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Sample records for convective clouds experiment

  1. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-01

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth’s energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earth’s climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical “parameterizations” that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States

  2. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-10

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available.

  3. The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, M. C.; Brune, W. H.; Cantrell, C. A.; Rutledge, S. A.; Crawford, J. H.; Huntrieser, H.; Homeyer, C. R.; Nault, B.; Cohen, R. C.; Pan, L.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field experiment took place in the central U.S. in May and June 2012 and had the objectives of characterizing the effect of thunderstorms on the chemical composition of the lower atmosphere and determining the chemical aging of upper troposphere (UT) convective outflow plumes. DC3 employed ground-based radars, lightning mapping arrays, and weather balloon soundings in conjunction with aircraft measurements sampling the composition of the inflow and outflow of a variety of thunderstorms in northeast Colorado, West Texas to central Oklahoma, and northern Alabama. A unique aspect of the DC3 strategy was to locate and sample the convective outflow a day after active convection in order to measure the chemical transformations within the UT convective plume. The DC3 data are being analyzed to investigate transport and dynamics of the storms, scavenging of soluble trace gases and aerosols, production of nitrogen oxides by lightning, relationships between lightning flash rates and storm parameters, and chemistry in the UT that is affected by the convection. In this presentation, we give an overview of the DC3 field campaign and highlight results from the campaign that are relevant to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region. These highlights include stratosphere-troposphere exchange in connection with thunderstorms, the 0-12 hour chemical aging and new particle formation in the UT outflow of a dissipating mesoscale convective system observed on June 21, 2012, and UT chemical aging in convective outflow as sampled the day after convection occurred and modeled in the Weather Research and Forecasting coupled with Chemistry model.

  4. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Mark P.; Petersen, Walt A.; Bansemer, Aaron; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Carey, Larry; Cecil, D. J.; Collis, Scott M.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Dolan, Brenda A.; Gerlach, J.; Giangrande, Scott; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Heymsfield, Gerald; Kollias, Pavlos; Lang, T. J.; Nesbitt, Steve W.; Neumann, Andrea; Poellot, M. R.; Rutledge, Steven A.; Schwaller, Mathew R.; Tokay, Ali; Williams, C. R.; Wolff, D. B.; Xie, Shaocheng; Zipser, Edward J.

    2016-10-18

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), a field program jointly led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, was conducted in south-central Oklahoma during April – May 2011. MC3E science objectives were motivated by the need to improve understanding of midlatitude continental convective cloud system lifecycles, microphysics, and GPM precipitation retrieval algorithms. To achieve these objectives a multi-scale surface- and aircraft-based in situ and remote sensing observing strategy was employed. A variety of cloud and precipitation events were sampled during the MC3E, of which results from three deep convective events are highlighted. Vertical structure, air motions, precipitation drop-size distributions and ice properties were retrieved from multi-wavelength radar, profiler, and aircraft observations for an MCS on 11 May. Aircraft observations for another MCS observed on 20 May were used to test agreement between observed radar reflectivities and those calculated with forward-modeled reflectivity and microwave brightness temperatures using in situ particle size distributions and ice water content. Multi-platform observations of a supercell that occurred on 23 May allowed for an integrated analysis of kinematic and microphysical interactions. A core updraft of 25 ms-1 supported growth of hail and large rain drops. Data collected during the MC3E campaign is being used in a number of current and ongoing research projects and is available through the DOE ARM and NASA data archives.

  5. The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds (MC3E) Experiment Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Giangrande, S [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Kollias, P [Stony Brook University

    2014-04-01

    The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place from April 22 through June 6, 2011, centered at the ARM Southern Great Plains site (http://www.arm.gov/sites/sgp) in northcentral Oklahoma. MC3E was a collaborative effort between the ARM Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The campaign leveraged the largest ground-based observing infrastructure available in the central United States, including recent upgrades through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, and additional radar and in situ precipitation instrumentation. The overarching goal of the campaign was to provide a three-dimensional characterization of convective clouds and precipitation for the purpose of improving the representation of convective lifecycle in atmospheric models and the reliability of satellite-based retrievals of precipitation.

  6. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E sounding network: operations, processing and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Jensen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E took place during the spring of 2011 centered in north-central Oklahoma, USA. The main goal of this field campaign was to capture the dynamical and microphysical characteristics of precipitating convective systems in the Central Plains. A major component of the campaign was a 6-site radiosonde array designed to capture the large-scale variability of the atmospheric state with the intent of deriving model forcing datasets. Over the course of the 46 day MC3E campaign, a total of 1362 radiosondes were launched from the enhanced sonde network. This manuscript describes the details of the instrumentation used as part of the sounding array, the data processing activities including quality checks and humidity bias corrections and an analysis of the impacts of bias correction and algorithm assumptions on the determination of convective levels and indices. It is found that corrections for known radiosonde humidity biases and assumptions regarding the characteristics of the surface convective parcel result in significant differences in the derived values of convective levels and indices in many soundings.

  7. Alabama Ground Operations during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Lawrence; Blakeslee, Richard; Koshak, William; Bain, Lamont; Rogers, Ryan; Kozlowski, Danielle; Sherrer, Adam; Saari, Matt; Bigelbach, Brandon; Scott, Mariana; Schultz, Elise; Schultz, Chris; Gatlin, Patrick; Wingo, Matt; Phillips, Dustin; Phillips, Chris; Peterson, Harold; Bailey, Jeff; Frederickson, Terryn; Hall, John; Bart, Nicole; Becker, Melissa; Pinkney, Kurtis; Rowe, Scott; Starzec, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign investigates the impact of deep, midlatitude convective clouds, including their dynamical, physical and lighting processes, on upper tropospheric composition and chemistry. DC3 science operations took place from 14 May to 30 June 2012. The DC3 field campaign utilized instrumented aircraft and ground ]based observations. The NCAR Gulfstream ]V (GV) observed a variety of gas ]phase species, radiation and cloud particle characteristics in the high ]altitude outflow of storms while the NASA DC ]8 characterized the convective inflow. Groundbased radar networks were used to document the kinematic and microphysical characteristics of storms. In order to study the impact of lightning on convective outflow composition, VHF ]based lightning mapping arrays (LMAs) provided detailed three ]dimensional measurements of flashes. Mobile soundings were utilized to characterize the meteorological environment of the convection. Radar, sounding and lightning observations were also used in real ]time to provide forecasting and mission guidance to the aircraft operations. Combined aircraft and ground ]based observations were conducted at three locations, 1) northeastern Colorado, 2) Oklahoma/Texas and 3) northern Alabama, to study different modes of deep convection in a variety of meteorological and chemical environments. The objective of this paper is to summarize the Alabama ground operations and provide a preliminary assessment of the ground ]based observations collected over northern Alabama during DC3. The multi ] Doppler, dual ]polarization radar network consisted of the UAHuntsville Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR), the UAHuntsville Mobile Alabama X ]band (MAX) radar and the Hytop (KHTX) Weather Surveillance Radar 88 Doppler (WSR ]88D). Lightning frequency and structure were observed in near real ]time by the NASA MSFC Northern Alabama LMA (NALMA). Pre ]storm and inflow proximity

  8. Intensification of convective extremes driven by cloud-cloud interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Moseley, Christopher; Berg, Peter; Haerter, Jan O

    2015-01-01

    In a changing climate, a key role may be played by the response of convective-type cloud and precipitation to temperature changes. Yet, it is unclear if precipitation intensities will increase mainly due to modified thermodynamic forcing or due to stronger convective dynamics. In gradual self-organization, convective events produce highest intensities late in the day. Tracking rain cells throughout their life cycles, we find that interacting events respond strongly to changes in boundary conditions. Conversely, events without interaction remain unaffected. Increased surface temperature indeed leads to more interaction and higher precipitation extremes. However, a similar intensification occurs when leaving temperature unchanged but simply granting more time for self-organization.Our study implies that the convective field as a whole acquires a memory of past precipitation and inter-cloud dynamics, driving extremes. Our results implicate that the dynamical interaction between convective clouds must be incorpor...

  9. Convective formation of pileus cloud near the tropopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Garrett

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Pileus clouds form where humid, vertically stratified air is mechanically displaced ahead of rising convection. This paper describes convective formation of pileus cloud in the tropopause transition layer (TTL, and explores a possible link to the formation of long-lasting cirrus at cold temperatures. The study examines in detail in-situ measurements from off the coast of Honduras during the July 2002 CRYSTAL-FACE experiment that showed an example of TTL cirrus associated with, and penetrated by, deep convection. The TTL cirrus was enriched with total water compared to its surroundings, but was composed of extremely small ice crystals with effective radii between 2 and 4 μm. Through gravity wave analysis, and intercomparison of measured and simulated cloud microphysics, it is argued that the TTL cirrus originated neither from convectively-forced gravity wave motions nor environmental mixing alone. Rather, it is hypothesized that a combination of these two processes was involved in which, first, a pulse of convection forced pileus cloud to form from TTL air; second, the pileus layer was punctured by the convective pulse and received larger ice crystals through interfacial mixing; third, the addition of this condensate inhibited evaporation of the original pileus ice crystals where a convectively forced gravity wave entered its warm phase; fourth, through successive pulses of convection, a sheet of TTL cirrus formed. While the general incidence and longevity of pileus cloud remains unknown, in-situ measurements, and satellite-based Microwave Limb Sounder retrievals, suggest that much of the tropical TTL is sufficiently humid to be susceptible to its formation. Where these clouds form and persist, there is potential for an irreversible repartition from water vapor to ice at cold temperatures.

  10. Equatorial cloud level convection on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon Joo; Imamura, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Sato, Takao M.; Maejima, Yasumitsu

    2016-10-01

    In the equatorial region on Venus, a clear cloud top morphology difference depending on solar local time has been observed through UV images. Laminar flow shaped clouds are shown on the morning side, and convective-like cells on the afternoon side (Titov et al. 2012). Baker et al. (1998) suggested that deep convective motions in the low-to-middle cloud layers at the 40–60 km range can explain cellular shapes. Imamura et al. (2014), however argued that this cannot be a reason, as convection in the low-to-middle cloud layers can be suppressed near sub solar regions due to a stabilizing effect by strong solar heating. We suggest that the observed feature may be related to strong solar heating at local noon time (Lee et al. 2015). Horizontal uneven distribution of an unknown UV absorber and/or cloud top structure may trigger horizontal convection (Toigo et al. 1994). In order to examine these possibilities, we processed 1-D radiative transfer model calculations from surface to 100 km altitude (SHDOM, Evans 1998), which includes clouds at 48-71 km altitudes (Crisp et al. 1986). The results on the equatorial thermal cooling and solar heating profiles were employed in a 2D fluid dynamic model calculation (CReSS, Tsuboki and Sakakibara 2007). The calculation covered an altitude range of 40-80 km and a 100-km horizontal distance. We compared three conditions; an 'effective' global circulation condition that cancels out unbalanced net radiative energy at equator, a condition without such global circulation effect, and the last condition assumed horizontally inhomogeneous unknown UV absorber distribution. Our results show that the local time dependence of lower level cloud convection is consistent with Imamura et al.'s result, and suggest a possible cloud top level convection caused by locally unbalanced net energy and/or horizontally uneven solar heating. This may be related to the observed cloud morphology in UV images. The effective global circulation condition, however

  11. Convective dust clouds in a complex plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mitic, S; Ivlev, A V; Hoefner, H; Thoma, M H; Zhdanov, S; Morfill, G E

    2008-01-01

    The plasma is generated in a low frequency glow discharge within an elongated glass tube oriented vertically. The dust particles added to the plasma are confined above the heater and form counter-rotating clouds close to the tube centre. The shape of the clouds and the velocity field of the conveying dust particles are determined. The forces acting on the particles are calculated. It is shown that convection of the dust is affected by the convective gas motion which is triggered, in turn, by thermal creep of the gas along the inhomogeneously heated walls of the tube.

  12. Coupling between lower-tropospheric convective mixing and low-level clouds: Physical mechanisms and dependence on convection scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Jessica; Bony, Sandrine; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Roehrig, Romain

    2016-12-01

    Several studies have pointed out the dependence of low-cloud feedbacks on the strength of the lower-tropospheric convective mixing. By analyzing a series of single-column model experiments run by a climate model using two different convective parametrizations, this study elucidates the physical mechanisms through which marine boundary-layer clouds depend on this mixing in the present-day climate and under surface warming. An increased lower-tropospheric convective mixing leads to a reduction of low-cloud fraction. However, the rate of decrease strongly depends on how the surface latent heat flux couples to the convective mixing and to boundary-layer cloud radiative effects: (i) on the one hand, the latent heat flux is enhanced by the lower-tropospheric drying induced by the convective mixing, which damps the reduction of the low-cloud fraction, (ii) on the other hand, the latent heat flux is reduced as the lower troposphere stabilizes under the effect of reduced low-cloud radiative cooling, which enhances the reduction of the low-cloud fraction. The relative importance of these two different processes depends on the closure of the convective parameterization. The convective scheme that favors the coupling between latent heat flux and low-cloud radiative cooling exhibits a stronger sensitivity of low-clouds to convective mixing in the present-day climate, and a stronger low-cloud feedback in response to surface warming. In this model, the low-cloud feedback is stronger when the present-day convective mixing is weaker and when present-day clouds are shallower and more radiatively active. The implications of these insights for constraining the strength of low-cloud feedbacks observationally is discussed.

  13. Particle sedimentation and diffusive convection in volcanic ash-clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carazzo, G.; Jellinek, A. M.

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the longevity of volcanic ash-clouds generated by powerful explosive eruptions is a long standing problem for assessing volcanic hazards and the nature and time scale of volcanic forcings on climate change. It is well known that the lateral spreading and longevity of these clouds is influenced by stratospheric winds, particle settling and turbulent diffusion. Observations of the recent 2010 Eyjafjallajökull and 2011 Grimsvötn umbrella clouds, as well as the structure of atmospheric aerosol clouds from the 1991 Mt Pinatubo event, suggest that an additional key process governing the cloud dynamics is the production of internal layering. Here, we use analog experiments on turbulent particle-laden umbrella clouds to show that this layering occurs where natural convection driven by particle sedimentation and the differential diffusion of primarily heat and fine particles give rise to a large scale instability. Where umbrella clouds are particularly enriched in fine ash, this "particle diffusive convection" strongly influences the cloud longevity. More generally, cloud residence time will depend on fluxes due to both individual settling and diffusive convection. We develop a new sedimentation model that includes both sedimentation processes, and which is found to capture real-time measurements of the rate of change of particle concentration in the 1982 El Chichon, 1991 Mt Pinatubo and 1992 Mt Spurr ash-clouds. A key result is that these combined sedimentation processes enhance the fallout of fine particles relative to expectations from individual settling suggesting that particle aggregation is not the only mechanism required to explain volcanic umbrella longevity.

  14. Deep convective clouds at the tropopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Aumann

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Data from the Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS on the EOS Aqua spacecraft identify thousands of cloud tops colder than 225 K, loosely referred to as Deep Convective Clouds (DCC. Many of these cloud tops have "inverted" spectra, i.e. areas of strong water vapor, CO2 and ozone opacity, normally seen in absorption, are now seen in emission. We refer to these inverted spectra as DCCi. They are found in about 0.4% of all spectra from the tropical oceans excluding the Western Tropical Pacific (WTP, 1.1% in the WTP. The cold clouds are the anvils capping thunderstorms and consist of optically thick cirrus ice clouds. The precipitation rate associated with DCCi suggests that imbedded in these clouds, protruding above them, and not spatially resolved by the AIRS 15 km FOV, are even colder bubbles, where strong convection pushes clouds to within 5 hPa of the pressure level of the tropopause cold point. Associated with DCCi is a local upward displacement of the tropopause, a cold "bulge", which can be seen directly in the brightness temperatures of AIRS and AMSU channels with weighting function peaking between 40 and 2 hPa, without the need for a formal temperature retrieval. The bulge is not resolved by the analysis in numerical weather prediction models. The locally cold cloud tops relative to the analysis give the appearance (in the sense of an "illusion" of clouds overshooting the tropopause and penetrating into the stratosphere. Based on a simple model of optically thick cirrus clouds, the spectral inversions seen in the AIRS data do not require these clouds to penetrate into the stratosphere. However, the contents of the cold bulge may be left in the lower stratosphere as soon as the strong convection subsides. The heavy precipitation and the distortion of the temperature structure near the tropopause indicate that DCCi are associated with intense storms. Significant long-term trends in the statistical properties of DCCi could be

  15. The CLOUD experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets (CLOUD) experiment as shown by Jasper Kirkby (spokesperson). Kirkby shows a sketch to illustrate the possible link between galactic cosmic rays and cloud formations. The CLOUD experiment uses beams from the PS accelerator at CERN to simulate the effect of cosmic rays on cloud formations in the Earth's atmosphere. It is thought that cosmic ray intensity is linked to the amount of low cloud cover due to the formation of aerosols, which induce condensation.

  16. Do convective schemes substantially alter simulated global climate and cloud feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, S. C.; Webb, M.; Lock, A.; Bretherton, C. S.; Bony, S.; Cole, J. N.; Idelkadi, A.; Kang, S. M.; Koshiro, T.; Kawai, H.; Ogura, T.; Roehrig, R.; Shin, Y.; Mauritsen, T.; Vial, J.; Watanabe, M.; Woelfle, M.; Zhao, M.; Cairns, C. W.; Vallis, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate CFMIP-2 AMIP and AMIP+4K experiments with ten climate models which have had their convective parametrizations turned off. Previous studies have suggested that parameterized convection may be a leading source of inter-model spread in cloud feedbacks and other aspects. We find that model biases in 'ConvOff' runs (those with the convective schemes switched off), for example in tropical lapse rate and relative humidity, are generally smaller than intermodel differences in these fields, in spite of the fact that these fields are widely thought to be controlled by convective processes. This suggests that, to a considerable extent, explicitly resolved convection is able to do most of the overall job of convection in modern climate models at least with respect to phenomena at large scales. We find moreover that 'ConvOff' models have a similar overall range of cloud feedbacks compared to the standard configurations. Furthermore, applying a simple bias correction method to allow for differences in present day global cloud radiative effects substantially reduces the differences between the cloud feedbacks with and without parametrized convection in the individual models. We conclude that, while parametrized convection influences the strength of the cloud feedbacks substantially in some models, other processes must also contribute substantially to the overall inter-model spread. The positive shortwave cloud feedbacks seen in the models in subtropical regimes associated with shallow clouds are still present in the ConvOff experiments. Inter-model spread in shortwave cloud feedback increases slightly in regimes associated with trade cumulus in the ConvOff experiments but is quite similar in the most stable sub-tropical regimes associated with stratocumulus clouds. Inter-model spread in longwave cloud feedbacks in strongly precipitating regions of the tropics is substantially reduced in the ConvOff experiments however, indicating a considerable local contribution

  17. An Overview of the Lightning - Atmospheric Chemistry Aspects of the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, K. E.; Barth, M. C.; Koshak, W.; Bucsela, E. J.; Allen, D. J.; Weinheimer, A.; Ryerson, T.; Huntrieser, H.; Bruning, E.; MacGorman, D.; Krehbiel, P.; Thomas, R.; Carey, L.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the major goals of the DC3 experiment are to determine the contribution of lightning to NO(x) in the anvils of observed thunderstorms, examine the relationship of lightning NO(x) production to flash rates and to lightning channel lengths, and estimate the relative production per flash for cloud-to-ground flashes and intracloud flashes. In addition, the effects of lightning NO(x) production on photochemistry downwind of thunderstorms is also being examined. The talk will survey the observation types that were conducted during DC3 relevant to these goals and provide an overview of the analysis and modeling techniques which are being used to achieve them. NO(x) was observed on three research aircraft during DC3 (the NCAR G-V, the NASA DC-8, and the DLR Falcon) in flights through storm anvils in three study regions (NE Colorado, Central Oklahoma to West Texas, and northern Alabama) where lightning mapping arrays (LMAs) and radar coverage were available. Initial comparisons of the aircraft NOx observations in storm anvils relative to flash rates have been conducted, which will be followed with calculations of the flux of NO(x) through the anvils, which when combined with observed flash rates can be used to estimate storm-average lightning NOx production per flash. The WRF-Chem model will be run for cloud-resolved simulations of selected observed storms during DC3. Detailed lightning information from the LMAs (flash rates and flash lengths as a function of time and vertical distributions of flash channel segments) will be input to the model along with assumptions concerning NO(x) production per CG flash and per IC flash. These assumptions will be tested through comparisons with the aircraft NOx data from anvil traverses. A specially designed retrieval method for lightning NO2 column amounts from the OMI instrument on NASA fs Aura satellite has been utilized to estimate NO2 over the region affected by selected DC3 storms. Combined with NO(x) to NO2 ratios from the

  18. Vertical Motions in Convective Clouds Over Darwin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallinson, H.; Schumacher, C.; Ahmed, F.

    2015-12-01

    Vertical motions are essential in parameterizing convection in large-scale models. Yet in tropical systems vertical motions are difficult to obtain, especially in areas of active convection. This study uses three months of profiler data from Darwin, Australia to directly compare vertical velocity and spectrum width with reflectivity at a height of 1 km (a near-surface rain proxy) for shallow, mid-level, and deep convective clouds. Vertical velocities for all convective clouds were also compared to echo-top heights of varying reflectivities to better understand convective cloud dynamics in relation to their vertical structure. In shallow convective clouds (tops 40 dBz). These regimes could represent different stages in the convective cloud life cycle with strong updrafts and moderate reflectivity occurring in the growing phase and strong downdrafts and large reflectivity occurring in the mature phase. The weak up-and downdraft couplet and low reflectivities suggest a dissipating phase. Mid-level convective clouds (tops 4-8 km) also show three distinct regimes: moderate updrafts at low reflectivities (possible growing phase), a weak up-and downdraft couplet at moderate reflectivities (possible dissipating phase), and strong up-and downdrafts at large reflectivities (mature phase). Deep convective clouds (tops >8 km) show strong updrafts above 4 km for all reflectivities with the strongest downdrafts occurring at large reflectivities. While maximum updrafts vary in height and occur at different reflectivities among cloud types, mean downdraft depth never exceeds 3 km and is always strongest at large reflectivities, which may allow better characterization of cold pool properties. Throughout all convective cloud types, spectrum width has the highest values at lower heights than where the strongest up-and downdrafts occur while also showing a maximum value core around the transition height. In addition, maximum vertical motions occur at or just beneath the 30-dBz echo

  19. A new perspective on the infrared brightness temperature distribution of the deep convective clouds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KONDURU, RAKESH TEJA; KISHTAWAL, C M; SHAH, SHIVANI

    2013-01-01

    ...), for both deep convective and non-deep convective (shallow cloud) cases. It is observed that Johnson SB function is the best continuous distribution function in explaining the histogram of infrared brightness temperatures of the convective clouds...

  20. Estimation of convective entrainment properties from a cloud-resolving model simulation during TWP-ICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang J.; Wu, Xiaoqing; Zeng, Xiping; Mitovski, Toni

    2016-10-01

    The fractional entrainment rate in convective clouds is an important parameter in current convective parameterization schemes of climate models. In this paper, it is estimated using a 1-km-resolution cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation of convective clouds from TWP-ICE (the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment). The clouds are divided into different types, characterized by cloud-top heights. The entrainment rates and moist static energy that is entrained or detrained are determined by analyzing the budget of moist static energy for each cloud type. Results show that the entrained air is a mixture of approximately equal amount of cloud air and environmental air, and the detrained air is a mixture of ~80 % of cloud air and 20 % of the air with saturation moist static energy at the environmental temperature. After taking into account the difference in moist static energy between the entrained air and the mean environment, the estimated fractional entrainment rate is much larger than those used in current convective parameterization schemes. High-resolution (100 m) large-eddy simulation of TWP-ICE convection was also analyzed to support the CRM results. It is shown that the characteristics of entrainment rates estimated using both the high-resolution data and CRM-resolution coarse-grained data are similar. For each cloud category, the entrainment rate is high near cloud base and top, but low in the middle of clouds. The entrainment rates are best fitted to the inverse of in-cloud vertical velocity by a second order polynomial.

  1. On the observation of unusual high concentration of small chain-like aggregate ice crystals and large ice water contents near the top of a deep convective cloud during the CIRCLE-2 experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Gayet

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During the CIRCLE-2 experiment carried out over Western Europe in May 2007, combined in situ and remote sensing observations allowed to describe microphysical and optical properties near-top of an overshooting convective cloud (11 080 m/−58 °C. The airborne measurements were performed with the DLR Falcon aircraft specially equipped with a unique set of instruments for the extensive in situ cloud measurements of microphysical and optical properties (Polar Nephelometer, FSSP-300, Cloud Particle Imager and PMS 2D-C and nadir looking remote sensing observations (DLR WALES Lidar. Quasi-simultaneous space observations from MSG/SEVIRI, CALIPSO/CALIOP-WFC-IIR and CloudSat/CPR combined with airborne RASTA radar reflectivity from the French Falcon aircraft flying above the DLR Falcon depict very well convective cells which overshoot by up to 600 m the tropopause level. Unusual high values of the concentration of small ice particles, extinction, ice water content (up to 70 cm−3, 30 km−1 and 0.5 g m−3, respectively are experienced. This very dense cloud causes a strong attenuation of the WALES and CALIOP lidar returns. The mean effective diameter is of 43 μm and the maximum particle size is about 300 μm. The SEVIRI retrieved parameters confirm the occurrence of small ice crystals at the top of the convective cell. Smooth and featureless phase functions with asymmetry factors of 0.776 indicate fairly uniform optical properties. Due to small ice crystals the power-law relationship between ice water content (IWC and radar reflectivity appears to be very different from those usually found in cirrus and anvil clouds. For a given equivalent reflectivity factor, IWCs are significantly larger for the overshooting cell than for the cirrus. Assuming the same prevalent microphysical properties over the depth of the overshooting cell, RASTA reflectivity profiles scaled into ice water content show that retrieved IWC up to 1 g

  2. On the observation of unusual high concentration of small chain-like aggregate ice crystals and large ice water contents near the top of a deep convective cloud during the CIRCLE-2 experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Gayet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the CIRCLE-2 experiment carried out over Western Europe in May 2007, combined in situ and remote sensing observations allowed to describe microphysical and optical properties near-top of an overshooting convective cloud (11 080 m/−58 °C. The airborne measurements were performed with the DLR Falcon aircraft specially equipped with a unique set of instruments for the extensive in situ cloud measurements of microphysical and optical properties (Polar Nephelometer, FSSP-300, Cloud Particle Imager and PMS 2-D-C and nadir looking remote sensing observations (DLR WALES Lidar. Quasi-simultaneous space observations from MSG/SEVIRI, CALIPSO/CALIOP-WFC-IIR and CloudSat/CPR combined with airborne RASTA radar reflectivity from the French Falcon aircraft flying above the DLR Falcon depict very well convective cells which overshoot by up to 600 m the tropopause level. Unusual high values of the concentration of small ice particles, extinction, ice water content (up to 70 cm−3, 30 km−1 and 0.5 g m−3, respectively are experienced. The mean effective diameter and the maximum particle size are 43 μm and about 300 μm, respectively. This very dense cloud causes a strong attenuation of the WALES and CALIOP lidar returns. The SEVIRI retrieved parameters confirm the occurrence of small ice crystals at the top of the convective cell. Smooth and featureless phase functions with asymmetry factors of 0.776 indicate fairly uniform optical properties. Due to small ice crystals the power-law relationship between ice water content (IWC and radar reflectivity appears to be very different from those usually found in cirrus and anvil clouds. For a given equivalent reflectivity factor, IWCs are significantly larger for the overshooting cell than for the cirrus. Assuming the same prevalent microphysical properties over the depth of the overshooting cell, RASTA reflectivity profiles scaled into ice water content show that retrieved

  3. Retrievals of ice cloud microphysical properties of deep convective systems using radar measurements: Convective Cloud Microphysical Retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Jingjing [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks North Dakota USA; Dong, Xiquan [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks North Dakota USA; Xi, Baike [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks North Dakota USA; Wang, Jingyu [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks North Dakota USA; Homeyer, Cameron R. [School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, Norman Oklahoma USA; McFarquhar, Greg M. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana Illinois USA; Fan, Jiwen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-09-23

    This study presents new algorithms for retrieving ice cloud microphysical properties (ice water content (IWC) and median mass diameter (Dm)) for the stratiform and thick anvil regions of Deep Convective Systems (DCSs) using Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) reflectivity and recently developed empirical relationships from aircraft in situ measurements during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). A classic DCS case on 20 May 2011 is used to compare the retrieved IWC profiles with other retrieval and cloud-resolving model simulations. The mean values of each retrieved and simulated IWC fall within one standard derivation of the other two. The statistical results from six selected cases during MC3E show that the aircraft in situ derived IWC and Dm are 0.47 ± 0.29 g m-3 and 2.02 ± 1.3 mm, while the mean values of retrievals have a positive bias of 0.16 g m-3 (34%) and a negative bias of 0.39 mm (19%). To validate the newly developed retrieval algorithms from this study, IWC and Dm are performed with other DCS cases during Bow Echo and Mesoscale Convective Vortex Experiment (BAMEX) field campaign using composite gridded NEXRAD reflectivity and compared with in situ IWC and Dm from aircraft. A total of 64 1-min collocated aircraft and radar samples are available for comparisons, and the averages of radar retrieved and aircraft in situ measured IWCs are 1.22 g m-3 and 1.26 g m-3 with a correlation of 0.5, and their averaged Dm values are 2.15 and 1.80 mm. These comparisons have shown that the retrieval algorithms 45 developed during MC3E can retrieve similar ice cloud microphysical properties of DCS to aircraft in situ measurements during BAMEX with median errors of ~40% and ~25% for IWC and Dm retrievals, respectively. This is indicating our retrieval algorithms are suitable for other midlatitude continental DCS ice clouds, especially at stratiform rain and thick anvil regions. In addition, based on the averaged IWC and Dm values during MC3E and

  4. What Goes Up Must Come Down: The Lifecycle of Convective Clouds (492nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Michael [BNL Environmental Sciences

    2014-02-19

    Some clouds look like cotton balls and others like anvils. Some bring rain, some snow and sleet, and others, just shade. But, whether big and billowy or dark and stormy, clouds affect far more than the weather each day. Armed with measurements of clouds’ updrafts and downdrafts—which resemble airflow in a convection oven—and many other atmospheric interactions, scientists from Brookhaven Lab and other institutions around the world are developing models that are crucial for understanding Earth’s climate and forecasting future climate change. During his lecture, Dr. Jensen provides an overview of the importance of clouds in the Earth’s climate system before explaining how convective clouds form, grow, and dissipate. His discussion includes findings from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), a major collaborative experiment between U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA scientists to document precipitation, clouds, winds, and moisture in 3-D for a holistic view of convective clouds and their environment.

  5. CLOUD Experiment - How it works -

    CERN Multimedia

    Jasper Kirkby

    2016-01-01

    A brief tour of the CLOUD experiment at CERN, and its scientific aims. CLOUD uses a special cloud chamber to study the possible link between galactic cosmic rays and cloud formation. The results should contribute much to our fundamental understanding of aerosols and clouds, and their affect on climate.

  6. Microphysical characteristics of convective clouds over ocean and land from aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmakumari, B.; Maheskumar, R. S.; Anand, Vrinda; Axisa, Duncan

    2017-10-01

    The Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement EXperiment (CAIPEEX) is a field campaign conducted in India with an instrumented research aircraft. On 29 October 2010, a cyclonic circulation over the Bay of Bengal persisted throughout the day. A special mission was conducted over the Bay of Bengal on this day with the objective of characterizing marine and continental clouds on the same day and finding contrasting/similar signatures of their microphysical properties. The research aircraft sampled growing convective clouds over the ocean and over land. High concentrations of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) were observed over land compared to ocean. Over ocean, higher liquid water content (LWC) and lower cloud droplet number concentrations (Nc) were observed, and droplets reached the threshold of precipitation initiation at lower cloud depths. Over land, clouds contained lower LWC and higher Nc, hence droplets did not reach the threshold of precipitation initiation at a warm temperature as in ocean clouds. Over the ocean larger droplets or drizzle were observed at lower cloud depth than over land. The maximum LWC was found to be very similar at higher altitudes. The convective clouds over land were modified by pollution aerosol with contrasting microphysical properties to those over the ocean.

  7. Vertical Variation of Ice Particle Size in Convective Cloud Tops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Fridlind, Ann M.; Cairns, Brian; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Yorks, John E.

    2016-01-01

    A novel technique is used to estimate derivatives of ice effective radius with respect to height near convective cloud tops (dr(sub e)/dz) from airborne shortwave reflectance measurements and lidar. Values of dr(sub e)/dz are about -6 micrometer/km for cloud tops below the homogeneous freezing level, increasing to near 0 micrometer/km above the estimated level of neutral buoyancy. Retrieved dr(sub e)/dz compares well with previously documented remote sensing and in situ estimates. Effective radii decrease with increasing cloud top height, while cloud top extinction increases. This is consistent with weaker size sorting in high, dense cloud tops above the level of neutral buoyancy where fewer large particles are present and with stronger size sorting in lower cloud tops that are less dense. The results also confirm that cloud top trends of effective radius can generally be used as surrogates for trends with height within convective cloud tops. These results provide valuable observational targets for model evaluation.

  8. A Convective Vorticity Vector Associated With Tropical Convection: A 2D Cloud-Resolving Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shou-Ting; Ping, Fan; Li, Xiao-Fan; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    Although dry/moist potential vorticity is a useful physical quantity for meteorological analysis, it cannot be applied to the analysis of 2D simulations. A convective vorticity vector (CVV) is introduced in this study to analyze 2D cloud-resolving simulation data associated with 2D tropical convection. The cloud model is forced by the vertical velocity, zonal wind, horizontal advection, and sea surface temperature obtained from the TOGA COARE, and is integrated for a selected 10-day period. The CVV has zonal and vertical components in the 2D x-z frame. Analysis of zonally-averaged and mass-integrated quantities shows that the correlation coefficient between the vertical component of the CVV and the sum of the cloud hydrometeor mixing ratios is 0.81, whereas the correlation coefficient between the zonal component and the sum of the mixing ratios is only 0.18. This indicates that the vertical component of the CVV is closely associated with tropical convection. The tendency equation for the vertical component of the CVV is derived and the zonally-averaged and mass-integrated tendency budgets are analyzed. The tendency of the vertical component of the CVV is determined by the interaction between the vorticity and the zonal gradient of cloud heating. The results demonstrate that the vertical component of the CVV is a cloud-linked parameter and can be used to study tropical convection.

  9. Studying an effect of salt powder seeding used for precipitation enhancement from convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Drofa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and theoretical studies of cloud microstructure modification with hygroscopic particles for obtaining additional precipitation amounts from convective clouds are performed. The experiment used salt powder with the particle sizes that gave the greatest effectiveness according to the simulations of Segal et al. (2004. The experiments were carried out in a cloud chamber at the conditions corresponding to the formation of convective clouds. The results have shown that the introduction of the salt powder before a cloud medium is formed in the chamber results in the formation on a "tail" of additional large drops. In this case seeding with the salt powder leads also to enlargement of the whole population of cloud drops and to a decrease of their total concentration as compared to a cloud medium that is formed on background aerosols. These results are the positive factors for stimulating coagulation processes in clouds and for subsequent formation of precipitation in them. An overseeding effect, which is characterized by increased droplet concentration and decreased droplet size, was not observed even at high salt powder concentrations.

    The results of numerical simulations have shown that the transformation of cloud drop spectra induced by the introduction of the salt powder results in more intense coagulation processes in clouds as compared to the case of cloud modification with hygroscopic particles with relatively narrow particle size distributions, and for the distribution of the South African hygroscopic flares. The calculation results obtained with a one-dimensional model of a warm convective cloud demonstrated that the effect of salt powder on clouds (total amounts of additional precipitation is significantly higher than the effect caused by the use of hygroscopic particles with narrow particle size distributions at comparable consumptions of seeding agents, or with respect to the hygroscopic flares. Here we show that

  10. Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) Experiment Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Parsons, D [NCAR; Geerts, B [Department of Atmospheric Science, University of Wyoming

    2015-03-01

    The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment is a large field campaign that is being supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with contributions from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Atmospheric and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The overarching goal of the PECAN experiment is to improve the understanding and simulation of the processes that initiate and maintain convection and convective precipitation at night over the central portion of the Great Plains region of the United States (Parsons et al. 2013). These goals are important because (1) a large fraction of the yearly precipitation in the Great Plains comes from nocturnal convection, (2) nocturnal convection in the Great Plains is most often decoupled from the ground and, thus, is forced by other phenomena aloft (e.g., propagating bores, frontal boundaries, low-level jets [LLJ], etc.), (3) there is a relative lack of understanding how these disturbances initiate and maintain nocturnal convection, and (4) this lack of understanding greatly hampers the ability of numerical weather and climate models to simulate nocturnal convection well. This leads to significant uncertainties in predicting the onset, location, frequency, and intensity of convective cloud systems and associated weather hazards over the Great Plains.

  11. Precipitation growth in convective clouds. [hail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the equations of both the growth and motion of hailstones in updrafts and of cloud water contents which vary linearly with height were used to investigate hail growth in a model cloud. A strong correlation was found between the hail embyro starting position and its trajectory and final size. A simple model of the evolution of particle size distribution by coalescence and spontaneous and binary disintegrations was formulated. Solutions for the mean mass of the distribution and the equilibrium size distribution were obtained for the case of constant collection kernel and disintegration parameters. Azimuthal scans of Doppler velocity at a number of elevation angles were used to calculate high resolution vertical profiles of particle speed and horizontal divergence (the vertical air velocity) in a region of widespread precipitation trailing a mid-latitude squall line.

  12. Characterization of fast-growing convection from synergistic observations of CloudSat, MODIS and IIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Z. J.; Anderson, R.

    2012-12-01

    We exploit the fact that Aqua leads CloudSat/CALIPSO by 1-2 min to identify fast-growing convection, whose cloud-top temperature (CTT) shows significant decrease from MODIS (onboard Aqua) to IIR (onboard CALIPSO). Assuming adiabatic ascent of convective clouds, we estimate cloud-top vertical velocity (w) from the decrease rate of CTT. Categorizing convective towers by cloud-top height (CTH) gives a means to study the vertical profiles of w - an important parameter for understanding convective dynamics. Our initial results show that the fastest-growing convection has CTH ~ 8- 10 km. They are likely deep convection in early life stage. Finally, we analyze CloudSat cloud-profiling radar (CPR) reflectivities which provide a glimpse into the internal vertical structure of these fast-growing convective towers.

  13. Frequency of Deep Convective Clouds and Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Teixeira, Joao

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effect of global warming on the formation of Deep Convective Clouds (DCC). It concludes that nature responds to global warming with an increase in strong convective activity. The frequency of DCC increases with global warming at the rate of 6%/decade. The increased frequency of DCC with global warming alone increases precipitation by 1.7%/decade. It compares the state of the art climate models' response to global warming, and concludes that the parametrization of climate models need to be tuned to more closely emulate the way nature responds to global warming.

  14. Frequency of Deep Convective Clouds and Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Teixeira, Joao

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effect of global warming on the formation of Deep Convective Clouds (DCC). It concludes that nature responds to global warming with an increase in strong convective activity. The frequency of DCC increases with global warming at the rate of 6%/decade. The increased frequency of DCC with global warming alone increases precipitation by 1.7%/decade. It compares the state of the art climate models' response to global warming, and concludes that the parametrization of climate models need to be tuned to more closely emulate the way nature responds to global warming.

  15. Quantifying the effects of resolution on convective organisation in cloud-system resolving simulations of West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bethan; Stier, Philip; Birch, Cathryn

    2016-04-01

    Convection transports moisture, momentum, heat and aerosols through the troposphere, and so the variability of convection is a major driver of global weather and climate. Convection in the tropics is organised across a wide range of spatiotemporal scales, from the few kilometres and hours associated with individual cloud systems, through the mesoscale of squall lines and cloud clusters, to the synoptic scale of tropical cyclones. Global and limited area models often fail to represent many of these scales of organisation, and the interaction between the scales remains poorly understood. In this work we devise a new metric to quantify the degree of convective organisation. We apply this metric to data from simulations of the West African Monsoon region from the CASCADE project, where simulations were performed using the Met Office Unified Model at 12 km horizontal grid length with parameterised convection, and at 12, 4 and 1.5 km horizontal grid lengths with permitted convection. This allows us to perform quantitative analysis of convective organisation across model configurations that experience the same large-scale state and differ only in horizontal grid length and representation of deep convection. We show that our analysis technique can be usefully applied to high-resolution, cloud-system resolving, large-domain simulations of tropical convection. We use our technique to quantify the effects of horizontal grid length and of convective parameterisation on the degree of organisation in the simulated convection, and investigate the spatiotemporal variability of the convective organisation in the different model configurations. We then determine relationships between the degree of convective organisation and precipitation. Further, we compare our results against equivalent parameters derived from satellite data to identify how well each of the model configurations performs against observations. Through the use of this new metric, this work provides a quantitative

  16. Using SEVIRI radiances to retrieve cloud optical properties of convective cloud systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jennifer; Fischer, Jürgen; Hünerbein, Anja; Deneke, Hartwig; Macke, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    In this case study the development of cloud properties (cloud optical depth, effective radius and cloud top height) during the life-cycle of a convective cloud system over Europe was analyzed. To retrieve the properties we developed a retrieval scheme based on the radiative transfer code MOMO and an optimal estimation procedure. Input data are the visible to short-wavelength infrared channels from SEVIRI. In contrast to many other retrieval schemes we used 4 channels simultaneously. Especially the 3,9μm channel provides additional information due to the fact that it measures solar reflectance and thermal emission and allows the inclusion of cloud top height into the retrieval. By using a time series of SEVIRI measurements we want to provide and examine the microphysical development of the cloud over life-time. We monitored the growth of the system and found the most active parts of the convection with the highest water content and optical depth in those regions where the cloud top height is largest, too. The effective radius of the cloud particles is largest in older regions of the cloud system, where the cloud is already decaying.

  17. Cloud's center of gravity – a compact approach to analyze convective cloud development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Koren

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available As cloud resolving models become more detailed, with higher resolution outputs, it is often complicated to isolate the physical processes that control the cloud attributes. Moreover, due to the high dimensionality and complexity of the model output, the analysis and interpretation of the results can be very complicated. Here we suggest a novel approach to convective cloud analysis that yields more insight into the physical and temporal evolution of clouds, and is compact and efficient. The different (3-D cloud attributes are weighted and projected onto a single point in space and in time, that has properties of, or similar to, the Center Of Gravity (COG. The location, magnitude and spread of this variable are followed in time. The implications of the COG approach are demonstrated for a study of aerosol effects on a warm convective cloud. We show that in addition to reducing dramatically the dimensionality of the output, such an approach often enhances the signal, adds more information, and makes the physical description of cloud evolution clearer, allowing unambiguous comparison of clouds evolving in different environmental conditions. This approach may also be useful for analysis of cloud data retrieved from surface or space-based cloud radars.

  18. The Mechanism of First Raindrops Formation in Deep Convective Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khain, Alexander; Prabha, Thara; Benmoshe, Nir; Pandithurai, G.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

    2013-08-22

    The formation of first raindrops in deep convective clouds is investigated. A combination of observational data analysis and 2-D and 3-D numerical bin microphysical simulations of deep convective clouds suggests that the first raindrops form at the top of undiluted or slightly diluted cores. It is shown that droplet size distributions in these regions are wider and contain more large droplets than in diluted volumes. The results of the study indicate that the initial raindrop formation is determined by the basic microphysical processes within ascending adiabatic volumes. It allows one to predict the height of the formation of first raindrops considering the processes of nucleation, diffusion growth and collisions. The results obtained in the study explain observational results reported by Freud and Rosenfeld (2012) according to which the height of first raindrop formation depends linearly on the droplet number concentration at cloud base. The results also explain why a simple adiabatic parcel model can reproduce this dependence. The present study provides a physical basis for retrieval algorithms of cloud microphysical properties and aerosol properties using satellites proposed by Rosenfeld et al. ( 2012). The study indicates that the role of mixing and entrainment in the formation of the first raindrops is not of crucial importance. It is also shown that low variability of effective and mean volume radii along horizontal traverses, as regularly observed by in situ measurements, can be simulated by high-resolution cloud models, in which mixing is parameterized by a traditional 1.5 order turbulence closure scheme.

  19. Vertical profiles of droplet effective radius in shallow convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Conventional satellite retrievals can only provide information on cloud-top droplet effective radius (re. Given the fact that cloud ensembles in a satellite snapshot have different cloud-top heights, Rosenfeld and Lensky (1998 used the cloud-top height and the corresponding cloud-top re from the cloud ensembles in the snapshot to construct a profile of re representative of that in the individual clouds. This study investigates the robustness of this approach in shallow convective clouds based on results from large-eddy simulations (LES for clean (aerosol mixing ratio Na = 25 mg−1, intermediate (Na = 100 mg−1, and polluted (Na = 2000 mg−1 conditions. The cloud-top height and the cloud-top re from the modeled cloud ensembles are used to form a constructed re profile, which is then compared to the in-cloud re profiles. For the polluted and intermediate cases where precipitation is negligible, the constructed re profiles represent the in-cloud re profiles fairly well with a low bias (about 10 %. The method used in Rosenfeld and Lensky (1998 is therefore validated for nonprecipitating shallow cumulus clouds. For the clean, drizzling case, the in-cloud re can be very large and highly variable, and quantitative profiling based on cloud-top re is less useful. The differences in re profiles between clean and polluted conditions derived in this manner are however, distinct. This study also investigates the subadiabatic characteristics of the simulated cumulus clouds to reveal the effect of mixing on re and its evolution. Results indicate that as polluted and moderately polluted clouds develop into their decaying stage, the subadiabatic fraction

  20. How do changes in warm-phase microphysics affect deep convective clouds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.; Dagan, Guy; Pinto, Lital

    2017-08-01

    Understanding aerosol effects on deep convective clouds and the derived effects on the radiation budget and rain patterns can largely contribute to estimations of climate uncertainties. The challenge is difficult in part because key microphysical processes in the mixed and cold phases are still not well understood. For deep convective clouds with a warm base, understanding aerosol effects on the warm processes is extremely important as they set the initial and boundary conditions for the cold processes. Therefore, the focus of this study is the warm phase, which can be better resolved. The main question is: How do aerosol-derived changes in the warm phase affect the properties of deep convective cloud systems? To explore this question, we used a weather research and forecasting (WRF) model with spectral bin microphysics to simulate a deep convective cloud system over the Marshall Islands during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). The model results were validated against observations, showing similarities in the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and the surface rain rate. Simulations with larger aerosol loading resulted in a larger total cloud mass, a larger cloud fraction in the upper levels, and a larger frequency of strong updrafts and rain rates. Enlarged mass both below and above the zero temperature level (ZTL) contributed to the increase in cloud total mass (water and ice) in the polluted runs. Increased condensation efficiency of cloud droplets governed the gain in mass below the ZTL, while both enhanced condensational and depositional growth led to increased mass above it. The enhanced mass loading above the ZTL acted to reduce the cloud buoyancy, while the thermal buoyancy (driven by the enhanced latent heat release) increased in the polluted runs. The overall effect showed an increased upward transport (across the ZTL) of liquid water driven by both larger updrafts and larger droplet mobility. These aerosol effects were reflected in the larger ratio

  1. How do changes in warm-phase microphysics affect deep convective clouds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding aerosol effects on deep convective clouds and the derived effects on the radiation budget and rain patterns can largely contribute to estimations of climate uncertainties. The challenge is difficult in part because key microphysical processes in the mixed and cold phases are still not well understood. For deep convective clouds with a warm base, understanding aerosol effects on the warm processes is extremely important as they set the initial and boundary conditions for the cold processes. Therefore, the focus of this study is the warm phase, which can be better resolved. The main question is: How do aerosol-derived changes in the warm phase affect the properties of deep convective cloud systems? To explore this question, we used a weather research and forecasting (WRF model with spectral bin microphysics to simulate a deep convective cloud system over the Marshall Islands during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX. The model results were validated against observations, showing similarities in the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and the surface rain rate. Simulations with larger aerosol loading resulted in a larger total cloud mass, a larger cloud fraction in the upper levels, and a larger frequency of strong updrafts and rain rates. Enlarged mass both below and above the zero temperature level (ZTL contributed to the increase in cloud total mass (water and ice in the polluted runs. Increased condensation efficiency of cloud droplets governed the gain in mass below the ZTL, while both enhanced condensational and depositional growth led to increased mass above it. The enhanced mass loading above the ZTL acted to reduce the cloud buoyancy, while the thermal buoyancy (driven by the enhanced latent heat release increased in the polluted runs. The overall effect showed an increased upward transport (across the ZTL of liquid water driven by both larger updrafts and larger droplet mobility. These aerosol effects were reflected in the

  2. A long-term satellite study of aerosol effects on convective clouds in Nordic background air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Sporre

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol-cloud interactions constitute a~major uncertainty in future climate predictions. This study combines 10 yr of ground-based aerosol particle measurements from 2 Nordic background stations (Vavihill and Hyytiälä with MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite data of convective clouds. The merged data are used to examine the indirect aerosol effects on convective clouds over the Nordic countries. From the satellite scenes, vertical profiles of cloud droplet effective radius (re are created by plotting re against cloud top temperature. The profiles have been divided according to aerosol loading but also modeled meteorological parameters from the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts. Furthermore, weather radar data from the BALTEX (Baltic Sea Experiment and ground based precipitation measurements from several ground-based meteorological measurement stations have been investigated to determine whether aerosols affect precipitation intensity and amount. Higher aerosol number concentrations result in smaller re throughout the entire profiles at both stations. Profiles associated with no or little precipitation have smaller droplets than those associated with more precipitation. Furthermore, an increase in aerosol loadings results in a suppression of precipitation rates, when the vertical extent of the clouds has been taken into account. Clouds with greater vertical extent have the highest precipitation rates and are most sensitive to aerosol perturbations. Nevertheless, meteorological parameters such as the vertical extent of the clouds, the atmospheric instability and the relative humidity in the lower atmosphere affect the amount of precipitation that reaches the ground more than the aerosols do. The combination of these ground-based and remote sensing datasets provides a unique long-term study of the effects of aerosols on convective clouds over the Nordic countries.

  3. Preliminary investigation of radiatively driven convection in marine stratocumulus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, P. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Marine stratocumulus play an important yet still poorly modeled role in the climate system. These clouds cool the planet, having a large albedo, but little infrared effect. A fundamental question is whether such clouds will exist at a given time and location. Stratocumulus is often formed at higher latitudes as stratus and advected equatorward until it breaks up. Possible mechanisms for cloud breakup include strong subsidence, cloud top entrainment instability (CTEI), drizzle, solar heating and resultant boundary layer decoupling, and surface forcing. The Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) was conducted to investigate these potential cloud breakup mechanisms. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Dynamic subgrid heterogeneity of convective cloud in a global model: description and evaluation of the Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) in ECHAM6-HAM2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Labbouz, Laurent; Wagner, Till

    2017-01-01

    The Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) attempts to address some of the shortcomings of both the commonly used bulk mass-flux parameterisations and those using a prescribed spectrum of clouds. By considering the cloud spectrum as a competitive system in which cloud types interact through their environment in competition for convective available potential energy (CAPE), the spectrum is able to respond dynamically to changes in the environment. An explicit Lagrangian entraining plume model for each cloud type allows for the representation of convective-cloud microphysics, paving the way for the study of aerosol-convection interactions at the global scale where their impact remains highly uncertain. In this paper, we introduce a new treatment of convective triggering, extending the entraining plume model below cloud base to explicitly represent the unsaturated thermals which initiate convection. This allows for a realistic vertical velocity to develop at cloud base, so that the cloud microphysics can begin with physically based activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). We evaluate this new version of CCFM in the context of the global model ECHAM6-HAM, comparing its performance to the standard Tiedtke-Nordeng parameterisation used in that model. We find that the spatio-temporal distribution of precipitation is improved, both against a climatology from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) and also against diurnal cycles from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) with a reduced tendency for precipitation to peak too early in the afternoon. Cloud cover is quite sensitive to the vertical level from which the dry convection is initiated, but when this is chosen appropriately the cloud cover compares well with that from Tiedtke-Nordeng. CCFM can thus perform as well as, or better than, the standard scheme while providing additional capabilities to represent convective-cloud microphysics and dynamic cloud morphology at the global scale.

  5. Aerosol Microphysical and Macrophysical Effects on Deep Convective Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, T.; Li, Z.; Wilcox, E. M.; Oreopoulos, L.; Remer, L. A.; Yu, H.; Platnick, S. E.; Posselt, D. J.; Zhang, Z.; Martins, J. V.

    2014-12-01

    We illustrate a conceptual model of hydrometeor vertical development inside a convective cloud and its utility in studying of aerosol-DCC interactions. Both case studies and ensemble means are used to investigate aerosol-DCC interactions. We identify a few scenarios where possible signal of aerosol effect on DCC may be extracted. The results show a consistent and physically sound picture of aerosols affecting DCC microphysics as well as macrophysical properties. Specifically, pollutions and smokes are shown to consistently decrease ice particle size. On the contrary, dust particles close to source regions are shown to make cloud ice particle size more maritime like. We postulate that dust may achieve this by acting as either heterogeneous ice nuclei or giant cloud condensation nuclei. This contrast between smoke or pollution and dust also exists for their effects on cloud glaciation temperature. Smoke and pollution aerosols are shown to decrease glaciation temperature while dust particles do the opposite. Possible Implications of our results for studying aerosol indirect forcing, cirrus cloud properties, troposphere-stratosphere water vapor exchange and cloud latent heating are discussed.

  6. CO Signatures in Subtropical Convective Clouds and Anvils During CRYSTAL-FACE: An Analysis of Convective Transport and Entertainment Using Observations and a Cloud-Resolving Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jimena P.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Jost, Hans-Jurg; Loewenstein, Max; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Campos, Teresa L.; Weinstock, Elliot M.; Sayres, David S.; Smith, Jessica B.; Pittman, Jasna V.; hide

    2006-01-01

    Convective systems are an important mechanism in the transport of boundary layer air into the upper troposphere. The Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) campaign, in July 2002, was developed as a comprehensive atmospheric mission to improve knowledge of subtropical cirrus systems and their roles in regional and global climate. In situ measurements of carbon monoxide (CO), water vapor (H20v), and total water (H20t) aboard NASA's . WB-57F aircraft and CO aboard the U.S. Navy's Twin Otter aircraft were obtained to study the role of convective transport. Three flights sampled convective outflow on 11, 16 and 29 July found varying degrees of CO enhancement relative to the fiee troposphere. A cloud-resolving model used the in situ observations and meteorological fields to study these three systems. Several methods of filtering the observations were devised here using ice water content, relative humidity with respect to ice, and particle number concentration as a means to statistically sample the model results to represent the flight tracks. A weighted histogram based on ice water content observations was then used to sample the simulations for the three flights. In addition, because the observations occurred in the convective outflow cirrus and not in the storm cores, the model was used to estimate the maximum CO within the convective systems. In general, anvil-level air parcels contained an estimated 20-40% boundary layer air in the analyzed storms.

  7. CO Signatures in Subtropical Convective Clouds and Anvils during CRYSTAL-FACE: An Analysis of Convective Transport and Entrainment using Observations and a Cloud-Resolving Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jimena P.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Loewenstein, Max; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Campos, Teresa L.; Weinstock, Elliot M.; Sayres, David S.; Smith, Jessica B.; Pittman, Jasna V.

    2006-01-01

    Convective systems are an important mechanism in the transport of boundary layer air into the upper troposphere. The Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) campaign, in July 2002, was developed as a comprehensive atmospheric mission to improve knowledge of subtropical cirrus systems and their roles in regional and global climate. In situ measurements of carbon monoxide (CO), water vapor (H2Ov), and total water (H2Ot) aboard NASA's WB-57F aircraft and CO aboard the U.S. Navy's Twin Otter aircraft were obtained to study the role of convective transport. Three flights sampled convective outflow on 11, 16 and 29 July found varying degrees of CO enhancement relative to the free troposphere. A cloud-resolving model used the in situ observations and meteorological fields to study these three systems. Several methods of filtering the observations were devised here using ice water content, relative humidity with respect to ice, and particle number concentration as a means to statistically sample the model results to represent the flight tracks. A weighted histogram based on ice water content observations was then used to sample the simulations for the three flights. In addition, because the observations occurred in the convective outflow cirrus and not in the storm cores, the model was used to estimate the maximum CO within the convective systems. In general, anvil-level air parcels contained an estimated 20-40% boundary layer air in the analyzed storms.

  8. Improving Convection and Cloud Parameterization Using ARM Observations and NCAR Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang J. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-11-07

    The fundamental scientific objectives of our research are to use ARM observations and the NCAR CAM5 to understand the large-scale control on convection, and to develop improved convection and cloud parameterizations for use in GCMs.

  9. Factors controlling cloud microphysics, precipitation rate, and brightness temperature of tropical convective and stratiform clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashino, T.; Casella, D.; Mugnai, A.; Sano, P.; Smith, E. A.; Tripoli, G.

    2008-12-01

    This paper discusses factors controlling cloud microphysics, precipitation rate and brightness temperature of tropical convective and stratiform clouds. Tropical convective and stratiform clouds are important in radiative forcing of climates and distribution of precipitation over the ocean. The possible effects of climate change on these clouds are still not well understood. Recent studies show that the higher CCN concentration in a convective cloud can lead to more vigorous updrafts and a higher evaporation/precipitation ratio. The stronger updraft often means stronger downdraft and gust fronts, which can trigger convection nearby. This implies that increases in CCN concentration can result in an increase in area coverage and persistence of tropical cirrus and stratiform clouds. The increased cloudiness would then be expected to lower sensible and latent heat flux from the ocean by lowering sea surface temperature, affecting the future development of convective clouds. The sea surface temperature may also change in a local area due to change of ocean circulation in climate change scenarios. Satellite remote sensing is a powerful tool to study tropical and global precipitation distribution. Many physically-based passive-microwave (MW) satellite precipitation algorithms make use of cloud radiation databases (CRDs), which typically consist of microphysical profiles from cloud resolving model (CRMs) and simulated MW brightness temperature (Tb). Thus, it is important to validate Tb simulated by a CRM against the observed Tb. Also, it is important to study how any changes in the tropical clouds due to aerosols and sea surface temperature translate into the precipitation and brightness temperature. The case study chosen is KWAJEX campaign that took place from 23 July to 14 September 1999. Authors have developed microphysical physical framework (Advanced Microphysics Prediction System) to predict ice particle properties explicitly in a CRM (University of Wisconsin

  10. A Cloud-Resolving Modeling Intercomparison Study on Properties of Cloud Microphysics, Convection, and Precipitation for a Squall Line Cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Han, B.; Morrison, H.; Varble, A.; Mansell, E.; Milbrandt, J.; Wang, Y.; Lin, Y.; Dong, X.; Giangrande, S. E.; Jensen, M. P.; Collis, S. M.; North, K.; Kollias, P.

    2015-12-01

    The large spread in CRM model simulations of deep convection and aerosol effects on deep convective clouds (DCCs) makes it difficult (1) to further our understanding of deep convection and (2) to define "benchmarks" and recommendations for their use in parameterization developments. Past model intercomparison studies used different models with different complexities of dynamic-microphysics interactions, making it hard to isolate the causes of differences between simulations. In this intercomparison study, we employed a much more constrained approach - with the same model and same experiment setups for simulations with different cloud microphysics schemes (one-moment, two-moment, and bin models). Both the piggybacking and interactive approaches are employed to explore the major microphysical processes that control the model differences and the significance of their feedback to dynamics through latent heating/cooling and cold pool characteristics. Real-case simulations are conducted for the squall line case 20 May 2011 from the MC3E field campaign. Results from the piggybacking approach show substantially different responses of the microphysics schemes to the same dynamical fields. Although the interactive microphysics-dynamics simulations buffer some differences compared with those from the piggyback runs, large differences still exist and are mainly contributed by ice microphysical processes parameterizations. The presentation will include in-depth analyses of the major microphysical processes for the squall line case, the significance of the feedback of the processes to dynamics, and how those results differ in different cloud microphysics schemes.

  11. Parameterization of convective clouds mesoscale convective systems, and convective-generated cirrus. Final report, September 15, 1990--October 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotton, W.R.

    1993-11-05

    The overall goal of this research is to develop a scheme to parameterize diabatic heating, moisture/water substance, and momentum transports, and precipitation from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) for use in general circulation models (GCMs). Our approach is to perform explicit cloud-resolving simulations of MCSs in the spirit of the GEWEX Cloud Systems Study (GCSS), by using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) developed at Colorado State University (CSU). We then perform statistical analyses (conditional sampling, ensemble-averages, trajectory analyses) of simulated MCSs to assist in fabricating a parameterization scheme, calibrating coefficients, and provide independent tests of the efficacy of the parameterization scheme. A cloud-resolving simulation of ordinary cumulonimbi forced by sea breeze fronts has been completed. Analysis of this case and comparison with parameterized convection simulations has resulted in a number of refinements in the scheme. Three three-dimensional, cloud-resolving simulations of MCSs have been completed. Statistical analyses of model-output data are being performed to assist in developing a parameterization scheme of MCSs in general circulation models.

  12. Convective Signatures in Ozone Profiles: Guidance for Cloud Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J. B.; Thompson, A. M.; Miller, S. K.; Witte, J. C.; Pickering, K. E.; Tao, W. K.

    2006-05-01

    Ozone throughout the free troposphere is a tracer for convection, stratospheric exchange and pollution. Convective influences are typically manifested in two ways: (1) redistribution of ozone from the boundary-layer to free troposphere. In unpolluted regions, this usually means decreasing ozone in the upper troposphere (UT) or UT/LS (upper troposphere-lower stratosphere). Over polluted regions, the opposite may occur. (2) enhancing O3 precursors (NO, CO, hydrocarbons) in the free troposphere, through redistribution, or in the case of lightning, through direct production of NO, adds to photochemical ozone formation. Since about 1990 we have studied ozone dynamics and photochemistry with cloud-resolving (CRM) and larger-scale models. Aircraft profiles of O3, ozone precursors (NO, CO, hydrocarbons) and photochemically related constituents guide model input and are used to evaluate model output. Recently, we have used a semi-empirical approach ("lamina-layering," after Pierce and Grant [1998]) to identifying convective impacts on ozone profiles taken with soundings. The latter are measured by ozonesondes that are flown with radiosondes, to collect PTU data. The advantage of ozonesondes is consistent vertical sampling of ozone into the UT/LS with 5- 25 m resolution, and regular frequency at stations where they are launched. Examples of convective influence in ozone profiles - case studies and climatology at selected locations - will be shown for mid-latitudes and tropics. In mid-latitudes convective ozone budgets are compared to influences of stratospheric exchange and pollution. In the tropics, convective impacts reflect El Nino, the MJO and possible trends in a cooling UT/LS.

  13. Three Dimensional Radiative Transfer In Tropical Deep Convective Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Giuseppe, F.

    In this study the focus is on the interaction between short-wave radiation with a field of tropical deep convective events generated using a 3D cloud resolving model (CRM) to assess the significance of 3D radiative transport (3DRT). It is not currently un- derstood what magnitude of error is involved when a two stream approximation is used to describe the radiative transfer through such a cloud field. It seems likely that deep convective clouds could be the most complex to represent, and that the error in neglecting horizontal transport could be relevant in these cases. The field here con- sidered has an extention of roughly 90x90 km, approximately equivalent to the grid box dimension of many global models. The 3DRT results are compared both with the calculations obtained by an Independent Pixel Approximation (IPA) approch and by the Plane Parallel radiative scheme (PP) implemented in ECMWF's Forecast model. The differences between the three calculations are used to assess both problems in current GCM's representation of radiative heating and inaccuracies in the dynamical response of CRM simulations due to the Independent Column Approximation (ICA). The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the main 3DRT/1D differences is the starting point for the future attempt to develop a parameterization procedure.

  14. Global anthropogenic aerosol effects on convective clouds in ECHAM5-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Lohmann

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols affect the climate system by changing cloud characteristics in many ways. They act as cloud condensation and ice nuclei and may have an influence on the hydrological cycle. Here we investigate aerosol effects on convective clouds by extending the double-moment cloud microphysics scheme developed for stratiform clouds, which is coupled to the HAM double-moment aerosol scheme, to convective clouds in the ECHAM5 general circulation model. This enables us to investigate whether more, and smaller cloud droplets suppress the warm rain formation in the lower parts of convective clouds and thus release more latent heat upon freezing, which would then result in more vigorous convection and more precipitation. In ECHAM5, including aerosol effects in large-scale and convective clouds (simulation ECHAM5-conv reduces the sensitivity of the liquid water path increase with increasing aerosol optical depth in better agreement with observations and large-eddy simulation studies. In simulation ECHAM5-conv with increases in greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions since pre-industrial times, the geographical distribution of the changes in precipitation better matches the observed increase in precipitation than neglecting microphysics in convective clouds. In this simulation the convective precipitation increases the most suggesting that the convection has indeed become more vigorous.

  15. The Diurnal Cycle of the Boundary Layer, Convection, Clouds, and Surface Radiation in a Coastal Monsoon Environment (Darwin Australia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Peter T.; Long, Charles N.; Protat, Alain

    2012-08-01

    The diurnal variation of convection and associated cloud and radiative properties remains a significant issue in global NWP and climate models. This study analyzes observed diurnal variability of convection in a coastal monsoonal environment examining the interaction of convective rain clouds, their associated cloud properties, and the impact on the surface radiation and corresponding boundary layer structure during periods where convection is suppressed or active on the large scale. The analysis uses data from the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) as well as routine measurements from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Both active monsoonal and large-scale suppressed (buildup and break) conditions are examined and demonstrate that the diurnal variation of rainfall is much larger during the break periods and the spatial distribution of rainfall is very different between the monsoon and break regimes. During the active monsoon the total net radiative input to the surface is decreased by more than 3 times the amount than during the break regime - this total radiative cloud forcing is found to be dominated by the shortwave (SW) cloud effects because of the much larger optical thicknesses and persistence of long-lasting anvils and cirrus cloud decks associated with the monsoon regime. These differences in monsoon versus break surface radiative energy contribute to low-level air temperature differences in the boundary layer over the land surfaces.

  16. Vertical Structures of Anvil Clouds of Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems Observed by CloudSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J.; Houze, R. A., Jr.; Heymsfield, A.

    2011-01-01

    A global study of the vertical structures of the clouds of tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) has been carried out with data from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar. Tropical MCSs are found to be dominated by cloud-top heights greater than 10 km. Secondary cloud layers sometimes occur in MCSs, but outside their primary raining cores. The secondary layers have tops at 6--8 and 1--3 km. High-topped clouds extend outward from raining cores of MCSs to form anvil clouds. Closest to the raining cores, the anvils tend to have broader distributions of reflectivity at all levels, with the modal values at higher reflectivity in their lower levels. Portions of anvil clouds far away from the raining core are thin and have narrow frequency distributions of reflectivity at all levels with overall weaker values. This difference likely reflects ice particle fallout and therefore cloud age. Reflectivity histograms of MCS anvil clouds vary little across the tropics, except that (i) in continental MCS anvils, broader distributions of reflectivity occur at the uppermost levels in the portions closest to active raining areas; (ii) the frequency of occurrence of stronger reflectivity in the upper part of anvils decreases faster with increasing distance in continental MCSs; and (iii) narrower-peaked ridges are prominent in reflectivity histograms of thick anvil clouds close to the raining areas of connected MCSs (superclusters). These global results are consistent with observations at ground sites and aircraft data. They present a comprehensive test dataset for models aiming to simulate process-based upper-level cloud structure around the tropics.

  17. Sensitivity studies of developing convection in a cloud-resolving model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petch, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    Cloud-resolving models (CRMs) remain an important tool for providing detailed process information about convection. In this short paper I focus on the development of deep convection and consider what can be considered a minimum expense benchmark simulation for comparison with a numerical weather-prediction model. To decide this a range of sensitivity studies are presented to aspects of the experimental set-up which strongly impact the computational expense. Many of the sensitivities shown in these CRM experiments are quite different to those seen in previous papers which have tended to focus more on deep active convection. Here it is shown that for the case-study presented a minimum expense benchmark simulation must be a 3D simulation. A 200 m horizontal grid length and a domain of 25 km are also required to capture the most important processes.

  18. Simulation of shallow cumuli and their transition to deep convective clouds by cloud-resolving models with different third-order turbulence closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Anning; Xu, Kuan-Man

    2006-01-01

    The abilities of a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with double-Gaussian based and quasi-Gaussian based third-order closures (TOCs) to simulate shallow cumuli and their transition to deep convective clouds are compared in this study. The quasi-Gaussian based TOC is fully prognostic (FP), while the double-Gaussian based TOC is intermediately prognostic (IP). The latter only predicts three important third-order moments while the former predicts all the third-order moments. A shallow cumulus case is simulated by single-column versions of the FP and IP TOC models and a large-eddy simulation (LES). The IP TOC improves the simulation of shallow cumulus greatly over the FP TOC by producing more realistic cloud structures, when both are compared to LES. Large differences of the second- and third-order moments between the FP and IP TOC simulations appear in the cloud layer, because the cloud top height is underestimated by the FP TOC simulation. Sensitivity experiments and analysis of probability density functions (pdfs) used in the TOCs show that both the turbulence-scale condensation and higher-order moments are important to realistic simulations of the boundary-layer shallow cumuli.A shallow to deep convective cloud transition case is also simulated by the two-dimensional (2-D) version of the CRM with FP and IP TOCs. Both simulations can capture the transition from the shallow cumuli to deep convective clouds. The IP simulations produce more and deeper shallow cumuli than the FP simulations, but the FP simulations produce larger and wider convective clouds than the IP simulations. The temporal evolutions of cloud and precipitation are closely related to the turbulent transport, the cold pool and the cloud-scale circulation. The large amount of turbulent mixing associated with the shallow cumuli slows down the increase of the convective available potential energy and inhibits the early transition to deep convective clouds in the IP simulation. When the deep convective clouds

  19. Electromagnetic fields and electrical currents in deep turbulent convective clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmoshe, Nir; Khain, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Charge separation and lightning formation in a thunderstorm is explicitly simulated using spectral bin microphysics the Hebrew University Cloud Model (HUCM) with resolution of 50 m. The model microphysics is based on solving equations for eight size distribution functions for aerosols, drops, three types of ice crystals, aggregates, graupel and hail. Each size distribution is defined on a mass grid containing 43 bins. The model describes the processes of nucleation of cloud particles, diffusion growth, collisions between all types of hydrometeors, differential sedimentation, freezing, melting, breakup of droplets and aggregates, etc' using the equations basing on the first principles, without any parameterization assumptions. Turbulence effects on droplet collisions are taken into account. Charge separation is calculated by collisions between graupel, hail and ice crystals in the presence of liquid water. The charge obtained by particles as a result of collisions depends on the particle size, the temperature, the presence of liquid water, following laboratory results by Takahashi. These charges are transported by convective motions and differential sedimentation depending on mass and type of particles air density. The charges are redistributed between different hydrometeors in course of particle collisions, as well as during freezing, melting and breakup. These charge transformations create time dependent electricity field. The field of electrical potential is determined by solving the Poisson equation. The recursive procedure similar to that developed by Mansell (2002) is used to calculate the lightning path with connects zones where the potential gradients exceeded the breakdown threshold. The electric currents in the clouds are being calculated. The magnetic field near and inside the clouds are shown. The relationship between lightning intensity and cloud microstructure is investigated. It is shown, for instance, that increase in aerosol concentration leads to

  20. Characteristics of clouds and the near cloud environment in a simulation of tropical convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Ian Bruce

    This work presents the general characteristics of cumulus convection and the large-scale environment in a simulation of tropical precipitating convection known as the Giga-LES. A moist static energy (MSE)-based analysis is used because MSE mixes linearly and is conserved for moist adiabatic motions. The MSE-based analysis is first used to examine the properties of convection over height and amount of dilution through mixing, and a minimum dilution greater than zero is quantified. Additionally, an interesting pattern of average buoyancy over MSE and height in the simulation is revealed, possibly linked to cloudy downdrafts and mixing at the edge of clouds. Investigating further, an MSE-based analysis is performed on selected subregions of the simulation domain, particularly the near cloud environment (NCE) of cloudy updrafts in the simulation. It is found that the NCE around all sizes of updrafts, from shallow to deep convection, contains points with properties of a subsiding shell. The dynamical importance of the evaporative-cooling driven subsiding shell has already been demonstrated in previous work studying shallow cumulus clouds. This work presents the first evidence of subsiding shells in the NCE of deep convection, and quantifies the mass flux associated with subsiding shells for different sized clouds. With a new understanding of the NCE of active cloudy updrafts, the updrafts themselves are studied further. The work of Lin and Arakawa is discussed which clarifies how the entraining plumes of the Arakawa and Schubert parameterization should be interpreted. The physical interpretation is that they are composed of subcloud elements with similar detrainment levels that come from different cloudy updrafts. How are the subcloud elements that make up these ideal plumes distributed throughout the cloud field? The answer to this question has implications for the viability of different techniques of cumulus parameterization. I present a new method for characterizing

  1. Various Numerical Applications on Tropical Convective Systems Using a Cloud Resolving Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, C.-L.; Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been given to cloud resolving models (CRMs or cloud ensemble models-CEMs) for their ability to simulate the radiative-convective system, which plays a significant role in determining the regional heat and moisture budgets in the Tropics. The growing popularity of CRM usage can be credited to its inclusion of crucial and physically relatively realistic features such as explicit cloud-scale dynamics, sophisticated microphysical processes, and explicit cloud-radiation interaction. On the other hand, impacts of the environmental conditions (for example, the large-scale wind fields, heat and moisture advections as well as sea surface temperature) on the convective system can also be plausibly investigated using the CRMs with imposed explicit forcing. In this paper, by basically using a Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model, three different studies on tropical convective systems are briefly presented. Each of these studies serves a different goal as well as uses a different approach. In the first study, which uses more of an idealized approach, the respective impacts of the large-scale horizontal wind shear and surface fluxes on the modeled tropical quasi-equilibrium states of temperature and water vapor are examined. In this 2-D study, the imposed large-scale horizontal wind shear is ideally either nudged (wind shear maintained strong) or mixed (wind shear weakened), while the minimum surface wind speed used for computing surface fluxes varies among various numerical experiments. For the second study, a handful of real tropical episodes (TRMM Kwajalein Experiment - KWAJEX, 1999; TRMM South China Sea Monsoon Experiment - SCSMEX, 1998) have been simulated such that several major atmospheric characteristics such as the rainfall amount and its associated stratiform contribution, the Qlheat and Q2/moisture budgets are investigated. In this study, the observed large-scale heat and moisture advections are continuously applied to the 2-D

  2. Tornado funnel-shaped cloud as convection in a cloudy layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zavolgenskiy

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Analytical model of convection in a thick horizontal cloud layer with free upper and lower boundaries is constructed. The cloud layer is supposed to be subjected to the Coriolis force due to the cloud rotation, which is a typical condition for tornado formation. It is obtained that convection in such system can look as just one rotating cell in contrast to the usual many-cells Benard convection. The tornado-type vortex is different from spatially periodic convective cells because their amplitudes vanish with distance from the vortex axis. The lower boundary at this convection can substantially move out of the initially horizontal cloud layer forming a single vertical vortex with intense upward and downward flows. The results are also applicable to convection in water layer with negative temperature gradient.

  3. Diurnal cycle of convection during the CAIPEEX 2011 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resmi, EA; Malap, Neelam; Kulkarni, Gayatri; Murugavel, P.; Nair, Sathy; Burger, Roelof; Prabha, Thara V.

    2016-10-01

    The diurnal cycle of convective storm events is investigated in the study with the help of C-band radar reflectivity data during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX 2011) in combination with other ground-based observations. A threshold reflectivity of 25 dBZ is used to identify the initiation of storms. Observations from collocated sensors such as a microwave radiometer profiler, water vapor measurement from eddy covariance system, and wind lidar measurements are used to investigate the characteristic features and diurnal cycle of convectively initiated storms from 21st September to 5th November 2011. The maximum reflectivity follows a normal distribution with a mean value of 40 dBZ. The cloud depth over the domain varied between 5 and 15 km corresponding to a range of reflectivity of 30-50 dBZ values. In the diurnal cycle, double maximum in the precipitation flux is noted—one during the afternoon hours associated with the diurnal heating and the other in the nocturnal periods. The nocturnal precipitation maximum is attributed to initiation of several single-cell storms (of congestus type) with a duration that is larger than the storms initiated during the daytime. The convective available potential energy (CAPE) showed a diurnal variation and was directly linked with the surface level water vapor content. The high CAPE favored single storms with a reflectivity >40 dBZ and higher echo top heights. In the evening or late night hours, a nocturnal low-level jet present over the location together with the reduced stability above the cloud base favored enhancement of low-level moisture, CAPE, and further initiation of new convection. The study illustrated how collocated observations could be used to study storm initiation and associated thermodynamic features.

  4. An experimental study of the role of particle diffusive convection on the residence time of volcanic ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, E.; Carazzo, G.; Jellinek, M.

    2013-12-01

    The longevity of volcanic ash clouds generated by explosive volcanic plumes is difficult to predict. Diffusive convective instabilities leading to the production of internal layering are known to affect the stability and longevity of these clouds, but the detailed mechanisms controlling particle dynamics and sedimentation are poorly understood. We present results from a series of analog experiments reproducing diffusive convection in a 2D (Hele-Shaw) geometry, which allow us to constrain conditions for layer formation, sedimentation regime and cloud residence time as a function of only the source conditions. We inject a turbulent particle-laden jet sideways into a tank containing a basal layer of salt water and an upper layer of fresh water, which ultimately spreads as a gravity current. After the injection is stopped, particles in suspension settle through the cloud to form particle boundary layers (PBL) at the cloud base. We vary the initial particle concentration of the plume and the injection velocity over a wide range of conditions to identify and characterize distinct regimes of sedimentation. Our experiments show that convective instabilities driven as a result of differing diffusivities of salt and particles lead to periodic layering over a wide range of conditions expected in nature. The flux of particles from layered clouds and the thicknesses of the layers are understood using classical theory for double diffusive convection adjusted for the hydrodynamic diffusion of particles. Although diffusive convection increases sedimentation rates for the smallest particles (<30 μm) its overall effect is to extend the cloud residence time to several hours by maintaining larger particles in suspension within the layers, which is several orders of magnitude longer than expected when considering individual settling rates.

  5. The effect of aerosol-derived changes in the warm phase on the properties of deep convective clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven; Dagan, Guy

    2017-04-01

    The aerosol impact on deep convective clouds starts in an increased number of cloud droplets in higher aerosol loading environment. This change drives many others, like enhanced condensational growth, delay in collision-coalescence and others. Since the warm processes serve as the initial and boundary conditions for the mixed and cold-phase processes in deep clouds, it is highly important to understand the aerosol effect on them. The weather research and forecasting model (WRF) with spectral bin microphysics was used to study a deep convective system over the Marshall Islands, during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). Three simulations were conducted with aerosol concentrations of 100, 500 and 2000 cm-3, to reflect clean, semipolluted, and polluted conditions. The results of the clean run agreed well with the radar profiles and rain rate observations. The more polluted simulations resulted in larger total cloud mass, larger upper level cloud fraction and rain rates. There was an increased mass both below and above the zero temperature level. It indicates of more efficient growth processes both below and above the zero level. In addition the polluted runs showed an increased upward transport (across the zero level) of liquid water due to both stronger updrafts and larger droplet mobility. In this work we discuss the transport of cloud mass crossing the zero temperature level (in both directions) in order to gain a process level understanding of how aerosol effects on the warm processes affect the macro- and micro-properties of deep convective clouds.

  6. An Integrated Convective Cloud Detection Method Using FY-2 VISSR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuai Liang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of convective clouds on infrared brightness temperature (BTIR and brightness temperature difference (BTD image were analyzed using successive Infrared and Visible Spin-Scan Radiometer (VISSR data of FY-2, and an integrated detection method of convective clouds using infrared multi-thresholds in combination with tracking techniques was implemented. In this method, BT and BTD thresholds are used to detect severe convection and uncertain clouds, then the tracking technique including overlap ratio, minimum BT change and cross-correlation coefficient is used to detect convection activities in uncertain clouds. The Application test results show that our integrated detection method can effectively detect convective clouds in different life periods, which show a better performance than any single step in it. The statistical results show that the α-type clouds are mostly large-scale systems, and the β- and γ-type clouds have the highest proportion of general type. However, the proportion of weak convective cloud is higher than that of severe ones in γ-type cloud, and an opposite result is found in the β-type.

  7. Thermal structure of intense convective clouds derived from GPS radio occultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Randel, W. J.; Ho, S. -P.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal structure associated with deep convective clouds is investigated using Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation measurements. GPS data are insensitive to the presence of clouds, and provide high vertical resolution and high accuracy measurements to identify associated temperature...... occultations with CALIPSO profiles over deep convection. Results show a sharp spike in GPS bending angle highly correlated to the top of the clouds, corresponding to anomalously cold temperatures within the clouds. Above the clouds the temperatures return to background conditions, and there is a strong...

  8. Thermal structure of intense convective clouds derived from GPS radio occultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Randel, W. J.; Ho, S.-P.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal structure associated with deep convective clouds is investigated using Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation measurements. GPS data are insensitive to the presence of clouds, and provide high vertical resolution and high accuracy measurements to identify associated temperature...... occultations with CALIPSO profiles over deep convection. Results show a sharp spike in GPS bending angle highly correlated to the top of the clouds, corresponding to anomalously cold temperatures within the clouds. Above the clouds the temperatures return to background conditions, and there is a strong...

  9. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions during Tropical Deep Convection: Evidence for the Importance of Free Tropospheric Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, A.; Jensen, E.; Stevens, D.; Wang, D.; Heymsfield, A.; Miloshevich, L.; Twohy, C.; Poellot, M.; VanReken, T.; Fridland, Ann

    2003-01-01

    NASA's 2002 CRYSTAL-FACE field experiment focused on the formation and evolution of tropical cirrus cloud systems in southern Florida. Multiple aircraft extensively sampled cumulonimbus dynamical and microphysical properties, as well as characterizing ambient aerosol populations both inside and outside the full depth of the convective column. On July 18, unique measurements were taken when a powerful updraft was traversed directly by aircraft, providing a window into the primary source region of cumulonimbus anvil crystals. Observations of the updraft, entered at approximately l0 km altitude and -34 C, indicated more than 200 cloud particles per mL at vertical velocities exceeding 20 m/s and the presence of significant condensation nuclei and liquid water within the core. In this work, aerosol and cloud phase observations are integrated by simulating the updraft conditions using a large-eddy resolving model with 3 explicit multiphase microphysics, including treatment of size-resolved aerosol fields, aerosol activation and freezing, and evaporation of cloud particles back to the aerosol phase. Simulations were initialized with observed thermodynamic and aerosol size distributions profiles and convection was driven by surface fluxes assimilated from the ARPS forecast model. Model results are consistent with the conclusions that most crystals are homogeneously frozen droplets and that entrained free tropospheric aerosols may contribute a significant fraction of the crystals. Thus most anvil crystals appear to be formed aloft in updraft cores, well above cloud base. These conclusions are supported by observations of hydrometeor size distribution made while traversing the dore, as well as aerosol and cloud particle size distributions generally observed by aircraft below 4km and crystal properties generally observed by aircraft above 12km.

  10. Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of LBA Convective Systems: Easterly and Westerly Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Stephen E.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2002-01-01

    The 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model was used to simulate convection that occurred during the TRMM LBA field experiment in Brazil. Convection in this region can be categorized into two different regimes. Low-level easterly flow results in moderate to high CAPE and a drier environment. Convection is more intense like that seen over continents. Low-level westerly flow results in low CAPE and a moist environment. Convection is weaker and more widespread characteristic of oceanic or monsoon-like systems. The GCE model has been used to study both regimes in order to provide cloud data sets that are representative of both environments in support of TRMM rainfall and heating algorithm development. Two different case are presented: Jan 26,1999, an easterly regime case, and Feb 23,1999, a westerly regime case. The Jan 26 case is an organized squall line and is initialized with a standard cold pool. The sensitivity to mid-level sounding moisture and wind shear will also be shown. The Feb 23 case is less-organized with only transient lines and is initialized with either warm bubbles or prescribed surface fluxes. Heating profiles, rainfall statistics and storm characteristics are compared and validated for the two cases against observations collected during the experiment.

  11. The Shallow-to-Deep Transition in Convective Clouds During GoAmazon 2014/5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M. P.; Gostic, C.; Giangrande, S. E.; Mechem, D. B.; Ghate, V. P.; Toto, T.

    2016-12-01

    Nearly two years of observations from the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployed at Manacapuru, Brazil during the GOAmazon 2014/5 campaign are analyzed to investigate the environmental conditions controlling the transition from shallow to deep convective clouds. The Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL) product, which combines radar and lidar observations to produce best estimates of cloud locations in the vertical column is used to qualitatively define four subsets of convective cloud conditions: 1,2) Transition cases (wet season, dry season), where a period of shallow convective clouds is followed by a period of deep convective clouds and 2) Non-transition cases (wet season, dry season), where shallow convective clouds persist without any subsequent development. For these subsets, observations of the time varying thermodynamic properties of the atmosphere, including the surface heat and radiative fluxes, the profiles of atmospheric state variables, and the ECMWF-derived large-scale advective tendencies, are composited to define averaged properties for each transition state. Initial analysis indicates that the transition state strongly depends on the pre-dawn free-tropospheric humidity, the convective inhibition and surface temperature and humidity with little dependence on the convective available potential energy and surface heat fluxes. The composited environmental thermodynamics are then used to force large-eddy simulations for the four transition states to further evaluate the sensitivity of the transition to the composite thermodynamics versus the importance of larger-scale forcing.

  12. A Review of Cloud-Resolving Model Studies of Convective Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqing WU; Xiaofan LI

    2008-01-01

    Convective processes affect large-scale environments through cloud-radiation interaction.cloud micro-physical processes,and surface rainfall processes.Over the last three decades,cloud-resolving models (CRMs)have demonstrated to be capable of simulating convective-radiative responses to an imposed large-scale forcing.The CRM-produced cloud and radiative properties have been utilized to study the convective-related processes and their ensemble effects on large-scale circulations.This review summarizes the recent progress on the understanding of convective processes with the use of CRM simulations,including precipi-tation processes;cloud microphysical and radiative processes;dynamical processes;precipitation efficiency;diurnal variations of tropical oceanic convection;local-scale atmosphere-ocean coupling processes;and tropi-cal convective-radiative equilibrium states.Two different ongoing applications of CRMs to general circulation models(GCMs)are discussed:replacing convection and cloud schemes for studying the interaction between cloud systems and large-scale circulation,and improving the schemes for climate simulations.

  13. Randomized convective cloud seeding experiment in extended areas in Cuba (EXPAREX Experimento aleatório de semeadura de nuvens convectivas em áreas extensas em Cuba (EXPAREX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Martinez-Castro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Randomized Convective Cloud Seeding Experiment in Extended Areas (EXPerimento aleatorizado de siembra de nubes en AReas EXtensas, EXPAREX is being implemented in Camagüey, Cuba and adjacent regions from August 2005 as the continuation of a previous successful experiment (PCMAT, held in the period 1982-1990. The first season of the experiment was exploratory and was focused on upgrading facilities, equipment and software, including an An-26 instrumented aircraft and the 10-cm MRL-5 weather radar. It was aimed at implementing methodologies and testing the application of the experimental design, excluding the randomization scheme, which was scheduled to be started in the second experimental year, in the rainy season of 2006. The field operations of the confirmatory phase started only in October, 2006, when seven experimental units, treated under a randomized scheme, were qualified. In the 2007 experiment, 13 more experimental units were processed. The general description, experimental design, procedures and characterization of the first two experimental seasons of the confirmatory phase of EXPAREX are presented in this work. Is it shown that the experimental clouds processed in the first two seasons of the experiment have similar characteristics to the PCMAT clouds, so that the conclusions of previous physical research are applicable.O Experimento Aleatório de Semeadura de Nuvens Convectivas em áreas extensas (EXPAREX vem sendo realizado em Camagüey, Cuba e em regiões adjacentes, desde agosto de 2005, como continuação de experiência anterior bem sucedida (PCMAT realizada entre 1982 e 1990. A primeira temporada do experimento foi exploratória e concentrou-se na modernização das instalações, equipamentos e software, incluindo um avião An-26 instrumentado e um radar meteorológico MRL-5, de comprimento de onda de 10 centímetros. Nesta fase destinou-se a aplicar e testar metodologias, além de definir o desenho experimental, com

  14. Diurnal evolution of cloud base heights in convective cloud fields from MSG/SEVIRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Meerkötter

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This study shows that it is possible to retrieve the temporal evolution of cloud base heights in convective broken cloud fields from data of the SEVIRI instrument onboard the geostationary satellite Meteosat-9. Presented and discussed are time dependent base heights with a temporal resolution of 15 min from morning to afternoon. Cloud base heights retrieved from SEVIRI data are also compared with independent measurements of a ceilometer, with condensation levels calculated from radiosonde data and with base heights obtained from an application of the method to NOAA/AVHRR data. The validation has been performed for three days in the year 2007 and for seven test areas distributed over Germany and neighbouring countries. The standard deviations of the absolute differences between cloud base heights from Meteosat-9 and radiosonde measurements as well as between NOAA/AVHRR and Meteosat-9 results are both of the order of ±290 m. The correlation coefficient is 0.53 for the comparison of satellite with radiosonde measurements and 0.78 for the intercomparison of the satellite measurements. Furthermore, it is shown that the method retrieves the temporal evolution of cloud base heights in very good agreement with time dependent ceilometer measurements.

  15. Results of Experiments on Convective Precipitation Enhancement in the Camaguey Experimental Area, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koloskov, Boris; Zimin, Boris; Beliaev, Vitaly; Seregin, Yury; Chernikov, Albert; Petrov, Victor; Valdés, Mario; Martínez, Daniel; Pérez, Carlos A.; Puente, Guillermo

    1996-09-01

    Experiments on randomized seeding of individual convective clouds and cloud clusters were conducted in the Camaguey experimental area, Cuba, from 1985 through 1990 in order to elucidate whether cold-cloud dynamic seeding can be used to augment convective rainfall. An information measuring system was set up, and primary tools included three instrumented aircraft (AN-26, AN-12 CYCLONE, IL-14), MRL-5 and ARS-3 radars, a system for radiosounding, two special rain gauge networks, and surface weather stations.A total of 232 randomized experiments were carried out during this experimentation period, and 117 individual clouds and 115 cloud clusters were studied during 136 `go' days. Pyrotechnic flares containing silver iodide were ejected in a selected cloud when the seeder aircraft was flying through its top. The seeding effects were monitored by the MRL-5 radar, which was equipped with an automated system for digital processing of data.A total of 46 convective clouds, 29 seeded and 17 nonseeded, were studied during an exploratory experiment in 1985. Analyses of the radar properties of seeded and nonseeded clouds have indicated that the response of convective clouds to AgI seeding is dependent on their type, and the treatment within the range of cloud tops from 6 to 8 km—that is, at top temperatures between 10° and 20°C, is found to increase their maximum height by 13% and the lifetime by 30%, and to enhance rainfall.A confirmatory phase of the experiment in the Camaguey experimental area was conducted during 1986 90. A total of 46 individual convective clouds, 24 seeded and 22 nonseeded, were identified, and their properties were determined using three-dimensional radar data. The results have shown that the AgI seeding of growing clouds with top temperatures over the range from 10° to 20°C increases their lifetime by 24%, maximum height by 9%, area by 64%, and rain volume by 120%, as compared to unseeded clouds. The lifetime, area, and rainfall results are

  16. Impact of aerosols on precipitation from deep convective clouds in eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mengjiao; Li, Zhanqing; Wan, Bingcheng; Cribb, Maureen

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the impact of aerosols on precipitation based on 3 years of 3-hourly observations made in heavily polluted eastern China. The probability of precipitation from different cloud types was calculated using International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project cloud data and gauge-based hourly precipitation data. Because deep convective clouds have the largest precipitation probability, the influence of aerosols on the precipitation from such clouds was studied in particular. Aerosol properties were taken from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis data set. As aerosol optical depth increased, rainfall amounts from deep convective clouds increased at first and then decreased. The descending part of the trend is likely due to the aerosol radiative effect. Downwelling solar radiative fluxes at the surface decreased as aerosol optical depth increased. The decrease in solar radiation led to a decrease in ground heat fluxes and convective available potential energy, which is unfavorable for development of convective clouds and precipitation. The tendencies for lower cloud top temperatures, lower cloud top pressures, and higher cloud optical depths as a response to larger aerosol optical depths suggest the invigoration effect. Vertical velocity, relative humidity, and air temperature from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System Reanalysis were sorted to help investigate if the trends are dependent on any environmental conditions. How dynamic and microphysical factors strengthen or mitigate the impact of aerosols on clouds and precipitation and more details about their interplay should be studied further using more observations and model simulations.

  17. Remote sensing of cloud sides of deep convection: towards a three-dimensional retrieval of cloud particle size profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zinner

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The cloud scanner sensor is a central part of a recently proposed satellite remote sensing concept – the three-dimensional (3-D cloud and aerosol interaction mission (CLAIM-3D combining measurements of aerosol characteristics in the vicinity of clouds and profiles of cloud microphysical characteristics. Such a set of collocated measurements will allow new insights in the complex field of cloud-aerosol interactions affecting directly the development of clouds and precipitation, especially in convection. The cloud scanner measures radiance reflected or emitted by cloud sides at several wavelengths to derive a profile of cloud particle size and thermodynamic phase. For the retrieval of effective size a Bayesian approach was adopted and introduced in a preceding paper.

    In this paper the potential of the approach, which has to account for the complex three-dimensional nature of cloud geometry and radiative transfer, is tested in realistic cloud observing situations. In a fully simulated environment realistic cloud resolving modelling provides complex 3-D structures of ice, water, and mixed phase clouds, from the early stage of convective development to mature deep convection. A three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer is used to realistically simulate the aspired observations.

    A large number of cloud data sets and related simulated observations provide the database for an experimental Bayesian retrieval. An independent simulation of an additional cloud field serves as a synthetic test bed for the demonstration of the capabilities of the developed retrieval techniques. For this test case only a minimal overall bias in the order of 1% as well as pixel-based uncertainties in the order of 1 μm for droplets and 8 μm for ice particles were found for measurements at a high spatial resolution of 250 m.

  18. Microphysical effects determine macrophysical response for aerosol impacts on deep convective clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, L Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation, energy, and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Aerosol particles can influence DCCs by altering cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Previous studies reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but few were concerned with the whole life cycle of DCC. By conducting multiple monthlong cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macrophysical and microphysical properties of summer convective clouds and precipitation in the tropics and midlatitudes, this study provides a comprehensive view of how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height, and radiative forcing. We found that although the widely accepted theory of DCC invigoration due to aerosol's thermodynamic effect (additional latent heat release from freezing of greater amount of cloud water) may work during the growing stage, it is microphysical effect influenced by aerosols that drives the dramatic increase in cloud cover, cloud top height, and cloud thickness at the mature and dissipation stages by inducing larger amounts of smaller but longer-lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs, even when thermodynamic invigoration of convection is absent. The thermodynamic invigoration effect contributes up to ~27% of total increase in cloud cover. The overall aerosol indirect effect is an atmospheric radiative warming (3-5 W m(-2)) and a surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m(-2)). The modeling findings are confirmed by the analyses of ample measurements made at three sites of distinctly different environments.

  19. Intraseasonal Variations in Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2009-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20oN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  20. Estimation of cloud fraction profile in shallow convection using a scanning cloud radar: Cloud Fraction of Shallow Cumuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oue, Mariko [School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Kollias, Pavlos [School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; North, Kirk W. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montreal Quebec Canada; Tatarevic, Aleksandra [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montreal Quebec Canada; Endo, Satoshi [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Vogelmann, Andrew M. [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Gustafson, William I. [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-10-18

    Large spatial inhomogeneity in shallow convection raises uncertainties in estimation of the domain-averaged cloud fraction profile (CFP). Here, numerical model simulations of shallow convection over land, coupled with a sophisticated radar simulator, are used to address this issue, and an objective method for estimating domain-averaged CFP is proposed. The analysis clearly indicates that profiling observations are inadequate to provide reliable CFP estimates. The use of Scanning Cloud Radar (SCR) performing a sequence of cross-wind horizon-to-horizon scans is not straightforward due to the strong dependency of its sensitivity with range. The retrieved CFP by a novel methodology that uses the observed statistics of SCR hydrometeor detections with height to estimate optimum ranges shows very good agreement with the model CFP. On average of CFP estimates more than 40 min of SCR observations are required to converge on the model domain average. The proposed technique is expected to improve our ability to compare model and observations in broken cloud conditions.

  1. How do changes in warm-phase microphysics affect deep convective clouds?

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qian; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.; Dagan, Guy; Pinto, Lital

    2016-01-01

    Understanding aerosol effects on deep convective clouds and the derived effects on the radiation budget and rain patterns can largely contribute to estimations of climate uncertainties. The challenge is difficult in part because key microphysical processes in the mixed and cold phases are still not well understood. For deep convective clouds with a warm base, understanding aerosol effects on the warm processes is extremely important as they set the initial and boundary conditions for the cold...

  2. Numerical simulation on the evolution of cloud particles in 3-D convective cloud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A 3-D convective cloud model with compressible non-hydrostatic dynamics and the spectral bin microphysics of a 2-D slab-symmetric model has been used to simulate an observed supercell storm occurring on 29 June, 2000 near Bird City, Kansas, USA. The main objective of this paper is to study the evolution of particles in this convective storm with bin spectral microphysics scheme. Graupels form and grow through two mechanisms, deposition and riming, with the riming process dominant on top of the inflow and in the upper portion of main updraft. Over the outflow and during the developing and mature stages of the storm, graupel particles mainly grow through deposition with dominant unimodal spectra. Most fall out after growing up. Reducing initial relative humidity disturbance (increasing initial potential temperature disturbance) has negative impact on the formation and growth of graupels over the inflow (outflow). This study shows that large graupel and hail could be suppressed by altering the deposition and coalescence process over the inflow and main updraft. At different locations of the convective cells and with different initial humidity and potential temperature disturbance, the graupel formation and growth mechanisms are different, so as to the feasible hail suppression locations and methods.

  3. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE): Cloud and Rain Characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PT May; C Jakob; JH Mather

    2004-05-30

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Commission DG RTD-1.2, and several United States, Australian, Canadian, and European Universities. This experiment will be undertaken over a 4-week period in early 2006. January and February corresponds to the wet phase of the Australia monsoon. This season has been selected because, despite Darwin’s coastal location, the convection that occurs over and near Darwin at this time is largely of maritime origin with a large fetch over water

  4. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment TWP-ICE Cloud and rain characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, P.T., Jakob, C., and Mather, J.H.

    2004-05-31

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them.

  5. Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-12-23

    Quantifying the aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative effect at a global scale requires simultaneous satellite retrievals of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and cloud base updraft velocities (Wb). Hitherto, the inability to do so has been a major cause of high uncertainty regarding anthropogenic aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative forcing. This can be addressed by the emerging capability of estimating CCN and Wb of boundary layer convective clouds from an operational polar orbiting weather satellite. Our methodology uses such clouds as an effective analog for CCN chambers. The cloud base supersaturation (S) is determined by Wb and the satellite-retrieved cloud base drop concentrations (Ndb), which is the same as CCN(S). Developing and validating this methodology was possible thanks to the ASR/ARM measurements of CCN and vertical updraft profiles. Validation against ground-based CCN instruments at the ARM sites in Oklahoma, Manaus, and onboard a ship in the northeast Pacific showed a retrieval accuracy of ±25% to ±30% for individual satellite overpasses. The methodology is presently limited to boundary layer not raining convective clouds of at least 1 km depth that are not obscured by upper layer clouds, including semitransparent cirrus. The limitation for small solar backscattering angles of <25º restricts the satellite coverage to ~25% of the world area in a single day. This methodology will likely allow overcoming the challenge of quantifying the aerosol indirect effect and facilitate a substantial reduction of the uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing.

  6. A new perspective on the infrared brightness temperature distribution of the deep convective clouds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rakesh Teja Konduru; C M Kishtawal; Shivani Shah

    2013-10-01

    We are proposing a statistical technique to analyze the best fit of the histogram of infrared brightness temperature of convective cloud pixels. For this we have utilized the infrared brightness temperatures (IRTB) of Kalpana-1 (8 km resolution) and globally merged infrared brightness temperatures of Climate Prediction Centre NCEP/NWS (4 km resolution, merged from all the available geostationary satellites GOES-8/10, METEOSAT-7/5 and GMS), for both deep convective and non-deep convective (shallow cloud) cases. It is observed that Johnson SB function is the best continuous distribution function in explaining the histogram of infrared brightness temperatures of the convective clouds. The best fit is confirmed by Kolmogorov–Smirnov statistic. Johnson SB’s distribution of histogram of infrared brightness temperatures clearly discriminates the cloud pixels of deep convective and non-deep convective cases. It also captures the asymmetric nature in histogram of infrared brightness temperatures. We also observed that Johnson SB distribution of infrared brightness temperatures for deep convective systems is different in each of the pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. And Johnson SB parameters are observed to be best in discriminating the Johnson SB distribution of infrared brightness temperatures of deep convective systems for each season. Due to these properties of Johnson SB function, it can be utilized in the modelling of the histogram of infrared brightness temperature of deep convective and non-deep convective systems. It focuses a new perspective on the infrared brightness temperature that will be helpful in cloud detection, classification and modelling.

  7. Thermodynamic phase retrieval of convective clouds: impact of sensor viewing geometry and vertical distribution of cloud properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jäkel

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of passive remote sensing measurements to retrieve microphysical parameters of convective clouds, in particular their thermodynamic phase, is investigated by three-dimensional (3-D radiative transfer simulations. The effects of different viewing geometries and vertical distributions of the cloud microphysical properties are investigated. Measurement examples of spectral solar radiance reflected by cloud sides (passive in the near-infrared (NIR spectral range are performed together with collocated lidar observations (active. The retrieval method to distinguish the cloud thermodynamic phase (liquid water or ice exploits different slopes of cloud side reflectivity spectra of water and ice clouds in the NIR. The concurrent depolarization backscattering lidar provides geometry information about the cloud distance and height as well as the depolarization.

  8. Impacts of cloud overlap assumptions on radiative budgets and heating fields in convective regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, XiaoCong; Liu, YiMin; Bao, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Impacts of cloud overlap assumptions on radiative budgets and heating fields are explored with the aid of a cloud-resolving model (CRM), which provided cloud geometry as well as cloud micro and macro properties. Large-scale forcing data to drive the CRM are from TRMM Kwajalein Experiment and the Global Atmospheric Research Program's Atlantic Tropical Experiment field campaigns during which abundant convective systems were observed. The investigated overlap assumptions include those that were traditional and widely used in the past and the one that was recently addressed by Hogan and Illingworth (2000), in which the vertically projected cloud fraction is expressed by a linear combination of maximum and random overlap, with the weighting coefficient depending on the so-called decorrelation length Lcf. Results show that both shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcings (SWCF/LWCF) are significantly underestimated under maximum (MO) and maximum-random (MRO) overlap assumptions, whereas remarkably overestimated under the random overlap (RO) assumption in comparison with that using CRM inherent cloud geometry. These biases can reach as high as 100 Wm- 2 for SWCF and 60 Wm- 2 for LWCF. By its very nature, the general overlap (GenO) assumption exhibits an encouraging performance on both SWCF and LWCF simulations, with the biases almost reduced by 3-fold compared with traditional overlap assumptions. The superiority of GenO assumption is also manifested in the simulation of shortwave and longwave radiative heating fields, which are either significantly overestimated or underestimated under traditional overlap assumptions. The study also pointed out the deficiency of constant assumption on Lcf in GenO assumption. Further examinations indicate that the CRM diagnostic Lcf varies among different cloud types and tends to be stratified in the vertical. The new parameterization that takes into account variation of Lcf in the vertical well reproduces such a relationship and

  9. Molecular Clouds: Observation to Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, J O; Ryutov, D D; Mizuta, A; Remington, B A; Pound, M W

    2004-05-06

    Our ongoing investigation of how 'Pillars' and other structure form in molecular clouds irradiated by ultraviolet (UV) stars has revealed that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is strongly suppressed by recombination in the photoevaporated outflow, that clumps and filaments may be key, that the evolution of structure is well-modeled by compressible hydrodynamics, and that directionality of the UV radiation may have significant effects. We discuss a generic, flexible set of laboratory experiments that can address these issues.

  10. Photochemical ozone production in tropical squall line convection during NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment/Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Scala, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The role of convection was examined in trace gas transport and ozone production in a tropical dry season squall line sampled on August 3, 1985, during NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment/Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A (NASA GTE/ABLE 2A) in Amazonia, Brazil. Two types of analyses were performed. Transient effects within the cloud are examined with a combination of two-dimensional cloud and one-dimensional photochemical modeling. Tracer analyses using the cloud model wind fields yield a series of cross sections of NO(x), CO, and O3 distribution during the lifetime of the cloud; these fields are used in the photochemical model to compute the net rate of O3 production. At noon, when the cloud was mature, the instantaneous ozone production potential in the cloud is between 50 and 60 percent less than in no-cloud conditions due to reduced photolysis and cloud scavenging of radicals. Analysis of cloud inflows and outflows is used to differentiate between air that is undisturbed and air that has been modified by the storm. These profiles are used in the photochemical model to examine the aftereffects of convective redistribution in the 24-hour period following the storm. Total tropospheric column O3 production changed little due to convection because so little NO(x) was available in the lower troposphere. However, the integrated O3 production potential in the 5- to 13-km layer changed from net destruction to net production as a result of the convection. The conditions of the August 3, 1985, event may be typical of the early part of the dry season in Amazonia, when only minimal amounts of pollution from biomass burning have been transported into the region.

  11. Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment Completed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Thomas P.; Sedlak, Deborah A.

    1997-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) was designed to study basic fluid mechanics and heat transfer on thermocapillary flows generated by temperature variations along the free surfaces of liquids in microgravity. STDCE first flew on the USML-1 mission in July 1992 and was rebuilt for the USML-2 mission that was launched in October 1995. This was a collaborative project with principal investigators from Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), Professors Simon Ostrach and Yasuhiro Kamotani, along with a team from the NASA Lewis Research Center composed of civil servants and contractors from Aerospace Design & Fabrication, Inc. (ADF), Analex, and NYMA, Inc.

  12. Understanding the responses of deep convective clouds to changing thermodynamic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Marieanne; Dobbie, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Clouds cover a significant part of the globe and have profound impact on the Earth's radiative budget because of their interaction with the propagation of radiation through scattering, absorption and emission processes. Clouds also play an important role in regulating the hydrological cycle through the transport of heat and moisture, which leads to precipitation that is essential in maintaining the biosphere. Berg et al. (2013) reported that convective precipitation is sensitive to temperature change. It is also expected that cloud processes and their radiative effects may change with global warming (Ceppi and Hartmann, 2015). However, cloud responses remain a significant contributor to uncertainties in the climate sensitivity of global warming simulations (Soden and Held, 2006) due to the complex interactions between clouds and other atmospheric processes. Clouds are sensitive to changes in thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere and large-scale circulation (Bony et al. (2004). Past studies have looked at the effects of dynamical variability and external perturbations (e.g. aerosol loading and temperature) on cloud and radiation (e.g. Fan et al., 2008; Sherwood et al., 2015). Other studies also looked at the microphysical scale of cloud evolution as computing power improved (Morrison, 2010). However, there is a lack of knowledge about the thermodynamic effects on clouds, especially on convection. Therefore, it is important to understand how changes in the thermodynamic structure predicted from global warming simulations affect the formation and growth of clouds, with a particular focus on the microphysical processes during the cloud evolution and associated cloud radiative properties. Results will be presented from WRF simulations of deep convective clouds that were run based on past and future thermodynamic profiles derived from climate model simulations (CCSM3). Simulations were performed for a range of locations in the USA and cloud and radiative property

  13. The Invigoration of Deep Convective Clouds Over the Atlantic: Aerosol Effect, Meteorology or Retrieval Artifact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Ilan; Feingold, Graham; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2010-01-01

    Associations between cloud properties and aerosol loading are frequently observed in products derived from satellite measurements. These observed trends between clouds and aerosol optical depth suggest aerosol modification of cloud dynamics, yet there are uncertainties involved in satellite retrievals that have the potential to lead to incorrect conclusions. Two of the most challenging problems are addressed here: the potential for retrieved aerosol optical depth to be cloud-contaminated, and as a result, artificially correlated with cloud parameters; and the potential for correlations between aerosol and cloud parameters to be erroneously considered to be causal. Here these issues are tackled directly by studying the effects of the aerosol on convective clouds in the tropical Atlantic Ocean using satellite remote sensing, a chemical transport model, and a reanalysis of meteorological fields. Results show that there is a robust positive correlation between cloud fraction or cloud top height and the aerosol optical depth, regardless of whether a stringent filtering of aerosol measurements in the vicinity of clouds is applied, or not. These same positive correlations emerge when replacing the observed aerosol field with that derived from a chemical transport model. Model-reanalysis data is used to address the causality question by providing meteorological context for the satellite observations. A correlation exercise between the full suite of meteorological fields derived from model reanalysis and satellite-derived cloud fields shows that observed cloud top height and cloud fraction correlate best with model pressure updraft velocity and relative humidity. Observed aerosol optical depth does correlate with meteorological parameters but usually different parameters from those that correlate with observed cloud fields. The result is a near-orthogonal influence of aerosol and meteorological fields on cloud top height and cloud fraction. The results strengthen the case

  14. A Method for Obtaining High Frequency, Global, IR-Based Convective Cloud Tops for Studies of the TTL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Ueyama, Rei; Jensen, Eric; Schoeberl, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Models of varying complexity that simulate water vapor and clouds in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) show that including convection directly is essential to properly simulating the water vapor and cloud distribution. In boreal winter, for example, simulations without convection yield a water vapor distribution that is too uniform with longitude, as well as minimal cloud distributions. Two things are important for convective simulations. First, it is important to get the convective cloud top potential temperature correctly, since unrealistically high values (reaching above the cold point tropopause too frequently) will cause excessive hydration of the stratosphere. Second, one must capture the time variation as well, since hydration by convection depends on the local relative humidity (temperature), which has substantial variation on synoptic time scales in the TTL. This paper describes a method for obtaining high frequency (3-hourly) global convective cloud top distributions which can be used in trajectory models. The method uses rainfall thresholds, standard IR brightness temperatures, meteorological temperature analyses, and physically realistic and documented corrections IR brightness temperature corrections to derive cloud top altitudes and potential temperatures. The cloud top altitudes compare well with combined CLOUDSAT and CALIPSO data, both in time-averaged overall vertical and horizontal distributions and in individual cases (correlations of .65-.7). An important finding is that there is significant uncertainty (nearly .5 km) in evaluating the statistical distribution of convective cloud tops even using lidar. Deep convection whose tops are in regions of high relative humidity (such as much of the TTL), will cause clouds to form above the actual convection. It is often difficult to distinguish these clouds from the actual convective cloud due to the uncertainties of evaluating ice water content from lidar measurements. Comparison with models show that

  15. Aerosol-induced changes of convective cloud anvils produce strong climate warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Koren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of aerosol on clouds poses one of the largest uncertainties in estimating the anthropogenic contribution to climate change. In contrast, even small human-induced perturbations in cloud coverage, lifetime, height or optical properties can change the instantaneous radiative energy flux by hundreds of watts per unit area, and this forcing can be either warming or cooling. Clouds and aerosols form a complex coupled system that, unlike greenhouse gases, have relatively short lifetime (hours to days and inhomogeneous distribution. This and the inherent complexity of cloud microphysics and dynamics, and the strong coupling with meteorology explain why the estimation of the overall effect of aerosol on climate is so challenging.

    Here we focus on the effect of aerosol on cloud top properties of deep convective clouds over the tropical Atlantic. The tops of these vertically developed clouds consist of mostly ice and can reach high levels of the atmosphere, overshooting the lower stratosphere and reaching altitudes greater than 16 km. We show a link between aerosol, clouds and the free atmosphere wind profile that can change the magnitude and sign of the overall climate radiative forcing.

    This study demonstrates the deep link between cloud shape and aerosol loading and that the overall aerosol effect in regions of deep convective clouds might be warming. Moreover we show how averaging the cloud height and optical properties over large regions may lead to a false cooling estimation.

  16. Evaluation of cloud convection and tracer transport in a three-dimensional chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Feng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the performance of cloud convection and tracer transport in a global off-line 3-D chemical transport model. Various model simulations are performed using different meteorological (reanalyses (ERA-40, ECMWF operational and ECMWF Interim to diagnose the updraft mass flux, convective precipitation and cloud top height.

    The diagnosed upward mass flux distribution from TOMCAT agrees quite well with the ECMWF reanalysis data (ERA-40 and ERA-Interim below 200 hPa. Inclusion of midlevel convection improves the agreement at mid-high latitudes. However, the reanalyses show strong convective transport up to 100 hPa, well into the tropical tropopause layer (TTL, which is not captured by TOMCAT. Similarly, the model captures the spatial and seasonal variation of convective cloud top height although the mean modelled value is about 2 km lower than observed.

    The ERA-Interim reanalyses have smaller archived upward convective mass fluxes than ERA-40, and smaller convective precipitation, which is in better agreement with satellite-based data. TOMCAT captures these relative differences when diagnosing convection from the large-scale fields. The model also shows differences in diagnosed convection with the version of the operational analyses used, which cautions against using results of the model from one specific time period as a general evaluation.

    We have tested the effect of resolution on the diagnosed modelled convection with simulations ranging from 5.6° × 5.6° to 1° × 1°. Overall, in the off-line model, the higher model resolution gives stronger vertical tracer transport, however, it does not make a large change to the diagnosed convective updraft mass flux (i.e., the model results using the convection scheme fail to capture the strong convection transport up to 100 hPa as seen in the archived convective mass fluxes. Similarly, the resolution of the forcing winds in the higher resolution CTM does not make a

  17. A Convective Cloud Feedback and Spring Arctic Sea Ice Forecasting at High CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbot, D. S.; Walker, C. C.; Tziperman, E.

    2008-12-01

    Winter and spring sea ice dramatically cool the Arctic climate during the the coldest seasons of the year and may have remote effects on global climate as well. Accurate forecasting of winter and spring sea ice has significant social and economic benefits. Such forecasting requires the identification and understanding of all the feedbacks that can affect sea ice. A novel convective cloud feedback has recently been proposed in the context of explaining equable climates, e.g., the climate of the Eocene, that might be important for determining future winter and spring sea ice. In this feedback CO2 -initiated warming leads to sea ice reduction, which which allows increased heat and moisture fluxes from the ocean surface, which destabilizes the atmosphere and leads to atmospheric convection. This atmospheric convection produces high and optically thick convective clouds and increases high-altitude moisture levels, both of which trap outgoing longwave radiation and therefore result in a further warming and sea ice loss. Here it is shown that this convective cloud feedback is active during winter in the coupled ocean-sea ice-land-atmosphere global climate models used for the 1%/year CO2 increase to quadrupling scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fourth assessment report. It is further shown that the convective cloud feedback plays an essential role in the elimination of maximum seasonal (spring) sea ice in NCAR's CCSM model, one of the IPCC models that nearly completely loses spring sea ice. This is done by performing a sensitivity analysis using the atmospheric component of CCSM, run at a CO2 concentration of 1120 ppm, by selectively disabling the convective cloud feedback and the ocean heat transport feedback. The result is that both feedbacks are necessary for the elimination of spring sea ice at this CO2 concentration.

  18. Shallow convection over land: a mesoscale modelling study based on idealized WRF experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. M. Lenaerts

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A shallow cumulus over land redistributes heat and moisture in the boundary layer, but is also important on larger scales, because it can trigger severe convection events. Due to its small (100 - 1000 m spatial scale, this feature is defined as a sub-grid process in mesoscale models. The goal of this research is to examine the representation of shallow cumulus clouds in the mesoscale model WRF by reproducing a shallow cumulus situation observed over land. In particular, we focus on the role of the convection parameterisation in the characteristic vertical energy transport in the boundary layer. The analysis focusses on the thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer and on the cloud properties derived from a simple parcel method theory. This numerical experiment is designed to be as close as possible to the Large-Eddy Simulations (LES model intercomparison study of Brown et al. (2002. They concentrated on the representation of shallow cumulus clouds over land in LES, using data from the American Southern Great Plains of 21st June 1997. To imitate the dynamic structure of LES, we have designed a Multiple Single Column version of WRF. Using identical surface forcing and initial thermodynamic profiles, WRF boundary layer structure shows good agreement with the LES results. However, the parcel method indicates that a larger inversion and the absence of a conditionally unstable layer suppress shallow cumulus clouds development by WRF. In addition, WRF does not show any cloud development in terms of cloud liquid water. We show also that a convective parameterisation is necessary to represent the enhanced boundary layer vertical transport by shallow cumulus clouds. Different convective parameterisation schemes are analyzed and compared.

  19. 3-D model simulations of dynamical and microphysical interactions in pyro-convective clouds under idealized conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Reutter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pyro-convective clouds, i.e. convective clouds forming over wildland fires due to high sensible heat, play an important role for the transport of aerosol particles and trace gases into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Additionally, due to the emission of a large number of aerosol particles from forest fires, the microphysical structure of a pyro-convective cloud is clearly different from that of ordinary convective clouds. A crucial step in the microphysical evolution of a (pyro- convective cloud is the activation of aerosol particles to form cloud droplets. The activation process affects the initial number and size of cloud droplets and can thus influence the evolution of the convective cloud and the formation of precipitation. Building upon a realistic parameterization of CCN activation, the model ATHAM is used to investigate the dynamical and microphysical processes of idealized three-dimensional pyro-convective clouds in mid-latitudes. A state-of-the-art two-moment microphysical scheme has been implemented in order to study the influence of the aerosol concentration on the cloud development. The results show that the aerosol concentration influences the formation of precipitation. For low aerosol concentrations (NCN=1000 cm−3, rain droplets are rapidly formed by autoconversion of cloud droplets. This also triggers the formation of large graupel and hail particles resulting in an early and strong onset of precipitation. With increasing aerosol concentration (NCN=20 000 cm−3 and NCN=60 000 cm−3 the formation of rain droplets is delayed due to more but smaller cloud droplets. Therefore, the formation of ice crystals and snowflakes becomes more important for the eventual formation of graupel and hail. However, this causes a delay of the onset of precipitation and its intensity for increasing aerosol concentration. This work shows the first detailed investigation of the interaction between cloud microphysics and dynamics of a

  20. An Algorithm to Detect Tropical Deep Convective Clouds Through AMSU-B Water Vapor Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xu; Georg Heygster; ZHANG Suping

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm to detect tropical deep convective clouds and deep convective overshootings based on the measurements from the three water vapor channels (183.3GHz±1 GHz, 183.3GHz±3GHz and 183.3GHz±7GHz) of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B) is presented. This algorithm is an improved version of the method of Hong et al. (2005). The proposed procedure is based on the statistical analysis of seven years'(2001-2007) measurements from AMSU-B on NOAA-16 From the 1-d histograms of the brightness temperature of the three water vapor channels and the 2-d tustograms of the brightness temperature dif-ference between these channels, new thresholds for brightness temperature differences and the brightness temperature of channel 18 (183.3 GHz±1 GHz) are suggested. The new algorithm is employed to investigate the mean distribution of tropical deep convective clouds and convective overshootings from 30°S to 30°N for the years 2001 to 2007. The major concentration of deep convective clouds and convective overshootings is found over the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), tropical Africa, South America, the Indian Ocean and Indonesia with an average fraction of 0.4%. In terms of these clouds we identify the secondary Intertropical Convergence Zone located in the eastern South Pacific and parallel to the main ITCZ in the North Pacific. The convective overshooting is more frequently observed over land than over the ocean.

  1. Robust relations between CCN and the vertical evolution of cloud drop size distribution in deep convective clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, E.; Rosenfeld, D.; Andreae, M. O.; Costa, A. A.; Artaxo, P.

    2008-03-01

    In-situ measurements in convective clouds (up to the freezing level) over the Amazon basin show that smoke from deforestation fires prevents clouds from precipitating until they acquire a vertical development of at least 4 km, compared to only 1-2 km in clean clouds. The average cloud depth required for the onset of warm rain increased by ~350 m for each additional 100 cloud condensation nuclei per cm3 at a super-saturation of 0.5% (CCN0.5%). In polluted clouds, the diameter of modal liquid water content grows much slower with cloud depth (at least by a factor of ~2), due to the large number of droplets that compete for available water and to the suppressed coalescence processes. Contrary to what other studies have suggested, we did not observe this effect to reach saturation at 3000 or more accumulation mode particles per cm3. The CCN0.5% concentration was found to be a very good predictor for the cloud depth required for the onset of warm precipitation and other microphysical factors, leaving only a secondary role for the updraft velocities in determining the cloud drop size distributions. The effective radius of the cloud droplets (re) was found to be a quite robust parameter for a given environment and cloud depth, showing only a small effect of partial droplet evaporation from the cloud's mixing with its drier environment. This supports one of the basic assumptions of satellite analysis of cloud microphysical processes: the ability to look at different cloud top heights in the same region and regard their re as if they had been measured inside one well developed cloud. The dependence of re on the adiabatic fraction decreased higher in the clouds, especially for cleaner conditions, and disappeared at re≥~10 μm. We propose that droplet coalescence, which is at its peak when warm rain is formed in the cloud at re=~10 μm, continues to be significant during the cloud's mixing with the entrained air, cancelling out the decrease in re due to evaporation.

  2. Impact of aerosol on post-frontal convective clouds over Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rieger

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We carried out simulations with predefined and simulated aerosol distributions in order to investigate the improvement in the forecasting capabilities of an operational weather forecast model by the use of an improved aerosol representation. This study focuses on convective cumulus clouds developing after the passage of a cold front on 25 April 2008 over Germany. The northerly flow after the cold front leads to increased sea salt aerosol concentrations compared to prefrontal conditions. High aerosol number concentrations are simulated in the interactive scenario representing typically polluted conditions. Nevertheless, due to the presence of sea salt particles, effective radii of cloud droplets reach values typical of pristine clouds (between 7 µm and 13 µm at the same time. Compared to the predefined continental and maritime aerosol scenarios, the simulated aerosol distribution leads to a significant change in cloud properties such as cloud droplet radii and number concentrations. Averaged over the domain covered by the convective cumuli clouds, we found a systematic decrease in precipitation with increasing aerosol number concentrations. Differences in cloud cover, short wave radiation and cloud top heights are buffered by systematic differences in precipitation and the related diabatic effects. Comparisons with measured precipitation show good agreement for the interactive aerosol scenario as well as for the extreme maritime aerosol scenario.

  3. High Rayleigh number convection numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzicco, Roberto

    2002-03-01

    Numerical experiments on the flow developing in a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio Γ = 1/2 heated from below and cooled from above, are conducted for Rayleigh numbers (Ra) ranging from 2 x 10^6 up to 2 x 10^11. The aim of the present study is to numerically replicate the experiments by Roche et al. (2001) and Niemela et al. (2000) performed using gaseous helium close to the critical point as working fluid (Pr = 0.7). The numerical simulation permitted us to generate a large data base which was validated by the experimental results and, on the other hand, provided physical insights which are missed by the experimental approaches usually limited to pointwise temperature and global heat exchange measurements. Attention is focussed on the presence of large-scale structures whose characterization is important owing to the introduction of constant `winds' sweeping the plates and generating viscous and thermal boundary layers. The analysis of instantaneous snapshots clearly indicates that the topology of the recirculating large scale structures is quite different with respect to what is commonly observed in Γ = 1 cells where a unique large scale recirculation structure completely fills the fluid volume (e.g. Verzicco & Camussi, 1999). It is shown that a transition occurs at about Ra = 10^9; at lower Ra the flow is characterized by the presence of two counter-rotating toroidal rings attached to the horizontal plates. At larger Ra, in contrast, the most intense structure consists of two counter-rotating rolls of unitary aspect ratio. The two types of flow, which co-exists in the range 10^9 < Ra < 10^10, determine different properties of both the thermal and the viscous boundary layers. Indeed, even if the limited range of Ra analyzed in the present simulation does not allow the presence of a transition to be clearly observed in the Nu vs Ra diagram, the proposed scenario is confirmed by the direct analysis of the boundary layer thicknesses and of the kinetic energy and

  4. Classification of Clouds and Deep Convection from GEOS-5 Using Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, William; Suarez, Max

    2010-01-01

    With the increased resolution of global atmospheric models and the push toward global cloud resolving models, the resemblance of model output to satellite observations has become strikingly similar. As we progress with our adaptation of the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) as a high resolution cloud system resolving model, evaluation of cloud properties and deep convection require in-depth analysis beyond a visual comparison. Outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) provides a sufficient comparison with infrared (IR) satellite imagery to isolate areas of deep convection. We have adopted a binning technique to generate a series of histograms for OLR which classify the presence and fraction of clear sky versus deep convection in the tropics that can be compared with a similar analyses of IR imagery from composite Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations. We will present initial results that have been used to evaluate the amount of deep convective parameterization required within the model as we move toward cloud system resolving resolutions of 10- to 1-km globally.

  5. A COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF INTERACTIONS BETWEEN MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE CLOUD CLUSTERS IN TYPHOONS AND MESOSCALE HEAVY RAINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林毅; 刘爱鸣; 林新彬

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, time and space distribution regularity of meso-scale heavy rains in five selected typhoons which landed at Fujian from 1996 to 1998 hasbeen analyzed. Besides, with hourly digitized satellite infrared imagery, the features of the mesoscale are revealed for the genesis and evolution of mesoscaleconvective systems in typhoons. It indicates that the intensity of mesoscale storms is closely connected with the temperature and the area of the coldest cloudcluster. The heavy rainfall usually emerges on the eastern side of the mesoscale convective cloud clusters, where the cloud mass is developing and with a densegradient and big curvature of isoline of the cloud top temperature.

  6. Cloud patterns and mixing properties in shallow moist Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidauer, Thomas; Schumacher, Joerg [Institut fuer Thermo- und Fluiddynamik, Postfach 100565, Technische Universitaet Ilmenau, D-98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Pauluis, Olivier, E-mail: thomas.weidauer@tu-ilmenau.d, E-mail: pauluis@cims.nyu.ed, E-mail: joerg.schumacher@tu-ilmenau.d [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012-1185 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of idealized moist turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection are presented. The thermodynamics of moist air is linearized close to the phase boundary between water vapor and liquid water. This formulation allows for a simplified saturation condition for the cloud formation, but omits supersaturation and rain. The sensitivity of this problem to changes of the Rayleigh number, the aspect ratio of the convection layer and the water vapor concentration is studied. The Rayleigh number is found to impact the behavior of the system in multiple ways. First, the relaxation time toward a well-mixed turbulent state increases with the Rayleigh number. Similarly, the flow exhibits a higher spatial and temporal intermittency at higher Rayleigh number. This is in line with an enhanced intermittency of the upward buoyancy flux, which we quantify by a multifractal analysis. In addition, phase transition introduces an asymmetry in the distribution of the thermodynamic properties of the well-mixed state. This asymmetry is most pronounced in layers where clouds are partially present. Furthermore, the geometrical properties of the cloud formations averaged with respect to the height of the layer are studied. Similar to isocontours in scalar mixing, the boundaries of isolated clouds show no strict (mono-)fractal behavior. The results of the perimeter-area analysis of the largest isolated clouds agree well with those of large eddy simulations of cumulus convection. This perimeter-area scaling is also similar to that of percolation processes in a plane.

  7. Aerosol-induced changes of convective cloud anvils produce strong climate warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Koren

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of aerosol on clouds poses one of the largest uncertainties in estimating the anthropogenic contribution to climate change. Small human-induced perturbations to cloud characteristics via aerosol pathways can create a change in the top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing of hundreds of Wm−2. Here we focus on links between aerosol and deep convective clouds of the Atlantic and Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zones, noting that the aerosol environment in each region is entirely different. The tops of these vertically developed clouds consisting of mostly ice can reach high levels of the atmosphere, overshooting the lower stratosphere and reaching altitudes greater than 16 km. We show a link between aerosol, clouds and the free atmosphere wind profile that can change the magnitude and sign of the overall climate radiative forcing.

    We find that increased aerosol loading is associated with taller cloud towers and anvils. The taller clouds reach levels of enhanced wind speeds that act to spread and thin the anvil clouds, increasing areal coverage and decreasing cloud optical depth. The radiative effect of this transition is to create a positive radiative forcing (warming at top-of-atmosphere.

    Furthermore we introduce the cloud optical depth (τ, cloud height (Z forcing space and show that underestimation of radiative forcing is likely to occur in cases of non homogenous clouds. Specifically, the mean radiative forcing of towers and anvils in the same scene can be several times greater than simply calculating the forcing from the mean cloud optical depth in the scene.

    Limitations of the method are discussed, alternative sources of aerosol loading are tested and meteorological variance is restricted, but the trend of taller clouds, increased and thinner anvils associated with increased aerosol loading remains robust through all the different tests and perturbations.

  8. Adjusting thresholds of satellite-based convective initiation interest fields based on the cloud environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Christopher P.; Mecikalski, John R.

    2013-11-01

    The Time-Space Exchangeability (TSE) concept states that similar characteristics of a given property are closely related statistically for objects or features within close proximity. In this exercise, the objects considered are growing cumulus clouds, and the data sets to be considered in a statistical sense are geostationary satellite infrared (IR) fields that help describe cloud growth rates, cloud top heights, and whether cloud tops contain significant amounts of frozen hydrometeors. In this exercise, the TSE concept is applied to alter otherwise static thresholds of IR fields of interest used within a satellite-based convective initiation (CI) nowcasting algorithm. The convective environment in which the clouds develop dictate growth rate and precipitation processes, and cumuli growing within similar mesoscale environments should have similar growth characteristics. Using environmental information provided by regional statistics of the interest fields, the thresholds are examined for adjustment toward improving the accuracy of 0-1 h CI nowcasts. Growing cumulus clouds are observed within a CI algorithm through IR fields for many 1000 s of cumulus cloud objects, from which statistics are generated on mesoscales. Initial results show a reduction in the number of false alarms of ~50%, yet at the cost of eliminating approximately ~20% of the correct CI forecasts. For comparison, static thresholds (i.e., with the same threshold values applied across the entire satellite domain) within the CI algorithm often produce a relatively high probability of detection, with false alarms being a significant problem. In addition to increased algorithm performance, a benefit of using a method like TSE is that a variety of unknown variables that influence cumulus cloud growth can be accounted for without need for explicit near-cloud observations that can be difficult to obtain.

  9. Polluting of Winter Convective Clouds upon Transition from Ocean Inland Over Central California: Contrasting Case Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; Prather, Kimberly; Suski, Kaitlyn; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf

    2014-01-01

    In-situ aircraft measurements of aerosol chemical and cloud microphysical properties were conducted during the CalWater campaign in February and March 2011 over the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the coastal waters of central California. The main objective was to elucidate the impacts of aerosol properties on clouds and precipitation forming processes. In order to accomplish this, we compared contrasting cases of clouds that ingested aerosols from different sources. The results showed that clouds containing pristine oceanic air had low cloud drop concentrations and started to develop rain 500 m above their base. This occurred both over the ocean and over the Sierra Nevada, mainly in the early morning when the radiatively cooled stable continental boundary layer was decoupled from the cloud base. Supercooled rain dominated the precipitation that formed in growing convective clouds in the pristine air, up to the -21°C isotherm level. A contrasting situation was documented in the afternoon over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, when the clouds ingested high pollution aerosol concentrations produced in the Central Valley. This led to slow growth of the cloud drop effective radius with height and suppressed and even prevented the initiation of warm rain while contributing to the development of ice hydrometeors in the form of graupel. Our results show that cloud condensation and ice nuclei were the limiting factors that controlled warm rain and ice processes, respectively, while the unpolluted clouds in the same air mass produced precipitation quite efficiently. These findings provide the motivation for deeper investigations into the nature of the aerosols seeding clouds.

  10. Cloud and convection frequencies over the southeast United States as related to small-scale geographic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Harold M.; Vonder Haar, Thomas H.

    1990-01-01

    Based on relatively high spatial and temporal resolution satelite data collected at 0700 CST and at each hour from 1000 CST to 1700 CST during the summer of 1986, cloud and convection variations over the area from Mississippi east to Georgia and from the Gulf of Mexico north to Tennessee are discussed. The data analyses show an average maximum cloud frequency over the land areas at 1400 local time and a maximum of deep convection one hour later. Both cloudiness and deep convection are found to be at a maximum during the nocturnal hours over the Gulf of Mexico. Cloud frequency shows a strong relationship to small terrain features. Small fresh water bodies have cloud minima relative to the surroundings in the afternoon hours. Higher, steep terrain shows cloud maxima and the adjacent lower terrain exhibits afternoon cloud minima due to a divergence of mountain breeze caused by the valley.

  11. On the importance of cloud—cloud interaction to invigorate convective extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Peter; Moseley, Christopher; Hohenegger, Cathy; Haerter, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Observational studies have shown that convective extremes are invigorated with increasing temperatures beyond thermodynamic constraints through the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship (e.g. Lenderink and van Meijgaard, Nature Geosci., 2008; Berg et al., Nature Geosci., 2013). This implies that there are changes in the dynamics of the convective showers that are dependent on the environmental conditions. Observations of convective cells lack sufficient resolution to investigate the dynamics in detail. We have therefore applied a large eddy simulator (LES) at a 200 m horizontal resolution to study the dynamical interaction between convective cells in a set of idealized simulations of a full diurnal cycle with a vertical profile of a typical day with convective showers (Moseley et al., Nature Geosci., 2016). The simulations show that the convective cells are subjected to a gradual self-organization over the day, forming larger cell clusters and more intense precipitation. Further, by tracking rain cells, we find that cells that collide with other cells during their lifetime have a different response to changes in the environmental conditions, such as an increase in temperature, than cells that do not interact. Whereas the non-interacting cells remain almost unaffected by the boundary conditions, the colliding cells show a strong invigoration. Interestingly, granting more time for the self-organization to occur has a similar effect as increasing the temperature. We therefore speculate that self-organization is a key element to explain the strong response of convective extremes to increasing temperature. Our results suggest that proper modeling and predicting of convective extremes requires the description of the interaction between convective clouds.

  12. Redistribution of trace gases by convective clouds - mixed-phase processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of gas transport to the free and upper troposphere in convective clouds is investigated in an axisymmetric dynamic cloud model with detailed microphysics. In particular, we examine the sensitivity of gas transport to the treatment of gas uptake by different ice hydrometeors. Two parameters are used to describe this uptake. The gas retention coefficient defines the fraction of dissolved gas that is retained in an ice particle upon freezing, which includes also the riming process. We also define a gas burial efficiency defining the amount of gas entrapped in ice crystals growing by vapour diffusion. Model calculations are performed for continental and maritime clouds using a complete range of gas solubilities, retention coefficients and burial efficiencies. The results show that the magnitude of the gas retention coefficient is much more important for gas transport in maritime clouds than in continental clouds. The cause of this difference lies in the different microphysical processes dominating the formation and evolution of hydrometeors in the two cloud types. For highly soluble gases, the amount of gas transported to the free troposphere in maritime clouds falls approximately linearly by a factor of 12 as the retention coefficient is varied between 0 and 1. Gas transport is relatively insensitive to the magnitude of the gas burial efficiency. However, the burial efficiency strongly controls the concentration of trace gases inside anvil ice crystals, which subsequently form cirrus clouds.

  13. Redistribution of trace gases by convective clouds – mixed-phase processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yin

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of gas transport to the free and upper troposphere in convective clouds is investigated in an axisymmetric dynamic cloud model with detailed microphysics. In particular, we examine the sensitivity of gas transport to the treatment of gas uptake by different ice hydrometeors. Two parameters are used to describe this uptake. The gas retention coefficient defines the fraction of dissolved gas that is retained in an ice particle upon freezing, which includes also the riming process. We also define a gas burial efficiency defining the amount of gas entrapped in ice crystals growing by vapour diffusion. Model calculations are performed for continental and maritime clouds using a complete range of gas solubilities, retention coefficients and burial efficiencies. The results show that the magnitude of the gas retention coefficient is much more important for gas transport in maritime clouds than in continental clouds. The cause of this difference lies in the different microphysical processes dominating the formation and evolution of hydrometeors in the two cloud types. For highly soluble gases, the amount of gas transported to the free troposphere in maritime clouds falls approximately linearly by a factor of 12 as the retention coefficient is varied between 0 and 1. Gas transport is relatively insensitive to the magnitude of the gas burial efficiency. However, the burial efficiency strongly controls the concentration of trace gases inside anvil ice crystals, which subsequently form cirrus clouds.

  14. Resolving both entrainment-mixing and number of activated CCN in deep convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Freud

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The number concentration of activated CCN (Na is the most fundamental microphysical property of a convective cloud. It determines the rate of droplet growth with cloud depth and conversion into precipitation-sized particles and affects the radiative properties of the clouds. However, measuring Na is not always possible, even in the cores of the convective clouds, because entrainment of sub-saturated ambient air deeper into the cloud lowers the concentrations by dilution and may cause partial or total droplet evaporation, depending on whether the mixing is homogeneous or extreme inhomogeneous, respectively.

    Here we describe a methodology to derive Na based on the rate of cloud droplet effective radius (Re growth with cloud depth and with respect to the cloud mixing with the entrained ambient air. We use the slope of the tight linear relationship between the adiabatic water and Re3 to derive an upper limit for Na assuming extreme inhomogeneous mixing. Then we tune Na down to find the theoretical relative humidity that the entrained ambient air would have for each horizontal cloud penetration, in case of homogeneous mixing. This allows us to evaluate both the entrainment and mixing process in the vertical dimension in addition to getting a better estimation for Na.

    We found that the derived Na from the entire profile data is highly correlated with the independent CCN measurements from below cloud base. Moreover, it was found that mixing of sub-saturated ambient air into the cloud is inclined towards the extreme inhomogeneous limit, i.e. that the time scale of droplet evaporation is significantly smaller than that for turbulent mixing. This means that ambient air that entrains the cloud is pre-moistened by total evaporation of cloud droplets before it mixes

  15. Resolving both entrainment-mixing and number of activated CCN in deep convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Freud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The number concentration of activated CCN (Na is the most fundamental microphysical property of a convective cloud. It determines the rate of droplet growth with cloud depth and conversion into precipitation-sized particles and affects the radiative properties of the clouds. However, measuring Na is not always possible, even in the cores of the convective clouds, because entrainment of sub-saturated ambient air deeper into the cloud lowers the concentrations by dilution and may cause partial or total droplet evaporation, depending on whether the mixing is homogeneous or extreme inhomogeneous, respectively.

    Here we describe a methodology to derive Na based on the rate of cloud droplet effective radius (Re growth with cloud depth and with respect to the cloud mixing with the entrained ambient air. We use the slope of the tight linear relationship between the adiabatic liquid water mixing ratio and Re3 (or Rv3 to derive an upper limit for Na assuming extreme inhomogeneous mixing. Then we tune Na down to find the theoretical relative humidity that the entrained ambient air would have for each horizontal cloud penetration, in case of homogeneous mixing. This allows us to evaluate both the entrainment and mixing process in the vertical dimension in addition to getting a better estimation for Na.

    We found that the derived Na from the entire profile data is highly correlated with the independent CCN measurements from below cloud base. Moreover, it was found that mixing of sub-saturated ambient air into the cloud at scales of ~100 m and above is inclined towards the extreme inhomogeneous limit, i.e. that the time scale of droplet evaporation is significantly smaller than that for turbulent mixing. This means that ambient air that entrains

  16. Analysis of Cloud-resolving Simulations of a Tropical Mesoscale Convective System Observed during TWP-ICE: Vertical Fluxes and Draft Properties in Convective and Stratiform Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.; Rio, Catherine; Fridlind, Ann; Ackerman, Andrew; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Pauluis, Olivier; Varble, Adam; Fan, Jiwen

    2012-10-02

    We analyze three cloud-resolving model simulations of a strong convective event observed during the TWP-ICE campaign, differing in dynamical core, microphysical scheme or both. Based on simulated and observed radar reflectivity, simulations roughly reproduce observed convective and stratiform precipitating areas. To identify the characteristics of convective and stratiform drafts that are difficult to observe but relevant to climate model parameterization, independent vertical wind speed thresholds are calculated to capture 90% of total convective and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes. Convective updrafts are fairly consistent across simulations (likely owing to fixed large-scale forcings and surface conditions), except that hydrometeor loadings differ substantially. Convective downdraft and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes vary notably below the melting level, but share similar vertically uniform draft velocities despite differing hydrometeor loadings. All identified convective and stratiform downdrafts contain precipitation below ~10 km and nearly all updrafts are cloudy above the melting level. Cold pool properties diverge substantially in a manner that is consistent with convective downdraft mass flux differences below the melting level. Despite differences in hydrometeor loadings and cold pool properties, convective updraft and downdraft mass fluxes are linearly correlated with convective area, the ratio of ice in downdrafts to that in updrafts is ~0.5 independent of species, and the ratio of downdraft to updraft mass flux is ~0.5-0.6, which may represent a minimum evaporation efficiency under moist conditions. Hydrometeor loading in stratiform regions is found to be a fraction of hydrometeor loading in convective regions that ranges from ~10% (graupel) to ~90% (cloud ice). These findings may lead to improved convection parameterizations.

  17. Relationships Between Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes on Intraseasonal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20degN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  18. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization – Part I: Convection and Cloud Properties Simulated with Spectral Bin and Bulk Microphysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Yi-Chin; Xu, Kuan-Man; North, Kirk; Collis, Scott M.; Dong, Xiquan; Zhang, Guang J.; Chen, Qian; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    The ultimate goal of this study is to improve representation of convective transport by cumulus parameterization for meso-scale and climate models. As Part I of the study, we perform extensive evaluations of cloud-resolving simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complexes in mid-latitude continent and tropical regions using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with spectral-bin microphysics (SBM) and with two double-moment bulk microphysics schemes: a modified Morrison (MOR) and Milbrandt and Yau (MY2). Compared to observations, in general, SBM gives better simulations of precipitation, vertical velocity of convective cores, and the vertically decreasing trend of radar reflectivity than MOR and MY2, and therefore will be used for analysis of scale-dependence of eddy transport in Part II. The common features of the simulations for all convective systems are (1) the model tends to overestimate convection intensity in the middle and upper troposphere, but SBM can alleviate much of the overestimation and reproduce the observed convection intensity well; (2) the model greatly overestimates radar reflectivity in convective cores (SBM predicts smaller radar reflectivity but does not remove the large overestimation); and (3) the model performs better for mid-latitude convective systems than tropical system. The modeled mass fluxes of the mid latitude systems are not sensitive to microphysics schemes, but are very sensitive for the tropical case indicating strong microphysics modification to convection. Cloud microphysical measurements of rain, snow and graupel in convective cores will be critically important to further elucidate issues within cloud microphysics schemes.

  19. Cloud-scale model intercomparison of chemical constituent transport in deep convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Barth

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Transport and scavenging of chemical constituents in deep convection is important to understanding the composition of the troposphere and therefore chemistry-climate and air quality issues. High resolution cloud chemistry models have been shown to represent convective processing of trace gases quite well. To improve the representation of sub-grid convective transport and wet deposition in large-scale models, general characteristics, such as species mass flux, from the high resolution cloud chemistry models can be used. However, it is important to understand how these models behave when simulating the same storm. The intercomparison described here examines transport of six species. CO and O3, which are primarily transported, show good agreement among models and compare well with observations. Models that included lightning production of NOx reasonably predict NOx mixing ratios in the anvil compared with observations, but the NOx variability is much larger than that seen for CO and O3. Predicted anvil mixing ratios of the soluble species, HNO3, H2O2, and CH2O, exhibit significant differences among models, attributed to different schemes in these models of cloud processing including the role of the ice phase, the impact of cloud-modified photolysis rates on the chemistry, and the representation of the species chemical reactivity. The lack of measurements of these species in the convective outflow region does not allow us to evaluate the model results with observations.

  20. Impact of aerosol on post-frontal convective clouds over Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Rieger, D; M. Bangert; Kottmeier, C; Vogel, H.; Vogel, B.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out simulations with predefined and simulated aerosol distributions in order to investigate the improvement in the forecasting capabilities of an operational weather forecast model by the use of an improved aerosol representation. This study focuses on convective cumulus clouds developing after the passage of a cold front on 25 April 2008 over Germany. The northerly flow after the cold front leads to increased sea salt aerosol concentrations compared to prefrontal conditions. High ...

  1. Validation of multiple-Doppler analysis of convective clouds using the ARM multi-frequency radar network during MC3E

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, K. W.; Collis, S. M.; Giangrande, S. E.; Kollias, P.

    2012-12-01

    Convective processes play an important role in Earth's energy balance by redistributing heat and moisture throughout the atmosphere. Vertical air motions associated with these processes are inherently linked to the life cycle of these convective systems and are therefore directly tied to their energetic impacts. Despite this importance, the spatial and temporal scales of these vertical air motions are poorly understood and not accurately represented in convective parameterization schemes found in numerical weather prediction models. A radar data assimilation tool based on a 3-dimensional variational technique has been developed to study these vertical air motions within convective clouds. However, in order to trust the output of this tool, its sensitivities and accuracies need to be properly characterized. Scanning precipitation radars located at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are used in the assimilation process to retrieve vertical air motions for selected convective cases during the recent Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). Using a statistical approach, the veracity of these retrievals is evaluated by comparing them with observations from the UHF ARM Zenith-pointing Radar (UAZR) network located at SGP.

  2. Airplane investigation of a case of convective cloud bands over the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T.; Bakan, S.

    1991-09-01

    During the experiment KONTROL 1985, an interesting case of prefrontal, nonprecipitating cloud bands parallel to the front at distances of about 25 km was observed over the North Sea. Spectral analysis of high frequency airplane measurements is discussed, putting special emphasis on the significance of the resulting spectral signals. A smaller scale roll circulation of a few kilometers wavelength mainly below cloud base could be inferred from these data. The rolls transport momentum downwards, but heat and moisture upwards into the cloud layer where transport is taken over by individual cloud elements. In addition, reasons for the existence, spacing and orientation of the larger scale cloud bands are discussed.

  3. NATURAL CONVECTION IN PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDINGS: EXPERIMENTS, ANALYSIS AND RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadgil, A.; Bauman, F.; Kammerud, R.

    1981-04-01

    Computer programs have been developed to numerically simulate natural convection in two- and three-dimensional room geometries. The programs have been validated using published data from the literature, results from a full-scale experiment performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and results from a small-scale experiment performed at LBL. One of the computer programs has been used to study the influence of natural convection on the thermal performance of a single zone in a direct-gain passive solar building. It is found that the convective heat transfer coefficients between the air and the enclosure surfaces can be substantially different from the values assumed in the standard building energy analysis methods, and can exhibit significant variations across a given surface. This study implies that the building heating loads calculated by standard building energy analysis methods may have substantial errors as a result of their use of common assumptions regarding the convection processes which occur in an enclosure.

  4. Observational evidence of high ice concentration in a shallow convective cloud embedded in stratiform cloud over North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiefan; Lei, Hengchi; Hou, Tuanjie

    2017-04-01

    In this study we observed the microphysical properties, including the vertical and horizontal distributions of ice particles, liquid water content and ice habit, in different regions of a slightly supercooled stratiform cloud. Using aircraft instrument and radar data, the cloud top temperature was recorded as higher than -15°C, behind a cold front, on 9 September 2015 in North China. During the flight sampling, the high ice number concentration area was located in the supercooled part of a shallow convective cloud embedded in a stratiform cloud, where the ambient temperature was around -3°C. In this area, the maximum number concentrations of particles with diameter greater than 100 μm and 500 μm ( N 100 and N 500) exceeded 300 L-1 and 30 L-1, respectively, and were related to large supercooled water droplets with diameter greater than 24 μm derived from cloud-aerosol spectrometer probe measurements. The ice particles types in this region were predominantly columnar, needle, graupel, and some freezing drops, suggesting that the occurrence of high ice number concentrations was likely related to the Hallett-Mossop mechanism, although many other ice multiplication processes cannot be totally ruled out. The maximum ice number concentration obtained during the first penetration was around two to three orders of magnitude larger than that predicted by the Demott and Fletcher schemes when assuming the cloud top temperature was around -15°C. During the second penetration conducted within the stratiform cloud, N 100 and N 500 decreased by a factor of five to ten, and the presence of columnar and needle-like crystals became very rare.

  5. Convective self-aggregation feedbacks in near-global cloud-resolving simulations of an aquaplanet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretherton, Christopher S.; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.

    2015-12-01

    Positive feedbacks between precipitable water, reduced radiative cooling and enhanced surface fluxes promote convective self-aggregation in limited-area cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations over uniform sea-surface temperature (SST). Near-global aquaplanet simulations with 4 km horizontal grid spacing and no cumulus or boundary layer parameterization are used to test the importance of these feedbacks to realistically organized tropical convection. A 20,480 × 10,240 km equatorially centered channel with latitudinally varying SST is used. Realistic midlatitude and tropical cloud structures develop. The natural zonal variability of humidity and convection are studied in a 30 day control simulation. The temporal growth of a small white-noise humidity perturbation and intrinsic predictability implications are explored. Atmospheric column budgets of moist-static energy (MSE) quantify its covariation with precipitation, surface heat flux, and radiative energy loss. Zonal Fourier analysis partitions these budgets by length scale. Radiative feedbacks on MSE natural variability and perturbation growth are found to be positive, broadly similar across scales, and comparable to limited-area CRMs, capable of e-folding a column MSE perturbation in 6-14 days. Surface fluxes are highest in synoptic-scale dry intrusions, inhibiting aggregation by damping tropical MSE perturbations. Sub-4-day MSE variations are due mainly to advection. Both tropics and midlatitudes have large-scale intrinsic predictability horizons of 15-30 days. An identical simulation but with 20 km grid spacing has more mesoscale variability and low cloud.

  6. Surface temperature sensitivities from cloud cover variations in the Hummel-Kuhn radiative—convective model with three different cloud approximations

    OpenAIRE

    HUMMEL, JOHN R.

    2011-01-01

    In modeling the thermal structure of the atmosphere, the role of clouds is critically important. Clouds modify the solar flux distribution throughout the atmosphere, radiate significantly in the infrared, and provide large thermal reservoirs because of the large latent heat of water. In the best current radiative convective one-dimensional models the global atmosphere is modeled as the sum of clear and cloudy sky parts weighted by a fractional cloud cover. In considering the cloudy sky part,...

  7. Aerosol effect on the evolution of the thermodynamic properties of warm convective cloud fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.

    2016-12-01

    Convective cloud formation and evolution strongly depend on environmental temperature and humidity profiles. The forming clouds change the profiles that created them by redistributing heat and moisture. Here we show that the evolution of the field’s thermodynamic properties depends heavily on the concentration of aerosol, liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Under polluted conditions, rain formation is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to warm the lower part of the cloudy layer (where there is net condensation) and cool and moisten the upper part of the cloudy layer (where there is net evaporation), thereby destabilizing the layer. Under clean conditions, precipitation causes net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer (driven by rain evaporation), which together act to stabilize the atmosphere with time. Previous studies have examined different aspects of the effects of clouds on their environment. Here, we offer a complete analysis of the cloudy atmosphere, spanning the aerosol effect from instability-consumption to enhancement, below, inside and above warm clouds, showing the temporal evolution of the effects. We propose a direct measure for the magnitude and sign of the aerosol effect on thermodynamic instability.

  8. Soil-plant-atmosphere conditions regulating convective cloud formation above southeastern US pine plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Novick, Kimberly; Oishi, Andrew Christopher; Noormets, Asko; Marani, Marco; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.) occupy more than 20% of the forested area in the southern United States, represent more than 50% of the standing pine volume in this region, and remove from the atmosphere about 500 g C m-2 per year through net ecosystem exchange. Hence, their significance as a major regional carbon sink can hardly be disputed. What is disputed is whether the proliferation of young plantations replacing old forest in the southern United States will alter key aspects of the hydrologic cycle, including convective rainfall, which is the focus of the present work. Ecosystem fluxes of sensible (Hs) and latent heat (LE) and large-scale, slowly evolving free atmospheric temperature and water vapor content are known to be first-order controls on the formation of convective clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer. These controlling processes are here described by a zero-order analytical model aimed at assessing how plantations of different ages may regulate the persistence and transition of the atmospheric system between cloudy and cloudless conditions. Using the analytical model together with field observations, the roles of ecosystem Hs and LE on convective cloud formation are explored relative to the entrainment of heat and moisture from the free atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that cloudy-cloudless regimes at the land surface are regulated by a nonlinear relation between the Bowen ratio Bo=Hs/LE and root-zone soil water content, suggesting that young/mature pines ecosystems have the ability to recirculate available water (through rainfall predisposition mechanisms). Such nonlinearity was not detected in a much older pine stand, suggesting a higher tolerance to drought but a limited control on boundary layer dynamics. These results enable the generation of hypotheses about the impacts on convective cloud formation driven by afforestation/deforestation and groundwater depletion projected to increase following increased human population in the

  9. Aerosol-radiation-cloud interactions in a regional coupled model: the effects of convective parameterisation and resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Schultz, David M.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) has been used to simulate a region of Brazil heavily influenced by biomass burning. Nested simulations were run at 5 and 1 km horizontal grid spacing for three case studies in September 2012. Simulations were run with and without fire emissions, convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain, and aerosol-radiation interactions in order to explore the differences attributable to the parameterisations and to better understand the aerosol direct effects and cloud responses. Direct aerosol-radiation interactions due to biomass burning aerosol resulted in a net cooling, with an average short-wave direct effect of -4.08 ± 1.53 Wm-2. However, around 21.7 Wm-2 is absorbed by aerosol in the atmospheric column, warming the atmosphere at the aerosol layer height, stabilising the column, inhibiting convection, and reducing cloud cover and precipitation. The changes to clouds due to radiatively absorbing aerosol (traditionally known as the semi-direct effects) increase the net short-wave radiation reaching the surface by reducing cloud cover, producing a secondary warming that counters the direct cooling. However, the magnitude of the semi-direct effect was found to be extremely sensitive to the model resolution and the use of convective parameterisation. Precipitation became organised in isolated convective cells when not using a convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain, reducing both total cloud cover and total precipitation. The SW semi-direct effect varied from 6.06 ± 1.46 with convective parameterisation to 3.61 ± 0.86 Wm-2 without. Convective cells within the 1 km domain are typically smaller but with greater updraft velocity than equivalent cells in the 5 km domain, reducing the proportion of the domain covered by cloud in all scenarios and producing a smaller semi-direct effect. Biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles acted as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), increasing the droplet number

  10. Squall and Cloud Lines as Structural Components of an Arabian Sea Convective Cloud Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    and M. Garstang, 1982: Suboloud layer energetics of precipitating convection. =. 12L. laX.., 11, 102-117. Betta , A. K., 1976: The thermodynamic...tur- bulence data. Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Saint Louis University, 199 Pp. Miller, M. J., and A. K. Betta

  11. Tropical deep convective life cycle: Cb-anvil cloud microphysics from high-altitude aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, W.; Borrmann, S.; Fierli, F.; Weigel, R.; Mitev, V.; Matthey, R.; Ravegnani, F.; Sitnikov, N. M.; Ulanovsky, A.; Cairo, F.

    2014-12-01

    The case study presented here focuses on the life cycle of clouds in the anvil region of a tropical deep convective system. During the SCOUT-O3 campaign from Darwin, Northern Australia, the Hector storm system has been probed by the Geophysica high-altitude aircraft. Clouds were observed by in situ particle probes, a backscatter sonde, and a miniature lidar. Additionally, aerosol number concentrations have been measured. On 30 November 2005 a double flight took place and Hector was probed throughout its life cycle in its developing, mature, and dissipating stage. The two flights were four hours apart and focused on the anvil region of Hector in altitudes between 10.5 and 18.8 km (i.e. above 350 K potential temperature). Trajectory calculations, satellite imagery, and ozone measurements have been used to ensure that the same cloud air masses have been probed in both flights. The size distributions derived from the measurements show a change not only with increasing altitude but also with the evolution of Hector. Clearly different cloud to aerosol particle ratios as well as varying ice crystal morphology have been found for the different development stages of Hector, indicating different freezing mechanisms. The development phase exhibits the smallest ice particles (up to 300 μm) with a rather uniform morphology. This is indicative for rapid glaciation during Hector's development. Sizes of ice crystals are largest in the mature stage (larger than 1.6 mm) and even exceed those of some continental tropical deep convective clouds, also in their number concentrations. The backscatter properties and particle images show a change in ice crystal shape from the developing phase to rimed and aggregated particles in the mature and dissipating stages; the specific shape of particles in the developing phase cannot be distinguished from the measurements. Although optically thin, the clouds in the dissipating stage have a large vertical extent (roughly 6 km) and persist for at

  12. Processing Doppler Lidar and Cloud Radar Observations for Analysis of Convective Mass Flux Parameterizations Using DYNAMO Direct Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Processing Doppler Lidar and Cloud Radar Observations...campaign the data gathered from the High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) and the 94-GHz cloud Doppler radar Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Processing Doppler Lidar and Cloud Radar Observations for Analysis of Convective Mass Flux

  13. Nowcasting of deep convective clouds and heavy precipitation: Comparison study between NWP model simulation and extrapolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bližňák, Vojtěch; Sokol, Zbyněk; Zacharov, Petr

    2017-02-01

    An evaluation of convective cloud forecasts performed with the numerical weather prediction (NWP) model COSMO and extrapolation of cloud fields is presented using observed data derived from the geostationary satellite Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). The present study focuses on the nowcasting range (1-5 h) for five severe convective storms in their developing stage that occurred during the warm season in the years 2012-2013. Radar reflectivity and extrapolated radar reflectivity data were assimilated for at least 6 h depending on the time of occurrence of convection. Synthetic satellite imageries were calculated using radiative transfer model RTTOV v10.2, which was implemented into the COSMO model. NWP model simulations of IR10.8 μm and WV06.2 μm brightness temperatures (BTs) with a horizontal resolution of 2.8 km were interpolated into the satellite projection and objectively verified against observations using Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), correlation coefficient (CORR) and Fractions Skill Score (FSS) values. Naturally, the extrapolation of cloud fields yielded an approximately 25% lower RMSE, 20% higher CORR and 15% higher FSS at the beginning of the second forecasted hour compared to the NWP model forecasts. On the other hand, comparable scores were observed for the third hour, whereas the NWP forecasts outperformed the extrapolation by 10% for RMSE, 15% for CORR and up to 15% for FSS during the fourth forecasted hour and 15% for RMSE, 27% for CORR and up to 15% for FSS during the fifth forecasted hour. The analysis was completed by a verification of the precipitation forecasts yielding approximately 8% higher RMSE, 15% higher CORR and up to 45% higher FSS when the NWP model simulation is used compared to the extrapolation for the first hour. Both the methods yielded unsatisfactory level of precipitation forecast accuracy from the fourth forecasted hour onward.

  14. An aircraft study of rapid precipitation development and electrification in a growing convective cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, P. T.; Hallett, J.; Black, R. A.; Hendricks, W.

    The rapid initial precipitation growth and initial electrification of a convective cloud, growing as a new cell on the upshear side of a cloud system in Florida, is traced from radar data and aircraft penetrations at the -7°C to -10°C level. This study combines radar, microphysical and electrical measurements so that an examination of the interactions between the cloud dynamics, microphysics and electrification is possible. The first pass (-7°C) was characterized by a strong 23 m/s updraft, all liquid cloud water, no precipitation, and no significant electrification. In the 300 s between the two penetrations, precipitation developed very rapidly from electric field increased from below the measurement threshold to - 25 kv/m. The second penetration, which started at - 7°C and ended at - 10°C, was still exclusively updraft, but with lesser peak velocities and a more complex structure; i.e., no downdraft, but with relative minima in the updraft. The microphysics of the second pass displayed a segment of exclusively cloud liquid water (no precipitation size hydrometeors), a small segment of all liquid precipitation size hydrometeors, a small region of mixed hydrometeors and an extensive region of graupel hydrometeors, ranging in size from 100 μm to several mm. High cloud liquid water coexisted with the liquid and graupel hydrometeors in the strong updrafts. The electrification was observed to occur exclusively in the segments of the cloud pass where graupel were observed. Within this graupel region, where the graupel often coexisted with supercooled cloud liquid water, significant electric field occurred only at relative minima in the updraft. These relative velocity minima were also minima in the cloud liquid water content. The observed updraft velocities in these relative minima were close to balance velocities for the observed larger graupel hydrometeors. The strongest updrafts, where the formation and the riming growth of graupel was the greatest (maxima in

  15. The Impacts of Chihuahua Desert Aerosol Intrusions on Convective Clouds and Regional Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Karina

    Growing up in a desert region influenced by a monsoon system and experiencing, first-hand, dust storms produced by convective thunderstorms stimulated my interest in the study of the impacts of aerosols on clouds. Contrary to other studies which focus more on anthropogenic aerosols, I chose to investigate the role of natural aerosols in the deserts of North America. Moreover, the role played by aerosols in desert regions within the North American Monsoon domain has not received as much attention as in other monsoon regions around the world. This dissertation describes my investigation of the connection between mineral aerosols (dust storms) and monsoon rainfall in the deserts of the Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico. To develop the context for the study of the role of mineral dust in summer-time convection on a regional scale, large-scale dynamical processes and their impact on the inter-annual variability of monsoon rainfall were analyzed. I developed the climatology of monsoonal rainfall and dust storms using surface observations to determine which mesoscale features influence North American Monsoon rainfall in the Paso Del Norte region. The strongest correlations were found between sea surface temperatures over the Gulf of California, Gulf of California moisture surges and monsoon rainfall in the Paso Del Norte region. A connection to ENSO could not be clearly established despite analyzing twenty-one years of data. However, by breaking the data into segments, a strong correlation was found for periods of intense rainfall. Twenty-one case studies were identified in which dust storms were produced in conjunction with thunderstorms during the 2005 - 2007 monsoon seasons. However, in some cases all the conditions were there for rainfall to occur but it did not precipitate. I concluded that strong thunderstorm outflow was triggering dust storms. The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem V3.1.1) was used to evaluate

  16. A Study of the Response of Deep Tropical Clouds to Mesoscale Processes. Part 1; Modeling Strategies and Simulations of TOGA-COARE Convective Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Daniel E.; Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.; Sui, C.-H.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Interactions between deep tropical clouds over the western Pacific warm pool and the larger-scale environment are key to understanding climate change. Cloud models are an extremely useful tool in simulating and providing statistical information on heat and moisture transfer processes between cloud systems and the environment, and can therefore be utilized to substantially improve cloud parameterizations in climate models. In this paper, the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) cloud-resolving model is used in multi-day simulations of deep tropical convective activity over the Tropical Ocean-Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE). Large-scale temperature and moisture advective tendencies, and horizontal momentum from the TOGA-COARE Intensive Flux Array (IFA) region, are applied to the GCE version which incorporates cyclical boundary conditions. Sensitivity experiments show that grid domain size produces the largest response to domain-mean temperature and moisture deviations, as well as cloudiness, when compared to grid horizontal or vertical resolution, and advection scheme. It is found that a minimum grid-domain size of 500 km is needed to adequately resolve the convective cloud features. The control experiment shows that the atmospheric heating and moistening is primarily a response to cloud latent processes of condensation/evaporation, and deposition/sublimation, and to a lesser extent, melting of ice particles. Air-sea exchange of heat and moisture is found to be significant, but of secondary importance, while the radiational response is small. The simulated rainfall and atmospheric heating and moistening, agrees well with observations, and performs favorably to other models simulating this case.

  17. Cloud-Resolving Modeling Intercomparison Study of a Squall Line Case from MC3E - Properties of Convective Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Han, B.; Varble, A.; Morrison, H.; North, K.; Kollias, P.; Chen, B.; Dong, X.; Giangrande, S. E.; Khain, A.; Lin, Y.; Mansell, E.; Milbrandt, J.; Stenz, R.; Thompson, G.; Wang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The large spread in CRM model simulations of deep convection and aerosol effects on deep convective clouds (DCCs) makes it difficult to (1) further our understanding of deep convection and (2) define "benchmarks" and then limit their use in parameterization developments. A constrained model intercomparsion study on a mid-latitude mesoscale squall line is performed using the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) model at 1-km horizontal grid spacing with eight cloud microphysics schemes to understand specific processes that lead to the large spreads of simulated convection and precipitation. Various observational data are employed to evaluate the baseline simulations. All simulations tend to produce a wider convective area but a much narrower stratiform area. The magnitudes of virtual potential temperature drop, pressure rise, and wind speed peak associated with the passage of the gust front are significantly smaller compared with the observations, suggesting simulated cool pools are weaker. Simulations generally overestimate the vertical velocity and radar reflectivity in convective cores compared with the retrievals. The modeled updraft velocity and precipitation have a significant spread across eight schemes. The spread of updraft velocity is the combination of both low-level pressure perturbation gradient (PPG) and buoyancy. Both PPG and thermal buoyancy are small for simulations of weak convection but both are large for those of strong convection. Ice-related parameterizations contribute majorly to the spread of updraft velocity, while they are not the reason for the large spread of precipitation. The understandings gained in this study can help to focus future observations and parameterization development.

  18. Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Lavanya; Zbiegel, Piotr; Campbell, Scott; Bradshaw, Rick; Canon, Richard; Coghlan, Susan; Sakrejda, Iwona; Desai, Narayan; Declerck, Tina; Liu, Anping

    2011-02-02

    Cloud resources promise to be an avenue to address new categories of scientific applications including data-intensive science applications, on-demand/surge computing, and applications that require customized software environments. However, there is a limited understanding on how to operate and use clouds for scientific applications. Magellan, a project funded through the Department of Energy?s (DOE) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program, is investigating the use of cloud computing for science at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Facility (NERSC). In this paper, we detail the experiences to date at both sites and identify the gaps and open challenges from both a resource provider as well as application perspective.

  19. Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Lavanya; Zbiegel, Piotr; Campbell, Scott; Bradshaw, Rick; Canon, Richard; Coghlan, Susan; Sakrejda, Iwona; Desai, Narayan; Declerck, Tina; Liu, Anping

    2011-02-02

    Cloud resources promise to be an avenue to address new categories of scientific applications including data-intensive science applications, on-demand/surge computing, and applications that require customized software environments. However, there is a limited understanding on how to operate and use clouds for scientific applications. Magellan, a project funded through the Department of Energy?s (DOE) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program, is investigating the use of cloud computing for science at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Facility (NERSC). In this paper, we detail the experiences to date at both sites and identify the gaps and open challenges from both a resource provider as well as application perspective.

  20. Correlation of Cloud Droplet Growth with the Scalar Fluctuations in a Turbulent Moist Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond; Yang, Fan

    2016-11-01

    Cloud droplet growth in a turbulent environment is studied by creating turbulent moist Rayleigh-Bénard convection in the Michigan Tech Pi Chamber. Cloud formation is achieved by injecting aerosols into the water-supersaturated environment created by the isobaric mixing of saturated air at different temperatures. A range of steady-state cloud droplet number concentration is achieved by supplying aerosols at different rates. As steady-state droplet number concentration is decreased the mean droplet size increases as expected, but also the width of the size distribution increases. This increase in the width is associated with larger supersaturation fluctuations due to the slow droplet microphysical response (sink of the water vapor) compared to the fast turbulent mixing (source of the water vapor). The observed standard deviation of the squared droplet radius is a linear function of the combined time scale of the system τs- 1 =τc- 1 +τt- 1 ; here, τc is the phase relaxation time and τt is the turbulence correlation time. A stochastic differential equation approach for supersaturation also predicts the same linear response. This finding has significance for cloud-radiation budgets and precipitation formation. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant AGS-1623429.

  1. Tropical deep convective life cycle: Cb-anvil cloud microphysics from high altitude aircraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Frey

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The case study presented here focusses on the life cycle of clouds in a tropical deep convective system. During the SCOUT-O3 campaign from Darwin, Northern Australia, the Hector storm system has been probed by the Geophysica high altitude aircraft. Clouds were observed by in situ particle probes, a backscatter sonde, and a miniature lidar. Additionally, aerosol number concentrations have been measured. On 30 November 2005 a double flight took place and Hector was probed throughout its life cycle in its developing, mature, and dissipating stage. The two flights were four hours apart and focussed on the anvil region of Hector in altitudes between 10.5 km and 18.8 km (i.e. above 350 K potential temperature. Trajectory calculations and ozone measurements have been used to identify that the same cloud air masses have been probed in both flights. The size distributions derived from the measurements not only show a change with increasing altitude but also with the evolution of Hector. Clearly different aerosol to cloud particle ratios as well as varying ice crystal morphology have been found for the different development stages of Hector, indicating a change in freezing mechanisms. The development phase exhibits the smallest ice particles (up to 300 μm with a rather uniform morphology. This is indicative for rapid glaciation during Hector's development. Sizes of ice crystals are largest in the mature stage (larger 1.6 mm and even exceed those of some continental tropical deep convective clouds, also in their number concentrations. The backscatter properties and particle images show a change from frozen droplets in the developing phase to rimed and aggregated particles. The clouds in the dissipating stage have a large vertical extend (roughly 6 km though optically thin and persist for at least 6 h. This poses a high potential for affecting the tropical tropopause layer background conditions regarding humidity, e.g. through facilitating subvisible

  2. Tropical deep convective life cycle: Cb-anvil cloud microphysics from high altitude aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, W.; Borrmann, S.; Fierli, F.; Weigel, R.; Mitev, V.; Matthey, R.; Ravegnani, F.; Sitnikov, N. M.; Ulanovsky, A.; Cairo, F.

    2014-05-01

    The case study presented here focusses on the life cycle of clouds in a tropical deep convective system. During the SCOUT-O3 campaign from Darwin, Northern Australia, the Hector storm system has been probed by the Geophysica high altitude aircraft. Clouds were observed by in situ particle probes, a backscatter sonde, and a miniature lidar. Additionally, aerosol number concentrations have been measured. On 30 November 2005 a double flight took place and Hector was probed throughout its life cycle in its developing, mature, and dissipating stage. The two flights were four hours apart and focussed on the anvil region of Hector in altitudes between 10.5 km and 18.8 km (i.e. above 350 K potential temperature). Trajectory calculations and ozone measurements have been used to identify that the same cloud air masses have been probed in both flights. The size distributions derived from the measurements not only show a change with increasing altitude but also with the evolution of Hector. Clearly different aerosol to cloud particle ratios as well as varying ice crystal morphology have been found for the different development stages of Hector, indicating a change in freezing mechanisms. The development phase exhibits the smallest ice particles (up to 300 μm) with a rather uniform morphology. This is indicative for rapid glaciation during Hector's development. Sizes of ice crystals are largest in the mature stage (larger 1.6 mm) and even exceed those of some continental tropical deep convective clouds, also in their number concentrations. The backscatter properties and particle images show a change from frozen droplets in the developing phase to rimed and aggregated particles. The clouds in the dissipating stage have a large vertical extend (roughly 6 km) though optically thin and persist for at least 6 h. This poses a high potential for affecting the tropical tropopause layer background conditions regarding humidity, e.g. through facilitating subvisible cirrus formation, and

  3. Extraction of convective cloud parameters from Doppler Weather Radar MAX(Z) product using Image Processing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, M. S.; Puli, Anil; Anuradha, B.

    2016-07-01

    In the present work continuous extraction of convective cloud optical information and reflectivity (MAX(Z) in dBZ) using online retrieval technique for time series data production from Doppler Weather Radar (DWR) located at Indian Meteorological Department, Chennai has been developed in MATLAB. Reflectivity measurements for different locations within the DWR range of 250 Km radii of circular disc area can be retrieved using this technique. It gives both time series reflectivity of point location and also Range Time Intensity (RTI) maps of reflectivity for the corresponding location. The Graphical User Interface (GUI) developed for the cloud reflectivity is user friendly; it also provides the convective cloud optical information such as cloud base height (CBH), cloud top height (CTH) and cloud optical depth (COD). This technique is also applicable for retrieving other DWR products such as Plan Position Indicator (Z, in dBZ), Plan Position Indicator (Z, in dBZ)-Close Range, Volume Velocity Processing (V, in knots), Plan Position Indicator (V, in m/s), Surface Rainfall Intensity (SRI, mm/hr), Precipitation Accumulation (PAC) 24 hrs at 0300UTC. Keywords: Reflectivity, cloud top height, cloud base, cloud optical depth

  4. Evaluation of convection-permitting model simulations of cloud populations associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation using data collected during the AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagos, Samson M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Feng, Zhe [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burleyson, Casey D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lim, Kyo-Sun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Long, Charles N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wu, Di [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States); Thompson, Gregory [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-11-12

    Regional cloud permitting model simulations of cloud populations observed during the 2011 ARM Madden Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment/ Dynamics of Madden-Julian Experiment (AMIE/DYNAMO) field campaign are evaluated against radar and ship-based measurements. Sensitivity of model simulated surface rain rate statistics to parameters and parameterization of hydrometeor sizes in five commonly used WRF microphysics schemes are examined. It is shown that at 2 km grid spacing, the model generally overestimates rain rate from large and deep convective cores. Sensitivity runs involving variation of parameters that affect rain drop or ice particle size distribution (more aggressive break-up process etc) generally reduce the bias in rain-rate and boundary layer temperature statistics as the smaller particles become more vulnerable to evaporation. Furthermore significant improvement in the convective rain-rate statistics is observed when the horizontal grid-spacing is reduced to 1 km and 0.5 km, while it is worsened when run at 4 km grid spacing as increased turbulence enhances evaporation. The results suggest modulation of evaporation processes, through parameterization of turbulent mixing and break-up of hydrometeors may provide a potential avenue for correcting cloud statistics and associated boundary layer temperature biases in regional and global cloud permitting model simulations.

  5. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 1: Deep Convective Updraft Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varble, A. C.; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Collis, Scott M.; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben

    2014-12-27

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observed radar reflectivity fields and dual-Doppler retrievals of vertical wind speeds in an attempt to explain published results showing a high bias in simulated convective radar reflectivity aloft. This high bias results from ice water content being large, which is a product of large, strong convective updrafts, although hydrometeor size distribution assumptions modulate the size of this bias. Snow reflectivity can exceed 40 dBZ in a two-moment scheme when a constant bulk density of 100 kg m-3 is used. Making snow mass more realistically proportional to area rather than volume should somewhat alleviate this problem. Graupel, unlike snow, produces high biased reflectivity in all simulations. This is associated with large amounts of liquid water above the freezing level in updraft cores. Peak vertical velocities in deep convective updrafts are greater than dual-Doppler retrieved values, especially in the upper troposphere. Freezing of large rainwater contents lofted above the freezing level in simulated updraft cores greatly contributes to these excessive upper tropospheric vertical velocities. Strong simulated updraft cores are nearly undiluted, with some showing supercell characteristics. Decreasing horizontal grid spacing from 900 meters to 100 meters weakens strong updrafts, but not enough to match observational retrievals. Therefore, overly intense simulated updrafts may partly be a product of interactions between convective dynamics, parameterized microphysics, and large-scale environmental biases that promote different convective modes and strengths than observed.

  6. Results from the CERN pilot CLOUD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Duplissy, J; Reichl, U; Winkler, P M; Pedersen, E; Makhmutov, V; Viisanen, Y; Kulmala, M; Wilhelmsson, M; Weingartner, E; Avngaard, M; Curtius, J; Veenhof, R; Laakso, L; Gagne, S; Harrison, R G; Sipila, M; David, A; Seinfeld, J H; Nieminen, T; Verheggen, B; Aplin, K L; Stratmann, F; Arnold, F; Makela, J; Kellett, B; Fastrup, B; Marsh, N D; Lockwood, M; Carslaw, K; Wehrle, G; Aufmhoff, H; Pedersen, J O P; Baltensperger, U; Onnela, A; Laaksonen, A; Enghoff, M B; Svensmark, J; Wex, H; Lillestol, E; Wagner, P E; Kirkby, J; Stozhkov, Y; Polny, J; Bondo, T; Bingham, R; Svensmark, H

    2010-01-01

    During a 4-week run in October-November 2006, a pilot experiment was performed at the CERN Proton Synchrotron in preparation for the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) experiment, whose aim is to study the possible influence of cosmic rays on clouds. The purpose of the pilot experiment was firstly to carry out exploratory measurements of the effect of ionising particle radiation on aerosol formation from trace H2SO4 vapour and secondly to provide technical input for the CLOUD design. A total of 44 nucleation bursts were produced and recorded, with formation rates of particles above the 3 nm detection threshold of between 0.1 and 100 cm(-3) s(-1), and growth rates between 2 and 37 nm h(-1). The corresponding H2SO4 concentrations were typically around 10(6) cm(-3) or less. The experimentally-measured formation rates and H2SO4 concentrations are comparable to those found in the atmosphere, supporting the idea that sulphuric acid is involved in the nucleation of atmospheric aerosols. However, sulphuric acid...

  7. Convective cloud identification and classification in daytime satellite imagery using standard deviation limited adaptive clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendes, Todd A.; Mecikalski, John R.; MacKenzie, Wayne M.; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Nair, U. S.

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes a statistical clustering approach toward the classification of cloud types within meteorological satellite imagery, specifically, visible and infrared data. The method is based on the Standard Deviation Limited Adaptive Clustering (SDLAC) procedure, which has been used to classify a variety of features within both polar orbiting and geostationary imagery, including land cover, volcanic ash, dust, and clouds of various types. In this study, the focus is on classifying cumulus clouds of various types (e.g., "fair weather, "towering, and newly glaciated cumulus, in addition to cumulonimbus). The SDLAC algorithm is demonstrated by showing examples using Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 12, Meteosat Second Generation's (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI), and the Moderate Resolution Infrared Spectrometer (MODIS). Results indicate that the method performs well, classifying cumulus similarly between MODIS, SEVIRI, and GOES, despite the obvious channel and resolution differences between these three sensors. The SDLAC methodology has been used in several research activities related to convective weather forecasting, which offers some proof of concept for its value.

  8. Comparing parameterized versus measured microphysical properties of tropical convective cloud bases during the ACRIDICON–CHUVA campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Braga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to validate parameterizations that were recently developed for satellite retrievals of cloud condensation nuclei supersaturation spectra, NCCN(S, at cloud base alongside more traditional parameterizations connecting NCCN(S with cloud base updrafts and drop concentrations. This was based on the HALO aircraft measurements during the ACRIDICON–CHUVA campaign over the Amazon region, which took place in September 2014. The properties of convective clouds were measured with a cloud combination probe (CCP, a cloud and aerosol spectrometer (CAS-DPOL, and a CCN counter onboard the HALO aircraft. An intercomparison of the cloud drop size distributions (DSDs and the cloud water content (CWC derived from the different instruments generally shows good agreement within the instrumental uncertainties. To this end, the directly measured cloud drop concentrations (Nd near cloud base were compared with inferred values based on the measured cloud base updraft velocity (Wb and NCCN(S spectra. The measurements of Nd at cloud base were also compared with drop concentrations (Na derived on the basis of an adiabatic assumption and obtained from the vertical evolution of cloud drop effective radius (re above cloud base. The measurements of NCCN(S and Wb reproduced the observed Nd within the measurements uncertainties when the old (1959 Twomey's parameterization was used. The agreement between the measured and calculated Nd was only within a factor of 2 with attempts to use cloud base S, as obtained from the measured Wb, Nd, and NCCN(S. This underscores the yet unresolved challenge of aircraft measurements of S in clouds. Importantly, the vertical evolution of re with height reproduced the observation-based nearly adiabatic cloud base drop concentrations, Na. The combination of these results provides aircraft observational support for the various components of the satellite-retrieved methodology that was recently developed to

  9. Final Technical Report for "Radiative Heating Associated with Tropical Convective Cloud Systems: Its Importance at Meso and Global Scales"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Courtney

    2012-12-13

    Heating associated with tropical cloud systems drive the global circulation. The overall research objectives of this project were to i) further quantify and understand the importance of heating in tropical convective cloud systems with innovative observational techniques, and ii) use global models to determine the large-scale circulation response to variability in tropical heating profiles, including anvil and cirrus cloud radiative forcing. The innovative observational techniques used a diversity of radar systems to create a climatology of vertical velocities associated with the full tropical convective cloud spectrum along with a dissection of the of the total heating profile of tropical cloud systems into separate components (i.e., the latent, radiative, and eddy sensible heating). These properties were used to validate storm-scale and global climate models (GCMs) and were further used to force two different types of GCMs (one with and one without interactive physics). While radiative heating was shown to account for about 20% of the total heating and did not have a strong direct response on the global circulation, the indirect response was important via its impact on convection, esp. in how radiative heating impacts the tilt of heating associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a phenomenon that accounts for most tropical intraseasonal variability. This work shows strong promise in determining the sensitivity of climate models and climate processes to heating variations associated with cloud systems.

  10. Sensitivity of summer ensembles of super-parameterized US mesoscale convective systems to cloud resolving model microphysics and resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, E.; Yu, S.; Kooperman, G. J.; Morrison, H.; Wang, M.; Pritchard, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Microphysical and resolution sensitivities of explicitly resolved convection within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the central United States are well documented in the context of single case studies simulated by cloud resolving models (CRMs) under tight boundary and initial condition constraints. While such an experimental design allows researchers to causatively isolate the effects of CRM microphysical and resolution parameterizations on modeled MCSs, it is still challenging to produce conclusions generalizable to multiple storms. The uncertainty associated with the results of such experiments comes both from the necessary physical constraints imposed by the limited CRM domain as well as the inability to evaluate or control model internal variability. A computationally practical method to minimize these uncertainties is the use of super-parameterized (SP) global climate models (GCMs), in which CRMs are embedded within GCMs to allow their free interaction with one another as orchestrated by large-scale global dynamics. This study uses NCAR's SP Community Atmosphere Model 5 (SP-CAM5) to evaluate microphysical and horizontal resolution sensitivities in summer ensembles of nocturnal MCSs in the central United States. Storm events within each run were identified using an objective empirical orthogonal function (EOF) algorithm, then further calibrated to harmonize individual storm signals and account for the temporal and spatial heterogeneity between them. Three summers of control data from a baseline simulation are used to assess model internal interannual variability to measure its magnitude relative to sensitivities in a number of distinct experimental runs with varying CRM parameters. Results comparing sensitivities of convective intensity to changes in fall speed assumptions about dense rimed species, one- vs. two-moment microphysics, and CRM horizontal resolution will be discussed.

  11. Atmospheric aerosol optical parameters, deep convective clouds and hail occurence - a correlation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talianu, Camelia; Andrei, Simona; Toanca, Florica; Stefan, Sabina

    2016-04-01

    Among the severe weather phenomena, whose frequency has increased during the past two decades, hail represents a major threat not only for agriculture but also for other economical fields. Generally, hail are produced in deep convective clouds, developed in an unstable environment. Recent studies have emphasized that besides the state of the atmosphere, the atmospheric composition is also very important. The presence of fine aerosols in atmosphere could have a high impact on nucleation processes, initiating the occurrence of cloud droplets, ice crystals and possibly the occurrence of graupel and/or hail. The presence of aerosols in the atmosphere, correlated with specific atmospheric conditions, could be predictors of the occurrence of hail events. The atmospheric investigation using multiwavelength Lidar systems can offer relevant information regarding the presence of aerosols, identified using their optical properties, and can distinguish between spherical and non-spherical shape, and liquid and solid phase of these aerosols. The aim of this study is to analyse the correlations between the presence and the properties of aerosols in atmosphere, and the production of hail events in a convective environment, using extensive and intensive optical parameters computed from lidar and ceilometer aerosols measurements. From these correlations, we try to evaluate if these aerosols can be taken into consideration as predictors for hail formation. The study has been carried out in Magurele - Romania (44.35N, 26.03E, 93m ASL) using two collocated remote sensing systems: a Raman Lidar (RALI) placed at the Romanian Atmospheric 3D Observatory and a ceilometer CL31 placed at the nearby Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest. To evaluate the atmospheric conditions, radio sounding and satellite images were used. The period analysed was May 1st - July 15th, 2015, as the May - July period is climatologically favorable for deep convection events. Two hail events have been

  12. Numerical Simulation of the Dynamics, Cloud Microphysics and Radar Echo Structures of Tropical and Mid-Latitude Convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chee Pong

    Tropical convective cells have radar echo patterns that are distinctly different from many mid-latitude convective cells. Also, tropical convection develops associated regions of rain falling from thick anvil clouds. This anvil rain is stratiform and its radar reflectivity pattern contrasts sharply with the radar echoes of the cells. The goal of this study is to use numerical modeling to achieve a better understanding of the dynamical-microphysical interactions that result in the radar echo patterns of tropical and mid-latitude convective cells and of tropical anvil precipitation. A parameterized cloud microphysical scheme with ice-phase processes is coupled first with a one-dimensional time-dependent convective cloud model to simulate tropical and mid-latitude convective cells. Then the microphysical scheme is coupled with a set of prescribed mesoscale anvil cloud vertical motions to simulate the radar reflectivity in anvil precipitation. The simulated tropical convective cells are generally consistent with vertical velocities, and water contents observed by aircraft, although the model vertical velocities may be somewhat higher than those observed. Inclusion of the ice-phase microphysics and in-cloud perturbation pressure are both important in obtaining reasonable cloud dynamics. Tropical clouds of various maximum heights can be produced by varying the cell radius (which is prescribed parameter), cloud base conditions and the environment sounding. With a few exceptions, it was necessary to destabilize the input sounding (by lifting it on an adiabatic chart) prior to using it as input to the model, in order to generate tropical cells greater than 9 km in maximum height. This result indicates the importance of mesoscale forcing prior to the outbreak of deep convection. Warm-rain microphysics are found to account for 40-100% of the rain that falls from the simulated tropical cells. A portion of the rain in deep cells, however, is accounted for by graupel, which

  13. Results from the CERN pilot CLOUD experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Duplissy

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available During a 4-week run in October–November 2006, a pilot experiment was performed at the CERN Proton Synchrotron in preparation for the CLOUD1 experiment, whose aim is to study the possible influence of cosmic rays on clouds. The purpose of the pilot experiment was firstly to carry out exploratory measurements of the effect of ionising particle radiation on aerosol formation from trace H2SO4 vapour and secondly to provide technical input for the CLOUD design. A total of 44 nucleation bursts were produced and recorded, with formation rates of particles above the 3 nm detection threshold of between 0.1 and 100 cm−3s−1, and growth rates between 2 and 37 nm h−1. The corresponding H2SO4 concentrations were typically around 106 cm−3 or less. The experimentally-measured formation rates and H2SO4 concentrations are comparable to those found in the atmosphere, supporting the idea that sulphuric acid is involved in the nucleation of atmospheric aerosols. However, sulphuric acid alone is not able to explain the observed rapid growth rates, which suggests the presence of additional trace vapours in the aerosol chamber, whose identity is unknown. By analysing the charged fraction, a few of the aerosol bursts appear to have a contribution from ion-induced nucleation and ion-ion recombination to form neutral clusters. Some indications were also found for the accelerator beam timing and intensity to influence the aerosol particle formation rate at the highest experimental SO2 concentrations of 6 ppb, although none was found at lower concentrations. Overall, the exploratory measurements provide suggestive evidence for ion-induced nucleation or ion-ion recombination as sources of aerosol particles. However in order to quantify the conditions under which ion processes become significant, improvements are needed in

  14. Aerosol effects on deep convective clouds: impact of changes in aerosol size distribution and aerosol activation parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, A. M. L.; Engström, A.; Söderberg, A.

    2010-03-01

    A cloud-resolving model including explicit aerosol physics and chemistry is used to study the impact of aerosols on deep convective strength. More specifically, by conducting six sensitivity series we examine how the complexity of the aerosol model, the size of the aerosols and the aerosol activation parameterization influence the aerosol-induced deep convective cloud sensitivity. Only aerosol effects on liquid droplet formation are considered. We find that an increased aerosol concentration generally results in stronger convection, which for the simulated case is in agreement with the conceptual model presented by Rosenfeld et al. (2008). However, there are two sensitivity series that do not display a monotonic increase in updraft velocity with increasing aerosol concentration. These exceptions illustrate the need to: 1) account for changes in evaporation processes and subsequent cooling when assessing aerosol effects on deep convective strength, 2) better understand graupel impaction scavenging of aerosols which may limit the number of CCN at a critical stage of cloud development and thereby dampen the convection, 3) increase our knowledge of aerosol recycling due to evaporation of cloud droplets. Furthermore, we find a significant difference in the aerosol-induced deep convective cloud sensitivity when using different complexities of the aerosol model and different aerosol activation parameterizations. For the simulated case, a 100% increase in aerosol concentration results in a difference in average updraft between the various sensitivity series which is as large as the average updraft increase itself. The model simulations also show that the change in graupel and rain formation is not necessarily directly proportional to the change in updraft velocity. For example, several of the sensitivity series display a decrease of the rain amount at the lowest model level with increasing updraft velocity. Finally, an increased number of aerosols in the Aitken mode (here

  15. Aerosol effects on deep convective clouds: impact of changes in aerosol size distribution and aerosol activation parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. L. Ekman

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A cloud-resolving model including explicit aerosol physics and chemistry is used to study the impact of aerosols on deep convective strength. More specifically, by conducting six sensitivity series we examine how the complexity of the aerosol model, the size of the aerosols and the aerosol activation parameterization influence the aerosol-induced deep convective cloud sensitivity. Only aerosol effects on liquid droplet formation are considered. We find that an increased aerosol concentration generally results in stronger convection, which for the simulated case is in agreement with the conceptual model presented by Rosenfeld et al. (2008. However, there are two sensitivity series that do not display a monotonic increase in updraft velocity with increasing aerosol concentration. These exceptions illustrate the need to: 1 account for changes in evaporation processes and subsequent cooling when assessing aerosol effects on deep convective strength, 2 better understand graupel impaction scavenging of aerosols which may limit the number of CCN at a critical stage of cloud development and thereby dampen the convection, 3 increase our knowledge of aerosol recycling due to evaporation of cloud droplets. Furthermore, we find a significant difference in the aerosol-induced deep convective cloud sensitivity when using different complexities of the aerosol model and different aerosol activation parameterizations. For the simulated case, a 100% increase in aerosol concentration results in a difference in average updraft between the various sensitivity series which is as large as the average updraft increase itself. The model simulations also show that the change in graupel and rain formation is not necessarily directly proportional to the change in updraft velocity. For example, several of the sensitivity series display a decrease of the rain amount at the lowest model level with increasing updraft velocity. Finally, an increased number of aerosols in the

  16. Influence of convection and aerosol pollution on ice cloud particle effective radius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Jiang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Satellite observations show that ice cloud effective radius (re increases with ice water content (IWC but decreases with aerosol optical thickness (AOT. Using least-squares fitting to the observed data, we obtain an analytical formula to describe the variations of re with IWC and AOT for several regions with distinct characteristics of re-IWC-AOT relationships. As IWC directly relates to convective strength and AOT represents aerosol loading, our empirical formula provides a means to quantify the relative roles of dynamics and aerosols in controlling re in different geographical regions, and to establish a framework for parameterization of aerosol effects on re in climate models.

  17. The scientific basis for a satellite mission to retrieve CCN concentrations and their impacts on convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rosenfeld

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The cloud -mediated radiative forcing is widely recognized as the main source of uncertainty in our knowledge of the anthropogenic climate forcing and in our understanding of climate sensitivity. Current outstanding challenges are (1 global measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN in the cloudy boundary layer from space, and, (2 disentangling the effects of aerosols from the thermodynamic and meteorological effects on the clouds. Here we present a new concept for a way to overcome these two challenges, using relatively simple passive satellite measurements in the visible and IR. The idea is to use the clouds themselves as natural CCN chambers by retrieving simultaneously the number of activated aerosols at cloud base, Na, and the cloud base updraft speed. The Na is obtained by analyzing the distribution of cloud drop effective radius in convective elements as a function distance above cloud base. The cloud base updraft velocities are estimated by double stereoscopic viewing and tracking of the evolution of cloud surface features just above cloud base. In order to resolve the vertical dimension of the clouds, the field of view will be 100 m for the microphysical retrievals, and 50 m for the stereoscopic measurements. The viewing geometry will be 30 degrees off nadir eastward, with the Sun in the back at 30 degrees off zenith westward, which requires a Sun synchronous orbit at 14:00 LST. Having measured simultaneously the thermodynamic environment, the vertical motions of the clouds, their microstructure and the CCN concentration will allow separating the dynamic from the CCN effects. This concept is being applied in the proposed satellite mission named Clouds, Hazards and Aerosols Survey for Earth Researchers (CHASER.

  18. The scientific basis for a satellite mission to retrieve CCN concentrations and their impacts on convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rosenfeld

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The cloud-mediated aerosol radiative forcing is widely recognized as the main source of uncertainty in our knowledge of the anthropogenic forcing on climate. The current challenges for improving our understanding are (1 global measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN in the cloudy boundary layer from space, and (2 disentangling the effects of aerosols from the thermodynamic and meteorological effects on the clouds. Here, we present a new conceptual framework to help us overcome these two challenges, using relatively simple passive satellite measurements in the visible and infared (IR. The idea is to use the clouds themselves as natural CCN chambers by retrieving simultaneously the number of activated aerosols at cloud base, Na, and the cloud base updraft speed. The Na is obtained by analyzing the distribution of cloud drop effective radius in convective elements as a function of distance above cloud base. The cloud base updraft velocities are estimated by double stereoscopic viewing and tracking of the evolution of cloud surface features just above cloud base. In order to resolve the vertical dimension of the clouds, the field of view will be 100 m for the microphysical retrievals, and 50 m for the stereoscopic measurements. The viewing geometry will be eastward and 30 degrees off nadir, with the Sun in the back at 30 degrees off zenith westward, requiring a Sun-synchronous orbit at 14 LST. Measuring simultaneously the thermodynamic environment, the vertical motions of the clouds, their microstructure and the CCN concentration will allow separating the dynamics from the CCN effects. This concept is being applied in the proposed satellite mission named Clouds, Hazards and Aerosols Survey for Earth Researchers (CHASER.

  19. Examining diurnal cycle influences on convective intensity in idealized cloud resolving model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Z.; Back, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    There is a large observed contrast in the lightning flash rate per unit precipitation between land and ocean in the tropics. Higher lightning flash rates are associated with faster updraft velocities, and thus greater lightning flash rate per unit precipitation is associated with faster updrafts per unit precipitation, a clear measure of convective intensity. As it is the land regions exhibiting the greater lightning flash rate per unit precipitation, there is an expectation that tropical land areas exhibit greater convective intensity than tropical oceans. Using a cloud resolving model (CRM) we tested whether the application of a diurnal cycle in sea surface temperature (SST) over a portion of the domain would result in faster updrafts per unit precipitation over that domain. We applied a Bernoulli sampling technique to the area of oscillating SST to give it the same effective mean precipitation as the fixed SST area. Once the mean precipitation values were equal, it was found that there were no differences in high intensity updraft velocity that could be associated with lightning flash rate per unit precipitation variations in the real world.

  20. A cryostat device for liquid nitrogen convection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Charles; Duchesne, Alexis; Caps, Herve

    2015-11-01

    When a horizontal layer of expansible fluid heated from below is submitted to a large vertical temperature gradient, one can observe convective cells. This phenomenon is the so-called Rayleigh-Bénard instability. In the literature, this instability is mainly studied when the entire bottom surface of a container heats the liquid. Under these conditions, the development of regularly spaced convective cells in the liquid bulk is observed. Cooling applications led us to consider this instability in a different geometry, namely a resistor immersed in a bath of cold liquid. We present here experiments conducted with liquid nitrogen. For this purpose, we developed a cryostat in order to be able to perform Particle Image Velocimetry. We obtained 2D maps of the flow and observed, as expected, two Rayleigh-Bénard convective cells around the heater. We particularly investigated the vertical velocity in the central column between the two cells. We compared these data to results we obtained with silicone oil and water in the same geometry. We derived theoretical law from classical models applied to the proposed geometry and found a good agreement with our experimental data. This project has been financially supported by ARC SuperCool contract of the University of Liege.

  1. Results from the CERN pilot CLOUD experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Duplissy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available During a 4-week run in October–November 2006, a pilot experiment was performed at the CERN Proton Synchrotron in preparation for the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD experiment, whose aim is to study the possible influence of cosmic rays on clouds. The purpose of the pilot experiment was firstly to carry out exploratory measurements of the effect of ionising particle radiation on aerosol formation from trace H2SO4 vapour and secondly to provide technical input for the CLOUD design. A total of 44 nucleation bursts were produced and recorded, with formation rates of particles above the 3 nm detection threshold of between 0.1 and 100 cm−3s−1, and growth rates between 2 and 37 nm h−1. The corresponding H2O concentrations were typically around 106 cm−3 or less. The experimentally-measured formation rates and htwosofour concentrations are comparable to those found in the atmosphere, supporting the idea that sulphuric acid is involved in the nucleation of atmospheric aerosols. However, sulphuric acid alone is not able to explain the observed rapid growth rates, which suggests the presence of additional trace vapours in the aerosol chamber, whose identity is unknown. By analysing the charged fraction, a few of the aerosol bursts appear to have a contribution from ion-induced nucleation and ion-ion recombination to form neutral clusters. Some indications were also found for the accelerator beam timing and intensity to influence the aerosol particle formation rate at the highest experimental SO2 concentrations of 6 ppb, although none was found at lower concentrations. Overall, the exploratory measurements provide suggestive evidence for ion-induced nucleation or ion-ion recombination as sources of aerosol particles. However in order to quantify the conditions under which ion processes become significant, improvements are needed in

  2. Intense convection over West Africa during AMMA SOP3 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenouo, André; Sall, Saïdou Moustapha; Badiane, Daouda; Gaye, Amadou Thierno; Kamga Mkankam, F.

    2016-11-01

    ERA-Interim product from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) assimilation of African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) resources, Meteosat satellite images, and synoptic observations were used to study local- and regional-scale environments associated with intense convective systems during the AMMA-SOP3 experiment over West Africa in the Northern Hemisphere of summer 2006. The convective system, from the 21st to 23rd of August 2006, was more active at 0000 and 1800 UTC showing diurnal cycle of deep convection over West Africa where the African easterly waves (AEWs) are developed downstream. Downstream barotropic and baroclinic energy conversions associated with strong AEWs are important for the maintenance of AEW activity in West Africa. Barotropic energy conversions dominate south of the African easterly jet (AEJ), while baroclinic energy conversions are most important north of the AEJ. From a dynamical viewpoint, the low-level vorticity presents strong positive values over the sea and Sahara zone, indicating that exists on the cyclonic shear side of the African easterly jet, which is consistent with baroclinic growth. The 925-hPa equivalent potential temperature structure show a maximum over the Sahara which corresponds to the depression observed in this region. A mosaic of three hourly infrared (IR) satellite images, depicts a very distinct signal from an initial region of convection, developing through several stages and moving off the African coast. These observations, along with those available from the World Weather Watch, provide an opportunity to carry out numerical weather prediction (NWP) studies over West Africa utilizing high resolution limited area models.

  3. Behavior of predicted convective clouds and precipitation in the high-resolution Unified Model over the Indian summer monsoon region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, A.; Sethunadh, Jisesh; Rakhi, R.; Arulalan, T.; Mohandas, Saji; Iyengar, Gopal R.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2017-05-01

    National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting high-resolution regional convective-scale Unified Model with latest tropical science settings is used to evaluate vertical structure of cloud and precipitation over two prominent monsoon regions: Western Ghats (WG) and Monsoon Core Zone (MCZ). Model radar reflectivity generated using Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project Observation Simulator Package along with CloudSat profiling radar reflectivity is sampled for an active synoptic situation based on a new method using Budyko's index of turbulence (BT). Regime classification based on BT-precipitation relationship is more predominant during the active monsoon period when convective-scale model's resolution increases from 4 km to 1.5 km. Model predicted precipitation and vertical distribution of hydrometeors are found to be generally in agreement with Global Precipitation Measurement products and BT-based CloudSat observation, respectively. Frequency of occurrence of radar reflectivity from model implies that the low-level clouds below freezing level is underestimated compared to the observations over both regions. In addition, high-level clouds in the model predictions are much lesser over WG than MCZ.

  4. Vertical structure of cumulonimbus towers and intense convective clouds over the South Asian region during the summer monsoon season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, G. S.; Kumar, Shailendra

    2015-03-01

    The vertical structure of radar reflectivity factor in active convective clouds that form during the South Asian monsoon season is reported using the 2A25 version 6 data product derived from the precipitation radar measurements on board the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite. We define two types of convective cells, namely, cumulonimbus towers (CbTs) and intense convective cells (ICCs). CbT is defined referring to a reflectivity threshold of 20 dBZ at 12 km altitude and is at least 9 km thick. ICCs are constructed referring to reflectivity thresholds at 8 km and 3 km altitudes. Cloud properties reported here are based on 10 year climatology. It is observed that the frequency of occurrence of CbTs is highest over the foothills of Himalayas, plains of northern India and Bangladesh, and minimum over the Arabian Sea and equatorial Indian Ocean west of 90°E. The regional differences depend on the reference height selected, namely, small in the case of CbTs and prominent in 6-13 km height range for ICCs. Land cells are more intense than the oceanic ones for convective cells defined using the reflectivity threshold at 3 km, whereas land versus ocean contrasts are not observed in the case of CbTs. Compared to cumulonimbus clouds elsewhere in the tropics, the South Asian counterparts have higher reflectivity values above 11 km altitude.

  5. Performing quantum computing experiments in the cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum computing technology has reached a second renaissance in the past five years. Increased interest from both the private and public sector combined with extraordinary theoretical and experimental progress has solidified this technology as a major advancement in the 21st century. As anticipated my many, some of the first realizations of quantum computing technology has occured over the cloud, with users logging onto dedicated hardware over the classical internet. Recently, IBM has released the Quantum Experience, which allows users to access a five-qubit quantum processor. In this paper we take advantage of this online availability of actual quantum hardware and present four quantum information experiments. We utilize the IBM chip to realize protocols in quantum error correction, quantum arithmetic, quantum graph theory, and fault-tolerant quantum computation by accessing the device remotely through the cloud. While the results are subject to significant noise, the correct results are returned from the chip. This demonstrates the power of experimental groups opening up their technology to a wider audience and will hopefully allow for the next stage of development in quantum information technology.

  6. A 1D microphysical cloud model for Earth, and Earth-like exoplanets. Liquid water and water ice clouds in the convective troposphere

    CERN Document Server

    Zsom, A; Goldblatt, C

    2012-01-01

    One significant difference between the atmospheres of stars and exoplanets is the presence of condensed particles (clouds or hazes) in the atmosphere of the latter. The main goal of this paper is to develop a self-consistent microphysical cloud model for 1D atmospheric codes, which can reproduce some observed properties of Earth, such as the average albedo, surface temperature, and global energy budget. The cloud model is designed to be computationally efficient, simple to implement, and applicable for a wide range of atmospheric parameters for planets in the habitable zone. We use a 1D, cloud-free, radiative-convective, and photochemical equilibrium code originally developed by Kasting, Pavlov, Segura, and collaborators as basis for our cloudy atmosphere model. The cloud model is based on models used by the meteorology community for Earth's clouds. The free parameters of the model are the relative humidity and number density of condensation nuclei, and the precipitation efficiency. In a 1D model, the cloud c...

  7. How well can a convection-permitting climate model reproduce decadal statistics of precipitation, temperature and cloud characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Erwan; Van Weverberg, Kwinten; Demuzere, Matthias; Devis, Annemarie; Saeed, Sajjad; Stengel, Martin; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2016-11-01

    Convection-permitting climate model are promising tools for improved representation of extremes, but the number of regions for which these models have been evaluated are still rather limited to make robust conclusions. In addition, an integrated interpretation of near-surface characteristics (typically temperature and precipitation) together with cloud properties is limited. The objective of this paper is to comprehensively evaluate the performance of a `state-of-the-art' regional convection-permitting climate model for a mid-latitude coastal region with little orographic forcing. For this purpose, an 11-year integration with the COSMO-CLM model at Convection-Permitting Scale (CPS) using a grid spacing of 2.8 km was compared with in-situ and satellite-based observations of precipitation, temperature, cloud properties and radiation (both at the surface and the top of the atmosphere). CPS clearly improves the representation of precipitation, in especially the diurnal cycle, intensity and spatial distribution of hourly precipitation. Improvements in the representation of temperature are less obvious. In fact the CPS integration overestimates both low and high temperature extremes. The underlying cause for the overestimation of high temperature extremes was attributed to deficiencies in the cloud properties: The modelled cloud fraction is only 46 % whereas a cloud fraction of 65 % was observed. Surprisingly, the effect of this deficiency was less pronounced at the radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere due to a compensating error, in particular an overestimation of the reflectivity of clouds when they are present. Overall, a better representation of convective precipitation and a very good representation of the daily cycle in different cloud types were demonstrated. However, to overcome remaining deficiencies, additional efforts are necessary to improve cloud characteristics in CPS. This will be a challenging task due to compensating deficiencies that currently

  8. Determining ice water content from 2D crystal images in convective cloud systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Delphine; Coutris, Pierre; Fontaine, Emmanuel; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Strapp, J. Walter

    2016-04-01

    Cloud microphysical in-situ instrumentation measures bulk parameters like total water content (TWC) and/or derives particle size distributions (PSD) (utilizing optical spectrometers and optical array probes (OAP)). The goal of this work is to introduce a comprehensive methodology to compute TWC from OAP measurements, based on the dataset collected during recent HAIC (High Altitude Ice Crystals)/HIWC (High Ice Water Content) field campaigns. Indeed, the HAIC/HIWC field campaigns in Darwin (2014) and Cayenne (2015) provide a unique opportunity to explore the complex relationship between cloud particle mass and size in ice crystal environments. Numerous mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) were sampled with the French Falcon 20 research aircraft at different temperature levels from -10°C up to 50°C. The aircraft instrumentation included an IKP-2 (isokinetic probe) to get reliable measurements of TWC and the optical array probes 2D-S and PIP recording images over the entire ice crystal size range. Based on the known principle relating crystal mass and size with a power law (m=α•Dβ), Fontaine et al. (2014) performed extended 3D crystal simulations and thereby demonstrated that it is possible to estimate the value of the exponent β from OAP data, by analyzing the surface-size relationship for the 2D images as a function of time. Leroy et al. (2015) proposed an extended version of this method that produces estimates of β from the analysis of both the surface-size and perimeter-size relationships. Knowing the value of β, α then is deduced from the simultaneous IKP-2 TWC measurements for the entire HAIC/HIWC dataset. The statistical analysis of α and β values for the HAIC/HIWC dataset firstly shows that α is closely linked to β and that this link changes with temperature. From these trends, a generalized parameterization for α is proposed. Finally, the comparison with the initial IKP-2 measurements demonstrates that the method is able to predict TWC values

  9. Climatology of precipitating convective clouds in ERA-Interim derived from the Emanuel and Živković-Rothman parameterisation scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Anne; Seibert, Petra

    2016-04-01

    The convective parameterisation scheme of Emanuel and Živković-Rothman (1999) was designed to represent cumulus convection with a special focus on convective water fluxes. This scheme is implemented in the Lagrangian particle transport and dispersion model FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model, http://flexpart.eu) to calculate a redistribution matrix used for the transport simulation. In order to improve the wet scavenging through convective clouds in this model, we are statistically evaluating a global data set of cloud base and cloud top heights of precipitating clouds derived from the EZ99 scheme and based on ECMWF's ERA-Interim data. They have a spectral resolution of about 80 km and 60 vertical levels available every 6 hours. The results will be evaluated as a function of season and geographical region.

  10. Detection of potentially hazardous convective clouds with a dual-polarized C-band radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Adachi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A method for forecasting very short-term rainfall to detect potentially hazardous convective cloud that produces heavy local rainfall was developed using actual volumetric C-band polarimetric radar data. Because the rainfall estimation algorithm used in this method removed the effect of ice particles based on polarimetric measurements, it was immune to the high reflectivity associated with hail. The reliability of the algorithm was confirmed by comparing the rainfall rate estimated from the polarimetric radar measurements at the lowest elevation angle with that obtained from an optical disdrometer on the ground. The rainfall rate estimated from polarimetric data agreed well with the results obtained from the disdrometer, and was much more reliable than results derived from reflectivity alone. Two small cumulus cells were analyzed, one of which developed and later produced heavy rainfall, whereas the other did not. Observations made by polarimetric radar with a volumetric scan revealed that a high vertical maximum intensity of rainfall rate and a vertical area of enhanced differential reflectivity extending above the freezing level, often termed a high ZDR column, were clearly formed about 10 min prior to the onset of heavy rainfall on the ground. The onset time of the heavy rainfall could be estimated in advance from the polarimetric data, which agreed fairly well with observations. These polarimetric characteristics were not observed for the cumulus cell that did not produce heavy rainfall. The results suggest that both the vertical maximum intensity of the rainfall rate and a high ZDR column, estimated from polarimetric measurements, can be used to identify potentially hazardous clouds. Furthermore, this study shows that polarimetric radar measurements with high spatial and temporal resolutions are invaluable for disaster reduction.

  11. Detection of potentially hazardous convective clouds with a dual-polarized C-band radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Yamauchi, H.; Onogi, S.

    2013-10-01

    A method for forecasting very short-term rainfall to detect potentially hazardous convective cloud that produces heavy local rainfall was developed using actual volumetric C-band polarimetric radar data. Because the rainfall estimation algorithm used in this method removed the effect of ice particles based on polarimetric measurements, it was immune to the high reflectivity associated with hail. The reliability of the algorithm was confirmed by comparing the rainfall rate estimated from the polarimetric radar measurements at the lowest elevation angle with that obtained from optical disdrometers on the ground. The rainfall rate estimated from polarimetric data agreed well with the results obtained from the disdrometers, and was much more reliable than results derived from reflectivity alone. Two small cumulus cells were analyzed, one of which developed and later produced heavy rainfall, whereas the other did not. Observations made by polarimetric radar with a volumetric scan revealed that a high vertical maximum intensity of rainfall rate and a vertical area of enhanced differential reflectivity extending above the freezing level, often termed a high ZDR column, were clearly formed about 10 min prior to the onset of heavy rainfall on the ground. The onset time of the heavy rainfall could be estimated in advance from the polarimetric data, which agreed fairly well with observations. These polarimetric characteristics were not observed for the cumulus cell that did not produce heavy rainfall. The results suggest that both the vertical maximum intensity of the rainfall rate and a high ZDR column, estimated from polarimetric measurements, can be used to identify potentially hazardous clouds. Furthermore, this study shows that polarimetric radar measurements with high spatial and temporal resolutions are invaluable for disaster reduction.

  12. Impacts of cloud and precipitation processes on maritime shallow convection as simulated by an LES model with bin microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, W. W.; Wang, L.-P.; Prabha, T. V.

    2014-07-01

    This paper discusses impacts of cloud and precipitation processes on macrophysical properties of shallow convective clouds as simulated by a large-eddy model applying warm-rain bin microphysics. Simulations with and without collision-coalescence are considered with CCN concentrations of 30, 60, 120, and 240 mg-1. Simulations with collision-coalescence include either the traditional gravitational collision kernel or a novel kernel that includes enhancements due to the small-scale cloud turbulence. Simulations with droplet collisions were discussed in Wyszogrodzki et al. (2013) focusing on the impact of the turbulent collision kernel. The current paper expands that analysis and puts model results in the context of previous studies. Despite a significant increase of the drizzle/rain with the decrease of CCN concentration, enhanced by the impact of the small-scale turbulence, impacts on the macroscopic cloud field characteristics are relatively minor. We document a clear feedback between cloud-scale processes and the mean environmental profiles that increases with the amount of drizzle/rain. Model results show a systematic shift in the cloud top height distributions, with an increasing contributions of deeper clouds and an overall increase of the number of cloudy columns for stronger precipitating cases. We argue that this is consistent with the explanation suggested in Wyszogrodzki et al. (2013) namely, the increase of drizzle/rain leading to a more efficient condensate off-loading in the upper parts of the cloud field. An additional effect involves suppressing cloud droplet evaporation near cloud edges in low-CCN simulations as documented in previous studies. We pose a question whether the effects of cloud turbulence on drizzle/rain formation can be corroborated by remote sensing observations, for instance, from space. Although a clear signal is extracted from model results, we argue that the answer is negative due to uncertainties caused by the temporal variability

  13. Results of the meteorological model WRF-ARW over Catalonia, using different parameterizations of convection and cloud microphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mercader

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The meteorological model WRF-ARW (Weather Research and Forecasting - Advanced Research WRF is a new generation model that has a worldwide growing community of users. In the framework of a project that studies the feasibility of implementing it operationally at the Meteorological Service of Catalonia, a verification of the forecasts produced by the model in several cases of precipitation observed over Catalonia has been carried out. Indeed, given the importance of precipitation forecasts in this area, one of the main objectives was to study the sensitivity of the model in different configurations of its parameterizations of convection and cloud microphysics. In this paper, we present the results of this verification for two domains, a 36-km grid size and one of 12 km grid size, unidirectionally nested to the previous one. In the external domain, the evaluation was based on the analysis of the main statistical parameters (ME and RMSE for temperature, relative humidity, geopotential and wind, and it has been determined that the combination using the Kain-Fritsch convective scheme with the WSM5 microphysical scheme has provided the best results. Then, with this configuration set for the external domain, some forecasts at the nested domain have been done, by combining different convection and cloud microphysics schemes, leading to the conclusion that the most accurate configuration is the one combining the convective parameterization of Kain-Fritsch and the Thompson microphysics scheme.

  14. Characterizing response versus scan-angle for MODIS reflective solar bands using deep convective clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Rajendra; Doelling, David R.; Angal, Amit; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Scarino, Benjamin; Gopalan, Arun; Haney, Conor; Wu, Aisheng

    2017-01-01

    MODIS consists of a cross-track, two-sided scan mirror, whose reflectance is not uniform but is a function of angle of incidence (AOI). This feature, known as response versus scan-angle (RVS), was characterized for all reflective solar bands of both MODIS instruments prior to launch. The RVS characteristic has changed on orbit, which must be tracked precisely over time to ensure the quality of MODIS products. The MODIS characterization support team utilizes the onboard calibrators and the earth view responses from multiple pseudoinvariant desert sites to track the RVS changes at different AOIs. The drawback of using deserts is the assumption that these sites are radiometrically stable during the monitoring period. In addition, the 16-day orbit repeat cycle of MODIS allows for only a limited set of AOIs over a given desert. We propose a novel and robust approach of characterizing the MODIS RVS using tropical deep convective clouds (DCC). The method tracks the monthly DCC response at specified sets of AOIs to compute the temporal RVS changes. Initial results have shown that the Aqua-MODIS collection 6 band 1 level 1B radiances show considerable residual RVS dependencies, with long-term drifts up to 2.3% at certain AOIs.

  15. Convective melting in a magma chamber: theory and numerical experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakin, A.

    2012-04-01

    conditions for the intruded magma to crystallize first and then switch to the roof melting or only crystallize were not defined. We did this in our numerical experiments in terms of the initial magma and roof rocks temperatures for particular sill size. Neglecting strong viscosity variation in the boundary layer at the melting front leads to the overestimation of the melting rate by H&S model on approximately 70% at Tm=940oC. At Tm =800oC effect of the crystals present in descending plumes compensates viscosity increase and numerical Um practically coincides with theoretical one (difference 8%). Some researchers (Huber et al., 2010) use empirical and scaling results obtained from stagnant-lid convection (Davaille and Jaupart, 1993). We find that the later model is not applicable to the melting problem since super-exponential dependence of the viscosity from temperature is valid providing full solidification below eutectic temperature Ts. "Melting temperature" at the stagnant-lid style of convection is defined by Arhenius rheological parameters and bulk melt temperature and can be less than Ts. Our numerical study was applied to the estimation of the possible time frame and efficiency of the remelting of the silicic pyroclastics by superheated rhyolites in the caldera environment (Simakin and Bindeman, 2012). Literature. 1)Davaille, A. and Jaupart, C. (1993) J. Fluid. Mech., 253: 141-166. 2) Huppert, H.E. and Sparks, R.S.J. (1988) J. Petrol., 29: 599-624. 3)Huber, C., Bachmann, O., Dufek, J. (2010) J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., 195: 97-105. 4)Jaupart, C. and Brandeis, G. (1986) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 80: 183-199. 5)Simakin, A.G. and Bindeman, I.N. (2012) Remelting in caldera and rift environments and the genesis of hot, "recycled" rhyolites. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. (in review). 6) Snyder, D. (2000) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 175: 257-273.

  16. The great dun fell cloud experiment 1993: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choularton, T. W.; Colvile, R. N.; Bower, K. N.; Gallagher, M. W.; Wells, M.; Beswick, K. M.; Arends, B. G.; Möls, J. J.; Kos, G. P. A.; Fuzzi, S.; Lind, J. A.; Orsi, G.; Facchini, M. C.; Laj, P.; Gieray, R.; Wieser, P.; Engelhardt, T.; Berner, A.; Kruisz, C.; Möller, D.; Acker, K.; Wieprecht, W.; Lüttke, J.; Levsen, K.; Bizjak, M.; Hansson, H.-C.; Cederfelt, S.-I.; Frank, G.; Mentes, B.; Martinsson, B.; Orsini, D.; Svenningsson, B.; Swietlicki, E.; Wiedensohler, A.; Noone, K. J.; Pahl, S.; Winkler, P.; Seyffer, E.; Helas, G.; Jaeschke, W.; Georgii, H. W.; Wobrock, W.; Preiss, M.; Maser, R.; Schell, D.; Dollard, G.; Jones, B.; Davies, T.; Sedlak, D. L.; David, M. M.; Wendisch, M.; Cape, J. N.; Hargreaves, K. J.; Sutton, M. A.; Storeton-West, R. L.; Fowler, D.; Hallberg, A.; Harrison, R. M.; Peak, J. D.

    The 1993 Ground-based Cloud Experiment on Great Dun Fell used a wide range of measurements of trace gases, aerosol particles and cloud droplets at five sites to study their sources and sinks especially those in cloud. These measurements have been interpreted using a variety of models. The conclusions add to our knowledge of air pollution, acidification of the atmosphere and the ground, eutrophication and climate change. The experiment is designed to use the hill cap cloud as a flow-through reactor, and was conducted in varying levels of pollution typical of much of the rural temperate continental northern hemisphere in spring-time.

  17. Modelling the reversible uptake of chemical species in the gas phase by ice particles formed in a convective cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Longo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is a preliminary study preparing the introduction of reversible trace gas uptake by ice particles into a 3-D cloud resolving model. For this a 3-D simulation of a tropical deep convection cloud was run with the BRAMS cloud resolving model using a two-moment bulk microphysical parameterization. Trajectories encountering the convective clouds were computed from these simulation outputs along which the variations of the pristine ice, snow and aggregate mixing ratios and size distributions were extracted. The reversible uptake of 11 trace gases by ice was examined assuming applicability of Langmuir isotherms using recently evaluated (IUPAC laboratory data. The results show that ice uptake is only significant for HNO3, HCl, CH3COOH and HCOOH. For H2O2, using new results for the partition coefficient results in significant partitioning to the ice phase for this trace gas also. It was also shown that the uptake is largely dependent on the temperature for some species. The adsorption saturation at the ice surface for large gas concentrations is generally not a limiting factor except for HNO3 and HCl for gas concentration greater than 1 ppbv. For HNO3, results were also obtained using a trapping theory, resulting in a similar order of magnitude of uptake, although the two approaches are based on different assumptions. The results were compared to those obtained using a BRAMS cloud simulation based on a single-moment microphysical scheme instead of the two moment scheme. We found similar results with a slightly more important uptake when using the single-moment scheme which is related to slightly higher ice mixing ratios in this simulation. The way to introduce these results in the 3-D cloud model is discussed.

  18. Modelling the reversible uptake of chemical species in the gas phase by ice particles formed in a convective cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marécal

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is a preliminary study preparing the introduction of reversible trace gas uptake by ice particles into a 3-D cloud resolving model. For this a 3-D simulation of a tropical deep convection cloud was run with the BRAMS cloud resolving model using a two-moment bulk microphysical parameterization. Trajectories within the convective clouds were computed from these simulation outputs along which the variations of the pristine ice, snow and aggregate mixing ratios and concentrations were extracted. The reversible uptake of 11 trace gases by ice was examined assuming applicability of Langmuir isotherms using recently evaluated (IUPAC laboratory data. The results show that ice uptake is only significant for HNO3, HCl, CH3COOH and HCOOH. For H2O2, using new results for the partition coefficient results in significant partitioning to the ice phase for this trace gas also. It was also shown that the uptake is largely dependent on the temperature for some species. The adsorption saturation at the ice surface for large gas mixing ratios is generally not a limiting factor except for HNO3 and HCl for gas mixing ratio greater than 1 ppbv. For HNO3, results were also obtained using a trapping theory, resulting in a similar order of magnitude of uptake, although the two approaches are based on different assumptions. The results were compared to those obtained using a BRAMS cloud simulation based on a single-moment microphysical scheme instead of the two moment scheme. We found similar results with a slightly more important uptake when using the single-moment scheme which is related to slightly higher ice mixing ratios in this simulation. The way to introduce these results in the 3-D cloud model is discussed.

  19. Impact of the ice phase on a mesoscale convective system: Implication of cloud parameterization and cloud radiative properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, H.N.S.; Bradley, M.M.; Molenkamp, C.R.; Grant, K.E.; Chuang, C.

    1991-08-01

    This study attempts to provide further understanding of the effect of the ice phase on cloud ensemble features which are useful for improving GCM cumulus parameterization. In addition, cloud model results are used to diagnose the radiative properties of anvils in order to assess cloud/radiation interaction and its feedback on the larger-scale climate for the future work. The heat, moisture and mass budget analyses of a simulated squall line system indicate that, at least for this type of system, the inclusion of the ice phase in the microphysics does not considerably change the net cloud heating and drying effects and the feedback on the large-scale motion. Nonetheless, its impact on the radiative properties of clouds significantly influences not only the squall line system itself, but also the larger-scale circulation due to the favorable stratification for long-lasting anvil clouds. The water budget suggests a simple methodology to parameterize the microphysical effect without considering it as a model physics module. Further application of the water budget might also be used to parameterize the cloud transport of condensates in the anvil cloud region, which allows the GCM columns to interact with each other. The findings of this study suggest that the ice phase could be ignored in the cloud parameterization in order to save significant amounts of computational resources and to simplify the model physics. More scientific effort should, however, be focused on the effect of the ice phase to further explore cloud feedback on the large-scale climate through the radiative process. The cloud/radiation interaction and its feedback on the larger-scale climate will be addressed in a companion study by coupling the radiative transfer model with the cloud model. 19 refs., 13 figs.

  20. Opportunities for understanding of aerosol cloud interactions in the context of Marine Cloud Brightening Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Philip J.; Wood, Robert; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2017-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosol impacts on clouds constitute the largest source of uncertainty in radiative forcing of climate, confounding estimates of climate sensitivity to increases in greenhouse gases. Projections of future warming are also thus strongly dependent on estimates of aerosol effects on clouds. I will discuss the opportunities for improving estimates of aerosol effects on clouds from controlled field experiments where aerosol with well understood size, composition, amount, and injection altitude could be introduced to deliberately change cloud properties. This would allow scientific investigation to be performed in a manner much closer to a lab environment, and facilitate the use of models to predict cloud responses ahead of time, testing our understanding of aerosol cloud interactions.

  1. VIIRS Reflective Solar Band Radiometric and Stability Evaluation Using Deep Convective Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tiejun; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Mu, Qiaozhen

    2016-01-01

    This work takes advantage of the stable distribution of deep convective cloud (DCC) reflectance measurements to assess the calibration stability and detector difference in Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) reflective bands. VIIRS Sensor Data Records (SDRs) from February 2012 to June 2015 are utilized to analyze the long-term trending, detector difference, and half angle mirror (HAM) side difference. VIIRS has two thermal emissive bands with coverage crossing 11 microns for DCC pixel identification. The comparison of the results of these two processing bands is one of the indicators of analysis reliability. The long-term stability analysis shows downward trends (up to approximately 0.4 per year) for the visible and near-infrared bands and upward trends (up to 0.5per year) for the short- and mid-wave infrared bands. The detector difference for each band is calculated as the difference relative to the average reflectance overall detectors. Except for the slightly greater than 1 difference in the two bands at 1610 nm, the detector difference is less than1 for other solar reflective bands. The detector differences show increasing trends for some short-wave bands with center wavelengths from 400 to 600 nm and remain unchanged for the bands with longer center wavelengths. The HAM side difference is insignificant and stable. Those short-wave bands from 400 to 600 nm also have relatively larger HAM side difference, up to 0.25.Comparing the striped images from SDR and the smooth images after the correction validates the analyses of detector difference and HAM side difference. These analyses are very helpful for VIIRS calibration improvement and thus enhance product quality

  2. Response versus scan-angle corrections for MODIS reflective solar bands using deep convective clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Rajendra; Angal, Amit; Doelling, David R.; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wu, Aisheng; Haney, Conor O.; Scarino, Benjamin R.; Gopalan, Arun

    2016-05-01

    The absolute radiometric calibration of the reflective solar bands (RSBs) of Aqua- and Terra-MODIS is performed using on-board calibrators. A solar diffuser (SD) panel along with a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) system, which tracks the degradation of the SD over time, provides the baseline for calibrating the MODIS sensors. MODIS also views the moon and deep space through its space view (SV) port for lunar-based calibration and computing the background, respectively. The MODIS instrument views the Earth's surface using a two-sided scan mirror, whose reflectance is a function of the angle of incidence (AOI) and is described by response versus scan-angle (RVS). The RVS for both MODIS instruments was characterized prior to launch. MODIS also views the SD and the moon at two different AOIs. There is sufficient evidence that the RVS is changing on orbit over time and as a function of wavelength. The SD and lunar observation scans can only track the RVS variation at two AOIs. Consequently, the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) developed enhanced approaches that supplement the onboard calibrator measurements with responses from the pseudo-invariant desert sites. This approach has been implemented in Level 1B (L1B) Collection 6 (C6) for select short-wavelength bands. This paper presents an alternative approach of characterizing the mirror RVS to derive the time-dependent RVS correction factors for MODIS RSBs using tropical deep convective cloud (DCC) targets. An initial assessment of the DCC response from Aqua-MODIS band 1 C6 data indicates evidence of RVS artifacts, which are not uniform across the scans and are more prevalent at the beginning of the earth-view scan.

  3. Evaluating regional cloud-permitting simulations of the WRF model for the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE, Darwin 2006)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi; Long, Charles N.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Dudhia, Jimy; McFarlane, Sally A.; Mather, James H.; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaodong

    2009-11-05

    Data from the Tropical Warm Pool I5 nternational Cloud Experiment (TWPICE) were used to evaluate two suites of high-resolution (4-7 km, convection-resolving) simulations of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with a focus on the performance of different cloud microphysics (MP) schemes. The major difference between these two suites of simulations is with and without the reinitializing process. Whenreinitialized every three days, the four cloud MP schemes evaluated can capture the general profiles of cloud fraction, temperature, water vapor, winds, and cloud liquid and ice water content (LWC and IWC, respectively). However, compared with surface measurements of radiative and moisture fluxes and satellite retrieval of top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) fluxes, disagreements do exist. Large discrepancies with observed LWC and IWC and derived radiative heating profiles can be attributed to both the limitations of the cloud property retrievals and model performance. The simulated precipitation also shows a wide range of uncertainty as compared with observations, which could be caused by the cloud MP schemes, complexity of land-sea configuration, and the high temporal and spatial variability. In general, our result indicates the importance of large-scale initial and lateral boundary conditions in re-producing basic features of cloudiness and its vertical structures. Based on our case study, we find overall the six-hydrometer single-moment MP scheme(WSM6) [Hong and Lim, 2006] in the WRF model si25 mulates the best agree- ment with the TWPICE observational analysis.

  4. Intercomparison study and optical asphericity measurements of small ice particles in the CERN CLOUD experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Nichman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Optical probes are frequently used for the detection of microphysical cloud particle properties such as liquid and ice phase, size and morphology. These properties can eventually influence the angular light scattering properties of cirrus clouds as well as the growth and accretion mechanisms of single cloud particles. In this study we compare four commonly used optical probes to examine their response to small cloud particles of different phase and asphericity. Cloud simulation experiments were conducted at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD chamber at European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN. The chamber was operated in a series of multi-step adiabatic expansions to produce growth and sublimation of ice particles at super- and subsaturated ice conditions and for initial temperatures of −30, −40 and −50 °C. The experiments were performed for ice cloud formation via homogeneous ice nucleation. We report the optical observations of small ice particles in deep convection and in situ cirrus simulations. Ice crystal asphericity deduced from measurements of spatially resolved single particle light scattering patterns by the Particle Phase Discriminator mark 2 (PPD-2K, Karlsruhe edition were compared with Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarisation (CASPOL measurements and image roundness captured by the 3View Cloud Particle Imager (3V-CPI. Averaged path light scattering properties of the simulated ice clouds were measured using the Scattering Intensity Measurements for the Optical detectioN of icE (SIMONE and single particle scattering properties were measured by the CASPOL. We show the ambiguity of several optical measurements in ice fraction determination of homogeneously frozen ice in the case where sublimating quasi-spherical ice particles are present. Moreover, most of the instruments have difficulties of producing reliable ice fraction if small aspherical ice particles are present, and all of the instruments cannot

  5. Intercomparison study and optical asphericity measurements of small ice particles in the CERN CLOUD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichman, Leonid; Järvinen, Emma; Dorsey, James; Connolly, Paul; Duplissy, Jonathan; Fuchs, Claudia; Ignatius, Karoliina; Sengupta, Kamalika; Stratmann, Frank; Möhler, Ottmar; Schnaiter, Martin; Gallagher, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Optical probes are frequently used for the detection of microphysical cloud particle properties such as liquid and ice phase, size and morphology. These properties can eventually influence the angular light scattering properties of cirrus clouds as well as the growth and accretion mechanisms of single cloud particles. In this study we compare four commonly used optical probes to examine their response to small cloud particles of different phase and asphericity. Cloud simulation experiments were conducted at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber at European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). The chamber was operated in a series of multi-step adiabatic expansions to produce growth and sublimation of ice particles at super- and subsaturated ice conditions and for initial temperatures of -30, -40 and -50 °C. The experiments were performed for ice cloud formation via homogeneous ice nucleation. We report the optical observations of small ice particles in deep convection and in situ cirrus simulations. Ice crystal asphericity deduced from measurements of spatially resolved single particle light scattering patterns by the Particle Phase Discriminator mark 2 (PPD-2K, Karlsruhe edition) were compared with Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarisation (CASPOL) measurements and image roundness captured by the 3View Cloud Particle Imager (3V-CPI). Averaged path light scattering properties of the simulated ice clouds were measured using the Scattering Intensity Measurements for the Optical detectioN of icE (SIMONE) and single particle scattering properties were measured by the CASPOL. We show the ambiguity of several optical measurements in ice fraction determination of homogeneously frozen ice in the case where sublimating quasi-spherical ice particles are present. Moreover, most of the instruments have difficulties of producing reliable ice fraction if small aspherical ice particles are present, and all of the instruments cannot separate perfectly

  6. Transient Free Convection Development in Hot-Wire Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaretto, Valter

    The transient behavior of free convection along the vertical wire of a hot-wire apparatus has been experimentally investigated at room temperature and ambient pressure, using water and propylene glycol. The development of free convection has been studied using an ad hoc apparatus, in order to obtain the best agreement between the vertical direction and the wire. The measurements were corrected for radiation influences, and the effects induced by free convection were detected at the wire-fluid interface. The convection outcomes have been correlated to fluid properties and test conditions. A suitable time scale has been introduced, which is defined by the modified Fourier and a proper definition of the local Grashof number. The obtained correlation has been applied to data found in the literature. The possibility of describing the free convection development at the wire-fluid interface could enable the fluid properties related to momentum diffusion to be investigated by the hot-wire technique.

  7. Cloud-resolving simulation of convective ensemble during TOGA-COARE using imposed and parameterized large-scale dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Sobel, A. H.; Kuang, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We will present results from cloud-resolving simulations of convective ensembles during the 4-month TOGA-COARE field campaign. Our cloud-resolving model (CRM) is driven by large scale vertical velocities that are either imposed, as many other studies, or parameterized using one of two different methods: the damped gravity wave method and the weak temperature gradient (WTG) method. Other forcings such as sea surface temperature and relaxation of the horizontal mean horizontal wind field are also applied to the model. The primary finding is that the CRM with imposed large-scale vertical motion can simulate observed convective variabilities with fidelity, while the CRM with parameterized large-scale vertical motion can capture the intraseasonal variations in rainfall to some degree. Surface evaporation from the latter compares particularly well with that derived from TOGA sounding array. The parameterized large scale vertical velocity has a vertical profile that is too bottom-heavy compared to observations when the wave coupling method is used with vertically uniform Rayleigh damping on horizontal wind, but too top-heavy when the WTG method is used. Key physical processes responsible for CRM simulated rainfall variations will also be identified. Finally, preliminary results from CRM simulations of convective ensemble during DYNAMO will be discussed.

  8. Empirical modeling of plasma clouds produced by the Metal Oxide Space Clouds experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Todd R.; Caton, Ronald G.; Miller, Daniel; Holmes, Jeffrey M.; Groves, Keith M.; Sutton, Eric

    2017-05-01

    The Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) Long-Range Tracking And Instrumentation Radar (ALTAIR) radar at Kwajalein Atoll was used in incoherent scatter mode to measure plasma densities within two artificial clouds created by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Metal Oxide Space Clouds (MOSC) experiment in May 2013. Optical imager, ionosonde, and ALTAIR measurements were combined to create 3-D empirical descriptions of the plasma clouds as a function of time, which match the radar measurements to within 15%. The plasma clouds closely track the location of the optical clouds, and the best fit plasma cloud widths are generally consistent with isotropic neutral diffusion. Cloud plasma densities decreased as a power of time, with exponents between -0.5 and -1.0, or much more slowly than the -1.5 predicted by diffusion. These exponents and estimates of total ion number from integration through the model volume are consistent with a scenario of slow ionization and a gradually increasing total number of ions with time, reaching a net ionization fraction of 20% after approximately half an hour. These robust representations of the plasma density are being used to study impacts of the artificial clouds on the dynamics of the background ionosphere and on RF propagation.

  9. Effects of Explicit Convection on Land-Atmosphere Coupling in GLACE-Type Experiments Using the SuperParameterized CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, H.; Pritchard, M. S.; Parishani, H.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding and realistically simulating the coupling between land and atmosphere in global climate models (GCMs) is an ongoing research frontier. We explore the hypothesis that past attempts to investigate these physics using GCM mechanism denial experiments may have suffered systematic limitations stemming from an overly strong sensitivity of deep convection parameterizations to surface conditions. Taking the philosophy of the Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE), we therefore compare the effects of breaking the soil-atmosphere feedback mechanism in the Super-Parameterized Community Atmosphere Model version 3.5 (SPCAM3.5) - which uses O(10k) embedded cloud resolving models to explicitly resolve moist convection - against the conventionally parameterized CAM3.5. This helps isolate the influence of explicit convection on land-atmosphere coupling. We find that soil moisture - precipitation coupling strength is reduced over northern Africa, northern South America and Arabian Peninsula due to superparameterization. Several geographically distinct coupling "hotspots" emerge in SPCAM3.5 located upstream of major topographic features in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes.

  10. Cloud-resolving modeling of aerosol indirect effects in idealized radiative-convective equilibrium with interactive and fixed sea surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Khairoutdinov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The study attempts to evaluate the aerosol indirect effects over tropical oceans in regions of deep convection applying a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model run over a doubly-periodic domain. The Tropics are modeled using a radiative-convective equilibrium idealization when the radiation, turbulence, cloud microphysics, and surface fluxes are explicitly represented while the effects of large-scale circulation are ignored. The aerosol effects are modeled by varying the number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN at 1% supersaturation, which serves as a proxy for the aerosol amount in the environment, over a wide range, starting from pristine maritime (50 cm−3 to polluted (1000 cm−3 conditions. No direct effects of aerosol on radiation are included. Two sets of simulations have been run to equilibrium: fixed (non-interactive sea surface temperature (SST and interactive SST as predicted by a simple slab-ocean model responding to the surface radiative fluxes and surface enthalpy flux. Both sets of experiments agree on the tendency to make the shortwave cloud forcing more negative and reduce the longwave cloud forcing in response to increasing CCN concentration. These, in turn, tend to cool the SST in interactive-SST case. It is interesting that the absolute change of the SST and most other bulk quantities depends only on relative change of CCN concentration; that is, same SST change can be the result of doubling CCN concentration regardless of clean or polluted conditions. It is found that the 10-fold increase of CCN concentration can cool the SST by as much as 1.5 K. This is quite comparable to 2 K warming obtained in a simulation for clean maritime conditions, but doubled CO2 concentration. Qualitative differences between the interactive and fixed SST cases have been found in sensitivity of the hydrological cycle to the increase in CCN concentration; namely, the precipitation rate shows some

  11. Cosmic rays,Climate and the CERN CLOUD Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    For more than two centuries, scientists have been puzzled by observations of solar-climate variability yet the lack of any established physical mechanism. Some recent observations, although disputed, suggest that clouds may be influenced by cosmic rays, which are modulated by the solar wind. The CLOUD experiment aims to settle the question of whether or not cosmic rays have a climatically-significant effect on clouds by carrying out a series of carefully-controlled measurements in a large cloud chamber exposed to a beam from the CERN PS. This talk will present the scientific motivation for CLOUD and the first results, which have recently been published in Nature (Kirkby et al. (2011). Role of sulphuric acid, ammonia and galactic cosmic rays in atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Nature 476, 429-433).

  12. Homomorphic encryption experiments on IBM's cloud quantum computing platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He-Liang; Zhao, You-Wei; Li, Tan; Li, Feng-Guang; Du, Yu-Tao; Fu, Xiang-Qun; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Xiang; Bao, Wan-Su

    2017-02-01

    Quantum computing has undergone rapid development in recent years. Owing to limitations on scalability, personal quantum computers still seem slightly unrealistic in the near future. The first practical quantum computer for ordinary users is likely to be on the cloud. However, the adoption of cloud computing is possible only if security is ensured. Homomorphic encryption is a cryptographic protocol that allows computation to be performed on encrypted data without decrypting them, so it is well suited to cloud computing. Here, we first applied homomorphic encryption on IBM's cloud quantum computer platform. In our experiments, we successfully implemented a quantum algorithm for linear equations while protecting our privacy. This demonstration opens a feasible path to the next stage of development of cloud quantum information technology.

  13. Individual aerosol particles in ambient and updraft conditions below convective cloud bases in the Oman mountain region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeniuk, T. A.; Bruintjes, R. T.; Salazar, V.; Breed, D. W.; Jensen, T. L.; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-03-01

    An airborne study of cloud microphysics provided an opportunity to collect aerosol particles in ambient and updraft conditions of natural convection systems for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Particles were collected simultaneously on lacey carbon and calcium-coated carbon (Ca-C) TEM grids, providing information on particle morphology and chemistry and a unique record of the particle's physical state on impact. In total, 22 particle categories were identified, including single, coated, aggregate, and droplet types. The fine fraction comprised up to 90% mixed cation sulfate (MCS) droplets, while the coarse fraction comprised up to 80% mineral-containing aggregates. Insoluble (dry), partially soluble (wet), and fully soluble particles (droplets) were recorded on Ca-C grids. Dry particles were typically silicate grains; wet particles were mineral aggregates with chloride, nitrate, or sulfate components; and droplets were mainly aqueous NaCl and MCS. Higher numbers of droplets were present in updrafts (80% relative humidity (RH)) compared with ambient conditions (60% RH), and almost all particles activated at cloud base (100% RH). Greatest changes in size and shape were observed in NaCl-containing aggregates (>0.3 µm diameter) along updraft trajectories. Their abundance was associated with high numbers of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and cloud droplets, as well as large droplet sizes in updrafts. Thus, compositional dependence was observed in activation behavior recorded for coarse and fine fractions. Soluble salts from local pollution and natural sources clearly affected aerosol-cloud interactions, enhancing the spectrum of particles forming CCN and by forming giant CCN from aggregates, thus, making cloud seeding with hygroscopic flares ineffective in this region.

  14. Utilizing CLASIC observations and multiscale models to study the impact of improved Land surface representation on modeling cloud- convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niyogi, Devdutta S. [Purdue

    2013-06-07

    The CLASIC experiment was conducted over the US southern great plains (SGP) in June 2007 with an objective to lead an enhanced understanding of the cumulus convection particularly as it relates to land surface conditions. This project was design to help assist with understanding the overall improvement of land atmosphere convection initiation representation of which is important for global and regional models. The study helped address one of the critical documented deficiency in the models central to the ARM objectives for cumulus convection initiation and particularly under summer time conditions. This project was guided by the scientific question building on the CLASIC theme questions: What is the effect of improved land surface representation on the ability of coupled models to simulate cumulus and convection initiation? The focus was on the US Southern Great Plains region. Since the CLASIC period was anomalously wet the strategy has been to use other periods and domains to develop the comparative assessment for the CLASIC data period, and to understand the mechanisms of the anomalous wet conditions on the tropical systems and convection over land. The data periods include the IHOP 2002 field experiment that was over roughly same domain as the CLASIC in the SGP, and some of the DOE funded Ameriflux datasets.

  15. The role of boundary layer aerosol particles for the development of deep convective clouds: A high-resolution 3D model with detailed (bin) microphysics applied to CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Delphine; Wobrock, Wolfram; Flossmann, Andrea I.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reproduces aircraft microphysical measurements using a three-dimensional model with bin resolved microphysics and is then used to analyze in particular the role of boundary layer aerosol particles in the anvil and the ice phase. The simulated case is a convective cloud which develops a large anvil of around 10 km height, which was sampled during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers — Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE). The model couples the 3D dynamics of a cloud scale model with a detailed mixed phase microphysical code. The microphysical package considers the evolution of the wet aerosol particles, drop and ice crystal spectra on size grids with 39 bins. With this model hereafter called DESCAM 3D, we are able to simulate the cloud with features close to those observed and to provide explanations of the observed phenomena concerning cloud microphysics as well as cloud dynamics. The same CRYSTAL-FACE cloud has already been simulated by other groups using a similar model. They investigated the role of mid-tropospheric aerosol particles versus boundary layer aerosol on the microphysical properties of the anvil. Similar simulations with our DESCAM 3D lead to quite different results. Reducing the number of mid-tropospheric aerosol particles causes only minor changes in the cloud anvil. However, changing the aerosol particle spectrum in the boundary layer from clean to polluted conditions modifies strongly the dynamical evolution of the convective clouds and thus impacts significantly on the microphysical properties of the anvil. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  16. Stratiform and Convective Precipitation Observed by Multiple Radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Min; Kollias, Pavlos; Feng, Zhe; Zhang, Chidong; Long, Charles N.; Kalesse, Heike; Chandra, Arunchandra; Kumar, Vickal; Protat, Alain

    2014-11-01

    The motivation for this research is to develop a precipitation classification and rain rate estimation method using cloud radar-only measurements for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) long-term cloud observation analysis, which are crucial and unique for studying cloud lifecycle and precipitation features under different weather and climate regimes. Based on simultaneous and collocated observations of the Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR), two precipitation radars (NCAR S-PolKa and Texas A&M University SMART-R), and surface precipitation during the DYNAMO/AMIE field campaign, a new cloud radar-only based precipitation classification and rain rate estimation method has been developed and evaluated. The resulting precipitation classification is equivalent to those collocated SMART-R and S-PolKa observations. Both cloud and precipitation radars detected about 5% precipitation occurrence during this period. The convective (stratiform) precipitation fraction is about 18% (82%). The 2-day collocated disdrometer observations show an increased number concentration of large raindrops in convective rain compared to dominant concentration of small raindrops in stratiform rain. The composite distributions of KAZR reflectivity and Doppler velocity also show two distinct structures for convective and stratiform rain. These indicate that the method produces physically consistent results for two types of rain. The cloud radar-only rainfall estimation is developed based on the gradient of accumulative radar reflectivity below 1 km, near-surface Ze, and collocated surface rainfall (R) measurement. The parameterization is compared with the Z-R exponential relation. The relative difference between estimated and surface measured rainfall rate shows that the two-parameter relation can improve rainfall estimation.

  17. Theory of convective saturation of Langmuir waves during ionospheric modification of a barium cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Drake, R. Paul; Afeyan, Bedros B.

    1997-12-01

    In recent experiments (Djuth, F. T., Sulzer, M. P., Elder, J. H. and Groves, K. M. (1995) Journal of Geophysical Research, 100, 17,347), a parametric decay instability was excited by an ordinary-wave HF pump during an ionospheric chemical release from a rocket over Arecibo, PR, which created an artificial `barium ionosphere,' with peak plasma frequency above the pump frequency, and a density gradient with a (short) 5 km scale length. Simultaneous incoherent scattering measurements revealed a strong initial asymmetry in the amplitudes of almost vertically upgoing versus downgoing measured plasma waves. We can account for this asymmetry in terms of linear convective saturation of parametrically unstable plasma waves propagating over a range of altitudes along geometric optics ray paths. Qualitative features of the frequency spectrum of the measured downgoing wave are in agreement with this model, although the theoretically predicted spectrum is narrower than observed. The observed altitude localization of the enhanced spectrum to a few range cells is consistent with the theory.

  18. Interpretation of simple and cloud-resolving simulations of moist convection radiation interaction with a mock-Walker circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretherton, Christopher S.; Blossey, Peter N.; Peters, Matthew E.

    2006-11-01

    An idealized two-dimensional mock-Walker circulation in the tropical atmosphere forced by prescribed horizontal gradients in sea-surface temperature (SST) is discussed. This model problem includes feedbacks between cumulus convection and tropical large-scale circulations that have proved challenging for global climate models to predict accurately. Three-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations that explicitly simulate turbulent circulations within individual cloud systems across 4,096 and 1,024 km-wide Walker circulations are compared with a simple theoretical model, the Simplified Quasiequilibrium Tropical Circulation Model (SQTCM). This theoretical model combines the weak-temperature-gradient approximation with a unimodal truncation of tropospheric vertical structure coupled to highly simplified formulations of moist precipitating cumulus convection and its cloud-radiative feedbacks. The rainfall, cloud and humidity distribution, circulation strength, energy fluxes and scaling properties are compared between the models. The CRM-simulated horizontal distribution of rainfall and energy fluxes are adequately predicted by the SQTCM. However, the humidity distribution (drier subsidence regions and high-humidity boundary layers in the CRM), vertical structure and domain-size scaling of the circulation differ significantly between the models. For the SQTCM, the concept of gross moist stability related to advection of moist static energy (MSE) out of tropospheric columns by the mean divergent circulation is used to explain the width and intensity of the rainy region. Column MSE budgets averaged across the ascent branch of the simulated Walker circulation provide similar insight into the cloud-resolving simulations after consideration of the more complex horizontal and vertical circulation structure and the role of transient eddies. A nondimensional ascent-region moist stability ratio α, analogous to the SQTCM gross moist stability, is developed. One term of

  19. Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Lynn M.; Sorooshian, Armin; Seinfeld, John H.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Nenes, Athanasios; Ahlm, Lars; Chen, Yi-Chun; Coggon, Matthew; Craven, Jill S.; Flagan, Richard C.; Frossard, Amanda A.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Jung, Eunsil; Lin, Jack J.; Metcalf, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol–cloud–radiation interactions are widely held to be the largest single source of uncertainty in climate model projections of future radiative forcing due to increasing anthropogenic emissions. The underlying causes of this uncertainty among modeled predictions of climate are the gaps in our fundamental understanding of cloud processes. There has been significant progress with both observations and models in addressing these important questions but quantifying them correctly is nontrivi...

  20. Meteorological observations in support of a hill cap cloud experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Morten

    1998-06-01

    Humid air flows form a hill cap cloud over the Agana mountain ridge in the north-east of Tenerife. The HILLCLOUD project utilised this cloud formation to investigate the chemical and physical properties of cloud aerosols by land based observations. The project was part of the second Aerosol characterisation Experiment (ACE-2) of the International Global Atmospheric chemistry project (IGAC). The present report describes meteorological observations in support of the hill cap cloud experiment. Time-series of wind speed, wind direction, temperature and humidity were collected at ground-based meteorological stations during a period starting one year in advance of the main campaign. A series of radiosonde detecting the upstream stability and wind profile were launched during the main campaign. (au) 5 tabs., 32 ills., 6 refs.

  1. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization, Part II: Analysis of Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yi-Chin; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Guang J.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    Following Part I, in which 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complex in the mid-latitude continental and the tropical regions are conducted and evaluated, we examine the scale-dependence of eddy transport of water vapor, evaluate different eddy transport formulations, and improve the representation of convective transport across all scales by proposing a new formulation that more accurately represents the CRM-calculated eddy flux. CRM results show that there are strong grid-spacing dependencies of updraft and downdraft fractions regardless of altitudes, cloud life stage, and geographical location. As for the eddy transport of water vapor, updraft eddy flux is a major contributor to total eddy flux in the lower and middle troposphere. However, downdraft eddy transport can be as large as updraft eddy transport in the lower atmosphere especially at the mature stage of 38 mid-latitude continental convection. We show that the single updraft approach significantly underestimates updraft eddy transport of water vapor because it fails to account for the large internal variability of updrafts, while a single downdraft represents the downdraft eddy transport of water vapor well. We find that using as few as 3 updrafts can account for the internal variability of updrafts well. Based on evaluation with the CRM simulated data, we recommend a simplified eddy transport formulation that considers three updrafts and one downdraft. Such formulation is similar to the conventional one but much more accurately represents CRM-simulated eddy flux across all grid scales.

  2. The Cloud Aerosol Interactions and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX): overview and prominent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, J. R.; Maheskumar, R. S.; Konwar, M.; Deshpande, C. G.; Morwal, S. B.; Padma Kumari, B.; Joshi, R. R.; Pandithurai, G.; Bhalwankar, R. V.; Mujumdar, V. R.; Goswami, B.; Rosenfeld, D.

    2009-12-01

    Cloud-Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX)”, an Indian national program, funded by Ministry of Earth Sciences, (MoES), Govt. of India is being conducted by Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune during the period 2009-2012. CAIPEEX has two phases. Phase I is devoted for intensive cloud and aerosol observations over different parts of India using an instrumented aircraft. Phase II is devoted for randomized precipitation enhancement experiment. The phase I is being carried out during the period May-September 2009. The main scientific objectives of Phase I are : To measure background concentrations of aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) during pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons over different parts of the country. Measurements of the associated differences in convective cloud microstructure and precipitation forming processes. The important preliminary results from the observational studies are: 1) During the pre-monsoon thick layer of brown haze extends to height of about 5-6 km at the foothills of the Himalaya, but does not normally spill over into the Tibetan Plateau. 2) The deep clouds that form in this layer are typically triggered at the slopes of the Himalaya. The clouds are super-continental microphysically, which means that the cloud drops are very small and prevent any warm rain. However, much ice is formed quickly, probably due to the ice nucleating activity of the aerosols. 3) In the pre-monsoon phase over central and southern India the clouds have similar nature as described for the foothills of the Himalaya, but with lower bases. Still, warm rain is substantially suppressed. During the monsoon, the clouds in the Bangalore-Hyderabad rain shadow area lose quickly their ability to produce warm rain with the increasing levels of CCN eastward away from the west coast. 4) A major finding was the dominance of thick haze in the Arabian Sea during the SW monsoon. It appears to be mostly of Arabian and

  3. NARVAL North - Remote Sensing of Postfrontal Convective Clouds and Precipitation over the North Atlantic with the Research Aircraft HALO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepp, Christian; Ament, Felix; Bakan, Stephan; Crewell, Susanne; Hagen, Martin; Hirsch, Lutz; Jansen, Friedhelm; Konow, Heike; Mech, Mario; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Schäfler, Andreas; Stevens, Bjorn

    2014-05-01

    The new German research aircraft HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft) became recently available for measurement flights in atmospheric research. It's capacity of measuring from a high altitude vertical profiles of all components of atmospheric water - like vapor, liquid and ice, in both cloud and precipitation forms, as well as the aerosol particles upon which cloud droplets form - makes it a unique research platform. The aircraft, equipped with advanced radiometers, radar and lidar technology, the HALO Microwave Package (HAMP), is an initiative by German climate and environmental research institutions and is operated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). One of the first major missions to exploit the capabilities of HALO was conducted for the NARVAL project (Next-generation Aircraft Remote-Sensing for Validation Studies) during January 2014. After studying subtropical clouds one month before in the first NARVAL phase, the interest of NARVAL North focused on the study of cold air convection and precipitation in the form of rain and snow. Based at Keflavik airport (Iceland), several flights were conducted to examine the specific small-scale precipitation structures behind the backsides of cold fronts over the North Atlantic. This should help to narrow the gap in the understanding of substantial differences between satellite observations and model calculations in such situations. First data analysis of these measurements indicate promising results. The poster will describe the HALO instrument packages as well as the collected observations during the campaign and will present preliminary scientific findings.

  4. Macroscopic impacts of cloud and precipitation processes on maritime shallow convection as simulated by a large eddy simulation model with bin microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, W. W.; Wang, L.-P.; Prabha, T. V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses impacts of cloud and precipitation processes on macrophysical properties of shallow convective clouds as simulated by a large eddy model applying warm-rain bin microphysics. Simulations with and without collision-coalescence are considered with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations of 30, 60, 120, and 240 mg-1. Simulations with collision-coalescence include either the standard gravitational collision kernel or a novel kernel that includes enhancements due to the small-scale cloud turbulence. Simulations with droplet collisions were discussed in Wyszogrodzki et al. (2013) focusing on the impact of the turbulent collision kernel. The current paper expands that analysis and puts model results in the context of previous studies. Despite a significant increase of the drizzle/rain with the decrease of CCN concentration, enhanced by the effects of the small-scale turbulence, impacts on the macroscopic cloud field characteristics are relatively minor. Model results show a systematic shift in the cloud-top height distributions, with an increasing contribution of deeper clouds for stronger precipitating cases. We show that this is consistent with the explanation suggested in Wyszogrodzki et al. (2013); namely, the increase of drizzle/rain leads to a more efficient condensate offloading in the upper parts of the cloud field. A second effect involves suppression of the cloud droplet evaporation near cloud edges in low-CCN simulations, as documented in previous studies (e.g., Xue and Feingold, 2006). We pose the question whether the effects of cloud turbulence on drizzle/rain formation in shallow cumuli can be corroborated by remote sensing observations, for instance, from space. Although a clear signal is extracted from model results, we argue that the answer is negative due to uncertainties caused by the temporal variability of the shallow convective cloud field, sampling and spatial resolution of the satellite data, and overall accuracy of

  5. In-situ measurements of tropical cloud properties in the West African monsoon: upper tropospheric ice clouds, mesoscale convective system outflow, and subvisual cirrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, W.; Borrmann, S.; Kunkel, D.; Weigel, R.; de Reus, M.; Schlager, H.; Roiger, A.; Voigt, C.; Hoor, P.; Curtius, J.; Krämer, M.; Schiller, C.; Volk, C. M.; Homan, C. D.; Fierli, F.; di Donfrancesco, G.; Ulanovsky, A.; Ravegnani, F.; Sitnikov, N. M.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Shur, G. N.; Belyaev, G. V.; Law, K. S.; Cairo, F.

    2011-01-01

    In-situ measurements of ice crystal size distributions in tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) clouds were performed during the SCOUT-AMMA campaign over West Africa in August 2006. The cloud properties were measured with a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP-100) and a Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP) operated aboard the Russian high altitude research aircraft M-55 ''Geophysica'' with the mission base in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. A total of 117 ice particle size distributions were obtained from the measurements in the vicinity of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS). Two or three modal lognormal size distributions were fitted to the average size distributions for different potential temperature bins. The measurements showed proportionate more large ice particles compared to former measurements above maritime regions. With the help of trace gas measurements of NO, NOy, CO2, CO, and O3, and satellite images clouds in young and aged MCS outflow were identified. These events were observed at altitudes of 11.0 km to 14.2 km corresponding to potential temperature levels of 346 K to 356 K. In a young outflow (developing MCS) ice crystal number concentrations of up to 8.3 cm-3 and rimed ice particles with maximum dimensions exceeding 1.5 mm were found. A maximum ice water content of 0.05 g m-3 was observed and an effective radius of about 90 μm. In contrast the aged outflow events were more diluted and showed a maximum number concentration of 0.03 cm-3, an ice water content of 2.3 × 10-4 g m-3, an effective radius of about 18 μm, while the largest particles had a maximum dimension of 61 μm. Close to the tropopause subvisual cirrus were encountered four times at altitudes of 15 km to 16.4 km. The mean ice particle number concentration of these encounters was 0.01 cm-3 with maximum particle sizes of 130 μm, and the mean ice water content was about 1.4 × 10-4 g m-3. All known in-situ measurements of subvisual tropopause cirrus are compared and an

  6. In situ measurements of tropical cloud properties in the West African Monsoon: upper tropospheric ice clouds, Mesoscale Convective System outflow, and subvisual cirrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, W.; Borrmann, S.; Kunkel, D.; Weigel, R.; de Reus, M.; Schlager, H.; Roiger, A.; Voigt, C.; Hoor, P.; Curtius, J.; Krämer, M.; Schiller, C.; Volk, C. M.; Homan, C. D.; Fierli, F.; di Donfrancesco, G.; Ulanovsky, A.; Ravegnani, F.; Sitnikov, N. M.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Shur, G. N.; Belyaev, G. V.; Law, K. S.; Cairo, F.

    2011-06-01

    In situ measurements of ice crystal size distributions in tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) clouds were performed during the SCOUT-AMMA campaign over West Africa in August 2006. The cloud properties were measured with a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP-100) and a Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP) operated aboard the Russian high altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysica with the mission base in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. A total of 117 ice particle size distributions were obtained from the measurements in the vicinity of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS). Two to four modal lognormal size distributions were fitted to the average size distributions for different potential temperature bins. The measurements showed proportionately more large ice particles compared to former measurements above maritime regions. With the help of trace gas measurements of NO, NOy, CO2, CO, and O3 and satellite images, clouds in young and aged MCS outflow were identified. These events were observed at altitudes of 11.0 km to 14.2 km corresponding to potential temperature levels of 346 K to 356 K. In a young outflow from a developing MCS ice crystal number concentrations of up to (8.3 ± 1.6) cm-3 and rimed ice particles with maximum dimensions exceeding 1.5 mm were found. A maximum ice water content of 0.05 g m-3 was observed and an effective radius of about 90 μm. In contrast the aged outflow events were more diluted and showed a maximum number concentration of 0.03 cm-3, an ice water content of 2.3 × 10-4 g m-3, an effective radius of about 18 μm, while the largest particles had a maximum dimension of 61 μm. Close to the tropopause subvisual cirrus were encountered four times at altitudes of 15 km to 16.4 km. The mean ice particle number concentration of these encounters was 0.01 cm-3 with maximum particle sizes of 130 μm, and the mean ice water content was about 1.4 × 10-4 g m-3. All known in situ measurements of subvisual tropopause cirrus are compared

  7. Atmospheric circulation patterns, cloud-to-ground lightning, and locally intense convective rainfall associated with debris flow initiation in the Dolomite Alps of northeastern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, S. Jeffrey; Schultz, Michael D.; Berti, Metteo; Gregoretti, Carlo; Simoni, Alessandro; Mote, Thomas L.; Saylor, Anthony M.

    2016-02-01

    The Dolomite Alps of northeastern Italy experience debris flows with great frequency during the summer months. An ample supply of unconsolidated material on steep slopes and a summer season climate regime characterized by recurrent thunderstorms combine to produce an abundance of these destructive hydro-geologic events. In the past, debris flow events have been studied primarily in the context of their geologic and geomorphic characteristics. The atmospheric contribution to these mass-wasting events has been limited to recording rainfall and developing intensity thresholds for debris mobilization. This study aims to expand the examination of atmospheric processes that preceded both locally intense convective rainfall (LICR) and debris flows in the Dolomite region. 500 hPa pressure level plots of geopotential heights were constructed for a period of 3 days prior to debris flow events to gain insight into the synoptic-scale processes which provide an environment conducive to LICR in the Dolomites. Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flash data recorded at the meso-scale were incorporated to assess the convective environment proximal to debris flow source regions. Twelve events were analyzed and from this analysis three common synoptic-scale circulation patterns were identified. Evaluation of CG flashes at smaller spatial and temporal scales illustrated that convective processes vary in their production of CF flashes (total number) and the spatial distribution of flashes can also be quite different between events over longer periods. During the 60 min interval immediately preceding debris flow a majority of cases exhibited spatial and temporal colocation of LICR and CG flashes. Also a number of CG flash parameters were found to be significantly correlated to rainfall intensity prior to debris flow initiation.

  8. Water Vapor and Cloud Radiative Forcings over the Pacific Ocean Simulated by the LASG/IAP AGCM: Sensitivity to Convection Schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chunqiang; ZHOU Tianjun; SUN De-Zheng; BAO Qing

    2011-01-01

    Characteristics of the total clear-sky greenhouse effect (GA) and cloud radiative forcings (CRFs), along with the radiative-related water vapor and cloud properties simulated by the Spectral Atmospheric Model developed by LASG/IAP (SAMIL) are evaluated. Impacts of the convection scheme on the simulation of CRFs are discussed by using two AMIP (Atmospheric Model Inter-comparison Project) type simulations employing different convection schemes: the new Zhang-McFarlane (NZH) and Tiedtke (TDK) convection schemes. It shows that both the climatological GA and its response to El Nifio warming are simulated well, both in terms of spatial pattern and magnitude. The impact of the convection scheme on GA is not significant. The climatological longwav e CRF (LWCRF) and its response to El Nino warming are simulated well, but with a prominently weaker magnitude. The simulation of the climatology (response) of LWCRF in the NZH (TDK) run is slightly more realistic than in the TDK (NZH) simulation, indicating significant impacts of the convection scheme. The shortwave CRF (SWCRF) shows large biases in both spatial pattern and magnitude, and the results from the TDK run are better than those from the NZH run. A spuriously excessive negative climatological SWCRF over the southeastern Pacific and an insufficient response of SWCRF to El Nifio warming over the tropical Pacific are seen in the NZH run. These two biases are alleviated in the TDK run, since it produces vigorous convection, which is related to the low threshold for convection to take place. Also, impacts of the convection scheme on the cloud profile are discussed.

  9. GRAPES-Meso 模式浅对流云辐射效应的改进试验%An improvement on the radiation effects of shallow convective clouds in GRAPES-Meso model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康家琦; 王建捷; 黄丽萍; 万子为

    2016-01-01

    A compensation scheme on shallow convection clouds including both cloud cover and hydrometeors has been designed and tested in the GRAPES-Meso model on the basis of the shallow convection parameterization scheme modified by Wan,et al (2015).The purpose of this work is to improve simulation deficiencies on the low-level cloud cover and cloud radiation effects of shallow convection.Results of this study showed that:(1 )The introduced diagnostic method performs reasonably on the simulation of shallow convective cloud cover;there is corresponding cloud cover in the triggering areas of shallow convection, and the deviation of the model simulated cloud cover from satellite observation is reduced by the improved scheme.(2)Com-pensations of cloud cover and cloud hydrometeors exist in a shallow layer that is about 0.5 -4 km above the ground,corre-sponding to the active layer of shallow convection;the maximum of cloud compensations occurs at the height of 1 -1.5 km, and the proportion of compensated cloud hydrometeors (the sum of cloud water content and rain water content)to the total is a-bout 20%-55%.(3)There is a reasonable response of the cloud optical depth to the compensations of cloud hydrometeors in the lower troposphere;the vertical profile of the increment in the cloud optical depth and its variation trend with integration time are very similar to those of the cloud hydrometeor compensation,and the variation of the cloud optical depth depends more on the change in cloud water content than on the change in rain water.(4)In the daytime,the cloud radiation effects from the shallow cloud compensation relevant to shallow convection are clearly reflected by decreases in surface total solar radiation and 2 meter air temperature.As a result biases of these variables in the model simulation decrease.The positive effect of this im-proved scheme on reducing biases of the GRAPES-Meso simulation of cloud cover,surface total solar radiation,and 2 meter air temperature has been

  10. Artificial ionospheric modification: The Metal Oxide Space Cloud experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caton, Ronald G.; Pedersen, Todd R.; Groves, Keith M.; Hines, Jack; Cannon, Paul S.; Jackson-Booth, Natasha; Parris, Richard T.; Holmes, Jeffrey M.; Su, Yi-Jiun; Mishin, Evgeny V.; Roddy, Patrick A.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Ard, Shaun G.; Bernhardt, Paul A.; Siefring, Carl L.; Retterer, John; Kudeki, Erhan; Reyes, Pablo M.

    2017-05-01

    Clouds of vaporized samarium (Sm) were released during sounding rocket flights from the Reagan Test Site, Kwajalein Atoll in May 2013 as part of the Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) experiment. A network of ground-based sensors observed the resulting clouds from five locations in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Of primary interest was an examination of the extent to which a tailored radio frequency (RF) propagation environment could be generated through artificial ionospheric modification. The MOSC experiment consisted of launches near dusk on two separate evenings each releasing 6 kg of Sm vapor at altitudes near 170 km and 180 km. Localized plasma clouds were generated through a combination of photoionization and chemi-ionization (Sm + O → SmO+ + e-) processes producing signatures visible in optical sensors, incoherent scatter radar, and in high-frequency (HF) diagnostics. Here we present an overview of the experiment payloads, document the flight characteristics, and describe the experimental measurements conducted throughout the 2 week launch window. Multi-instrument analysis including incoherent scatter observations, HF soundings, RF beacon measurements, and optical data provided the opportunity for a comprehensive characterization of the physical, spectral, and plasma density composition of the artificial plasma clouds as a function of space and time. A series of companion papers submitted along with this experimental overview provide more detail on the individual elements for interested readers.

  11. Simulation of Mixed-Phase Convective Clouds: A Comparison of Spectral and Parameterized Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, A.; Khain, A.; Pokrovsky, A.

    2002-12-01

    The simulation of clouds and precipitation is one of the most complex problems in atmospheric modeling. The microphysics of clouds has to deal with a large variety of hydrometeor types and a multitude of complicated physical processes like nukleation, condensation, freezing, melting, collection and breakup of particles. Due to the lack of reliable in-situ observations many of the processes are still not well understood. Nevertheless a cloud resolving model (CRM) has to include these processes in some way. All CRMs can be separated into two groups, according to the microphysical representation used. Cloud models of the first kind utilize the so-called bulk parameterization of cloud microphysics. This concept has been introduced by Kessler (1969) and has been improved and extended in the field of mesoscale modeling. The state-of-the-art bulk schemes include several particle types like cloud droplets, raindrops, ice crystals, snow and graupel which are represented by mass contents and for some of them also by the number concentrations. Within a bulk microphysical model all relevant processes have to be parameterized in terms of these model variables. CRMs of the second kind are based on the spectral formulation of cloud microphysics. For each particle type taken into account the size distribution function is represented by a number of discrete size bins with its corresponding budget equation. To achieve satisfactory numerical results at least 30 bins are necessary for each particle type. This approach has the clear advantage of being a more general representation of the relevant physical processes and the different physical properties of particles of different sizes. A spectral model is able to include detailed descriptions of collisional and condensational growth and activation/nucleation of particles. But this approach suffers from the large computational effort necessary, especially in threedimensional models. We present a comparison between a cloud model with

  12. Stochastic Convection Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Joao; Reynolds, Carolyn; Suselj, Kay; Matheou, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    computational fluid dynamics, radiation, clouds, turbulence, convection, gravity waves, surface interaction, radiation interaction, cloud and aerosol microphysics, complexity (vegetation, biogeochemistry, radiation versus turbulence/convection stochastic approach, non-linearities, Monte Carlo, high resolutions, large-Eddy Simulations, cloud structure, plumes, saturation in tropics, forecasting, parameterizations, stochastic, radiation-clod interaction, hurricane forecasts

  13. Laboratory experiments on rain-driven convection: Implications for planetary dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Peter; Landeau, Maylis; Hirsh, Benjamin H.

    2017-01-01

    Compositional convection driven by precipitating solids or immiscible liquids has been invoked as a dynamo mechanism in planets and satellites throughout the solar system, including Mercury, Ganymede, and the Earth. Here we report laboratory experiments on turbulent rain-driven convection, analogs for the flows generated by precipitation within planetary fluid interiors. We subject a two-layer fluid to a uniform intensity rainfall, in which the rain is immiscible in the upper layer and miscible in the lower layer. Rain falls through the upper layer and accumulates as a two-fluid emulsion in the interfacial region between the layers. In experiments where the rain is denser than the lower fluid, rain-injected vortices evolve into small-scale plumes that rapidly coalesce into larger structures, resulting in turbulent convection throughout the lower layer. The turbulent convective velocity in our experiments increases approximately as the cube root of the rain buoyancy flux, implying little or no dependence on viscous and chemical diffusivities. Applying diffusion-free scaling laws for magnetic field generation, we find that precipitation-driven convection can be an effective dynamo mechanism in planetary cores provided the precipitation buoyancy flux is large and the convecting region is deep and nearly adiabatic.

  14. In-space experiment on thermoacoustic convection heat transfer phenomenon-experiment definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, M.; Crocker, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    The definition phase of an in-space experiment in thermoacoustic convection (TAC) heat transfer phenomenon is completed and the results are presented and discussed in some detail. Background information, application and potential importance of TAC in heat transfer processes are discussed with particular focus on application in cryogenic fluid handling and storage in microgravity space environment. Also included are the discussion on TAC space experiment objectives, results of ground support experiments, hardware information, and technical specifications and drawings. The future plans and a schedule for the development of experiment hardware (Phase 1) and flight tests and post-flight analysis (Phase 3/4) are also presented. The specific experimental objectives are rapid heating of a compressible fluid and the measurement of the fluid temperature and pressure and the recording and analysis of the experimental data for the establishment of the importance of TAC heat transfer process. The ground experiments that were completed in support of the experiment definition included fluid temperature measurement by a modified shadowgraph method, surface temperature measurements by thermocouples, and fluid pressure measurements by strain-gage pressure transducers. These experiments verified the feasibility of the TAC in-space experiment, established the relevance and accuracy of the experimental results, and specified the nature of the analysis which will be carried out in the post-flight phase of the report.

  15. The role of tree age in triggering convective clouds: implications for plantation forestry expansion in the Southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, G.; Domec, J. C.; Novick, K. A.; Oishi, A. C.; Marani, M.; Katul, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Southeastern United States includes some of the most intensively managed forests worldwide and conversion from natural forests to pine plantations is projected to increase. Currently, natural and unmanaged forests are being replaced with young, fast growing loblolly pine plantations to cope with an increasing demand for timber. These large scale land cover/management changes can impact key features of the hydrological cycle such as the generation of convective rainfall (i.e. thermodynamic precipitation). The role of stand age in regulating land-atmosphere feedback mechanisms is here investigated by the combined use of field observations and modeling. We use simple analytical solutions to describe the diurnal evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and the lifting condensation level so as to derive relations for cloudy/cloudless conditions (a proxy for the predisposition of the system to trigger convective rainfall) as a function of soil water content (SWC) and free atmosphere (FA) conditions. Results from four study sites suggest that young pine plantations maximize soil water depletion while minimizing rainfall suppression, thereby reducing the risk of water stress. In contrast, mature pine stands are more tolerant to drought, and cloud formation becomes nearly independent of the soil conditions. Our findings suggest that the impact of land cover, and therefore management practices, on ABL processes is encoded in the non-linear response of the Bowen ratio to changes in the SWC. Given the observed FA conditions in the Southeastern US, age-related changes in the surface energy fluxes can modify cloud cover and rainfall recycling mechanisms.

  16. A study of the relationship between cloud-to-ground lightning and precipitation in the convective weather system in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhou

    Full Text Available In this paper, the correlation between cloud-to-ground (CG lightning and precipitation has been studied by making use of the data from weather radar, meteorological soundings, and a lightning location system that includes three direction finders about 40 km apart from each other in the Pingliang area of east Gansu province in P. R. China. We have studied the convective systems that developed during two cold front processes passing over the observation area, and found that the CG lightning can be an important factor in the precipitation estimation. The regression equation between the average precipitation intensity (R and the number of CG lightning flashes (L in the main precipitation period is R = 1.69 ln (L - 0.27, and the correlation coefficient r is 0.86. The CG lightning flash rate can be used as an indicator of the formation and development of the convective weather system. Another more exhaustive precipitation estimation method has been developed by analyzing the temporal and spatial distributions of the precipitation relative to the location of the CG lightning flashes. Precipitation calculated from the CG lightning flashes is very useful, especially in regions with inadequate radar cover.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (atmospheric electricity; lightning; precipitation

  17. Improvement of Systematic Bias of mean state and the intraseasonal variability of CFSv2 through superparameterization and revised cloud-convection-radiation parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, P.; Phani Murali Krishna, R.; Goswami, Bidyut B.; Abhik, S.; Ganai, Malay; Mahakur, M.; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Dudhia, Jimmy

    2016-05-01

    Inspite of significant improvement in numerical model physics, resolution and numerics, the general circulation models (GCMs) find it difficult to simulate realistic seasonal and intraseasonal variabilities over global tropics and particularly over Indian summer monsoon (ISM) region. The bias is mainly attributed to the improper representation of physical processes. Among all the processes, the cloud and convective processes appear to play a major role in modulating model bias. In recent times, NCEP CFSv2 model is being adopted under Monsoon Mission for dynamical monsoon forecast over Indian region. The analyses of climate free run of CFSv2 in two resolutions namely at T126 and T382, show largely similar bias in simulating seasonal rainfall, in capturing the intraseasonal variability at different scales over the global tropics and also in capturing tropical waves. Thus, the biases of CFSv2 indicate a deficiency in model's parameterization of cloud and convective processes. Keeping this in background and also for the need to improve the model fidelity, two approaches have been adopted. Firstly, in the superparameterization, 32 cloud resolving models each with a horizontal resolution of 4 km are embedded in each GCM (CFSv2) grid and the conventional sub-grid scale convective parameterization is deactivated. This is done to demonstrate the role of resolving cloud processes which otherwise remain unresolved. The superparameterized CFSv2 (SP-CFS) is developed on a coarser version T62. The model is integrated for six and half years in climate free run mode being initialised from 16 May 2008. The analyses reveal that SP-CFS simulates a significantly improved mean state as compared to default CFS. The systematic bias of lesser rainfall over Indian land mass, colder troposphere has substantially been improved. Most importantly the convectively coupled equatorial waves and the eastward propagating MJO has been found to be simulated with more fidelity in SP-CFS. The reason of

  18. Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011: Cloud particles containing ammonia and water ices indicate a deep convective origin. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Baines, K. H.; Fry, P.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011 was first detected by amateur astronomers in early December 2010 and later found in Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images taken on 5 December, when it took the form of a 1000 km wide bright spot. Within a week the head of the storm grew by a factor of ten in width and within a few months created a wake that encircled the planet. This is the sixth Great Saturn Storm in recorded history, all having appeared in the northern hemisphere, and most near northern summer solstice at intervals of roughly 30 years (Sanchez-Lavega et al. 1991, Nature 353, 397-401). That the most recent storm appeared 10 years early proved fortunate because Cassini was still operating in orbit around Saturn and was able to provide unique observations from which we could learn much more about these rare and enormous events. Besides the dramatic dynamical effects displayed at the visible cloud level by high-resolution imaging observations (Sayanagi et al. 2013, Icarus 223, 460-478), dramatic thermal changes also occurred in the stratosphere above the storm (Fletcher et al. 2011, Science 332, 1413), and radio measurements of lightning (Fischer et al., 2011, Nature 475, 75-77) indicated strong convective activity at deeper levels. Numerical models of Saturn's Giant storms (Hueso and Sanchez-Lavega 2004, Icarus 172, 255-271) suggest that they are fueled by water vapor condensation beginning at the 10-12 bar level, some 250 km below the visible cloud tops. That idea is also supported by our detection of water ice near the cloud tops (Sromovsky et al. 2013, Icarus 226, 402-418). From Cassini VIMS spectral imaging taken in February 2011, we learned that the storm's cloud particles are strong absorbers of sunlight at wavelengths from 2.8 to 3.1 microns. Such absorption is not seen on Saturn outside of storm regions, implying a different kind of cloud formation process as well as different cloud composition inside the storm region. We found compelling evidence

  19. Laboratory flow experiments for visualizing carbon dioxide-induced, density-driven brine convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.; Pruess, K.

    2009-09-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers confined by low-permeability cap rock will result in a layer of CO{sub 2} overlying the brine. Dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the brine increases the brine density, resulting in an unstable situation in which more-dense brine overlies less-dense brine. This gravitational instability could give rise to density-driven convection of the fluid, which is a favorable process of practical interest for CO{sub 2} storage security because it accelerates the transfer of buoyant CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase, where it is no longer subject to an upward buoyant drive. Laboratory flow visualization tests in transparent Hele-Shaw cells have been performed to elucidate the processes and rates of this CO{sub 2} solute-driven convection (CSC). Upon introduction of CO{sub 2} into the system, a layer of CO{sub 2}-laden brine forms at the CO{sub 2}-water interface. Subsequently, small convective fingers form, which coalesce, broaden, and penetrate into the test cell. Images and time-series data of finger lengths and wavelengths are presented. Observed CO{sub 2} uptake of the convection system indicates that the CO{sub 2} dissolution rate is approximately constant for each test and is far greater than expected for a diffusion-only scenario. Numerical simulations of our system show good agreement with the experiments for onset time of convection and advancement of convective fingers. There are differences as well, the most prominent being the absence of cell-scale convection in the numerical simulations. This cell-scale convection observed in the experiments is probably initiated by a small temperature gradient induced by the cell illumination.

  20. Studying Convective Events Over Southern Arizona by Using Ground GPS Receivers and Cloud to Ground Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orduño, A. M.; Sosa, C. M.; Jacobo, R. A.

    2013-05-01

    Over the last decades, Global Position System (GPS) satellites have been used for in various fields of the Earth Sciences. In particular, "GPS Meteorology" was born in the attempt to retrieve water vapor, specifically column-integrated water vapor or, precipitable water vapor (PWV), that results from the noise induced by the atmosphere in the GPS signal. Monitoring PWV with GPS is relatively inexpensive, works under all weather conditions, and has a high time resolution which complements traditional techniques such as radiosondes and satellite-based retrievals. The North American Monsoon (NAM) is a seasonal system that affects the southwestern of United States and northwestern Mexico. Atmospheric Water Vapor is transported from the Gulf of California, Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico to the continental areas and this contribute to the genesis of convective systems that develop over this region. In many cases, these systems are characterized by relatively short lifetimes, a great amount of precipitation accompanied with lightning making it difficult to study with radiosondes, given their limited time resolution (operationally twice a day). On the other hand, GOES satellite has better time resolution (one hour), but does not provide water vapor in cloudy conditions, precisely when the data are needed. This makes GPS a great tool to study deep atmospheric convection over during the NAM. During the monsoon season 2002 and 2003, we noted that local GPS and the radiosondes launched in Tucson, Arizona showed, for some cases, a significant discrepancy in their PWV estimation. In determining the causes of these discrepancies we discovered that the GPS was detecting convective events in its vicinity that the radiosondes could not detect, a strength that had not considered before. Convective activity in Southern Arizona often produces gust fronts that result in dramatic changes of temperature and humidity. These gust fronts also generate a shift in wind direction and

  1. Effects of turbulence on mixed-phase deep convective clouds under different basic-state winds and aerosol concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunho; Baik, Jong-Jin; Han, Ji-Young

    2014-12-01

    The effects of turbulence-induced collision enhancement (TICE) on mixed-phase deep convective clouds are numerically investigated using a 2-D cloud model with bin microphysics for uniform and sheared basic-state wind profiles and different aerosol concentrations. Graupel particles account for the most of the cloud mass in all simulation cases. In the uniform basic-state wind cases, graupel particles with moderate sizes account for some of the total graupel mass in the cases with TICE, whereas graupel particles with large sizes account for almost all the total graupel mass in the cases without TICE. This is because the growth of ice crystals into small graupel particles is enhanced due to TICE. The changes in the size distributions of graupel particles due to TICE result in a decrease in the mass-averaged mean terminal velocity of graupel particles. Therefore, the downward flux of graupel mass, and thus the melting of graupel particles, is reduced due to TICE, leading to a decrease in the amount of surface precipitation. Moreover, under the low aerosol concentration, TICE increases the sublimation of ice particles, consequently playing a partial role in reducing the amount of surface precipitation. The effects of TICE are less pronounced in the sheared basic-state wind cases than in the uniform basic-state wind cases because the number of ice crystals is much smaller in the sheared basic-state wind cases than in the uniform basic-state wind cases. Thus, the size distributions of graupel particles in the cases with and without TICE show little difference.

  2. Contribution of cloud condensate to surface rainfall process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yushu; CUI Xiaopeng; LI Xiaofan

    2006-01-01

    Contribution of cloud condensate to surface rainfall processes is investigated in a life span of tropical convection based on hourly data from a two-dimensional cloud resolving simulation. The model is forced by the large-scale vertical velocity, zonal wind and horizontal advections obtained from tropical ocean global atmosphere coupled ocean-atmosphere response experiment (TOGA COARE). The results show that during the genesis, development, and decay of tropical convection, calculations with water vapor overestimate surface rain rate, and cloud condensate plays an important role in correcting overestimation in surface rain rates. The analysis is carried out in deep convective clouds and anvil clouds during the development of tropical convection. The surface rain rates calculated with water vapor in deep convective clouds and anvil clouds have similar magnitudes, the large surface rain rate appears in deep convective clouds due to the consumption of water hydrorneteors whereas the small surface rain rate occurs in anvil clouds because of the gain of ice hydrometeors. Further analysis of the grid data shows that the surface rain rates calculated with water vapor and with cloud condensate are negatively correlated with the correlation coefficient of - 0.85, and the surface rain rate calculated with cloud condensate is mainly contributed to the water hydrometeors in the tropical deep convective regime.

  3. Liquid Water Cloud Properties During the Polarimeter Definition Experiment (PODEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Wasilewski, Andrzei P.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Platnick, Steven; Arnold, George; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; hide

    2015-01-01

    We present retrievals of water cloud properties from the measurements made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) during the Polarimeter Definition Experiment (PODEX) held between January 14 and February 6, 2013. The RSP was onboard the high-altitude NASA ER-2 aircraft based at NASA Dryden Aircraft Operation Facility in Palmdale, California. The retrieved cloud characteristics include cloud optical thickness, effective radius and variance of cloud droplet size distribution derived using a parameter-fitting technique, as well as the complete droplet size distribution function obtained by means of Rainbow Fourier Transform. Multi-modal size distributions are decomposed into several modes and the respective effective radii and variances are computed. The methodology used to produce the retrieval dataset is illustrated on the examples of a marine stratocumulus deck off California coast and stratus/fog over California's Central Valley. In the latter case the observed bimodal droplet size distributions were attributed to two-layer cloud structure. All retrieval data are available online from NASA GISS website.

  4. Liquid Water Cloud Properties During the Polarimeter Definition Experiment (PODEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Wasilewski, Andrzei P.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Platnick, Steven; Arnold, George; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Chowdhary, Jacek; Ottaviani, Matteo; Knobelspiesse, Kirk D.

    2015-01-01

    We present retrievals of water cloud properties from the measurements made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) during the Polarimeter Definition Experiment (PODEX) held between January 14 and February 6, 2013. The RSP was onboard the high-altitude NASA ER-2 aircraft based at NASA Dryden Aircraft Operation Facility in Palmdale, California. The retrieved cloud characteristics include cloud optical thickness, effective radius and variance of cloud droplet size distribution derived using a parameter-fitting technique, as well as the complete droplet size distribution function obtained by means of Rainbow Fourier Transform. Multi-modal size distributions are decomposed into several modes and the respective effective radii and variances are computed. The methodology used to produce the retrieval dataset is illustrated on the examples of a marine stratocumulus deck off California coast and stratus/fog over California's Central Valley. In the latter case the observed bimodal droplet size distributions were attributed to two-layer cloud structure. All retrieval data are available online from NASA GISS website.

  5. Modeling of thermosolutal convection during Bridgman solidification of semiconductor alloys in relation with experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelian, Carmen; Duffar, Thierry

    2004-05-01

    Thermosolutal convection during vertical Bridgman directional solidification of Ga 1- xIn xSb alloys has been studied by numerical simulation. The transient analysis of heat, momentum and species transport has been performed by using the finite element code FIDAP ®. In the case of vertical Bridgman configuration, the thermal convection is driven by the radial temperature gradients. The solute (InSb) rejected at the solid-liquid interface, which is heavier than the GaSb component, damps the thermally driven convection. The solutal effect on the melt convection has been analyzed for low ( x=0.01) and high ( x=0.1) doped Ga 1- xIn xSb alloys. It is found that the damping effect is negligible for Ga 0.99In 0.01Sb alloy grown at low pulling rates ( V= 1 μm/s ), but cannot be neglected if the pulling rate is increased. In the case of concentrated alloys, the low level of convection intensity leads to an increase of radial segregation and interface curvature during the whole growth process as also shown by experiments. The effect of solutal buoyancy force on the melt convection is analyzed for the horizontal Bridgman configuration under microgravity conditions. An inverse but lower solutal effect on the melt convection, as compared with vertical Bridgman arrangement, is observed. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data, and show that convective transport can be observed even for low (2×10 -6g0) residual gravity levels.

  6. Jupiter cloud composition, stratification, convection, and wave motion: a view from new horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, D C; Simon-Miller, A A; Lunsford, A; Baines, K H; Cheng, A F; Jennings, D E; Olkin, C B; Spencer, J R; Stern, S A; Weaver, H A; Young, L A

    2007-10-12

    Several observations of Jupiter's atmosphere made by instruments on the New Horizons spacecraft have implications for the stability and dynamics of Jupiter's weather layer. Mesoscale waves, first seen by Voyager, have been observed at a spatial resolution of 11 to 45 kilometers. These waves have a 300-kilometer wavelength and phase velocities greater than the local zonal flow by 100 meters per second, much higher than predicted by models. Additionally, infrared spectral measurements over five successive Jupiter rotations at spatial resolutions of 200 to 140 kilometers have shown the development of transient ammonia ice clouds (lifetimes of 40 hours or less) in regions of strong atmospheric upwelling. Both of these phenomena serve as probes of atmospheric dynamics below the visible cloud tops.

  7. Detailed cloud resolving model simulations of the impacts of Saharan air layer dust on tropical deep convection – Part 1: Dust acts as ice nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Gong

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies suggest that the Saharan Air Layer (SAL, an elevated layer (850–500 hPa of Saharan air and mineral dust, has strong impacts on the microphysical as well as dynamical properties of tropical deep convective cloud systems along its track. In this case study, numerical simulations using a two-dimensional Detailed Cloud Resolving Model (DCRM were carried out to investigate the dust-cloud interactions in the tropical deep convection, focusing on the dust role as Ice Nuclei (IN.

    The simulations showed that mineral dust considerably enhanced heterogeneous nucleation and freezing at temperatures warmer than −40 °C, resulting in more ice hydrometeors number concentration and reduced precipitating size of ice particles. Because of the lower in the saturation over ice as well as more droplet freezing, total latent heating increased, and consequently the updraft velocity was stronger.

    On the other hand, the increased ice deposition consumed more water vapor at middle troposphere, which induces a competition for water vapor between heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing and nucleation. As a result, dust suppressed the homogeneous droplet freezing and nucleation due to the heterogeneous droplet freezing and the weakened transport of water vapor at lower stratosphere, respectively. These effects led to decreased number concentration of ice cloud particles in the upper troposphere, and consequently lowered the cloud top height during the stratus precipitating stage.

    Acting as IN, mineral dust also influenced precipitation in deep convection. It initiated earlier the collection because dust-related heterogeneous nucleation and freezing at middle troposphere occur earlier than homogeneous nucleation at higher altitudes. Nevertheless, the convective precipitation was suppressed by reduced collection of large graupel particles and insufficient fallout related to decreased sizes of precipitating ice hydrometeors

  8. Convective overshooting top detection with MSG SEVIRI, Himawari-8 AHI, and CloudSat CPR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, J.; Kim, M.; Park, S.

    2015-12-01

    Overshooting Tops (OTs) are the clouds that penetrate into the tropopause and grow to the bottom of stratosphere at the top layer of cumulonimbus with very strong updraft. Severe weather conditions such as ground lightning, large hail, strong winds, and heavy rainfall can cause in the cumulonimbus clouds with OTs, with turbulence and lightning occurring very frequently in the area near OTs. In terms of aviation operations, OTs are a very important risk factor. According to Federal Aviation Administration, 509 cases of 4,326 weather-related events from 1992 to 2001were caused by turbulences. The detection of OTs is important to predict the degree and location of severe weather conditions such as turbulence, lightning, and thunderstorms. There are two methods widely used to detect OTs with multispectral images. One is the Water Vapor-InfraRed window channel Brightness Temperature Difference (WV-IRW BTD), which uses the differences in brightness temperatures at an infrared channel (about 11 ㎛). The other approach is the InfraRed Window texture (IRW-texture) method, which is based on the characteristics of OTs that appear a pixel group with low temperatures. The typical IRW-texture algorithm uses simple thresholds to detect OTs, whereas this research proposes an advanced approach based on machine learning techniques such as decision trees, random forest (RF), and support vector machines (SVM) with various variables from geostationary satellite data such as MSG SEVIRI (over Africa) and Himawari AHI (over East Asia) so as to improve the detection of OTs. OT and non-OT samples (e.g. other types of clouds such as stratus and cirrus) were extracted using the CloudSat cloud profiling radar (CPR) and SEVIRI (and Himawari) imagery. Results show that RF produced the best performance in detection of OTs yielding an overall accuracy of 98.33% and a false alarm rate of 9.01%. The user's accuracies of OT and non-OT were similar, whereas the producer's accuracy of non-OT was

  9. In situ measurements of tropical cloud properties in the West African Monsoon: upper tropospheric ice clouds, Mesoscale Convective System outflow, and subvisual cirrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Frey

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In situ measurements of ice crystal size distributions in tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS clouds were performed during the SCOUT-AMMA campaign over West Africa in August 2006. The cloud properties were measured with a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP-100 and a Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP operated aboard the Russian high altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysica with the mission base in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. A total of 117 ice particle size distributions were obtained from the measurements in the vicinity of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS. Two to four modal lognormal size distributions were fitted to the average size distributions for different potential temperature bins. The measurements showed proportionately more large ice particles compared to former measurements above maritime regions. With the help of trace gas measurements of NO, NOy, CO2, CO, and O3 and satellite images, clouds in young and aged MCS outflow were identified. These events were observed at altitudes of 11.0 km to 14.2 km corresponding to potential temperature levels of 346 K to 356 K. In a young outflow from a developing MCS ice crystal number concentrations of up to (8.3 ± 1.6 cm−3 and rimed ice particles with maximum dimensions exceeding 1.5 mm were found. A maximum ice water content of 0.05 g m−3 was observed and an effective radius of about 90 μm. In contrast the aged outflow events were more diluted and showed a maximum number concentration of 0.03 cm−3, an ice water content of 2.3 × 10−4 g m−3, an effective radius of about 18 μm, while the largest particles had a maximum dimension of 61 μm.

    Close to the tropopause subvisual cirrus were encountered four times at altitudes of 15 km to 16.4 km. The mean ice particle number concentration of these encounters was 0.01 cm−3 with maximum particle sizes of 130

  10. In-situ measurements of tropical cloud properties in the West African monsoon: upper tropospheric ice clouds, mesoscale convective system outflow, and subvisual cirrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Frey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In-situ measurements of ice crystal size distributions in tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS clouds were performed during the SCOUT-AMMA campaign over West Africa in August 2006. The cloud properties were measured with a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP-100 and a Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP operated aboard the Russian high altitude research aircraft M-55 ''Geophysica'' with the mission base in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. A total of 117 ice particle size distributions were obtained from the measurements in the vicinity of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS. Two or three modal lognormal size distributions were fitted to the average size distributions for different potential temperature bins. The measurements showed proportionate more large ice particles compared to former measurements above maritime regions. With the help of trace gas measurements of NO, NOy, CO2, CO, and O3, and satellite images clouds in young and aged MCS outflow were identified. These events were observed at altitudes of 11.0 km to 14.2 km corresponding to potential temperature levels of 346 K to 356 K. In a young outflow (developing MCS ice crystal number concentrations of up to 8.3 cm−3 and rimed ice particles with maximum dimensions exceeding 1.5 mm were found. A maximum ice water content of 0.05 g m−3 was observed and an effective radius of about 90 μm. In contrast the aged outflow events were more diluted and showed a maximum number concentration of 0.03 cm−3, an ice water content of 2.3 × 10−4 g m−3, an effective radius of about 18 μm, while the largest particles had a maximum dimension of 61 μm.

    Close to the tropopause subvisual cirrus were encountered four times at altitudes of 15 km to 16.4 km. The mean ice particle number concentration of these encounters was 0.01 cm−3 with maximum particle sizes of 130 μm, and the mean

  11. Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) Science Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, D.; Schnase, J. L.; McInerney, M.; Webster, W. P.; Sinno, S.; Thompson, J. H.; Griffith, P. C.; Hoy, E.; Carroll, M.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of climate change are being revealed at alarming rates in the Arctic and Boreal regions of the planet. NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program has launched a major field campaign to study these effects over the next 5 to 8 years. The Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) will challenge scientists to take measurements in the field, study remote observations, and even run models to better understand the impacts of a rapidly changing climate for areas of Alaska and western Canada. The NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has partnered with the Terrestrial Ecology Program to create a science cloud designed for this field campaign - the ABoVE Science Cloud. The cloud combines traditional high performance computing with emerging technologies to create an environment specifically designed for large-scale climate analytics. The ABoVE Science Cloud utilizes (1) virtualized high-speed InfiniBand networks, (2) a combination of high-performance file systems and object storage, and (3) virtual system environments tailored for data intensive, science applications. At the center of the architecture is a large object storage environment, much like a traditional high-performance file system, that supports data proximal processing using technologies like MapReduce on a Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS). Surrounding the storage is a cloud of high performance compute resources with many processing cores and large memory coupled to the storage through an InfiniBand network. Virtual systems can be tailored to a specific scientist and provisioned on the compute resources with extremely high-speed network connectivity to the storage and to other virtual systems. In this talk, we will present the architectural components of the science cloud and examples of how it is being used to meet the needs of the ABoVE campaign. In our experience, the science cloud approach significantly lowers the barriers and risks to organizations

  12. A study of the effect of overshooting deep convection on the water content of the TTL and lower stratosphere from Cloud Resolving Model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Grosvenor

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of overshooting, tropical deep convection using a Cloud Resolving Model with bulk microphysics are presented in order to examine the effect on the water content of the TTL (Tropical Tropopause Layer and lower stratosphere. This case study is a subproject of the HIBISCUS (Impact of tropical convection on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere at global scale campaign, which took place in Bauru, Brazil (22° S, 49° W, from the end of January to early March 2004.

    Comparisons between 2-D and 3-D simulations suggest that the use of 3-D dynamics is vital in order to capture the mixing between the overshoot and the stratospheric air, which caused evaporation of ice and resulted in an overall moistening of the lower stratosphere. In contrast, a dehydrating effect was predicted by the 2-D simulation due to the extra time, allowed by the lack of mixing, for the ice transported to the region to precipitate out of the overshoot air.

    Three different strengths of convection are simulated in 3-D by applying successively lower heating rates (used to initiate the convection in the boundary layer. Moistening is produced in all cases, indicating that convective vigour is not a factor in whether moistening or dehydration is produced by clouds that penetrate the tropopause, since the weakest case only just did so. An estimate of the moistening effect of these clouds on an air parcel traversing a convective region is made based on the domain mean simulated moistening and the frequency of convective events observed by the IPMet (Instituto de Pesquisas Meteorológicas, Universidade Estadual Paulista radar (S-band type at 2.8 Ghz to have the same 10 dBZ echo top height as those simulated. These suggest a fairly significant mean moistening of 0.26, 0.13 and 0.05 ppmv in the strongest, medium and weakest cases, respectively, for heights between 16 and 17 km. Since the cold point and WMO (World Meteorological Organization tropopause in

  13. Facial convective heat exchange coefficients in cold and windy environments estimated from human experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Shabat, Yael; Shitzer, Avraham

    2012-07-01

    Facial heat exchange convection coefficients were estimated from experimental data in cold and windy ambient conditions applicable to wind chill calculations. Measured facial temperature datasets, that were made available to this study, originated from 3 separate studies involving 18 male and 6 female subjects. Most of these data were for a -10°C ambient environment and wind speeds in the range of 0.2 to 6 m s(-1). Additional single experiments were for -5°C, 0°C and 10°C environments and wind speeds in the same range. Convection coefficients were estimated for all these conditions by means of a numerical facial heat exchange model, applying properties of biological tissues and a typical facial diameter of 0.18 m. Estimation was performed by adjusting the guessed convection coefficients in the computed facial temperatures, while comparing them to measured data, to obtain a satisfactory fit (r(2) > 0.98, in most cases). In one of the studies, heat flux meters were additionally used. Convection coefficients derived from these meters closely approached the estimated values for only the male subjects. They differed significantly, by about 50%, when compared to the estimated female subjects' data. Regression analysis was performed for just the -10°C ambient temperature, and the range of experimental wind speeds, due to the limited availability of data for other ambient temperatures. The regressed equation was assumed in the form of the equation underlying the "new" wind chill chart. Regressed convection coefficients, which closely duplicated the measured data, were consistently higher than those calculated by this equation, except for one single case. The estimated and currently used convection coefficients are shown to diverge exponentially from each other, as wind speed increases. This finding casts considerable doubts on the validity of the convection coefficients that are used in the computation of the "new" wind chill chart and their applicability to humans in

  14. Model sensitivity studies regarding the role of the retention coefficient for the scavenging and redistribution of highly soluble trace gases by deep convective cloud systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salzmann

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the retention coefficient (i.e. the fraction of a dissolved trace gas which is retained in hydrometeors during freezing for the scavenging and redistribution of highly soluble trace gases by deep convective cloud systems is investigated using a modified version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. Results from cloud system resolving model runs (in which deep convection is initiated by small random perturbations in association with so-called "large scale forcings (LSF" for a tropical oceanic (TOGA COARE and a mid-latitude continental case (ARM are compared to two runs in which bubbles are used to initiate deep convection (STERAO, ARM. In the LSF runs, scavenging is found to almost entirely prevent a highly soluble tracer initially located in the lowest 1.5 km of the troposphere from reaching the upper troposphere, independent of the retention coefficient. The release of gases from freezing hydrometeors leads to mixing ratio increases in the upper troposphere comparable to those calculated for insoluble trace gases only in the two runs in which bubbles are used to initiate deep convection. A comparison of the two ARM runs indicates that using bubbles to initiate deep convection may result in an overestimate of the influence of the retention coefficient on the vertical transport of highly soluble tracers. It is, however, found that the retention coefficient plays an important role for the scavenging and redistribution of highly soluble trace gases with a (chemical source in the free troposphere and also for trace gases for which even relatively inefficient transport may be important. The large difference between LSF and bubble runs is attributed to differences in dynamics and microphysics in the inflow regions of the storms. The dependence of the results on the model setup indicates the need for additional model studies with a more realistic initiation of deep convection, e.g., considering effects of orography in a nested

  15. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. II: Multi layered cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, H.; McCoy, Renata; Klein, Stephen A.; Xie, Shaocheng; Luo, Yali; Avramov, Alexander; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Mike; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khrairoutdinov, Marat; Larson, Vince; Liu, Xiaohong; McFarquhar, Greg; Poellot, M. R.; Von Salzen, Knut; Shipway, Ben; Shupe, Matthew D.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, G.

    2009-05-21

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, the cloud-resolving models and models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models also tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

  16. Evolution of particle composition in CLOUD nucleation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Keskinen, H; Joutsensaari, J; Tsagkogeorgas, G; Duplissy, J; Schobesberger, S; Gysel, M; Riccobono, F; Bianchi, F; Yli-Juuti, T; Lehtipalo, K; Rondo, L; Breitenlechner, M; Kupc, A; Almeida, J; Amorim, A; Dunne, E M; Downard, A J; Ehrhart, S; Franchin, A; Kajos, M K; Kirkby, J; Kurten, A; Nieminen, T; Makhmutov, V; Mathot, S; Miettinen, P; Onnela, A; Petaja, T; Praplan, A; Santos, F D; Schallhart, S; Sipila, M; Stozhkov, Y; Tome, A; Vaattovaara, P; Wimmer, D; Prevot, A; Dommen, J; Donahue, N M; Flagan, R C; Weingartner, E; Viisanen, Y; Riipinen, I; Hansel, A; Curtius, J; Kulmala, M; Worsnop, D R; Baltensperger, U; Wex, H; Stratmann, F; Laaksonen, A; Slowik, J G

    2013-01-01

    Sulphuric acid, ammonia, amines, and oxidised organics play a crucial role in nanoparticle formation in the atmosphere. In this study, we investigate the composition of nucleated nanoparticles formed from these compounds in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber experiments at CERN (Centre europ ́ een pour la recherche nucl ́ eaire). The investigation was carried out via analysis of the particle hygroscopicity, ethanol affinity, oxidation state, and ion composition. Hygroscopicity was studied by a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyser and a cloud condensation nuclei counter, ethanol affinity by an organic differential mobility analyser and particle oxidation level by a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer. The ion composition was studied by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The volume fraction of the organics in the particles during theirgrowth from sizes of a few nanometers to tens of nanometers was derived from measured hygros...

  17. Organic aerosol processing in tropical deep convective clouds: Development of a new model (CRM-ORG) and implications for sources of particle number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B. N.; Julin, J.; Riipinen, I.; Ekman, A. M. L.

    2015-10-01

    The difficulty in assessing interactions between atmospheric particles and clouds is due in part to the chemical complexity of the particles and to the wide range of length and timescales of processes occurring simultaneously during a cloud event. The new Cloud-Resolving Model with Organics (CRM-ORG) addresses these interactions by explicitly predicting the formation, transport, uptake, and re-release of surrogate organic compounds consistent with the volatility basis set framework within a nonhydrostatic, three-dimensional cloud-resolving model. CRM-ORG incorporates photochemical production, explicit condensation/evaporation of organic and inorganic vapors, and a comprehensive set of four different mechanisms describing particle formation from organic vapors and sulfuric acid. We simulate two deep convective cloud events over the Amazon rain forest in March 1998 and compare modeled particle size distributions with airborne observations made during the time period. The model predictions agree well with the observations for Aitken mode particles in the convective outflow (10-14 km) but underpredict nucleation mode particles by a factor of 20. A strong in-cloud particle formation process from organic vapors alone is necessary to reproduce even relatively low ultrafine particle number concentrations (~1500 cm-3). Sensitivity tests with variable initial aerosol loading and initial vertical aerosol profile demonstrate the complexity of particle redistribution and net gain or loss in the cloud. In-cloud particle number concentrations could be enhanced by as much as a factor of 3 over the base case simulation in the cloud outflow but were never reduced by more than a factor of 2 lower than the base. Additional sensitivity cases emphasize the need for constrained estimates of surface tension and affinity of organic vapors to ice surfaces. When temperature-dependent organic surface tension is introduced to the new particle formation mechanisms, the number concentration of

  18. Convective cloud vertical velocity and mass-flux characteristics from radar wind profiler observations during GoAmazon2014/5: VERTICAL VELOCITY GOAMAZON2014/5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giangrande, Scott E. [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Toto, Tami [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Jensen, Michael P. [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Bartholomew, Mary Jane [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Feng, Zhe [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Protat, Alain [Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Melbourne Victoria Australia; Williams, Christopher R. [University of Colorado Boulder and NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory/Physical Sciences Division, Boulder Colorado USA; Schumacher, Courtney [Texas A& M University, College Station Texas USA; Machado, Luiz [National Institute for Space Research, Sao Jose dos Campos Brazil

    2016-11-15

    A radar wind profiler data set collected during the 2 year Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) campaign is used to estimate convective cloud vertical velocity, area fraction, and mass flux profiles. Vertical velocity observations are presented using cumulative frequency histograms and weighted mean profiles to provide insights in a manner suitable for global climate model scale comparisons (spatial domains from 20 km to 60 km). Convective profile sensitivity to changes in environmental conditions and seasonal regime controls is also considered. Aggregate and ensemble average vertical velocity, convective area fraction, and mass flux profiles, as well as magnitudes and relative profile behaviors, are found consistent with previous studies. Updrafts and downdrafts increase in magnitude with height to midlevels (6 to 10 km), with updraft area also increasing with height. Updraft mass flux profiles similarly increase with height, showing a peak in magnitude near 8 km. Downdrafts are observed to be most frequent below the freezing level, with downdraft area monotonically decreasing with height. Updraft and downdraft profile behaviors are further stratified according to environmental controls. These results indicate stronger vertical velocity profile behaviors under higher convective available potential energy and lower low-level moisture conditions. Sharp contrasts in convective area fraction and mass flux profiles are most pronounced when retrievals are segregated according to Amazonian wet and dry season conditions. During this deployment, wet season regimes favored higher domain mass flux profiles, attributed to more frequent convection that offsets weaker average convective cell vertical velocities.

  19. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

  20. ARM Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, L Ruby [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s ARM Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign contributes to CalWater 2015, a multi-agency field campaign that aims to improve understanding of atmospheric rivers and aerosol sources and transport that influence cloud and precipitation processes. The ultimate goal is to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of droughts and floods in California. With the DOE G-1 aircraft and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2) well equipped for making aerosol and cloud measurements, ACAPEX focuses specifically on understanding how aerosols from local pollution and long-range transport affect the amount and phase of precipitation associated with atmospheric rivers. ACAPEX took place between January 12, 2015 and March 8, 2015 as part of CalWater 2015, which included four aircraft (DOE G-1, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA] G-IV and P-3, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA] ER-2), the NOAA research ship Ron Brown, carrying onboard the AMF2, National Science Foundation (NSF)-sponsored aerosol and precipitation measurements at Bodega Bay, and the California Department of Water Resources extreme precipitation network.

  1. The influence of convection parameterisations under alternate climate conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Harald; Tost, Holger

    2013-04-01

    In the last decades several convection parameterisations have been developed to consider the impact of small-scale unresolved processes in Earth System Models associated with convective clouds. Global model simulations, which have been performed under current climate conditions with different convection schemes, significantly differ among each other in the simulated precipitation patterns due to the parameterisation assumptions and formulations, e.g. the simplified treatment of the cloud microphysics. Additionally, the simulated transport of short-lived trace gases strongly depends on the chosen convection parameterisation due to the differences in the vertical redistribution of mass. Furthermore, other meteorological parameters like the temperature or the specific humidity show substantial differences in convectively active regions. This study presents uncertainties of climate change scenarios caused by different convection parameterisations. For this analysis two experiments (reference simulation with a CO2 concentration of 348 ppm; 2xCO2-simulation with a CO2 concentration of 696 ppm) are calculated with the ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric chemistry (EMAC) model applying four different convection schemes (Tiedtke, ECMWF, Emanuel and Zhang-McFarlane - Hack) and two resolutions (T42 and T63), respectively. The results indicate that the equilibrium climate sensitivity is independent of the chosen convection parameterisation. However, the regional temperature increase, induced by a doubling of the carbon dioxide concentration, demonstrates differences of up to a few Kelvin at the surface as well as in the UTLS for the ITCZ region depending on the selected convection parameterisation. The interaction between cloud and convection parameterisations results in a large disagreement of precipitation patterns. Although every 2xCO2 -experiment simulates an increase in global mean precipitation rates, the change of regional precipitation patterns differ widely. Finally, analysing

  2. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: a case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, H.; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, G. S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-20

    The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep, continental convective clouds in the mid-latitudes is studied for a severe storm case in Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. A new passive-tracer based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize the convective transport based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases. The passive gas concentration in the upper troposphere convective outflow results from a mixture of 47% from the lower level (0-3 km), 21% entrained from the upper troposphere, and 32% from mid-atmosphere based on observations. The transport analysis framework is applied to aerosols to estimate aerosol transport and wet-scavenging efficiency. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% and 68% for aerosol mass (Dp < 1μm) and aerosol number (0.03< Dp < 2.5μm), respectively. Little chemical selectivity to wet scavenging is seen among observed submicron sulfate (84%), organic (82%), and ammonium (80%) aerosols, while nitrate has a much lower scavenging efficiency of 57% likely due to the uptake of nitric acid. Observed larger size particles (0.15 - 2.5μm) are scavenged more efficiently (84%) than smaller particles (64%; 0.03 - 0.15μm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the WRF model. Compared to the observation based analysis, the standard model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency for both mass and number concentrations with low biases of 31% and 40%, respectively. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulation results, so that the bias in scavenging efficiency in mass and number concentrations is reduced to <10%. This supports the hypothesis that secondary activation is an important process for wet removal of aerosols in deep convective storms.

  3. Influence of galactic cosmic rays and solar variability on aerosols, clouds and climate: Results from the CLOUD experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtius, Joachim [Institute for Atmosph. and Envir. Sciences, Univ. of Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The potential influence of ions produced from galactic cosmic rays on the formation of new aerosol particles in the atmosphere may play an important role relevant for aerosol properties, cloud formation and climate. Variability of galactic cosmic rays due to modulating influences from the sun therefore may affect (regional) climate on various time scales. A quantitative understanding of the role of ions for atmospheric aerosol formation has not been reached, but also the dependence of aerosol formation on the concentration of the nucleating substances such as gaseous sulfuric acid, ammonia and amines is missing. Here results from the CLOUD experiment at CERN are presented. CLOUD is a new aerosol and cloud chamber facility at CERN. The chamber can be exposed to a pion beam from CERN to simulate various levels of atmospheric ionization. CLOUD has been set up to investigate aerosol and cloud processes under well-controlled laboratory conditions. We find that cosmic ray ionization substantially increases the nucleation rate of pure sulfuric acid/water particles while charge effects are much less pronounced for ternary systems including ammonia or dimethylamine. The results from the CLOUD experiments have been used to develop a new parameterization of aerosol nucleation which has been included in a global climate model. Impacts of our findings for cloud formation and climate are discussed.

  4. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. I: Single layer cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata; Morrison, H.; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alexander; DeBoer, GIJS; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Mike; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Larson, Vince; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, M. R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, D.; Sud, Yogesh; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana; Von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, G.

    2009-05-21

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of –15°C. While the cloud was water dominated, ice precipitation appears to have lowered the liquid water path to about 2/3 of the adiabatic value. The simulations, which were performed by seventeen single column and nine cloud-resolving models, generally underestimate the liquid water path with the median single-column and cloud-resolving model liquid water path a factor of 3 smaller than observed. While the simulated ice water path is in general agreement with the observed values, results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice phase microphysics is responsible for the strong model underestimate of liquid water path. Although no single factor is found to lead to a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for care in the model treatment of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

  5. Simulated Source and Flash Detection Efficiency during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Field Campaign Using a New Interactive Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, V.; Bruning, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed source and flash detection efficiencies for Lightning Mapping Arrays (LMA) are needed for observational and climatological work with the data. Simulations of the LMAs active during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry campaign (DC3) were performed with a new Monte Carlo interactive tool. As with previous simulations, it propagated emissions from a given source point, added Gaussian observed timing errors to the retrieval times at each station and used a least squared algorithm to find the best solution for the source. This simulation added the ability to account for variable receiver thresholds to restrict the stations contributing to the solution based on received power, which allowed a better examination of the overall impacts of site selection. The average errors were then calculated as has been done previously but with the addition of the probability of detection for a given source location. Based on a 17 month climatology of flashes over the West Texas Lightning Mapping Array (WTLMA), the distribution of flashes by number of sources was used to relate the source detection efficiency from the simulation to the most likely flash detection efficiency. As observed in previous theoretical and observational studies, the average errors in azimuth, range and especially altitude of the source point solutions increased with increasing distance from the center of the network, with the standard deviations of these errors highly dependent on the station configuration and noise thresholds. The source and therefore flash detection efficiency also decreased with range as expected, but its centroid was offset from the center of the WTLMA when variable, observed receiver thresholds were used instead of uniform thresholds across the network. With the observed WTLMA thresholds, 95% of flashes could be detected to approximately 150 km from the center of the network, where average altitude errors were less than 0.4 km but the standard deviation of those errors

  6. A Lagrangian view of convective sources for transport of air across the Tropical Tropopause Layer: distribution, times and the radiative influence of clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tzella

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The tropical tropopause layer (TTL is a key region controlling transport between the troposphere and the stratosphere. The efficiency of transport across the TTL depends on the continuous interaction between the large-scale advection and the small-scale intermittent convection that reaches the Level of Zero radiative Heating (LZH. The wide range of scales involved presents a significant challenge to determine the sources of convection and quantify transport across the TTL. Here, we use a simple Lagrangian model, termed TTL detrainment model, that combines a large ensemble of 200-day back trajectory calculations with high-resolution fields of brightness temperatures (provided by the CLAUS dataset in order to determine the ensemble of trajectories that are detrained from convective sources. The trajectories are calculated using the ECMWF ERA-Interim winds and radiative heating rates, and in order to establish the radiative influence of clouds, the latter rates are derived both under all-sky and clear-sky conditions.

    We show that most trajectories are detrained near the mean LZH with the horizontal distributions of convective sources being highly-localized, even within the space defined by deep convection. As well as modifying the degree of source localization, the radiative heating from clouds facilitates the rapid upwelling of air across the TTL. However, large-scale motion near the fluctuating LZH can lead a significant proportion of trajectories to alternating clear-sky and cloudy regions, thus generating a large dispersion in the vertical transport times. The distributions of vertical transport times are wide and skewed and are largely insensitive to a bias of about ±1 km (∓5 K in the altitude of cloud top heights (the main sensitivity appearing in the times to escape the immediate neighbourhood of the LZH while some seasonal and regional transport characteristics are apparent for times up to 60 days. The strong horizontal

  7. Validation Experiments for Spent- Fuel Dry-Cask In-Basket Convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, barton [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)

    2016-08-16

    This work consisted of the following major efforts; 1. Literature survey on validation of external natural convection; 2. Design the experiment; 3. Build the experiment; 4. Run the experiment; 5. Collect results; 6. Disseminate results; and 7. Perform a CFD validation study using the results. We note that while all tasks are complete, some deviations from the original plan were made. Specifically, geometrical changes in the parameter space were skipped in favor of flow condition changes, which were found to be much more practical to implement. Changing the geometry required new as-built measurements, which proved extremely costly and impractical given the time and funds available

  8. Validation Experiments for Spent-Fuel Dry-Cask In-Basket Convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Barton L. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    2016-08-16

    This work consisted of the following major efforts; 1. Literature survey on validation of external natural convection; 2. Design the experiment; 3. Build the experiment; 4. Run the experiment; 5. Collect results; 6. Disseminate results; and 7. Perform a CFD validation study using the results. We note that while all tasks are complete, some deviations from the original plan were made. Specifically, geometrical changes in the parameter space were skipped in favor of flow condition changes, which were found to be much more practical to implement. Changing the geometry required new as-built measurements, which proved extremely costly and impractical given the time and funds available

  9. Lightning Potential Index performances in multimicrophysical cloud-resolving simulations of a back-building mesoscale convective system: The Genoa 2014 event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagasio, M.; Parodi, A.; Procopio, R.; Rachidi, F.; Fiori, E.

    2017-04-01

    Severe weather events are responsible for hundreds of fatalities and millions of euros of damage every year on the Mediterranean basin. Lightning activity is a characteristic phenomenon of severe weather and often accompanies torrential rainfall, which, under certain conditions like terrain type, slope, drainage, and soil saturation, may turn into flash flood. Building on the existing relationship between significant lightning activity and deep convection and precipitation, the performance of the Lightning Potential Index, as a measure of the potential for charge generation and separation that leads to lightning occurrence in clouds, is here evaluated for the V-shape back-building Mesoscale Convective System which hit Genoa city (Italy) in 2014. An ensemble of Weather Research and Forecasting simulations at cloud-permitting grid spacing (1 km) with different microphysical parameterizations is performed and compared to the available observational radar and lightning data. The results allow gaining a deeper understanding of the role of lightning phenomena in the predictability of V-shape back-building Mesoscale Convective Systems often producing flash flood over western Mediterranean complex topography areas. Moreover, they support the relevance of accurate lightning forecasting for the predictive ability of these severe events.

  10. On the diurnal cycle of deep moist convection in the southern side of the Alps analysed through cloud-to-ground lightning activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladich, I.; Gallai, I.; Giaiotti, D. B.; Stel, F.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, eight years of cloud-to-ground lightning data are used as a proxy observable to describe the hourly frequency of deep moist convection occurrence over an area characterized by complex geography in the southern side of the Alps (Friuli Venezia Giulia). The study area is divided in eight sub-zones, defined according to the climatic differences of the southern side of the Alps, in particular those related to the precipitation regime. In the eight sub-zones, the hourly frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning shows two different behaviours: bimodal and single-mode. Single-mode hourly frequencies, in turn, can be divided into two more classes: afternoon maximum and evening maximum. A conceptual model for the explanation of the observed features is proposed. This conceptual model takes into account the atmospheric instability, which has a maximum during afternoon, and the convection forcing represented by the switch in the breezes regime, which is stronger in the late morning and evening. The proposed conceptual model is coherent with the complementary meteorological parameters taken into account (hourly rain, temperature and wind distribution and speed) and it is capable to describe, at least qualitatively, the observed behaviours in cloud-to-ground lightning hourly distribution.

  11. An Observational Study of Entrainment Rate in Deep Convection

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaohao Guo; Chunsong Lu; Tianliang Zhao; Guang J. Zhang; Yangang Liu

    2015-01-01

    This study estimates entrainment rate and investigates its relationships with cloud properties in 156 deep convective clouds based on in-situ aircraft observations during the TOGA-COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment) field campaign over the western Pacific. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study on the probability density function of entrainment rate, the relationships between entrainment rate and cloud microphysics, and the effects...

  12. Numerical simulation of precipitation formation in the case orographically induced convective cloud: Comparison of the results of bin and bulk microphysical schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkadi, N.; Geresdi, I.; Thompson, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, results of bulk and bin microphysical schemes are compared in the case of idealized simulations of pre-frontal orographic clouds with enhanced embedded convection. The description graupel formation by intensive riming of snowflakes was improved compared to prior versions of each scheme. Two methods of graupel melting coincident with collisions with water drops were considered: (1) all simulated melting and collected water drops increase the amount of melted water on the surface of graupel particles with no shedding permitted; (2) also no shedding permitted due to melting, but the collision with the water drops can induce shedding from the surface of the graupel particles. The results of the numerical experiments show: (i) The bin schemes generate graupel particles more efficiently by riming than the bulk scheme does; the intense riming of snowflakes was the most dominant process for the graupel formation. (ii) The collision-induced shedding significantly affects the evolution of the size distribution of graupel particles and water drops below the melting level. (iii) The three microphysical schemes gave similar values for the domain integrated surface precipitation, but the patterns reveal meaningful differences. (iv) Sensitivity tests using the bulk scheme show that the depth of the melting layer is sensitive to the description of the terminal velocity of the melting snow. (v) Comparisons against Convair-580 flight measurements suggest that the bin schemes simulate well the evolution of the pristine ice particles and liquid drops, while some inaccuracy can occur in the description of snowflakes riming. (vi) The bin scheme with collision-induced shedding reproduced well the quantitative characteristics of the observed bright band.

  13. The interaction of a magnetic cloud with the Earth - Ionospheric convection in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for a wide range of quasi-steady interplanetary magnetic field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, M. P.; Farrugia, C. J.; Burlaga, L. F.; Hairston, M. R.; Greenspan, M. E.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Lepping, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    Observations are presented of the ionospheric convection in cross sections of the polar cap and auroral zone as part of the study of the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the magnetic cloud of January 13-15, 1988. For strongly northward IMF, the convection in the Southern Hemisphere is characterized by a two-cell convection pattern comfined to high latitudes with sunward flow over the pole. The strength of the flows is comparable to that later seen under southward IMF. Superimposed on this convection pattern there are clear dawn-dusk asymmetries associated with a one-cell convection component whose sense depends on the polarity of the magnetic cloud's large east-west magnetic field component. When the cloud's magnetic field turns southward, the convection is characterized by a two-cell pattern extending to lower latitude with antisunward flow over the pole. There is no evident interhemispheric difference in the structure and strength of the convection. Superimposed dawn-dusk asymmetries in the flow patterns are observed which are only in part attributable to the east-west component of the magnetic field.

  14. Advanced Understanding of Convection Initiation and Optimizing Cloud Seeding by Advanced Remote Sensing and Land Cover Modification over the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulfmeyer, V.; Behrendt, A.; Branch, O.; Schwitalla, T.

    2016-12-01

    A prerequisite for significant precipitation amounts is the presence of convergence zones. These are due to land surface heterogeneity, orography as well as mesoscale and synoptic scale circulations. Only, if these convergence zones are strong enough and interact with an upper level instability, deep convection can be initiated. For the understanding of convection initiation (CI) and optimal cloud seeding deployment, it is essential that these convergence zones are detected before clouds are developing in order to preempt the decisive microphysical processes for liquid water and ice formation. In this presentation, a new project on Optimizing Cloud Seeding by Advanced Remote Sensing and Land Cover Modification (OCAL) is introduced, which is funded by the United Arab Emirates Rain Enhancement Program (UAEREP). This project has two research components. The first component focuses on an improved detection and forecasting of convergence zones and CI by a) operation of scanning Doppler lidar and cloud radar systems during two seasonal field campaigns in orographic terrain and over the desert in the UAE, and b) advanced forecasting of convergence zones and CI with the WRF-NOAHMP model system. Nowcasting to short-range forecasting of convection will be improved by the assimilation of Doppler lidar and the UAE radar network data. For the latter, we will apply a new model forward operator developed at our institute. Forecast uncertainties will be assessed by ensemble simulations driven by ECMWF boundaries. The second research component of OCAL will study whether artificial modifications of land surface heterogeneity are possible through plantations or changes of terrain, leading to an amplification of convergence zones. This is based on our pioneering work on high-resolution modeling of the impact of plantations on weather and climate in arid regions. A specific design of the shape and location of plantations can lead to the formation of convergence zones, which can

  15. Modulation of radiative heating by the Madden-Julian Oscillation and convectively coupled Kelvin waves as observed by CloudSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ding; Kuang, Zhiming

    2011-11-01

    The vertical distribution of radiative heating affects the moist static energy budget and potentially the maintenance and propagation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). This paper uses CloudSat data to examine the radiative heating climatology in the tropics and the vertical structure of its modulation by the MJO and convectively coupled Kelvin Waves (KWs). Composites of active regions of the MJO and KW both show positive radiative heating anomaly in the middle and lower troposphere and slightly negative radiative heating anomaly in upper troposphere. Such bottom-heavy profiles can help to strengthen the MJO while weaken the KWs. Another finding is that cloud condensate anomalies associated with the MJO are significantly more bottom-heavy than those of the KWs, while the radiative heating anomalies associated with the MJO are only very slightly more bottom-heavy.

  16. The Midcourse Space Experiment Infrared-Dark Cloud Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, S. J.; Egan, M. P.; Kuchar, T. A.; Mizuno, D.; Feldman, P. A.; Redman, R. O.; Price, S. D.

    2000-12-01

    We present a preliminary catalog of infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) that were identified in the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) Galactic Plane Survey images. These objects are clearly visible as absorption features against the diffuse Galactic emission in the 8.3 micron MSX images. IRDCs are cold (T CS, C18O and HCO+. IRDC have a wide variety of shapes from globule-like to filamentary. We will present the filling factors, fractal dimension and other morphological identifiers for the IRDCs. In particular, the fractal dimension will be compared to the dimensions of other components of the ISM including GMCs and infrared cirrus. Few IRDCs are associated with previously observed star formation tracers such as far-infrared point sources and maser emission. The catalog will be cross-referenced with published observations of star formation tracers and the properties of previously identified star forming regions will be contrasted with the new objects detected by MSX.

  17. On the Use of Deep Convective Clouds to Characterize Response versus Scan-angle for MODIS Reflective Solar Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, R.; Doelling, D. R.; Scarino, B. R.; Gopalan, A.; Haney, C.

    2016-12-01

    MODIS is a cross-track scanning radiometer with a two-sided scan mirror that images the Earth with an angular field of view of 55° on either side of the nadir. The reflectance of the scan mirror is not uniform and is a function of angle of incidence (AOI), as well as wavelength. This feature of the scan mirror is described by response versus scan-angle (RVS), and was characterized for all reflective solar bands (RSBs), for both MODIS instruments prior to launch. The RVS characteristic of the two MODIS instruments has changed on orbit and, therefore, must be tracked precisely over time to ensure high-quality data in the MODIS products. The MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) utilizes the onboard solar diffuser (SD) and lunar measurements to track the RVS changes at two fixed AOIs. The RVS at the remaining AOIs is characterized using the earth view (EV) responses from multiple pseudo-invariant desert sites located in Northern Africa. The drawback of this approach is the assumption that all of the desert sites imaged by the MODIS sensors at different AOIs are radiometrically stable during the same period of time. In addition, the desert samples do not always have continuous AOI coverage as they are limited by the 16-day repeat cycle of the satellite orbit, and by clear-sky conditions over the deserts. This paper proposes a novel and robust approach of characterizing the MODIS RVS using tropical deep convective clouds (DCCs) as an invariant calibration target. The method tracks the monthly DCC response at specified sets of AOIs to compute the temporal RVS changes. Because DCCs are distributed across the entirety of the tropics, they provide a continuum of AOI measurements. Initial results have shown that the Aqua-MODIS Collection 6 band 1 level 1b radiances show considerable residual, or artifact, RVS dependencies, especially on the left side of the cross-track scan. Long-term drifts, up to 2.3%, have been observed at certain AOIs. Temporal correction factors

  18. Simulation benchmark based on THAI-experiment on dissolution of a steam stratification by natural convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, M., E-mail: freitag@becker-technologies.com; Schmidt, E.; Gupta, S.; Poss, G.

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: . • We studied the generation and dissolution of steam stratification in natural convection. • We performed a computer code benchmark including blind and open phases. • The dissolution of stratification predicted only qualitatively by LP and CFD models during the blind simulation phase. - Abstract: Locally enriched hydrogen as in stratification may contribute to early containment failure in the course of severe nuclear reactor accidents. During accident sequences steam might accumulate as well to stratifications which can directly influence the distribution and ignitability of hydrogen mixtures in containments. An international code benchmark including Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Lumped Parameter (LP) codes was conducted in the frame of the German THAI program. Basis for the benchmark was experiment TH24.3 which investigates the dissolution of a steam layer subject to natural convection in the steam-air atmosphere of the THAI vessel. The test provides validation data for the development of CFD and LP models to simulate the atmosphere in the containment of a nuclear reactor installation. In test TH24.3 saturated steam is injected into the upper third of the vessel forming a stratification layer which is then mixed by a superposed thermal convection. In this paper the simulation benchmark will be evaluated in addition to the general discussion about the experimental transient of test TH24.3. Concerning the steam stratification build-up and dilution of the stratification, the numerical programs showed very different results during the blind evaluation phase, but improved noticeable during open simulation phase.

  19. INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE OF CLOUD ORIENTED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT DESIGN IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana G. Lytvynova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the foreign experience of designing of cloud oriented learning environments (COLE in general secondary education. The projects in Russia, Germany, Czech Republic, Australia, China, Israel, Africa, Singapore, Brazil, Egypt, Colombia and the United States are analyzed. The analysis of completed projects found out the common problems of implementing of cloud oriented learning environments (security of personal data, technical problems of integration of cloud environments with existing systems, and productivity of cloud services and their advantages for secondary education (mobility of participants, volumetric cloud data storage, universally accessibility, regular software updating, ease of use, etc..

  20. Evolution of particle composition in CLOUD nucleation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Keskinen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulphuric acid, ammonia, amines, and oxidised organics play a crucial role in nanoparticle formation in the atmosphere. In this study, we investigate the composition of nucleated nanoparticles formed from these compounds in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber experiments at CERN (Centre européen pour la recherche nucléaire. The investigation was carried out via analysis of the particle hygroscopicity, ethanol affinity, oxidation state, and ion composition. Hygroscopicity was studied by a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyser and a cloud condensation nuclei counter, ethanol affinity by an organic differential mobility analyser and particle oxidation level by a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer. The ion composition was studied by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The volume fraction of the organics in the particles during their growth from sizes of a few nanometers to tens of nanometers was derived from measured hygroscopicity assuming the Zdanovskii–Stokes–Robinson relationship, and compared to values gained from the spectrometers. The ZSR-relationship was also applied to obtain the measured ethanol affinities during the particle growth, which were used to derive the volume fractions of sulphuric acid and the other inorganics (e.g. ammonium salts. In the presence of sulphuric acid and ammonia, particles with a mobility diameter of 150 nm were chemically neutralised to ammonium sulphate. In the presence of oxidation products of pinanediol, the organic volume fraction of freshly nucleated particles increased from 0.4 to ~0.9, with an increase in diameter from 2 to 63 nm. Conversely, the sulphuric acid volume fraction decreased from 0.6 to 0.1 when the particle diameter increased from 2 to 50 nm. The results provide information on the composition of nucleated aerosol particles during their growth in the presence of various combinations of sulphuric acid

  1. Zero-gravity cloud physics laboratory: Experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, L. R.; Greco, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    The experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies on the zero G cloud physics laboratory are reported. This program involves the definition and development of an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and the selection and delineations of a set of candidate experiments that must utilize the unique environment of zero gravity or near zero gravity.

  2. Aerosols, clouds, and precipitation in the North Atlantic trades observed during the Barbados aerosol cloud experiment - Part 1: Distributions and variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunsil; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Feingold, Graham; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Chuang, Patrick; Donaher, Shaunna L.

    2016-07-01

    Shallow marine cumulus clouds are by far the most frequently observed cloud type over the Earth's oceans; but they are poorly understood and have not been investigated as extensively as stratocumulus clouds. This study describes and discusses the properties and variations of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed in the North Atlantic trades during a field campaign (Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment- BACEX, March-April 2010), which took place off Barbados where African dust periodically affects the region. The principal observing platform was the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter (TO) research aircraft, which was equipped with standard meteorological instruments, a zenith pointing cloud radar and probes that measured aerosol, cloud, and precipitation characteristics.The temporal variation and vertical distribution of aerosols observed from the 15 flights, which included the most intense African dust event during all of 2010 in Barbados, showed a wide range of aerosol conditions. During dusty periods, aerosol concentrations increased substantially in the size range between 0.5 and 10 µm (diameter), particles that are large enough to be effective giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The 10-day back trajectories showed three distinct air masses with distinct vertical structures associated with air masses originating in the Atlantic (typical maritime air mass with relatively low aerosol concentrations in the marine boundary layer), Africa (Saharan air layer), and mid-latitudes (continental pollution plumes). Despite the large differences in the total mass loading and the origin of the aerosols, the overall shapes of the aerosol particle size distributions were consistent, with the exception of the transition period.The TO was able to sample many clouds at various phases of growth. Maximum cloud depth observed was less than ˜ 3 km, while most clouds were less than 1 km

  3. Time-dependent, non-monotonic response of warm convective cloud fields to changes in aerosol loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.

    2017-06-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) with bin microphysics are used here to study cloud fields' sensitivity to changes in aerosol loading and the time evolution of this response. Similarly to the known response of a single cloud, we show that the mean field properties change in a non-monotonic trend, with an optimum aerosol concentration for which the field reaches its maximal water mass or rain yield. This trend is a result of competition between processes that encourage cloud development versus those that suppress it. However, another layer of complexity is added when considering clouds' impact on the field's thermodynamic properties and how this is dependent on aerosol loading. Under polluted conditions, rain is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to increase atmospheric instability. This results in warming of the lower part of the cloudy layer (in which there is net condensation) and cooling of the upper part (net evaporation). Evaporation at the upper part of the cloudy layer in the polluted simulations raises humidity at these levels and thus amplifies the development of the next generation of clouds (preconditioning effect). On the other hand, under clean conditions, the precipitating clouds drive net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer due to rain evaporation. These two effects act to stabilize the atmospheric boundary layer with time (consumption of the instability). The evolution of the field's thermodynamic properties affects the cloud properties in return, as shown by the migration of the optimal aerosol concentration toward higher values.

  4. Biomass-burning aerosol effects on convective cloud properties and in the detrained UTLS environment: a pyroCb case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D. A.; Kablick, G. P., III; Fromm, M. D.; Miller, S. D.; Partain, P.; Nedoluha, G. E.; Li, Z.

    2015-12-01

    On 5 August 2014 at approximately 1800 UTC, a wildfire complex (14WB-025) south of Great Slave Lake (GSL) in the North West Territories of Canada began producing a large pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb). The phenomena was captured at multiple times and viewing geometries from a large assortment of geostationary (GOES) and polar-orbiting (A-Train and Suomi-NPP) satellites. Between 1945 and 2000 UTC, a large anvil had formed atop the intensifying pyroCb, and at approximately 2020 UTC, the A-Train passed directly over the active pyroCb column. This overpass allowed for a rare penetration into the internal structure of this type of convection with nadir-viewing instruments: the CloudSat radar (94 GHz) and the CALIOP lidar (1064 and 532 nm). Thermal infrared (10.8 um) brightness temperatures from MODIS at the time of the A-Train overpass were lower than -60 C, which, in combination with the ~13.5 km height of the overshooting top observed by CALIOP, indicated penetration into the lower stratosphere. This presentation compares the aerosol-laden GSL pyroCb with a concurrent meteorological cumulonimbus (pristine environment, classical Cb) that developed within the same region. The large-scale synoptic conditions which preface the pyroCb and Cb formation are similar, but CloudSat and CALIOP indicate two very different internal convective structures, much of which may be attributable to aerosol loading. Many interesting aspects of this case study will be discussed, including: i) insights gained by the observations of the external morphology and internal convective structure by passive and active sensors, ii) the impact of the heavy smoke loading on pyroCb microphysics, iii) the long lifetime of the detrained pyroCb ice anvil compared to pristine environment Cb and iv) the increase in stratospheric water vapor from the detrained anvil.

  5. Automated Grid Monitoring for the LHCb Experiment Through HammerCloud

    CERN Document Server

    Dice, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    The HammerCloud system is used by CERN IT to monitor the status of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG). HammerCloud automatically submits jobs to WLCG computing resources, closely replicating the workflow of Grid users (e.g. physicists analyzing data). This allows computation nodes and storage resources to be monitored, software to be tested (somewhat like continuous integration), and new sites to be stress tested with a heavy job load before commissioning. The HammerCloud system has been in use for ATLAS and CMS experiments for about five years. This summer's work involved porting the HammerCloud suite of tools to the LHCb experiment. The HammerCloud software runs functional tests and provides data visualizations. HammerCloud's LHCb variant is written in Python, using the Django web framework and Ganga/DIRAC for job management.

  6. Cloud chamber experiments on the origin of ice crystal complexity in cirrus clouds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valery N Shcherbakov; Carl G Schmitt; Andrew J Heymsfield

    2016-01-01

    ...) cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). A new experimental procedure was applied to grow and sublimate ice particles at defined super- and subsaturated ice conditions and for temperatures in the -40 to -60-°C range...

  7. Dynamics of molecular clouds: observations, simulations, and NIF experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Jave O.; Martinez, David A.; Pound, Marc W.; Heeter, Robert F.; Casner, Alexis; Mancini, Roberto C.

    2015-02-01

    For over fifteen years astronomers at the University of Maryland and theorists and experimentalists at LLNL have investigated the origin and dynamics of the famous Pillars of the Eagle Nebula, and similar parsec-scale structures at the boundaries of HII regions in molecular hydrogen clouds. Eagle Nebula was selected as one of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Science programs, and has been awarded four NIF shots to study the cometary model of pillar formation. These experiments require a long-duration drive, 30 ns or longer, to drive deeply nonlinear ablative hydrodynamics. The NIF shots will feature a new long-duration x-ray source prototyped at the Omega EP laser, in which multiple hohlraums are driven with UV light in series for 10 ns each and reradiate the energy as an extended x-ray pulse. The new source will be used to illuminate a science package with directional radiation mimicking a cluster of stars. The scaled Omega EP shots tested whether a multi-hohlraum concept is viable — whether earlier time hohlraums would degrade later time hohlraums by preheat or by ejecting ablated plumes that would deflect the later beams. The Omega EP shots illuminated three 2.8 mm long by 1.4 mm diameter Cu hohlraums for 10 ns each with 4.3 kJ per hohlraum. At NIF each hohlraum will be 4 mm long by 3 mm in diameter and will be driven with 80 kJ per hohlraum.

  8. Macquarie Island Cloud and Radiation Experiment (MICRE) Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, RT [University of Washington; Protat, A [Australian Bureau of Meterology; Alexander, SP [Australian Antarctic Division

    2015-12-01

    Clouds over the Southern Ocean are poorly represented in present day reanalysis products and global climate model simulations. Errors in top-of-atmosphere (TOA) broadband radiative fluxes in this region are among the largest globally, with large implications for modeling both regional and global scale climate responses (e.g., Trenberth and Fasullo 2010, Ceppi et al. 2012). Recent analyses of model simulations suggest that model radiative errors in the Southern Ocean are due to a lack of low-level postfrontal clouds (including clouds well behind the front) and perhaps a lack of supercooled liquid water that contribute most to the model biases (Bodas-Salcedo et al. 2013, Huang et al. 2014). These assessments of model performance, as well as our knowledge of cloud and aerosol properties over the Southern Ocean, rely heavily on satellite data sets. Satellite data sets are incomplete in that the observations are not continuous (i.e., they are acquired only when the satellite passes nearby), generally do not sample the diurnal cycle, and view primarily the tops of cloud systems (especially for the passive instruments). This is especially problematic for retrievals of aerosol, low-cloud properties, and layers of supercooled water embedded within (rather than at the top of) clouds, as well as estimates of surface shortwave and longwave fluxes based on these properties.

  9. An Experience of Taiwan Policy Development To Accelerate Cloud Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chi Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available developing cloud computing is a key policy for government, while convenient service is an important issue for people living. In the beginning of 2010, the Taiwan Government has launched a “Cloud Computing Development Project”, and has devoted to service planning and investment activities. At the end of 2012, in a three-year comprehensive review and suggestion adoption from public and private sectors, the Taiwan Government adjusted the policy and rename as “Cloud Computing Application and Development Project”. From the perspectives of government application, industry development, and cloud open platform, this study describes how the vision drive goals and thinking push forward strategies. In the process of government and industry collaboration, it is progressively created value for cloud services. The Cloud Computing Project Management Office acts a key role as policy advisor, matching platform, and technical supporting to the achievements of (1 policy assessment and strategy enhancement; (2 construction of cloud open platform to the demand and supply linkage; (3 innovation and integration planning for government service application, leading to industry development.

  10. Airborne measurements of single particle refractory black carbon over the continental U.S. during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Gao, R.; Holloway, J. S.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) campaign was a large-scale, collaborative project, which took place in the continental U.S. in May and June of 2012. The goal of the campaign was to investigate the impacts of continental convection on the composition and chemistry of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere through a series of aircraft and ground-based measurements of atmospheric gases and particles. During DC3, a NOAA Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) instrument was utilized onboard NASA's DC8 research aircraft for measurements of refractory black carbon (rBC) in atmospheric particles with 1 second time resolution. Particles containing rBC are emitted into the atmosphere by incomplete combustion of fossil and bio fuel and hence are strongly linked to anthropogenic sources. These particles are of great importance because, among other effects, they increase the radiative forcing of the Earth's system through absorption of shortwave solar radiation in the troposphere, accelerate the rate of melting of arctic ice and snow by changing the albedo, and pose a respiratory and cardiovascular health risk in the boundary layer. Removal processes and timescales for rBC-containing particles are poorly constrained, which leads to high uncertainty in modeling of regional and global distributions. In this work, an overview of the NOAA SP2 measurements during DC3 is presented. Geographical variations in mass loadings and size distributions of rBC over the continental U.S. are discussed. Vertical profiles of rBC concentrations are generated and, in conjunction with carbon monoxide (CO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) mixing ratios, are used to investigate the impacts of cloud convection and storm processing on the removal of rBC-containing particles from convected air masses. Comparisons of rBC mass loadings with acetonitrile (CH3CN) and CO mixing ratios are made to identify biomass burning plumes from wild fires originating in Colorado and New Mexico, and to

  11. Optimized Setup for 2D Convection Experiments in Thin Liquid Films

    CERN Document Server

    Winkler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel experimental setup to investigate two-dimensional thermal convection in a freestanding thin liquid film. We develop a setup for the reproducible generation of freestanding thin liquid films. Such films can be produced in a controlled way on the scale of 5 to 1000 nanometers. Our primary goal is to investigate the statistics of reversals in Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection with varying aspect ratio; here numerical works are quite expensive and 3D experiments prohibitively complicated and costly. However, as well questions regarding the physics of liquid films under controlled conditions can be investigated, like surface forces, or stability under varying thermodynamical parameters. The thin liquid film has a well-defined and -chosen chemistry in order to fit our particular requirements, it has a thickness to area ratio of approximately 10^8 and is supported by a frame which is adjustable in height and width to vary the aspect ratio from 0.16 to 10. The top and bottom frame elements can be set to...

  12. The genesis of Typhoon Nuri as observed during the Tropical Cyclone Structure 2008 (TCS08 field experiment – Part 2: Observations of the convective environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Smith

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of thermodynamic data gathered from airborne dropwindsondes during the Tropical Cyclone Structure (2008 experiment are presented for the disturbance that became Typhoon Nuri. Although previous work has suggested that Nuri formed within the protective recirculating "pouch" region of a westward propagating wave-like disturbance and implicated rotating deep convective clouds in driving the inflow to spin up the tangential circulation of the system-scale flow, the nature of the thermodynamic environment that supported the genesis remains a topic of debate. During the genesis phase, vertical profiles of virtual potential temperature show little variability between soundings on a particular day and the system-average soundings likewise show a negligible change. There is a tendency also for the lower and middle troposphere to moisten. However, the data show that, on the scale of the recirculating region of the disturbance, there was no noticeable reduction of virtual temperature in the lower troposphere, but a small warming (less than 1 K in the upper troposphere. Vertical profiles of pseudo-equivalent potential temperature, θe, during the genesis show a modestly decreasing deficit of θe in the vertical between the surface and the height of minimum θe (between 3 and 4 km, from 17.5 K to 15.2 K. The findings reported here are consistent with those found for developing disturbances observed in the Pre-Depression Investigation of Cloud Systems in the Tropics (PREDICT experiment in 2010. Some implications of the findings are discussed.

  13. Remote sensing of severe convective storms over Qinghai-Xizang Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Liu, J. M.; Tsao, D. Y.; Smith, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    The American satellite, GOES-1 was moved to the Indian Ocean at 58 deg E during the First GARP Global Experiment (FGGE). The Qinghai-Xizang Plateau significantly affects the initiation and development of heavy rainfall and severe storms in China, just as the Rocky Mountains influence the local storms in the United States. Satelite remote sensing of short-lived, meso-scale convective storms is particularly important for covering a huge area of a high elevation with a low population density, such as the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau. Results of this study show that a high growth rate of the convective clouds, followed by a rapid collapse of the cloud top, is associated with heavy rainfall in the area. The tops of the convective clouds developed over the Plateau lie between the altitudes of the two tropopauses, while the tops of convective clouds associated with severe storms in the United States usually extend much above the tropopause.

  14. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Morrison, Hugh; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Michael J.; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel A. J.; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, Michael R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana E.; von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey B.; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, Gong

    2009-02-02

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed average liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the average mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics suggest that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics.

  15. Surface Deformation by Thermo-capillary Convection -Sounding Rocket COMPERE Experiment SOURCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Eckart; Dreyer, Michael E.

    The sounding rocket COMPERE experiment SOURCE was successfully flown on MASER 11, launched in Kiruna (ESRANGE), May 15th, 2008. SOURCE has been intended to partly ful-fill the scientific objectives of the European Space Agency (ESA) Microgravity Applications Program (MAP) project AO-2004-111 (Convective boiling and condensation). Three parties of principle investigators have been involved to design the experiment set-up: ZARM for thermo-capillary flows, IMFT (Toulouse, France) for boiling studies, EADS Astrium (Bremen, Ger-many) for depressurization. The scientific aims are to study the effect of wall heat flux on the contact line of the free liquid surface and to obtain a correlation for a convective heat transfer coefficient. The experiment has been conducted along a predefined time line. A preheating sequence at ground was the first operation to achieve a well defined temperature evolution within the test cell and its environment inside the rocket. Nearly one minute after launch, the pressurized test cell was filled with the test liquid HFE-7000 until a certain fill level was reached. Then the free surface could be observed for 120 s without distortion. Afterwards, the first depressurization was started to induce subcooled boiling, the second one to start saturated boiling. The data from the flight consists of video images and temperature measurements in the liquid, the solid, and the gaseous phase. Data analysis provides the surface shape versus time and the corresponding apparent contact angle. Computational analysis provides information for the determination of the heat transfer coefficient in a compensated gravity environment where a flow is caused by the temperature difference between the hot wall and the cold liquid. Correlations for the effective contact angle and the heat transfer coefficient shall be delivered as a function of the relevant dimensionsless parameters. The data will be used for benchmarking of commercial CFD codes and the tank design

  16. Application verification research of cloud computing technology in the field of real time aerospace experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Junwei; Chen, Hongyan; Zhao, Jing

    2017-08-01

    According to the requirements of real-time, reliability and safety for aerospace experiment, the single center cloud computing technology application verification platform is constructed. At the IAAS level, the feasibility of the cloud computing technology be applied to the field of aerospace experiment is tested and verified. Based on the analysis of the test results, a preliminary conclusion is obtained: Cloud computing platform can be applied to the aerospace experiment computing intensive business. For I/O intensive business, it is recommended to use the traditional physical machine.

  17. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hohenegger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM. Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle.

    Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and mid-latitude continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  18. Characterization of mantle convection experiments using two-point correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puster, Peter; Jordan, Thomas H.; Hager, Bradford H.

    1995-04-01

    Snapshots of the temperature T(r, phi, t), horizontal flow velocity u(r, phi, t), and radial flow velocity w(r, phi, t) obtained from numerical convection experiments of time-dependent flows in annular cylindrical geometry are taken to be samples of stationary, rotationally invariant random fields. For such a field f(r, phi, t), the spatio-temporal two-point correlation function, C(sub ff)(r, r-prime, delta, t(sub *)), is constructed by averaging over rotational transformations of this ensemble. To assess the structural differences among mantle convection experiments we construct three spartial subfunctions of C(sub ff)(r, r-prime, delta, t(sub *)): the rms variation, sigma(sub f)(r), the radial correlation function, R(sub f)(r, r-prime), and the angular correlation function, A(sub f)(r, delta). R(sub f)(r, r-prime) and A(sub f)(r, r-prime) are symmetric about the loci r = r-prime and delta = 0, respectively, where they achieve their maximum value of unity. The falloff of R(sub f) and A(sub f) away from their symmetry can be quantified by a correlation length rho(sub f)(r) and a correlation angle alpha(sub f)(r), which we define to be the half widths of the central peaks at the correlation level 0.75. The behavior of rho(sub f) is a diagnostic of radial structure, while alpha(sub f) measures average plume width. We have used two-point correlation functions of the temperature field (T-diagnostics) and flow velocity fields (V-diagnostics) to quantify some important aspects of mantle convection experiments. We explore the dependence of different correlation diagnostics on Rayleigh number, internal heating rate, and depth- and temperature-dependent viscosity. For isoviscous flows in an annulus, we show how radial averages of sigma(sub T), rho(sub T), and alpha(sub T) scale with Rayleigh number for various internal heating rates. A break in the power-law relationship at the transition from steady to time-dependent regimes is evident for rho(sub T) and alpha(sub T) but

  19. A methodology to determine boundary conditions from forced convection experiments using liquid crystal thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakkareddy, Pradeep S.; Balaji, C.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental study to estimate the heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient using liquid crystal thermography and Bayesian inference in a heat generating sphere, enclosed in a cubical Teflon block. The geometry considered for the experiments comprises a heater inserted in a hollow hemispherical aluminium ball, resulting in a volumetric heat generation source that is placed at the center of the Teflon block. Calibrated thermochromic liquid crystal sheets are used to capture the temperature distribution at the front face of the Teflon block. The forward model is the three dimensional conduction equation which is solved within the Teflon block to obtain steady state temperatures, using COMSOL. Match up experiments are carried out for various velocities by minimizing the residual between TLC and simulated temperatures for every assumed loss coefficient, to obtain a correlation of average Nusselt number against Reynolds number. This is used for prescribing the boundary condition for the solution to the forward model. A surrogate model obtained by artificial neural network built upon the data from COMSOL simulations is used to drive a Markov Chain Monte Carlo based Metropolis Hastings algorithm to generate the samples. Bayesian inference is adopted to solve the inverse problem for determination of heat flux and heat transfer coefficient from the measured temperature field. Point estimates of the posterior like the mean, maximum a posteriori and standard deviation of the retrieved heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient are reported. Additionally the effect of number of samples on the performance of the estimation process has been investigated.

  20. A methodology to determine boundary conditions from forced convection experiments using liquid crystal thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakkareddy, Pradeep S.; Balaji, C.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental study to estimate the heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient using liquid crystal thermography and Bayesian inference in a heat generating sphere, enclosed in a cubical Teflon block. The geometry considered for the experiments comprises a heater inserted in a hollow hemispherical aluminium ball, resulting in a volumetric heat generation source that is placed at the center of the Teflon block. Calibrated thermochromic liquid crystal sheets are used to capture the temperature distribution at the front face of the Teflon block. The forward model is the three dimensional conduction equation which is solved within the Teflon block to obtain steady state temperatures, using COMSOL. Match up experiments are carried out for various velocities by minimizing the residual between TLC and simulated temperatures for every assumed loss coefficient, to obtain a correlation of average Nusselt number against Reynolds number. This is used for prescribing the boundary condition for the solution to the forward model. A surrogate model obtained by artificial neural network built upon the data from COMSOL simulations is used to drive a Markov Chain Monte Carlo based Metropolis Hastings algorithm to generate the samples. Bayesian inference is adopted to solve the inverse problem for determination of heat flux and heat transfer coefficient from the measured temperature field. Point estimates of the posterior like the mean, maximum a posteriori and standard deviation of the retrieved heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient are reported. Additionally the effect of number of samples on the performance of the estimation process has been investigated.

  1. Cloud chamber experiments on the origin of ice crystal complexity in cirrus clouds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Schnaiter; E. Järvinen; P. Vochezer; A. Abdelmonem; R. Wagner; O. Jourdan; G. Mioche; V. N. Shcherbakov; C. G. Schmitt; U. Tricoli; Z. Ulanowski; A. J. Heymsfield

    2015-01-01

    ...) cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). A new experimental procedure was applied to grow and sublimate ice particles at defined super- and subsaturated ice conditions and for temperatures in the −40 to −60 °C range...

  2. Experiments Using a Ground-Based Electrostatic Levitator and Numerical Modeling of Melt Convection for the Iron-Cobalt System in Support of Space Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghyun; SanSoucie, Michael P.

    2017-08-01

    Materials research is being conducted using an electromagnetic levitator installed in the International Space Station. Various metallic alloys were tested to elucidate unknown links among the structures, processes, and properties. To accomplish the mission of these space experiments, several ground-based activities have been carried out. This article presents some of our ground-based supporting experiments and numerical modeling efforts. Mass evaporation of Fe50Co50, one of flight compositions, was predicted numerically and validated by the tests using an electrostatic levitator (ESL). The density of various compositions within the Fe-Co system was measured with ESL. These results are being served as reference data for the space experiments. The convection inside a electromagnetically-levitated droplet was also modeled to predict the flow status, shear rate, and convection velocity under various process parameters, which is essential information for designing and analyzing the space experiments of some flight compositions influenced by convection.

  3. Cloud Experiment. View inside the chamber with Jasper Kirkby, Head leader of the project.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    CLOUD, the cutting-edge physics experiment that will shed light on climate-related matters, has finished its assembly phase and is starting taking data using a beam of protons from the Proton Synchrotron.

  4. X-Ray Shadowing Experiments Toward Infrared Dark Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L. E.; Snowden, S.; Bania, T. M.

    2009-01-01

    We searched for X-ray shadowing toward two infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) using the MOS detectors on XMM-Newton to learn about the Galactic distribution of X-ray emitting plasma. IRDCs make ideal X-ray shadowing targets of 3/4 keY photons due to their high column densities, relatively large angular sizes, and known kinematic distances. Here we focus on two clouds near 30 deg Galactic longitude at distances of 2 and 5 kpc from the Sun. We derive the foreground and background column densities of molecular and atomic gas in the direction of the clouds. We find that the 3/4 ke V emission must be distributed throughout the Galactic disk. It is therefore linked to the structure of the cooler material of the ISM, and to the birth of stars.

  5. Multiparameter radar and aircraft based studies of microphysical, kinematic, and electrical structure of convective clouds during CaPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringi, V. N.

    1994-03-01

    Two storms from the 9 August, 1991 CaPE case were analyzed in-depth focusing on multiparameter radar signature evolution over 60 min. in coordination with 24 aircraft penetrations which provided particle image and electric field data together with vertical air motion, cloud water and other state parameters. A total of five discrete 'cells' were identified in the two storms and their life cycle fully documented. Collaboration with South Dakota School of Mines and University of Alabama at Huntsville has resulted in a full integration of aircraft image and field mill data (from SDSM&T T-28 aircraft) with vertical air motion from dual-Doppler wind synthesis (UAH). The cellular evolution starts with a warm rain phase where updrafts and a very low concentration of large drops dominate the cloud. As the supercooled drops rise in the updraft they freeze and acquire a water-coat possibly by collisions with other liquid drops. The multi-parameter radar signatures clearly identify this mixed-phase zone. The cloud thereafter gets electrified which may intensify to produce lightning depending on cloud vertical growth, and generation of updraft/ downdrafts.

  6. Heat Transfer by Thermo-capillary Convection -Sounding Rocket COMPERE Experiment SOURCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Michael; Fuhrmann, Eckart

    The sounding rocket COMPERE experiment SOURCE was successfully flown on MASER 11, launched in Kiruna (ESRANGE), May 15th, 2008. SOURCE has been intended to partly ful-fill the scientific objectives of the European Space Agency (ESA) Microgravity Applications Program (MAP) project AO-2004-111 (Convective boiling and condensation). Three parties of principle investigators have been involved to design the experiment set-up: ZARM for thermo-capillary flows, IMFT (Toulouse, France) for boiling studies, EADS Astrium (Bremen, Ger-many) for depressurization. The topic of this paper is to study the effect of wall heat flux on the contact line of the free liquid surface and to obtain a correlation for a convective heat trans-fer coefficient. The experiment has been conducted along a predefined time line. A preheating sequence at ground was the first operation to achieve a well defined temperature evolution within the test cell and its environment inside the rocket. Nearly one minute after launch, the pressurized test cell was filled with the test liquid HFE-7000 until a certain fill level was reached. Then the free surface could be observed for 120 s without distortion. Afterwards, the first depressurization was started to induce subcooled boiling, the second one to start saturated boiling. The data from the flight consists of video images and temperature measurements in the liquid, the solid, and the gaseous phase. Data analysis provides the surface shape versus time and the corresponding apparent contact angle. Computational analysis provides information for the determination of the heat transfer coefficient in a compensated gravity environment where a flow is caused by the temperature difference between the hot wall and the cold liquid. The paper will deliver correlations for the effective contact angle and the heat transfer coefficient as a function of the relevant dimensionsless parameters as well as physical explanations for the observed behavior. The data will be used

  7. FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC EXPERIENCE OF INTEGRATING CLOUD COMPUTING INTO PEDAGOGICAL PROCESS OF HIGHER EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia A. Khmil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present article foreign and domestic experience of integrating cloud computing into pedagogical process of higher educational establishments (H.E.E. has been generalized. It has been stated that nowadays a lot of educational services are hosted in the cloud, e.g. infrastructure as a service (IaaS, platform as a service (PaaS and software as a service (SaaS. The peculiarities of implementing cloud technologies by H.E.E. in Ukraine and abroad have been singled out; the products developed by the leading IT companies for using cloud computing in higher education system, such as Microsoft for Education, Google Apps for Education and Amazon AWS Educate have been reviewed. The examples of concrete types, methods and forms of learning and research work based on cloud services have been provided.

  8. In-lab in-line digital holography for cloud particle measurement experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaiqi; Ji, Feng; Li, Liang; Li, Baosheng; Ma, Fei

    2016-10-01

    In terms of climate science, getting the accurate cloud particle sizes, shape and number distributions is necessary for searching the influence of cloud on the environment, radiative transfer, remote sensing measurements and understanding precipitation formation. Many methods and instruments have been developed to measure cloud particles, yet there is still restricted to one-dimensional or two-dimensional projections of particle positions, unable to get the three-dimensional information of the spatial distribution of particles. In-line holography is particularly useful for particles field measurements, because it can directly get the three-dimensional information of the particles and quickly access and storage holographic image. In this paper, the main work is using digital in-line holographic system to measure simulated cloud particles in the laboratory. For digital recording hologram reconstructing, we consider the image intensity in conjunction with the edge sharpness of the particles, to obtain an automatically selected threshold of each particle. Using the threshold, we can get a binary image to identify the particles and separate the particles from background, and then get the information such as the location, shape, particle size of particles. The experimental results show that the in-line digital holography can be used to detect the cloud particles, which can gain many parameters of the simulated cloud particles in the plane perpendicular to the optical axis, and can estimate volume parameters of the simulated cloud particles. This experiment is a basis for the further in situ detection of atmospheric cloud particles.

  9. Comprehensive Radar Observations of Clouds and Precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau and Preliminary Analysis of Cloud Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Intensive fi eld experiment is an important approach to obtain microphysical information about clouds and precipitation. From 1 July to 31 August 2014, the third Tibetan Plateau Atmospheric Science Experiment was carried out and comprehensive measurements of water vapor, clouds, and precipitation were conducted at Naqu. The most advanced radars in China, such as Ka-band millimeter-wave cloud radar, Ku-band micro-rain radar, C-band continuous-wave radar and lidar, and microwave radiometer and disdrometer were deployed to observe high spatial-temporal vertical structures of clouds and precipitation. The C-band dual-linear polarization radar was coordinated with the China new generation weather radar to constitute a dual-Doppler radar system for the measurements of three-dimensional wind fi elds within convective precipitations and the structure and evolution of hydrometeors related to precipitation process. Based on the radar measurements in this experiment, the diurnal variations of several important cloud properties were analyzed, including cloud top and base, cloud depth, cloud cover, number of cloud layers, and their vertical structures during summertime over Naqu. The features of refl ectivity, velocity, and depolarization ratio for diff erent types of clouds observed by cloud radar are discussed. The results indicate that the cloud properties were successfully measured by using various radars in this fi eld experiment. During the summertime over Naqu, most of the clouds were located above 6 km and below 4 km above ground level. Statistical analysis shows that total amounts of clouds, the top of high-level clouds, and cloud depth, all demonstrated a distinct diurnal variation. Few clouds formed at 1000 LST (local standard time), whereas large amounts of clouds formed at 2000 LST. Newly formed cumulus and stratus clouds were often found at 3-km height, where there existed signifi cant updrafts. Deep convection reached up to 16.5 km (21 km above the mean sea level

  10. An Analysis of Thermally-Related Surface Rainfall Budgets Associated with Convective and Stratiform Rainfall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yushu; Xiaofan LI

    2011-01-01

    Both water vapor and heat processes play key roles in producing surface rainfall.While the water vapor effects of sea surface temperature and cloud radiative and microphysical processes on surface rainfall have been investigated in previous studies,the thermal effects on rainfall are analyzed in this study using a series of two-dimensional equilibrium cloud-resolving model experiments forced by zonally-uniform,constant,large-scale zonal wind and zero large-scale vertical velocity.The analysis of thermally-related surface rainfall budget reveals that the model domain mean surface rain rate is primarily associated with the mean infrared cooling rate.Convective rainfall and transport of hydrometeor concentration from convective regions to raining stratiform regions corresponds to the heat divergence over convective regions,whereas stratiform rainfall corresponds to the transport of hydrometeor concentration from convective regions and heat divergence over raining stratiform regions.The heat divergence over convective regions is mainly balanced by the heat convergence over rainfall-free regions,which is,in turn,offset by the radiative cooling over rainfall-free regions.The sensitivity experiments of rainfall to the effects of sea surface temperature and cloud radiative and microphysical processes show that the sea surface temperature and cloud processes affect convective rainfall through the changes in infrared cooling rate over rainfall-free regions and transport rate of heat from convective regions to rainfall-free regions.

  11. Convectively Aggregated Structures Across a Hierarchy of Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvers, Levi; Dipankar, Anurag; Hohenegger, Cathy

    2015-04-01

    Convective clouds are among the most interesting and poorest understood atmospheric phenomena. This study explores the interaction between deep convection and the lower troposphere with a focus on the coupling of deep convection to the lower tropospheric clouds, water vapor, and relative humidity. We are particularly interested in the controlling factors of the cloud amount and cloud size at cloud base across various model set-ups. In particular we seek to determine how the generation of large convective structures depends on the characteristics of the lower troposphere and parameterization choices. Our experiments are analyzed by comparing the mean state, the probability distribution functions of particular quantities, and snapshots in time of the spatial distribution of cloud related fields. It is shown that the formation of aggregated convective structures depends on the different model setups. Experiments performed using an NWP model (ICON-NWP) and two cloud-resolving models (ICON-LES and UCLA-LES) are compared. The ICOsahedral Nonhydrostatic (ICON) model is used to provide a unified modeling framework in which both the NWP and CRM versions use the same dynamical core but different physics packages. This allows for a fair comparison between the GCM and CRM and leads to a better understanding of both. To check the robustness of the CRM results we also compare the ICON experiments with the UCLA-LES model. The initial analysis looks at the ICON-NWP and both CRM experiments with a uniform domain size of (1800 km)2 and doubly periodic boundary conditions to determine some of the fundamental differences between the models. The NWP experiment has an effective resolution of 13.5 km while the CRM's have resolutions in the range of 5 km. We run the NWP experiments with the full suit of physics parameterizations as well as with the convection turned off. Further sensitivity studies are then made to isolate some of the key characteristics of the convection in each model

  12. The Atmospheric Energy Budget and Large-Scale Precipitation Efficiency of Convective Systems during TOGA COARE, GATE, SCSMEX, and ARM: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, W.-K.; Johnson, D.; Shie, C.-L.; Simpson, J.

    2004-10-01

    A two-dimensional version of the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model is used to simulate convective systems that developed in various geographic locations (east Atlantic, west Pacific, South China Sea, and Great Plains in the United States). Observed large-scale advective tendencies for potential temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and horizontal momentum derived from field campaigns are used as the main forcing. The atmospheric temperature and water vapor budgets from the model results show that the two largest terms are net condensation (heating/drying) and imposed large-scale forcing (cooling/moistening) for tropical oceanic cases though not for midlatitude continental cases. These two terms are opposite in sign, however, and are not the dominant terms in the moist static energy budget.The balance between net radiation, surface latent heat flux, and net condensational heating vary in these tropical cases, however. For cloud systems that developed over the South China Sea and eastern Atlantic, net radiation (cooling) is not negligible in the temperature budget; it is as large as 20% of the net condensation. However, shortwave heating and longwave cooling are in balance with each other for cloud systems over the west Pacific region such that the net radiation is very small. This is due to the thick anvil clouds simulated in the cloud systems over the Pacific region. The large-scale advection of moist static energy is negative, as a result of a larger absolute value of large-scale advection of sensible heat (cooling) compared to large-scale latent heat (moistening) advection in the Pacific and Atlantic cases. For three cloud systems that developed over a midlatitude continent, the net radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes play a much more important role. This means that the accurate measurement of surface fluxes and radiation is crucial for simulating these midlatitude cases.The results showed that large-scale mean (multiday) precipitation efficiency

  13. First identification of sub- and supercritical convection patterns from ‘GeoFlow’, the geophysical flow simulation experiment integrated in Fluid Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futterer, B.; Egbers, C.; Dahley, N.; Koch, S.; Jehring, L.

    2010-01-01

    Physical mechanisms of thermally driven rotating fluids are important for a large number of geophysical problems, e.g. to explain the convection of the Earth's liquid outer core. Objective of the 'GeoFlow' experiment is to study stability, pattern formation, and transition to chaos of thermal convection in fluid-filled concentric, co-axially rotating spheres. This experiment is integrated in the Fluid Science Laboratory of the European COLUMBUS module on International Space Station. Fluid dynamics of the experiment was predicted with numerical simulations by means of a spectral code. In the non-rotating case the onset of convection bifurcated into steady fluid flow. Here patterns of convection showed co-existing states with axisymmetric, cubic and pentagonal modes. Transition to chaos was in the form of sudden onset. For the thermal convection in rotating spheres the onset of first instability showed an increase of modes for higher parameter regime. Transition was from steady via periodic to chaotic behaviour. Convection patterns of the experiment are observed with the Wollaston shearing interferometry. Images are in terms of interferograms with fringe patterns corresponding to special convective flows. A first glance at the images showed the classification of sub- and supercritical flow regimes. Aligned with numerical data a shift between experiment and numerical simulation was identified. Identification of convection patterns in interferograms was demonstrated for the example of a supercritical flow.

  14. Ensemble cloud-resolving modelling of a historic back-building mesoscale convective system over Liguria: the San Fruttuoso case of 1915

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Antonio; Ferraris, Luca; Gallus, William; Maugeri, Maurizio; Molini, Luca; Siccardi, Franco; Boni, Giorgio

    2017-05-01

    Highly localized and persistent back-building mesoscale convective systems represent one of the most dangerous flash-flood-producing storms in the north-western Mediterranean area. Substantial warming of the Mediterranean Sea in recent decades raises concerns over possible increases in frequency or intensity of these types of events as increased atmospheric temperatures generally support increases in water vapour content. However, analyses of the historical record do not provide a univocal answer, but these are likely affected by a lack of detailed observations for older events. In the present study, 20th Century Reanalysis Project initial and boundary condition data in ensemble mode are used to address the feasibility of performing cloud-resolving simulations with 1 km horizontal grid spacing of a historic extreme event that occurred over Liguria: the San Fruttuoso case of 1915. The proposed approach focuses on the ensemble Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model runs that show strong convergence over the Ligurian Sea (17 out of 56 members) as these runs are the ones most likely to best simulate the event. It is found that these WRF runs generally do show wind and precipitation fields that are consistent with the occurrence of highly localized and persistent back-building mesoscale convective systems, although precipitation peak amounts are underestimated. Systematic small north-westward position errors with regard to the heaviest rain and strongest convergence areas imply that the reanalysis members may not be adequately representing the amount of cool air over the Po Plain outflowing into the Ligurian Sea through the Apennines gap. Regarding the role of historical data sources, this study shows that in addition to reanalysis products, unconventional data, such as historical meteorological bulletins, newspapers, and even photographs, can be very valuable sources of knowledge in the reconstruction of past extreme events.

  15. Density driven convection with dissolution in porous media: experiment, simulation and linear stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xuhui; Yang, Xiaofan; Guo, Zhaoli

    2016-11-01

    Geological storage of the CO2 in subsurface saline aquifers is a promising way to reduce CO2 emissions. During this process, CO2 first dissolves into pure brine. Then the acidic and denser mixture falls down under the gravity and reacts with the rock. In the present work, a microfluidic experiment is conducted to investigate the density-driven convection with dissolution in porous media. Moreover, the linear stability analysis and numerical simulations are further performed to investigate the interfacial instability. The results demonstrate that front instability can be triggered by the density contrast between the two miscible fluids, leading to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. While this type of instability can be suppressed by the surface reaction between the fluid and solid phases, which prevents the transport of the denser fluid to the deeper region at the beginning. Over the long term, it is found that the interfacial instability can be influenced by the evolution of the porosity due to the dissolution, which will drive the transport of denser fluid further down. Our investigation shows that the transport of the reactive fluid in porous media depends on the competition among the density contrast, the chemical reaction rate and the evolution of the porosity/permeability.

  16. New particle-dependent parameterizations of heterogeneous freezing processes: sensitivity studies of convective clouds with an air parcel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Diehl

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the outcome of laboratory results, new particle-dependent parameterizations of heterogeneous freezing were derived and used to improve and extend a two-dimensional spectral microphysics scheme. They include (1 a particle-type dependent parameterization of immersion freezing using the numbers of active sites per mass, (2 a particle-type and size-resolved parameterization of contact freezing, and (3 a particle-type dependent description of deposition freezing. The modified microphysical scheme was embedded in an adiabatic air parcel model with entrainment. Sensitivity studies were performed to simulate convective situations and the impact of ice nuclei concentrations and types on ice formation. As a central diagnostic parameter the ice water fraction IWF was selected which is the relation of the ice water content to the total water content. The following parameters were varied: initial aerosol particle number size distributions, types of ice nucleating particles, strength of convection, and the fractions of potential ice nucleating particles. Single and coupled freezing processes were investigated. The results show that immersion freezing seems to be the most efficient process and, in competition with contact freezing, the dominant process. Contact freezing is constrained by the collision kernel between supercooled drops and potential ice nucleating particles and becomes relevant at temperatures lower than −25 °C. The importance of deposition freezing lies in secondary ice formation, i.e. small ice particles produced by deposition nucleation trigger the freezing of supercooled drops by collisions. Thus, a broader ice particle spectrum is generated than by immersion and contact freezing. Competition of contact and deposition freezing is negligible because of involved particle sizes. As already suggested in literature, mineral dust particles seem to be the most important ice nucleating particles. Biological particles are probably not

  17. Experiment on mass-stripping of interstellar cloud following shock passage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J F; Robey, H F; Klein, R I; Miles, A R

    2006-10-17

    The interaction of supernova shocks and interstellar clouds is an important astrophysical phenomenon which can lead to mass-stripping (transfer of material from cloud to surrounding flow, ''mass-loading'' the flow) and possibly increase the compression in the cloud to high enough densities to trigger star formation. Our experiments attempt to simulate and quantify the mass-stripping as it occurs when a shock passes through interstellar clouds. We drive a strong shock using 5 kJ of the 30 kJ Omega laser into a cylinder filled with low-density foam with an embedded 120 {micro}m Al sphere simulating an interstellar cloud. The density ratio between Al and foam is {approx} 9. Time-resolved x-ray radiographs show the cloud getting compressed by the shock (t {approx} 5 ns), undergoing a classical Kelvin-Helmholtz roll-up (12 ns) followed by a Widnall instability (30 ns), an inherently 3d effect that breaks the 2d symmetry of the experiment. Material is continuously being stripped from the cloud at a rate which is shown to be inconsistent with laminar models for mass-stripping (the cloud is fully stripped by 80 ns-100 ns, ten times faster than the laminar model). We present a new model for turbulent mass-stripping that agrees with the observed rate and which should scale to astrophysical conditions, which occur at even higher Reynolds numbers than the current experiment. The new model combines the integral momentum equations, potential flow past a sphere, flat plate skin friction coefficients, and Spalding's law of the wall for turbulent boundary layers.

  18. The halt of deep convection in the Greenland Sea: A natural experiment for the study of their causes and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somavilla Cabrillo, Raquel; Schauer, Ursula; Budeus, Gedeon; Latarius, Katrin

    2015-04-01

    There are only a few sites where the deep ocean is ventilated from the surface. The responsible process known as deep convection is recognized to be a key process on the Earth's climate system, but still it is scarcely observed, and its good representation by global oceanographic and climate models remains unclear. In the Arctic Ocean, the halt of deep convection in the Greenland Sea during the last three decades serves as a natural experiment to study: (1) the conditions that drive the occurrence or not of deep convection and (2) the effects of the halt of deep convection on the thermohaline properties of the deep water masses and circulation both locally and in adjacent ocean basins. Combining oceanic and atmospheric in-situ data together with reanalysis data, we observe that not only on average the winter net heat losses from the ocean to the atmosphere (Qo) have decreased during the last three decades in the Greenland Sea (ΔQo (before the 1980s- after the 1980s) = 25 Wm-2) but the intensity and number of strong cooling events (Qo ≥ 800Wm-2). This last value for convection reaching 2000 m in the Greenland Sea seems critical to make the mixed layer deepening from being a non-penetrative process to one arrested by baroclinic instabilities. Besides, changes in the wind stress curl and preconditioning for deep convection have occurred, hindering also the occurrence of deep convection. Concerning the effects of the halt of deep convection, hydrographic data reveal that the temperature between 2000 meters depth and the sea floor has risen by 0.3 °C in the last 30 years, which is ten times higher than the temperature increase in the global ocean on average, and salinity rose by 0.02 because import of relatively warm and salty Arctic Ocean deep waters continued. The necessary transports to explain the observed changes suggest an increase of Arctic Ocean deep water transport that would have compensated the decrease in deep water formation rate after the 1980s. The

  19. Chemical composition of ambient aerosol, ice residues and cloud droplet residues in mixed-phase clouds: single particle analysis during the Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kamphus

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Two different single particle mass spectrometers were operated in parallel at the Swiss High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch (JFJ, 3580 m a.s.l. during the Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6 in February and March 2007. During mixed phase cloud events ice crystals from 5 μm up to 20 μm were separated from large ice aggregates, non-activated, interstitial aerosol particles and supercooled droplets using an Ice-Counterflow Virtual Impactor (Ice-CVI. During one cloud period supercooled droplets were additionally sampled and analyzed by changing the Ice-CVI setup. The small ice particles and droplets were evaporated by injection into dry air inside the Ice-CVI. The resulting ice and droplet residues (IR and DR were analyzed for size and composition by two single particle mass spectrometers: a custom-built Single Particle Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SPLAT and a commercial Aerosol Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS, TSI Model 3800. During CLACE 6 the SPLAT instrument characterized 355 individual ice residues that produced a mass spectrum for at least one polarity and the ATOFMS measured 152 particles. The mass spectra were binned in classes, based on the combination of dominating substances, such as mineral dust, sulfate, potassium and elemental carbon or organic material. The derived chemical information from the ice residues is compared to the JFJ ambient aerosol that was sampled while the measurement station was out of clouds (several thousand particles analyzed by SPLAT and ATOFMS and to the composition of the residues of supercooled cloud droplets (SPLAT: 162 cloud droplet residues analyzed, ATOFMS: 1094. The measurements showed that mineral dust particles were strongly enhanced in the ice particle residues. 57% of the SPLAT spectra from ice residues were dominated by signatures from mineral compounds, and 78% of the ATOFMS spectra. Sulfate and nitrate containing particles were strongly

  20. ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, L. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Prather, K. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Ralph, R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Washington, DC (United States); Rosenfeld, D. [The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Spackman, R. [Science and Technology Corporation (STC), Hampton, VA (United States); DeMott, P. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Fairall, C. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Washington, DC (United States); Fan, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hagos, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hughes, M. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Washington, DC (United States); Long, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rutledge, S. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Waliser, D. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Washington, DC (United States); Wang, H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The western U.S. receives precipitation predominantly during the cold season when storms approach from the Pacific Ocean. The snowpack that accumulates during winter storms provides about 70-90% of water supply for the region. Understanding and modeling the fundamental processes that govern the large precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. is a critical test for the ability of climate models to predict the regional water cycle, including floods and droughts. Two elements of significant importance in predicting precipitation variability in the western U.S. are atmospheric rivers and aerosols. Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow bands of enhanced water vapor associated with the warm sector of extratropical cyclones over the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Because of the large lower-tropospheric water vapor content, strong atmospheric winds and neutral moist static stability, some ARs can produce heavy precipitation by orographic enhancement during landfall on the U.S. West Coast. While ARs are responsible for a large fraction of heavy precipitation in that region during winter, much of the rest of the orographic precipitation occurs in post-frontal clouds, which are typically quite shallow, with tops just high enough to pass the mountain barrier. Such clouds are inherently quite susceptible to aerosol effects on both warm rain and ice precipitation-forming processes.

  1. Aerosol removal and cloud collapse accelerated by supersaturation fluctuations in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrakar, K. K.; Cantrell, W.; Ciochetto, D.; Karki, S.; Kinney, G.; Shaw, R. A.

    2017-05-01

    Prior observations have documented the process of cloud cleansing, through which cloudy, polluted air from a continent is slowly transformed into cloudy, clean air typical of a maritime environment. During that process, cloud albedo changes gradually, followed by a sudden reduction in cloud fraction and albedo as drizzle forms and convection changes from closed to open cellular. Experiments in a cloud chamber that generates a turbulent environment show a similar cloud cleansing process followed by rapid cloud collapse. Observations of (1) cloud droplet size distribution, (2) interstitial aerosol size distribution, (3) cloud droplet residual size distribution, and (4) water vapor supersaturation are all consistent with the hypothesis that turbulent fluctuations of supersaturation accelerate the cloud cleansing process and eventual cloud collapse. Decay of the interstitial aerosol concentration occurs slowly at first then more rapidly. The accelerated cleansing occurs when the cloud phase relaxation time exceeds the turbulence correlation time.

  2. Laboratory experiments on diffusive convection layer thickness and its oceanographic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuang-Xi; Zhou, Sheng-Qi; Qu, Ling; Lu, Yuan-Zheng

    2016-10-01

    We studied the thickness of diffusive convective layers that form when a linearly stratified fluid is subjected to heating from below in the laboratory. The thickness of the bottom convecting layer is much larger than subsequent layers. These thicknesses are systematically identified and used to examine the available convecting layer thickness parameterizations, which are consisted of the measured heat flux F (or thermal buoyancy flux qT), initial stratification N, density ratio Rρ, thermal diffusivity κT, etc. Parameterization with an intrinsic length scale >(qT3κ/TN8)1/4 is shown to be superior. Including the present laboratory convecting layer thicknesses and those observed in oceans and lakes, where layer thickness ranges from 0.01 to 1000 m, the parameterization is updated as H=C>(Rρ-1>)2>(qT3κ/TN8)1/4, where C = 38.3 for the bottom convective layer and 10.8 for the subsequent layers. Different prefactors are proposed to be attributed to different convective instabilities induced by different boundary conditions.

  3. The application of time-dependent ice crystal trajectory and growth model for the evaluation of cloud seeding experiment using liquid carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, K.; Wakimizu, K.; Maki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Morita, O.; Tomine, K.

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the results of cloud seeding experiment conducted on 17th January, 2008, in western Kyushu, Japan, using simplified time-dependent ice crystal growth and trajectory cloud model, which is characterized by 1) depositional diffusion growth process only of an ice crystal, and 2) the pursuit of the growing ice crystal based on wind field and ice crystal terminal velocity. For the estimation of the ice crystal growth and trajectory, the model specifies ice supersaturation ratio that expresses the degree of competition growth among ice crystals formed by LC seeding for existing water vapor, assuming no effect of natural ice crystals. The model is based on ice crystal growth along a- and c-axes depending on air temperature and ice supersatuation, according to Chen and Lamb (1994). The cloud seeding experiment was conducted by applying homogeneous nucleation (rapid cooling of air mass and subsequent formation of many ice crystals~1013/g LC) of Liquid Carbon (LC) dioxide seeding under typical winter-type snowfall-inducing weather situation characterized by the outbreak of cold air masses from the Siberia. The result of aircraft horizontally-penetrating seeding of LC into lower layer (-2 degree C) of supercooled convective cloud with 1km thickness above the freezing level led to the formation of an artificially-induced 'isolated' radar echo (the left figures of Fig. 1) in dominant 'no-natural radar echo region'. In other words, natural biases were eliminated by the formation of the isolated radar echo. This fact provides the shortcut for evaluating the result of cloud seeding experiment. In the next, the observed cloud seeding results were evaluated by estimating the trajectory of artificially-induced growing ice crystal. The results show that the trajectory of artificial ice crystals depends on the degree of completion growth mode. Free growth brings rapid growth of an ice crystal and, therefore, the ice crystal falls into lower layers for a short time

  4. Turbulent convection experiment at high Rayleigh number to support CAP1400 IVR strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Li, E-mail: mali@snptrd.com [State Nuclear Hua Qing(Beijing) Nuclear Power Technology R& D Centre Co., Ltd, Building A, State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Future Science & Technology Park, Changping Dist., Beijing 102209 (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: lijing@snptrd.com [State Nuclear Hua Qing(Beijing) Nuclear Power Technology R& D Centre Co., Ltd, Building A, State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Future Science & Technology Park, Changping Dist., Beijing 102209 (China); Ji, Shui, E-mail: jishui@snptrd.com [State Nuclear Hua Qing(Beijing) Nuclear Power Technology R& D Centre Co., Ltd, Building A, State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Future Science & Technology Park, Changping Dist., Beijing 102209 (China); Chang, Huajian, E-mail: changhuajian@snptrd.com [State Nuclear Hua Qing(Beijing) Nuclear Power Technology R& D Centre Co., Ltd, Building A, State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Future Science & Technology Park, Changping Dist., Beijing 102209 (China); Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The facility reached high Ra number at 10{sup 12} of CAP1400 working condition. • The fitting formula Nu = 0.085 × Ra{sup 0.315} was established to calculate the heat flux in the metal layer at high Ra for the CAP1400. • The coupling method can accurately and safely predict the heat flow distribution of metal layer in high Ra number conditions. • The experiment results will predict the relationship between axial and radial heat transfer well. - Abstract: The characteristics of the heat transfer and the calculation of heat flux in metal layer are both the critical problems for in-vessel retention (IVR) strategy. Turbulent convection occurs in the metal layer when the Rayleigh number (Ra) becomes sufficient high. The Globe–Dropkin (G–D) correlation (Globe and Dropkin, 1959) and Chu–Churchill (C–C) correlation (Churchill and Chu, 1975) have been widely used to calculate the heat flux in the metal layer, where the valid range of the Ra is from 1.5 × 10{sup 5} to 6.8 × 10{sup 8} in G–D correlation and less than 10{sup 12} in C–C correlation. However, with the increase of reactor power, both the Rayleigh number and the rate of heat transfer below the bottom of metal layer of the molten pool will increase, and in this case the Rayleigh number even can reach 10{sup 11} for the China Advanced Passive Plant CAP1400. Accordingly, the G–D correlation is not suitable for the CAP1400. Therefore, our experiment purposes are to establish the appropriate correlation at high Ra for the CAP1400 and predict the axial and radial distribution of the heat transfer in the metal layer with the heat transfer behavior of metal layer experiment (HELM) facility. The experiments are divided into two parts. Each part concerns 39 runs and 47 experimental conditions. Its corresponding results are obtained at middle Prandtl number (Pr = 7 for water) and the Nusselt number is found to be proportional to Ra{sup 0.315} in the range 3.93 × 10{sup 8} < Ra < 3.57

  5. Application of Radar Reflectivity Factor in Initializing Cloud-Resolving Mesoscale Model. Part Ⅱ: Numerical Simulation Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hongya; XU Haiming; XUE Jishan; HU Zhijin; SHEN Tongli

    2008-01-01

    Microphysics elements and vertical velocity retrieved were incorporated using the nudging method into the initial data assimilation of GRAPES (Global/Regional Assimilation and Prediction System) model.Simulation experiments indicated that nudging technique was effective in forcing the model forecast gradually consistent to the observations, yielding the thermodynamically and dynamically balanced analysis field. As viewed from the simulation results, water vapor is vital to precipitation, and it is a governing factor for the amount and duration of precipitation. The initial cloud water, rain water, and vertical velocity determine the strength distribution of convection and precipitation at the beginning time of forecast; the horizontal wind field steers the motion of the mesoscale weather system embedded in and impacts the position of precipitation zone to a large extent. The simulation experiments show that the influence of the initial retrieval data on prediction weakens with the increase of forecast time, and within the first hour of forecast, the retrieval data have an important impact on the evolution of the weather system, but its influence becomes trivial after the first three hours. Changing the nudging coefficient and the integral time-spacing of numerical model will bring some influences to the results. Herein only one radar reflectivity was used, the radar observations did not cover the whole model domain, and some empirical parameters were used in the retrieval method, therefore some differences still lie between simulation and observation to a certain extent, and further studies on several aspects are expected.

  6. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release and Their Retrieval for TOGA COARE Convective Systems Using a Cloud Resolving Model, SSM/I, and Ship-borne Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Olson, W. S.; Johnson, D.; Ferrier, B.; Kummerow, C.; Adler, R.

    1999-01-01

    Latent heating profiles associated with three (TOGA COARE) Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment active convective episodes (December 10-17 1992; December 19-27 1992; and February 9-13 1993) are examined using the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model and retrieved by using the Goddard Convective and Stratiform Heating (CSH) algorithm . The following sources of rainfall information are input into the CSH algorithm: Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/1), Radar and the GCE model. Diagnostically determined latent heating profiles calculated using 6 hourly soundings are used for validation. The GCE model simulated rainfall and latent heating profiles are in excellent agreement with those estimated by soundings. In addition, the typical convective and stratiform heating structures (or shapes) are well captured by the GCE model. Radar measured rainfall is smaller than that both estimated by the GCE model and SSM/I in all three different COARE IFA periods. SSM/I derived rainfall is more than the GCE model simulated for the December 19-27 and February 9-13 periods, but is in excellent agreement with the GCE model for the December 10-17 period. The GCE model estimated stratiform amount is about 50% for December 19-27, 42% for December 11-17 and 56% for the February 9-13 case. These results are consistent with large-scale analyses. The accurate estimates of stratiform amount is needed for good latent heating retrieval. A higher (lower) percentage of stratiform rain can imply a maximum heating rate at a higher (lower) altitude. The GCE model always simulates more stratiform rain (10 to 20%) than the radar for all three convective episodes. SSM/I derived stratiform amount is about 37% for December 19-27, 48% for December 11-17 and 41% for the February 9-13 case. Temporal variability of CSH algorithm retrieved latent heating profiles using either GCE model simulated or radar estimated rainfall and stratiform amount is in good

  7. Improved mixing representation in Emanuel's convection scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandpeix, J. Y.; Phillips, V.; Tailleux, R.

    2004-10-01

    Recent empirical and modelling studies suggest that mid-tropospheric relative humidity (RH) is an important controlling factor of deep atmospheric convection, which appears to be underestimated in present cumulus parametrizations. This indicates the possible presence of shortcomings in the way that entrainment is represented in such parametrizations. This matter was explored in the European Cloud Systems project (EUROCS) by means of an idealized humidity experiment in which the main controlling parameter is RH. In the latter study, cloud-resolving model (CRM) experiments suggested that a shallow/deep convection transition occurs when RH crosses a threshold value that ranges from about RH = 50% to RH = 60%. In this paper, we seek to increase the responsiveness of Emanuel's convection scheme to RH, and to reproduce the threshold behaviour of the idealized humidity case, by replacing the original uniform probability density function (PDF) for mixing fractions by a more flexible two-parameter bell-shaped function that allows a wider range of behaviour. The main result is that the parameters of this PDF can be tuned to allow a regime transition to occur near a threshold value of RH 55%. In contrast to CRM results, however, this transition is between two different regimes of deep convection rather than between a shallow and deep regime. Possible ways to obtain a shallow-to-deep transition with Emanuel's scheme are discussed.

  8. Social Experiments in Tokyo Metropolitan Area Convection Study for Extreme Weather Resilient Cities(TOMACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyoshi, Nakatani; Nakamura, Isao; MIsumi, Ryohei; Shoji, Yoshinori

    2015-04-01

    Introduction TOMACS research project has been started since 2010 July in order to develop the elementary technologies which are required for the adaptation of societies to future global warming impacts that cannot be avoided by the reduction of greenhouse gases. In collaboration with related government institutions, local governments, private companies, and residents, more than 25 organizations and over 100 people are participated. TOMACS consists of the following three research themes: Theme 1: Studies on extreme weather with dense meteorological observations Theme 2: Development of the extreme weather early detection and prediction system Theme 3: Social experiments on extreme weather resilient cities Theme 1 aims to understand the initiation, development, and dissipation processes of convective precipitation in order to clarify the mechanism of localized heavy rainfall which are potential causes of flooding and landslides. Theme 2 aims to establish the monitoring and prediction system of extreme phenomena which can process real-time data from dense meteorological observation networks, advanced X-band radar network systems and predict localized heavy rainfalls and strong winds. Through social experiments, theme 3 aims to establish a method to use information obtained by the monitoring system of extreme phenomena to disaster prevention operations in order to prevent disasters and reduce damage. Social Experiments Toyo University is the core university for the social experiments accomplishment. And following organizations are participating in this research theme: NIED, the Tokyo Metropolitan Research Institute for Environmental Protection (TMRIEP), University of Tokyo, Tokyo Fire Department (TFD), Edogawa Ward in Tokyo, Yokohama City, Fujisawa City and Minamiashigara City in Kanagawa, East Japan Railway Company, Central Japan Railway Company, Obayashi Corporation, and Certified and Accredited Meteorologists of Japan(CAMJ). The social experiments have carried out

  9. GRAPES 全球模式浅对流过程和边界层云对低云预报的影响研究%Influences of Shallow Convective Rrocess and Boundary-Layer Clouds on Cloud Forecast in GRARES Global Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜晓飞; 刘奇俊; 马占山

    2015-01-01

    This study develops a new cloud scheme of Global/Regional Assimilation and Rrediction System (GRARES)at 50 km spatial resolution,considering the impact of the detrainment process of shallow con-vection and boundary-layer clouds on hydrometeors water contents and cloud fraction.The purpose of this research is to improve the low-level cloud prediction of GRARES model,simulate and compare the results before and after the improvement.Besides the results are compared with observational data of the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES)and Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC).The results show that considering the detrainment process of shallow convection and boundary-layer clouds mainly in-creases the cloud fraction and liquid hydrometeor contents of low-level cloud below 700 hRa.The improved results are closer to observation.Boundary-layer stratocumulus clouds mainly affect the clouds near the top of boundary layer and the influenced thickness is less than 200 hRa.The impact magnitude of shallow con-vection detrainment process is equivalent to the one of boundary-layer clouds,but the impact thickness is more widely in the former.Shallow convection process will have a certain impact on the low clouds from surface to the height of 700 hRa.Further research shows that due to the improvement of low-level cloud prediction,forecast of cloud radiative forcing at surface and top of atmosphere could also be improved,the increasement of low-level clouds would directly enhance cloud radiative forcing at surface.%提在 GRARES 全球模式云方案中加入浅对流卷出过程和边界层云对云水(冰)、云量的影响,改进模式低云预报,模拟比较改进前后预报结果,并与 CERES(云和地球辐射能量系统)及 YOTC(热带对流年科学计划)资料进行对比分析。结果表明:考虑浅对流卷出过程和边界层云后,主要增加了模式700 hRa 以下低云量及低云中液态水凝物含量,改进后的结果

  10. Comparison of mean properties of simulated convection in a cloud-resolving model with those produced by cumulus parameterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudhia, J.; Parsons, D.B. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    An Intensive Observation Period (IOP) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program took place at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site from June 16-26, 1993. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)/Penn State Mesoscale Model (MM5) has been used to simulate this period on a 60-km domain with 20- and 6.67-km nests centered on Lamont, Oklahoma. Simulations are being run with data assimilation by the nudging technique to incorporate upper-air and surface data from a variety of platforms. The model maintains dynamical consistency between the fields, while the data correct for model biases that may occur during long-term simulations and provide boundary conditions. For the work reported here the Mesoscale Atmospheric Prediction System (MAPS) of the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 3-hourly analyses were used to drive the 60-km domain while the inner domains were unforced. A continuous 10-day period was simulated.

  11. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of SnomaxTM were investigated in the temperature range between −5 and −15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly spray into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of −5.7°. At this temperature, about 1% of the SnomaxTM cells induced freezing of the spray droplets before they evaporated in the cloud chamber. The other suspensions of living cells didn't induce any measurable ice concentration during spray formation at −5.7°. The remaining aerosol was exposed to typical cloud activation conditions in subsequent experiments with expansion cooling to about −11°C. During these experiments, the bacterial cells first acted as cloud condensation nuclei to form cloud droplets and then eventually acted as ice nuclei to freeze the droplets. The results indicate that the bacteria investigated in the present study are mainly ice active in the temperature range between −7 and −11°C with an INA fraction of the order of 10−4. The ice nucleation efficiency of SnomaxTM cells was much larger with an INA fraction of 0.2 at temperatures around −8°C.

  12. Experiences with distributed computing for meteorological applications: grid computing and cloud computing

    OpenAIRE

    Oesterle, F.; Ostermann, S; R. Prodan; G. J. Mayr

    2015-01-01

    Experiences with three practical meteorological applications with different characteristics are used to highlight the core computer science aspects and applicability of distributed computing to meteorology. Through presenting cloud and grid computing this paper shows use case scenarios fitting a wide range of meteorological applications from operational to research studies. The paper concludes that distributed computing complements and extends existing high performance comput...

  13. Shallow convection over land: a mesoscale modelling study based on idealized WRF experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.; Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2009-01-01

    A shallow cumulus over land redistributes heat and moisture in the boundary layer, but is also important on larger scales, because it can trigger severe convection events. Due to its small (102 - 103 m) spatial scale, this feature is defined as a sub-grid process in mesoscale models. The goal of thi

  14. Reinforcing Concepts of Transient Heat Conduction and Convection with Simple Experiments and COMSOL Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Sergio; AungYong, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    To help students make the connection between the concepts of heat conduction and convection to real-world phenomenon, we developed a combined experimental and computational module that can be incorporated into lecture or lab courses. The experimental system we present requires materials and apparatus that are readily accessible, and the procedure…

  15. Reinforcing Concepts of Transient Heat Conduction and Convection with Simple Experiments and COMSOL Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Sergio; AungYong, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    To help students make the connection between the concepts of heat conduction and convection to real-world phenomenon, we developed a combined experimental and computational module that can be incorporated into lecture or lab courses. The experimental system we present requires materials and apparatus that are readily accessible, and the procedure…

  16. Zero-Gravity Atmospheric Cloud Physics Experiment Laboratory engineering concepts/design tradeoffs. Volume 1: Study results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, R. V.; Eaton, L. R.; Wilkinson, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    The work is summarized which was accomplished from January 1974 to October 1974 for the Zero-Gravity Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory. The definition and development of an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and the selection and delineation of candidate experiments that require the unique environment of zero gravity or near zero gravity are reported. The experiment program and the laboratory concept for a Spacelab payload to perform cloud microphysics research are defined. This multimission laboratory is planned to be available to the entire scientific community to utilize in furthering the basic understanding of cloud microphysical processes and phenomenon, thereby contributing to improved weather prediction and ultimately to provide beneficial weather control and modification.

  17. NCloud - Experimenting with Architecting and Facilitating Utility Services for establishing Educational Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Bhavsar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic Institutions as well as Enterprises all over the globe have become heavily dependent on high performance computing systems for their day to day activities and hence it continues to seek opportunities to rationalize and optimize the utilization of resources. Continuous upgradation  of software and hardware have become important items of those organizations meetings creating budget pressure. In such scenario, Cloud computing services could provide many of those organizations to enhance the productivity keeping the budget expenditure low.The paper discusses the experiments carried out on our educational campus for architecting the cloud – hereafter referred as NCloud (Cloud built on Nirma Campus, configured using open source tools, furnishes the utility services which is leading towards an establishment of  a stepping stone for formation of knowledge cloud. Testbed formed for data center consists of 1 front-end and 16 worker node.  By using NCloud, user will be able to fulfill the demand  of infrastructure as a service in which user is provided an operating system with specific RAM and CPU cores. Utility oriented services in NCloud aims to charge user for what they use. For implementing utility oriented services, analysis of various major cloud providers is done including pricing models. Performance measures on heterogeneous platforms and the results obtained are included in the paper.

  18. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of Snomax™ were investigated in the temperature range between −5 and −15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly sprayed into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of −5.7°C. At this temperature, about 1% of the Snomax™ cells induced immersion freezing of the spray droplets before the droplets evaporated in the cloud chamber. The living cells didn't induce any detectable immersion freezing in the spray droplets at −5.7°C. After evaporation of the spray droplets the bacterial cells remained as aerosol particles in the cloud chamber and were exposed to typical cloud formation conditions in experiments with expansion cooling to about −11°C. During these experiments, the bacterial cells first acted as cloud condensation nuclei to form cloud droplets. Then, only a minor fraction of the cells acted as heterogeneous ice nuclei either in the condensation or the immersion mode. The results indicate that the bacteria investigated in the present study are mainly ice active in the temperature range between −7 and −11°C with an ice nucleation (IN active fraction of the order of 10−4. In agreement to previous literature results, the ice nucleation efficiency of Snomax™ cells was much larger with an IN active fraction of 0.2 at temperatures around −8°C.

  19. Sheet-like and plume-like thermal flow in a spherical convection experiment with high viscosity contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futterer, Birgit; Zaussinger, Florian; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Krebs, Andreas; Egbers, Christoph; Breuer, Doris

    2013-04-01

    We introduce our spherical experiments on electro-hydrodynamical driven Rayleigh-Bénard convection that have been performed either with temperature-independent properties of the fluid, called 'GeoFlow I', or with temperature-dependent properties, called 'GeoFlow II'. To set up a self-gravitating force field with radial directed buoyancy, we use a high voltage potential between the inner and outer boundaries and a dielectric insulating liquid and perform the experiment in the microgravity conditions of the ISS [1, 2]. We further run numerical simulations in a 3D spherical geometry to reproduce the results obtained in the GeoFlow experiments. In the experiment the used optical method for flow visualization as delivered by the Optical Diagnostics Module ODM of the Fluid Science Laboratory, is the so called Wollaston-Prism shearing interferometry WSI, which produces fringe pattern images. For the numerical simulations we compute from the temperature field a fringe pattern of convection to compare it then to the experiment data. In this work, we present the flow imaging techniques and their numerical analogues, which were used to compare experimental results with numerical solutions. An important finding is the difference in the flow pattern between our two experiments. We see a sheet-like thermal flow, if the physical properties of the fluid are not varying with temperature - a result from 'GeoFlow I'. In this case the convection patterns have been successfully reproduced by 3D numerical simulations using both the RESPECT [3] and GAIA [4] codes. If we use a liquid with varying (electro-hydrodynamic) volume expansion and temperature-dependent viscosity (GeoFlow II), for which the viscosity contrast measured in the experiment is 2, the structures change significantly and are plume-like. This result is not expected, since the viscosity contrast seems to be too small for this type of solution according to numerical simulations. However, using a viscosity contrast of two

  20. Aircraft Measurements of Convective System Vertical Structure and Coldpools during the DYNAMO Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, N.; Jorgensen, D. P.; Chen, S. S.; Wang, Q.

    2012-12-01

    The DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation) field experiment employed a large number of measurement platforms with which to study environmental and convective cloud system characteristics of the MJO initiation region in the Indian Ocean. One such platform, the NOAA P-3 instrumented aircraft, provided mobility to sample convective cloud systems along with the surrounding environment. The tail-mounted, X-band Doppler radar allowed a pseudo-dual-Doppler analysis technique to study system kinematics and derive vertical wind motion. GPS dropwindsondes provided a robust means for thermodynamic characterization both in and around the sampled convective cloud systems. This presentation will focus on the relationships between coldpool strength and depth (along with other environmental characteristics) and the vertical structure of convective systems. In addition, a comparison of the DYNAMO observations to previous results in the region (e.g. TOGA COARE) will be presented. Differences in organizational aspects of convective clouds into mesoscale convective systems between the studies will provide a context of regional differences, which may serve as a basis for future model simulations.

  1. An Observational Study of Entrainment Rate in Deep Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohao Guo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study estimates entrainment rate and investigates its relationships with cloud properties in 156 deep convective clouds based on in-situ aircraft observations during the TOGA-COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment field campaign over the western Pacific. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study on the probability density function of entrainment rate, the relationships between entrainment rate and cloud microphysics, and the effects of dry air sources on the calculated entrainment rate in deep convection from an observational perspective. Results show that the probability density function of entrainment rate can be well fitted by lognormal, gamma or Weibull distribution, with coefficients of determination being 0.82, 0.85 and 0.80, respectively. Entrainment tends to reduce temperature, water vapor content and moist static energy in cloud due to evaporative cooling and dilution. Inspection of the relationships between entrainment rate and microphysical properties reveals a negative correlation between volume-mean radius and entrainment rate, suggesting the potential dominance of homogeneous mechanism in the clouds examined. In addition, entrainment rate and environmental water vapor content show similar tendencies of variation with the distance of the assumed environmental air to the cloud edges. Their variation tendencies are non-monotonic due to the relatively short distance between adjacent clouds.

  2. Validation of the CALIPSO-CALIOP extinction coefficients from in situ observations in midlatitude cirrus clouds during the CIRCLE-2 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioche, Guillaume; Josset, Damien; Gayet, Jean-FrançOis; Pelon, Jacques; Garnier, Anne; Minikin, Andreas; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of combined Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) extinction retrievals with airborne lidar and in situ cirrus cloud measurements. Specially oriented research flights were carried out in western Europe in May 2007 during the Cirrus Cloud Experiment (CIRCLE-2) with the German Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) and the French Service des Avions Français Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement (SAFIRE) Falcon aircraft equipped for remote and in situ measurements, respectively. Four cirrus cloud situations including thin cirrus layers and outflow cirrus linked to midlatitude fronts and convective systems were chosen to perform experimental collocated observations along the satellite overpasses. The measurements were carried out with temperatures ranging between -38°C and -60°C and with extinction coefficients no larger than 2 km-1. Comparisons between CALIOP and airborne lidar (LEANDRE New Generation (LNG)) attenuated backscatter coefficients reveal much larger CALIOP values for one frontal cirrus situation which could be explained by oriented pristine ice crystals. During the four selected cases the CALIOP cirrus extinction profiles were compared with in situ extinction coefficients derived from the Polar Nephelometer. The results show a very good agreement for two situations (frontal and outflow cases) despite very different cloud conditions. The slope parameters of linear fittings of CALIOP extinction coefficients with respect to in situ measurements are 0.90 and 0.94, with correlation coefficients of 0.69 and only 0.36 for the latter case because of a small number of measurements. On the contrary, significant differences are evidenced for two other situations. In thin frontal cirrus at temperatures ranging between -58°C and -60°C, systematic larger CALIOP extinctions can be explained by horizontally

  3. Engaging observers to look at clouds from both sides: connecting NASA mission science with authentic STEM experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, L. H.; Taylor, J.; Ellis, T. D.; McCrea, S.; Rogerson, T. M.; Falcon, P.

    2016-12-01

    In 1997, NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) team began engaging K-12 schools as ground truth observers of clouds. CERES seeks to understand cloud effects on Earth's energy budget; thus accurate detection and characterization of clouds is key. While satellite remote sensing provides global information about clouds, it is limited in time and resolution. Ground observers, on the other hand, can observe clouds at any time of day (and sometimes night), and can see small and thin clouds that are challenging to detect from space. In 2006, two active sensing satellites, CloudSat and CALIPSO, were launched into the A-Train, which already contained 2 CERES instruments on the Aqua spacecraft. The CloudSat team also engaged K-12 schools to observe clouds, through The GLOBE Program, with a specialized observation protocol customized for the narrow radar swath. While providing valuable data for satellite assessment, these activities also engage participants in accessible, authentic science that gets people outdoors, helps them develop observation skills, and is friendly to all ages. The effort has evolved substantially since 1997, adopting new technology to provide a more compelling experience to citizen observers. Those who report within 15 minutes of the passage of a wide range of satellites (Terra, Aqua, CloudSat, CALIPSO, NPP, as well as a number of geostationary satellites) are sent a satellite image centered on their location and are invited to extend the experience beyond simple observation to include analysis of the two different viewpoints. Over the years these projects have collected large amounts of cloud observations from every continent and ocean basin on Earth. A number of studies have been conducted comparing the ground observations to the satellite results. This presentation will provide an overview of those results and also describe plans for a coordinated, thematic cloud observation and data analysis activity going forward.

  4. Feasibility of reduced gravity experiments involving quiescent, uniform particle cloud combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Howard D.; Facca, Lily T.; Berlad, Abraham L.; Tangirala, Venkat

    1989-01-01

    The study of combustible particle clouds is of fundamental scientific interest as well as a practical concern. The principal scientific interests are the characteristic combustion properties, especially flame structure, propagation rates, stability limits, and the effects of stoichiometry, particle type, transport phenomena, and nonadiabatic processes on these properties. The feasibility tests for the particle cloud combustion experiment (PCCE) were performed in reduced gravity in the following stages: (1) fuel particles were mixed into cloud form inside a flammability tube; (2) when the concentration of particles in the cloud was sufficiently uniform, the particle motion was allowed to decay toward quiescence; (3) an igniter was energized which both opened one end of the tube and ignited the suspended particle cloud; and (4) the flame proceeded down the tube length, with its position and characteristic features being photographed by high-speed cameras. Gravitational settling and buoyancy effects were minimized because of the reduced gravity enviroment in the NASA Lewis drop towers and aircraft. Feasibility was shown as quasi-steady flame propagation which was observed for fuel-rich mixtures. Of greatest scientific interest is the finding that for near-stoichiometric mixtures, a new mode of flame propagation was observed, now called a chattering flame. These flames did not propagate steadily through the tube. Chattering modes of flame propagation are not expected to display extinction limits that are the same as those for acoustically undisturbed, uniform, quiescent clouds. A low concentration of fuel particles, uniformly distributed in a volume, may not be flammable but may be made flammable, as was observed, through induced segregation processes. A theory was developed which showed that chattering flame propagation was controlled by radiation from combustion products which heated the successive discrete laminae sufficiently to cause autoignition.

  5. Study to perform preliminary experiments to evaluate particle generation and characterization techniques for zero-gravity cloud physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, U.

    1982-01-01

    Methods of particle generation and characterization with regard to their applicability for experiments requiring cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of specified properties were investigated. Since aerosol characterization is a prerequisite to assessing performance of particle generation equipment, techniques for characterizing aerosol were evaluated. Aerosol generation is discussed, and atomizer and photolytic generators including preparation of hydrosols (used with atomizers) and the evaluation of a flight version of an atomizer are studied.

  6. The onset of natural convection in vertical fault planes: consequences for the thermal regime in crystalline basements and for heat recovery experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tournier, C.; Genthon, P.; Rabinowicz, M. [UMR 5562 Observatoire Midi-Pyrenees, Toulouse (France)

    1999-07-01

    lapse required for the onset of delayed convection is less than 10 conductive times of the fracture width. This time lapse is therefore negligible compared with geological timescales, and R{sub d} can be considered as the critical Rayleigh number for the onset of free convection in a fracture zone. However, the characteristic conductive time of a fracture which amounts, for example, to 3 years for a 10-m thick fracture, must be considered for thermal recovery experiments. It is suggested that convection may start during exploitation and will be superimposed on the forced flow. We expect that this will enhance the efficiency of thermal recovery. (author)

  7. STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, J; Matrosov, S; Shupe, M; Lawson, P; Hallar, G; McCubbin, I; Marchand, R; Orr, B; Coulter, R; Sedlacek, A; Avallone, L; Long, C

    2010-09-29

    During the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), a substantial correlative data set of remote sensing observations and direct in situ measurements from fixed and airborne platforms will be created in a winter season, mountainous environment. This will be accomplished by combining mountaintop observations at Storm Peak Laboratory and the airborne National Science Foundation-supported Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study campaign with collocated measurements from the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2). We describe in this document the operational plans and motivating science for this experiment, which includes deployment of AMF2 to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The intensive STORMVEX field phase will begin nominally on 1 November 2010 and extend to approximately early April 2011.

  8. Assembly of live micro-organisms on microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for AFM bio-experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dague, E; Jauvert, E; Laplatine, L; Viallet, B; Thibault, C; Ressier, L

    2011-09-30

    Immobilization of live micro-organisms on solid substrates is an important prerequisite for atomic force microscopy (AFM) bio-experiments. The method employed must immobilize the cells firmly enough to enable them to withstand the lateral friction forces exerted by the tip during scanning but without denaturing the cell interface. In this work, a generic method for the assembly of living cells on specific areas of substrates is proposed. It consists in assembling the living cells within the patterns of microstructured, functionalized poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps using convective/capillary deposition. This versatile approach is validated by applying it to two systems of foremost importance in biotechnology and medicine: Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and Aspergillus fumigatus fungal spores. We show that this method allows multiplexing AFM nanomechanical measurements by force spectroscopy on S. cerevisiae yeasts and high-resolution AFM imaging of germinated Aspergillus conidia in buffer medium. These two examples clearly demonstrate the immense potential of micro-organism assembly on functionalized, microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for performing rigorous AFM bio-experiments on living cells.

  9. Solar radiation absorption in the atmosphere due to water and ice clouds: Sensitivity experiments with plane-parallel clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, C. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    One cloud radiation issue that has been troublesome for several decades is the absorption of solar radiation by clouds. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the discrepancies between observations and modeling results. A good review of these often-competing hypotheses has been provided by Stephens and Tsay. They characterize the available hypotheses as failing into three categories: (1) those linked to cloud microphysical and consequent optical properties; (2) those linked to the geometry and heterogeneity of clouds; and (3) those linked to atmospheric absorption.Current modeling practice is seriously inconsistent with new observational inferences concerning absorption of solar radiation in the atmosphere. The author and her colleagues contend that an emphasis on R may, therefore, not be the optimal way of addressing the cloud solar absorption issue. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Multiscale Convective Interactions During DYNAMO/CINDY2011/AMIE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, C.; DePasquale, A. M.; Fliegel, J. M.; Funk, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Radar and sounding observations are used to examine precipitation, cloud, and environmental characteristics over Addu Atoll from the Dynamics of the Madden-Julian (MJO) Oscillation (DYNAMO), the Cooperative Indian Ocean Experiment on Intraseasonal Variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY2011), and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment (AMIE) field campaigns. Particular focus is placed on how the existence of and interactions between three MJO events, 10 Kelvin waves (KWs), and the diurnal cycle impact convective system properties. For example, the average MJO characteristics were generally consistent with past studies, although an increase in deep convective rain and echo tops appeared to precede relative humidity increases at low- to middle-levels. MJO convective organization was also impacted by deep tropospheric wind shear. The active and developing MJO KWs produced more rain and cloud than suppressed MJO KWs and had a secondary peak in stratiform rain potentially associated with subsynoptic-scale cloud clusters. The diurnal cycle of rain was also more pronounced during the active MJO. The suppressed MJO KW composite displayed previously documented structure of vertical moisture buildup prior to the KW passage, whereas the developing and active MJO KWs did not. Upper level moisture was enhanced after KW passages, regardless of MJO phase. However, upper level moisture was most enhanced after the developing MJO KW passage, providing deep tropospheric moisture that may have assisted MJO onset. Non-precipitating upper level cloud and midlevel altocumulus/altostratus also persisted after most KW passages with potential radiative impacts.

  11. Aerosol and cloud chemistry of amines from CCS - reactivity experiments and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Christian; Tilgner, Andreas; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Capturing CO2 from the exhaust of power plants using amine scrubbing is a common technology. Therefore, amines can be released during the carbon capture process. To investigate the tropospheric chemical fate of amines from CO2 capturing processes and their oxidation products, the impact of aqueous aerosol particles and cloud droplets on the amine chemistry has been considered. Aqueous phase reactivity experiments of NO3 radicals and ozone with relevant amines and their corresponding nitrosamines were performed. Furthermore, nitrosamine formation and nitrosamine photolysis was investigated during laboratory experiments. These experiments implicated that aqueous phase photolysis can be an effective sink for nitrosamines and that ozone is unreactive towards amines and nitrosamines. Multiphase phase oxidation schemes of amines, nitrosamines and amides were developed, coupled to the existing multiphase chemistry mechanism CAPRAM and built into the Lagrangian parcel model SPACCIM using published and newly measured data. As a result, both deliquescent particles and cloud droplets are important compartments for the multiphase processing of amines and their products. Amines can be readily oxidised by OH radicals in the gas and cloud phase during daytime summer conditions. However, amine oxidation is restricted during winter conditions with low photochemical activity leading to long lifetimes of amines. The importance of the gas and aqueous phase depends strongly on the partitioning of the different amines. Furthermore, the simulations revealed that the aqueous formation of nitrosamines in aerosol particles and could droplets is not a relevant process under tropospheric conditions.

  12. Monitoring the NOAA Operational VIIRS RSB and DNB Calibration Stability Using Monthly and Semi-Monthly Deep Convective Clouds Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhui Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS onboard the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS/Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP satellite provide sensor data records for the retrievals of many environment data records. It is critical to monitor the VIIRS long-term calibration stability to ensure quality EDR retrieval. This study investigates the radiometric calibration stability of the NOAA operational SNPP VIIRS Reflective Solar Bands (RSB and Day-Night-Band (DNB using Deep Convective Clouds (DCC. Monthly and semi-monthly DCC time series for 10 moderate resolution bands (M-bands, M1–M5 and M7–M11, March 2013–September 2015, DNB (March 2013–September 2015, low gain stage, and three imagery resolution bands (I-bands, I1–I3, January 2014–September 2015 were developed and analyzed for long-term radiometric calibration stability monitoring. Monthly DCC time series show that M5 and M7 are generally stable, with a stability of 0.4%. DNB has also been stable since May 2013, after its relative response function update, with a stability of 0.5%. The stabilities of M1–M4 are 0.6%–0.8%. Large fluctuations in M1–M4 DCC reflectance were observed since early 2014, correlated with F-factor (calibration coefficients trend changes during the same period. The stabilities of M8-M11 are from 1.0% to 3.1%, comparable to the natural DCC variability at the shortwave infrared spectrum. DCC mean band ratio time series show that the calibration stabilities of I1–I3 follow closely with M5, M7, and M10. Relative calibration changes were observed in M1/M4 and M5/M7 DCC mean band ratio time series. The DCC time series are generally consistent with results from the VIIRS validation sites and VIIRS/MODIS (the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer simultaneous nadir overpass time series. Semi-monthly DCC time series for RSB M-bands and DNB were compared with monthly DCC time series. The results indicate that semi-monthly DCC

  13. Physico-chemical properties of cloud drop residual and interstitial particles sampled inside hill capped clouds during a field experiment in Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertes, S.; Schneider, J.; Merkel, M.; Roth, A.; Van Pinxteren, D.; Wiedensohler, A.; Herrmann, H.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction, particle activation and phase partitioning of ambient aerosol particles between the liquid and interstitial phase in continental boundary layer clouds were investigated during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia field experiment in autumn 2010 (HCCT 2010). An interstitial inlet (INT) and two counterflow virtual impactors (CVI) were operated inside cloud in order to separate and collect non-activated interstitial particles (IP) and cloud drops, respectively, on the mountain site Schmücke (938 m asl) in Central Europe. Both inlet types were designed for a separation diameter of 5 μm. Inside the CVI systems the collected drops are evaporated releasing dry cloud drop residues (CDR), which are closely related to the original cloud condensation nuclei forming the cloud. By two sets of instruments that measured the same parameter connected to each inlet type, the CDR and IP were micro-physically and chemically characterized simultaneously. Number concentration and size distribution were determined by a condensation particle counter (CPC) and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) + optical particle counter (OPC) at INT and CVI. The chemical composition of CDR and IP was inferred in various ways. The amount of black carbon in each reservoir was measured by two particle soot absorption photometers (PSAP) supplemented by a multiangle absorption photometer (MAAP) at the interstitial inlet only. The content of non-refractory chemical compounds was analyzed by a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS) and a high-resolution (HR)-ToF- AMS for the CDR and IP, respectively. Filter and adsorption cartridge samples were taken at both inlet types to determine selected inorganic and organic species. The mixing state of single cloud drop residues was derived from the aircraft-based laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometer ALABAMA. During the analyzed cloud events, the cloud microphysical parameters measured by a particle volume monitor (PVM

  14. Experiments on forced convection form a horizontal heated plate in a packed bed of glass spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renken, K.J. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (USA)); Poulikakos, D. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (USA))

    1989-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of boundary-layer forced convective heat transfer from a flat isothermal plate in a packed bed of spheres. Extensive experimental results are reported for the thermal boundary-layer thickness, the temperature field, and the local wall heat flux (represented by the local Nusselt number). Theoretical findings of previous investigations using the Darcy flow model as well as a general model for themomentum equation accouting for flow inertia and macroscopic shear wtih and without variable porosity are used to evaluate the theoretical models. Several trends are revealed regarding the conditions of validity of these flow models. Overall the general flow model including variable porosity appears to perform better, even through the need for serious improvements in modeling becomes apparent.

  15. Blue skies for CLOUD

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Through the recently approved CLOUD experiment, CERN will soon be contributing to climate research. Tests are being performed on the first prototype of CLOUD, an experiment designed to assess cosmic radiation influence on cloud formation.

  16. Sheet-like and plume-like thermal flow in a spherical convection experiment performed under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, D.; Futterer, B.; Plesa, A.; Krebs, A.; Zaussinger, F.; Egbers, C.

    2013-12-01

    In mantle dynamics research, experiments, usually performed in rectangular geometries in Earth-based laboratories, have the character of ';exploring new physics and testing theories' [1]. In this work, we introduce our spherical geometry experiments on electro-hydrodynamical driven Rayleigh-Benard convection that have been performed for both temperature-independent (`GeoFlow I'), and temperature-dependent fluid viscosity properties (`GeoFlow II') with a measured viscosity contrast up to 1.5. To set up a self-gravitating force field, we use a high voltage potential between the inner and outer boundaries and a dielectric insulating liquid and perform the experiment under microgravity conditions at the ISS [2, 3]. Further, numerical simulations in 3D spherical geometry have been used to reproduce the results obtained in the `GeoFlow' experiments. For flow visualisation, we use Wollaston prism shearing interferometry which is an optical method producing fringe pattern images. Flow pattern differ between our two experiments (Fig. 1). In `GeoFlow I', we see a sheet-like thermal flow. In this case convection patterns have been successfully reproduced by 3D numerical simulations using two different and independently developed codes. In contrast, in `GeoFlow II' we obtain plume-like structures. Interestingly, numerical simulations do not yield this type of solution for the low viscosity contrast realised in the experiment. However, using a viscosity contrast of two orders of magnitude or higher, we can reproduce the patterns obtained in the `GeoFlow II' experiment, from which we conclude that non-linear effects shift the effective viscosity ratio [4]. References [1] A. Davaille and A. Limare (2009). In: Schubert, G., Bercovici, D. (Eds.), Treatise on Geophysics - Mantle Dynamics. [2] B. Futterer, C. Egbers, N. Dahley, S. Koch, L. Jehring (2010). Acta Astronautica 66, 193-100. [3] B. Futterer, N. Dahley, S. Koch, N. Scurtu, C. Egbers (2012). Acta Astronautica 71, 11-19. [4

  17. ACE-2 HILLCLOUD. An overview of the ACE-2 ground-based cloud experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bower, B.K.N.; Choularton, T.W.; Gallagher, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    The ACE-2 HILLCLOUD experiment was carried out on the island of Tenerife in June-July 1997 to investigate the interaction of the boundary layer aerosol with a hill cap cloud forming over a ridge to the north-east of the island. The cloud was used as a natural flow through reactor to investigate......, (nocturnally for seven of the eight runs) and were carried out in a wide range of airmass conditions from clean maritime to polluted continental. Polluted air was characterised by higher than average concentrations of ozone (> 50 ppbv), fine and accumulation mode aerosols (>3000 and >1500 cm-3, respectively...... and hydrochloric acids were present as a result of outgassing from aerosol, the HNO3 from nitrate rich aerosol transported into the region from upwind of Tenerife, and HCl from sea salt aerosol newly formed at the sea surface. The oxidants hydrogen peroxide and ozone were abundant (i.e., were well in excess over...

  18. Classification of Particle Shapes from Lidar Depolarization Ratios in Convective Ice Clouds Compared to in situ Observations During CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Vincent; Winker, David; McGill, Matthew; Lawson, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This manuscript describes a method to class@ cirrus cloud ice particle shape using lidar depolarization measurements as a basis for segregating different particle shape regimes. Measurements from the ER-2 Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) system during CRYSTAL-FACE provide the basis for this work. While the CPL onboard the ER-2 aircraft was providing remote sensing measurements of cirrus clouds, the Cloud Particle Imager (CPI) onboard the WB-57 aircraft was flying inside those same clouds to sample particle sizes. The results of classifying particle shapes using the CPL data are compared to the in situ measurements made using the CPI , and there is found to be good agreement between the particle shape inferred from the CPL data and that actually measured by the CPI. If proven practical, application of this technique to spaceborne observations could lead to large-scale classification of cirrus cloud particle shapes.

  19. Large-Eddy Simulation of Maritime Deep Tropical Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Krueger, Steve K.; Moeng, Chin-Hoh; Bogenschutz, Peter A.; Randall, David A.

    2009-04-01

    This study represents an attempt to apply Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) resolution to simulate deep tropical convection in near equilibrium for 24 hours over an area of about 205 × 205 km2, which is comparable to that of a typical horizontal grid cell in a global climate model. The simulation is driven by large-scale thermodynamic tendencies derived from mean conditions during the GATE Phase III field experiment. The LES uses 2048 × 2048 × 256 grid points with horizontal grid spacing of 100 m and vertical grid spacing ranging from 50 m in the boundary layer to 100 m in the free troposphere. The simulation reaches a near equilibrium deep convection regime in 12 hours. The simulated vertical cloud distribution exhibits a tri-modal vertical distribution of deep, middle and shallow clouds similar to that often observed in Tropics. A sensitivity experiment in which cold pools are suppressed by switching off the evaporation of precipitation results in much lower amounts of shallow and congestus clouds. Unlike the benchmark LES where the new deep clouds tend to appear along the edges of spreading cold pools, the deep clouds in the no-cold-pool experiment tend to reappear at the sites of the previous deep clouds and tend to be surrounded by extensive areas of sporadic shallow clouds. The vertical velocity statistics of updraft and downdraft cores below 6 km height are compared to aircraft observations made during GATE. The comparison shows generally good agreement, and strongly suggests that the LES simulation can be used as a benchmark to represent the dynamics of tropical deep convection on scales ranging from large turbulent eddies to mesoscale convective systems. The effect of horizontal grid resolution is examined by running the same case with progressively larger grid sizes of 200, 400, 800, and 1600 m. These runs show a reasonable agreement with the benchmark LES in statistics such as convective available potential energy, convective inhibition, cloud fraction

  20. Large-eddy simulation of maritime deep tropical convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Bogenschutz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study represents an attempt to apply Large-Eddy Simulation (LES resolution to simulate deep tropical convection in near equilibrium for 24 hours over an area of about 205 x 205 km2, which is comparable to that of a typical horizontal grid cell in a global climate model. The simulation is driven by large-scale thermodynamic tendencies derived from mean conditions during the GATE Phase III field experiment. The LES uses 2048 x 2048 x 256 grid points with horizontal grid spacing of 100 m and vertical grid spacing ranging from 50 m in the boundary layer to 100 m in the free troposphere. The simulation reaches a near equilibrium deep convection regime in 12 hours. The simulated vertical cloud distribution exhibits a trimodal vertical distribution of deep, middle and shallow clouds similar to that often observed in Tropics. A sensitivity experiment in which cold pools are suppressed by switching off the evaporation of precipitation results in much lower amounts of shallow and congestus clouds. Unlike the benchmark LES where the new deep clouds tend to appear along the edges of spreading cold pools, the deep clouds in the no-cold-pool experiment tend to reappear at the sites of the previous deep clouds and tend to be surrounded by extensive areas of sporadic shallow clouds. The vertical velocity statistics of updraft and downdraft cores below 6 km height are compared to aircraft observations made during GATE. The comparison shows generally good agreement, and strongly suggests that the LES simulation can be used as a benchmark to represent the dynamics of tropical deep convection on scales ranging from large turbulent eddies to mesoscale convective systems. The effect of horizontal grid resolution is examined by running the same case with progressively larger grid sizes of 200, 400, 800, and 1600 m. These runs show a reasonable agreement with the benchmark LES in statistics such as convective available potential energy, convective inhibition

  1. Multicloud convective parametrizations with crude vertical structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khouider, Boualem [University of Victoria, Mathematics and Statistics, PO BOX 3045 STN CSC, Victoria, BC (Canada); Majda, Andrew J. [New York University, Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere/Ocean Sciences, Courant Institute, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Recent observational analysis reveals the central role of three multi-cloud types, congestus, stratiform, and deep convective cumulus clouds, in the dynamics of large scale convectively coupled Kelvin waves, westward propagating two-day waves, and the Madden-Julian oscillation. The authors have recently developed a systematic model convective parametrization highlighting the dynamic role of the three cloud types through two baroclinic modes of vertical structure: a deep convective heating mode and a second mode with low level heating and cooling corresponding respectively to congestus and stratiform clouds. The model includes a systematic moisture equation where the lower troposphere moisture increases through detrainment of shallow cumulus clouds, evaporation of stratiform rain, and moisture convergence and decreases through deep convective precipitation and a nonlinear switch which favors either deep or congestus convection depending on whether the troposphere is moist or dry. Here several new facets of these multi-cloud models are discussed including all the relevant time scales in the models and the links with simpler parametrizations involving only a single baroclinic mode in various limiting regimes. One of the new phenomena in the multi-cloud models is the existence of suitable unstable radiative convective equilibria (RCE) involving a larger fraction of congestus clouds and a smaller fraction of deep convective clouds. Novel aspects of the linear and nonlinear stability of such unstable RCE's are studied here. They include new modes of linear instability including mesoscale second baroclinic moist gravity waves, slow moving mesoscale modes resembling squall lines, and large scale standing modes. The nonlinear instability of unstable RCE's to homogeneous perturbations is studied with three different types of nonlinear dynamics occurring which involve adjustment to a steady deep convective RCE, periodic oscillation, and even heteroclinic chaos in

  2. Examination of Scale-Awareness of Convective Transport for Parameterization Development in Mesoscale and Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Fan, J.; Zhang, G. J.; Xu, K.

    2013-12-01

    Cumulus convection plays a key role in atmospheric circulation. The results of global climate models, which have been widely used in climate research, are highly sensitive to cumulus parameterizations used for modeling cumulus clouds. Existing parameterization schemes have relied upon a number of assumptions whose validity is questionable at high spatial resolutions. In this study, we intended to develop a scale-aware cumulus parameterization based on the conventional Zhang-McFarlane scheme which is suitable for a broad range of uses, ranging from meso-scale to climate models. We conduct analyses from cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations, including two cases from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), to understand scale-dependencies of convective cloud properties following the unified parameterization framework of Arakawa and Wu (2013), but with a more complete set of considerations such as including downdrafts and at different convective stages for eddy flux approximations. Our preliminary results show that downdrafts could make a significant contribution to eddy flux transport at the developed stage of convection. The eddy transported by updrafts and downdrafts with respect to the environmental background increased with the increasing of grid-spacing, but do not change with fraction. There are large differences between the explicit calculation of eddy flux and that from approximations used in cumulus parameterization at grid-spacings of less than 64 km. Much of this difference is due to the sub-grid inhomogeneity of updrafts and downdrafts.

  3. Microphysical properties and high ice water content in continental and oceanic Mescoscale Convective Systems and potential implications for commercial aircraft at flight altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayet, J.-F.; Shcherbakov, V.; Bugliaro, L.; Protat, A.; Delanoë, J.; Pelon, J.; Garnier, A.

    2013-08-01

    Two complementary case studies are conducted to analyse convective system properties in the region where strong cloud-top lidar backscatter anomalies are observed as reported by Platt et al. (2011). These anomalies were reported for the first time using in-situ microphysical measurements in an isolated continental convective cloud over Germany during the CIRCLE2 experiment (Gayet et al., 2012). In this case, quasi collocated in situ observations with CALIPSO, CloudSat and Meteosat-9/SEVIRI observations confirm that regions of backscatter anomalies represent the most active and dense convective cloud parts with likely the strongest core updrafts and unusual high values of the particle concentration, extinction and ice water content (IWC), with the occurrence of small ice crystal sizes. Similar spaceborne observations are then analyzed in a maritime mesoscale cloud system (MCS) on 20 June 2008 located off the Brazil coast between 0° and 3° N latitude. Near cloud-top backscatter anomalies are evidenced in a region which corresponds to the coldest temperatures with maximum cloud top altitudes derived from collocated CALIPSO/IIR and Meteosat-9/SEVIRI infrared brightness temperatures. The interpretation of CALIOP data highlights significant differences of microphysical properties from those observed in the continental isolated convective cloud. Indeed, SEVIRI retrievals in the visible confirm much smaller ice particles near-top of the isolated continental convective cloud, i.e. effective radius (Reff) ~15 μm against 22-27 μm in the whole MCS area. 94 GHz Cloud Profiling Radar observations from CloudSat are then used to describe the properties of the most active cloud regions at and below cloud top. The cloud ice water content and effective radius retrieved with the CloudSat 2B-IWC and DARDAR inversion techniques, show that at usual cruise altitudes of commercial aircraft (FL 350 or ~10 700 m level), high IWC (i.e. up to 2 to 4 g m-3) could be identified according to

  4. Multiscale Cloud System Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Moncrieff, Mitchell W.

    2009-01-01

    The central theme of this paper is to describe how cloud system resolving models (CRMs) of grid spacing approximately 1 km have been applied to various important problems in atmospheric science across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales and how these applications relate to other modeling approaches. A long-standing problem concerns the representation of organized precipitating convective cloud systems in weather and climate models. Since CRMs resolve the mesoscale to large scales of motion (i.e., 10 km to global) they explicitly address the cloud system problem. By explicitly representing organized convection, CRMs bypass restrictive assumptions associated with convective parameterization such as the scale gap between cumulus and large-scale motion. Dynamical models provide insight into the physical mechanisms involved with scale interaction and convective organization. Multiscale CRMs simulate convective cloud systems in computational domains up to global and have been applied in place of contemporary convective parameterizations in global models. Multiscale CRMs pose a new challenge for model validation, which is met in an integrated approach involving CRMs, operational prediction systems, observational measurements, and dynamical models in a new international project: the Year of Tropical Convection, which has an emphasis on organized tropical convection and its global effects.

  5. Insights Into Atmospheric Aqueous Organic Chemistry Through Controlled Experiments with Cloud Water Surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, B. J.; Ramos, A.; Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Seitzinger, S.

    2011-12-01

    There is considerable laboratory and field-based evidence that chemical processing in clouds and wet aerosols alters organic composition and contributes to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Single-compound laboratory experiments have played an important role in developing aqueous-phase chemical mechanisms that aid prediction of SOA formation through multiphase chemistry. In this work we conduct similar experiments with cloud/fog water surrogates, to 1) evaluate to what extent the previously studied chemistry is observed in these more realistic atmospheric waters, and 2) to identify additional atmospherically-relevant precursors and products that require further study. We used filtered Camden and Pinelands, NJ rainwater as a surrogate for cloud water. OH radical (~10-12 M) was formed by photolysis of hydrogen peroxide and samples were analyzed in real-time by electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS). Discrete samples were also analyzed by ion chromatography (IC) and ESI-MS after IC separation. All experiments were performed in duplicate. Standards of glyoxal, methylglyoxal and glycolaldehyde and their major aqueous oxidation products were also analyzed, and control experiments performed. Decreases in the ion abundance of many positive mode compounds and increases in the ion abundance of many negative mode compounds (e.g., organic acids) suggest that precursors are predominantly aldehydes, organic peroxides and/or alcohols. Real-time ESI mass spectra were consistent with the expected loss of methylglyoxal and subsequent formation of pyruvate, glyoxylate, and oxalate. New insights regarding other potential precursors and products will be provided.

  6. Method for Estimating Harmonic Frequency Dependence of Diffusion Coefficient and Convective Velocity in Heat Pulse Propagation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Itoh, Kimitaka; Ida, Katsumi; Inagaki, Sigeru; Itoh, Sanae-I.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we propose a new set of formulae for estimating the harmonic frequency dependence of the diffusion coefficient and the convective velocity in the heat pulse propagation experiment in order to investigate the transport hysteresis. The assumptions that are used to derive the formulae can result in dummy frequency dependences of the transport coefficients. It is shown that these dummy frequency dependences of the transport coefficients can be distinguished from the true frequency dependence due to the transport hysteresis by using a bidirectional heat pulse propagation manner, in which both the outward propagating heat pulse and the inward propagating heat pulse are analyzed. The validity of the new formulae are examined in a simple numerical calculation.

  7. Island based radar and microwave radiometer measurements of stratus cloud parameters during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, A.S. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Fairall, C.W.; Snider, J.B. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States); Lenshow, D.H.; Mayer, S.D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, simultaneous measurements were made with a vertically pointing cloud sensing radar and a microwave radiometer. The radar measurements are used to estimate stratus cloud drizzle and turbulence parameters. In addition, with the microwave radiometer measurements of reflectivity, we estimated the profiles of cloud liquid water and effective radius. We used radar data for computation of vertical profiles of various drizzle parameters such as droplet concentration, modal radius, and spread. A sample of these results is shown in Figure 1. In addition, in non-drizzle clouds, with the radar and radiometer we can estimate the verticle profiles of stratus cloud parameters such as liquid water concentration and effective radius. This is accomplished by assuming a droplet distribution with droplet number concentration and width constant with height.

  8. Cloud-Top Entrainment in Stratocumulus Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Cloud entrainment, the mixing between cloudy and clear air at the boundary of clouds, constitutes one paradigm for the relevance of small scales in the Earth system: By regulating cloud lifetimes, meter- and submeter-scale processes at cloud boundaries can influence planetary-scale properties. Understanding cloud entrainment is difficult given the complexity and diversity of the associated phenomena, which include turbulence entrainment within a stratified medium, convective instabilities driven by radiative and evaporative cooling, shear instabilities, and cloud microphysics. Obtaining accurate data at the required small scales is also challenging, for both simulations and measurements. During the past few decades, however, high-resolution simulations and measurements have greatly advanced our understanding of the main mechanisms controlling cloud entrainment. This article reviews some of these advances, focusing on stratocumulus clouds, and indicates remaining challenges.

  9. Evaluation of Cloud Microphysical Parameterizations in Cloud Resolving Model Simulations using the ARM observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Muhlbauer, A.; Ackerman, T. P.

    2011-12-01

    Clouds modulate the distribution of energy and water within the atmosphere and regulate the hydrological cycle. Cloud microphysical parameterizations are critical for the representation of cloud microphysical properties in both cloud-resolving and climate models. In this study, we analyze the capabilities of a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with advanced bulk microphysics schemes to simulate the microphysical properties and evolution of convective clouds and anvil cirrus over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in the mid-latitudes and Kwajalein Atoll in the tropics. For evaluating simulated cloud properties, we use observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program 1997 summer Intensive Observations Period at the SGP site and the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX) field campaign. The CRM simulations are evaluated with the ARM and KWAJEX observations, in particular using precipitation records, radiative fluxes, and radar reflectivity values observed by the ARM millimeter wavelength cloud radar (MMCR) and the Kwajalein precipitation radar. Preliminary analysis of the ARM SGP case shows that although the precipitation events during this period are well captured by the model, the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) is considerably underestimated and the model generates too much high cloud, which is inconsistent with the MMCR observations. In our study we especially focus on the causes of the overproduction of ice and high clouds in the CRM simulations. Improvements of the ice microphysics scheme and resulting impacts on the simulation are presented.

  10. Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity: a comparison of observations obtained during the INCA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ström

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on in-situ observations performed during the Interhemispheric differences in cirrus properties from anthropogenic emissions (INCA experiment, we introduce and discuss the cloud presence fraction (CPF defined as the ratio between the number of data points determined to represent cloud at a given ambient relative humidity over ice (RHI divided by the total number of data points at that value of RHI. The CPFs are measured with four different cloud probes. Within similar ranges of detected particle sizes and concentrations, it is shown that different cloud probes yield results that are in good agreement with each other. The CPFs taken at Southern Hemisphere (SH and Northern Hemisphere (NH midlatitudes differ from each other. Above ice saturation, clouds occurred more frequently during the NH campaign. Local minima in the CPF as a function of RHI are interpreted as a systematic underestimation of cloud presence when cloud particles become invisible to cloud probes. Based on this interpretation, we find that clouds during the SH campaign formed preferentially at RHIs between 140 and 155%, whereas clouds in the NH campaign formed at RHIs somewhat below 130%. The data show that interstitial aerosol and ice particles coexist down to RHIs of 70-90%, demonstrating that the ability to distinguish between different particle types in cirrus conditions depends on the sensors used to probe the aerosol/cirrus system. Observed distributions of cloud water content differ only slightly between the NH and SH campaigns and seem to be only weakly, if at all, affected by the freezing aerosols.

  11. High-resolution simulations of shallow and deep convection over land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, J. P.; Teixeira, J.; Soares, P. M.; Miranda, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    The GCSS WG4 (Grabowski, 2006) case was chosen to study the transition from shallow to deep convection over land. The case was based on an idealization of observations made during the TRMM-LBA (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission - Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere experiment) in Rondonia, Brazil, on February 23, 1999. The case considered is a daytime convective development over land, which starts with the growth of a mixed boundary layer, evolving to shallow convective clouds with a later transition from shallow to deep precipitating convection. High resolution simulations of this case have been performed using the French community non-hydrostatic model MesoNH. Different model setups were used, with an emphasis on the sensitivity to model resolution, domain size and to the choice of microphysical parametrizations. A single column model (SCM) is also being developed in order to perform a simulation of the same case. The SCM model includes prognostic equations for the wind components, the thermodynamic variables and the turbulent kinetic energy. The sub-grid turbulent and convective fluxes are parameterized using the Eddy- Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach (EDMF) which combines the effects of local and non-local transport in a unified scheme. The comparison between the SCM and the Cloud Resolving Model will provide clues to the improvement of the EDMF framework in order to include the effects of deep convection, since currently it is only suitable to represent dry and shallow cumulus convection.

  12. Effect of ions on the measurement of sulphuric acid in the CLOUD experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rondo, L; Ehrhart, S; Schobesberger, S; Franchin, A; Junninen, H; Petäjä, T; Sipilä, M; Worsnop, D R; Curtius, J

    2014-01-01

    Ternary aerosol nucleation experiments were conducted in the CLOUD chamber at CERN in order to investigate the influence of ions on new particle formation. Neutral and ion-induced nucleation experiments, i.e., with and without the presence of ions, were carried out under precisely controlled conditions. The sulphuric acid concentration was measured with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) during the new particle formation experiments. The added ternary trace gases were ammonia (NH3), dimethylamine (DMA, C2H7N) or oxidised products of pinanediol (PD, C10H18O2). When pinanediol was introduced into the chamber, an increase in the mass spectrometric signal used to determine the sulphuric acid concentration (m/z 97, i.e., HSO4−) was observed due to ions from the CLOUD chamber. The enhancement was only observed during ion-induced nucleation measurements by using either galactic cosmic rays (GCR) or the proton synchrotron (PS) pion beam for the ion generation, respectively. The ion effect typically invo...

  13. The comparison of the results of numerical modeling and physical model experiment on laser polarization sensing of droplet clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshkevich, A. A.; Bryukhanova, V. V.; Samokhvalov, I. V.; Stykon, A. P.

    2014-11-01

    The task of laser sensing of droplet clouds by coaxial lidar is considered. Lidar return due to single scattering is formed in the volume bounded by the radiation pattern of the transmitter, while the double-scattering is determined by a receiving system field of view. The volume of the scattering medium exceeding a receiving system field of view forms the signal higher scattering orders ( < 2). The results of the numerical modeling of the distribution (in the recording plane) polarization characteristics of lidar signal from droplet clouds in the double scattering approximation in comparison with the results of the physical model experiment simulating sounding of a droplet cloud are discussed in this paper.

  14. Shallow cirrus convection – a source for ice supersaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Spichtinger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The origin and persistence of high ice supersaturation is still not well understood. In this study, the impact of local dynamics as source for ice supersaturation inside cirrus clouds is investigated. Nucleation and growth of ice crystals inside potentially unstable layers in the tropopause region might lead to shallow convection inside (layered cirrus clouds due to latent heat release. The intrinsic updraught inside convective cells constitutes a dominant but transient source for ice supersaturation. A realistic case of shallow cirrus convection is investigated using radiosonde data, meteorological analyses and large-eddy simulations of cirrus clouds. The simulations corroborate the existence of ice supersaturation inside cirrus clouds as a transient phenomenon. Ice supersaturation is frequent, but determined by the life cycle of convective cells in shallow cirrus convection. Cirrus clouds driven by shallow cirrus convection are mostly not in thermodynamic equilibrium; they are usually in a subsaturated or supersaturated state.

  15. Characterization of cumulus cloud fields using trajectories in the center of gravity versus water mass phase space: 2. Aerosol effects on warm convective clouds: Center of Gravity Versus Water Mass 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiblum, Reuven H. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Altaratz, Orit [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Koren, Ilan [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Feingold, Graham [Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL), Boulder Colorado USA; Kostinski, Alexander B. [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton Michigan USA; Khain, Alexander P. [Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem Israel; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail [Atmosphere Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Fredj, Erick [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Dagan, Guy [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Pinto, Lital [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Yaish, Ricki [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Chen, Qian [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel

    2016-06-07

    In Part I of this work a 3D cloud tracking algorithm and phase-space of center of gravity altitude versus cloud liquid water mass (CvM space) were introduced and described in detail. We showed how new physical insight can be gained by following cloud trajectories in the CvM space. Here, this approach is used to investigate aerosol effects on cloud fields of warm cumuli. We show a clear effect of the aerosol loading on the shape and size of CvM clusters. We also find fundamental differences in the CvM space between simulations using bin versus bulk microphysical schemes, with the bin scheme precipitation expressing much higher sensitivity to changes in aerosol concentrations. Using the bin microphysical scheme, we find that the increase in cloud center of gravity altitude with increase in aerosol concentrations occurs for a wide range of cloud sizes. This is attributed to reduced sedimentation, increased buoyancy and vertical velocities, and increased environmental instability, all of which are tightly coupled to inhibition of precipitation processes and subsequent feedbacks of clouds on their environment. Many of the physical processes shown here are consistent with processes typically associated with cloud invigoration.

  16. A transilient matrix for moist convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2011-08-15

    A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

  17. A study on the structure of the convective atmosphere over the Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX-99

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U C Mohanty; N V Sam; S Das; A N V Satyanarayana

    2003-06-01

    Convective activity is one of the major processes in the atmosphere influencing the local and large scale weather in the tropics. The latent heat released by the cumulus cloud is known to drive monsoon circulation, which on the other hand supplies the moisture that maintains the cumulus clouds. An investigation is carried out on the convective structure of the atmosphere during active and suppressed periods of convection using data sets obtained from the Bay of Bengal and Monsoon Experiment (BOBMEX). The cumulus convection though being a small-scale phenomenon, still influences its embedding environment by interaction through various scales. This study shows the variation in the kinematic and convective parameters during the transition from suppressed to active periods of convection. Convergence in the lower levels and strong upward vertical velocity, significant during active convection are associated with the formation of monsoon depressions. The apparent heat source due to latent heat release and the vertical transport of the eddy heat by cumulus convection, and the apparent moisture sink due to net condensation and vertical divergence of the eddy transport of moisture, are estimated through residuals of the thermodynamic equation and examined in relation to monsoon activity during BOBMEX.

  18. Experience in Grid Site Testing for ATLAS, CMS and LHCb with HammerCloud

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Frequent validation and stress testing of the network, storage and CPU resources of a grid site is essential to achieve high performance and reliability. HammerCloud was previously introduced with the goals of enabling VO- and site-administrators to run such tests in an automated or on-demand manner. The ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments have all developed VO plugins for the service and have successfully integrated it into their grid operations infrastructures. This work will present the experience in running HammerCloud at full scale for more than 3 years and present solutions to the scalability issues faced by the service. First, we will show the particular challenges faced when integrating with CMS and LHCb offline computing, including customized dashboards to show site validation reports for the VOs and a new API to tightly integrate with the LHCbDIRAC Resource Status System. Next, a study of the automatic site exclusion component used by ATLAS will be presented along with results for tuning the exclusion ...

  19. Experience in Grid Site Testing for ATLAS, CMS and LHCb with HammerCloud

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Ster , D; Medrano Llamas, R; Legger , F; Sciaba, A; Sciacca, G; Ubeda Garca , M

    2012-01-01

    Frequent validation and stress testing of the network, storage and CPU resources of a grid site is essential to achieve high performance and reliability. HammerCloud was previously introduced with the goals of enabling VO- and site-administrators to run such tests in an automated or on-demand manner. The ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments have all developed VO plugins for the service and have successfully integrated it into their grid operations infrastructures. This work will present the experience in running HammerCloud at full scale for more than 3 years and present solutions to the scalability issues faced by the service. First, we will show the particular challenges faced when integrating with CMS and LHCb offline computing, including customized dashboards to show site validation reports for the VOs and a new API to tightly integrate with the LHCbDIRAC Resource Status System. Next, a study of the automatic site exclusion component used by ATLAS will be presented along with results for tuning the exclusion p...

  20. The Complex Point Cloud for the Knowledge of the Architectural Heritage. Some Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveta, C.; Salvatori, M.; Vitelli, G. P.

    2017-05-01

    The present paper aims to present a series of experiences and experimentations that a group of PhD from the University of Naples Federico II conducted over the past decade. This work has concerned the survey and the graphic restitution of monuments and works of art, finalized to their conservation. The targeted query of complex point cloud acquired by 3D scanners, integrated with photo sensors and thermal imaging, has allowed to explore new possibilities of investigation. In particular, we will present the scientific results of the experiments carried out on some important historical artifacts with distinct morphological and typological characteristics. According to aims and needs that emerged during the connotative process, with the support of archival and iconographic historical research, the laser scanner technology has been used in many different ways. New forms of representation, obtained directly from the point cloud, have been tested for the elaboration of thematic studies for documenting the pathologies and the decay of materials, for correlating visible aspects with invisible aspects of the artifact.

  1. THE COMPLEX POINT CLOUD FOR THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE. SOME EXPERIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Aveta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to present a series of experiences and experimentations that a group of PhD from the University of Naples Federico II conducted over the past decade. This work has concerned the survey and the graphic restitution of monuments and works of art, finalized to their conservation. The targeted query of complex point cloud acquired by 3D scanners, integrated with photo sensors and thermal imaging, has allowed to explore new possibilities of investigation. In particular, we will present the scientific results of the experiments carried out on some important historical artifacts with distinct morphological and typological characteristics. According to aims and needs that emerged during the connotative process, with the support of archival and iconographic historical research, the laser scanner technology has been used in many different ways. New forms of representation, obtained directly from the point cloud, have been tested for the elaboration of thematic studies for documenting the pathologies and the decay of materials, for correlating visible aspects with invisible aspects of the artifact.

  2. Convective aggregation in realistic convective-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the real-world relevance of idealized-model convective self-aggregation, five 15 day cases of real organized convection in the tropics are simulated. These include multiple simulations of each case to test sensitivities of the convective organization and mean states to interactive radiation, interactive surface fluxes, and evaporation of rain. These simulations are compared to self-aggregation seen in the same model configured to run in idealized radiative-convective equilibrium. Analysis of the budget of the spatial variance of column-integrated frozen moist static energy shows that control runs have significant positive contributions to organization from radiation and negative contributions from surface fluxes and transport, similar to idealized runs once they become aggregated. Despite identical lateral boundary conditions for all experiments in each case, systematic differences in mean column water vapor (CWV), CWV distribution shape, and CWV autocorrelation length scale are found between the different sensitivity runs, particularly for those without interactive radiation, showing that there are at least some similarities in sensitivities to these feedbacks in both idealized and realistic simulations (although the organization of precipitation shows less sensitivity to interactive radiation). The magnitudes and signs of these systematic differences are consistent with a rough equilibrium between (1) equalization due to advection from the lateral boundaries and (2) disaggregation due to the absence of interactive radiation, implying disaggregation rates comparable to those in idealized runs with aggregated initial conditions and noninteractive radiation. This points to a plausible similarity in the way that radiation feedbacks maintain aggregated convection in both idealized simulations and the real world.Plain Language SummaryUnderstanding the processes that lead to the organization of tropical rainstorms is an important challenge for weather

  3. Radiative effects of polar stratospheric clouds during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, Joan E.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of a study of the radiative effects of polar stratospheric clouds during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) in which daily 3D Type I nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and Type II water ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were generated in the polar regions during AAOE and the AASE aircraft missions. Mission data on particular composition and size, together with NMC-analyzed temperatures, are used. For AAOE, both Type I and Type II clouds were formed for the time period August 23 to September 17, after which only Type I clouds formed. During AASE, while Type I clouds were formed for each day between January 3 and February 10, Type II clouds formed on only two days, January 24 and 31. Mie theory and a radiative transfer model are used to compute the radiative heating rates during the mission periods, for clear and cloudy lower sky cases. Only the Type II water ice clouds have a significant radiative effect, with the Type I NATO PSCs generating a net heating or cooling of 0.1 K/d or less.

  4. Zero-gravity cloud physics laboratory: Candidate experiments definition and preliminary concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, L. R.; Greco, R. V.; Hollinden, A. B.

    1973-01-01

    The candidate definition studies on the zero-g cloud physics laboratory are covered. This laboratory will be an independent self-contained shuttle sortie payload. Several critical technology areas have been identified and studied to assure proper consideration in terms of engineering requirements for the final design. Areas include chambers, gas and particle generators, environmental controls, motion controls, change controls, observational techniques, and composition controls. This unique laboratory will allow studies to be performed without mechanical, aerodynamics, electrical, or other type techniques to support the object under study. This report also covers the candidate experiment definitions, chambers and experiment classes, laboratory concepts and plans, special supporting studies, early flight opportunities and payload planning data for overall shuttle payload requirements assessments.

  5. Oscillatory thermocapillary convection in liquid bridges with highly deformed free surfaces: Experiments and energy-stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, L. B. S.; Neitzel, G. P.; Fontaine, J.-P.; Dell'Aversana, P.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory experimentation, numerical simulation, and energy-stability theory are used to examine the effect of interface deformation on the onset of oscillatory thermocapillary convection in half zones. Experiments are performed to map the stability boundaries marking the onset of oscillatory flow, modifying the free-surface deformation by adjusting the volume of liquid in the bridge. The stability results presented here along with those of other researchers [Monti et al., Proceedings of the 43rd Cong. Int. Artro. Fed. (1992); Hu et al., J. Cryst. Growth 142, 379 (1994)] show that free-surface curvature can have a pronounced influence on flow stability. Steady, axisymmetric flow simulations are computed using the commercial code FIDAP to model the conditions of the experiments, and reveal that flow structure near the stability boundary is sensitive to several parameters. Energy theory is applied to these simulations to determine sufficient conditions for stability. Comparisons between the theoretical and experimental results show nonconservative energy limits falling above the experimentally determined stability boundaries for bridges of various liquid volumes. While the trend of the experimental data is predicted for zones of large volume ratio (bulging zones), the same cannot be said for those with small volume ratio (necked-down zones). In addition, energy-stability limits for some undeformed-free-surface cases were determined which are above the linear-stability limits determined by other researchers, in clear contradiction of the roles of the respective theories.

  6. Cloud Detection with MATLAB

    OpenAIRE

    P. Shrivastava

    2013-01-01

    The accurate detection of clouds in satellite imagery is important in research and operational applications. Cloud cover influences the distribution of solar radiation reaching the ground where it is absorbed. Resulting fluxes of sensible and latent heat are critical to the accurate characterization of boundary layer behavior and mesoscale circulations that often lead to convective development. Therefore the spatial and temporal variation in cloud cover can greatly affect regional an...

  7. Cloud microphysics and surface properties in climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamnes, K. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Cloud optical thickness is determined from ground-based measurements of broadband incoming solar irradiance using a radiation model in which the cloud optical depth is adjusted until computed irradiance agrees with the measured value. From spectral measurements it would be feasible to determine both optical thickness and mean drop size, which apart from cloud structure and morphology, are the most important climatic parameters of clouds. A radiative convective model is used to study the sensitivity of climate to cloud liquid water amount and cloud drop size. This is illustrated in Figure 21.1 which shows that for medium thick clouds a 10 % increase in drop size yields a surface warming of 1.5{degrees}C, which is the same as that due to a doubling of carbon dioxide. For thick clouds, a 5% decrease in drop size is sufficient to offset the warming due to doubling of carbon dioxide. A radiative transfer model for the coupled atmosphere/sea ice/ocean system is used to study the partitioning of radiative energy between the three strata, and the potential for testing such a model in terms of planned experiments in the Arctic is discussed.

  8. Generalized Convective Quasi-Equilibrium Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Plant, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Arakawa and Schubert proposed convective quasi-equilibrium as a basic principle for closing their spectrum mass-flux convection parameterization. In deriving this principle, they show that the cloud work function is a key variable that controls the growth of convection. Thus, this closure hypothesis imposes a steadiness of the cloud work function tendency. This presentation shows how this principle can be generalized so that it can also encompasses both the CAPE and the moisture-convergence closures. Note that the majority of the current mass-flux convection parameterization invokes a CAPE closure, whereas the moisture-convergence closure was extremely popular historically. This generalization, in turn, includes both closures as special cases of convective quasi-equilibrium. This generalization further suggests wide range of alternative possibilities for convective closure. In general, a vertical integral of any function depending on both large-scale and convective-scale variables can be adopted as an alternative closure variables, leading to an analogous formulation as Arakawa and Schubert's convective quasi-equilibrium formulation. Among those, probably the most fascinating possibility is to take a vertical integral of the convective-scale moisture for the closure. Use of a convective-scale variable for closure has a particular appeal by not suffering from a loss of predictability of any large-scale variables. That is a main problem with any of the current convective closures, not only for the moisture-convergence based closure as often asserted.

  9. Cloud management and security

    CERN Document Server

    Abbadi, Imad M

    2014-01-01

    Written by an expert with over 15 years' experience in the field, this book establishes the foundations of Cloud computing, building an in-depth and diverse understanding of the technologies behind Cloud computing. In this book, the author begins with an introduction to Cloud computing, presenting fundamental concepts such as analyzing Cloud definitions, Cloud evolution, Cloud services, Cloud deployment types and highlighting the main challenges. Following on from the introduction, the book is divided into three parts: Cloud management, Cloud security, and practical examples. Part one presents the main components constituting the Cloud and federated Cloud infrastructure(e.g., interactions and deployment), discusses management platforms (resources and services), identifies and analyzes the main properties of the Cloud infrastructure, and presents Cloud automated management services: virtual and application resource management services. Part two analyzes the problem of establishing trustworthy Cloud, discuss...

  10. Library development for Storj cloud clients in unsupported environments : Based on experiences in an Android environment

    OpenAIRE

    Comte, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    The thesis illustrates the differences between presently common cloud architectures which are traditionally of a centralized form and decentralized cloud architectures. The latter particularly pays attention to the decentralized cloud provided by Storj Labs. Researching the Storj cloud further, it explains the advantages that its architecture entails and presents some of the difficulties coming with it. The main aim of the thesis is providing information for developers on how to programma...

  11. Flight Experiments of Physical Vapor Transport of ZnSe: Growth of Crystals in Various Convective Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    2015-01-01

    A low gravity material experiment will be performed in the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR) on International Space Station (ISS). The flight experiment will conduct crystal growths of ZnSe and related ternary compounds, such as ZnSeS and ZnSeTe, by physical vapor transport (PVT). The main objective of the project is to determine the relative contributions of gravity-driven fluid flows to the compositional distribution, incorporation of impurities and defects, and deviation from stoichiometry observed in the grown crystals as results of buoyancy-driven convection and growth interface fluctuations caused by irregular fluid-flows on Earth. The investigation consists of extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research efforts and concurrent flight experimentation. The objectives of the ground-based studies are (1) obtain the experimental data and conduct the analyses required to define the optimum growth parameters for the flight experiments, (2) perfect various characterization techniques to establish the standard procedure for material characterization, (3) quantitatively establish the characteristics of the crystals grown on Earth as a basis for subsequent comparative evaluations of the crystals grown in a low-gravity environment and (4) develop theoretical and analytical methods required for such evaluations. ZnSe and related ternary compounds have been grown by vapor transport technique with real time in-situ non-invasive monitoring techniques. The grown crystals have been characterized extensively by various techniques to correlate the grown crystal properties with the growth conditions. This talk will focus on the ground-based studies on the PVT crystal growth of ZnSe and related ternary compounds, especially the effects of different growth orientations related to gravity direction on the grown crystals.

  12. Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in anExperimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFDPredictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaraman, Buvaneswari; Finlayson, Elizabeth U.; Sohn, MichaelD.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Price, Phillip N.; Wood, Emily E.; Sextro,Richard G.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2006-01-01

    We compare computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions using a steady-state Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model with experimental data on airflow and pollutant dispersion under mixed-convection conditions in a 7 x 9 x 11m high experimental facility. The Rayleigh number, based on height, was O(10{sup 11}) and the atrium was mechanically ventilated. We released tracer gas in the atrium and measured the spatial distribution of concentrations; we then modeled the experiment using four different levels of modeling detail. The four computational models differ in the choice of temperature boundary conditions and the choice of turbulence model. Predictions from a low-Reynolds-number k-{var_epsilon} model with detailed boundary conditions agreed well with the data using three different model-measurement comparison metrics. Results from the same model with a single temperature prescribed for each wall also agreed well with the data. Predictions of a standard k-{var_epsilon} model were about the same as those of an isothermal model; neither performed well. Implications of the results for practical applications are discussed.

  13. Large-eddy simulation of organized precipitating trade wind cumulus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Seifert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Trade wind cumulus clouds often organize in along-wind cloud streets and across-wind mesoscale arcs. We present a benchmark large-eddy simulation which resolves the individual clouds as well as the mesoscale organization on scales of O(10 km. Different methods to quantify organization of cloud fields are applied and discussed. Using perturbed physics large-eddy simulations experiments the processes leading to the formation of cloud clusters and the mesoscale arcs are revealed. We find that both cold pools as well as the sub-cloud layer moisture field are crucial to understand the organization of precipitating shallow convection. Further sensitivity studies show that microphysical assumptions can have a pronounced impact on the onset of cloud organization.

  14. Scaling for Mixed Convection Heat Transfer in Passive Containments and Experiment Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shengfei; Yu, Yu; Lv, Xuefeng; Niu, Fenglei [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources/North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China); Yan, Xiuping [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, Beijing (China)

    2012-03-15

    Most of the advanced nuclear reactor design utilizes passive systems to remove heat from the core by natural circulation. The passive systems will be widely used in generation III pressurized water reactor. One of the typical passive systems is passive containment cooling system (PCCS), which is a passive condenser system designed to remove heat from the containment for long term cooling after a postulated reactor accident. In order to establish empirical correlations and develop simulation models, a scaling analysis is performed in designing an experiment for the prototype PCCS. This paper presents a scaling method and the design of the experimental facility. The key dimensionless parameters governing the dominant processes are given at last.

  15. User experience integrated life-style cloud-based medical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serban, Alexandru; Lupşe, Oana Sorina; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara

    2015-01-01

    Having a modern application capable to automatically collect and process data from users, based on information and lifestyle answers is one of current challenges for researchers and medical science. The purpose of the current study is to integrate user experience design (UXD) in a cloud-based medical application to improve patient safety, quality of care and organizational efficiency. The process consists of collecting traditional and new data from patients and users using online questionnaires. A questionnaire dynamically asks questions about the user's current diet and lifestyle. After the user will introduce the data, the application will formulate a presumptive nutritional plan and will suggest different medical recommendations regarding a healthy lifestyle, and calculates a risk factor for diseases. This software application, by design and usability will be an efficient tool dedicated for fitness, nutrition and health professionals.

  16. Kinematical analysis with the Emulsion Cloud Chamber in the OPERA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Di Capua, F

    2010-01-01

    The OPERA experiment aims at measuring for the first time neutrino oscil- lation in appearance mode through the detection of ni-tau in an almost pure niμ beam produced at CERN SPS (CNGS), 730 km far from the detector. The ni-tau appearance signal is identified through the measurement of the decay daughter particles of the " lepton produced in CC ni-tau interactions. Since the short-lived " particle has, at the energy of the beam, an average decay length shorter than a 1 mm, a micrometric detection resolution is needed. The OPERA appara- tus is hybrid, using nuclear emulsion as high precision tracker and electronic detectors for the time stamp, event localization in the target and muon recon- struction. The Emulsion Cloud Chamber technique fulfils the requirement of a microscopic resolution together with a large target mass. The kinematical analysis allowed by this technique is described.

  17. Self-organization of hydrothermal outflow and recharge in young oceanic crust: Constraints from open-top porous convection analog experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Olive, J. A. L.; Barreyre, T.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrothermal circulation at the axis of mid-ocean ridges has a profound effect on chemical and biological processes in the deep ocean, and influences the thermo-mechanical state of young oceanic lithosphere. Yet, the geometry of fluid pathways beneath the seafloor and its relation to spatial gradients in crustal permeability remain enigmatic. Here we present new laboratory models of hydrothermal circulation aimed at constraining the self-organization of porous convection cells in homogeneous as well as highly heterogeneous crust analogs. Oceanic crust analogs of known permeability are constructed using uniform glass spheres and 3-D printed plastics with a network of mutually perpendicular tubes. These materials are saturated with corn syrup-water mixtures and heated at their base by a resistive silicone strip heater to initiate thermal convection. A layer of pure fluid (i.e., an analog ocean) overlies the porous medium and allows an "open-top" boundary condition. Areas of fluid discharge from the crust into the ocean are identified by illuminating microscopic glass particles carried by the fluid, using laser sheets. Using particle image velocimetry, we estimate fluid discharge rates as well as the location and extent of fluid recharge. Thermo-couples distributed throughout the crust provide insights into the geometry of convection cells at depth, and enable estimates of convective heat flux, which can be compared to the heat supplied at the base of the system. Preliminary results indicate that in homogeneous crust, convection is largely confined to the narrow slot overlying the heat source. Regularly spaced discharge zones appear focused while recharge areas appear diffuse, and qualitatively resemble the along-axis distribution of hydrothermal fields at oceanic spreading centers. By varying the permeability of the crustal analogs, the viscosity of the convecting fluid, and the imposed basal temperature, our experiments span Rayleigh numbers between 10 and 10

  18. A limited area model (LAM) intercomparison study of a TWP-ICE active monsoon mesoscale convective event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Dudhia, Jim; Field, Paul R.; Wapler, Kathrin; Fridlind, Ann; Varble, Adam; Zipser, Ed; Petch, Jon; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Zhenduo

    2012-06-01

    A limited area model (LAM) intercomparison study is conducted based on a tropical monsoonal deep convection case observed during the Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE). The LAM simulations are compared with the variational analyses (VA) based on the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) observations and the cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations forced by the VA. Driven by the ECMWF analyses or global model forecasts, LAMs are able to produce the large-scale thermodynamic field reasonably well compared with the VA. However, the LAM simulated dynamic fields, such as the large-scale horizontal divergence, vertical velocity, and cyclogenesis in the monsoonal trough, have a large inter-model spread and deviate substantially from observations. Despite the differences in large-scale forcing, there is certain consistency between the CRM and LAM simulations: stratiform (w ≤ 1 m s-1) ice clouds dominate the cloud fraction and convective (w > 3 m s-1) clouds occupy less than 3 percent of the total cloudy area. But the hydrometeor content of stratiform ice clouds is only one tenth of that of convective and transitional (1 m s-1 < w ≤ 3 m s-1) ice clouds. However, there is a large inter-LAM spread in the simulated cloud fraction and hydrometeor mixing ratios. The inter-LAM difference in solid phase hydrometeors (cloud ice, snow, and graupel) can be up to nearly a factor of 10. Among all the hydrometeor types, the stratiform ice clouds are simulated least consistently by the LAMs. The large inter-LAM spread suggests that obtaining consistent and reliable dynamic and cloud fields remains a challenge for the LAM approach.

  19. Sensitivity of a global climate model to the specification of convective updraft and downdraft mass fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Genio, Anthony D.; Yao, Mao-Sung

    1988-01-01

    The response of the GISS global climate model to different parameterizations of moist convective mass flux is studied. A control run with arbitrarily specified updraft mass flux is compared to experiments predicting cumulus mass fulx on the basis of low-level convergence, convergence plus surface evaporation, or convergence and evaporation modified by varying boundary layer height. Also, an experiment that includes a simple parameterization of saturated convective-scale downdrafts is discussed. It is found that the model correctly simulates the correlation between deep convection strength and tropical sea surface temperature in each experiment with the parameterization of cumulus mass flux having little effect. The implications of the experiments for cloud effects on climate sensitivity are examined.

  20. Experience in Grid Site Testing for ATLAS, CMS and LHCb with HammerCloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmsheuser, Johannes; Medrano Llamas, Ramón; Legger, Federica; Sciabà, Andrea; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Úbeda García, Mario; van der Ster, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Frequent validation and stress testing of the network, storage and CPU resources of a grid site is essential to achieve high performance and reliability. HammerCloud was previously introduced with the goals of enabling VO- and site-administrators to run such tests in an automated or on-demand manner. The ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments have all developed VO plugins for the service and have successfully integrated it into their grid operations infrastructures. This work will present the experience in running HammerCloud at full scale for more than 3 years and present solutions to the scalability issues faced by the service. First, we will show the particular challenges faced when integrating with CMS and LHCb offline computing, including customized dashboards to show site validation reports for the VOs and a new API to tightly integrate with the LHCbDIRAC Resource Status System. Next, a study of the automatic site exclusion component used by ATLAS will be presented along with results for tuning the exclusion policies. A study of the historical test results for ATLAS, CMS and LHCb will be presented, including comparisons between the experiments’ grid availabilities and a search for site-based or temporal failure correlations. Finally, we will look to future plans that will allow users to gain new insights into the test results; these include developments to allow increased testing concurrency, increased scale in the number of metrics recorded per test job (up to hundreds), and increased scale in the historical job information (up to many millions of jobs per VO).

  1. Evaluation of precipitation in a set of sensitivity experiments at convection-permitting resolution over the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Marie; Truhetz, Heimo; Csaki, Andras

    2017-04-01

    While the added-value of convection-permitting regional climate models has been demonstrated for the representation of precipitation, the sensitivity to the model configuration of such RCMs remains largely unknown. This question is addressed in the framework of the projects NHCM-2 (Non-Hydrostatic Climate Modeling II, FWF project 24785-N29) and HighEnd:Extremes (ACRP project KR13AC6K10981). With COSMO-CLM version 5.0, a set of sensitivity experiments with 3 km grid spacing are conducted over the greater Alpine region, from January 2006 to December 2010. Ten parameters are tested, that are expected to have a critical influence on the representation of precipitation. It also includes a comparison to WRF with a similar setup. The evaluation of high-resolution precipitation uses a set of meaningful skill scores derived from NWP, for daily and sub-daily scales. A set of high-quality, high-resolution gridded observational datasets has been used: the Wegener Net high-density high-frequency stations network located on the South-Eastern part of Austria (151 stations, 15 km * 20 km); INCA (hourly, 1km resolution) GPARD1 (daily, 1 km) for Austria, and EURO4M (daily, 4km) for the full Alpine chain. Challenges related to the evaluation at high resolution are also discussed, and a set of indices is proposed to characterize and evaluate precipitation with the Wegener Net stations network. While the physics and micro-physics tuning experiments show robust representation of precipitation, the driving data plays a major role in the representation of precipitation. A dry bias in the low-land regions in summer and autumn exists both in CCLM and WRF, independently to the parameters tested in CCLM. The origin of this dry bias is also investigated.

  2. ISS COLUMBUS laboratory experiment `GeoFlow I and II' -fluid physics research in microgravity environment to study convection phenomena inside deep Earth and mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futterer, Birgit; Egbers, Christoph; Chossat, Pascal; Hollerbach, Rainer; Breuer, Doris; Feudel, Fred; Mutabazi, Innocent; Tuckerman, Laurette

    Overall driving mechanism of flow in inner Earth is convection in its gravitational buoyancy field. A lot of effort has been involved in theoretical prediction and numerical simulation of both the geodynamo, which is maintained by convection, and mantle convection, which is the main cause for plate tectonics. Especially resolution of convective patterns and heat transfer mechanisms has been in focus to reach the real, highly turbulent conditions inside Earth. To study specific phenomena experimentally different approaches has been observed, against the background of magneto-hydrodynamic but also on the pure hydrodynamic physics of fluids. With the experiment `GeoFlow' (Geophysical Flow Simulation) instability and transition of convection in spherical shells under the influence of central-symmetry buoyancy force field are traced for a wide range of rotation regimes within the limits between non-rotating and rapid rotating spheres. The special set-up of high voltage potential between inner and outer sphere and use of a dielectric fluid as working fluid induce an electro-hydrodynamic force, which is comparable to gravitational buoyancy force inside Earth. To reduce overall gravity in a laboratory this technique requires microgravity conditions. The `GeoFlow I' experiment was accomplished on International Space Station's module COLUM-BUS inside Fluid Science Laboratory FSL und supported by EADS Astrium, Friedrichshafen, User Support und Operations Centre E-USOC in Madrid, Microgravity Advanced Research and Support Centre MARS in Naples, as well as COLUMBUS Control Center COL-CC Munich. Running from August 2008 until January 2009 it delivered 100.000 images from FSL's optical diagnostics module; here more precisely the Wollaston shearing interferometry was used. Here we present the experimental alignment with numerical prediction for the non-rotating and rapid rotation case. The non-rotating case is characterized by a co-existence of several stationary supercritical

  3. Idealized marine cloud brightening experiments G4cdnc from the geoengineering model intercomparison project GeoMIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weum Stjern, Camilla; Egill Kristjánsson, Jón; Boucher, Olivier; Cole, Jason N. S.; Jones, Andy; Kravitz, Ben; Niemeier, Ulrike; Muri, Helene; Phipps, Steven J.; Watanabe, Shingo

    2017-04-01

    Climate engineering could be considered as part of a response portfolio to contribute to reach such ambitious climate targets as those set by the Paris Agreement. Marine cloud brightening (MCB) is one of these techniques, which falls into the category of solar radiation management, or albedo modification, and aims to cool the climate by increasing the amount of solar radiation reflected by clouds. Existing model assessments of MCB have very different experimental set-ups, making comparison difficult. Therefore, the experiment G4cdnc was designed, in which several Earth system models performed the same perturbation of cloud properties, to assess the climate impacts. The G4cdnc experiment starts in year 2020 in the RCP4.5 scenario and dictates a 50% increase in cloud droplet number concentrations of low level clouds over global oceans for a duration of 50 years. Many of the models significantly underestimate low level cloud amounts; nevertheless, all the models simulate a cooling effect from MCB. The resulting net radiative forcing is of -1.8 Wm^-2 in the ensemble mean with large inter-model spread. The ensemble mean global cooling achieved is of -0.95 K with a particularly strong cooling over low latitude land masses. There is a global precipitation decrease of -0.08 mm/day due to a cooler climate, but in low latitudes there is a 0.03 mm/day increase over land from circulation changes. Inter-model differences can be partly explained by different cloud susceptibilities, but more studies are needed to fully understand the mechanisms involved.

  4. An application of a higher order finite difference method to a natural convection experiment in the hot plenum of an LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, O. (Advanced Reactor Div., Mitsubishi Atomic Power Industries, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)); Motomiya, Y. (Advanced Reactor Div., Mitsubishi Atomic Power Industries, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)); Takeda, H. (FBR Dept., Abiko Lab., Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Chiba (Japan)); Koga, T. (FBR Dept., Abiko Lab., Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Chiba (Japan))

    1994-02-01

    A two dimensional thermal-hydraulic analysis of a natural circulation experiment has been performed to evaluate the effectiveness of a higher order finite difference method for solving the Navier-Stokes and the energy equations. In the method, the convection terms appearing in each equation are solved by the Method of Characteristics using the third order Lagrange type polynomial as the interpolation function, and an iterative procedure is applied to solve the time derivative terms of each equation stably with second order accuracy. The analytical results have been compared with an experiment in which the temperature and the velocity distributions in the plenum region were measured with their fluctuations, and it was shown that the higher order finite difference method could simulate natural convection phenomena involving fluctuations well. (orig.)

  5. Developing large-scale forcing data for single-column and cloud-resolving models from the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shaocheng; Klein, Stephen A.; Zhang, Minghua; Yio, John J.; Cederwall, Richard T.; McCoy, Renata

    2006-10-01

    This study represents an effort to develop Single-Column Model (SCM) and Cloud-Resolving Model large-scale forcing data from a sounding array in the high latitudes. An objective variational analysis approach is used to process data collected from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which was conducted over the North Slope of Alaska in October 2004. In this method the observed surface and top of atmosphere measurements are used as constraints to adjust the sounding data from M-PACE in order to conserve column-integrated mass, heat, moisture, and momentum. Several important technical and scientific issues related to the data analysis are discussed. It is shown that the analyzed data reasonably describe the dynamic and thermodynamic features of the Arctic cloud systems observed during M-PACE. Uncertainties in the analyzed forcing fields are roughly estimated by examining the sensitivity of those fields to uncertainties in the upper-air data and surface constraints that are used in the analysis. Impacts of the uncertainties in the analyzed forcing data on SCM simulations are discussed. Results from the SCM tests indicate that the bulk features of the observed Arctic cloud systems can be captured qualitatively well using the forcing data derived in this study, and major model errors can be detected despite the uncertainties that exist in the forcing data as illustrated by the sensitivity tests. Finally, the possibility of using the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis data to derive the large-scale forcing over the Arctic region is explored.

  6. Direct Observation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation during Cloud Condensation-Evaporation Cycles (SOAaq) in Simulation Chamber Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doussin, J. F.; Bregonzio-Rozier, L.; Giorio, C.; Siekmann, F.; Gratien, A.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Ravier, S.; Pangui, E.; Tapparo, A.; Kalberer, M.; Monod, A.

    2014-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) undergo many reactions in the atmosphere and form a wide range of oxidised and water-soluble compounds. These compounds can partition into atmospheric water droplets, and react within the aqueous phase producing higher molecular weight and/or less volatile compounds which can remain in the particle phase after water evaporation and thus increase the organic aerosol mass (Ervens et al., 2011; Altieri et al., 2008; Couvidat et al., 2013). While this hypothesis is frequently discussed in the literature, so far, almost no direct observations of such a process have been provided.The aim of the present work is to study SOA formation from isoprene photooxidation during cloud condensation-evaporation cycles.The experiments were performed during the CUMULUS project (CloUd MULtiphase chemistry of organic compoUndS in the troposphere), in the CESAM simulation chamber located at LISA. CESAM is a 4.2 m3 stainless steel chamber equipped with realistic irradiation sources and temperature and relative humidity (RH) controls (Wang et al., 2011). In each experiment, isoprene was allowed to oxidize during several hours in the presence on nitrogen oxides under dry conditions. Gas phase compounds were analyzed on-line by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), NOx and O3 analyzers. SOA formation was monitored on-line with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The experimental protocol was optimised to generate cloud events in the simulation chamber, which allowed us to generate clouds lasting for ca. 10 minutes in the presence of light.In all experiments, we observed that during cloud formation, water-soluble gas-phase oxidation products (e.g., methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid and glycolaldehyde) readily partitioned into cloud

  7. Covariability in the Monthly Mean Convective and Radiative Diurnal Cycles in the Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Jason B.; Taylor, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    The diurnal cycle of convective clouds greatly influences the radiative energy balance in convectively active regions of Earth, through both direct presence, and the production of anvil and stratiform clouds. Previous studies show that the frequency and properties of convective clouds can vary on monthly timescales as a result of variability in the monthly mean atmospheric state. Furthermore, the radiative budget in convectively active regions also varies by up to 7 Wm-2 in convectively active regions. These facts suggest that convective clouds connect atmospheric state variability and radiation variability beyond clear sky effects alone. Previous research has identified monthly covariability between the diurnal cycle of CERES-observed top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes and multiple atmospheric state variables from reanalysis over the Amazon region. ASVs that enhance (reduce) deep convection, such as CAPE (LTS), tend to shift the daily OLR and cloud albedo maxima earlier (later) in the day by 2-3 hr. We first test the analysis method using multiple reanalysis products for both the dry and wet seasons to further investigate the robustness of the preliminary results. We then use CloudSat data as an independent cloud observing system to further evaluate the relationships of cloud properties to variability in radiation and atmospheric states. While CERES can decompose OLR variability into clear sky and cloud effects, it cannot determine what variability in cloud properties lead to variability in the radiative cloud effects. Cloud frequency, cloud top height, and cloud microphysics all contribute to the cloud radiative effect, all of which are observable by CloudSat. In addition, CloudSat can also observe the presence and variability of deep convective cores responsible for the production of anvil clouds. We use these capabilities to determine the covariability of convective cloud properties and the radiative diurnal cycle.

  8. An investigation of how radiation may cause accelerated rates of tropical cyclogenesis and diurnal cycles of convective activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Nicholls

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent cloud-resolving numerical modeling results suggest that radiative forcing causes accelerated rates of tropical cyclogenesis and early intensification. Furthermore, observational studies of tropical cyclones have found that oscillations of the cloud canopy areal extent often occur that are clearly related to the solar diurnal cycle. A theory is put forward to explain these findings. The primary mechanism that seems responsible can be considered a refinement of the mechanism proposed by Gray and Jacobson (1977 to explain diurnal variations of oceanic tropical deep cumulus convection. It is hypothesized that differential radiative cooling or heating between a relatively cloud-free environment and a developing tropical disturbance generates circulations that can have very significant influences on convective activity in the core of the system. It is further suggested that there are benefits to understanding this mechanism by viewing it in terms of the lateral propagation of thermally driven gravity wave circulations, also known as buoyancy bores. Numerical model experiments indicate that mean environmental radiative cooling outside the cloud system is playing an important role in causing a significant horizontal differential radiative forcing and accelerating the rate of tropical cyclogenesis. As an expansive stratiform cloud layer forms aloft within a developing system the mean low level radiative cooling is reduced while at mid levels small warming occurs. During the daytime there is not a very large differential radiative forcing between the environment and the cloud system, but at nighttime when there is strong radiative clear sky cooling of the environment it becomes significant. Thermally driven circulations develop, characterized by relatively weak subsidence in the environment but much stronger upward motion in the cloud system. This upward motion leads to a cooling tendency and increased relative humidity. The increased relative

  9. Investigating CloudSat Retrievals Sensitivity to Forward Iterative Algorithm Parameters in the Mixed Cloud Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yujun; Lu, Chunsong

    2016-09-01

    When millimeter-wave cloud radar data are used for the forward iterative retrieval of the liquid water content (LWC) and effective radius of cloud droplets ( R e) in a cloud layer, the prior values and tolerance ranges of the cloud droplet number density ( N t), scale parameter ( R g) and spectral width parameter ( W g) in the iterative algorithm are the main factors that affect the retrieval accuracy. In this study, we used data from stratus and convective clouds that were simultaneously observed by CloudSat and aircraft to conduct a sensitivity analysis of N t, R g, and W g for the retrieval accuracies of LWC and R e in both stratus and convective clouds. N t is the least sensitive parameter for accurately retrieving stratus LWC and R e in both stratus and convective clouds, except for retrieving the convective cloud LWC. Opposite to N t, R g is the most sensitive parameter for both LWC and R e retrievals. As to the effects of parameter tolerance ranges on the retrievals of LWC and R e, the least important parameter is the N t tolerance range; the most important one is the W g tolerance range for retrieving convective cloud LWC and R e, the R g is the important parameter for retrieving stratus LWC and R e. To obtain accurate retrieved values for clouds in a specific region, it is important to use typical values of the sensitive parameters, which could be calculated from in situ observations of cloud droplet size distributions. In addition, the sensitivities of the LWC and R e to the three parameters are stronger in convective clouds than in stratus clouds. This may be related to the melting and merging of solid cloud droplets during the convective mixing process in the convective clouds.

  10. A new conceptual model of convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walcek, C. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Classical cumulus parameterizations assume that cumulus clouds are entraining plumes of hot air rising through the atmosphere. However, ample evidence shows that clouds cannot be simulated using this approach. Dr. Walcek suggests that cumulus clouds can be reasonably simulated by assuming that buoyant plumes detrain mass as they rise through the atmosphere. Walcek successfully simulates measurements of tropical convection using this detraining model of cumulus convection. Comparisons with measurements suggest that buoyant plumes encounter resistance to upward movement as they pass through dry layers in the atmosphere. This probably results from turbulent mixing and evaporation of cloud water, which generates negatively buoyant mixtures which detrain from the upward moving plume. This mass flux model of detraining plumes is considerably simpler than existing mass flux models, yet reproduces many of the measured effects associated with convective activity. 1 fig.

  11. Aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud droplet activation of extracts of filters from biomass burning experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, Christian M.; Petters, Markus D.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Engling, Guenter; Malm, William C.

    2008-04-01

    In this laboratory closure study, we compare sub- and supersaturated water uptake properties for aerosol particles possessing a range of hygroscopicity. Measurements for water sub-saturated conditions used a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). Simultaneously, measurements of particle critical supersaturation were conducted on the same sample stream with a continuous flow cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) counter. For these experiments, we used filter-collected samples of biomass smoke generated in the combustion of two common wildland fire fuels, western sagebrush and Alaskan duff core. Extractions of separate sections of the filter were performed using two solvents, ultrapure water and methanol. The extracts were subsequently atomized, producing aerosols having a range of hygroscopic responses. HTDMA and CCN measurements were fit to a single-parameter model of water uptake, in which the fit parameter is denoted κ, the hygroscopicity parameter. Here, for the four extracts we observed mean values of the hygroscopicity parameter of 0.06 CCN-derived values of κ for each experiment agreed within approximately 20%. Applicability of the κ-parameterization to other multicomponent aerosols relevant to the atmosphere remains to be tested.

  12. Galactic Cosmic Rays - Clouds Effect and Bifurcation Model of the Earth Global Climate. Part 2. Comparison of Theory with Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, V; Vaschenko, V; Mihalys, O; Kosenko, S; Mavrodiev, S; Vachev, B

    2008-01-01

    The solution of the energy-balance model of the Earth's global climate proposed in Ref. [1] is compared with well-known experimental data on the palaeotemperature evolution of Earth's surface over past 420 kyr and 740 kyr obtained in the framework of Antarctic projects the EPICA Dome C and Vostok. The Solar-Earth mechanism of anomalous temperature jumps observed in the EPICA Dome C and Vostok experiments and its relation with the "order-chaos" transitions in convection evolution in the liquid Earth core responsible to the mechanism of the Earth magnetic field inversions was discussed. The stabilizing role of the slow nuclear burning on the boundary of the liquid and solid phases of the Earth's core (georeactor with power of 30 TW) for convection evolution in the liquid Earth's core and hence in the Earth's magnetic field evolution is pointed out.

  13. Aerosol and Cloud Experiments in Eastern North Atlantic (ACE-ENA) Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dong, Xiquan [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Wood, Robert [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    With their extensive coverage, low clouds greatly impact global climate. Presently, low clouds are poorly represented in global climate models (GCMs), and the response of low clouds to changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols remains the major source of uncertainty in climate simulations. The poor representations of low clouds in GCMs are in part due to inadequate observations of their microphysical and macrophysical structures, radiative effects, and the associated aerosol distribution and budget in regions where the aerosol impact is the greatest. The Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) is a region of persistent but diverse subtropical marine boundary-layer (MBL) clouds, whose albedo and precipitation are highly susceptible to perturbations in aerosol properties. Boundary-layer aerosol in the ENA region is influenced by a variety of sources, leading to strong variations in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and aerosol optical properties. Recently a permanent ENA site was established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility on Graciosa Island in the Azores, providing invaluable information on MBL aerosol and low clouds. At the same time, the vertical structures and horizontal variabilities of aerosol, trace gases, cloud, drizzle, and atmospheric thermodynamics are critically needed for understanding and quantifying the budget of MBL aerosol, the radiative properties, precipitation efficiency, and lifecycle of MBL clouds, and the cloud response to aerosol perturbations. Much of this data can be obtained only through aircraft-based measurements. In addition, the interconnected aerosol and cloud processes are best investigated by a study involving simultaneous in situ aerosol, cloud, and thermodynamics measurements. Furthermore, in situ measurements are also necessary for validating and improving ground-based retrieval algorithms at the ENA site. This project is motivated by the need

  14. Integrating canopy and large-scale effects in the convective boundary-layer dynamics during the CHATS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapkalijevski, Metodija M.; Ouwersloot, Huug G.; Moene, Arnold F.; Vilà-Guerau de Arrellano, Jordi

    2017-02-01

    By characterizing the dynamics of a convective boundary layer above a relatively sparse and uniform orchard canopy, we investigated the impact of the roughness-sublayer (RSL) representation on the predicted diurnal variability of surface fluxes and state variables. Our approach combined numerical experiments, using an atmospheric mixed-layer model including a land-surface-vegetation representation, and measurements from the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS) field experiment near Dixon, California. The RSL is parameterized using an additional factor in the standard Monin-Obukhov similarity theory flux-profile relationships that takes into account the canopy influence on the atmospheric flow. We selected a representative case characterized by southerly wind conditions to ensure well-developed RSL over the orchard canopy. We then investigated the sensitivity of the diurnal variability of the boundary-layer dynamics to the changes in the RSL key scales, the canopy adjustment length scale, Lc, and the β = u*/|U| ratio at the top of the canopy due to their stability and dependence on canopy structure. We found that the inclusion of the RSL parameterization resulted in improved prediction of the diurnal evolution of the near-surface mean quantities (e.g. up to 50 % for the wind velocity) and transfer (drag) coefficients. We found relatively insignificant effects on the modelled surface fluxes (e.g. up to 5 % for the friction velocity, while 3 % for the sensible and latent heat), which is due to the compensating effect between the mean gradients and the drag coefficients, both of which are largely affected by the RSL parameterization. When varying Lc (from 10 to 20 m) and β (from 0.25 to 0.4 m), based on observational evidence, the predicted friction velocity is found to vary by up to 25 % and the modelled surface-energy fluxes (sensible heat, SH, and latent heat of evaporation, LE) vary up to 2 and 9 %. Consequently, the boundary-layer height varies up to

  15. Hygroscopicity of nanoparticles produced from homogeneous nucleation in the CLOUD experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sulfuric acid, amines and oxidized organics have been found to be important compounds in the nucleation and initial growth of atmospheric particles. Because of the challenges involved in determining the chemical composition of objects with very small mass, however, the properties of the freshly nucleated particles and the detailed pathways of their formation processes are still not clear. In this study, we focus on a challenging size range, i.e. particles that have grown to diameters of 10 and 15 nm following nucleation, and measure their water uptake. Water uptake constrains their chemical composition. We use a nanometer-hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (nano-HTDMA at subsaturated conditions (ca. 90 % relative humidity at 293 K to measure the hygroscopicity of particles during the seventh Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD7 experiments performed at CERN in 2012. In CLOUD7, the hygroscopicity of nucleated nanoparticles was measured in the presence of sulfuric acid, sulfuric acid-dimethylamine, and sulfuric acid-organics derived from α-pinene oxidation. The hygroscopicity parameter κ decreased with increasing particle size indicating decreasing acidity of particles. No clear effect of the sulfuric acid monomer concentrations on the hygroscopicities of 10 nm particles produced from sulfuric acid and dimethylamine was observed, whereas the hygroscopicity of 15 nm particles sharply decreased with decreasing sulfuric acid monomer concentrations. In particular, when the concentrations of sulfuric acid was 5.1 × 106 molecules cm−3 in the gas phase, and the dimethylamine mixing ratio was 11.8 ppt, the measured κ of 15 nm particles was 0.31 ± 0.01 close to the value reported for dimethylamine sulfate (DMAS (κDMAS ~ 0.28. Furthermore, the difference in κ between sulfuric acid and sulfuric acid-dimethylamine experiments increased with increasing particle size. The κ values of particles in the presence of sulfuric acid and

  16. A Study of Detrainment from Deep Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, I. B.; Krueger, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty in the results of Global Climate Model simulations has been attributed to errors and simplifications in how parameterizations of convection coarsely represent the processes of entrainment, detrainment, and mixing between convective clouds and their environment. Using simulations of convection we studied these processes at a resolution high enough to explicitly resolve them. Two of several recently developed analysis techniques that allow insight into these processes at their appropriate scale are an Eulerian method of directly measuring entrainment and detrainment, and a Lagrangian method that uses particle trajectories to map convective mass flux over height and a cloud variable of interest. The authors of the Eulerian technique used it to show that the dynamics of shells of cold, humid air that surround shallow convective updrafts have important effects on the properties of air entrained and detrained from the updrafts. There is some evidence for the existence of such shells around deep convective updrafts as well, and that detrainment is more important than entrainment in determining the ultimate effect of the deep convection on the large scale environment. We present results from analyzing a simulation of deep convection through the Eulerian method as well as using Lagrangian particle trajectories to illustrate the role of the shell in the process of detrainment and mixing between deep convection and its environment.

  17. Cloud-Based versus Local-Based Web Development Education: An Experimental Study in Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Ronald E.; Pittman, Jason M.; Hwang, Drew

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of a cloud computing environment to facilitate the teaching of web development at a university in the Southwestern United States. A between-subjects study of students in a web development course was conducted to assess the merits of a cloud computing environment instead of personal computers for developing websites.…

  18. Overview of the Field Phase of the NASA Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP)Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Zipser, Edward; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Kakar, Ramesh; Halverson Jeffery; Rogers, Robert; Black, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes experiment is sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to investigate characteristics of tropical cyclone genesis, rapid intensification and rainfall using a three-pronged approach that emphasizes satellite information, suborbital observations and numerical model simulations. Research goals include demonstration and assessment of new technology, improvements to numerical model parameterizations, and advancements in data assimilation techniques. The field phase of the experiment was based in Costa Rica during July 2005. A fully instrumented NASA ER-2 high altitude airplane was deployed with Doppler radar, passive microwave instrumentation, lightning and electric field sensors and an airborne simulator of visible and infrared satellite sensors. Other assets brought to TCSP were a low flying uninhabited aerial vehicle, and a surface-based radiosonde network. In partnership with the Intensity Forecasting Experiment of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Hurricane Research Division, two NOAA P-3 aircraft instrumented with radar, passive microwave, microphysical, and dropsonde instrumentation were also deployed to Costa Rica. The field phase of TCSP was conducted in Costa Rica to take advantage of the geographically compact tropical cyclone genesis region of the Eastern Pacific Ocean near Central America. However, the unusual 2005 hurricane season provided numerous opportunities to sample tropical cyclone development and intensification in the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico as well. Development of Hurricane Dennis and Tropical Storm Gert were each investigated over several days in addition to Hurricane Emily as it was close to Saffir-Simpson Category 5 intensity. An overview of the characteristics of these storms along with the pregenesis environment of Tropical Storm Eugene in the Eastern Pacific will be presented.

  19. Discrimination of water, ice and aerosols by light polarisation in the CLOUD experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Nichman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather and General Circulation Models (GCMs. The simultaneous detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud-particle size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable ice-water phase environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarisation (CASPOL is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure their effects on the backscatter polarisation state. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics-Leaving-OUtdoor-Droplets (CLOUD chamber facility at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed phase clouds and viscous Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA are presented. We report observations of significant liquid – viscous SOA particle polarisation transitions under dry conditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles according to their polarisation ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organic aerosol (e.g., SOA and oxalic acid, crystalline substances such as ammonium sulphate, and volcanic ash. Finally, we discuss the benefits and limitations of this classification approach for atmospherically relevant concentration and mixtures with respect to the CLOUD 8–9 campaigns and its potential contribution to Tropical Troposphere Layer (TTL analysis.

  20. Sensitivities of Amazonian clouds to aerosols and updraft speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Micael A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Martin, Scot T.; Albrecht, Rachel I.; Artaxo, Paulo; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Borrmann, Stephan; Fütterer, Daniel; Jurkat, Tina; Mahnke, Christoph; Minikin, Andreas; Molleker, Sergej; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Voigt, Christiane; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Wendisch, Manfred

    2017-08-01

    The effects of aerosol particles and updraft speed on warm-phase cloud microphysical properties are studied in the Amazon region as part of the ACRIDICON-CHUVA experiment. Here we expand the sensitivity analysis usually found in the literature by concomitantly considering cloud evolution, putting the sensitivity quantifications into perspective in relation to in-cloud processing, and by considering the effects on droplet size distribution (DSD) shape. Our in situ aircraft measurements over the Amazon Basin cover a wide range of particle concentration and thermodynamic conditions, from the pristine regions over coastal and forested areas to the southern Amazon, which is highly polluted from biomass burning. The quantitative results show that particle concentration is the primary driver for the vertical profiles of effective diameter and droplet concentration in the warm phase of Amazonian convective clouds, while updraft speeds have a modulating role in the latter and in total condensed water. The cloud microphysical properties were found to be highly variable with altitude above cloud base, which we used as a proxy for cloud evolution since it is a measure of the time droplets that were subject to cloud processing. We show that DSD shape is crucial in understanding cloud sensitivities. The aerosol effect on DSD shape was found to vary with altitude, which can help models to better constrain the indirect aerosol effect on climate.

  1. The Role of Ascent-Forced Convection in Orographic Precipitation: Results from the DOMEX Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minder, J. R.; Smith, R. B.; Nugent, A. D.; Kirshbaum, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Shallow convection is a pervasive feature of orographic precipitation, but its detailed role remains poorly understood. The mountainous Caribbean island of Dominica is a natural laboratory for isolating the role of shallow convection in orographic rainfall. It lies in a region of persistent easterly trade wind flow, and receives much of its rainfall from shallow convection that is forced mechanically by ascent of easterly flow over the Dominican terrain. The Dominica Experiment (DOMEX) has focused on convective orographic precipitation over the island from 2007-2011. The first phase of the project developed a climatology of rainfall and theories to explain the observed enhancement over the terrain. The second phase of the project (Apr-May 2011) has provided a detailed view of 20 individual rainfall events with data from: surface gauges, time-lapse photography, operational radar scans, a mountaintop weather station, and both in situ and remote observations from the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft. Focusing on ascent--forced convection during DOMEX has revealed a number of the key processes that control the rainfall. Upwind of the island, clouds and water vapor anomalies exist that appear to play a crucial role in seeding the convection over the terrain and determining its vigor. Over the windward slopes the air is readily lifted with little flow deflection. Strong convective cells rapidly develop to produce large rainfall rates. Over the lee slopes of the terrain there is an abrupt transition to a deep and turbulent plunging flow that quickly eliminates convective clouds, but allows for the spillover of rainfall. The air that passes over the island is transformed such that low-levels are dried, warmed and decelerated, and the downwind wake becomes less hospitable to trade wind cumuli.

  2. A Lagrangian Study of Southeast Pacific Boundary Layer Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Gallia

    Low clouds lie at the heart of climate feedback uncertainties. The representation of clouds in global climate models relies on parameterization of many sub-grid scale processes that are crucial to understanding cloud responses to climate; low clouds in particular exist as a result of tightly coupled microphysical, mesoscale, and synoptic mechanisms. The influence of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud properties could have important ramifications for our understanding of how clouds respond to a changing climate. The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS REx) sampled the persistent stratocumulus cloud deck located off the coast of Peru and Chile in the southeastern Pacific ocean. Several cloud features found in the stratocumulus deck during VOCALS exhibit signs of interesting aerosol-cloud interactions, including pockets of open cells (POCs). POCs are regions of open-cellular convection surrounded by closed cell stratocumulus, exhibiting not only a marked transition in mesoscale organization and cloud morphology, but also sharp microphysical gradients (especially in droplet concentration) across the boundary between open-cellular and closed cellular convection. In addition, precipitation is often higher at the POC boundaries, hinting at the importance of precipitation in driving their formation. In order to evaluate the microphysical characteristics of POCs prior cloud breakup, we use Lagrangian trajectories coupled with geostationary satellite imagery and cloud retrievals, as well as observational data from VOCALS REx and model data. In three of our case studies, we found regions of anomalously low droplet concentration 18-24 hours prior to POC formation (coupled with liquid water path similar to or higher than surrounding cloud), supporting a precipitation driven mechanism for POC formation. Another group of features with interesting aerosol-cloud interactions observed during VOCALS were mesoscale hook-like features of high droplet

  3. From large-eddy simulation to multi-UAVs sampling of shallow cumulus clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamraoui, Fayçal; Roberts, Greg; Burnet, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    In-situ sampling of clouds that can provide simultaneous measurements at satisfying spatio-temporal resolutions to capture 3D small scale physical processes continues to present challenges. This project (SKYSCANNER) aims at bringing together cloud sampling strategies using a swarm of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) based on Large-eddy simulation (LES). The multi-UAV-based field campaigns with a personalized sampling strategy for individual clouds and cloud fields will significantly improve the understanding of the unresolved cloud physical processes. An extensive set of LES experiments for case studies from ARM-SGP site have been performed using MesoNH model at high resolutions down to 10 m. The carried out simulations led to establishing a macroscopic model that quantifies the interrelationship between micro- and macrophysical properties of shallow convective clouds. Both the geometry and evolution of individual clouds are critical to multi-UAV cloud sampling and path planning. The preliminary findings of the current project reveal several linear relationships that associate many cloud geometric parameters to cloud related meteorological variables. In addition, the horizontal wind speed indicates a proportional impact on cloud number concentration as well as triggering and prolonging the occurrence of cumulus clouds. In the framework of the joint collaboration that involves a Multidisciplinary Team (including institutes specializing in aviation, robotics and atmospheric science), this model will be a reference point for multi-UAVs sampling strategies and path planning.

  4. Connections matter: Updraft merging in organized tropical deep convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, I. B.; Krueger, Steven K.

    2017-07-01

    When tropical cumulus convection is organized, the spacing between updrafts is reduced, and deep convective cloud tops are higher. The relative importance of various processes through which organization increases cloud top heights is not well understood. It is likely that decreased spacing between updrafts in organized convection increases the frequency of convective updraft merging. What is the relative importance of merging in determining an updraft parcel's detrainment height? We investigated updraft parcel merging in organized deep convection using results from a large eddy simulation. We used Lagrangian parcel trajectories (LPTs) to locate merging events. LPTs that merge reach detrainment heights 1.5 km higher on average than LPTs which do not merge. Merged LPTs are more buoyant than nonmerged LPTs, implying less dilution due to entrainment. Using mutual information analysis, we found that merging, cloud base vertical velocity, and cloud base area are about equally important in determining parcel detrainment height.

  5. Unexpectedly acidic nanoparticles formed in dimethylamine-ammonia-sulfuric-acid nucleation experiments at CLOUD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Michael J.; Winkler, Paul M.; Kim, Jaeseok; Ahlm, Lars; Tröstl, Jasmin; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kürten, Andreas; Kirkby, Jasper; Bianchi, Federico; Duplissy, Jonathan; Hansel, Armin; Jokinen, Tuija; Keskinen, Helmi; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Petäjä, Tuukka; Rissanen, Matti; Rondo, Linda; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Riipinen, Ilona; Virtanen, Annele; Smith, James N.

    2016-11-01

    New particle formation driven by acid-base chemistry was initiated in the CLOUD chamber at CERN by introducing atmospherically relevant levels of gas-phase sulfuric acid and dimethylamine (DMA). Ammonia was also present in the chamber as a gas-phase contaminant from earlier experiments. The composition of particles with volume median diameters (VMDs) as small as 10 nm was measured by the Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS). Particulate ammonium-to-dimethylaminium ratios were higher than the gas-phase ammonia-to-DMA ratios, suggesting preferential uptake of ammonia over DMA for the collected 10-30 nm VMD particles. This behavior is not consistent with present nanoparticle physicochemical models, which predict a higher dimethylaminium fraction when NH3 and DMA are present at similar gas-phase concentrations. Despite the presence in the gas phase of at least 100 times higher base concentrations than sulfuric acid, the recently formed particles always had measured base : acid ratios lower than 1 : 1. The lowest base fractions were found in particles below 15 nm VMD, with a strong size-dependent composition gradient. The reasons for the very acidic composition remain uncertain, but a plausible explanation is that the particles did not reach thermodynamic equilibrium with respect to the bases due to rapid heterogeneous conversion of SO2 to sulfate. These results indicate that sulfuric acid does not require stabilization by ammonium or dimethylaminium as acid-base pairs in particles as small as 10 nm.

  6. submitter Unexpectedly acidic nanoparticles formed in dimethylamine–ammonia–sulfuric-acid nucleation experiments at CLOUD

    CERN Document Server

    Lawler, Michael J; Kim, Jaeseok; Ahlm, Lars; Tröstl, Jasmin; Praplan, Arnaud P; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kürten, Andreas; Kirkby, Jasper; Bianchi, Federico; Duplissy, Jonathan; Hansel, Armin; Jokinen, Tuija; Keskinen, Helmi; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Petäjä, Tuukka; Rissanen, Matti; Rondo, Linda; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Riipinen, Ilona; Virtanen, Annele; Smith, James N

    2016-01-01

    New particle formation driven by acid–base chemistry was initiated in the CLOUD chamber at CERN by introducing atmospherically relevant levels of gas-phase sulfuric acid and dimethylamine (DMA). Ammonia was also present in the chamber as a gas-phase contaminant from earlier experiments. The composition of particles with volume median diameters (VMDs) as small as 10 nm was measured by the Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS). Particulate ammonium-to-dimethylaminium ratios were higher than the gas-phase ammonia-to-DMA ratios, suggesting preferential uptake of ammonia over DMA for the collected 10–30 nm VMD particles. This behavior is not consistent with present nanoparticle physicochemical models, which predict a higher dimethylaminium fraction when NH3 and DMA are present at similar gas-phase concentrations. Despite the presence in the gas phase of at least 100 times higher base concentrations than sulfuric acid, the recently formed particles always had measured base : ...

  7. The study of membrane formation via phase inversion method by cloud point and light scattering experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arahman, Nasrul; Maimun, Teuku; Mukramah, Syawaliah

    2017-01-01

    The composition of polymer solution and the methods of membrane preparation determine the solidification process of membrane. The formation of membrane structure prepared via non-solvent induced phase separation (NIPS) method is mostly determined by phase separation process between polymer, solvent, and non-solvent. This paper discusses the phase separation process of polymer solution containing Polyethersulfone (PES), N-methylpirrolidone (NMP), and surfactant Tetronic 1307 (Tet). Cloud point experiment is conducted to determine the amount of non-solvent needed on induced phase separation. Amount of water required as a non-solvent decreases by the addition of surfactant Tet. Kinetics of phase separation for such system is studied by the light scattering measurement. With the addition of Tet., the delayed phase separation is observed and the structure growth rate decreases. Moreover, the morphology of fabricated membrane from those polymer systems is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The images of both systems show the formation of finger-like macrovoids through the cross-section.

  8. Mechanisms for convection triggering by cold pools

    CERN Document Server

    Torri, Giuseppe; Tian, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cold pools are fundamental ingredients of deep convection. They contribute to organizing the sub-cloud layer and are considered key elements in triggering convective cells. It was long known that this could happen mechanically, through lifting by the cold pools' fronts. More recently, it has been suggested that convection could also be triggered thermodynamically, by accumulation of moisture around the edges of cold pools. A method based on Lagrangian tracking is here proposed to disentangle the signatures of both forcings and quantify their importance in a given environment. Results from a simulation of radiative-convective equilibrium over the ocean show that parcels reach their level of free