Potential Negative Effects of Groundwater Dynamics on Dry Season Convection in the Amazon River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y. H.; Lo, M. H.; Chou, C.

    2014-12-01

    Adding a groundwater component to land surface models affects modeled precipitation because the additional water supply from the subsurface contributes to increased water vapor in the atmosphere, resulting in modifications of atmospheric convection. This study focused on how groundwater dynamics affect atmospheric convection in the Amazon River Basin (ARB) during July, typically the driest month. Coupled groundwater-land-atmosphere model simulations show that groundwater storage increases evapotranspiration rates (latent heat fluxes) and lowers surface temperatures, which increases the surface pressure gradient and thus, anomalous surface divergence. Therefore, the convection over the Southern Hemispheric ARB during the dry season becomes weaker when groundwater dynamics are included in the model. In addition, the changes in atmospheric vertical water vapor advection are associated with decreases in precipitation resulting from downward transport anomalies. The results of this study highlight the importance of subsurface hydrological processes in the Amazon climate system, which have implications for precipitation changes during the dry season observed in most current climate models.

  10. Simulations of core convection in rotating A-type stars: Magnetic dynamo action

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, A S; Toomre, J; Brun, Allan Sacha; Browning, Matthew K.; Toomre, Juri

    2005-01-01

    Core convection and dynamo activity deep within rotating A-type stars of 2 solar masses are studied with 3--D nonlinear simulations. Our modeling considers the inner 30% by radius of such stars, thus capturing within a spherical domain the convective core and a modest portion of the surrounding radiative envelope. The MHD equations are solved using the ASH code to examine turbulent flows and magnetic fields, both of which exhibit intricate time dependence. By introducing small seed magnetic fields into our progenitor hydrodynamic models rotating at one and four times the solar rate, we assess here how the vigorous convection can amplify those fields and sustain them against ohmic decay. Dynamo action is indeed realized, ultimately yielding magnetic fields that are in energy equipartion with the flow. Such magnetism reduces the differential rotation obtained in the progenitors, partly by Maxwell stresses that transport angular momentum poleward and oppose the Reynolds stresses in the latitudinal balance. In co...

  11. Topology optimisation for natural convection problems

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandersen, Joe; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Sigmund, Ole

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of the density-based topology optimisation approach for the design of heat sinks and micropumps based on natural convection effects. The problems are modelled under the assumptions of steady-state laminar flow using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled to the convection-diffusion equation through the Boussinesq approximation. In order to facilitate topology optimisation, the Brinkman approach is taken to penalise velocities inside the solid domain and the effective thermal conductivity is interpolated in order to accommodate differences in thermal conductivity of the solid and fluid phases. The governing equations are discretised using stabilised finite elements and topology optimisation is performed for two different problems using discrete adjoint sensitivity analysis. The study shows that topology optimisation is a viable approach for designing heat sink geometries cooled by natural convection and micropumps powered by natural convection.

  12. Convective Radio Occultations Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biondi, R. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Deep convective systems are destructive weather phenomena that annually cause many deaths and injuries as well as much damage, thereby accounting for major economic losses in several countries. The number and intensity of such phenomena have increased over the last decades in some areas of the globe. Damage is mostly caused by strong winds and heavy rain parameters that are strongly connected to the structure of the particular storm. Convection over land is usually stronger and deeper than over the ocean and some convective systems, known as supercells, also develop tornadoes through processes that remain mostly unclear. The intensity forecast and monitoring of convective systems is one of the major challenges for meteorology because in situ measurements during extreme events are too sparse or unreliable and most ongoing satellite missions do not provide suitable time/space coverage.

  13. Layer Formation in Sedimentary Fingering Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Reali, J F; Alsinan, A; Meiburg, E

    2016-01-01

    When particles settle through a stable temperature or salinity gradient they can drive an instability known as sedimentary fingering convection. This phenomenon is thought to occur beneath sediment-rich river plumes in lakes and oceans, in the context of marine snow where decaying organic materials serve as the suspended particles, or in the atmosphere in the presence of aerosols or volcanic ash. Laboratory experiments of Houk and Green (1973) and Green (1987) have shown sedimentary fingering convection to be similar to the more commonly known thermohaline fingering convection in many ways. Here, we study the phenomenon using 3D direct numerical simulations. We find evidence for layer formation in sedimentary fingering convection in regions of parameter space where it does not occur for non-sedimentary systems. This is due to two complementary effects. Sedimentation affects the turbulent fluxes and broadens the region of parameter space unstable to the $\\gamma$-instability (Radko 2003) to include systems at l...

  14. Fingering Convection in Red Giants Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Wachlin, F C; Althaus, L G

    2014-01-01

    Fingering (thermohaline) convection has been invoked for several years as a possible extra-mixing which could occur in Red Giant stars due to the modification of the chemical composition induced by nuclear reactions in the hydrogen burning zone. Recent studies show however that this mixing is not sufficient to account for the needed surface abundances. A new prescription for fingering convection, based on 3D numerical simulations has recently been proposed (BGS). The resulting mixing coefficient is larger than the ones previously given in the literature. We compute models using this new coefficient and compare them to previous studies. We use the LPCODE stellar evolution code with the GNA generalized version of the mixing length theory to compute Red Giant models and we introduce fingering convection using the BGS prescription. The results show that, although the fingering zone now reaches the outer dynamical convective zone, the efficiency of the mixing is not enough to account for the observations. The fing...

  15. An Observational Investigation of Penetrative Convection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Lenschow, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Data taken during the Air Mass Transformation Experiment (AMTEX) by the NCAR Electra aircraft have proven useful for investigating the structure of thermals penetrating into the turbulent inversion layer which caps the convective mixed layer. Variances, covariances, spectra and cospectra...

  16. Destabilization of free convection by weak rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfgat, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This study offers an explanation of a recently observed effect of destabilization of free convective flows by weak rotation. After studying several models where flows are driven by a simultaneous action of convection and rotation, it is concluded that the destabilization is observed in the cases where centrifugal force acts against main convective circulation. At relatively low Prandtl numbers this counter action can split the main vortex into two counter rotating vortices, where the interaction leads to instability. At larger Prandtl numbers, the counter action of the centrifugal force steepens an unstable thermal stratification, which triggers Rayleigh-B\\'enard instability mechanism. Both cases can be enhanced by advection of azimuthal velocity disturbances towards the axis, where they grow and excite perturbations of the radial velocity. The effect was studied considering a combined convective/rotating flow in a cylinder with a rotating lid and a parabolic temperature profile at the sidewall. Next, explana...

  17. High-resolution calculations of the solar global convection with the reduced speed of sound technique: I. The structure of the convection and the magnetic field without the rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Hotta, H; Yokoyama, T

    2014-01-01

    We carry out non-rotating high-resolution calculations of the solar global convection, which resolve convective scales of less than 10 Mm. To cope with the low Mach number conditions in the lower convection zone, we use the reduced speed of sound technique (RSST), which is simple to implement and requires only local communication in the parallel computation. In addition, the RSST allows us to expand the computational domain upward to about $0.99 R_{\\odot}$ as it can also handle compressible flows. Using this approach, we study the solar convection zone on the global scale, including small-scale near-surface convection. In particular, we investigate the influence of the top boundary condition on the convective structure throughout the convection zone as well as on small-scale dynamo action. Our main conclusions are: 1. The small-scale downflows generated in the near-surface layer penetrate into deeper layers to some extent and excite small-scale turbulence in the region $>0.9R_\\odot$, where $R_\\odot$ is the so...

  18. Bivalve carrying capacity in coastal ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dame, R.F.; Prins, T.C.

    1998-01-01

    carrying capacity of suspension feeding bivalves in 11 coastal and estuarine ecosystems is examined. Bivalve carrying capacity is defined in terms of water mass residence time, primary production time and bivalve clearance time. Turnover times for the 11 ecosystems are compared both two and three di

  19. Comments on the image of Sister Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张楠

    2016-01-01

    Thedore Oreiser was one of America's greatest writers and one of his famous masterpieces is Sister Carrie. the heroin of the novel was a country girl who struggled for success and finally became a movie star. Analysis on the image of Carrie is of practical significance to the country girls swarming into the city nowdays in our country.

  20. Carrie Chapman Catt and Woman Suffrage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Most of the material for this issue of the "Goldfinch," which explores the life of Carrie Chapman Catt, came from the archives of the State Historical Society of Iowa. Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947) was an Iowan who advocated woman suffrage and spent 26 years actively working for that cause. The issue contains a biography of Catt, and…